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Sample records for brain concussion

  1. Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain injury - concussion; Traumatic brain injury - concussion; Closed head injury - concussion ... for a period of time. More severe traumatic brain injuries may result in many brain and nervous system ...

  2. Investigating a Novel Measure of Brain Networking Following Sports Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio, S P; Rettmann, A; Greer, J; Brimacombe, S; Moore, B; Narisetty, N; He, X; Eckner, J

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians managing sports-related concussions are left to their clinical judgment in making diagnoses and return-to-play decisions. This study was designed to evaluate the utility of a novel measure of functional brain networking for concussion management. 24 athletes with acutely diagnosed concussion and 21 control participants were evaluated in a research laboratory. At each of the 4 post-injury time points, participants completed the Axon assessment of neurocognitive function, a self-report symptom inventory, and the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks while electroencephalogram (EEG) readings were recorded. Brain Network Activation (BNA) scores were calculated from EEG data related to the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks. BNA scores were unable to differentiate between the concussed and control groups or by self-report symptom severity. These findings conflict with previous work implementing electrophysiological assessments in concussed athletes, suggesting that BNA requires additional investigation and refinement before clinical implementation. PMID:27286176

  3. School-Based Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), including concussions, can result in a constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral symptoms that affect students' well-being and performance at school. Despite these effects, school personnel remain underprepared identify, educate, and assist this population of students. This article describes a…

  4. The young brain and concussion: imaging as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Esteban; Lebel, Alyssa; Becerra, Lino; Minster, Anna; Linnman, Clas; Maleki, Nasim; Dodick, David W; Borsook, David

    2012-07-01

    Concussion (mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)) is a significant pediatric public health concern. Despite increased awareness, a comprehensive understanding of the acute and chronic effects of concussion on central nervous system structure and function remains incomplete. Here we review the definition, epidemiology, and sequelae of concussion within the developing brain, during childhood and adolescence, with current data derived from studies of pathophysiology and neuroimaging. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries, which in turn, may lead to the development of brain biomarkers to improve identification, management and prognosis of pediatric patients suffering from concussion. PMID:22476089

  5. Experience in using ceretone (choline alfoscerate in brain concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N G Voropay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nootropics are used to treat patients who have sustained concussion of the brain and complain of reductions in memory and working capacity, as well as emotional disorders. The efficacy of ceretone® (choline alfoscerate was studied in 76 patients (45 men and 31 women whose age was 21-56 years who had sustained brain concussion and had complaints of headache, easy fatigability, nocturnal sleep disorders, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and bad mood. Thirty-nine patients received intravenous ceretone® in a dose of 1000 mg/day for 10 days; the other 37 patients formed a control group. A one-year follow-up indicated that ceretone® had a positive effect on health, autonomic, and emotional status and working capacity.

  6. The Young Brain and Concussion: Imaging as a Biomarker for Diagnosis and Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Toledo, E. (Estefanía); Lebel, A.; Becerra, L.; Minster, A.; Linnman, C; Maleki, N; Dodick, D.W.; Borsook, D.

    2012-01-01

    Concussion (mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)) is a significant pediatric public health concern. Despite increased awareness, a comprehensive understanding of the acute and chronic effects of concussion on central nervous system structure and function remains incomplete. Here we review the definition, epidemiology, and sequelae of concussion within the developing brain, during childhood and adolescence, with current data derived from studies of pathophysiology and neuroimaging. These finding...

  7. Technical knockout: when is traumatic brain injury “just” a concussion?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Halloran, P J

    2016-05-01

    While cricket is an unlikely source of concussion, the fierce contagion of media coverage surrounding Rugby and Gaelic Football has led to difficulties in deciphering real from perceived risk. The surge in public interest has forced this young science to mature quickly. The principles of managing head injury have not changed, but there is now a greater awareness that concussion is a traumatic brain injury (TBI).\\r\

  8. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concussion? A Not giving the brain enough recovery time after a concussion can be dangerous. A repeat ... especially if the first concussion has not had time to heal. B will never have another concussion. ...

  9. Change and clinical significance of cerebral blood flow after concussion of brain detected with three-dimensional transcranial Doppler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖兴义; 薛关生; 许国珍; 尹晓梅

    2003-01-01

    @@ From April 1995 to October 1999, 135 patients with concussion of brain were examined with threedimensional transcranial Doppler (3D-TCD) and the change of cerebral blood flow in various phases was analyzed to evaluate the effect of 3D-TCD on diagnosis and therapy of brain concussion.

  10. fMRI and brain activation after sport concussion: a tale of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Hutchison

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sport-related concussions are now recognized as a major public health concern: The number of participants in sport and recreation is growing, possibly playing their games faster, and there is heightened public awareness of injuries to some high-profile athletes. However, many clinicians still rely on subjective symptom reports for the clinical determination of recovery. Relying on subjective symptom reports can be dangerous, as it has been shown that some concussed athletes may downplay their symptoms. The use of neuropsychological (NP testing tools has enabled clinicians to measure the effects and extent of impairment following concussion more precisely, providing more objective metrics for determining recovery after concussion. Nevertheless, there is a remaining concern that brain abnormalities may exist beyond the point at which individuals achieve recovery in self-reported symptoms and cognition measured by NP testing. Our understanding of brain recovery after concussion is important not only from a neuroscience perspective, but also from the perspective of clinical decision making for safe return-to-play (RTP. A number of advanced neuroimaging tools, including blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, have independently yielded early information on these abnormal brain functions. In the two cases presented in this article, we report contrasting brain activation patterns and recovery profiles using fMRI. Importantly, fMRI was conducted using adapted versions of the most sensitive computerized NP tests administered in current clinical practice to determine impairments and recovery after sport-related concussion. One of the cases is consistent with the concept of lagging brain recovery.

  11. Microstructural brain injury in post-concussion syndrome after minor head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smits, Marion; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Lugt, Aad van der [Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology (Hs-224), PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Houston, Gavin C. [Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Dippel, Diederik W.J.; Koudstaal, Peter J. [Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Neurology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hunink, M.G.M. [Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology (Hs-224), PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    After minor head injury (MHI), post-concussive symptoms commonly occur. The purpose of this study was to correlate the severity of post-concussive symptoms in MHI patients with MRI measures of microstructural brain injury, namely mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as the presence of microhaemorrhages. Twenty MHI patients and 12 healthy controls were scanned at 3 T using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high-resolution gradient recalled echo (HRGRE) T2*-weighted sequences. One patient was excluded from the analysis because of bilateral subdural haematomas. DTI data were preprocessed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics. The resulting MD and FA images were correlated with the severity of post-concussive symptoms evaluated with the Rivermead Postconcussion Symptoms Questionnaire. The number and location of microhaemorrhages were assessed on the HRGRE T2*-weighted images. Comparing patients with controls, there were no differences in MD. FA was decreased in the right temporal subcortical white matter. MD was increased in association with the severity of post-concussive symptoms in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. FA was reduced in association with the severity of post-concussive symptoms in the uncinate fasciculus, the IFO, the internal capsule and the corpus callosum, as well as in the parietal and frontal subcortical white matter. Microhaemorrhages were observed in one patient only. The severity of post-concussive symptoms after MHI was significantly correlated with a reduction of white matter integrity, providing evidence of microstructural brain injury as a neuropathological substrate of the post-concussion syndrome. (orig.)

  12. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, T. J.; Beluk, N. H.; Elbin, R. J.; Henry, L. C.; French, J.; Dakan, S. M.; Collins, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/ patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18–45 years with a recent (15–45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X’s and O’s) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion. PMID:24477579

  13. Brain MRI CO2 stress testing: a pilot study in patients with concussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Alan C Mutch

    Full Text Available There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition.This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS patients--both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied--baseline 1 (BL1--at basal CO2 tension, hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg, BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for 1st level analysis to compare each subject's response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient's response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level.We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response controls.Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.

  14. Bang to the Brain: What We Know about Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later leads to an even steeper drop in glucose use and memory problems that last longer. But when the brain has several days to recover, and the use of glucose returns to normal, a second mild brain injury ...

  15. Dietary intake alters behavioural recovery and gene expression profiles in the brain of juvenile rats that have experienced a concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelle eMychasiuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI research has made minimal progress diagnosing who will suffer from lingering symptomology or generating effective treatment strategies. Research demonstrates that dietary intake affects many biological systems including brain and neurological health. This study determined if exposure to a high fat diet (HFD or caloric restriction (CR altered post-concussion susceptibility or resiliency using a rodent model of pediatric concussion. Rats were maintained on HFD, CR, or standard diet (STD throughout life (including the prenatal period and weaning. At postnatal day 30, male and female rats experienced a concussion or a sham injury which was followed by 17 days of testing. Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus tissue was collected for molecular profiling. Gene expression changes in BDNF, CREB, DNMT1, FGF-2, IGF1, LEP, PGC-1α, SIRT1, Tau, and TERT were analyzed with respect to injury and diet. Analysis of telomere length (TL using peripheral skin cells and brain tissue found that TL in skin significantly correlated with TL in brain tissue and TL was affected by dietary intake and injury status. With respect to mTBI outcomes, diet was correlated with recovery as animals on the HFD often displayed poorer performance than animals on the CR diet. Molecular analysis demonstrated that diet induced epigenetic changes that can be associated with differences in individual predisposition and resiliency to post-concussion syndrome.

  16. A prospective biopsychosocial study of the persistent post-concussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäljas, Minna; Iverson, Grant L; Lange, Rael T; Hakulinen, Ullamari; Dastidar, Prasun; Huhtala, Heini; Liimatainen, Suvi; Hartikainen, Kaisa; Öhman, Juha

    2015-04-15

    This study examined multiple biopsychosocial factors relating to post-concussion symptom (PCS) reporting in patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), including structural (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and microstructural neuroimaging (diffusion tensor imaging [DTI]). Patients with mTBIs completed several questionnaires and cognitive testing at approximately one month (n=126) and one year (n=103) post-injury. At approximately three weeks post-injury, DTI was undertaken using a Siemens 3T scanner in a subgroup (n=71). Measures of fractional anisotropy were calculated for 16 regions of interest (ROIs) and measures of apparent diffusion coefficient were calculated for 10 ROIs. Patients were compared with healthy control subjects. Using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) PCS criteria and mild or greater symptom reporting, 59% of the mTBI sample met criteria at one month and 38% met criteria at one year. However, 31% of the healthy control sample also met criteria for the syndrome-illustrating a high false-positive rate. Significant predictors of ICD-10 PCS at one month were pre-injury mental health problems and the presence of extra-cranial bodily injuries. Being symptomatic at one month was a significant predictor of being symptomatic at one year, and depression was significantly related to PCS at both one month and one year. Intracranial abnormalities visible on MRI were present in 12.1% of this sample, and multifocal areas of unusual white matter as measured by DTI were present in 50.7% (compared with 12.4% of controls). Structural MRI abnormalities and microstructural white matter findings were not significantly associated with greater post-concussion symptom reporting. The personal experience and reporting of post-concussion symptoms is likely individualized, representing the cumulative effect of multiple variables, such as genetics, mental health history, current life stress, medical problems

  17. The relationship between suboptimal effort and post-concussion symptoms in children and adolescents with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Gabriel C; Antonini, Tanya N; Monahan, Kerry; Gelfius, Carl; Klamar, Karl; Potts, Michelle; Yeates, Keith O; Bodin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective chart review study explored the relationship between suboptimal effort and post-concussion symptoms in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Participants were 382 clinically referred children and adolescents between 8 and 16 years of age who sustained an mTBI. Suboptimal effort was identified using reliable digit span and age-corrected scaled scores from the Numbers subtest of the Children's Memory Scale (CMS); 20% of the sample were classified as non-credible performers. Chi-square analyses and t-tests were used to examine differences in post-concussion symptoms and neuropsychological test performance between credible and non-credible performers. Linear regression was used to examine whether CMS Numbers performance predicted post-concussion symptoms after controlling for baseline symptoms and other relevant demographic- and injury-related factors. We found that non-credible performers presented with a greater number of post-concussion symptoms as compared with credible performers. Additionally, non-credible performers demonstrated comparatively poorer performance on neuropsychological tests of focused attention and processing speed. These results suggest that children and adolescents with mTBI who fail effort testing might have a greater tendency to exaggerate post-concussion symptoms and cognitive impairment. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concussion are at increased risk for another concussion. C Young children and teens are more likely to ... how the brain works and a serious issue. C While rare, permanent brain damage and death are ...

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life after Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineblit, Samuel; Selci, Erin; Loewen, Hal; Ellis, Michael; Russell, Kelly

    2016-09-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an emerging method to quantify the consequences of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)/concussion in both clinical practice and research. However, to utilize HRQOL measurements to their full potential in the context of mTBI/concussion recovery, a better understanding of the typical course of HRQOL after these injuries is needed. The objective of this study was to summarize current knowledge on HRQOL after pediatric mTBI/concussion and identify areas in need of further research. The following databases from their earliest date of coverage through June 1, 2015 were used: MEDLINE(®), PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTDiscus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and Child Development and Adolescent Studies (CDAS). Studies must have examined and reported HRQOL in a pediatric population after mTBI/concussion, using a validated HRQOL measurement tool. Eight of 1660 records identified ultimately met inclusion criteria. Comprehensive data were extracted and checked by a second reviewer for accuracy and completeness. There appears to be a small but important subgroup of patients who experience poor HRQOL outcomes up to a year or longer post-injury. Potential predictors of poor HRQOL include older age, lower socioeconomic status, or a history of headaches or trouble sleeping. Differing definitions of mTBI precluded meta-analysis. HRQOL represents an important outcome measure in mTBI/concussion clinical practice and research. The evidence shows that a small but important proportion of patients have diminished HRQOL up to a year or longer post-injury. Further study on this topic is warranted to determine the typical longitudinal progression of HRQOL after pediatric concussion. PMID:26916876

  20. White matter damage and brain network alterations in concussed patients: a review of recent diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Catherine D; Schwedt, Todd J

    2015-05-01

    Over 2 million people are diagnosed with concussion each year in the USA, resulting in substantial individual and societal burdens. Although 'routine' clinical neuroimaging is useful for the diagnosis of more severe forms of traumatic brain injury, it is insensitive for detecting pathology associated with concussion. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) are techniques that allow for investigation of brain structural and functional connectivity patterns. DTI and rs-fMRI may be more sensitive than routine neuroimaging for detecting brain sequelae of concussion. This review summarizes recent DTI and rs-fMRI findings of altered structural and functional connectivity patterns in concussed patients.

  1. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... LESSON 4 QUIZ QUESTION 3 Concussions affect people differently. While most athletes with a concussion recover quickly ... for Health Care Providers Materials for School Professionals Learn More about the Brain and How it Works ...

  2. Insomnia and self-perceived disability in workers with delayed recovery after mild traumatic brain injury/concussion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, T.; Pratt, B.; Shapiro, C.;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Insomnia is a common complaint among persons with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, its impact on recovery after mTBI/concussion has not been characterized. Clarifying the association between insomnia and self-perceived disability may serve the vital role in understanding...... questionnaires, insurer records, and clinical assessment at the time of recruitment. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) measured the primary independent variable and the Sheehan Disability Scale measured perceived disability outcome. This variable was highly skewed and therefore classified as "mild...... of the deviance value/degrees of freedom. Multinomial logistic models with several categorizations of the outcome were compared with the binary logistic model. Results: Of 94 workers (61.2% male) with mTBI/concussion, with a mean age of 45.2 +/- 9.9 years and a median time since injury of 197 days, the majority...

  3. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain recovers from the first concussion can slow recovery or increase the chances for long-term ... Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma ...

  4. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... GET MORE INFORMATION ON CONCUSSION and TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN THE UNITED STATES Statistics Causes Outcomes Prevention ... School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma Foundation Center for ...

  5. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Materials for School Professionals Learn More about the Brain and How it Works Order Free Copies of ... Associations) GET MORE INFORMATION ON CONCUSSION and TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN THE UNITED STATES Statistics Causes Outcomes ...

  6. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disruption of how the brain works and a serious issue. C While rare, permanent brain damage and ... last for days, or even weeks. A more serious concussion can last for months or longer. A ...

  7. Potential Blood-based Biomarkers for Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Linda

    2016-09-01

    Mounting research in the field of sports concussion biomarkers has led to a greater understanding of the effects of brain injury from sports. A recent systematic review of clinical studies examining biomarkers of brain injury following sports-related concussion established that almost all studies have been published either in or after the year 2000. In an effort to prevent chronic traumatic encephalopathy and long-term consequences of concussion, early diagnostic and prognostic tools are becoming increasingly important; particularly in sports and in military personnel, where concussions are common occurrences. Early and tailored management of athletes following a concussion with biomarkers could provide them with the best opportunity to avoid further injury. Should blood-based biomarkers for concussion be validated and become widely available, they could have many roles. For instance, a point-of-care test could be used on the field by trained sport medicine professionals to help detect a concussion. In the clinic or hospital setting, it could be used by clinicians to determine the severity of concussion and be used to screen players for neuroimaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging) and further neuropsychological testing. Furthermore, biomarkers could have a role in monitoring progression of injury and recovery and in managing patients at high risk of repeated injury by being incorporated into guidelines for return to duty, work, or sports activities. There may even be a role for biomarkers as surrogate measures of efficacy in the assessment of new treatments and therapies for concussion. PMID:27482776

  8. Sports and Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Sports and Concussions KidsHealth > For Teens > Sports and Concussions ... between skiers or snowboarders continue Preventing Concussions in Sports Start With the Right Equipment Everyone should wear ...

  9. Mild Concussion, but Not Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury, Is Associated with Long-Term Depression-Like Phenotype in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita M Bajwa

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits, increasing the risk of future behavioral, neurological, and affective disorders. Our study focused on long-term behavioral deficits after repeated injury in which mice received either a single mild CHI (mCHI, a repeated mild CHI (rmCHI consisting of one impact to each hemisphere separated by 3 days, or a moderate controlled cortical impact injury (CCI. Shams received only anesthesia. Behavioral tests were administered at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 90 days post-injury (dpi. CCI animals showed significant motor and sensory deficits in the early (1-7 dpi and long-term (90 dpi stages of testing. Interestingly, sensory and subtle motor deficits in rmCHI animals were found at 90 dpi. Most importantly, depression-like behaviors and social passiveness were observed in rmCHI animals at 90 dpi. These data suggest that mild concussive injuries lead to motor and sensory deficits and affective disorders that are not observed after moderate TBI.

  10. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issue. C While rare, permanent brain damage and death are two potential consequences of not identifying and ... of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Sports Medicine Concussion Program US Lacrosse US Soccer USA Baseball USA Football USA ...

  11. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concussion and require rushing an athlete to the emergency department immediately: A The athlete seems slightly off ... Medical Center Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Emergency Nurses Association Health Resources and Services Administration, EMS ...

  12. Concussion and football: a review and editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kalil G; Grady, M Sean; Levine, Joshua M

    2015-04-01

    The issue of concussion in football is of substantial interest to players, coaches, fans, and physicians. In this article, we review specific cultural hindrances to diagnosis and treatment of concussion in football. We review current trends in management and identify areas for improvement. We also discuss the obligations that physicians, particularly neurosurgeons and neurologists, have toward brain-injured football players and the larger societal role they may play in helping to minimize football-associated brain injury.

  13. A study on the expression of c-jun mRNA after experimental rat brain concussion%实验性大鼠脑震荡后c-jun mRNA表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪枫; 李永宏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes of c-jun mRNA after brain concussion. Methods Fifty-five rats were randomly divided into brain concussion groups ( 0min, 15 min, 30min, 60min, 3 h, 6h, 12h, 24h, 48 h,96h) and control group. The expression of c-jun mRNA in cortex 、thalamus and brain stem was microscopically observed by In site hybridization method. Results There were weak positive expression of c-jun mRNA in some neutrons and neuroglia cells in control group. In brain concussion group, however,positive expression of c-jun mRNA in some neutrons was seen at 15min after brain concussion,and reach to the peak at 30min after brain concussion the level of expression of c-jun mRNA were as well as control group at 96h. Conclusion There findings suggest that detection of c-jun mRNA could be an index of diagnosis of brain concussion and a sensitive marker of timing of injury after brain concussion.%目的 观察实验性大鼠脑震荡后c-jun mRNA的表达变化规律.方法 55只实验大鼠随机分为脑震荡组(0min、15min、30min、60min、3h、6h、12h、24h、48h、96h)和对照组,用原位杂交法观察大鼠脑震荡后各时间点,大脑皮质、脑干和丘脑神经元c-jun mRNA表达的变化规律.结果 对照组大鼠神经元和胶质细胞均可见c-jun mRNA的弱阳性表达.脑震荡组大鼠损伤后15min神经细胞观察到c-jun mRNA阳性表达,随损伤后经过时间的延长阳性表达逐渐增强;30min时c-jun mRNA阳性反应达高峰,随后逐渐降低,至96h时回落至对照组水平.结论 c-jun mRNA表达水平可成为诊断脑震荡和推断伤后经过时间的一项敏感指标.

  14. Concussion: current concepts in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borich, Michael R; Cheung, Katharine L; Jones, Paul; Khramova, Vera; Gavrailoff, Lauren; Boyd, Lara A; Virji-Babul, Naznin

    2013-09-01

    Current understanding of the term "concussion" is fraught with misconceptions regarding the extent and nature of brain injury. Despite increasing attention in popular media and within the context of sports, considerable gaps exist in our knowledge of the diagnosis, underlying brain pathology, recovery of function, and optimal interventions for concussion. In this special interest article, we discuss the definition and risk factors associated with concussion, summarize and highlight some of the most widely used assessment tools, and critique the evidence for current principles of concussion management. Our evaluation has identified opportunities for novel neuroimaging techniques to improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of concussion and to evaluate the changes in the recovering brain in response to rehabilitation. In summary, a clear definition of the underlying brain pathology, the potential long-term consequences, and the risk factors of injury and recovery will help guide future research aiming to minimize the impact of injury and develop innovative and successful therapeutic approaches aimed at ameliorating the functional impairments associated with concussion. PMID:23872682

  15. Repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury interacts with post-injury foot shock stress to worsen social and depression-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenhagen, Kristen C; O'Brien, Scott P; Brody, David L

    2013-01-01

    The debilitating effects of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) have been increasingly recognized in both military and civilian populations. rcTBI may result in significant neurological, cognitive, and affective sequelae, and is often followed by physical and/or psychological post-injury stressors that may exacerbate the effects of the injury and prolong the recovery period for injured patients. However, the consequences of post-injury stressors and their subsequent effects on social and emotional behavior in the context of rcTBI have been relatively little studied in animal models. Here, we use a mouse model of rcTBI with two closed-skull blunt impacts 24 hours apart and social and emotional behavior testing to examine the consequences of a stressor (foot shock fear conditioning) following brain injury (rcTBI). rcTBI alone did not affect cued or contextual fear conditioning or extinction compared to uninjured sham animals. In the sucrose preference test, rcTBI animals had decreased preference for sucrose, an anhedonia-like behavior, regardless of whether they experienced foot shock stress or were non-shocked controls. However, rcTBI and post-injury foot shock stress had synergistic effects in tests of social recognition and depression-like behavior. In the social recognition test, animals with both injury and shock were more impaired than either non-shocked injured mice or shocked but uninjured mice. In the tail suspension test, injured mice had increased depression-like behavior compared with uninjured mice, and shock stress worsened the depression-like behavior only in the injured mice with no effect in the uninjured mice. These results provide a model of subtle emotional behavioral deficits after combined concussive brain injury and stress, and may provide a platform for testing treatment and prevention strategies for social behavior deficits and mood disorders that are tailored to patients with traumatic brain injury.

  16. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Concussive Head Injuries in Sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vállez Garcia, David; Otte, Andreas; Glaudemans, Andor WJM; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Gielen, Jan LMA; Zwerver, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Concussions in sports and during recreational activities are a major source of traumatic brain injury in our society. This is mainly relevant in adolescence and young adulthood, where the annual rate of diagnosed concussions is increasing from year to year. Contact sports (e.g., ice hockey, American

  17. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are more likely to get a concussion than adults and they take longer to recover than adults. D All of the above. Submit LESSON 1 ... Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma ...

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Concussion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a concussion and crowd the brain against the skull. Contact your health care professional or emergency department ... or cannot be awakened. Have one pupil (the black part in the middle of the eye) larger ...

  19. Concussion associated with head trauma in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Murguía Cánovas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been increased attention to concussions that occur during sports activities, both at school level or amateur and professional level. Concussion is defined as a sudden and transient alteration of consciousness induced by traumatic biomechanical forces transmitted directly or indirectly to the brain. Such injuries most commonly occur in contact sports such as boxing, football, soccer, wrestling, hockey, among others. Concussion should be suspected in any athlete who suffers a head injury, whether or not it is associated to loss of consciousness. These athletes should not return to their sports activities immediately, and a few days of mental and physical leave are recommended in order to ensure full recovery. Repeat head injuries should be avoided, since there is evidence that in some athletes they can lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The present review focuses on the different definitions of concussion, management and long-term consequences. It also contains the Spanish version of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2.

  20. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NCAA Sports Download Materials [Exit Disclaimer] Watch a Video or PSA on Concussion NFL PSA on Concussion ... Exit Disclaimer] Banner 3 [Exit Disclaimer] Watch a Video or PSA on Concussion> NFL PSA on Concussion ...

  1. Antisaccadic Eye Movements Are Correlated with Corpus Callosum White Matter Mean Diffusivity, Stroop Performance, and Symptom Burden in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Windsor Kwan-Chun; Schweizer, Tom A; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Antisaccades are thought to involve higher level inputs from neural centers involved in rapid eye movement inhibition and control. Previous work has demonstrated that performance on the antisaccade task can help in the assessment of injury in acute and/or chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). In this exploratory study, we performed cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons of rapid eye movement, followed by correlations of antisaccade performance with assessments of symptom burden, diffusion tensor imaging, and a neuropsychological test of response inhibition. Significant deficits in antisaccade median latency, F(2, 31) = 3.65, p = 0.04 and prosaccade error mean duration, F(2, 31) = 3.63, p = 0.04 were found between patient groups and controls: the former was correlated with loss of white matter integrity in the splenium of the corpus callosum in acute mTBI, rho = 0.90, p = 0.0005. Furthermore, increased antisaccade median latency was also correlated with poor performance on an executive functioning task, r (2) = 0.439, p = 0.03, and greater symptom burden, r (2) = 0.480, p = 0.02 in the acute mTBI patients. Our preliminary research suggests that the antisaccade task could be useful as a neurological marker for mTBI and concussion, but more work is required. PMID:26834693

  2. Antisaccadic eye movements are correlated with corpus callosum white matter mean diffusivity, stroop performance and symptom burden in mild traumatic brain injury and concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windsor Kwan-Chun eTing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisaccades are thought to involve higher level inputs from neural centers involved in rapid eye movement inhibition and control. Previous work has demonstrated that performance on the antisaccade task can help in assessment of injury in acute and/or chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. In this exploratory study we performed cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons of rapid eye movement, followed by correlations of antisaccade performance with assessments of symptom burden, diffusion tensor imaging, and a neuropsychological test of response inhibition. Significant deficits in antisaccade median latency, F(2, 31 = 3.65, p = 0.04 and prosaccade error mean duration, F(2, 31 = 3.63, p = 0.04 were found between patient groups and controls: the former was correlated with loss of white matter integrity in the splenium of the corpus callosum in acute mTBI, rho (8 = 0.90, p = 0.0005. Furthermore, increased antisaccade median latency was also correlated with poor performance on an executive functioning task, r2 = 0.439, p = 0.03, and greater symptom burden, r2 = 0.480, p = 0.02 in the acute mTBI patients. Our preliminary research suggests that the antisaccade task could be useful as a neurological marker for mTBI and concussion but more work is required.

  3. Repetitive concussions in adolescent athletes – translating clinical and experimental research into perspectives on rehabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgette D Semple

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sports-related concussions are particularly common during adolescence, a time when even mild brain injuries may disrupt ongoing brain maturation and result in long-term complications. A recent focus on the consequences of repetitive concussions amongst professional athletes has prompted the development of several new experimental models in rodents, as well as the revision of guidelines for best management of sports concussions. Here, we consider the utility of rodent models to understand the functional consequences and pathobiology of concussions in the developing brain, identifying the unique behavioral and pathological signatures of concussive brain injuries. The impact of repetitive concussions on behavioral consequences and injury progression is also addressed. In particular, we focus on the epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence underlying current recommendations for physical and cognitive rest after concussion, and highlight key areas in which further research is needed. Lastly, we consider how best to promote recovery after injury, recognizing that optimally-timed, activity-based rehabilitative strategies may hold promise for the adolescent athlete who has sustained single or repetitive concussions. The purpose of this review is to inform the clinical research community as it strives to develop and optimize evidence-based guidelines for the concussed adolescent, in terms of both acute and long-term management.

  4. School and Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I Help a Friend Who ... Should I Tell My Teachers? Tips for Dealing With a Concussion at School ...

  5. Concussion - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concentrating, and may have mild headaches and less tolerance for noise. Consider asking for more breaks when ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Concussion Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  6. Know the Facts: Understand Concussion

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-17

    This podcast discusses concussions and provides information to help people better understand concussion.  Created: 3/17/2010 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/17/2010.

  7. Self-reported concussion history: impact of providing a definition of concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins CA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Clifford A Robbins,1 Daniel H Daneshvar,1,2 John D Picano,1,3 Brandon E Gavett,1,4 Christine M Baugh,1,2 David O Riley,1 Christopher J Nowinski,1,2,5 Ann C McKee,1,2,6–8 Robert C Cantu,1,5,9,10 Robert A Stern1,2,8,91Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, 2Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA; 4Department of Psychology, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO, USA; 5Sports Legacy Institute, Waltham MA, USA; 6United States Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; 7Department of Pathology, 8Alzheimer's Disease Center, 9Department of Neurosurgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 10Department of Neurosurgery, Emerson Hospital, Concord, MA, USABackground: In recent years, the understanding of concussion has evolved in the research and medical communities to include more subtle and transient symptoms. The accepted definition of concussion in these communities has reflected this change. However, it is unclear whether this shift is also reflected in the understanding of the athletic community.What is known about the subject: Self-reported concussion history is an inaccurate assessment of someone's lifetime exposure to concussive brain trauma. However, unfortunately, in many cases it is the only available tool.Hypothesis/purpose: We hypothesize that athletes' self-reported concussion histories will be significantly greater after reading them the current definition of concussion, relative to the reporting when no definition was provided. An increase from baseline to post-definition response will suggest that athletes are unaware of the currently accepted medical definition.Study design: Cross-sectional study of 472 current and former athletes.Methods: Investigators conducted structured telephone interviews with current and former athletes between January

  8. Heart Rate Variability Interventions for Concussion and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lake Conder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain. It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory Post Concussive Syndrome (PCS. This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced heart rate variability on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation.

  9. Magnetoencephalography in the diagnosis of concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roland R; Huang, Mingxiong

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a biomedical technique which measures the magnetic fields emitted by the brain, generated by neuronal activity. Commercial whole-head MEG units have been available for about 15 years, but currently there are only about 20 such units operating in the USA. Here, we review the basic concepts of MEG and list some of the usual clinical indications: noninvasive localization of epileptic spikes and presurgical mapping of eloquent cortex. We then discuss using MEG to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI; concussions). Injured brain tissues in TBI patients generate abnormal low-frequency magnetic activity (delta-waves: 1-4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by MEG. These abnormal delta-waves originate from neurons that experience deafferentation from axonal injury to the associated white matter fiber tracts, also manifested on diffusion tensor imaging as reduced fractional anisotropy. Magnetoencephalographic evaluation of abnormal delta-waves (1-4 Hz) is probably the most sensitive objective test to diagnose concussions. An automated MEG low-frequency (slow wave) source imaging method, frequency-domain vector-based spatiotemporal analysis using a L1-minimum norm (VESTAL), achieved a positive finding rate of 87% for diagnosing concussions (blast-induced plus nonblast), 100% for moderate TBI, and no false-positive diagnoses in normal controls. There were also significant correlations between the number of cortical regions generating abnormal slow waves and the total postconcussive symptom scores in TBI patients.

  10. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Concussions [PDF 348KB] DOWNLOAD SPORT-SPECIFIC CONCUSSION INFORMATION Baseball Field Hockey Football Ice Hockey Lacrosse Rugby Soccer ... Medicine Concussion Program US Lacrosse US Soccer USA Baseball USA Football USA Rugby USA Volleyball YMCA of ...

  11. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Concussion Responding To Concussions Getting Back In The Game Concussion Prevention Resource Center Menu Button Return To ... or position Forgets sports plays Is unsure of game, score, or opponent Moves clumsily Answers questions slowly ...

  12. Postural control deficits identify lingering post-concussion neurological deficits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas A. Buckley; Jessie R. Oldham; Jaclyn B. Caccese

    2016-01-01

    Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, incidence rates have reached epidemic levels and impaired postural control is a cardinal symptom. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the linear and non-linear assessments of post-concussion postural control. The current acute evaluation for concussion utilizes the subjective balance error scoring system (BESS) to assess postural control. While the sensitivity of the overall test battery is high, the sensitivity of the BESS is unacceptably low and, with repeat administration, is unable to accurately identify recovery. Sophisticated measures of postural control, utilizing traditional linear assessments, have identified impairments in postural control well beyond BESS recovery. Both assessments of quiet stance and gait have identified lingering impairments for at least 1 month post-concussion. Recently, the application of non-linear metrics to concussion recovery have begun to receive limited attention with the most commonly utilized metric being approximate entropy (ApEn). ApEn, most commonly in the medial-lateral plane, has successfully identified impaired postural control in the acute post-concussion timeframe even when linear assessments of instrumented measures are equivalent to healthy pre-injury values;unfortunately these studies have not gone beyond the acute phase of recovery. One study has identified lingering deficits in postural control, utilizing Shannon and Renyi entropy metrics, which persist at least through clinical recovery and return to participation. Finally, limited evidence from two studies suggest that individuals with a previous history of a single concussion, even months or years prior, may display altered ApEn metrics. Overall, non-linear metrics provide a fertile area for future study to further the understanding of postural control impairments acutely post-concussion and address the current challenge of sensitive identification of recovery.

  13. Treatment Perspectives Based on Our Current Understanding of Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Sports-related concussion also referred to in the literature as mild traumatic brain injury remains a popular area of study for physicians, neurologists, neuropsychologists, neuroimaging, athletic trainers, and researchers across the other areas of brain sciences. Treatment for concussion is an emerging area of focus with investigators seeking to improve outcomes and protect patients from the deleterious short-term and long-term consequences which have been extensively studied and identified. Broadly, current treatment strategies for athletes recovering from concussion have remained largely unchanged since early 2000s. Knowledge of the complex pathophysiology surrounding injury should improve or advance our ability to identify processes which may serve as targets for therapeutic intervention. Clinicians working with athletes recovering from sports-related concussion should have an advanced understanding of the injury cascade and also be aware of the current efforts within the research to treat concussion. In addition, how clinicians use the word "treatment" should be carefully defined and promoted so the patient is aware of the level of intervention and what stage of recovery or healing is being affected by a specific intervention. The purpose of this review is to bring together efforts across disciplines of brain science into 1 platform where clinicians can assimilate this information before making best practices decisions regarding the treatment of patients and athletes under their care. PMID:27482780

  14. The effects of fatigue and the post-concussion syndrome on executive functioning in traumatic brain injury and healthy comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enid Schutte

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, behavioural manifestations of compromised executive control, including perseveration and reduced inductive reasoning, on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST were investigated.Performance was affected by fatigue in both a head-injured and matched population, which has implications for health care professionals involved in rehabilitation and assessment. A fatigue condition was manipulated for 15 moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI individuals through the course of a three-hour neuropsychological testing session. A comparison sample of 15 participants in a group of ‘no history of TBI’ was fatigued through the same approach. All fatigued participants (with and without TBI displayed trends towards increased levels of perseveration and reduced inductive reasoning on the WCST. Thus, the effects of fatigue on high-level functioning are pervasive even when not head-injured. This finding supports the sub-optimal performance in cognitive skills, specifically in executive control, that is often found in fatigued people. These findings are relevant for the manner in which rehabilitation interventions and medico-legal assessments are structured. Importantly, the order of tests, their interpretation and rest sessions should be clearly indicated and interpreted in assessment reports and rehabilitation sessions.

    Opsomming

    In hierdie studie is gedragsmanifestering in individue met gekompromitteerde uitvoerende funksionering, met inbegrip van perseverasie en verminderde induktiewe redenering, op die Wisconsin-kaartsorteringstoets (WCST, bestudeer. Die waarneming dat prestasie deur uitputting beïnvloed word in sowel normale populasies as dié met kopbeserings het implikasies vir gesondheidsorgpersoneel wat by rehabilitasie en assessering betrokke is. ’n Uitputtingstoestand is gemanipuleer vir 15 matig ernstige individue met traumatiese kopbeserings (TKB vir die duur van ’n drie uur lange toetssessie.

  15. Recognizing and managing concussion in school sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Vicki

    2014-08-01

    Every country around the world enjoys some sort of sport. The Olympics sees countries from all over the globe participate in elite sport, in both winter and summer competitions. Australia is widely known for cricket and rugby; America is known for baseball and gridiron football (among others). These sports are played at an elite level as well as beginners from early ages as young as 4 years in the backyard. Yet, it is also these sports that can deliver a ball at the speed of 100 km/h (football), 105 km/h (baseball), 112 km/h (rugby), 150 km/h (cricket), and 211 km/h (soccer). This is the same force that a car collision can produce. That force eventually finds a target, and in some cases, unfortunately, it is a head. Damage to the brain is not only from the impact of the ball hitting its target but rather also the shearing forces of acceleration-deceleration injury that can cause extensive injuries. There has been much discussion of late regarding concussion in sport and the accumulative effects of head blows resulting in varying degrees of memory loss and dementia later in life. The media have been saturated with heightened awareness of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This, however, is still being researched. It is true that each concussion compounds the one before, but rather than focus on the injury, managers/coaches and sporting codes should be focusing on the identification and proper management of a suspected concussion and the return-to-play protocols. This is especially important in our schools where growing brains need nurturing. Neuroscience nurses are at the forefront of educating school children, teachers, and coaches through partnering with local schools. This article will focus on concussion recognition and management in school sport. PMID:24905132

  16. Ocular motor assessment in concussion: Current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Rachel E; Balcer, Laura J; Galetta, Steven L; Rucker, Janet C

    2016-02-15

    Mild head injury such as concussions and subconcussive repetitive impact may lead to subtle changes in brain function and it is imperative to find sensitive and reliable tests to detect such changes. Tests involving the visual system, in particular eye movements, can incorporate higher cortical functioning and involve diffuse pathways in the brain, including many areas susceptible to head impact. With concussions, the clinical neuro-ophthalmic exam is important for detecting abnormalities in vergence, saccades, pursuit, and visual fixation. On the sidelines, the King-Devick test has been used as a visual performance measure that incorporates eye movements and increases the sensitivity in detecting possible concussions in conjunction with standard sideline tests of cognition, symptom checklists, and balance. Much promise lies in the eye movement laboratory to quantitate changes in saccades and pursuit with concussions using video-oculography. A combination of eye movement tasks coupled with neuroimaging techniques and other objective biomarkers may lead to a better understanding of the anatomical and physiological consequences of concussion and to better understand the natural history of this condition. PMID:26810521

  17. 78 FR 32253 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Be Heads Up About Concussion Safety” Poster...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... that there are things they can do to help prevent concussions and other serious brain injuries. We... serious brain injuries. How To Enter: Sign up for a Challenge.gov account and become a follower of...

  18. Concussion in High School Sports: Overall Estimate of Occurrence Is Not Available, but Key State Laws and Nationwide Guidelines Address Injury Management. Testimony before the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives. GAO-10-569T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Linda T.

    2010-01-01

    Participation in school sports can benefit children but also carries a risk of injury, including concussion. Concussion is a brain injury that can affect memory, speech, and muscle coordination and can cause permanent disability or death. Concussion can be especially serious for children, who are more likely than adults both to sustain a…

  19. A Historical Perspective on Sports Concussion: Where We Have Been and Where We Are Going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Vernon B; Danan, Ilan J

    2016-06-01

    The approach to sports concussion diagnosis and management has been evolving at an unprecedented rate over the last several years. So much so, that committees at all level of sports have implemented concussion protocols and made adjustments to certain league rules in an effort to minimize the risk of head injury. With this newfound attention has come an even greater push by the scientific community to address the many questions that remain. The aim of this review article is to present the topic of sports concussion by means of discreet eras. It begins by introducing the very first mentions of concussion, dating back to ancient Greece, to present day, highlighting important periods along the way. It then goes on to review emerging scientific data, from biomarkers and serum studies, to imaging modalities, and brain networking. All of which will hopefully contribute to both the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to sports concussion. PMID:27188579

  20. Mismanaging Concussions in Intercollegiate Football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Austin; Miller, John J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, Adrian Arrington filed a class action lawsuit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) on behalf of himself and other athletes who had sustained concussions that resulted in long-term injuries. In the lawsuit, Arrington alleged that the NCAA employed a negligent approach to concussed student-athletes.

  1. UNDERSTANDING THE NEUROINFLAMMATORY RESPONSE FOLLOWING CONCUSSION TO DEVELOP TREATMENT STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI have been associated with long-term cognitive deficits relating to trauma-induced neurodegeneration. These long-term deficits include impaired memory and attention, changes in executive function, emotional instability and sensorimotor deficits. Furthermore, individuals with concussions show a high co-morbidity with a host of psychiatric illnesses (e.g. depression, anxiety, addiction and dementia. The neurological damage seen in mTBI patients is the result of the direct impact and mechanical injury, followed by a delayed neuroimmune response that can last hours, days and even months after the injury. As part of the neuroimmune response, a cascade of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released and can be detected at the site of injury as well as subcortical, and often contralateral, regions. It has been suggested that the delayed neuroinflammatory response to concussions is more damaging then the initial impact itself. However, evidence exists for favourable consequences of cytokine production following traumatic brain injuries as well. In some cases, treatments that reduce the inflammatory response will also hinder the brain's intrinsic repair mechanisms. At present, there is no evidence-based pharmacological treatment for concussions in humans. The ability to treat concussions with drug therapy requires an in-depth understanding of the pathophysiological and neuroinflammatory changes that accompany concussive injuries. The use of neurotrophic factors (e.g. nerve growth factor and anti-inflammatory agents as an adjunct for the management of post-concussion symptomology will be explored in this review.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion) are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Michael A. Kiraly; Kiraly, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzh...

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  4. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  5. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Pham

    Full Text Available Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  6. Neuroimaging assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in concussion: current concepts, methodological considerations and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Ellis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concussion is a form of traumatic brain injury (TBI that presents with a wide spectrum of subjective symptoms and few objective clinical findings. Emerging research suggests that one of the processes that may contribute to concussion pathophysiology is dysregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF leading to a mismatch between CBF delivery and the metabolic needs of the injured brain. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR is defined as the change in CBF in response to a measured vasoactive stimulus. Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques can be used as a surrogate measure of CBF in clinical and laboratory studies. In order to provide an accurate assessment of CVR, these sequences must be combined with a reliable, reproducible vasoactive stimulus that can manipulate CBF. Although CVR imaging currently plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of many cerebrovascular diseases, only recently have studies begun to apply this assessment tool in patients with concussion. In order to evaluate the quality, reliability and relevance of CVR studies in concussion, it is important that clinicians and researchers have a strong foundational understanding of the role of cerebral blood flow regulation in health, concussion and more severe forms of TBI, and an awareness of the advantages and limitations of currently available CVR measurement techniques. Accordingly, in this review we 1 discuss the role of CVR in TBI and concussion; 2 examine methodological considerations for MRI-based measurement of CVR; and 3 provide an overview of published CVR studies in concussion patients.

  7. A Case for Mental and Physical Rest in Youth Sports Concussion: It’s Never Too Late

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Scolaro Moser

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTOver the past decade, there has been a considerable increase in research on, and media attention to, sports-related concussion. However, despite accurate diagnosis, effective treatment and management of sports-related concussion have remained a challenge. There are approximately 1.8 million traumatic brain injuries in the United States annually (Faul, Xu, Wald, & Coronado, 2010 and emergency department pediatric visits for suspected concussion have doubled in the past decade (Bakhos, Lockhart, Myers, & Linakis, 2010. However, health care providers and medical researchers have yet to offer an effective, reliable evidence based treatment for concussive brain injury. The Zurich 2008 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport codified the prescription for cognitive and physical rest immediately following a concussion based on clinical acumen and common sense (McCrory et al., 2009. Currently, rest is the considered the best immediate treatment for concussion. Other supportive and anecdotal treatments are often applied throughout the post-concussive recovery process to address persistent symptoms. The need for empirical research to translate current guidelines for rest into evidence-based treatment protocols is essential. A recent study evaluated the efficacy of comprehensive rest and concluded that such rest may be helpful whether applied soon after a concussion or weeks to months later (Moser, Glatts, Schatz, 2012. Here, we present a case illustrating the effectiveness of rest in a youth athlete, commenced after experiencing 13 months of post-concussion symptoms. There appears to be value in applying a specific period of cognitive and physical rest following concussion, whether immediately or later in the recovery phase.

  8. The Sport Concussion Education Project. A brief report on an educational initiative: from concept to curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echlin, Paul S; Johnson, Andrew M; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Tichenoff, Annalise; Gray, Sarah; Gatavackas, Heather; Walsh, Joanne; Middlebro, Tim; Blignaut, Angelique; MacIntyre, Martin; Anderson, Chris; Fredman, Eli; Mayinger, Michael; Skopelja, Elaine N; Sasaki, Takeshi; Bouix, Sylvain; Pasternak, Ofer; Helmer, Karl G; Koerte, Inga K; Shenton, Martha E; Forwell, Lorie A

    2014-12-01

    Current research on concussion is primarily focused on injury identification and treatment. Prevention initiatives are, however, important for reducing the incidence of brain injury. This report examines the development and implementation of an interactive electronic teaching program (an e-module) that is designed specifically for concussion education within an adolescent population. This learning tool and the accompanying consolidation rubric demonstrate that significant engagement occurs in addition to the knowledge gained among participants when it is used in a school curriculum setting.

  9. Metabolic changes in concussed American football players during the acute and chronic post-injury phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellemberg Dave

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite negative neuroimaging findings many athletes display neurophysiological alterations and post-concussion symptoms that may be attributable to neurometabolic alterations. Methods The present study investigated the effects of sports concussion on brain metabolism using 1H-MR Spectroscopy by comparing a group of 10 non-concussed athletes with a group of 10 concussed athletes of the same age (mean: 22.5 years and education (mean: 16 years within both the acute and chronic post-injury phases. All athletes were scanned 1-6 days post-concussion and again 6-months later in a 3T Siemens MRI. Results Concussed athletes demonstrated neurometabolic impairment in prefrontal and motor (M1 cortices in the acute phase where NAA:Cr levels remained depressed relative to controls. There was some recovery observed in the chronic phase where Glu:Cr levels returned to those of control athletes; however, there was a pathological increase of m-I:Cr levels in M1 that was only present in the chronic phase. Conclusions These results confirm cortical neurometabolic changes in the acute post-concussion phase as well as recovery and continued metabolic abnormalities in the chronic phase. The results indicate that complex pathophysiological processes differ depending on the post-injury phase and the neurometabolite in question.

  10. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... or longer. A True B False Submit POST TEST QUESTION 1 A concussion is a: A type ... loud sound heard from far away. Submit POST TEST QUESTION 2 When can concussions occur? A Only ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk for another concussion. C Young children and teens are more likely to get a concussion than ... seconds] Mom and Daughter [Audio: 0:30 seconds] Teens [Audio: 0:30 seconds] Announcers [Audio: 0:30 ...

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    Full Text Available ... Sheet Download a Fact Sheet on Overall Sports Safety: Protect the Ones You Love For parents Order ... or PSA on Concussion NFL PSA on Concussion Safety [Exit Disclaimer] Keeping Quiet Can Keep You Out ...

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    Full Text Available ... foggy, or groggy 17 Concentration or memory problems 18 Confusion 19 Just not “feeling right” or is “ ... NCAA Sports Download Materials [Exit Disclaimer] Watch a Video or PSA on Concussion NFL PSA on Concussion ...

  14. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  15. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... true? A Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness. B Athletes who have ever had a concussion ... or opponent Moves clumsily Answers questions slowly Loses consciousness (even briefly) Shows behavior or personality changes Can' ...

  16. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  17. Risk Modifiers for Concussion and Prolonged Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Scopaz, Kristen A.; Hatzenbuehler, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Currently, no consensus exists for grading the severity of concussions. Identification of risk factors that may affect concussion risk and the likelihood of prolonged recovery can be of value to providers who manage concussion. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were identified through MEDLINE (1996-2011) using the keywords concussion, postconcussive syndrome, and risk or risk factor. Targeted searches for specific risk factors were conducted with additional keywords, such as gen...

  18. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  20. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  1. The cognitive effects and decrements following concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Covassin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tracey Covassin, Robert J ElbinMichigan State University, Department of Kinesiology, East Lansing, MI, USAAbstract: Sports-related concussion is an injury that continues to receive attention from both the popular media and sports medicine community. The many different symptom presentations and cognitive decrements that follow concussions, have made this injury difficult to detect and manage. Furthermore, concussed athletes should not always be entrusted to appropriately self-report their concussion symptoms; therefore the burden falls on the clinician and coach. Recent management recommendations call for using a multi-faceted approach to managing concussion, which consists of neurocognitive testing before (ie, baseline/preseason and after injury. In addition age, sex, and previous history of concussion have been found to influence the risk and recovery from this injury.Keywords: cognitive function, neurocognitive testing, concussion

  2. Use of a tracing task to assess visuomotor performance for evidence of concussion and recuperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelty-Stephen, Damian G; Qureshi Ahmad, Mona; Stirling, Leia

    2015-12-01

    The likelihood of suffering a concussion while playing a contact sport ranges from 15-45% per year of play. These rates are highly variable as athletes seldom report concussive symptoms, or do not recognize their symptoms. We performed a prospective cohort study (n = 206, aged 10-17) to examine visuomotor tracing to determine the sensitivity for detecting neuromotor components of concussion. Tracing variability measures were investigated for a mean shift with presentation of concussion-related symptoms and a linear return toward baseline over subsequent return visits. Furthermore, previous research relating brain injury to the dissociation of smooth movements into "submovements" led to the expectation that cumulative micropause duration, a measure of motion continuity, might detect likelihood of injury. Separate linear mixed effects regressions of tracing measures indicated that 4 of the 5 tracing measures captured both short-term effects of injury and longer-term effects of recovery with subsequent visits. Cumulative micropause duration has a positive relationship with likelihood of participants having had a concussion. The present results suggest that future research should evaluate how well the coefficients for the tracing parameter in the logistic regression help to detect concussion in novel cases. PMID:25894704

  3. Concussions in Collision Youth Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A. Linzmeier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the University of Pittsburg, University of Arkansas, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, and Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical College researched the incidence of concussions in youth hockey in relation to age and activity setting.

  4. Taking Care After A Concussion

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-17

    This podcast describes how to take care of yourself after a concussion, including proper recognition and response recommendations.  Created: 3/17/2010 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/17/2010.

  5. The cognitive effects and decrements following concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Elbin, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Sports-related concussion is an injury that continues to receive attention from both the popular media and sports medicine community. The many different symptom presentations and cognitive decrements that follow concussions, have made this injury difficult to detect and manage. Furthermore, concussed athletes should not always be entrusted to appropriately self-report their concussion symptoms; therefore the burden falls on the clinician and coach. Recent management recommendations call for using a multi-faceted approach to managing concussion, which consists of neurocognitive testing before (ie, baseline/preseason) and after injury. In addition age, sex, and previous history of concussion have been found to influence the risk and recovery from this injury. PMID:24198543

  6. Retirement-from-sport considerations following pediatric sports-related concussion: case illustrations and institutional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; McDonald, Patrick J; Cordingley, Dean; Mansouri, Behzad; Essig, Marco; Ritchie, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The decision to advise an athlete to retire from sports following sports-related concussion (SRC) remains a persistent challenge for physicians. In the absence of strong empirical evidence to support recommendations, clinical decision making must be individualized and should involve a multidisciplinary team of experts in concussion and traumatic brain injury. Although previous authors have advocated for a more conservative approach to these issues in child and adolescent athletes, there are few reports outlining considerations for this process among this unique population. Here, the authors use multiple case illustrations to discuss 3 subgroups of clinical considerations for sports retirement among pediatric SRC patients including the following: those with structural brain abnormalities identified on neuroimaging, those presenting with focal neurological deficits and abnormalities on physical examination, and those in whom the cumulative or prolonged effects of concussion are suspected or demonstrated. The authors' evolving multidisciplinary institutional approach to return-to-play and retirement decision making in pediatric SRC is also presented.

  7. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Foundation Society of State Directors of Health, Physical Education & Recreation Sports Legacy Institute University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Sports Medicine Concussion Program ...

  8. Concussion management in soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Mihalik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries in sports drew more and more public attentions in recent years. Brain injuries vary by name, type, and severity in the athletic setting. It should be noted, however, that these injuries are not isolated to only the athletic arena, as non-athletic mechanisms (e.g., motor vehicle accidents are more common causes of traumatic brain injuries (TBI among teenagers. Notwithstanding, as many as 1.6 to 3.8 million TBI result from sports and recreation each year in the United States alone. These injuries are extremely costly to the global health care system, and make TBI among the most expensive conditions to treat in children. This article serves to define common brain injuries in sport; describe their prevalence, what happens to the brain following injury, how to recognize and manage these injuries, and what you can expect as the athlete recovers. Some return-to-activity considerations for the brain-injured athlete will also be discussed.

  9. Concussion Education for High School Football Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse-Cohick, Nancy J.; Shapley, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    This survey study compared high school football players' knowledge and attitudes about concussion before and after receiving concussion education. There were no significant changes in the Concussion Attitude Index. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in the athletes' scores for the Concussion Knowledge Index,…

  10. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... After sustaining a concussion, you speak with a health care professional regarding your athlete’s condition and it was ... After sustaining a concussion, you speak with a health care professional regarding your athlete’s condition and it was ...

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  13. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... of concussion, encourage them to see a health care professional, and follow up regarding the status of the athlete. C Before the next game/match/event so as to make sure the child is cleared for play. Submit POST TEST QUESTION 11 How can you help prevent concussions? ...

  14. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  16. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  17. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  18. What You Need to Know About Concussion

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-17

    This podcast provides the essential facts about concussions and describes symptoms, danger signs, and ways to recover and heal after a concussion.  Created: 3/17/2010 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/17/2010.

  19. Sport-Related Concussion and Occupational Therapy: Expanding the Scope of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Sport participation is a common occupation for many children and youth and can lead to improved physical and psychosocial health. Despite these benefits, it exposes children and youth to the increased risk of injury. Concussion, also referred to as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is one of the most common sports injuries reported in the…

  20. Smartphone-enabled optofluidic exosome diagnostic for concussion recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jina; Hemphill, Matthew A.; Gabrieli, David; Wu, Leon; Yelleswarapu, Venkata; Lawrence, Gladys; Pennycooke, Wesley; Singh, Anup; Meaney, Dave F.; Issadore, David

    2016-08-01

    A major impediment to improving the treatment of concussion is our current inability to identify patients that will experience persistent problems after the injury. Recently, brain-derived exosomes, which cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate following injury, have shown great potential as a noninvasive biomarker of brain recovery. However, clinical use of exosomes has been constrained by their small size (30–100 nm) and the extensive sample preparation (>24 hr) needed for traditional exosome measurements. To address these challenges, we developed a smartphone-enabled optofluidic platform to measure brain-derived exosomes. Sample-to-answer on our chip is 1 hour, 10x faster than conventional techniques. The key innovation is an optofluidic device that can detect enzyme amplified exosome biomarkers, and is read out using a smartphone camera. Using this approach, we detected and profiled GluR2+ exosomes in the post-injury state using both in vitro and murine models of concussion.

  1. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene in the brain tissue of rats with cerebral concussion%神经元型一氧化氮合酶基因在脑震荡大鼠脑组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭瑞云; 高亚兵; 王德文; 肖兴义; 杨瑞; 陈浩宇; 吴小红; 刘杰; 胡文华; 马俊杰

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral concussion is a mild brain injury. In basic researches, the expression and significance of enkaphalin and dopamine in cerebral concussion remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene in rat models of cerebral concussion and to explore its significance.DESIGN: A randomized controlled trialled study.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: This study was conducted in the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences. Rat models of cerebral concussion was established in 80 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade purchased from the Experimental Animal Center of Academy of Military Medical Sciences with free access to food and water. The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the different levels of cerebral impact for model establishment, namely the control group, 50, 100 and 200 g counterweight groups.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain tissue samples were taken 1, 3, 7,14 and 30 days after injury respectively, from each group, to examine the changes in the expression of nNOS gene in the course of cerebral concussion by means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.RESULTS: Rats in 100 g group exhibited typical manifestations of cerebral concussion as seen in the clinical setting. The pathological changes included cerebral vascular dilatation, congestion, edema of the cerebral tissues, neuronal degeneration, necrosis, and decrease or even disappearance of the Nissl bodies. The protein and mRNA of nNOS were increased 3 days after the injury, peaked on the 7th day, and decreased till the 14th days but still remained positive on the 30th day. The positive expression was detected in the plasma of neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum.CONCLUSION: Cerebral concussion is pathologically characterized by blood circulation disorder and neural cell degeneration and necrosis. The expression of nNOS gene participates in brain tissue damage

  2. The Acute Management of Sport Concussion in Pediatric Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Jacob E; Kutcher, Jeffrey S

    2015-10-01

    During the past two decades the focus on sport concussion has increased significantly. Young athletes represent the most vulnerable population to sustain a sport concussion yet receive the least amount of attention. Specifically, young athletes who sustain a sport concussion can go unrecognized and continue to participate in sport putting them at an increased risk for a more significant injury. The purpose of this review is to provide a clinical framework for the evaluation and management of sport concussion. In addition, this review provides considerations for health care professionals in regard to clinical measures and follow-up strategies during the acute phase following concussion in young concussed athletes following injury.

  3. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... of safety. B By working with parents, athletes, school and club administrators to spread awareness about concussions all year: pre-season, during the season, and post-season. C ...

  4. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks. A more serious concussion can ... level is slowly increased over a period of days, weeks, or months depending on the athlete’s response ...

  5. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... recovery or increase the chances for long-term problems. B You can’t see a concussion like ... or "pressure" in head Nausea or vomiting Balance problems or dizziness Double or blurry vision Sensitivity to ...

  6. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... move rapidly back and forth. A True B False Submit LESSON 1 QUIZ QUESTION 2 Which of ... last for months or longer. A True B False Submit POST TEST QUESTION 1 A concussion is ...

  7. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... danger signs, of a severe concussion requiring immediate medical attention: 1 One pupil larger than the other ... etc. and then take the athlete for a medical examination. C Remove the athlete from play and ...

  8. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... at increased risk for another concussion. C Young children and teens are more likely to get a ... following the game or practice-before allowing the child to go home. You should provide information to ...

  9. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Matthew Alan Gfeller Sport-Related TBI Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill May Clinic ... of Health, Physical Education & Recreation Sports Legacy Institute University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Sports Medicine Concussion Program ...

  10. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Fact Sheet Download a Fact Sheet on Overall Sports Safety: Protect the Ones You Love For parents ... Exit Disclaimer] Concussion Educational Materials for all NCAA Sports Download Materials [Exit Disclaimer] Watch a Video or ...

  11. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... fingers. B The athlete feels weak, tired, and has stopped sweating. C The athlete states the lights ... Submit POST TEST QUESTION 6 If an athlete has had a previous concussion he or she: A ...

  12. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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  13. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... devices. For the best experience use a desktop computer. Touch anywhere to close. Concussion Basics Recognizing A ... vomiting Balance problems or dizziness Double or blurry vision Sensitivity to light Sensitivity to noise Feeling sluggish, ...

  14. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    ... Fact Sheet Download a Fact Sheet on Overall Sports Safety: Protect the Ones You Love For parents ... Exit Disclaimer] Concussion Educational Materials for all NCAA Sports Download Materials [Exit Disclaimer] Watch a Video or ...

  15. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... you should watch for and ask others to report which of the following two things among your ... danger signs, of a severe concussion requiring immediate medical attention: 1 One pupil larger than the other ...

  16. [Concussion and sport: too often underdiagnosed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, P-E

    2014-07-16

    Concussions are frequent in contact sports. Clinical symptoms, cognitive impairment, neurobehavioral features can be present. Loss of consciousness is rare. If suspicion, the player must be removed from the game. Return to play is gradual; it may be possible only if the sportsman is asymptomatic. Strict application of the rules of the game, fair play can decrease the incidence of concussion. SCAT (pocket, SCAT 3, SCAT Child) should be used as a help to diagnosis and follow up. PMID:25141566

  17. Sports-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shawn; Woessner, Derek

    2015-06-01

    Concussions have garnered more attention in the medical literature, media, and social media. As such, in the nomenclature according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the term concussion has been supplanted by the term mild traumatic brain injury. Current numbers indicate that 1.7 million TBIs are documented annually, with estimates around 3 million annually (173,285 sports- and recreation-related TBIs among children and adolescents). The Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool 3 and the NFL Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool are commonly used sideline tools.

  18. Possible Lingering Effects of Multiple Past Concussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant L. Iverson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The literature on lingering or “cumulative” effects of multiple concussions is mixed. The purpose of this study was to examine whether athletes with a history of three or more concussions perform more poorly on neuropsychological testing or report more subjective symptoms during a baseline, preseason evaluation. Hypothesis. Athletes reporting three or more past concussions would perform more poorly on preseason neurocognitive testing. Study Design. Case-control study. Methods. An archival database including 786 male athletes who underwent preseason testing with a computerized battery (ImPACT was used to select the participants. Twenty-six athletes, between the ages of 17 and 22 with a history of three or more concussions, were identified. Athletes with no history of concussion were matched, in a case-control fashion, on age, education, self-reported ADHD, school, sport, and, when possible, playing position and self-reported academic problems. Results. The two groups were compared on the four neuropsychological composite scores from ImPACT using multivariate analysis of variance followed by univariate ANOVAs. MANOVA revealed no overall significant effect. Exploratory ANOVAs were conducted using Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Reaction Time, Processing Speed, and Postconcussion Scale composite scores as dependent variables. There was a significant effect for only the Verbal Memory composite. Conclusions. Although inconclusive, the results suggest that some athletes with multiple concussions could have lingering memory deficits.

  19. Dance-related concussion: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cynthia J; Kinney, Susan A; McCrystal, Tara; Carew, Elizabeth A; Bottino, Nicole M; Meehan Iii, William P; Micheli, Lyle J

    2014-01-01

    Sport-related concussion is a topic of increasing public and media attention; the medical literature on this topic is growing rapidly. However, to our knowledge no published papers have described concussion specifically in the dancer. This case series involved a retrospective chart review at a large teaching hospital over a 5.5-year period. Eleven dancers (10 female, 1 male) were identified who experienced concussions while in dance class, rehearsal, or performance: 2 in classical ballet, 2 in modern dance, 2 in acro dance, 1 in hip hop, 1 in musical theater, and 3 were unspecified. Dancers were between 12 and 20 years old at the time of presentation. Three concussions occurred during stunting, diving, or flipping. Three resulted from unintentional drops while partnering. Two followed slips and falls. Two were due to direct blows to the head, and one dancer developed symptoms after repeatedly whipping her head and neck in a choreographed movement. Time to presentation in the sports medicine clinic ranged from the day of injury to 3 months. Duration of symptoms ranged from less than 3 weeks to greater than 2 years at last documented follow-up appointment. It is concluded that dancers do suffer dance-related concussions that can result in severe symptoms, limitations in dance participation, and difficulty with activities of daily living. Future studies are needed to evaluate dancers' recognition of concussion symptoms and care-seeking behaviors. Additional work is also necessary to tailor existing guidelines for gradual, progressive, safe return to dance. PMID:24844421

  20. Epidemiological considerations of concussions among intercollegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Swanik, C Buz; Sachs, Michael L

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine epidemiological trends of concussions among 15 different intercollegiate sports during the 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000 seasons. Data were collected using the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS). For the 15 sports studied during the 3 academic years, the NCAA ISS documented 3,535 team-seasons, 40,547 reportable injuries, 5,566,924 practice athlete exposures (AEs), and 1,090,298 game AEs. Concussions accounted for 6.2% of all reported injuries during this 3-year study. Of all the reported injuries, women lacrosse players (13.9%) reported the highest percentage of suffering a concussion during a game followed by women's soccer (11.4%), men's ice hockey (10.3%), men's lacrosse (10.1%), football (8.8%), women's basketball, (8.5%), field hockey (7.2%), men's soccer (7.0%), wrestling (6.6%), men's basketball (5.0%), baseball (4.2%), and women's volleyball (4.1%). Female athletes from all 7 sports were found to be at a lower risk for suffering concussions during practice sessions than the 8 male sports. However, female athletes were found to be at a greater risk for suffering concussions during games compared to male athletes. Injury trends over the 3- year period indicate concussions continue to be on the rise for athletes participating in collegiate football, men's soccer, and women's and men's basketball. PMID:12734071

  1. Concussions Strike 1 in 3 Water Polo Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or federal policy. More Health News on: Concussion Sports Injuries Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Concussion Sports Injuries About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  2. Concussion Tied to More School Problems Than Other Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Concussion Tied to More School Problems Than Other Sports Injuries Study suggests need for 'return-to-learn' guidelines ... more school difficulties than their peers with other sports-related injuries, a new study suggests. Researchers found that concussed ...

  3. Sports and Concussion | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Concussion Sports and Concussion Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of ... ages—reducing blows to the head by playing sports safely and avoiding falls is vital to a ...

  4. Concussion Rates Have Doubled Among U.S. Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159802.html Concussion Rates Have Doubled Among U.S. Kids Report can't determine whether trend signals more ... News) -- Concussion rates are rising sharply among U.S. kids and teens, researchers report. The study, which looked ...

  5. Young Football Players Tackle Greatest Concussion Risk At Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160579.html Young Football Players Tackle Greatest Concussion Risk at Practice But ... Children under the age of 14 who play football are at risk of concussions, and a small ...

  6. Kids' Concussion Rates May Be Higher Than Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other experts agreed that family doctors have a role to play in concussion care. "This study demonstrates the importance of incorporating the primary physician in the treatment team as our youth work through concussion," said Dr. ...

  7. CNS Voltage-gated Calcium Channel Gene Variation And Prolonged Recovery Following Sport-related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between concussion duration and two calcium channel, voltage-dependent, R type, alpha 1E subunit (CACNA1E) single nucleotide polymorphisms (i.e., rs35737760 and rs704326). A secondary purpose was to examine the association between CACNA1E single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and three acute concussion severity scores (i.e., vestibule-ocular reflex test, balance error scoring scale, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing). Methods: Forty athletes with a diagnosed concussion from a hospital concussion program completed a standardized initial evaluation. Concussion injury characteristics, acute signs and symptoms followed by an objective screening (i.e., vestibular ocular assessments, balance error scoring system test, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing exam) were assessed. Enrolled participants provided salivary samples for isolation of DNA. Two exon SNPs rs35737760 and rs704326 within CACNA1E were genotyped. Results: There was a significant difference found between acute balance deficits and prolonged recovery group (X2 = 5.66, p = 0.017). There was an association found between the dominant model GG genotype (X2 = 5.41, p = 0.027) within the rs704326 SNP and prolonged recovery group. Significant differences were identified for the rs704326 SNP within the dominant model GG genotype (p = 0.030) for VOR scores by recovery. A significant difference was found between the rs704326 SNP codominant model AA (p = 0.042) and visual memory. There was an association between acute balance deficits and prolonged recovery (X2 = 5.66, p = 0.017) for the rs35737760 SNP. No significant associations between concussion severity and genotype for rs35737760 SNP. Conclusion: Athletes carrying the CACNA1E rs704326 homozygous genotype GG are at a greater risk of a prolonged recovery. Athletes that reported balance deficits at the time of injury were more likely to have prolonged recovery. These

  8. Current concepts in sport concussion management:A multifaceted approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashley; Littleton; Kevin; Guskiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Sport-related concussion is a common neurological injury that occurs in all levels of athletic participation.Concussions may actually go undiagnosed,as they do not always display outward signs and athletes may fail to report symptoms of concussion,either because they do not know the symptoms,or for fear of removal from play.Inappropriate management of concussion can lead to increased risk of subsequent injury.This article outlines various aspects of sport-related concussion management,including preparation/planning,education,evaluation,management,return to play decisions,and long term effects of concussion.Preparation and education are the first steps that must be taken to minimize the potentially negative consequences of concussion.If a concussion is suspected,it must be stressed that the evaluation should include a multifaceted approach,with a physical examination and assessment of signs and symptoms,neurocognition and balance.The management of concussion should include both physical and cognitive rest and factors such as transportation,sleep,work,and academics should be taken into consideration.Return to play following concussion should follow a graduated return to play protocol,with careful monitoring of symptoms.Sports medicine clinicians should stay up to date with information regarding concussion management and take a conservative approach,because there are recent reports of various cumulative effects of multiple concussions.

  9. Engaging Teammates in the Promotion of Concussion Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice R.; Baugh, Christine M.; Calzo, Jerel P.

    2016-01-01

    Concussion underreporting contributes to the substantial public health burden of concussions from sport. Teammates may be able to play an important role in encouraging injury identification and help seeking. This study assessed whether there was an association between beliefs about the consequences of continued play with a concussion and…

  10. University Football Players, Postural Stability, and Concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Barbara Sue

    2016-02-01

    Concussion in football athletes is certainly more prevalent and has potentially serious outcomes. With current concerns and increasing return-to-play issues, additional assessment focus is needed. Division 1 college football athletes, from 18 to 20.9 years (n = 177; age, 19.7 ± 1.2 years; height, 182.3 ± 4.5 cm; weight, 97.3 ± 10.6 kg), before fall practice, over a period of 3 years, underwent baseline postural stability testing (sensory organization test [SOT], NeuroCom). Individuals, who were diagnosed with a concussion (headache, dizziness, fatigue, confusion, or loss of consciousness) during practice or actual competition (n = 15; age, 18.9 ± 0.9 years; height, 181.8 ± 2.5 cm; weight, 86.6 ± 3.6 kg), underwent serial evaluation after injury and 24 hours after concussion. As soon as the player was considered asymptomatic, the test was completed on the first and 14th day. A control group of noninjured male athletes (n = 15; age, 19.1 ± 0.4 years; height, 178.2 ± 3.2 cm; weight, 78.6 ± 2.1 kg) were tested for the same time frame. This particular study was only one part of the total evaluation conducted for the concussed athlete's return to play. Results indicated that the concussion group had a statistically significant (p = 0.037) change from their baseline SOT score and the control group (p = 0.025). This change remained significant until day 14 of posttesting. These data indicate that the SOT, when available, may be a positive additional assessment of concussed college-aged football players. Professionals, when dealing with concussion in competitive sports, do need to continue to work together, but awareness of SOT assessments may also contribute to the return-to-play decisions.

  11. Chronic Exposure to Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids Exacerbates Axonal Injury and Microgliosis in the CHIMERA Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; Cheng, Wai Hang; Carr, Michael; Martens, Kris M; Zareyan, Shahab; Wilkinson, Anna; McInnes, Kurt A; Cripton, Peter A; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a serious health concern. Concussion in athletes is of particular interest with respect to the relationship of concussion exposure to risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative condition associated with altered cognitive and psychiatric functions and profound tauopathy. However, much remains to be learned about factors other than cumulative exposure that could influence concussion pathogenesis. Approximately 20% of CTE cases report a history of substance use including androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). How acute, chronic, or historical AAS use may affect the vulnerability of the brain to concussion is unknown. We therefore tested whether antecedent AAS exposure in young, male C57Bl/6 mice affects acute behavioral and neuropathological responses to mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced with the CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration) platform. Male C57Bl/6 mice received either vehicle or a cocktail of three AAS (testosterone, nandrolone and 17α-methyltestosterone) from 8-16 weeks of age. At the end of the 7th week of treatment, mice underwent two closed-head TBI or sham procedures spaced 24 h apart using CHIMERA. Post-repetitive TBI (rTBI) behavior was assessed for 7 d followed by tissue collection. AAS treatment induced the expected physiological changes including increased body weight, testicular atrophy, aggression and downregulation of brain 5-HT1B receptor expression. rTBI induced behavioral deficits, widespread axonal injury and white matter microgliosis. While AAS treatment did not worsen post-rTBI behavioral changes, AAS-treated mice exhibited significantly exacerbated axonal injury and microgliosis, indicating that AAS exposure can alter neuronal and innate immune responses to concussive TBI. PMID:26784694

  12. Chronic Exposure to Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids Exacerbates Axonal Injury and Microgliosis in the CHIMERA Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay R Namjoshi

    Full Text Available Concussion is a serious health concern. Concussion in athletes is of particular interest with respect to the relationship of concussion exposure to risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE, a neurodegenerative condition associated with altered cognitive and psychiatric functions and profound tauopathy. However, much remains to be learned about factors other than cumulative exposure that could influence concussion pathogenesis. Approximately 20% of CTE cases report a history of substance use including androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS. How acute, chronic, or historical AAS use may affect the vulnerability of the brain to concussion is unknown. We therefore tested whether antecedent AAS exposure in young, male C57Bl/6 mice affects acute behavioral and neuropathological responses to mild traumatic brain injury (TBI induced with the CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration platform. Male C57Bl/6 mice received either vehicle or a cocktail of three AAS (testosterone, nandrolone and 17α-methyltestosterone from 8-16 weeks of age. At the end of the 7th week of treatment, mice underwent two closed-head TBI or sham procedures spaced 24 h apart using CHIMERA. Post-repetitive TBI (rTBI behavior was assessed for 7 d followed by tissue collection. AAS treatment induced the expected physiological changes including increased body weight, testicular atrophy, aggression and downregulation of brain 5-HT1B receptor expression. rTBI induced behavioral deficits, widespread axonal injury and white matter microgliosis. While AAS treatment did not worsen post-rTBI behavioral changes, AAS-treated mice exhibited significantly exacerbated axonal injury and microgliosis, indicating that AAS exposure can alter neuronal and innate immune responses to concussive TBI.

  13. Sports-related concussions: diagnosis, complications, and current management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jonathan G; Young, Jacob S; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-04-01

    Sports-related concussions (SRCs) are traumatic events that affect up to 3.8 million athletes per year. The initial diagnosis and management is often instituted on the field of play by coaches, athletic trainers, and team physicians. SRCs are usually transient episodes of neurological dysfunction following a traumatic impact, with most symptoms resolving in 7-10 days; however, a small percentage of patients will suffer protracted symptoms for years after the event and may develop chronic neurodegenerative disease. Rarely, SRCs are associated with complications, such as skull fractures, epidural or subdural hematomas, and edema requiring neurosurgical evaluation. Current standards of care are based on a paradigm of rest and gradual return to play, with decisions driven by subjective and objective information gleaned from a detailed history and physical examination. Advanced imaging techniques such as functional MRI, and detailed understanding of the complex pathophysiological process underlying SRCs and how they affect the athletes acutely and long-term, may change the way physicians treat athletes who suffer a concussion. It is hoped that these advances will allow a more accurate assessment of when an athlete is truly safe to return to play, decreasing the risk of secondary impact injuries, and provide avenues for therapeutic strategies targeting the complex biochemical cascade that results from a traumatic injury to the brain.

  14. Neuropsychological Assessment Following Concussion: an Evidence-Based Review of the Role of Neuropsychological Assessment Pre- and Post-Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Anthony P; Sufrinko, Alicia; Womble, Melissa; Kegel, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    Neuropsychological evaluation is one component of a comprehensive and multifaceted assessment following concussion. Although some neuropsychologists use a "hybrid" assessment approach integrating computerized neurocognitive testing batteries with traditional paper and pencil tests, computerized neurocognitive test batteries are the predominant testing modality for assessment of athletes from the youth to professional level. This review summarizes the most recent research supporting the utility of neuropsychological evaluation and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of both computerized and traditional neuropsychological testing approaches. The most up to date research and guidelines on baseline neurocognitive testing is also discussed. This paper addresses concerns regarding reliability of neuropsychological testing while providing an overview of factors that influence test performance, both transient situational factors (e.g., pain level, anxiety) and characteristics of particular subgroups (e.g., age, preexisting learning disabilities), warranting the expertise of an experienced neuropsychologist for interpretation. Currently, research is moving forward by integrating neuropsychological evaluation with emerging assessment approaches for other domains of brain function (e.g., vestibular function) vulnerable to concussion. PMID:27099226

  15. Concussion management by primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleacher, M D; Dexter, W W

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess current concussion management practices of primary care providers. Methods An 11 item questionnaire was mailed to primary care providers in the state of Maine, with serial mailings to non‐respondents. Results Over 50% of the questionnaires were completed, with nearly 70% of primary care providers indicating that they routinely use published guidelines as a tool in managing patients with concussion. Nearly two thirds of providers were aware that neuropsychological tests could be used, but only 16% had access to such tests within a week of injury. Conclusions Primary care providers are using published concussion management guidelines with high frequency, but many are unable to access neuropsychological testing when it is required. PMID:16371479

  16. Cognitive-motor integration deficits in young adult athletes following concussion

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jeffrey A.; Dalecki, Marc; Hughes, Cindy; MacPherson, Alison K.; Sergio, Lauren E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to perform visually-guided motor tasks requires the transformation of visual information into programmed motor outputs. When the guiding visual information does not align spatially with the motor output, the brain processes rules to integrate the information for an appropriate motor response. Here, we look at how performance on such tasks is affected in young adult athletes with concussion history. Methods Participants displaced a cursor from a central to peripheral tar...

  17. Academic achievement in early adolescent rugby players with multiple concussions : a retrospective analysis / Martha Getruida Kriel

    OpenAIRE

    Kriel, Martha Getruida

    2012-01-01

    Rugby is a popular sport in South Africa, and has been played by young boys from as early as seven years old (South African Rugby Union [SARU], 2011). Despite various physical health benefits, it carries a high risk for injury, especially head injury, and consequently has a high incidence of concussion (Alexander, 2009; Laubscher, 2006; Shuttleworth-Edwards, Smith & Radloff, 2008). It is common for 12 to 13 per cent of adolescent rugby players to report mild traumatic brain injury or concussi...

  18. Loss of possession: concussions, informed consent, and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeson, Richard; King, Nancy M P

    2014-01-01

    The recent explosion of publicity about the dangers of concussion in contact sports - particularly in football - represents the unraveling of a disinformation campaign by the NFL amid growing public and professional concern about the game's long-term risks of harm. The persistence of controversy and denial reflects a cultural view of football players as serving the needs of the team, a resulting evidentiary skepticism, and resistance to rule changes as excessive or unenforceable. This article considers the cultural context of informed decision making by parents of youth football players and suggests that policy changes designed to lower (although they cannot eliminate) risks of brain injury have the potential to change both the culture of football and the way the benefits and harms of the game are regarded for its players, without loss of its essential excitement and appeal.

  19. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and parents “Heads Up” for school nurses, parents, teachers, counselors, and other school professionals “Heads Up” for ... Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS "Heads ...

  20. In-office management of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Erin; Collins, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The field of sport-related concussion has grown exponentially over the past decade, with more concussion-specific clinics being identified in major hospital systems as well as independent practitioner's offices. To date, there is no standardized in-office protocol for managing ongoing symptoms. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Sports Concussion Program, established in 2000, is one of the largest programs in the USA, pioneering the way in clinical management, research, and education of sport-related concussion. This report will outline the essential components of a successful concussion clinic, using the UPMC Sports Concussion Program as a case example of best practice. We will share several case studies illustrating the individualized and complex nature of this injury, as well as review important rehabilitation components.

  1. Sports-related concussions - media, science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-08-01

    Although growing awareness about the potential long-term deleterious effects of sport-related concussion has led to increased attention to the risks of collision sports, calls to ban these sports, such as American football, might be premature. Collision sports have a relatively high incidence of concussions, but participation in these sports also confers a host of benefits. In addition, the associated risks of participation, including concussion, have not been definitively shown to outweigh the benefits they provide, and the risk-benefit ratio might vary among individuals. The risks of concussion and repetitive concussions associated with collision sports are unknown in the general population and not well characterized even in elite athlete populations. In this article, we discuss current knowledge on sports-related concussion, its neurological consequences, and implications for regulation of the practice of collision sports.

  2. Paternal age and diet: The contributions of a father's experience to susceptibility for post-concussion symptomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehar, Harleen; Yu, Katrina; Ma, Irene; Mychasiuk, Richelle

    2016-09-22

    In an attempt to improve current understanding of risk factors that influence individual susceptibility to poor outcomes following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion, this project investigated whether modifications to paternal experiences (Advanced Age (AA) or High-Fat Diet (HFD)) affected offspring susceptibility to behavioral symptomology and changes in gene expression following pediatric concussion in a rodent model. The study demonstrated that paternal treatment prior to conception altered behavioral outcomes and molecular characterization of offspring. Offspring of AA fathers demonstrated abnormal behavioral performance when compared to offspring of control fathers. Similarly, paternal HFD altered pathophysiological outcomes for offspring, contributing to the heterogeneity in post-concussion syndrome. Additionally, this study provided insight into the mechanisms that mediate non-genetic paternal inheritance. Paternal treatment and the mTBI significantly influenced expression of a majority of the genes under examination in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, with changes being dependent upon sex and the brain region examined. These epigenetic changes may have contributed to the differences in offspring susceptibility to concussion. PMID:27365176

  3. English professional football players concussion knowledge and attitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua M. Williams; Jody L. Langdon; James L. McMillan; Thomas A. Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Background: Concussions are a common pathology in football and multiple misconceptions exist amongst the players and managers. To address these misconceptions, and potentially reduce concussion associated sequela, effective educational interventions need to be developed. However, the current knowledge and attitude status must be ascertained to appropriately develop these interventions. The purpose of this study was to assess the concussion knowledge and attitude of English professional footballers. Methods: Twenty-six participants from one English Football League Championship club completed the study. A mixed methods approach included the Rosenbaum Concussion Knowledge and Attitudes Survey (RoCKAS) and a semi-structured interview. The RoCKAS contains separate knowledge (0–25) and attitude (15–75) scores and was followed by a semi-structured interview consisting of concussion knowledge, attitude, and behavior related questions. Results: The mean score on the RoCKAS knowledge was 16.4 ± 2.9 (range 11–22) and the attitude score was 59.6 ± 8.5 (range 41–71). The interview responses identified inconsistencies between the RoCKAS and the intended behaviors, endorsing multiple concussion misconceptions, and revealed barriers to concussion reporting. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that Championship Level English footballers have moderate concussion knowledge, safe attitudes, and good concussion symptom recognition when assessed with pen and paper questionnaires. However, within the semi-structured interview many respondents reported unsafe concussion behaviors despite accurately identifying the potential risks. Further, multiple barriers to concussion reporting were identified which included perceived severity of the injury, game situations, and the substitution rule. These findings can help form the foundation of educational interventions to potentially improve concussion reporting behaviors amongst professional footballers.

  4. History of neuropsychological study of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, Frank M; Zimmer, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Although the medical literature has a long history of description and comment on concussion, the occurrence of concussion within the context of sports other than boxing was not judged to be problematic until the 1980s. Neuropsychological assessment played a critical and integral role in identifying the cognitive sequelae of concussion and mapping out the short- and long-term vagaries in recovery. This paper captures that history and expands upon current applications of neuropsychological assessment in the diagnosis and management of sport-related concussion.

  5. The history of neurosurgical treatment of sports concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James L; Patel, Vimal; Bailes, Julian E

    2014-10-01

    Concussion has a long and interesting history spanning at least the 5 millennia of written medical record and closely mirrors the development of surgery and neurosurgery. Not surprisingly, much of the past and present experimental head injury and concussion work has been performed within neurosurgically driven laboratories or by several surgically oriented neurologists. This historical review chronicles the key aspects of neurosurgical involvement in sports concussion as related to the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation, and prevention of injury using the example of American football. In addition, we briefly trace the developments that led to our current understanding of the biomechanical and neurophysiological basis of concussion.

  6. Concussions and Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment: An Adolescent Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Iris; Wolf, Kimberly; Rakowsky, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Concussions commonly occur in adolescents. Although the majority of adolescent patients' symptoms resolve, about 11% continue to experience symptoms at 3 months. Standard treatment options for prolonged symptoms are not available, and the role of osteopathic manipulative treatment in the management of adolescent concussions is unclear. The authors describe a case of a 16-year-old girl with a history of 3 head injuries who presented with concussion symptoms. After 6 weekly osteopathic manipulative treatment sessions, the patient was able to return to her normal activities. Further research on the role of osteopathic manipulative treatment to manage concussions is needed.

  7. The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Sports Concussion Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Andrew; McGrew, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable research conducted in regard to the prevention and treatment of concussions. Numerous supplements and vitamins are being used throughout the country to help patients recover from concussions; however, to date, there are no completed human-based studies specifically examining supplement and vitamin use for the treatment or prevention of concussions. This article examines the most current evidence regarding supplements and vitamins for the treatment and prevention of concussions. The supplements and vitamins reviewed include omega-3 fatty acids, curcumin, resveratrol, melatonin, creatine, and Scutellaria baicalensis.

  8. The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Sports Concussion Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Andrew; McGrew, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable research conducted in regard to the prevention and treatment of concussions. Numerous supplements and vitamins are being used throughout the country to help patients recover from concussions; however, to date, there are no completed human-based studies specifically examining supplement and vitamin use for the treatment or prevention of concussions. This article examines the most current evidence regarding supplements and vitamins for the treatment and prevention of concussions. The supplements and vitamins reviewed include omega-3 fatty acids, curcumin, resveratrol, melatonin, creatine, and Scutellaria baicalensis. PMID:26745164

  9. Engaging Teammates in the Promotion of Concussion Help Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice R; Baugh, Christine M; Calzo, Jerel P

    2016-08-01

    Concussion underreporting contributes to the substantial public health burden of concussions from sport. Teammates may be able to play an important role in encouraging injury identification and help seeking. This study assessed whether there was an association between beliefs about the consequences of continued play with a concussion and intentions to engage as a proactive bystander in facilitating or encouraging teammate help seeking for a possible concussion. Participants were 328 (male and female) members of 19 U.S. collegiate contact or collision sports teams. Athletes who believed that there were negative health or performance consequences of continued play with a concussion were significantly more likely than their peers to intend to encourage teammate help seeking, but not more likely to alert a coach or medical personnel. Additionally, athletes who believed that their teammates were more supportive of concussion safety were more likely to intend to engage as proactive bystanders in encouraging teammate help seeking. Exploring how to encourage bystander promotion of concussion safety is an important direction for future programming and evaluation research and may provide an opportunity to improve the effectiveness of concussion education. PMID:27405801

  10. Sideline concussion testing in high school football on Guam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Duenas

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The feasibility of SCT use in Guam high school football was established and our pilot study identified areas for improvement. Established definitions of concussion and RTP guidelines were lacking. Therefore, an opportunity exists through public health efforts that involve the entire community to increase concussion awareness and reduce injuries in high school sports on Guam.

  11. Concussions--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Anne L.; Wyckoff, Leah J.

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention…

  12. Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions.

  13. Educating Coaches about Concussion in Sports: Evaluation of the CDC's "Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports" Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Elbin, R. J.; Sarmiento, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concussions remain a serious public health concern. It is important that persons involved in youth sports, particularly coaches, be made aware and educated on the signs and symptoms of concussion. This study assessed the perceptions of youth sport coaches who have received the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's…

  14. Pathophysiology of repetitive head injury in sports. Prevention against catastrophic brain damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common head injury in sports is concussion and experiencing multiple concussions in a short period of time sometimes can cause severe brain damage. In this paper, we investigate severe brain damage due to repeated head injury in sports and discuss the pathophysiology of repeated sports injury. The majority of these severe cases are usually male adolescents or young adults that suffer a second head injury before they have recovered from the first head injury. All cases that could be confirmed by brain CT scan after the second injury revealed brain swelling associated with a thin subdural hematoma. We suggested that the existence of subdural hematoma is one of the major causes of brain swelling after repeated head injury in sports. Since repeated concussions occurring within a short period may have a risk for severe brain damage, the diagnosis for initial cerebral concussion should be done appropriately. To prevent catastrophic brain damage, the player who suffered from concussion should not engage in any sports before recovery. The american Academy of Neurology and Colorado Medical Society set a guideline to return to play after cerebral concussion. An international conference on concussion in sports was held at Prague in 2004. The summary and agreement of this meeting was published and the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) was introduced to treat sports-related concussion. In addition, a number of computerized cognitive assessment tests and test batteries have been developed to allow athletes to return to play. It is important that coaches, as well as players and trainers, understand the medical issues involved in concussion. (author)

  15. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflicted traumatic brain injury (ITBI), is a leading cause of child maltreatment deaths in the United States. Meeting the ... Awareness Additional Prevention Resources Childhood Injuries Concussion in Children and Teens Injuries from Violence Injuries from Motor Vehicle Crashes Teen Driver Safety ...

  16. Can helmet design reduce the risk of concussion in football?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Greenwald, Richard M; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Mihalik, Jason P; Crisco, Joseph J; Wilcox, Bethany J; McAllister, Thomas W; Maerlender, Arthur C; Broglio, Steven P; Schnebel, Brock; Anderson, Scott; Brolinson, P Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    Of all sports, football accounts for the highest incidence of concussion in the US due to the large number of athletes participating and the nature of the sport. While there is general agreement that concussion incidence can be reduced through rule changes and teaching proper tackling technique, there remains debate as to whether helmet design may also reduce the incidence of concussion. A retrospective analysis was performed of head impact data collected from 1833 collegiate football players who were instrumented with helmet-mounted accelerometer arrays for games and practices. Data were collected between 2005 and 2010 from 8 collegiate football teams: Virginia Tech, University of North Carolina, University of Oklahoma, Dartmouth College, Brown University, University of Minnesota, Indiana University, and University of Illinois. Concussion rates were compared between players wearing Riddell VSR4 and Riddell Revolution helmets while controlling for the head impact exposure of each player. A total of 1,281,444 head impacts were recorded, from which 64 concussions were diagnosed. The relative risk of sustaining a concussion in a Revolution helmet compared with a VSR4 helmet was 46.1% (95% CI 28.1%-75.8%). When controlling for each player's exposure to head impact, a significant difference was found between concussion rates for players in VSR4 and Revolution helmets (χ(2) = 4.68, p = 0.0305). This study illustrates that differences in the ability to reduce concussion risk exist between helmet models in football. Although helmet design may never prevent all concussions from occurring in football, evidence illustrates that it can reduce the incidence of this injury.

  17. Concussion Knowledge and Behaviors in a Sample of the Dance Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lauren; Liederbach, Marijeanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in their concussion knowledge, athletes still demonstrate risky concussion behaviors (e.g., playing while concussed or not reporting a concussion). Little has been published about dancers' concussion knowledge and behaviors, but research in dance contending with questions about injury in general has found that dancers often avoid physician consults and ignore the signs of injury. In the present study, an IRB approved anonymous online survey, it was hypothesized that dancers would demonstrate concussion knowledge deficits, fail to report concussions, and have difficulty adhering to management guidelines. In addition, it was hypothesized that dancers in companies or schools with an onsite health care practitioner present would demonstrate improved concussion knowledge and safer concussion behaviors compared with those that do not have onsite health care. Concussion knowledge and behavior questions were modified for a dance sample based on validated sports-specific tools developed by other investigators. One hundred fifty-three subjects were recruited to complete the survey from an urban orthopaedic clinic specializing in dance medicine and via Facebook, email, and newsletter announcements. Dancers in this sample had good foundational knowledge of concussion; however, this knowledge did not correlate with safe, self-reported concussion care behaviors. Future research should focus on determination of dance-specific barriers to practicing safe behaviors and seeking care for concussive injury, as well as further identifying dance concussion epidemiology and outcomes. PMID:27245947

  18. Heads Up! Play it Safe When it Comes to Concussions

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-05-21

    As many as 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related concussions are estimated to occur in the United States each year. This podcast is a radio interview with CDC's Dr. Julie Gilchrist on the newly available “Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports" tool kit, which was developed to provide information to coaches, parents, and athletes involved in youth sports on preventing, recognizing, and responding to a concussion.  Created: 5/21/2007 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Injury Response.   Date Released: 10/31/2007.

  19. Concussion Tied to More School Problems Than Other Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Concussion Tied to More School Problems Than Other Sports Injuries Study suggests need for 'return-to-learn' ... more school difficulties than their peers with other sports-related injuries, a new study suggests. Researchers found ...

  20. Evidence-based management of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Concussion is not only one of the most common injuries encountered by athletes participating in contact and collision sports, but also among the most complex injuries to manage in a sports medicine setting. Over the past two decades, we have made great progress in advancing the basic and clinical science of concussion. These advances have had enormous clinical translational value for developing evidence-based guidelines for management of concussion in sports. Applied clinical research has clarified the defining characteristics of sport-related concussion (SRC) that support new diagnostic criteria. At the same time, major advancements have been realized in the development and validation of clinical tools that allow a more objective and accurate assessment of concussion and performance-based measures of recovery. These tools provide clinicians with a more informed basis for determining an athlete's cognitive and physical fitness to return to competition after concussion. Standardized injury management protocols that systematically prescribe rest, graded activity, and return to play have been adopted in nearly all clinical settings. Herein, we briefly summarize the findings and recommendations from several national and international consensus guidelines and position statements on best practice in the evaluation and management of SRC. PMID:24923397

  1. The effects of explanatory style on concussion outcomes in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapcott, Erin J B; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Loughead, Todd M; Delaney, J Scott

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with an optimistic explanatory style have generally been linked with improved mental and physical health across a variety of chronic and serious conditions. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of explanatory style on recovery time and number of sport-related concussions suffered in the last 12 months. University varsity athletes (n=170) suffering from at least one concussion over the last 12 months from six contact or collision team sports completed both the Attributional Style Questionnaire and the Sport History Questionnaire. The results indicated that athletes with an optimistic explanatory style took longer to recover than athletes with a pessimistic or average explanatory style. More specifically, optimistic athletes who suffered a complex concussion (requiring more than 7 days to recover) took significantly longer to return to play. However, the results showed that explanatory style did not influence whether an athlete suffered subsequent concussions. Overall, the current results can be used to better understand the psychology of concussions, as well as concussion prevention efforts and management strategies. PMID:17917166

  2. Factors Influencing the Risk and Recovery from Sport-Related Concussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.J.Elbin; Tracey Covassin

    2011-01-01

    @@ Sport-related concussion remains a hot topic in the field of sport medicine as recent estimates indicate approximately 1.6 to 3 million concussions occur in sport and recreation every year in the United States[1].

  3. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Hale, Andrew T; Zalneraitis, Brian H; Zuckerman, Scott L; Sills, Allen K; Solomon, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Over the last 2 decades, sport-related concussion (SRC) has garnered significant attention. Even with increased awareness and athlete education, sideline recognition and real-time diagnosis remain crucial. The need for an objective and standardized assessment of concussion led to the eventual development of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) during the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport in 2004, which is now in its third iteration (SCAT3). In an effort to update our understanding of the most well-known sideline concussion assessment, the authors conducted a systematic review of the SCAT and the evidence supporting its use to date. METHODS English-language titles and abstracts published between 1995 and October 2015 were searched systematically across 4 electronic databases and a review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines adapted for the review of a heterogeneous collection of study designs. Peer-reviewed journal articles were included if they reported quantitative data on any iteration of the SCAT, Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC), or modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS) data at baseline or following concussion in an exclusively athlete population with any portion older than 13 years of age. Studies that included nonathletes, only children less than 13 years old, exclusively BESS data, exclusively symptom scale data, or a non-SCAT-related assessment were excluded. RESULTS The database search process yielded 549 abstracts, and 105 full-text articles were reviewed with 36 meeting criteria for inclusion. Nineteen studies were associated with the SAC, 1 was associated with the mBESS exclusively, and 16 studies were associated with a full iteration of the SCAT. The majority of these studies (56%) were prospective cohort studies. Male football players were the most common athletes studied. An analysis of the studies focused on

  4. Rugby headgear and concussion prevention: misconceptions could increase aggressive play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Richard; Menger, Austin; Nanda, Anil

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Multiple studies have illustrated that rugby headgear offers no statistically significant protection against concussions. However, there remains concern that many players believe rugby headgear in fact does prevent concussions. Further investigation was undertaken to illustrate that misconceptions about concussion prevention and rugby headgear may lead to an increase in aggressive play. METHODS Data were constructed by Internet survey solicitation among United States collegiate rugby players across 19 teams. Initial information given was related to club, age, experience, use of headgear, playing time, whether the rugger played football or wrestling in high school, and whether the player believed headgear prevented concussion. Data were then constructed as to whether wearing headgear would increase aggressive playing style secondary to a false sense of protection. RESULTS A total of 122 players responded. All players were male. The average player was 19.5 years old and had 2.7 years of experience. Twenty-three of 122 players (18.9%) wore protective headgear; 55.4% of players listed forward as their primary position. Overall, 45.8% (55/120) of players played 70-80 minutes per game, 44.6% (54/121) played football or wrestled in high school, 38.1% (45/118) believed headgear prevented concussions, and 42.2% (51/121) stated that if they were using headgear they would be more aggressive with their play in terms of running or tackling. Regression analysis illustrated that those who believed headgear prevented concussions were or would be more likely to engage in aggressive play (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Nearly 40% of collegiate rugby players surveyed believed headgear helped to prevent concussions despite no scientific evidence that it does. This misconception about rugby headgear could increase aggressive play. Those who believed headgear prevented concussion were, on average, 4 times more likely to play with increased aggressive form than those who believed

  5. Concussion Management in Community College Athletics: Revealing and Understanding the Gap between Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Nancy Resendes; Porter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The seriousness of concussions in athletics is only recently becoming fully understood and appreciated. There are significant implications for the concussed student-athlete both in returning to the playing field and the classroom. Although practices are now in place to improve identification and management of concussions in professional sports,…

  6. Influence of the severity and location of bodily injuries on post-concussive and combat stress symptom reporting after military-related concurrent mild traumatic brain injuries and polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Louis M; Lange, Rael T; Marshall, Kathryn; Prokhorenko, Olga; Brickell, Tracey A; Bailie, Jason M; Asmussen, Sarah B; Ivins, Brian; Cooper, Douglas B; Kennedy, Jan E

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) sustained in combat frequently co-occur with significant bodily injuries. Intuitively, more extensive bodily injuries might be associated with increased symptom reporting. In 2012, however, French et al. demonstrated an inverse relation between bodily injury severity and symptom reporting. This study expands on that work by examining the influence of location and severity of bodily injuries on symptom reporting after mild TBI. Participants were 579 US military service members who sustained an uncomplicated mild TBI with concurrent bodily injuries and who were evaluated at two military medical centers. Bodily injury severity was quantified using a modified Injury Severity Score (ISSmod). Participants completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-C), on average, 2.5 months post-injury. There was a significant negative association between ISSmod scores and NSI (r=-0.267, p<0.001) and PCL-C (r=-0.273, p<0.001) total scores. Using linear regression to examine the relation between symptom reporting and injury severity across the six ISS body regions, three body regions were significant predictors of the NSI total score (face; p<0.001; abdomen; p=0.003; extremities; p<0.001) and accounted for 9.3% of the variance (p<0.001). For the PCL-C, two body regions were significant predictors of the PCL-C total score (face; p<0.001; extremities; p<0.001) and accounted for 10.5% of the variance. There was an inverse relation between bodily injury severity and symptom reporting in this sample. Hypothesized explanations include underreporting of symptoms, increased peer support, disruption of fear conditioning because of acute morphine use, or delayed expression of symptoms.

  7. Developing a data repository of standard concussion assessment clinical data for research involving college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerlender, Arthur; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Honaker, Julie A

    2016-11-01

    In sports concussion research, obtaining quality data from a sufficient number of participants to reach statistical power has been a particular problem. In addition, the necessary requirements of accessibility, informed consent, and confidentiality must be met. There is need to develop more efficient and controlled methods for collecting data to answer research questions in this realm, but the ability to collect and store these data in an efficient manner at the local level is limited. By virtue of their training, neuropsychologists can play a key role in improving data collection quality. The purpose of this paper is to describe a data repository that has been developed in the context of a university sports medicine concussion management program that includes baseline and postinjury data from student athletes. Diagnostic information, basic health information, current symptoms, neuropsychological test data, balance and vestibular data, and visual processing data are currently included in the standard of care for athletes; however, the process described need not be limited to these types of data. While a national traumatic brain injury (TBI) data repository has been developed by the National Institute of Health (NIH), local repositories have not yet become common. Thus, the description of this project is of value at the local level in the United States and internationally. PMID:27396292

  8. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  9. Management of Sport-Related Concussion in the Pediatric and Adolescent Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provance, Aaron J; Engelman, Glenn H; Terhune, E Bailey; Coel, Rachel A

    2016-01-01

    Concussions make up nearly 10% of all high school athletic injuries. Recent changes in concussion management guidelines and legislation aim to make concussion care more standardized and safe but simultaneously pose a challenge for the primary care and sports medicine physician. Pediatric and adolescent concussions may cause anxiety for the treating physician due to concerns over return-to-play decisions, academic issues, and the potential for second impact syndrome. Determining when to refer a patient to an emergency department acutely, to an outpatient concussion clinic, or to other subspecialists may be a difficult decision for the primary care physician. The aim of this article is to review current evidence regarding concussion treatment and return-to-school and return-to-play recommendations to provide the primary care and sports medicine physician with practical guidelines for managing concussions.

  10. CHOA concussion consensus: establishing a uniform policy for academic accommodations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoli, David Michael; Burns, Thomas G; Meehan, William P; Reisner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Concussion research generally centers on physical challenges, though aspects such as social functioning and returning to school also warrant attention in pediatric populations. Restoring academic performance postconcussion remains a challenge. Here we provide recommendations addressing a uniform policy for pediatric concussion patients in academic institutions. Tools that may minimize difficulty with academic re-entry include independent educational evaluations, individualized educational programs (IEPs), student support teams (SSTs), letters of academic accommodation, time off, and 504 Plans. Recognition and treatment is crucial for symptom relief and prevention of functional disruption, as is specialist referral during the acute window. We recommend early intervention with a letter of academic accommodation and SST and suggest that 504 Plans and IEPs be reserved for protracted or medically complicated cases. Students with concussion should be observed for anxiety and depression because these symptoms can lead to prolonged recovery, decreased quality of life, and other social challenges. PMID:23960266

  11. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... You will need a score of 80% or higher to pass. Please review the lessons and then ... Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma ...

  12. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation American College of Sports Medicine American Medical Society for Sports Medicine American School Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma ...

  13. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma ... School Principals National Council for Youth Sports National Education Association National Education Association Health Information Network National ...

  14. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Research and Policy, the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital Children's National Medical Center Defense and Veterans Brain Injury ... Association Health Resources and Services Administration, EMS for Children Health Resources Services Administration, Traumatic Brain Injury Program ...

  15. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma Foundation Center for Injury Research and Policy, the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's ...

  16. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... and then take the athlete for a medical examination. C Remove the athlete from play and look ... Health Association American School Health Association American Sports Education Program Brain Injury Association of America Brain Trauma ...

  17. Subjective, but not objective, lingering effects of multiple past concussions in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Brian L; McKay, Carly D; Mrazik, Martin; Barlow, Karen M; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Emery, Carolyn A

    2013-09-01

    The existing literature on lingering effects from concussions in children and adolescents is limited and mixed, and there are no clear answers for patients, clinicians, researchers, or policy makers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are lingering effects of past concussions in adolescent athletes. Participants in this study included 643 competitive Bantam and Midget hockey players (most elite 20% by division of play) between 13 and 17 years of age (mean age=15.5, SD=1.2). Concussion history at baseline assessment was retrospectively documented using a pre-season questionnaire (PSQ), which was completed at home by parents and players in advance of baseline testing. Players with English as a second language, self-reported attention or learning disorders, a concussion within 6 months of baseline, or suspected invalid test profiles were excluded from these analyses. Demographically adjusted standard scores for the five composites/domains and raw symptom ratings from the brief Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) computerized battery were analyzed. Adolescent athletes with one or two or more prior concussions did not have significantly worse neurocognitive functioning on ImPACT than did those with no previous concussions. There were significantly more symptoms reported in those with two or more prior concussions than in those with no or one prior concussion. Adolescents with multiple previous concussions had higher levels of baseline symptoms, but there were not group differences in neurocognitive functioning using this brief computerized battery. PMID:23560947

  18. Vision training methods for sports concussion mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph F; Colosimo, Angelo; Ellis, James K; Mangine, Robert; Bixenmann, Benjamin; Hasselfeld, Kimberly; Graman, Patricia; Elgendy, Hagar; Myer, Gregory; Divine, Jon

    2015-05-05

    There is emerging evidence supporting the use vision training, including light board training tools, as a concussion baseline and neuro-diagnostic tool and potentially as a supportive component to concussion prevention strategies. This paper is focused on providing detailed methods for select vision training tools and reporting normative data for comparison when vision training is a part of a sports management program. The overall program includes standard vision training methods including tachistoscope, Brock's string, and strobe glasses, as well as specialized light board training algorithms. Stereopsis is measured as a means to monitor vision training affects. In addition, quantitative results for vision training methods as well as baseline and post-testing *A and Reaction Test measures with progressive scores are reported. Collegiate athletes consistently improve after six weeks of training in their stereopsis, *A and Reaction Test scores. When vision training is initiated as a team wide exercise, the incidence of concussion decreases in players who participate in training compared to players who do not receive the vision training. Vision training produces functional and performance changes that, when monitored, can be used to assess the success of the vision training and can be initiated as part of a sports medical intervention for concussion prevention.

  19. Court Decisions Specific to Public School Responses to Student Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an up-to-date and comprehensive canvassing of the judicial case law concerning the responses to students with concussions in the public school context. The two categories of court decisions are (a) those concerning continued participation in interscholastic athletics, referred to under the rubric of "return to play"…

  20. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  1. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Center Emergency Nurses Association Health Resources and Services Administration, EMS for Children Health Resources Services Administration, Traumatic Brain Injury Program Massachusetts Department of ...

  2. The persistent influence of pediatric concussion on attention and cognitive control during flanker performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert D; Pindus, Dominika M; Drolette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Raine, Lauren B; Hillman, Charles H

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of concussion history on children's neurocognitive processing. Thirty-two children ages 8-10 years (16 with a concussion history, 16 controls) completed compatible and incompatible conditions of a flanker task while behavioral and neuroelectric data were collected. Relative to controls, children with a concussion history exhibited alterations in the sequential congruency effect, committed more omission errors, and exhibited decreased post-error accuracy. Children with a concussion history exhibited longer N2 latency across task conditions, increased N2 amplitude during the incompatible condition of the task, and decreased P3b amplitude across task conditions. Children with a history of concussion also exhibited decreased ERN and Pe amplitudes, with group difference increasing for the incompatible condition of the task. The current results indicate that pediatric concussion may lead to subtle, but pervasive deficits in attention and cognitive control. These results serve to inform a poorly understood but significant public health concern. PMID:25951782

  3. Emerging data on the incidence of concussion in football practice at all levels of amateur play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    There has been increasing concern, particularly in the US, about potential long-term neurological deterioration syndromes seen in the US football players. Recurrent concussions are a potential area of concern. The authors of this paper have used data bases from three levels of amateur US football to identify the rate and risk of concussion injury in both football games and practice at the youth, high school, and college levels. This information is very important initial data around concussion rates at these levels.

  4. Concussion Education in U.S. Collegiate Sport: What Is Happening and What Do Athletes Want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Baugh, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Concussion education for athletes has the potential to play a role in reducing the health burden of concussions from sport by modifying individual risk-related behaviors. In U.S. collegiate sport, decisions about content and delivery of concussion education are left up to the individual institution. This may result in a high degree of variability in what educational materials athletes receive and is particularly problematic as few concussion education programs have demonstrated efficacy. Health educators can play an important role in working collaboratively with sports medicine clinicians to design and evaluate evidence-based concussion education materials for athletes that meet their learning needs. As a first step in this process, the present study characterizes the content, source, and delivery modalities of concussion currently being provided to U.S. collegiate athletes. It also describes the reported concussion education preferences of a sample of U.S. collegiate athletes. Participants were 789 athletic trainers from 276 schools and 325 athletes from four schools. Results indicated that education is most frequently provided by athletic trainers but that many athletes would also like coaches and physicians to be involved in this process. Athletes also indicated a preference for content provision across a range of topics, including athletic and academic consequences of continued play with a concussion. Implications for the design and delivery of concussion education for athletes are discussed. PMID:26293460

  5. NASN position statement: Concussions--the role of the school nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Anne L; Wyckoff, Leah J

    2013-03-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention education to parents, students, and staff; identify suspected concussions; and help guide the student's post-concussion graduated academic and activity re-entry process. The school nurse collaborates with the team of stakeholders including health care providers, school staff, athletic trainers, and parents.

  6. Changes in the neurochemistry of athletes with repetitive brain trauma: preliminary results using localized correlated spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Alexander P.; Ramadan, Saadallah; Stern, Robert A.; Box, Hayden C; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Ross, Brian D.; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The goal was to identify which neurochemicals differ in professional athletes with repetitive brain trauma (RBT) when compared to healthy controls using a relatively new technology, in vivo Localized COrrelated SpectroscopY (L-COSY). Methods: To achieve this, L-COSY was used to examine five former professional male athletes with 11 to 28 years of exposure to contact sports. Each athlete who had had multiple symptomatic concussions and repetitive sub concussive trauma during thei...

  7. FDG-PET imaging in mild traumatic brain injury: A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Colin Wilson; Fiona Brabazon; Jennifer Jurgens; Oakes, Terrence R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects an estimated 1.7 million people in the United States and is a contributing factor to one third of all injury related deaths annually. According to the CDC, approximately 75% of all reported TBIs are concussions or considered mild in form, although the number of unreported mild TBIs and patients not seeking medical attention is unknown. Currently, classification of mild TBI (mTBI) or concussion is a clinical assessment since diagnostic imaging is typically ...

  8. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... right? A Immediately rush an athlete to the hospital–even if none of the Danger Signs are ... and Policy, the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital Children's National Medical Center Defense and Veterans Brain ...

  9. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More about the Brain and How it Works Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational ... Associations) Listen to a Radio PSA Coach and Team [Audio: 0:30 seconds] Mom and Daughter [Audio: ...

  10. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Administrators Association National Program for Playground Safety National Recreation and Park Association North American Brain Injury Society ... Society of State Directors of Health, Physical Education & Recreation Sports Legacy Institute University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, ...

  11. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Professionals Learn More about the Brain and How it Works Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” ... Enter your full name as you'd like it to appear on your completion certificate. Name: Submit

  12. Treatment of Concussion in High School Athletes: A Proposed Protocol for Athletic and Academic Return to Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Heyworth, Benton E.; Carroll, Kaitlin M.; Rizza, Andrew J.; McInnis, Kelly C.; Gill, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Growing evidence suggests that there may be significant long term sequellae of cumulative concussions, which may include prolonged cognitive deficits and physical symptoms. There are a growing number of concussions each year in high school athletes that occur during sports. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of cerebral concussions on athletes to gain a deeper understanding of sports related cerebral concussions that will ultimately lead to development of bet...

  13. The effects of performing the YMCA Bike protocol on general brain function in athletes with and without mild traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Michael

    Research into concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has increased significantly within the past decade. In the literature some researchers are reporting 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occurring in sports (Langlois, 2006), mTBI accounts for 80% of all reported traumatic brain injuries (Ruff, 2011). With these alarming statistics and an increasing number of athletes suffering a concussion there has been an increased emphasis for sports medicine practitioners to properly diagnose and treat those recovering from brain injury so that they may return safely to school, sports or work. Current clinical tools available to practitioners give them the ability to assess functional recovery in clinical measures of personality change; patient self reported symptom scales; functional cognitive domains (computer based neuropsychological batteries) and clinical balance measures. These current methods of clinical measurement, diagnosis and return to play protocols have remained largely unchanged for the past 20 years. In addition, there is some controversy into the application of these clinical measures within repeated measure testing as improvement does not necessarily reflect post-traumatic recovery but may instead reflect practice or "ceiling effects" of measurement. Therefore, diagnostic platforms that measure structural physiologic recovery must be implemented to assist the clinician in the 'Return to Play' process for athletic participation. In this study quantitative EEG (qEEG) analysis using a 128-lead dense array system during the first aerobic challenge in a 'Return to Play' protocol was performed. Subjects recovering from concussion and normal volunteers with no history of concussion were included and their neuroelectric activity recorded before, during, after and 24 hours post light aerobic exercise on a stationary bike. Subjects recovering from concussion demonstrated altered spectral absolute power across relevant regions of interest in the frontal, central

  14. Knowledge of Concussions by High School Coaches in a Rural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroyer, Josh; Stewart, Craig

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and opinions on concussions of high school coaches from a geographically large yet rural state in the northern Rocky Mountains of the United States. Few medical issues in sport are more important, or have had as much publicity recently, as concussions. The exposure gleaned from tragic health…

  15. Prevalence of and Attitudes about Concussion in Irish Schools' Rugby Union Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunty, Sinéad E.; Delahunt, Eamonn; Condon, Brian; Toomey, David; Blake, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Youth rugby players represent 45.2% (N?=?69,472) of the Irish rugby union playing population. The risk and consequences of concussion injury are of particular concern in these young athletes, but limited epidemiological data exists. This study investigated annual and lifetime prevalence of concussion in an Irish schoolboy rugby union…

  16. Concussion and the Student-Athlete: Considerations for the Secondary School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Andrea; Ploeg, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The number of high school students who participate in athletics has increased over the past decade. There has also been an increased emphasis placed on athletic involvement and physical strength and ability. This has led to increased awareness of athletic injuries such as concussions. While concussions are not a new injury, the medical community…

  17. Sideline assessment tools for the evaluation of concussion in athletes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, David O; Tempel, Zachary J; Maroon, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Sports-related concussions, which have become more prevalent in the past decade, are an extremely common phenomenon in organized athletics and create a substantial economic burden on the health care system. Furthermore, they can have devastating impacts on the athletic careers and long-term health of athletes. However, concussion evaluation remains a controversy with respect to diagnosis, management, and return-to-play guidelines for sports-related concussions. This is especially true of the immediate evaluation of sports-related concussion on the sidelines, where decisions must be made quickly and effectively with limited diagnostic resources. Considerable effort has been directed toward developing reliable and valid sidelines assessment modalities for concussion evaluation with a goal of accurately determining whether an athlete requires rapid removal from or is able to return to competition. This paper discusses the role of the concussion specialist on the sidelines during athletic competition and examines the current tools and resources available for the sidelines assessment of concussion. Additionally, new technologies, including electronic applications for Smartphones and tablets, as well as future directions in sidelines assessment of concussion are examined.

  18. Establishing a clinical service for the management of sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Erin; Collins, Michael W; Mucha, Anne; Troutman-Ensecki, Cara

    2014-10-01

    The clinical management of sports-related concussions is a specialized area of interest with a lack of empirical findings regarding best practice approaches. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Concussion Program was the first of its kind; 13 years after its inception, it remains a leader in the clinical management and research of sports-related concussions. This article outlines the essential components of a successful clinical service for the management of sports-related concussions, using the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Concussion Program as a case example. Drawing on both empirical evidence and anecdotal conclusions from this high-volume clinical practice, this article provides a detailed account of the inner workings of a multidisciplinary concussion clinic with a comprehensive approach to the management of sports-related concussions. A detailed description of the evaluation process and an in-depth analysis of targeted clinical pathways and subtypes of sports-related concussions effectively set the stage for a comprehensive understanding of the assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation model used in Pittsburgh today.

  19. Pilot Randomized Evaluation of Publically Available Concussion Education Materials: Evidence of a Possible Negative Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Baugh, Christine M.; Hawrilenko, Matt; Daneshvar, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Many states and sports leagues are instituting concussion policies aimed at reducing risk of morbidity and mortality; many include mandates about the provision of concussion education to youth athletes. However, there is limited evidence if educational materials provided under these typically vague mandates are in fact effective in changing…

  20. Improving the Memory Sections of the Standardized Assessment of Concussion Using Item Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Danielle; Kang, Minsoo; Starkey, Chad; Ragan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to improve the immediate and delayed memory sections of the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC) by identifying a list of more psychometrically sound items (words). A total of 200 participants with no history of concussion in the previous six months (aged 19.60 ± 2.20 years; N?=?93 men, N?=?107 women)…

  1. Repeated concussion among U.S. military personnel during Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. MacGregor, PhD, MPH

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Concussions are a predominant injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The aims of this study were to describe repeated concussive events among U.S. military personnel injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and examine subsequent healthcare utilization. We reviewed clinical records from the Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database to identify servicemembers with repeat concussions. We abstracted demographic and injury-specific variables, calculated time between events, and identified healthcare utilization from electronic medical databases. Overall, 113 personnel experienced more than one concussion between 2004 and 2008. A majority of these incidents were blast related. The median time between events was 40 days, with 20% experiencing a second event within 2 weeks of the first and 87% within 3 months. Time between events was not associated with severity of the second event. Greater severity of the second concussive event was associated with higher postinjury utilization of mental health and neurology services. This study is one of the first to describe repeated concussions in a combat setting. We found that repeated concussions occur within a short interval among deployed personnel, although the effects of the first event are unclear. Further research is needed to define the effect of repeated concussions on the health of combat veterans.

  2. Return to Play Guidelines Cannot Solve the Football-Related Concussion Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. Syd M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High school football players are the single largest cohort of athletes playing tackle football, and account for the majority of sport-related concussions. Return to play guidelines (RTPs) have emerged as the preferred approach for addressing the problem of sport-related concussion in youth athletes. Methods: This article reviews…

  3. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... parents “Heads Up” for high school coaches, athletic directors, athletic trainers, and parents “Heads Up” for school ... Alliance Sarah Jane Brain Foundation Society of State Directors of Health, Physical Education & Recreation Sports Legacy Institute ...

  4. A heads up on concussions: are there sex-related differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Emily M; Luo, Xuan; Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2016-01-01

    Head injuries are a major concern for physicians in athletes of all ages. Specifically, sports-related concussions are becoming an all-too-common injury among female athletes. The incidence of concussions among female athletes has likely increased over the past few decades because of an increase in sports participation afforded by Title IX. It would be useful for physicians to have general knowledge of concussions and their potential sex-related differences. This review article summarizes the current body of research concerning sex-related differences in concussion epidemiology and outcomes. A literature search was performed using PubMed and included all articles published from 1993 to present, with a predominant focus on research conducted over the past fifteen years. Additional articles were found using the bibliography from articles found through the PubMed search. Several articles have compared incidence, severity of neurological deficit, constellation of symptoms, and length of recovery post-concussion in males and females. However, the literature does not unanimously support a significant sex-related difference in concussions. Lack of consensus in the literature can be attributed to differences between patient populations, different tools used to study concussions, including subjective or objective measures, and differences in mechanisms of injury. We conclude that concussions are a serious injury in both male and female athletes, and physicians should have a very high index of suspicion regardless of sex, because there currently is not sufficient consensus in the literature to institute sex-related changes to concussion management. Current research may suggest a sex-related difference pertaining to sports-related concussions, but further evaluation is needed on this topic. PMID:26781686

  5. Youth Concussion Laws across the Nation: Implications for the Traveling Team Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lauren M; Mitchell, Cory N

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 1.6 to 3.8 million sports and recreation-related concussions annually in the United States, with an average annual increase in incidence of 15.5% from 1998 to 2007. From 2009 to 2014, all 50 states enacted youth concussion legislation. This study clarifies core elements common to state concussion legislation and State Interscholastic Athletic Association (SIAA) implementation. A concussion literature, legislative, and SIAA concussion bylaw review was performed for all 50 U.S. states. Mandated concussion education varies in the frequency of certification and method of education. Student athletes and their parents/guardians in a majority of states are required to sign annual educational information sheets. Forty-nine states specifically mandate removal from play. Return-to-play protocols vary with regard to the timeline, content, and health care professional that can provide written clearance. In conclusion, it is important for sports medicine clinicians to stay abreast of current and revised concussion legislation in the jurisdictions in which they provide care. PMID:27172079

  6. Depression as a Modifying Factor in Sport-Related Concussion: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary S; Kuhn, Andrew W; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    Since its third iteration in 2008, the international Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) has delineated several 'modifying factors' that have the potential to influence the management of sport-related concussions (SRC). One of these factors is co- and pre-morbidities, which includes migraines, mental health disorders, attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), learning disability, and sleep disorders. Mental health disorders, and in particular, depression, have received some attention in the management of SRC and in this review we summarize the empirical evidence for its inclusion as a modifying factor. This review is divided into three main bodies of findings: (1) the incidence and prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in non-concussed and concussed athletes, with comparison made to the general population; (2) managing the post-concussion athlete and accounting for premorbid depressive symptoms; and (3) depression as a long-term effect of repetitive head trauma. Overall, it has been reported that certain subpopulations of athletes have similar or even higher rates of depressive symptoms when compared to the general population. The challenge of accounting for these baseline-depressive symptoms while managing the post-concussive athlete is stressed. And lastly, the prevalence of depression and its relationship to concussion in later-life is discussed.

  7. Cardiac concussion: definition, differential diagnosis, and cases presentation and the legal ramification of a misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Steven A; Shakir, Abdulrezak; Ladham, Shaun; Rozin, Leon; Omalu, Bennet; Dominick, Joe; Wecht, Cyril H

    2004-09-01

    A cardiac concussion is caused by a sudden, nonpenetrating, localized impact to the chest that is theorized to result in almost simultaneous sudden death from a disruption to the conductive system. The detailed external/internal forensic examination of the body reveals no evidence of structural, pathologic, or histologic signs of trauma to the heart. A cardiac concussion is a rare and often overlooked cause of sudden death. This type of sudden death is typically seen among younger individuals participating in sports involving projectiles and, to a lesser degree, where collisions occur. Cardiac concussions are clinically, pathologically, and chemically different from a cardiac contusion. The objective of this paper will be to define cardiac concussion, differentiate between cardiac concussion and cardiac contusion, and describe the clinical and pathologic features of a 32-year-old white male who died of a cardiac concussion following a collision with a catcher during a softball game. The civil ramification of incorrectly diagnosing the manner of death in cases of death involving a cardiac concussion will also be addressed. PMID:15322461

  8. Dazed and confused: sports medicine, conflicts of interest, and concussion management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Brad

    2014-03-01

    Professional sports with high rates of concussion have become increasingly concerned about the long-term effects of multiple head injuries. In this context, return-to-play decisions about concussion generate considerable ethical tensions for sports physicians. Team doctors clearly have an obligation to the welfare of their patient (the injured athlete) but they also have an obligation to their employer (the team), whose primary interest is typically success through winning. At times, a team's interest in winning may not accord with the welfare of an injured player, particularly when it comes to decisions about returning to play after injury. Australia's two most popular professional football codes-rugby league and Australian Rules football-have adopted guidelines that prohibit concussed players from continuing to play on the same day. I suggest that conflicts of interest between doctors, patients, and teams may present a substantial obstacle to the proper adherence of concussion guidelines. Concussion management guidelines implemented by a sport's governing body do not necessarily remove or resolve conflicts of interest in the doctor-patient-team triad. The instigation of a concussion exclusion rule appears to add a fourth party to this triad (the National Rugby League or the Australian Football League). In some instances, when conflicts of interest among stakeholders are ignored or insufficiently managed, they may facilitate attempts at circumventing concussion management guidelines to the detriment of player welfare.

  9. A Preliminary Exploration of Concussion and Strength Performance in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, N; Taha, T; Monette, G; Keightley, M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the effect of concussion on upper and lower body strength in children and youth athletes. The participant group was made up of 178 unique male and female ice hockey players (ages 8-14 years). Using a 3-year prospective longitudinal research design, baseline and post-concussion data on hand grip strength, jump tests, and leg maximal voluntary contraction were collected. Using a linear mixed-effects model, no significant differences were found when comparing the baseline strength performance of individuals who went on to experience a concussion and those who did not. When accounting for sex, multiple concussions, and ongoing changes in strength associated with age, weaker hand grip scores were found following concussion while participants were still symptomatic. Lower squat jump heights were achieved while participants were symptomatic as well as when they were no longer self-reporting symptoms associated with concussion. This study represents an initial step towards better understanding strength performance following concussion that may limit the on and off ice performance of youth ice hockey players, as well as predispose youth to subsequent injuries. PMID:27191209

  10. Youth Concussion Laws across the Nation: Implications for the Traveling Team Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lauren M; Mitchell, Cory N

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 1.6 to 3.8 million sports and recreation-related concussions annually in the United States, with an average annual increase in incidence of 15.5% from 1998 to 2007. From 2009 to 2014, all 50 states enacted youth concussion legislation. This study clarifies core elements common to state concussion legislation and State Interscholastic Athletic Association (SIAA) implementation. A concussion literature, legislative, and SIAA concussion bylaw review was performed for all 50 U.S. states. Mandated concussion education varies in the frequency of certification and method of education. Student athletes and their parents/guardians in a majority of states are required to sign annual educational information sheets. Forty-nine states specifically mandate removal from play. Return-to-play protocols vary with regard to the timeline, content, and health care professional that can provide written clearance. In conclusion, it is important for sports medicine clinicians to stay abreast of current and revised concussion legislation in the jurisdictions in which they provide care.

  11. Depression as a Modifying Factor in Sport-Related Concussion: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary S; Kuhn, Andrew W; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    Since its third iteration in 2008, the international Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) has delineated several 'modifying factors' that have the potential to influence the management of sport-related concussions (SRC). One of these factors is co- and pre-morbidities, which includes migraines, mental health disorders, attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), learning disability, and sleep disorders. Mental health disorders, and in particular, depression, have received some attention in the management of SRC and in this review we summarize the empirical evidence for its inclusion as a modifying factor. This review is divided into three main bodies of findings: (1) the incidence and prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in non-concussed and concussed athletes, with comparison made to the general population; (2) managing the post-concussion athlete and accounting for premorbid depressive symptoms; and (3) depression as a long-term effect of repetitive head trauma. Overall, it has been reported that certain subpopulations of athletes have similar or even higher rates of depressive symptoms when compared to the general population. The challenge of accounting for these baseline-depressive symptoms while managing the post-concussive athlete is stressed. And lastly, the prevalence of depression and its relationship to concussion in later-life is discussed. PMID:26567843

  12. Near Point of Convergence After a Sport-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Kelly L.; Sufrinko, Alicia; Lau, Brian C.; Henry, Luke; Collins, Michael W.; Kontos, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Convergence insufficiency (CI) is a common binocular vision deficit after a sport-related concussion (SRC). CI may result in visual discomfort and vision-mediated functional difficulties such as slowed reading and compromised attention, leading to impaired academic, work, and sport performance. Purpose To test the reliability of repeated near point of convergence (NPC) measurements in a sample of athletes after an SRC; compare the symptoms and cognitive impairment of athletes with normal NPC to those with CI after an SRC; and explore the relationship among age, sex, learning disability, migraine history, and CI. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A total of 78 athletes (mean age, 14.31 ± 2.77 years) who were seen a mean 5.79 ± 5.63 days after an SRC were administered 3 trials of an NPC assessment, along with neurocognitive (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing [ImPACT]) and symptom assessments. Patients were divided into normal NPC (NPC ≤5 cm; n = 45) and CI (NPC >5 cm; n = 33) groups. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) assessed the consistency of NPC across the 3 trials. The ANOVAs were employed to examine differences on neurocognitive composites and symptoms between the normal NPC and CI groups. Stepwise regressions (controlling for age and symptom scores on the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale [PCSS]) were conducted to evaluate the predictive utility of the NPC distance for neurocognitive impairment. Results Groups did not differ on demographic or injury characteristics. NPC differed between trial 1 and trials 2 (P = .02) and 3 (P = .01) for the CI group but not the normal NPC group. Internal consistency was high across NPC measurements (ICC range, 0.95–0.98). Patients with CI performed worse on verbal memory (P = .02), visual motor speed (P = .02), and reaction time (P = .001, η2 = .13) and had greater total symptom scores (P = .02

  13. Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries : A 10-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth; Bedics, Beate Kärrdahl; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    Objective and design: Long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries were investigated based on a 10-year follow-up of patients from a previously published randomized controlled study of mild traumatic brain injuries. One aim was to describe changes over time after mild traumatic brain injuries in terms of the extent of persisting post-concussion symptoms, life satisfaction, perceived health, activities of daily living, changes in life roles and sick leave. Another aim was to identif...

  14. Monitoring recovery of gait balance control following concussion using an accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David; Osternig, Louis; Chou, Li-Shan

    2015-09-18

    Despite medical best-practice recommendations, no consistent standard exists to systematically monitor recovery from concussion. Studies utilizing camera-based systems have reported center-of-mass (COM) motion control deficits persisting in individuals with concussion up to two months post-injury. The use of an accelerometer may provide an efficient and sensitive method to monitor COM alterations following concussion that can be employed in clinical settings. This study examined: (1) frontal/sagittal plane acceleration characteristics during dual-task walking for individuals with concussion and healthy controls; and (2) the effectiveness of utilizing acceleration characteristics to classify concussed and healthy individuals via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Individuals with concussion completed testing within 72 h as well as 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months post-injury. Control subjects completed the same protocol in similar time increments. Participants walked and simultaneously completed a cognitive task while wearing an accelerometer attached to L5. Participants with concussion walked with significantly less peak medial-lateral acceleration during 55-75% gait cycle (p=0.04) throughout the testing period compared with controls. Moderate levels of sensitivity and specificity were found at the 72 h and 1 week testing times (sensitivity=0.70, specificity=0.71). ROC analysis revealed significant AUC values at the 72 h (AUC=0.889) and two week (AUC=0.810) time points. Accelerometer-derived measurements may assist in detecting frontal plane control deficits during dual-task walking post-concussion, consistent with camera-based studies. These initial findings demonstrate potential for using accelerometry as a tool for clinicians to monitor gait balance control following concussion. PMID:26152463

  15. Accounting for sampling variability, injury under-reporting, and sensor error in concussion injury risk curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael R; Margulies, Susan S; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2015-09-18

    There has been recent dramatic increase in the use of sensors affixed to the heads or helmets of athletes to measure the biomechanics of head impacts that lead to concussion. The relationship between injury and linear or rotational head acceleration measured by such sensors can be quantified with an injury risk curve. The utility of the injury risk curve relies on the accuracy of both the clinical diagnosis and the biomechanical measure. The focus of our analysis was to demonstrate the influence of three sources of error on the shape and interpretation of concussion injury risk curves: sampling variability associated with a rare event, concussion under-reporting, and sensor measurement error. We utilized Bayesian statistical methods to generate synthetic data from previously published concussion injury risk curves developed using data from helmet-based sensors on collegiate football players and assessed the effect of the three sources of error on the risk relationship. Accounting for sampling variability adds uncertainty or width to the injury risk curve. Assuming a variety of rates of unreported concussions in the non-concussed group, we found that accounting for under-reporting lowers the rotational acceleration required for a given concussion risk. Lastly, after accounting for sensor error, we find strengthened relationships between rotational acceleration and injury risk, further lowering the magnitude of rotational acceleration needed for a given risk of concussion. As more accurate sensors are designed and more sensitive and specific clinical diagnostic tools are introduced, our analysis provides guidance for the future development of comprehensive concussion risk curves.

  16. Wearable nanosensor system for monitoring mild traumatic brain injuries in football players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2016-04-01

    Football players are more to violent impacts and injuries more than any athlete in any other sport. Concussion or mild traumatic brain injuries were one of the lesser known sports injuries until the last decade. With the advent of modern technologies in medical and engineering disciplines, people are now more aware of concussion detection and prevention. These concussions are often overlooked by football players themselves. The cumulative effect of these mild traumatic brain injuries can cause long-term residual brain dysfunctions. The principle of concussion is based the movement of the brain in the neurocranium and viscerocranium. The brain is encapsulated by the cerebrospinal fluid which acts as a protective layer for the brain. This fluid can protect the brain against minor movements, however, any rapid movements of the brain may mitigate the protective capability of the cerebrospinal fluid. In this paper, we propose a wireless health monitoring helmet that addresses the concerns of the current monitoring methods - it is non-invasive for a football player as helmet is not an additional gear, it is efficient in performance as it is equipped with EEG nanosensors and 3D accelerometer, it does not restrict the movement of the user as it wirelessly communicates to the remote monitoring station, requirement of individual monitoring stations are not required for each player as the ZigBee protocol can couple multiple transmitters with one receiver. A helmet was developed and validated according to the above mentioned parameters.

  17. Resolution of Concussion Symptoms After Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guernsey, David T; Leder, Adena; Yao, Sheldon

    2016-03-01

    A concussion is the result of a biomechanical force directed toward the head, causing neurologic dysfunction. The inflammatory response and the production of reactive oxygen species are proposed mechanisms for the symptoms and long-term sequelae of concussion. Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) may help reduce inflammation by improving glymphatic flow. The authors describe the effect of OMT on a patient with mild concussion symptoms, including nausea, dizziness, tinnitus, and imbalance. The patient was evaluated with the Sensory Organization Test before and after undergoing a 25-minute session of OMT. After the session, the patient reported resolution of symptoms, and his sensory organization test score improved by 6 points. The role of OMT must be further investigated as an essential and cost-effective tool in the management of concussions.

  18. Significance of Concussions in Hawai'i: From Land to Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifu, David X; Uchima, Olivia K; Davis, Alaina S; Lower, Amy E; Jin, Jingyu L; Lew, Henry L

    2016-09-01

    Head injuries are a particular concern in Hawai'i given the large military population, the presence of many land and water sports such as football and surfing, and the lenient helmet laws for motorcycle and bicycle riders. Physical, psychological, and cognitive symptoms from single or repeated concussions can affect an individual's reentry to society and activity. Current literature indicates that repeated head injuries are associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) which is thought to lead to dementia. This paper reviews literature discussing causes of concussion including its incidence and prevalence in Hawai'i. Furthermore, the neurophysiological and neurobiological etiologies are discussed followed by an overview of methods for identification and management of concussion. The paper serves as information for professionals in the community such as educators, military personnel, and healthcare workers to identify risks of concussion, management of symptoms, and to connect with resources and programs available in Hawai'i. PMID:27688951

  19. Traumatic brain injury in children in Denmark: a national 15-year study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Teasdale, T W

    1998-01-01

    Demographic trends are reported concerning three types of traumatic brain injury (concussions, cranial fractures, and intracranial contusions/haemorrhages) among children in Denmark of ages up to and including 14 years, for a fifteen year period from 1979 through 1993. The data were derived from...... a national computer-based hospitalization register and include 49,594 children, of whom 60% were boys and 89% had suffered a concussion. Virtually all injuries were the result of accidents. A major finding was that there has been a general decline in the incidence of traumatic brain injuries, especially...

  20. Subjective, but not Objective, Lingering Effects of Multiple Past Concussions in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Brian L.; McKay, Carly D.; Mrazik, Martin; Barlow, Karen M; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Emery, Carolyn A

    2013-01-01

    The existing literature on lingering effects from concussions in children and adolescents is limited and mixed, and there are no clear answers for patients, clinicians, researchers, or policy makers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are lingering effects of past concussions in adolescent athletes. Participants in this study included 643 competitive Bantam and Midget hockey players (most elite 20% by division of play) between 13 and 17 years of age (mean age=15.5, SD=1.2)...

  1. Consequences of repeated blood-brain barrier disruption in football players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Marchi

    Full Text Available The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers. None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57; the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games. A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10. Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes.

  2. An Exploratory Study of the Potential Effects of Vision Training on Concussion Incidence in Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Clark, PHD, ATC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vision training has become a component of sports enhancement training; however, quantifiable and validated improvement in visual performance has not been clearly demonstrated. In addition, there is minimal literature related to the effects of vision training on sports performance and injury risk reduction. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the effects of vision training on peripheral vision and concussion incidence. Methods: Vision training was initiated among the University of Cincinnati football team at the beginning of the 2010 season and continued for four years (2010 to 2013. The sports vision enhancement was conducted during the two weeks of preseason camp. Typical vision training consisted of Dynavision D2 light board training, Nike strobe glasses, and tracking drills. Nike Strobe glasses and tracking drills were done with pairs of pitch-and-catch drills using footballs and tennis balls, with instructions to vary arc, speed, and trajectory. For skilled players, “high ball” drills were the focus, whereas for linemen, bounce passes and low pitch drills were stressed. Reaction time data was recorded for each athlete during every Dynavision D2 training session. We monitored the incidence of concussion during the four consecutive seasons of vision training, as well as the previous four consecutive seasons, and compared incidence of concussions (2006 to 2009 referent seasons v. 2010 to 2013 vision training seasons. Results: During the 2006-2013 pre- and regular football seasons, there were 41 sustained concussion events reported. The overall concussion incidence rate for the entire cohort was 5.1 cases per 100 player seasons. When the data were evaluated relative to vision trained versus referent untrained player seasons, a statistically significant lower rate of concussion was noted in player season in the vision training cohort (1.4 concussions per 100 player seasons compared to players who did not

  3. Recovery from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Previously Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losoi, Heidi; Silverberg, Noah D; Wäljas, Minna; Turunen, Senni; Rosti-Otajärvi, Eija; Helminen, Mika; Luoto, Teemu M; Julkunen, Juhani; Öhman, Juha; Iverson, Grant L

    2016-04-15

    This prospective longitudinal study reports recovery from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) across multiple domains in a carefully selected consecutive sample of 74 previously healthy adults. The patients with MTBI and 40 orthopedic controls (i.e., ankle injuries) completed assessments at 1, 6, and 12 months after injury. Outcome measures included cognition, post-concussion symptoms, depression, traumatic stress, quality of life, satisfaction with life, resilience, and return to work. Patients with MTBI reported more post-concussion symptoms and fatigue than the controls at the beginning of recovery, but by 6 months after injury, did not differ as a group from nonhead injury trauma controls on cognition, fatigue, or mental health, and by 12 months, their level of post-concussion symptoms and quality of life was similar to that of controls. Almost all (96%) patients with MTBI returned to work/normal activities (RTW) within the follow-up of 1 year. A subgroup of those with MTBIs and controls reported mild post-concussion-like symptoms at 1 year. A large percentage of the subgroup who had persistent symptoms had a modifiable psychological risk factor at 1 month (i.e., depression, traumatic stress, and/or low resilience), and at 6 months, they had greater post-concussion symptoms, fatigue, insomnia, traumatic stress, and depression, and worse quality of life. All of the control subjects who had mild post-concussion-like symptoms at 12 months also had a mental health problem (i.e., depression, traumatic stress, or both). This illustrates the importance of providing evidence-supported treatment and rehabilitation services early in the recovery period. PMID:26437675

  4. Predictors of delayed recovery following pediatric sports-related concussion: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph H; Gill, Clarence; Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Rocque, Brandon G; Menendez, Joshua Y; O'Neill, Jilian A; Agee, Bonita S; Brown, Steven T; Crowther, Marshall; Davis, R Drew; Ferguson, Drew; Johnston, James M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Pediatric sports-related concussions are a growing public health concern. The factors that determine injury severity and time to recovery following these concussions are poorly understood. Previous studies suggest that initial symptom severity and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are predictors of prolonged recovery (> 28 days) after pediatric sports-related concussions. Further analysis of baseline patient characteristics may allow for a more accurate prediction of which patients are at risk for delayed recovery after a sports-related concussion. METHODS The authors performed a single-center retrospective case-control study involving patients cared for at the multidisciplinary Concussion Clinic at Children's of Alabama between August 2011 and January 2013. Patient demographic data, medical history, sport concussion assessment tool 2 (SCAT2) and symptom severity scores, injury characteristics, and patient balance assessments were analyzed for each outcome group. The control group consisted of patients whose symptoms resolved within 28 days. The case group included patients whose symptoms persisted for more than 28 days. The presence or absence of the SCAT2 assessment had a modifying effect on the risk for delayed recovery; therefore, stratum-specific analyses were conducted for patients with recorded SCAT2 scores and for patients without SCAT2 scores. Unadjusted ORs and adjusted ORs (aORs) for an association of delayed recovery outcome with specific risk factors were calculated with logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 294 patients met the inclusion criteria of the study. The case and control groups did not statistically significantly differ in age (p = 0.7). For the patients who had received SCAT2 assessments, a previous history of concussion (aOR 3.67, 95% CI 1.51-8.95), presenting SCAT2 score history of ADHD significantly increased the odds of prolonged recovery (aOR 4.41, 95% CI 1.93-10.07 and aOR 3.87, 95% CI 1

  5. Multi-disciplinary management of athletes with post-concussion syndrome: an evolving pathophysiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Ellis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Historically, patients with sports-related concussion (SRC have been managed in a uniform fashion consisting mostly of prescribed physical and cognitive rest with the expectation that all symptoms will spontaneously resolve with time. Although this approach will result in successful return to school and sports activities in the majority of athletes, an important proportion will develop persistent concussion symptoms characteristic of post-concussion syndrome (PCS. Recent advances in exercise science, neuroimaging, and clinical research suggest that the clinical manifestations of PCS are mediated by unique pathophysiological processes that can be identified by features of the clinical history and physical examination as well as the use of graded aerobic treadmill testing. Athletes who develop PCS represent a unique population whose care must be individualized and must incorporate a rehabilitative strategy that promotes enhanced recovery of concussion-related symptoms while preventing physical deconditioning. In this review we present our evolving evidence-based approach to evaluation and management of athletes with PCS that aims to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms mediating persistent concussion symptoms and guides the initiation of individually-tailored rehabilitation programs that target these processes. In addition, we outline the important qualified roles that multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals can play in the management of this patient population, and discuss where future research efforts must be focused to further validate this evolving pathophysiological approach.

  6. Multi-Disciplinary Management of Athletes with Post-Concussion Syndrome: An Evolving Pathophysiological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J.; Leddy, John; Willer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Historically, patients with sports-related concussion (SRC) have been managed in a uniform fashion consisting mostly of prescribed physical and cognitive rest with the expectation that all symptoms will spontaneously resolve with time. Although this approach will result in successful return to school and sports activities in the majority of athletes, an important proportion will develop persistent concussion symptoms characteristic of post-concussion syndrome (PCS). Recent advances in exercise science, neuroimaging, and clinical research suggest that the clinical manifestations of PCS are mediated by unique pathophysiological processes that can be identified by features of the clinical history and physical examination as well as the use of graded aerobic treadmill testing. Athletes who develop PCS represent a unique population whose care must be individualized and must incorporate a rehabilitative strategy that promotes enhanced recovery of concussion-related symptoms while preventing physical deconditioning. In this review, we present our evolving evidence-based approach to evaluation and management of athletes with PCS that aims to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms mediating persistent concussion symptoms and guides the initiation of individually tailored rehabilitation programs that target these processes. In addition, we outline the important qualified roles that multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals can play in the management of this patient population, and discuss where future research efforts must be focused to further evaluate this evolving pathophysiological approach.

  7. Assessing Symptoms in Adolescents Following Sport-Related Concussion: A Comparison of Four Different Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbin, R J; Knox, Jordan; Kegel, Nathan; Schatz, Philip; Lowder, Harrison B; French, Jonathan; Burkhart, Scott; Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    This study compared post-concussion symptom endorsements on the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) between a clinical open-ended interview, clinician-guided PCSS, parent-report PCSS, and computer-based PCSS in youth athletes with sport-related concussion (SRC). Participants included 54 patients aged 13-17 years (M = 15.19, SD = 1.29, 51.8% male) with a diagnosed SRC seen at a concussion clinic. Participants were administered a computer-based version (COMP) of the PCSS followed by clinical open-ended symptom interview (OPEN) and clinician-guided PCSS (GUIDED). Participants' parents concurrently and independently endorsed their children's symptoms by completing the PCSS in the waiting room (PARENT). Total number of symptoms reported and total symptom severity score were analyzed and compared across the four PCSS administration methods. Results revealed significantly lower total number of symptoms for OPEN compared to GUIDED (p = .002), PARENT (p < .001), and COMP (p = .006); and significantly lower total severity score for OPEN compared to GUIDED (p = .04) and PARENT (p < .001). These data support using the PCSS as a structured method of assessing post-concussion symptoms and question the utility of unstructured interview methods for assessing symptoms in youth athletes with SRC. PMID:27105069

  8. Diffuse white matter tract abnormalities in clinically normal ageing retired athletes with a history of sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Sebastien; Henry, Luke C; Bedetti, Christophe; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; Gagnon, Jean-François; Evans, Alan C; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse; De Beaumont, Louis

    2014-11-01

    Sports-related concussions have been shown to lead to persistent subclinical anomalies of the motor and cognitive systems in young asymptomatic athletes. In advancing age, these latent alterations correlate with detectable motor and cognitive function decline. Until now, the interacting effects of concussions and the normal ageing process on white matter tract integrity remain unknown. Here we used a tract-based spatial statistical method to uncover potential white matter tissue damage in 15 retired athletes with a history of concussions, free of comorbid medical conditions. We also investigated potential associations between white matter integrity and declines in cognitive and motor functions. Compared to an age- and education-matched control group of 15 retired athletes without concussions, former athletes with concussions exhibited widespread white matter anomalies along many major association, interhemispheric, and projection tracts. Group contrasts revealed decreases in fractional anisotropy, as well as increases in mean and radial diffusivity measures in the concussed group. These differences were primarily apparent in fronto-parietal networks as well as in the frontal aspect of the corpus callosum. The white matter anomalies uncovered in concussed athletes were significantly associated with a decline in episodic memory and lateral ventricle expansion. Finally, the expected association between frontal white matter integrity and motor learning found in former non-concussed athletes was absent in concussed participants. Together, these results show that advancing age in retired athletes presenting with a history of sports-related concussions is linked to diffuse white matter abnormalities that are consistent with the effects of traumatic axonal injury and exacerbated demyelination. These changes in white matter integrity might explain the cognitive and motor function declines documented in this population.

  9. The Relation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Lapses of Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Broglio, Steven P.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Johnson, Chris R.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which failures in sustained attention were associated with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) deficits in cognitive control among college-age young adults with and without a history of sport-related concussion. Participants completed the ImPACT computer-based assessment and a modified flanker task. Results…

  10. Computerized Cognitive Testing in the Management of Youth Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Anthony P; Broshek, Donna K

    2016-01-01

    Computerized neurocognitive testing has become a growing practice across medical populations, but particularly within sports medicine and the management of sports-related concussion. Although traditional neuropsychological measures are solely administered and interpreted by neuropsychologists, computerized cognitive tests are marketed to and utilized by a wide range of professionals involved in the management of sports-related concussions, many of whom lack specialized psychometric training. Although the benefits of computerized testing allow for many youth athletes to be evaluated quickly, professionals implementing their use should be aware of the potential pitfalls and the high potential for misuse. After briefly reviewing the recommended guidelines set forth by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, we review the benefits/limitations of computerized testing in the management of sports-related concussion and the basic psychometric properties of some of the more widely used computerized measures. Lastly, we discuss the practical application of these devices.

  11. Computerized Cognitive Testing in the Management of Youth Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Anthony P; Broshek, Donna K

    2016-01-01

    Computerized neurocognitive testing has become a growing practice across medical populations, but particularly within sports medicine and the management of sports-related concussion. Although traditional neuropsychological measures are solely administered and interpreted by neuropsychologists, computerized cognitive tests are marketed to and utilized by a wide range of professionals involved in the management of sports-related concussions, many of whom lack specialized psychometric training. Although the benefits of computerized testing allow for many youth athletes to be evaluated quickly, professionals implementing their use should be aware of the potential pitfalls and the high potential for misuse. After briefly reviewing the recommended guidelines set forth by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, we review the benefits/limitations of computerized testing in the management of sports-related concussion and the basic psychometric properties of some of the more widely used computerized measures. Lastly, we discuss the practical application of these devices. PMID:25477270

  12. Mechanism and treatment principle for cerebral vessel spasm caused by concussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖兴义; 郭新红; 王德文; 薛关生

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the mechanism of cerebral vessel spasm caused by concussion and the effect of Nimodipine on concussion. Methods: A total of 224 patients who were treated from March 1995 to October 1999 were divided into two groups randomly, ie, Nimodipine group (113 cases) and control group (111 cases). Middle cerebral artery (MCA), basilar artery (BA) and the average peak forward velocity of cerebral blood flow were observed by color three-dimensional transcranial Doppler (3D-TCD) within 24 hours after admission and at the end of 3-6 days of treatment. Cerebral blood flow changes, characteristics and treatment effect were analyzed and determined by clinical main symptom disappearance rate. Results: In concussion, cerebral blood flow was divided into 3 phases: cerebral blood flow low infusion dilation phase, cerebral blood vessel spasm phase and cerebral blood flow recovery phase. In the Nimodipine group, clinical main symptom disappearance rate was higher than that in the control group in the cerebral spasm and recovery phases with a significant difference (P<0.01).  Conclusions: Cerebral vessel spasm, hypoxia and ischemia lesion are the main pathological changes. Whether cerebral dysfunction is reversible or not is mainly determined by spasm time of cerebral blood vessel. Nimodipine has a good effect on releasing spasm and diminishing the cerebral blood flow velocity. It not only improves curative effect on concussion, but also reduces and prevents concussion sequelae. Hence, concussion patients who have cerebral spasm confirmed by 3D-TCD should be given Nimodipine routinely and early.

  13. Los deportes y las conmociones cerebrales 1 PSA (:30) (Concussion in Sports 1)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-21

    Un entrenador habla con sus atletas sobre la gravedad de las conmociones cerebrales. (Coach and athletes discuss the serious nature of concussions.).  Created: 1/21/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/21/2010.

  14. Los deportes y las conmociones cerebrales 2 PSA (:30) (Concussion in Sports 2)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-21

    Una mamá habla con su hija atleta adolescente sobre la gravedad de las conmociones cerebrales. (A mom and her teen athlete discuss the serious nature of concussions.).  Created: 1/21/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/21/2010.

  15. Chronic post-concussion neurocognitive deficits. II. Relationship with persistent symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eMaruta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals who sustain a concussion may continue to experience problems long after their injury. However, it has been postulated in the literature that the relationship between a concussive injury and persistent complaints attributed to it is mediated largely by the development of symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. We sought to characterize cognitive deficits of adult patients who had persistent symptoms after a concussion and determine whether the original injury retains associations with these deficits after accounting for the developed symptoms that overlap with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. We compared the results of neurocognitive testing from 33 patients of both genders aged 18-55 at three months to five years post-injury with those from 140 control subjects. Statistical comparisons revealed that patients generally produced accurate responses on reaction time-based tests, but with reduced efficiency. On visual tracking, patients increased gaze position error variability following an attention demanding task, an effect that may reflect greater fatigability. When neurocognitive performance was examined in the context of demographic- and symptom-related variables, the original injury retained associations with reduced performance at a statistically significant level. For some patients, reduced cognitive efficiency and fatigability may represent key elements of interference when interacting with the environment, leading to varied paths of recovery after a concussion. Poor recovery may be better understood when these deficits are taken into consideration.

  16. Summary and Agreement Statement of the First International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Vienna 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Mark; Cantu, Robert; Dvorak, Jiri; Graf-Baumann, Toni; Johnston, Karen; Kelly, James; Lovell, Mark; McCrory, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem; Schamasch, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    An international group of concussion experts met in 2001 to discuss the most recent research and findings and to establish guidelines for clinical practice. They addressed such issues as epidemiology, basic and clinical science, grading systems, cognitive assessment, new research methods, protective equipment, management, prevention, and long-term…

  17. Measuring post-concussion symptoms in adolescents: feasibility of ecological momentary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Lawrence; Rieger, Brian; Smyth, Joshua; Perry, Lorraine; Gathje, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Although there is a large literature examining head trauma in general, several areas remain understudied. Notably, little is known about symptom expression over the course of a day for adolescents recovering from concussion. Furthermore, intra-individual symptom variability has not been well characterized. This pilot study examined the feasibility of a momentary data-gathering method, as well as the sensitivity of the assessment to the subtle and dynamic changes in symptoms of concussion. Six adolescents, three of whom suffered a concussion and three non-injured controls, provided symptom ratings five times per day for 5 days. This ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was conducted on a personal digital assistant to capture variability in symptom reports while in the natural environment. Preliminary results indicated that the EMA method showed great promise as a research tool in natural settings (e.g., school and home). Adolescents were able to comply with all tasks with little interference in their daily activities. Students with concussion showed generally higher symptom ratings across physical, cognitive, and affective domains, and temporal and diurnal patterns for symptoms emerged. Implications for future research and patient care are discussed. PMID:19892712

  18. Los deportes y las conmociones cerebrales 4 PSA (:30) (Concussion in Sports 4)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-21

    Dos cronistas deportivos hablan sobre la gravedad de las conmociones cerebrales. (Two sports announcers discuss the serious nature of concussions.).  Created: 1/21/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/21/2010.

  19. Los deportes y las conmociones cerebrales 3 PSA (:30) (Concussion in Sports 3)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-21

    Dos atletas adolescentes hablan sobre la gravedad de las conmociones cerebrales. (Discussion between two teen athletes about the serious nature of concussions.).  Created: 1/21/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/21/2010.

  20. Recognizing the Symptoms of Mental Illness following Concussions in the Sports Community: A Need for Improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Topolovec-Vranic

    Full Text Available To evaluate the awareness of concussion-related symptoms amongst members of the sports community in Canada.A cross-sectional national electronic survey was conducted. Youth athletes, parents, coaches and medical professionals across Canada were recruited through mailing lists from sports-related opt-in marketing databases. Participants were asked to identify, from a list of options, the symptoms of a concussion. The proportion of identified symptoms (categorized as physical, cognitive, mental health-related and overall as well as participant factors associated with symptom recognition were analyzed.The survey elicited 6,937 responses. Most of the respondents (92.1% completed the English language survey, were male (57.7%, 35-54 years of age (61.7%, with post-secondary education (58.2%, or high reported yearly household income (>$80,000; 53.0%. There were respondents from all provinces and territories with the majority of respondents from Ontario (35.2% or British Columbia (19.1%. While participants identified most of the physical (mean = 84.2% of symptoms and cognitive (mean = 91.2% of symptoms, they on average only identified 53.5% of the mental health-related symptoms of concussions. Respondents who were older, with higher education and household income, or resided in the Northwest Territories or Alberta identified significantly more of the mental health-related symptoms listed.While Canadian youth athletes, parents, coaches and medical professionals are able to identify most of the physical and cognitive symptoms associated with concussion, identification of mental health-related symptoms of concussion is still lagging.

  1. Are divided attention tasks useful in the assessment and management of sport-related concussion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Littleton, Ashley C; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    This article is a systematic review of the literature on divided attention assessment inclusive of a cognitive and motor task (balance or gait) for use in concussion management. The systematic review drew from published papers listed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases. The search identified 19 empirical research papers meeting the inclusion criteria. Study results were considered for the psychometric properties of the paradigms, the influence of divided attention on measures of cognition and postural control and the comparison of divided attention task outcomes between individuals with concussion and healthy controls (all samples were age 17 years or older). The review highlights that the reliability of the tasks under a divided attention paradigm presented ranges from low to high (ICC: 0.1-0.9); however, only 3/19 articles included psychometric information. Response times are greater, gait strategies are less efficient, and postural control deficits are greater in concussed participants compared with healthy controls both immediately and for some period following concussive injury, specifically under divided attention conditions. Dual task assessments in some cases were more reliable than single task assessments and may be better able to detect lingering effects following concussion. Few of the studies have been replicated and applied across various age groups. A key limitation of these studies is that many include laboratory and time-intensive measures. Future research is needed to refine a time and cost efficient divided attention assessment paradigm, and more work is needed in younger (pre-teens) populations where the application may be of greatest utility.

  2. The Peters/Price (See To Play Vision Concussion Protocol: Diagnosis and Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Peters, OD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sports-related concussion as a clinical entity has been a growing area of clinical concern. As primary eye care providers for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes, we have encountered these cases more and more each season. As a result, we have designed this retrospective study to assess our current evaluation and management protocols for all types of referred concussion cases. Methods: All patients referred to our private practice clinic from 2011 through 2013 for evaluation of concussion were included in this study. Retrospective analysis was performed to determine number of cases with a visual component, change in refractive state, resolution via new glasses, those requiring vision therapy, and average time to return to play. Results: A total of 137 patients were included in this study. Eighty-seven percent of patients (n = 120 demonstrated a visual component. Thirty-one percent (n = 37 of those resolved simply by changing their glasses prescription, while 61% (n = 73 required vision therapy to resolve their symptoms. Those who elected to perform vision therapy returned to play in less than six weeks’ time, while those deferring vision therapy returned to play in more than double the amount of time (12.3 weeks. Conclusion: The protocol studied is geared towards providing a uniform approach to diagnosing and treating concussions that demonstrate a visual component. The methods described not only accurately identify those with a visual component to their concussion but also provide an effective means of returning those individuals to play in a safe and timely manner.

  3. Subject-specific increases in serum S-100B distinguish sports-related concussion from sports-related exertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kiechle

    Full Text Available The on-field diagnosis of sports-related concussion (SRC is complicated by the lack of an accurate and objective marker of brain injury.To compare subject-specific changes in the astroglial protein, S100B, before and after SRC among collegiate and semi-professional contact sport athletes, and compare these changes to differences in S100B before and after non-contact exertion.Longitudinal cohort study.From 2009-2011, we performed a prospective study of athletes from Munich, Germany, and Rochester, New York, USA. Serum S100B was measured in all SRC athletes at pre-season baseline, within 3 hours of injury, and at days 2, 3 and 7 post-SRC. Among a subset of athletes, S100B was measured after non-contact exertion but before injury. All samples were collected identically and analyzed using an automated electrochemiluminescent assay to quantify serum S100B levels.Forty-six athletes (30 Munich, 16 Rochester underwent baseline testing. Thirty underwent additional post-exertion S100B testing. Twenty-two athletes (16 Rochester, 6 Munich sustained a SRC, and 17 had S100B testing within 3 hours post-injury. The mean 3-hour post-SRC S100B was significantly higher than pre-season baseline (0.099±0.008 µg/L vs. 0.058±0.006 µg/L, p = 0.0002. Mean post-exertion S100B was not significantly different than the preseason baseline. S100B levels at post-injury days 2, 3 and 7 were significantly lower than the 3-hour level, and not different than baseline. Both the absolute change and proportional increase in S100B 3-hour post-injury were accurate discriminators of SRC from non-contact exertion without SRC (AUC 0.772 and 0.904, respectively. A 3-hour post-concussion S100B >0.122 µg/L and a proportional S100B increase of >45.9% over baseline were both 96.7% specific for SRC.Relative and absolute increases in serum S100B can accurately distinguish SRC from sports-related exertion, and may be a useful adjunct to the diagnosis of SRC.

  4. Assessment of an experimental rodent model of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Farran, Allyson; Esser, Michael J

    2014-04-15

    Childhood is one the highest risk periods for experiencing a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from sports-related concussions, motor vehicle accidents, and falls. In addition, many children experience lingering symptomology (post-concussion syndrome) from these closed head injuries. Although the negative sequel of mTBI has been described, a clinically reliable animal model of mild pediatric brain injury has not. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of a modified weight-drop technique as a model for the induction of mTBI/concussion in juvenile rats following a single impact. Male and female rats (P30) were exposed to a single mTBI or a sham injury followed by a behavioral test battery. Juvenile rats who experienced a single mTBI displayed significant motor/balance impairments when tested on the beam walking task and in the open field, as well as deficits of executive functioning as measured with the novel context mismatch task and the probe trial of the Morris water task. In addition, both male and female rats showed depression-like behavior in the forced swim task, with male rats also exhibiting decreased anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus maze. The results from this study suggest that the modified weight-drop technique induces a clinically relevant behavioral phenotype in juvenile rats, and may provide researchers with a reliable animal model of mTBI/concussion from which clinical therapeutic strategies could be developed. PMID:24283269

  5. Functional brain imaging to investigate the higher brain dysfunction induced by diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher brain dysfunction is the major problem of patients who recover from neurotrauma the prevents them from returning to their previous social life. Many such patients do not have focal brain damage detected with morphological imaging. We focused on studying the focal brain dysfunction that can be detected only with functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to the score of various cognition batteries. Patients who complain of higher brain dysfunction without apparent morphological cortical damage were recruited for this study. Thirteen patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or cerebral concussion was included. They underwent a PET study to image glucose metabolism by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and central benodiazepine receptor (cBZD-R) (marker of neuronal body) by 11C-flumazenil, together with cognition measurement by WAIS-R, WMS-R, and WCST etc. PET data were compared with age matched normal controls using statistical parametric mapping (SPM)2. DAI patients had a significant decrease in glucose matabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the cingulated cortex than normal controls. Patients diagnosed with concussion because of shorter consciousness disturbance also had abnormal FDG uptake and cBZD-R distribution. Cognition test scores were variable among patients. Degree of decreased glucose metabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the dominant hemishphere corresponded well to the severity of cognitive disturbance. PET molecular imaging was useful to depict focal cortical dysfunction of neurotrauma patients even when morphological change was not apparent. This method may be promising to clarify the pathophysiology of higher brain dysfunction of patients with diffuse axonal injury or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. (author)

  6. Detection and outcome of mild traumatic brain injury in patients and sportsmen : persisting symptoms, disabilities and life satisfaction in relation to S-100B, NSE and cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2004-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries are common (hospitalization incidence: 250-300 per 100.000 inhabitants/year) and a great majority of these injuries (80-85%) are classified as mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI/concussion). Many patients with MTBI (20-80%) suffer from subsequent persistent and often disabling symptoms. In previous studies serum levels of biochemical markers of brain tissue damage (S-100B and neuron-specific enolase, NSE) have been propounded to serve as predictors of persisting sympto...

  7. Concussion under-reporting and pressure from coaches, teammates, fans, and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice; Hawrilenko, Matt; Baugh, Christine M; Calzo, Jerel P

    2015-06-01

    Concussions from sport present a substantial public health burden given the number of youth, adolescent and emerging adult athletes that participate in contact or collision sports. Athletes who fail to report symptoms of a suspected concussion and continue play are at risk of worsened symptomatology and potentially catastrophic neurologic consequences if another impact is sustained during this vulnerable period. Understanding why athletes do or do not report their symptoms is critical for developing efficacious strategies for risk reduction. Psychosocial theories and frameworks that explicitly incorporate context, as a source of expectations about the outcomes of reporting and as a source of behavioral reinforcement, are useful in framing this problem. The present study quantifies the pressure that athletes experience to continue playing after a head impact--from coaches, teammates, parents, and fans--and assesses how this pressure, both independently and as a system, is related to future concussion reporting intention. Participants in the study were 328 male and female athletes from 19 teams competing in one of seven sports (soccer, lacrosse, basketball, softball, baseball, volleyball, field hockey) at four colleges in the northeast region of the United States. Results found that more than one-quarter of the sample had experienced pressure from at least one source to continue playing after a head impact during the previous year. Results of a latent profile mixture model indicated that athletes who experienced pressure from all four of the measured sources were significantly more likely to intend to continue playing in the future than were athletes who had not experienced pressure from all sources, or only pressure from coaches and teammates. These findings underscore the importance of designing interventions that address the system in which athletes make decisions about concussion reporting, including athletes' parents, rather than focusing solely on modifying the

  8. Stay aHEAD of the Game: Get the Facts about Concussion in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Sports offer so many benefits to kids, from fun and fitness to responsibility and teamwork skills. With sports also come bumps and bruises--and one type of injury requires much more than an ice pack or a band-aid. Head trauma is one of the most common injuries sustained by young athletes, with more than 60,000 concussions occurring each year in…

  9. Second time around:Corticospinal responses following repeated sports-related concussions within the same season. A transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan J Pearce; Daniel T Corp; Charlotte B Davies; Brendan P Major; Jerome J Maller

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the degree of neurophysiological and cognitive performance changes resulting from repeat concussions sustained in a single season ofAustralianRules football. Methods:Three amateur football players were recruited after sustainingtwo concussions during a single season of playing.Each player was assessed at multiple time points by transcranial magnetic stimulation(TMS) and electromyography, as well as tested for fine motor and cognitive performance after each concussion.Results:In all three cases, concussions resulted in reduction in fine dexterity and visuomotor reaction time, cognitive attention performance and increase in intracortical inhibition fromTMS.No changes in performance orTMS outcomes were found as a result of the order of the concussions.However, changes observed were dependent on the severity of the concussion.Conclusions:This multiple-case study has demonstrated that concussion result in increased intracortical inhibition and reduction in cognitive and motor performance. Further,TMS, in conjunction with tests of cognitive and motor performance, can be useful as a prognostic technique in assessing recovery from acute concussion injury.

  10. Suicide after traumatic brain injury: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rates of suicide among patients who have had a traumatic brain injury. METHODS: From a Danish population register of admissions to hospital covering the years 1979-93 patients were selected who had had either a concussion (n=126 114), a cranial fracture (n=7560......). There was, however, no evidence of a specific risk period for suicide after injury. CONCLUSION: The increased risk of suicide among patients who had a mild traumatic brain injury may result from concomitant risk factors such as psychiatric conditions and psychosocial disadvantage. The greater risk among...

  11. NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is to help determine the connections between repeated head trauma and CTE. The research is led by neuropathologist ... injury (TBI)—including concussion—occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the ... other events in which the head strikes or is struck by an object (19 ...

  12. Poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles loaded with cerebrolysin display neuroprotective activity in a rat model of concussive head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Forni, Flavio; Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin; Mössler, Herbert; Vandelli, Maria A; Tosi, Giovanni; Sharma, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrolysin (CBL) is a neuroprotective agent in central nervous system (CNS) injury and stimulates neurorepair processes. Several studies in our laboratory suggest that CBL administered through nanowired technology may have superior neuroprotective efficacy in CNS trauma. In this investigation, we compared the neuroprotective efficacy of poly-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with CBL vs free CBL in a rat model of concussive head injury (CHI). Free CBL or CBL loaded NPs was administered 30 min to 1 h after CHI and animals were sacrificed 5 h later. Changes in blood-brain barrier and brain edema formation were measured as parameters of neuroprotection in CHI after giving CBL alone or as the nanodelivered compound. Our results clearly show that delivery of CBL by NPs has superior neuroprotective effects following CHI as compared to normal CBL. This suggests that CBL delivered by NPs could have robust neuroprotective action in CNS trauma. These findings have potential clinical relevance with regard to nanodelivery of CBL, a feature that requires further investigation. PMID:25106629

  13. Concussion in the Military: an Evidence-Base Review of mTBI in US Military Personnel Focused on Posttraumatic Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Matthew D; Grimes, Jamie; Ling, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an alteration in brain function caused by an external force. Mild TBI or concussion is now well recognized to be a risk of military service as well as participation in athletic sports such as football. Posttraumatic headache (PTH) is the most common symptom after mTBI in US service members. PTH most commonly presents with migraine-like headache features. The following is an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, prognosis, complications, and treatment of mTBI and associated comorbidities with a focus on PTH. There is a particular emphasis on emerging evidence-based clinical practice. One important medical consequence of the recognition that mTBI is a highly prevalent among military service members is that the Department of Defense (DoD) is dedicating significant financial and intellectual resources to better understanding and developing treatments for TBI. The identification of the importance of TBI among the US military population has had the added benefit of increasing awareness of this condition among civilian populations, particularly those engaged in both professional and youth sports. The NIH and NSF are also supporting important TBI research. President Obama's Brain Initiative is also providing additional impetus for these efforts. Unfortunately, the understanding of the acute and chronic effects of mTBI on the brain remains limited. Gratefully, there is hope that through innovative research, there will be advances in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology, which will lead to clinical and prognostic indicators, ultimately resulting in new treatment options for this very complicated set of disorders. PMID:27084376

  14. Evidence for the Factorial and Construct Validity of a Self-Report Concussion Symptoms Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W.; Ferrara, Michael S.; Peterson, Connie L.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factorial and construct validity of the Head Injury Scale (HIS) among a sample of male and female collegiate athletes. Design and Setting: Using a cross-sectional design, we established the factorial validity of the HIS scale with confirmatory factor analysis and the construct validity of the HIS with Pearson product moment correlation analyses. Using an experimental design, we compared scores on the HIS between concussed and nonconcussed groups with a 2 (groups) × 5 (time) mixed-model analysis of variance. Subjects: Participants (N = 279) in the cross-sectional analyses were predominately male (n = 223) collegiate athletes with a mean age of 19.49 ± 1.63 years. Participants (N = 33) in the experimental analyses were concussed (n = 17) and nonconcussed control (n = 16) collegiate athletes with a mean age of 19.76 ± 1.49 years. Measurements: All participants completed baseline measures for the 16-item HIS, neuropsychological testing battery, and posturography. Concussed individuals and paired controls were evaluated on days 1, 2, 3, and 10 postinjury on the same testing battery. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a theoretically derived, 3-factor model provided a good but not excellent fit to the 16-item HIS. Hence, the 16-item HIS was modified on the basis of substantive arguments about item-content validity. The subsequent analysis indicated that the 3-factor model provided an excellent fit to the modified 9-item HIS. The 3 factors were best described by a single second-order factor: concussion symptoms. Scores from the 16-item HIS and 9-item HIS were strongly correlated, but there were few significant correlations between HIS scores and scores from the neuropsychological and balance measures. A significant group-by-day interaction was noted on both the 9-item HIS and 16-item HIS, with significant differences seen between groups on days 1 and 2 postconcussion. Conclusions: We provide evidence for the factorial and

  15. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 1. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with concussion injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    included 469 permanent incisors with concussion from 358 patients (226 male, 132 female). Among these, 292 had a concomitant crown fracture (70 with and 222 without pulp exposure). All teeth were examined and treated according to standardized protocol. Statistical analysis:  The risk of PN was analyzed...

  16. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident. PMID:27432348

  17. Relationship Between Cognitive Assessment and Balance Measures in Adolescents Referred for Vestibular Physical Therapy After Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalaheen, Bara A.; Whitney, Susan L.; Marchetti, Gregory F.; Furman, Joseph M.; Kontos, Anthony P.; Collins, Michael W.; Sparto, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between cognitive and balance performance in adolescents with concussion. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary. Patients Sixty patients. Interventions Correlation analyses were performed to describe the relationship between symptoms, cognitive measure, and balance measure at the time of initiation of vestibular physical therapy. Main Outcome Measures Cognitive performance was assessed using the Immediate Post-concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT). The dizziness and balance function measures included dizziness severity rating, Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Functional Gait Assessment, gait speed, Timed “UP and GO,” Five Times Sit to Stand, and Sensory Organization Test (SOT). To account for multiple comparisons, the False Discovery Rate method was used. Results Performance measures of balance were significantly correlated with cognitive measures. Greater total symptom scores were related to greater impairment in the ABC and DHI (r = 0.35-0.39, P ≤ 0.008) and worse performance in condition 2 of the SOT (r = −0.48, P = 0.004). Among the ImPACT composite scores, lower memory scores were correlated with impaired balance performance measures (r = 0.37-0.59, P ≤ 0.012). Lower visual memory was also correlated with worse ABC scores. Conclusions The significant relationships reported between the cognitive performance scores and balance measures may reflect that similar levels of functioning exist across domains in individuals with protracted recovery who receive vestibular physical therapy. PMID:25706663

  18. Contralateral Cochlear Labyrinthine Concussion without Temporal Bone Fracture: Unusual Posttraumatic Consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, D.; Silva, J. M. Duque; del Álamo, P. Ortega

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Labyrinthine concussion is a term used to describe a rare cause of sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular symptoms occurring after head trauma. Isolated damage to the inner ear without involving the vestibular organ would be designated as a cochlear labyrinthine concussion. Hearing loss is not a rare finding in head trauma that involves petrous bone fractures. Nevertheless it generally occurs ipsilateral to the side of the head injury and extraordinarily in the contralateral side and moreover without the presence of a fracture. Case Report. The present case describes a 37-year-old patient with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus in his right ear after a blunt head trauma of the left-sided temporal bone (contralateral). Otoscopy and radiological images showed no fractures or any abnormalities. A severe sensorineural hearing loss was found in his right ear with a normal hearing of the left side. Conclusion. The temporal bone trauma requires a complete diagnostic battery which includes a neurotologic examination and a high resolution computed tomography scan in the first place. Hearing loss after a head injury extraordinarily occurs in the contralateral side of the trauma as what happened in our case. In addition, the absence of fractures makes this phenomenon even more unusual.

  19. The History and Evolution of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povlishock, John

    2016-01-01

    This narrative provides a brief history of experimental animal model development for the study of traumatic brain injury. It draws upon a relatively rich history of early animal modeling that employed higher order animals to assess concussive brain injury while exploring the importance of head movement versus stabilization in evaluating the animal's response to injury. These themes are extended to the development of angular/rotational acceleration/deceleration models that also exploited brain movement to generate both the morbidity and pathology typically associated with human traumatic brain injury. Despite the significance of these early model systems, their limitations and overall practicality are discussed. Consideration is given to more contemporary rodent animal models that replicate individual/specific features of human injury, while via various transgenic technologies permitting the evaluation of injury-mediated pathways. The narrative closes on a reconsideration of higher order, porcine animal models of injury and their implication for preclinical/translational research. PMID:27604709

  20. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caron AM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimee M Caron, Richard Stephenson Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs (and concussion occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours total sleep deprivation (TSD and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons, and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%. Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%, and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%. Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. Keywords: sleep deprivation, concussion, traumatic brain injury, dark neuron, neurodegeneration, rat cortex

  1. Zhoubo plus uncaria tincture in the treatment of cerebral concussion sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianjun; Wang, Ying; Liang, Beicheng

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the clinical efficacy of the compound gouteng tincture combined with Zhoubo (GT-ZB) in treating the sequelae of cerebral concussion (CC) in children. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty children with CC-sequelae were randomily divided into a treatment group and a control group, with 30 cases in each group. The treatment group was treated using GT-ZB, and the control group was treated using the standard method of venoruton, dibazol, and Vitamin B6. The efficacies of the two treatments were compared. [Results] Compared with the control group, the clinical symptoms and signs in the treatment group were significantly mitigated. [Conclusion] GT-ZB demonstrated efficacy in treating the sequelae of CC in children, and it is worthy of further studies and possible clinical recommendations. PMID:27512257

  2. Zhoubo plus uncaria tincture in the treatment of cerebral concussion sequelae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianjun; Wang, Ying; Liang, Beicheng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the clinical efficacy of the compound gouteng tincture combined with Zhoubo (GT-ZB) in treating the sequelae of cerebral concussion (CC) in children. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty children with CC-sequelae were randomily divided into a treatment group and a control group, with 30 cases in each group. The treatment group was treated using GT-ZB, and the control group was treated using the standard method of venoruton, dibazol, and Vitamin B6. The efficacies of the two treatments were compared. [Results] Compared with the control group, the clinical symptoms and signs in the treatment group were significantly mitigated. [Conclusion] GT-ZB demonstrated efficacy in treating the sequelae of CC in children, and it is worthy of further studies and possible clinical recommendations. PMID:27512257

  3. Disability pensions in relation to traumatic brain injury: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2000-01-01

    From a Danish national register of hospitalizations, all patients were identified who had a discharge diagnosis of traumatic brain injury between the years 1979-1993 inclusive, at ages 18-66 years inclusive. These were classified as having suffered either a concussion (n = 74,398), a cranial...... award appeared to be independent of the injury itself. Rather, being awarded a disability pension appeared to be related to conditions which themselves are risk factors for a traumatic brain injury, e.g. chronic skeletomuscular disease and psychiatric disorders including alcoholism. Comparison...

  4. Individual and combined effects of LD and ADHD on computerized neurocognitive concussion test performance: evidence for separate norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbin, R J; Kontos, Anthony P; Kegel, Nate; Johnson, Eric; Burkhart, Scott; Schatz, Philip

    2013-08-01

    Decreased neurocognitive performance in individuals with self-reported attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) is well documented in the neuropsychological research literature. Previous studies employing paper-and-pencil neurocognitive assessments report lower performance in individuals with ADHD and LD. The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of a self-reported diagnosis of LD, ADHD, and combined LD/ADHD on baseline computerized neurocognitive testing (CNT) used for the concussion assessment. Results revealed athletes with a self-reported diagnosis of LD, ADHD, and/or combined LD/ADHD demonstrated lower performance on baseline CNT and reported larger numbers of symptoms than did control athletes without these diagnoses. These findings provide evidence for the development of separate normative data for athletes with LD, ADHD, and LD/ADHD diagnoses on CNT batteries commonly used for concussion management. PMID:23608188

  5. Athletes' age, sex, and years of education moderate the acute neuropsychological impact of sports-related concussion: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Brooke K; Horswill, Mark S; Geffen, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine which pre-existing athlete characteristics, if any, are associated with greater deficits in functioning following sports-related concussion, after controlling for factors previously shown to moderate this effect (e.g., time since injury). Ninety-one independent samples of concussion were included in a fixed+systematic effects meta-analysis (n = 3,801 concussed athletes; 5,631 controls). Moderating variables were assessed using analogue-to-ANOVA and meta-regression analyses. Post-injury assessments first conducted 1-10 days following sports-related concussion revealed significant neuropsychological dysfunction, postural instability and post-concussion symptom reporting (d = -0.54, -1.10, and -1.14, respectively). During this interval, females (d = -0.87), adolescent athletes competing in high school competitions (d = -0.60), and those with 10 years of education (d = -1.32) demonstrated larger post-concussion neuropsychological deficits than males (d = -0.42), adults (d = -0.25), athletes competing at other levels of competition (d = -0.43 to -0.41), or those with 16 years of education (d = -0.15), respectively. However, these sub-groups' differential impairment/recovery beyond 10 days could not be reliably quantified from available literature. Pre-existing athlete characteristics, particularly age, sex and education, were demonstrated to be significant modifiers of neuropsychological outcomes within 10 days of a sports-related concussion. Implications for return-to-play decision-making and future research directions are discussed.

  6. A retrospective view of concussion in American football, 1900-1959: What was suggested then we now know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary; Sills, Allen Kent

    2015-07-01

    While published work and media attention about football-related concussion in the USA have increased exponentially in the past few years, these injuries have in fact been written about for over a century. In this work, we undertook a selective review of the PubMed database of the published reports on concussion in football prior to 1960, with attention to the definitions used, physician attitudes, epidemiology, return to play criteria and recommendations and concerns related to long-term outcomes. Search inclusion criteria were English language, publication between the years 1900 and 1959 and studies written by healthcare professionals treating football-related injuries. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria for this review, and the findings are grouped by topic area and detailed chronologically. Early sports medicine physicians struggled with many of the same issues faced today by clinicians such as honest reporting of symptoms by athletes, lack of uniform diagnosis and treatment and ambiguity over maximum 'safe' number of lifetime concussions.

  7. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the "dark neuron" (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  11. Computerized neurocognitive testing in the management of sport-related concussion: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Jacob E; McCrea, Michael A; Cullum, C Munro

    2013-12-01

    Since the late nineties, computerized neurocognitive testing has become a central component of sport-related concussion (SRC) management at all levels of sport. In 2005, a review of the available evidence on the psychometric properties of four computerized neuropsychological test batteries concluded that the tests did not possess the necessary criteria to warrant clinical application. Since the publication of that review, several more computerized neurocognitive tests have entered the market place. The purpose of this review is to summarize the body of published studies on psychometric properties and clinical utility of computerized neurocognitive tests available for use in the assessment of SRC. A review of the literature from 2005 to 2013 was conducted to gather evidence of test-retest reliability and clinical validity of these instruments. Reviewed articles included both prospective and retrospective studies of primarily sport-based adult and pediatric samples. Summaries are provided regarding the available evidence of reliability and validity for the most commonly used computerized neurocognitive tests in sports settings.

  12. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  13. Progressive inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration after traumatic brain or spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Alan I; Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan A; Loane, David J

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been linked to dementia and chronic neurodegeneration. Described initially in boxers and currently recognized across high contact sports, the association between repeated concussion (mild TBI) and progressive neuropsychiatric abnormalities has recently received widespread attention, and has been termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Less well appreciated are cognitive changes associated with neurodegeneration in the brain after isolated spinal cord injury. Also under-recognized is the role of sustained neuroinflammation after brain or spinal cord trauma, even though this relationship has been known since the 1950s and is supported by more recent preclinical and clinical studies. These pathological mechanisms, manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation and appropriately termed chronic traumatic brain inflammation or chronic traumatic inflammatory encephalopathy, may be among the most important causes of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Importantly, emerging experimental work demonstrates that persistent neuroinflammation can cause progressive neurodegeneration that may be treatable even weeks after traumatic injury.

  14. Neuroepidemiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A J; Zafonte, R

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant public-health concern. TBI is defined as an acute brain injury resulting from mechanical energy to the head from external physical forces. Some of the leading causes of TBI include falls, assaults, motor vehicle or traffic accidents, and sport-related concussion. Two of the most common identified risk factors are sex (males are nearly three times more likely to suffer a TBI than females); and a bimodal age pattern (persons 65 years and older, and children under 14 years old). It is estimated that approximately 1.5-2 million Americans suffer from TBI annually. TBIs account for around 1.4 million emergency room visits, 275 000 hospital admissions, and 52 000 deaths in the USA each year. TBI contributes to approximately 30% of all deaths in the USA annually. In Australia, it is estimated that approximately 338 700 individuals (1.9% of the population) suffer from a disability related to TBI. Of these, 160 200 were severely or profoundly affected by acquired brain injury, requiring daily support. In the UK, TBI accounted for 3.4% of all emergency department attendances annually. An overall rate of 453 per 100 000 was found for all TBI severities, of which 40 per 100 000 (10.9%) were moderate to severe. TBI often results in residual symptoms that affect an individual's cognition, movement, sensation, and/or emotional functioning. Recovery and rehabilitation from TBI may require considerable resources and may take years. Some individuals never fully recover, and some require lifetime ongoing care and support. TBI has an enormous social and financial cost, with estimates of the annual financial burden associated with TBI ranging between 9 and 10 billion US dollars. PMID:27637960

  15. Compensation through Functional Hyperconnectivity: A Longitudinal Connectome Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Iraji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a major public health concern. Functional MRI has reported alterations in several brain networks following mTBI. However, the connectome-scale brain network changes are still unknown. In this study, sixteen mTBI patients were prospectively recruited from an emergency department and followed up at 4–6 weeks after injury. Twenty-four healthy controls were also scanned twice with the same time interval. Three hundred fifty-eight brain landmarks that preserve structural and functional correspondence of brain networks across individuals were used to investigate longitudinal brain connectivity. Network-based statistic (NBS analysis did not find significant difference in the group-by-time interaction and time effects. However, 258 functional pairs show group differences in which mTBI patients have higher functional connectivity. Meta-analysis showed that “Action” and “Cognition” are the most affected functional domains. Categorization of connectomic signatures using multiview group-wise cluster analysis identified two patterns of functional hyperconnectivity among mTBI patients: (I between the posterior cingulate cortex and the association areas of the brain and (II between the occipital and the frontal lobes of the brain. Our results demonstrate that brain concussion renders connectome-scale brain network connectivity changes, and the brain tends to be hyperactivated to compensate the pathophysiological disturbances.

  16. Sinistrad mirror writing and reading after brain concussion in a bi-systemic (oriento-occidental) polyglot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streifler, M; Hofman, S

    1976-12-01

    The problem of mirror writing and reading is discussed in the light of a clinical case, where this disturbance appeared after an apparently minor head injury. Mirror writing and reading in this polyglot individual affected only the sinistrad (Hebrew) writing and reading system, leaving the dextrad (Latin) system unimpaired. This disturbance appeared together with dyscalculia, left-right disorientation and slight temporal confusion, suggestive of parieto-occipital lobe pathology. The clinical picture also showed apparently "conversional" traits, such as are sometimes seen in incomplete parietal lobe syndromes. The relevant literature is reviewed and patho-physiological mechanisms of mirror reversal are discussed. PMID:1009772

  17. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  18. Combat Helmets and Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and the prominence of traumatic brain injury (TBI, mostly from improvised explosive devices, have focused attention on the effectiveness of combat helmets. Purpose: This paper examines the importance of TBI, the role and history of the development of combat helmets, current helmet designs and effectiveness, helmet design methodology, helmet sensors, future research and recommendations. Method: A literature review was conducted using search terms – combat helmets, traumatic brain injury, concussion, Iraq, Afghanistan and helmet sensors, searching PubMed, MEDLINE, ProQuest and Google Scholar. Conclusions: At present, no existing helmet is able to fully protect against all threats faced on the battlefield. The prominence of traumatic brain injury from improvised explosive devices in the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has highlighted the limitations in knowledge about blast and how to provide protection from it. As a result, considerable research is currently occurring in how to protect the head from blast over-pressure. Helmet sensors may provide valuable data. Some new combat helmets may be able to protect against rifle rounds, but may result in injuries occurring behind body armour. Optimal combat helmet design requires a balance between the need for protection from trauma and the comfort and practicality of the helmet for the user to ensure the best outcomes.

  19. Social Media, Futbol, and Crisis: An exploratory case study examining the FIFA World Cup addressing player concussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Hughey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social media strategies and practices continue to be integrated across various athletic sports, particularly futbol. One of the recent global athletic events that occurred where social media played an important role was the 2014 Fédération Internationale de Football Association World Cup in Brazil. While social media brings forth great opportunities for teams to engage with fans and share real-time updates, it also allows active fans to voice concerns around particular issues like player safety i.e. concussions, which could lead to a crisis situation. This particular incident in question involved futbol player Christoph Kramer, who suffered a blow to the head that left him slumped over during the Germany versus Argentina championship match. Fans are linking the lack of concern for player safety to the FIFA brand, making an outcry for protocol to be adapted to tackle the growing issue surrounding players who have suffered from concussions. The FIFA organization waited until September 9, 2014 to address the public and provide a plan for future occurrences of this kind. Based on the theoretical framework of Coombs’ Situational Crisis Communication Theory, the FIFA commission did not properly assessing the crisis at hand and actually implemented the denial posture of crisis response instead of taking proactive actions to address this situation with their stakeholders.

  20. Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace B

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bridgett Wallace,1–4 Jonathan Lifshitz4–8 1360 Balance and Hearing, Department of Physical Therapy, Austin, TX, 2Concussion Health, Department of Clinical Education, Austin, TX, 3Conquering Concussions, Scottsdale, AZ, 4Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, 5Department of Child Health, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, 6The CACTIS Foundation, Scottsdale, 7Phoenix VA Healthcare System, Phoenix, AZ, 8Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA Abstract: Normal function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR coordinates eye movement with head movement, in order to provide clear vision during motion and maintain balance. VOR is generated within the semicircular canals of the inner ear to elicit compensatory eye movements, which maintain stability of images on the fovea during brief, rapid head motion, otherwise known as gaze stability. Normal VOR function is necessary in carrying out activities of daily living (eg, walking and riding in a car and is of particular importance in higher demand activities (eg, sports-related activities. Disruption or damage in the VOR can result in symptoms such as movement-related dizziness, blurry vision, difficulty maintaining balance with head movements, and even nausea. Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms following traumatic brain injury (TBI and is considered a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Assessment of the vestibular system is of particular importance following TBI, in conjunction with oculomotor control, due to the intrinsic neural circuitry that exists between the ocular and vestibular systems. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of the VOR and the visual-vestibular symptoms associated with TBI and to discuss assessment and treatment guidelines for TBI. Current challenges and future prospects will also be addressed. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, concussion, vestibular, ocular

  1. Enriched environment improves the cognitive effects from traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, S; Lin, R; Haim, L; Baratz-Goldstien, R; Rubovitch, V; Vaisman, N; Pick, C G

    2014-09-01

    To date, there is yet no established effective treatment (medication or cognitive intervention) for post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with chronic sequelae. Enriched environment (EE) has been recognized of importance in brain regulation, behaviour and physiology. Rodents reared in, or pre-exposed to EE, recovered better from brain insults. Using the concussive head trauma model of minimal TBI in mice, we evaluated the effect of transition to EE following a weight-drop (30g or 50g) induced mTBI on behavioural and cognitive parameters in mice in the Novel Object Recognition task, the Y- and the Elevated Plus mazes. In all assays, both mTBI groups (30g, 50g) housed in normal conditions were equally and significantly impaired 6 weeks post injury in comparison with the no-mTBI (pjuggling training and intensive cognitive stimulation. PMID:24906196

  2. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  3. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  4. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  7. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  12. The Utility of the Balance Error Scoring System for Mild Brain Injury Assessments in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Quatman-Yates, Catherine; Hugentobler, Jason; Ammon, Robin; Mwase, Najima; Kurowski, Brad; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) is widely recognized as an acceptable assessment of postural control for adult patients following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion. However, the measurement properties of the BESS as a post-mTBI assessment test for younger patients are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the BESS as a post-mTBI assessment test for children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years through 2 investigations: (1) a retro...

  13. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI.

  14. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI. PMID:27482782

  15. Challenges in Determining the Role of Rest and Exercise in the Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Elizabeth M; Goodkin, Howard P; Griesbach, Grace S

    2016-01-01

    Current consensus guidelines recommending physical and cognitive rest until a patient is asymptomatic after a sports concussion (ie, a mild traumatic brain injury) are being called into question, particularly for patients who are slower to recover and in light of preclinical and clinical research demonstrating that exercise aids neurorehabilitation. The pathophysiological response to mild traumatic brain injury includes a complex neurometabolic cascade of events resulting in a neurologic energy deficit. It has been proposed that this energy deficit leads to a period of vulnerability during which the brain is at risk for additional injury, explains why early postconcussive symptoms are exacerbated by cognitive and physical exertion, and is used to rationalize absolute rest until all symptoms have resolved. However, at some point, rest might no longer be beneficial and exercise might need to be introduced. At both extremes, excessive exertion and prolonged avoidance of exercise (physical and mental) have negative consequences. Individuals who have experienced a concussion need guidance for avoidance of triggers of severe symptoms and a plan for graduated exercise to promote recovery as well as optimal functioning (physical, educational, and social) during the postconcussion period.

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration that many people with depression experience ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  11. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, ... the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neurons, the most highly specialized cells of all, conduct messages. Every cell in our bodies contains a ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  1. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  2. Summary of the findings of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, J.; Cancelliere, C.; Cassidy, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, the WHO Collaborating Centre for Neurotrauma, Prevention, Management and Rehabilitation Task Force published the first large systematic review and best evidence synthesis on the clinical course and prognosis for recovery after MTBI. Ten years later, the International Collaboration on Mil...... injuries and the risk of Second Impact Syndrome after sport concussion. Clinicians can use this information to help inform patients on the likely course of recovery after MTBI/concussion and guide better decision-making in the care of these patients.......In 2004, the WHO Collaborating Centre for Neurotrauma, Prevention, Management and Rehabilitation Task Force published the first large systematic review and best evidence synthesis on the clinical course and prognosis for recovery after MTBI. Ten years later, the International Collaboration on Mild...... Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis (ICoMP) formed to update the original WHO Task Force results. This summary review highlights important clinical findings from the full ICoMP results including the current evidence on the course and prognosis of recovery after MTBI in diverse patient populations (e.g., adults...

  3. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Study in the Patients with Subacute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Ming Lin

    Full Text Available This study uses a MRI technique, three-dimension pulse continuous arterial spin labeling (3D-PCASL, to measure the patient's cerebral blood flow (CBF at the subacute stage of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI in order to analyze the relationship between cerebral blood flow and neurocognitive deficits.To provide the relationship between cortical CBF and neuropsychological dysfunction for the subacute MTBI patients.After MTBI, perfusion MR imaging technique (3D-PCASL measures the CBF of MTBI patients (n = 23 within 1 month and that of normal controls (n = 22 to determine the quantity and location of perfusion defect. The correlation between CBF abnormalities and cognitive deficits was elucidated by combining the results of the neuropsychological tests of the patients.We observed a substantial reduction in CBF in the bilateral frontal and left occipital cortex as compared with the normal persons. In addition, there were correlation between post concussive symptoms (including dizziness and simulator sickness and CBF in the hypoperfused areas. The more severe symptom was correlated with higher CBF in bilateral frontal and left occipital lobes.First, this study determined that despite no significant abnormality detected on conventional CT and MRI studies, hypoperfusion was observed in MTBI group using 3D-PCASL technique in subacute stage, which suggested that this approach may increase sensitivity to MTBI. Second, the correlation between CBF and the severity of post concussive symptoms suggested that changes in cerebral hemodynamics may play a role in pathophysiology underlies the symptoms.

  4. The military's approach to traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Grimes, Jamie; Ecklund, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are common conditions. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI became prominent among US service members but the vast majority of TBI was still due to typical causes such as falls and sporting events. PTS has long been a focus of the US military mental health providers. Combat Stress Teams have been integral to forward deployed units since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. Military medical management of disease and injury follows standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) established by civilian counterparts. However, when civilian CPGs do not exist or are not applicable to the military environment, new practice standards are created. Such is the case for mild TBI. In 2009, the VA-DoD CPG for management of mild TBI/concussion was published and a system-wide clinical care program for mild TBI/concussion was introduced. This was the first large scale effort on an entire medical care system to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. In 2010, the VA-DoD CPG for management of PTSD was published. Nevertheless, both TBI and PTS are still incompletely understood. Investment in terms of money and effort has been committed by the DoD to their study. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury are prominent examples of this effort. These are just beginnings, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always striving to provide the very best care to its military beneficiaries.

  5. Low-frequency connectivity is associated with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.T. Dunkley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI occurs from a closed-head impact. Often referred to as concussion, about 20% of cases complain of secondary psychological sequelae, such as disorders of attention and memory. Known as post-concussive symptoms (PCS, these problems can severely disrupt the patient's quality of life. Changes in local spectral power, particularly low-frequency amplitude increases and/or peak alpha slowing have been reported in mTBI, but large-scale connectivity metrics based on inter-regional amplitude correlations relevant for integration and segregation in functional brain networks, and their association with disorders in cognition and behaviour, remain relatively unexplored. Here, we used non-invasive neuroimaging with magnetoencephalography to examine functional connectivity in a resting-state protocol in a group with mTBI (n = 20, and a control group (n = 21. We observed a trend for atypical slow-wave power changes in subcortical, temporal and parietal regions in mTBI, as well as significant long-range increases in amplitude envelope correlations among deep-source, temporal, and frontal regions in the delta, theta, and alpha bands. Subsequently, we conducted an exploratory analysis of patterns of connectivity most associated with variability in secondary symptoms of mTBI, including inattention, anxiety, and depression. Differential patterns of altered resting state neurophysiological network connectivity were found across frequency bands. This indicated that multiple network and frequency specific alterations in large scale brain connectivity may contribute to overlapping cognitive sequelae in mTBI. In conclusion, we show that local spectral power content can be supplemented with measures of correlations in amplitude to define general networks that are atypical in mTBI, and suggest that certain cognitive difficulties are mediated by disturbances in a variety of alterations in network interactions which are differentially

  6. Evaluation of Axonal Strain as a Predictor for Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Using Finite Element Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Chiara; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-11-01

    Finite element (FE) models are often used to study the biomechanical effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures based on mechanical responses, such as principal strain or invariants of the strain tensor, are used as a metric to predict the risk of injury. However, the reliability of inferences drawn from these models depends on the correspondence between the mechanical measures and injury data, as well as the establishment of accurate thresholds of tissue injury. In the current study, a validated anisotropic FE model of the human head is used to evaluate the hypothesis that strain in the direction of fibers (axonal strain) is a better predictor of TBI than maximum principal strain (MPS), anisotropic equivalent strain (AESM) and cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM). An analysis of head kinematics-based metrics, such as head injury criterion (HIC) and brain injury criterion (BrIC), is also provided. Logistic regression analysis is employed to compare binary injury data (concussion/no concussion) with continuous strain/kinematics data. The threshold corresponding to 50% of injury probability is determined for each parameter. The predictive power (area under the ROC curve, AUC) is calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The measure with the highest AUC is considered to be the best predictor of mTBI. Logistic regression shows a statistical correlation between all the mechanical predictors and injury data for different regions of the brain. Peaks of axonal strain have the highest AUC and determine a strain threshold of 0.07 for corpus callosum and 0.15 for the brainstem, in agreement with previously experimentally derived injury thresholds for reversible axonal injury. For a data set of mild TBI from the national football league, the strain in the axonal direction is found to be a better injury predictor than MPS, AESM, CSDM, BrIC and HIC.

  7. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest ...

  14. Brain peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  15. RXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDY OF CREATINE KINASE BB ACTIVITY FOR TH E DIAGNOSIS ON BRAIN DAMAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the differential diagnosis o n cerebral concussion and mild cerebral contusion value of the brain type creati n e kinase isoenzyme(CK-BB),and evaluate the seriousness of brain damage and prog nosis of the patients with acute head injury.Methods Chromatographic separating and fluorometric quant ifying technique was used to detect the CK-BB activity in the cerebrospinal flu id(CSF) of 117 patients with acute head injury and 12 patients with increased in tracranial pressure and 20 normal people.Results The CSF-CK-BB activity of the patients with acu te head injury was remarkably higher than that of the normal people and the CSF -CK-BB activity increased with the seriousness of brain damage.There was a clo se relationship between CSF-CK-BB activity and prognosis,and higher activity o f CSF-CK-BB indicated poor prognosis.Conclusion CSF-CK -BB activity could be used as a new index to diagnose brain damage and evaluate the seriousness of brain damage and prognosis.

  16. Test-retest, retest, and retest: Growth curve models of repeat testing with Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerlender, Arthur C; Masterson, Caitlin J; James, Tiffany D; Beckwith, Jonathan; Brolinson, Per Gunner; Crisco, Joe; Duma, Stefan; Flashman, Laura A; Greenwald, Rick; Rowson, Steven; Wilcox, Beth; McAllister, Tom W

    2016-10-01

    Computerized neuropsychological testing has become an important tool in the identification and management of sports-related concussions; however, the psychometric effect of repeat testing has not been studied extensively beyond test-retest statistics. The current study analyzed data from Division I collegiate athletes who completed Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) baseline assessments at four sequential time points that varied over the course of their athletic careers. Administrations were part of a larger National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. Growth curve modeling showed that the two memory composite scores increased significantly with successive administrations: Change in Verbal Memory was best represented with a quadratic model, while a linear model best fit Visual Memory. Visual Motor Speed and Reaction Time composites showed no significant linear or quadratic growth. The results demonstrate the effect of repeated test administrations for memory composite scores, while speed composites were not significantly impacted by repeat testing. Acceptable test-retest reliability was demonstrated for all four composites as well. PMID:27266563

  17. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  18. FDG-PET imaging in mild traumatic brain injury: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R Byrnes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI affects an estimated 1.7 million people in the United States and is a contributing factor to one third of all injury related deaths annually. According to the CDC, approximately 75% of all reported TBIs are concussions or considered mild in form, although the number of unreported mild TBIs and patients not seeking medical attention is unknown. Currently, classification of mild TBI (mTBI or concussion is a clinical assessment since diagnostic imaging is typically inconclusive due to subtle, obscure, or absent changes in anatomical or physiological parameters measured using standard magnetic resonance (MR or computed tomography (CT imaging protocols. Molecular imaging techniques that examine functional processes within the brain, such as measurement of glucose uptake and metabolism using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, have the ability to detect changes after mild TBI. Recent technological improvements in the resolution of PET systems, the integration of PET with MRI, and the availability of normal healthy human databases and commercial image analysis software contribute to the growing use of molecular imaging in basic science research and advances in clinical imaging. This review will discuss the technological considerations and limitations of FDG-PET, including differentiation between glucose uptake and glucose metabolism and the significance of these measurements. In addition, the current state of FDG-PET imaging in assessing mild TBI in clinical and preclinical research will be considered. Finally, this review will provide insight into potential critical data elements and recommended standardization to improve the application of FDG-PET to mild TBI research and clinical practice.

  19. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  20. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  1. Brain and Addiction

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    ... Teens / Drug Facts / Brain and Addiction Brain and Addiction Print Your Brain Your brain is who you ... is taken over and over. What Is Drug Addiction? Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ... normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Outreach Home Public Involvement Outreach Partners Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... to another. Share Science News Connectome Re-Maps Human Cortex ECT Lifts Depression, Sustains Remission in Older ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons ... depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... NIMH Strategic Plan in 2016 August 31, 2016, 2:00-3:00 PM ET General Health Information ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Director’s Blog Budget Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change the way a gene is ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or serious and cause severe disability. Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence ... many different types of cells in the body. We say that cells differentiate as the embryo develops, ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  1. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay Mentally and Socially Active We Can Help ... of any wellness plan. Learn More Adopt a Healthy Diet > Eat a heart-healthy diet that benefits both ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the ... disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous system. ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the ... as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mental disorder, or perhaps you have experienced one yourself at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her husband ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  11. In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Jorge R; Small, Gary W; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Merrill, David A; Giza, Christopher C; Fitzsimmons, Robert P; Omalu, Bennet; Bailes, Julian; Kepe, Vladimir

    2015-04-21

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is an acquired primary tauopathy with a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms linked to cumulative brain damage sustained from single, episodic, or repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). No definitive clinical diagnosis for this condition exists. In this work, we used [F-18]FDDNP PET to detect brain patterns of neuropathology distribution in retired professional American football players with suspected CTE (n = 14) and compared results with those of cognitively intact controls (n = 28) and patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) (n = 24), a disease that has been cognitively associated with CTE. [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging results in the retired players suggested the presence of neuropathological patterns consistent with models of concussion wherein brainstem white matter tracts undergo early axonal damage and cumulative axonal injuries along subcortical, limbic, and cortical brain circuitries supporting mood, emotions, and behavior. This deposition pattern is distinctively different from the progressive pattern of neuropathology [paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and amyloid-β] in AD, which typically begins in the medial temporal lobe progressing along the cortical default mode network, with no or minimal involvement of subcortical structures. This particular [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging pattern in cases of suspected CTE also is primarily consistent with PHF-tau distribution observed at autopsy in subjects with a history of mild TBI and autopsy-confirmed diagnosis of CTE.

  12. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of cap

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked ... we see, and help us to solve a problem. Some of the regions most commonly ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as ... making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC are involved in using short-term or "working" ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ADHD , schizophrenia , and depression . Hippocampus —Helps create and file new memories. When the hippocampus is damaged, a ... portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A ...

  17. THE VALVE OF TCD AND EEG FOR PATIENTS WITH BRAIN CONCUSSION%TCD与EEG对脑震荡患者的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙琪

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨经颅多普乐超声(TCD)和脑电图(EEG)对脑震荡患者的应用价值.方法:对76例脑震荡患者(病例组)和对照组80例正常查体者进行TCD和EEG检查,并分析探讨其特征.结果:脑震荡组TCD异常率为67%,EEG异常率为64%.对照组TCD异常率为15%,EEG异常率为13.5%,脑震荡组与对照组比较差异有显著意义(P<0.01).结论:TCD的应用有助于动态观察脑震荡患者的脑血流变化情况,EEG能客观评价脑震荡病人脑机能状态,两者对伤情变化的判断及预后估计均有重要的临床意义.

  18. Real-time, whole-brain, temporally resolved pressure responses in translational head impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Ji, Songbai

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical debate still exists on the role of linear acceleration ( a lin) on the risk of brain injury. Recent injury metrics only consider head rotational acceleration ( a rot) but not a lin, despite that real-world on-field head impacts suggesting a lin significantly improves a concussion risk function. These controversial findings suggest a practical challenge in integrating theory and real-world experiment. Focusing on tissue-level mechanical responses estimated from finite-element (FE) models of the human head, rather than impact kinematics alone, may help address this debate. However, the substantial computational cost incurred (runtime and hardware) poses a significant barrier for their practical use. In this study, we established a real-time technique to estimate whole-brain a lin-induced pressures. Three hydrostatic atlas pressures corresponding to translational impacts (referred to as 'brain print') along the three major axes were pre-computed. For an arbitrary a lin profile at any instance in time, the atlas pressures were linearly scaled and then superimposed to estimate whole-brain responses. Using 12 publically available, independently measured or reconstructed real-world a lin profiles representative of a range of impact/injury scenarios, the technique was successfully validated (except for one case with an extremely short impulse of approx. 1 ms). The computational cost to estimate whole-brain pressure responses for an entire a lin profile was less than 0.1 s on a laptop versus typically hours on a high-end multicore computer. These findings suggest the potential of the simple, yet effective technique to enable future studies to focus on tissue-level brain responses, rather than solely relying on global head impact kinematics that have plagued early and contemporary brain injury research to date.

  19. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  20. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  1. Examination of outcome after mild traumatic brain injury: the contribution of injury beliefs and Leventhal's common sense model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Deborah L; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Surgenor, Lois J; Siegert, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Associations between components of Leventhal's common sense model of health behaviour (injury beliefs, coping, distress) and outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) were examined. Participants (n = 147) were recruited within three months following MTBI and assessed six months later, completing study questionnaires at both visits (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire Revised, Brief COPE, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Outcome measures included the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire and Rivermead Head Injury Follow-Up Questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses examined associations between injury beliefs, coping and distress at baseline, and later outcome. Participants endorsing stronger injury identity beliefs (p model. Consistent with Leventhal's model, participant beliefs about their injury and recovery had significant associations with outcome over time. Coping also appeared to have important associations with outcome but more research is required to examine these. Current reassurance-based interventions may be improved by targeting variables such as injury beliefs, coping and adjustment soon after injury.

  2. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth [Department of Behavioural Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Hollis, Sally [Medical Statistics Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Yates, David W. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  3. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Eakin

    Full Text Available In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI. For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man.

  4. Social reintegration of traumatic brain-injured: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelle, J-L; Wild, K Von; Onillon, M; Montreuil, M

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) may lead to specific handicap, often hidden, mainly due to cognitive and behavioural sequelae. Social re-entry is a long-term, fluctuant and precarious process. The French experience will be illustrated by 6 initiatives answering to 6 challenges to do with TBI specificities:1. bridging the gap, between initial rehabilitation and community re-entry, via transitional units dealing with assessment, retraining, social/vocational orientation and follow-up. Today, there are 30 such units based on multidisciplinary teams.2. assessing recovery by TBI-specific and validated evaluation tools: EBIS holistic document, BNI Screening of higher cerebral functions, Glasgow outcome extended, and QOLIBRI, a TBI-specific quality of life tool.3. promoting specific re-entry programmes founded on limited medication, ecological neuro-psychological rehabilitation, exchange groups and workshops, violence prevention, continuity of care, environmental structuration, and "resocialisation".4. taking into account the "head injured family"5. facilitating recovery after sports-related concussion6. facing medico-legal consequences and compensation: In that perspective, we developed guidelines for TBI-specific expert appraisal, including mandatory neuro-psychological assessment, family interview and an annual forum gathering lawyers and health professionals. PMID:22028740

  5. Quantum Brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Skoulakis, E M C

    2000-01-01

    In order to create a novel model of memory and brain function, we focus our approach on the sub-molecular (electron), molecular (tubulin) and macromolecular (microtubule) components of the neural cytoskeleton. Due to their size and geometry, these systems may be approached using the principles of quantum physics. We identify quantum-physics derived mechanisms conceivably underlying the integrated yet differentiated aspects of memory encoding/recall as well as the molecular basis of the engram. We treat the tubulin molecule as the fundamental computation unit (qubit) in a quantum-computational network that consists of microtubules (MTs), networks of MTs and ultimately entire neurons and neural networks. We derive experimentally testable predictions of our quantum brain hypothesis and perform experiments on these.

  6. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction as a Hallmark Pathology in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Colin P; O'Keefe, Eoin; Wallace, Eugene; Loftus, Teresa; Keaney, James; Kealy, John; Humphries, Marian M; Molloy, Michael G; Meaney, James F; Farrell, Michael; Campbell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. In recent years, attention has focused on emerging evidence linking the development of CTE to concussive injuries in athletes and military personnel; however, the underlying molecular pathobiology of CTE remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is disrupted in regions of dense perivascular p-Tau accumulation in a case of CTE. Immunoreactivity patterns of the BBB-associated tight junction components claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 were markedly discontinuous or absent in regions of perivascular p-Tau deposition; there was also immunohistochemical evidence of a BBB in these foci. Because the patient was diagnosed premortem clinically as having progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we also compromised that the CTE alterations appear to be distinct from those in the brain of a patient with PSP. This report represents the first description of BBB dysfunction in a pathologically proven CTE case and suggests a vascular component in the postconcussion cascade of events that may ultimately lead to development of a progressive degenerative disorder. BBB dysfunction may represent a correlate of neural dysfunction in live subjects suspected of being at risk for development of CTE. PMID:27245243

  7. Animating Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  8. Concussion in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... typical aerobic exercises are: • Walking • Running • Stair climbing • Cycling • Rowing • Cross country skiing • Swimming. In addition, strength ... found, exercise can help you stay on a diet and lose weight. What’s more – regular exercise can ...

  9. Concussion in Winter Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication, Digital Media Branch, Division of Public Affairs Follow CDC Email Recommend Tweet Post RSS CDC Media Listen Watch eCards YouTube About CDC Employment Newsroom Training/Education Funding CDC's Organization Mission and Vision Using this ...

  10. Alteration of default mode network in high school football athletes due to repetitive subconcussive mild traumatic brain injury: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Kausar; Shenk, Trey E; Poole, Victoria N; Breedlove, Evan L; Leverenz, Larry J; Nauman, Eric A; Talavage, Thomas M; Robinson, Meghan E

    2015-03-01

    Long-term neurological damage as a result of head trauma while playing sports is a major concern for football athletes today. Repetitive concussions have been linked to many neurological disorders. Recently, it has been reported that repetitive subconcussive events can be a significant source of accrued damage. Since football athletes can experience hundreds of subconcussive hits during a single season, it is of utmost importance to understand their effect on brain health in the short and long term. In this study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) was used to study changes in the default mode network (DMN) after repetitive subconcussive mild traumatic brain injury. Twenty-two high school American football athletes, clinically asymptomatic, were scanned using the rs-fMRI for a single season. Baseline scans were acquired before the start of the season, and follow-up scans were obtained during and after the season to track the potential changes in the DMN as a result of experienced trauma. Ten noncollision-sport athletes were scanned over two sessions as controls. Overall, football athletes had significantly different functional connectivity measures than controls for most of the year. The presence of this deviation of football athletes from their healthy peers even before the start of the season suggests a neurological change that has accumulated over the years of playing the sport. Football athletes also demonstrate short-term changes relative to their own baseline at the start of the season. Football athletes exhibited hyperconnectivity in the DMN compared to controls for most of the sessions, which indicates that, despite the absence of symptoms typically associated with concussion, the repetitive trauma accrued produced long-term brain changes compared to their healthy peers.

  11. Myelin Water Fraction Is Transiently Reduced after a Single Mild Traumatic Brain Injury--A Prospective Cohort Study in Collegiate Hockey Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Wright

    Full Text Available Impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI are a major public health concern, and remain as one of the most poorly understood injuries in the field of neuroscience. Currently, the diagnosis and management of such injuries are based largely on patient-reported symptoms. An improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of mTBI is urgently needed in order to develop better diagnostic and management protocols. Specifically, dynamic post-injury changes to the myelin sheath in the human brain have not been examined, despite 'compromised white matter integrity' often being described as a consequence of mTBI. In this preliminary cohort study, myelin water imaging was used to prospectively evaluate changes in myelin water fraction, derived from the T2 decay signal, in two varsity hockey teams (45 players over one season of athletic competition. 11 players sustained a concussion during competition, and were scanned at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-injury. Results demonstrated a reduction in myelin water fraction at 2 weeks post-injury in several brain areas relative to preseason scans, including the splenium of the corpus callosum, right posterior thalamic radiation, left superior corona radiata, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left posterior limb of the internal capsule. Myelin water fraction recovered to pre-season values by 2 months post-injury. These results may indicate transient myelin disruption following a single mTBI, with subsequent remyelination of affected neurons. Myelin disruption was not apparent in the athletes who did not experience a concussion, despite exposure to repetitive subconcussive trauma over a season of collegiate hockey. These findings may help to explain many of the metabolic and neurological deficits observed clinically following mTBI.

  12. 2 Kids an Hour Hurt in Strollers, Infant Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which is scary considering the fact that traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and concussions in young children may have ... of stroller injuries were more serious, causing traumatic brain injuries or concussions, the study said. The researchers also ...

  13. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain and Nervous System Print ... is quite the juggler. Anatomy of the Nervous System If you think of the brain as a ...

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  15. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  16. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xiong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG. In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes, our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes, blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI.

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a novel brain and vestibular rehabilitation treatment modality in PTSD patients who have suffered combat related traumatic brain injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Robert Carrick

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast-related head injuries are among the most prevalent injuries suffered by military personnel deployed in combat and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion on the battlefield in Iraq/Afghanistan has resulted in its designation as a signature injury. Vestibular complaints are the most frequent sequelae of mTBI and vestibular rehabilitation (VR has been established as the most important treatment modality for this group of patients. Material and Methods:We studied the effectiveness of a novel brain and VR treatment PTSD in subjects who had suffered combat related traumatic brain injuries in terms of PTSD symptom reduction. The trial was registered as ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02003352. (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02003352?term=carrick&rank=6. We analyzed the difference in the Clinician Administered DSM-IV PTSD Scale (CAPS scores pre and post treatment using our subjects as their own matched controls. The study population consisted of 98 combat veterans maintaining an alpha of <0.05 and power of 80%. Results:Prior to treatment, 75 subjects representing 76.53 % of the sample were classified in the 2 most severe categories of PTSD. 41 subjects, representing 41.80 % of the total sample, were classified in the extreme category of PTSD and 34 subjects, representing 34.70 % of the total sample, were classified in the severe category of PTSD. After treatment we observed a large reduction in CAPS severity scores with both statistical and substantive significance. Discussion:Treatment of PTSD as a physical injury rather than a psychiatric disorder is associated with strong statistical and substantive significant outcomes associated with a decrease of PTSD classification. The stigma associated with neuropsychiatric disorders may be lessened when PTSD is treated with brain and VR with a potential decrease in suffering of patients, family and society.

  18. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel ...

  19. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    OpenAIRE

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-01-01

    Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The co...

  20. Resilience and Other Possible Outcomes After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Karen A; Kempe, Chloe B; Edmed, Shannon L; Bonanno, George A

    2016-06-01

    The relation between resilience and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcome has been theorized but empirical studies have been scarce. This systematic review aimed to describe the research in this area. Electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, SPORTdiscus, and PILOTS) were searched from inception to August 2015 for studies in which resilience was measured following TBI. The search terms included 'TBI' 'concussion' 'postconcussion' 'resilience' and 'hardiness'. Inclusion criteria were peer reviewed original research reports published in English, human participants aged 18 years and over with brain injury, and an accepted definition of mild TBI. Hand searching of identified articles was also undertaken. Of the 71 studies identified, five studies were accepted for review. These studies were formally assessed for risk of bias by two independent reviewers. Each study carried a risk of bias, most commonly a detection bias, but none were excluded on this basis. A narrative interpretation of the findings was used because the studies reflected fundamental differences in the conceptualization of resilience. No studies employed a trajectory based approach to measure a resilient outcome. In most cases, the eligible studies assessed trait resilience with a scale and used it as a predictor of outcome (postconcussion symptoms). Three of these studies showed that greater trait resilience was associated with better mild TBI outcomes (fewer symptoms). Future research of the adult mild TBI response that predicts a resilient outcome is encouraged. These studies could yield empirical evidence for a resilient, and other possible mild TBI outcomes. PMID:27154289

  1. Mild traumatic brain injury with social defeat stress alters anxiety, contextual fear extinction, and limbic monoamines in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eDavies

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM, or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 hr after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes.

  2. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Social Defeat Stress Alters Anxiety, Contextual Fear Extinction, and Limbic Monoamines in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Daniel R; Olson, Dawne; Meyer, Danielle L; Scholl, Jamie L; Watt, Michael J; Manzerra, Pasquale; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM), or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 h after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes. PMID:27147992

  3. 脑外伤后综合征患者执行功能的研究%A Study of Executive Functions in Patients with Post-concussion Syndrome.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张训; 彭彪; 秦明筠; 罗冬冬; 成友军; 邹文锦; 王金伟; 赵海林

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features of executive functions of patients with post-concussion syndrome. Methods The study was conducted in 40 patients with post-concussion syndrome and 20 normal controls. They were evaluated executive functions by verbal fluency test(animal), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test(WSCT) and Tower of Hanoi(TOH). Results Compared with normal controls, the patients with post-concussion syndrome were significantly impaired in total scores of verbal fluency, categories , total errors and persistent errors of WSCT, total score and mean executive time of TOH(P0.05). Conclusions The executive functions is impaired in patients with post-concussion syndrome. It is one of the reason for decreased learning and working ability.%  目的探讨脑外伤后综合征患者的执行功能特点,为临床工作提供理论依据。方法纳入40名脑外伤后综合征患者和20名正常对照者,应用言语流畅性测验(动物)、威斯康星卡片分类测验(WSCT)、汉诺塔(TOH)对受试者进行执行功能评定,对两组执行功能的差异进行相关分析。结果脑外伤后综合征患者组言语流畅总数、WSCT 分类数、WSCT 总错误数、WSCT 持续错误数、TOH 平均执行时间、TOH 总分显著差于正常对照组,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。而言语流畅重复数和 TOH 平均计划时间两组相比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论脑外伤后综合征患者的执行功能明显受损,这可能是脑外伤后综合征患者工作和学习能力下降的原因之一。

  4. Vulnerability imposed by diet and brain trauma for anxiety-like phenotype: implications for post-traumatic stress disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethika Tyagi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, cerebral concussion is a risk factor for the development of psychiatric illness such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We sought to evaluate how omega-3 fatty acids during brain maturation can influence challenges incurred during adulthood (transitioning to unhealthy diet and mTBI and predispose the brain to a PTSD-like pathobiology. Rats exposed to diets enriched or deficient in omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 during their brain maturation period, were transitioned to a western diet (WD when becoming adult and then subjected to mTBI. TBI resulted in an increase in anxiety-like behavior and its molecular counterpart NPY1R, a hallmark of PTSD, but these effects were more pronounced in the animals exposed to n-3 deficient diet and switched to WD. The n-3 deficiency followed by WD disrupted BDNF signaling and the activation of elements of BDNF signaling pathway (TrkB, CaMKII, Akt and CREB in frontal cortex. TBI worsened these effects and more prominently in combination with the n-3 deficiency condition. Moreover, the n-3 deficiency primed the immune system to the challenges imposed by the WD and brain trauma as evidenced by results showing that the WD or mTBI affected brain IL1β levels and peripheral Th17 and Treg subsets only in animals previously conditioned to the n-3 deficient diet. These results provide novel evidence for the capacity of maladaptive dietary habits to lower the threshold for neurological disorders in response to challenges.

  5. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-01-01

    Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial s...

  6. Brain Drain Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Borta, Oxana

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the widely acknowledged so-called brain drain controversy. More concretely on developments in the traditional brain drain literature towards a new shift, claiming the brain gain effect, as an alternative to the brain drain effect, that emigration may bring to a source country. The research investigates not only the obvious direct loss effects – the so called brain drain – but also the possibility of more subtle indirect beneficial effects.

  7. Neuropsychological, Metabolic, and GABAA Receptor Studies in Subjects with Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seong Ae; Song, Yoo Sung; Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, Ho-Young; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Sang Eun

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) occurs as a result of mild and accumulative brain damage. A prototype of rTBI is chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is a degenerative disease that occurs in patients with histories of multiple concussions or head injuries. Boxers have been the most commonly studied patient group because they may experience thousands of subconcussive hits over the course of a career. This study examined the consequences of rTBI with structural brain imaging and biomolecular imaging and investigated whether the neuropsychological features of rTBI were related to the findings of the imaging studies. Five retired professional boxers (mean age, 46.8 ± 3.19 years) and four age-matched controls (mean age, 48.5 ± 3.32 years) were studied. Cognitive-motor related functional impairment was assessed, and all subjects underwent neuropsychological evaluation and behavioral tasks, as well as structural brain imaging and functional-molecular imaging. In neuropsychological tests, boxers showed deficits in delayed retrieval of visuospatial memory and motor coordination, which had a meaningful relationship with biomolecular imaging results indicative of neuronal injury. Morphometric abnormalities were not found in professional boxers by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Glucose metabolism was impaired in frontal areas associated with cognitive dysfunction, similar to findings in Alzheimer's disease. Low binding potential (BP) of (18)F-flumazenil (FMZ) was found in the angular gyrus and temporal cortical regions, revealing neuronal deficits. These results suggested that cognitive impairment and motor dysfunction reflect chronic damage to neurons in professional boxers with rTBI. PMID:26414498

  8. Cognitive, emotional and behavioral impairments following traumatic brain injury and the neuro-radiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Definition and diagnostic criteria in Japan of a high order brain functional impairment are explained and recent findings of the useful imaging for the criteria are discussed. The criteria of cognitive, emotional and behavioral impairments following brain injury (BI) defined by Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) and National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities contain 4 items of major symptoms, test findings, exclusion criteria and diagnosis. The criteria contain parts of diseases F04, F06 and F7 in ICD (International Classification of Diseases) 10, and conceivably correspond to such Western terms as the neuropsychological impairment, neurobehavioral impairment, cognitive disability and post-concussion syndrome. Head trauma is the major cause of BI and in the second item (test findings) of the diagnostic criteria above, imaging confirmation of the organic BI (mainly diffuse) is essential. For imaging technology of chronic diffuse injury, discussed are on findings of the structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI; 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET); and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-ethyl-cysteinate dimmer and 123I-iomazenil. Based on those findings, it is thought that the impairment of the high order brain functions by diffuse injury is caused by the dysfunction of the primarily injured region and by its consequent disorder of cingulated gyrus and frontal anterior medial region through disturbance of cerebral nerve transmission and control. It is also suggested that a part of the blast related mild traumatic BI in US ex-servicemen is caused by the light diffuse BI, which can only be identified by the fractional anisotropy-statistical parametric mapping image in DTI. Number of patients with the high order brain functional impairment is estimated to be about 300,000 in Japan, but only 1/3 of those are actually diagnosed to be of the disease. (T.T.)

  9. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The conclusions suggest that Romania could benefit from the diaspora option, through an active implication at institutional level and the implementation of a strategy in this area.

  10. The Brain Never Stops

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Your brain is doing a lot of work when you are engaged in activities such as sports, playing a game, or watching a movie. Your brain is also a master of associating one thought with another and making your mind wander. But what does your brain do when you are not engaged in particular thoughts or actions? Interestingly, similar to the heart that always keeps beating, the brain never stops its activity. For example, your brain is highly active even when you are fast asleep. In fact, brain cell...

  11. Understanding brain networks and brain organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Luiz

    2014-09-01

    What is the relationship between brain and behavior? The answer to this question necessitates characterizing the mapping between structure and function. The aim of this paper is to discuss broad issues surrounding the link between structure and function in the brain that will motivate a network perspective to understanding this question. However, as others in the past, I argue that a network perspective should supplant the common strategy of understanding the brain in terms of individual regions. Whereas this perspective is needed for a fuller characterization of the mind-brain, it should not be viewed as panacea. For one, the challenges posed by the many-to-many mapping between regions and functions is not dissolved by the network perspective. Although the problem is ameliorated, one should not anticipate a one-to-one mapping when the network approach is adopted. Furthermore, decomposition of the brain network in terms of meaningful clusters of regions, such as the ones generated by community-finding algorithms, does not by itself reveal "true" subnetworks. Given the hierarchical and multi-relational relationship between regions, multiple decompositions will offer different "slices" of a broader landscape of networks within the brain. Finally, I described how the function of brain regions can be characterized in a multidimensional manner via the idea of diversity profiles. The concept can also be used to describe the way different brain regions participate in networks.

  12. Whole brain reirradiation for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis was done for 31 patients with brain metastases who had undergone reirradiation. Initial whole brain irradiation was performed with 30 Gy/10 fractions for 87% of these patients. Whole brain reirradiation was performed with 30 Gy/10 fractions for 42% of these patients (3-40 Gy/1-20 fractions). The median interval between the initial irradiation and reirradiation was 10 months (range: 2-69 months). The median survival time after reirradiation was 4 months (range: 1-21 months). The symptomatic improvement rate after reirradiation was 68%, and the partial and complete tumor response rate was 55%. Fifty-two percent of the patients developed grade 1 acute reactions. Whole brain reirradiation for brain metastases placed only a slight burden on patients and was effective for symptomatic improvement. (author)

  13. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  14. Brain Tumor Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Press Releases Headlines Newsletter ABTA ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain ...

  15. Biophysics: Unfolding the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The folded surface of the human brain, although striking, continues to evade understanding. Experiments with swelling gels now fuel the notion that brain folding is modulated by physical forces, and not by genetic, biological or chemical events alone.

  16. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free mailed brochure Cómo Prevenir un Accidente Cerebrovascular Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke Request free mailed brochure Table ... Americans are protecting their most important asset—their brain. Are you? Stroke ranks as the fourth leading ...

  17. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... to make progress in “immunogenomics” Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  18. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  19. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  20. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  1. NASA Robot Brain Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Mechanical Engineer Michael Guerrero works on the Robot Brain Surgeon testbed in the NeuroEngineering Group at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Principal investigator Dr. Robert W. Mah states that potentially the simple robot will be able to feel brain structures better than any human surgeon, making slow, very precise movements during an operation. The brain surgery robot that may give surgeons finer control of surgical instruments during delicate brain operations is still under development.

  2. Brain cancer spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue).......The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue)....

  3. Brain-actuated interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Millán, José del R.; Renkens, F.; Mourino, J.; Gerstner, W.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last years evidence has accumulated that shows the possibility to analyze human brain activity on-line and translate brain states into actions such as selecting a letter from a virtual keyboard or moving a robotics device. These initial results have been obtained with either invasive approaches (requiring surgical implantation of electrodes) or synchronous protocols (where brain signals are time-locked to external cues). In this paper we describe a portable noninvasive brain-computer...

  4. The connected brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The connected brain Martijn van den Heuvel, 2009 Our brain is a network. It is a network of different brain regions that are all functionally and structurally linked to each other. In the past decades, neuroimaging studies have provided a lot of information about the specific functions of each separ

  5. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  6. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  7. Brain emotional learning based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Asadi Ghanbari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface (BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction and classification operations. Classification is crucial as it has a substantial effect on the BCI speed and bit rate. Recent developments of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs bring forward some challenging problems to the machine learning community, of which classification of time-varying electrophysiological signals is a crucial one. Constructing adaptive classifiers is a promising approach to deal with this problem. In this paper, we introduce adaptive classifiers for classify electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The adaptive classifier is brain emotional learning based adaptive classifier (BELBAC, which is based on emotional learning process. The main purpose of this research is to use a structural model based on the limbic system of mammalian brain, for decision making and control engineering applications. We have adopted a network model developed by Moren and Balkenius, as a computational model that mimics amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, thalamus, sensory input cortex and generally, those parts of the brain thought responsible for processing emotions. The developed method was compared with other methods used for EEG signals classification (support vector machine (SVM and two different neural network types (MLP, PNN. The result analysis demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed approach.

  8. Instant BrainShark

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. ""Instant BrainShark"" is a step-by-step guide to creating online presentations using BrainShark. The book covers digital marketing best practices alongside tips for sales conversions. The book is written in an easy-to-read style for anybody to easily pick up and get started with BrainShark.Instant BrainShark is for anyone who wants to use BrainShark to create presentations online and share them around the community. The book is also useful for developers who are looking to explore

  9. The Blue Collar Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eVan Orden

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue collar role compared to the white collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

  10. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  11. Network analysis of human fMRI data suggests modular restructuring after simulated acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Vargas, E; Mitchell, D G V; Greening, S G; Wahl, L M

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology underlying neurocognitive dysfunction following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), or concussion, is poorly understood. In order to shed light on the effects of TBI at the functional network or modular level, our research groups are engaged in the acquisition and analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from subjects post-TBI. Complementary to this effort, in this paper we use mathematical and computational techniques to determine how modular structure changes in response to specific mechanisms of injury. In particular, we examine in detail the potential effects of focal contusions, diffuse axonal degeneration and diffuse microlesions, illustrating the extent to which functional modules are preserved or degenerated by each type of injury. One striking prediction of our study is that the left and right hemispheres show a tendency to become functionally separated post-injury, but only in response to diffuse microlesions. We highlight other key differences among the effects of the three modelled injuries and discuss their clinical implications. These results may help delineate the functional mechanisms underlying several of the cognitive sequelae associated with TBI. PMID:26463519

  12. Mapping brain function to brain anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Imaging the human brain, MRI is commonly used to reveal anatomical structure, while PET is used to reveal tissue function. This paper presents a protocol for correlating data between these two imaging modalities; this correlation can provide in vivo regional measurements of brain function which are essential to our understanding of the human brain. The authors propose a general protocol to standardize the acquisition and analysis of functional image data. First, MR and PET images are collected to form three-dimensional volumes of structural and functional image data. Second, these volumes of image data are corrected for distortions inherent in each imaging modality. Third, the image volumes are correlated to provide correctly aligned structural and functional images. The functional images are then mapped onto the structural images in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations. Finally, morphometric techniques can be used to provide statistical measures of the structure and function of the human brain

  13. A Brain Gain with a Brain Drain

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded; Prskawetz, Alexia; Helmenstein, Christian

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: We study human capital depletion and formation in an economy open to out-migration, as opposed to an economy which is closed. Under the natural assumption of asymmetric information, the enlarged opportunities and the associated different structure of incentives can give rise to a brain gain in conjunction with a brain drain. Migration by high-skill members of its workforce notwithstanding, the home country can end up with a higher average level of human capital per worker.;

  14. What Can I Do to Help Feel Better After a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to another concussion. (It is best to avoid roller coasters or other high speed rides that can make ... a bicycle, playing sports, or climbing playground equipment, roller coasters or rides that could result in another bump, ...

  15. Brain Temperature: Physiology and Pathophysiology after Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ségolène Mrozek; Fanny Vardon; Thomas Geeraerts

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of brain temperature is largely dependent on the metabolic activity of brain tissue and remains complex. In intensive care clinical practice, the continuous monitoring of core temperature in patients with brain injury is currently highly recommended. After major brain injury, brain temperature is often higher than and can vary independently of systemic temperature. It has been shown that in cases of brain injury, the brain is extremely sensitive and vulnerable to small variatio...

  16. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  17. [Brain abscess - overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur Arni; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Olafsson, Ingvar H

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess is a life threatening illness, demanding rapid diagnosis and treatment. Its development requires seeding of an organism into the brain parenchyma, often in an area of damaged brain tissue or in a region with poor microcirculation. The lesion evolves from a cerebritis stage to capsule formation. Brain abscesses can be caused by contiguous or haematogenous spread of an infection, or by head trauma/ neurosurgical procedure. The most common presentation is that of headache and vomiting due to raised intracranial pressure. Seizures have been reported in up to 50% of cases. Focal neurological deficits may be present, depending on the location of the lesion. Treatment of a brain abscess involves aspiration or excision, along with parenteral antibiotic therapy. The outcome has improved dramatically in the last decades due to improvement in diagnostic techniques, neurosurgery, and broad-spectrum antibiotics. The authors provide an overview of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of brain abscesses. PMID:23341403

  18. Handbook of Brain Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jirsa, Viktor K

    2007-01-01

    Our contemporary understanding of brain function is deeply rooted in the ideas of the nonlinear dynamics of distributed networks. Cognition and motor coordination seem to arise from the interactions of local neuronal networks, which themselves are connected in large scales across the entire brain. The spatial architectures between various scales inevitably influence the dynamics of the brain and thereby its function. But how can we integrate brain connectivity amongst these structural and functional domains? Our Handbook provides an account of the current knowledge on the measurement, analysis and theory of the anatomical and functional connectivity of the brain. All contributors are leading experts in various fields concerning structural and functional brain connectivity. In the first part of the Handbook, the chapters focus on an introduction and discussion of the principles underlying connected neural systems. The second part introduces the currently available non-invasive technologies for measuring struct...

  19. Brain Development in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-01

    Although human brain development continues throughout childhood and adolescence, it is a non-linear process both structurally and functionally. Here we review studies of brain development in healthy children from the viewpoint of structure and the perfusion of gray and white matter. Gray matter volume increases and then decreases with age, with the developmental time of the peak volume differing among brain regions in the first and second decades of life. On the other hand, white matter volum...

  20. Psychotherapy and brain plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Collerton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I will review why psychotherapy is relevant to the question of how consciousness relates to brain plasticity. A great deal of the research and theorizing on consciousness and the brain, including my own on hallucinations for example (Collerton and Perry, 2011) has focused upon specific changes in conscious content which can be related to temporal changes in restricted brain systems. I will argue that psychotherapy, in contrast, allows only a focus on holistic aspects of conscio...

  1. Multimodal Brain Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Current connectivity diagrams of human brain image data are either overly complex or overly simplistic. In this work we introduce simple yet accurate interactive visual representations of multiple brain image structures and the connectivity among them. We map cortical surfaces extracted from human brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data onto 2D surfaces that preserve shape (angle), extent (area), and spatial (neighborhood) information for 2D (circular disk) and 3D (spherical) mapping, spl...

  2. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

  3. Markowitz in the brain ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstin Preuschoff; Steven Quartz; Peter Bossaerts

    2008-01-01

    We review recent brain-scanning (fMRI) evidence that activity in certain sub-cortical structures of the human brain correlate with changes in expected reward, as well as with risk. Risk is measured by variance of payoff, as in Markowitz’ theory. The brain structures form part of the dopamine system. This system had been known to regulate learning of expected rewards. New data show that it is also involved in perception, of expected reward, and of risk. The findings suggest that the brain may ...

  4. Mapping the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With powerful new technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference device that peer through the skull and see the brain at work, neuroscientists seek the wellsprings of thoughts and emotions, the genesis of intelligence and language. A functional map of the brain is thus obtained and its challenge is to move beyond brain structure to create a detailed diagram of which part do what. For that the brain's cartographers rely on a variety of technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference devices. Their performances and uses are briefly reviewed. ills

  5. Trends in North American newspaper reporting of brain injury in ice hockey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Cusimano

    Full Text Available The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998-2000 and 2009-2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to 'perception of risks' and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media.

  6. Trends in North American newspaper reporting of brain injury in ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998-2000 and 2009-2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to 'perception of risks' and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

  7. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  8. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial such as hipoxia, hypotensi, hyponatremia, hypertermia, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The cause of intracranial such as extradural, subdural, intraserebral, intraventrikular, dan subarachnoid hemorrhage. Beside that secondary injury can also be caused by edema and infection. Post-traumatic cerebral injured is characterized by direct tissue damage, impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow (cerebral blood flow / CBF, and disruption of metabolism. Manifestations of secondary brain injured include increased intracranial pressure, ischemic brain damage, cerebral hypoxia and hypercarbi, as well as disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The first priority is to stabilize the patient's cervical spine injury, relieve and maintain airway, ensure adequate ventilation (breathing, and making venous access for fluid resuscitation pathways (circulation and assessing the level of awareness and disability. This steps is crucial in patients with head injured to prevent hypoxia and hypotension, which is the main cause of secondary brain injury.

  9. Brain, body and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2010-01-01

    This essay sketches out a biocultural theory of religion which is based on an expanded view of cognition that is anchored in brain and body (embrained and embodied), deeply dependent on culture (enculturated) and extended and distributed beyond the borders of individual brains. Such an approach u...... to scholars of religion and be submitted to further hypotheses and tests by cognitive scientists....

  10. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed.

  11. Demystifying the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nature of brain development in adolescence helps explain why adolescents can vacillate so often between mature and immature behavior. Early and middle adolescence, in particular, are times of heightened vulnerability to risky and reckless behavior because the brain's reward center is easily aroused, but the systems that control…

  12. Inside the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Stacy S.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Jay Giedd says that the main alterations in the adolescent brain are the inverted U-shaped developmental trajectories with late childhood/early teen peaks for gray matter volume among others. Giedd adds that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to substances that artificially modulate dopamine levels since its reward system is in a state of flux.

  13. Mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.E.; Alekseenko, Y.; Battistin, L.; Ehler, E.; Gerstenbrand, F.; Muresanu, D.F.; Potapov, A.; Stepan, C.A.; Traubner, P.; Vecsei, L.; Wild, K. von

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is among the most frequent neurological disorders. Of all TBIs 90% are considered mild with an annual incidence of 100-300/100.000. Intracranial complications of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) are infrequent (10%), requiring neurosurgical intervention in a minority o

  14. Coping changes the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Nechvatal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished subsequent indications of anxiety. Most of these studies focused on functional changes in the amygdala and anterior corticolimbic brain circuits that control cognitive, motivational, and emotional aspects of physiology and behavior. Corresponding structural brain changes and the timing, frequency, and duration of stress exposure required to modify brain functions remain to be elucidated in future research. These studies will advance our understanding of coping as a learning process and provide mechanistic insights for the development of new interventions that promote stress coping skills.

  15. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  16. Teen Brain: Still Under Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teen Brain Reprints For more information Share The Teen Brain: Still Under Construction Download PDF Download ePub ... emotional health. The Changing Brain and Behavior in Teens One interpretation of all these findings is that ...

  17. Development of the Young Brain

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... knowing the multimedia devices… whether their brains will be able to adapt differently than older people. Announcer: So, what was the human brain originally developed to do? Well, Dr. Giedd says our brains are fundamentally designed ...

  18. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics and Facts A- A A+ Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts An estimated 6 million people in ... Understanding the Brain Warning Signs/ Symptoms Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Risk Factors Aneurysm ...

  19. Enhanced neurofibrillary tangle formation, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive deficits induced by repetitive mild brain injury in a transgenic tauopathy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Uryu, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Longhi, Luca; Hoover, Rachel; Fujimoto, Scott; McIntosh, Tracy; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2005-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and repetitive TBI (rTBI) may culminate in dementia pugilistica (DP), a syndrome characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the hallmark brain lesions of AD, including neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by abnormal tau filaments and senile plaques (SPs) composed of Abeta fibrils. Previous study showed that mild rTBI (mrTBI) accelerated the deposition of Abeta in the brains of transgenic (Tg) mice (Tg2576) that over-express human Abeta precursor proteins with the familial AD Swedish mutations (APP695swe) and model of AD-like amyloidosis. Here, we report studies of the effects of mrTBI on AD-like tau pathologies in Tg mice expressing the shortest human tau isoform (T44) subjected to mrTBI, causing brain concussion without structural brain damage to simulate injuries linked to DP. Twelve-month-old Tg T44 (n = 18) and wild-type (WT; n = 24) mice were subjected to mrTBI (four times a day, 1 day per week, for 4 weeks; n = 24) or sham treatment (n = 18). Histopathological analysis of mice at 9 months after mrTBI revealed that one of the Tg T44 mice showed extensive telencephalic NFT and cerebral atrophy. Although statistical analysis of neurobehavioral tests at 6 months after mrTBI did not show any significant difference in any of groups of mice, the Tg T44 mouse with extensive NFT had an exceptionally low neurobehavioral score. The reasons for the augmentation of tau pathologies in only one T44 tau Tg mouse subjected to mrTBI remain to be elucidated.

  20. Brain Fingerprinting Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms.J.R.Rajput

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a new computer-based technology to identify the perpetrator of a crime accurately and scientifically by measuring brain-wave responses to crime-relevant words or pictures presented on a computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting has proven 100% accurate in over 120 tests, including tests on FBI agents, tests for a US intelligence agency and for the US Navy, and tests on real-life situations including felony crimes. Brain fingerprinting is based on finding that the brain generates a unique brain wave pattern when a person encounters a familiar stimulus Use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in lie detection derives from studies suggesting that persons asked to lie show different patterns of brain activity than they do when being truthful. Issues related to the use of such evidence in courts are discussed. The author concludes that neither approach is currently supported by enough data regarding its accuracy in detecting deception to warrant use in court. In the field of criminology, a new lie detector has been developed in the United States of America. This is called “brain fingerprinting”. This invention is supposed to be the best lie detector available as on date and is said to detect even smooth criminals who pass the polygraph test (the conventional lie detector test with ease. The new method employs brain waves, which are useful in detecting whether the person subjected to the test, remembers finer details of the crime. Even if the person willingly suppresses the necessary information, the brain wave is sure to trap him, according to the experts, who are very excited about the new kid on the block.

  1. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Kou, Zhifeng; Iraji, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy; however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrated both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. ...

  2. Degenerative brain disorders and brain iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-field-strength [e.g., 1.5 tesla (T)] magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a sensitive, in vivo method for mapping the normal and pathologic distribution of iron in the brain with excellent anatomic specificity. In all adults individuals studied using a multislice, spin-echo (SE) pulse sequence for T2-weighted (e.g., TR = 2,500 msec and TE = 80 msec) imaging, a prominent decreased signal intensity (decreased T2) was noted in the globus pallidum, red nucleus, reticular substantia nigra, and dentate nucleus of the cerebellum. The normal decreased signal intensity on SE 2,500/80 images correlates directly with previous autopsy studies on 98 normal brains of age 13 to 100 years that describe a preferential accumulation of brain iron in the globus pallidum (21 mg Fe/100 g), red nucleus (19 mg Fe/100 g), reticular substantia nigra (18 mg Fe/100 g), putamen (13 mg Fe/100g), caudate nucleus (9 mg Fe/100g), and thalamus (5 mg Fe/100 g). Our own studies using both high-field MRI in vivo and Peris staining for ferric iron on autopsy brains confirm this iron accumulation

  3. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  4. Cannabinoids on the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Irving

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has a long history of consumption both for recreational and medicinal uses. Recently there have been significant advances in our understanding of how cannabis and related compounds (cannabinoids affect the brain and this review addresses the current state of knowledge of these effects. Cannabinoids act primarily via two types of receptor, CB1 and CB2, with CB1 receptors mediating most of the central actions of cannabinoids. The presence of a new type of brain cannabinoid receptor is also indicated. Important advances have been made in our understanding of cannabinoid receptor signaling pathways, their modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, the cellular targets of cannabinoids in different central nervous system (CNS regions and, in particular, the role of the endogenous brain cannabinoid (endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids have widespread actions in the brain: in the hippocampus they influence learning and memory; in the basal ganglia they modulate locomotor activity and reward pathways; in the hypothalamus they have a role in the control of appetite. Cannabinoids may also be protective against neurodegeneration and brain damage and exhibit anticonvulsant activity. Some of the analgesic effects of cannabinoids also appear to involve sites within the brain. These advances in our understanding of the actions of cannabinoids and the brain endocannabinoid system have led to important new insights into neuronal function which are likely to result in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of key CNS disorders.

  5. Human brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just as there have been dramatic advances in the molecular biology of the human brain in recent years, there also have been remarkable advances in brain imaging. This paper reports on the development and broad application of microscopic imaging techniques which include the autoradiographic localization of receptors and the measurement of glucose utilization by autoradiography. These approaches provide great sensitivity and excellent anatomical resolution in exploring brain organization and function. The first noninvasive external imaging of receptor distributions in the living human brain was achieved by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Developments, techniques and applications continue to progress. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also becoming important. Its initial clinical applications were in examining the structure and anatomy of the brain. However, more recent uses, such as MRI spectroscopy, indicate the feasibility of exploring biochemical pathways in the brain, the metabolism of drugs in the brain, and also of examining some of these procedures at an anatomical resolution which is substantially greater than that obtainable by PET scanning. The issues will be discussed in greater detail

  6. Chronic Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Results in Reduced Cerebral Blood Flow, Axonal Injury, Gliosis, and Increased T-Tau and Tau Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Joseph O; Mouzon, Benoit; Algamal, Moustafa; Leary, Paige; Lynch, Cillian; Abdullah, Laila; Evans, James; Mullan, Michael; Bachmeier, Corbin; Stewart, William; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a risk factor for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is characterized by patchy deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates in neurons and astrocytes at the depths of cortical sulci. We developed an mTBI paradigm to explore effects of repetitive concussive-type injury over several months in mice with a human tau genetic background (hTau). Two injuries were induced in the hTau mice weekly over a period of 3 or 4 months and the effects were compared with those in noninjured sham animals. Behavioral and in vivo measures and detailed neuropathological assessments were conducted 6 months after the first injury. Our data confirm impairment in cerebral blood flow and white matter damage. This was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in total tau levels and mild increases in tau oligomers/conformers and pTau (Thr231) species in brain gray matter. There was no evidence of neurofibrillary/astroglial tangles, neuropil threads, or perivascular foci of tau immunoreactivity. There were neurobehavioral deficits (ie, disinhibition and impaired cognitive performance) in the mTBI animals. These data support the relevance of this new mTBI injury model for studying the consequences of chronic repetitive mTBI in humans, and the role of tau in TBI. PMID:27251042

  7. Brains on video games

    OpenAIRE

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C. Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F.; Merzenich, Michael M.; Gentile, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games ‘damage the brain’ or ‘boost brain power’ do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affe...

  8. The utility of the balance error scoring system for mild brain injury assessments in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatman-Yates, Catherine; Hugentobler, Jason; Ammon, Robin; Mwase, Najima; Kurowski, Brad; Myer, Gregory D

    2014-09-01

    The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) is widely recognized as an acceptable assessment of postural control for adult patients following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion. However, the measurement properties of the BESS as a post-mTBI assessment test for younger patients are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the BESS as a post-mTBI assessment test for children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years through 2 investigations: (1) a retrospective medical records review of the relationship among age, BESS scores, and other common post-mTBI assessment tests; and (2) a prospective study comparing BESS scores for a cohort of children with a recent mTBI and BESS scores for a cohort of matched healthy peers. Age was found to be significantly correlated with several of the BESS measures and the total BESS score (P < 0.05). Significant differences were observed between the injured and healthy cohorts for 3 of the BESS measures and the total BESS score. However, the observed differences were not likely to be clinically meaningful. Cumulatively, evidence from the literature and the results of these studies indicate that the BESS may be limited for producing accurate assessments of younger athletes' post-mTBI postural control abilities. Future research recommendations include testing of modified versions of the BESS or other alternatives for post-mTBI postural control assessments with younger individuals. PMID:25295764

  9. Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty. Poverty Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damron, Neil

    2015-01-01

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of…

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury Studies in Britain during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the wartime urgency to understand, prevent, and treat patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) during World War II (WWII), clinicians and basic scientists in Great Britain collaborated on research projects that included accident investigations, epidemiologic studies, and development of animal and physical models. Very quickly, investigators from different disciplines shared information and ideas that not only led to new insights into the mechanisms of TBI but also provided very practical approaches for preventing or ameliorating at least some forms of TBI. Neurosurgeon Hugh Cairns (1896-1952) conducted a series of influential studies on the prevention and treatment of head injuries that led to recognition of a high rate of fatal TBI among motorcycle riders and subsequently to demonstrations of the utility of helmets in lowering head injury incidence and case fatality. Neurologists Derek Denny-Brown (1901-1981) and (William) Ritchie Russell (1903-1980) developed an animal model of TBI that demonstrated the fundamental importance of sudden acceleration (i.e., jerking) of the head in causing concussion and forced a distinction between head injury associated with sudden acceleration/deceleration and that associated with crush or compression. Physicist A.H.S. Holbourn (1907-1962) used theoretical arguments and simple physical models to illustrate the importance of shear stress in TBI. The work of these British neurological clinicians and scientists during WWII had a strong influence on subsequent clinical and experimental studies of TBI and also eventually resulted in effective (albeit controversial) public health campaigns and legislation in several countries to prevent head injuries among motorcycle riders and others through the use of protective helmets. Collectively, these studies accelerated our understanding of TBI and had subsequent important implications for both military and civilian populations. As a result of the wartime urgency to understand

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Studies in Britain during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the wartime urgency to understand, prevent, and treat patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) during World War II (WWII), clinicians and basic scientists in Great Britain collaborated on research projects that included accident investigations, epidemiologic studies, and development of animal and physical models. Very quickly, investigators from different disciplines shared information and ideas that not only led to new insights into the mechanisms of TBI but also provided very practical approaches for preventing or ameliorating at least some forms of TBI. Neurosurgeon Hugh Cairns (1896-1952) conducted a series of influential studies on the prevention and treatment of head injuries that led to recognition of a high rate of fatal TBI among motorcycle riders and subsequently to demonstrations of the utility of helmets in lowering head injury incidence and case fatality. Neurologists Derek Denny-Brown (1901-1981) and (William) Ritchie Russell (1903-1980) developed an animal model of TBI that demonstrated the fundamental importance of sudden acceleration (i.e., jerking) of the head in causing concussion and forced a distinction between head injury associated with sudden acceleration/deceleration and that associated with crush or compression. Physicist A.H.S. Holbourn (1907-1962) used theoretical arguments and simple physical models to illustrate the importance of shear stress in TBI. The work of these British neurological clinicians and scientists during WWII had a strong influence on subsequent clinical and experimental studies of TBI and also eventually resulted in effective (albeit controversial) public health campaigns and legislation in several countries to prevent head injuries among motorcycle riders and others through the use of protective helmets. Collectively, these studies accelerated our understanding of TBI and had subsequent important implications for both military and civilian populations. As a result of the wartime urgency to understand

  12. Brains on video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F; Merzenich, Michael M; Gentile, Douglas A

    2011-11-18

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games 'damage the brain' or 'boost brain power' do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affect cognition and behaviour, and explain how this knowledge can be harnessed for educational and rehabilitation purposes. As research in this area is still in its early days, the contributors of this Viewpoint also discuss several issues and challenges that should be addressed to move the field forward.

  13. Postnatal brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William F C; Stiles, Joan;

    2011-01-01

    constantly with the environment. This is a protracted process, beginning in the third week of gestation and continuing into early adulthood. Reviewed here are studies using structural imaging techniques, with a special focus on diffusion weighted imaging, describing age-related brain maturational changes......After birth, there is striking biological and functional development of the brain's fiber tracts as well as remodeling of cortical and subcortical structures. Behavioral development in children involves a complex and dynamic set of genetically guided processes by which neural structures interact...... in children and adolescents, as well as studies that link these changes to behavioral differences. Finally, we discuss evidence for effects on the brain of several factors that may play a role in mediating these brain-behavior associations in children, including genetic variation, behavioral interventions...

  14. Postnatal brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William F C; Stiles, Joan;

    2011-01-01

    After birth, there is striking biological and functional development of the brain's fiber tracts as well as remodeling of cortical and subcortical structures. Behavioral development in children involves a complex and dynamic set of genetically guided processes by which neural structures interact...... constantly with the environment. This is a protracted process, beginning in the third week of gestation and continuing into early adulthood. Reviewed here are studies using structural imaging techniques, with a special focus on diffusion weighted imaging, describing age-related brain maturational changes...... in children and adolescents, as well as studies that link these changes to behavioral differences. Finally, we discuss evidence for effects on the brain of several factors that may play a role in mediating these brain-behavior associations in children, including genetic variation, behavioral interventions...

  15. Osmotherapy in brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grände, Per-Olof; Romner, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been used since the 1960s in diseases associated with brain edema and has been investigated in >150 publications on head injury, very little has been published on the outcome of osmotherapy. We can only speculate whether osmotherapy improves outcome, has no effect......, osmotherapy can be negative for outcome, which may explain why we lack scientific support for its use. These drawbacks, and the fact that the most recent Cochrane meta-analyses of osmotherapy in brain edema and stroke could not find any beneficial effects on outcome, make routine use of osmotherapy in brain...... edema doubtful. Nevertheless, the use of osmotherapy as a temporary measure may be justified to acutely prevent brain stem compression until other measures, such as evacuation of space-occupying lesions or decompressive craniotomy, can be performed. This article is the Con part in a Pro-Con debate...

  16. Brain versus Machine Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Octopus, the villain of the movie "Spiderman 2", is a fusion of man and machine. Neuroscientist Jose Carmena examines the facts behind this fictional account of a brain- machine interface

  17. Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up. Some children experience bedwetting, night terrors, or sleepwalking during deep sleep. When we switch into REM ... stimulate some parts of the brain and can cause insomnia, or an inability to sleep. Many antidepressants ...

  18. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Mission Advance Research Clinical Trial Endpoints Defeat GBM Oligo Research Fund Pediatric Initiatives Funded Research & Accomplishments ... no symptoms when their brain tumor is discovered Recurrent headaches Issues with vision Seizures Changes in personality ...

  19. Legionella micdadei Brain Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Marthe; Johnson, Edward; Macyk-Davey, Andrea; Henry, Monica; Nilsson, Jan-Erik; Miedzinski, Lil; Zahariadis, George

    2013-01-01

    We describe an immunocompromised patient who developed a large frontal brain abscess caused by Legionella micdadei. This is, to our knowledge, a rare case of culture-proven Legionella central nervous system infection.

  20. Brain derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Gede, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies are...

  1. Genetics and the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find us on YouTube Follow us on Instagram Genetics and the Brain by Carl Sherman September 10, ... effects that may be responsible. How Much Is Genetic? [x] , [xi] , [xii] , [xiii] A basic question in ...

  2. Brains on video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F; Merzenich, Michael M; Gentile, Douglas A

    2011-12-01

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games 'damage the brain' or 'boost brain power' do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affect cognition and behaviour, and explain how this knowledge can be harnessed for educational and rehabilitation purposes. As research in this area is still in its early days, the contributors of this Viewpoint also discuss several issues and challenges that should be addressed to move the field forward. PMID:22095065

  3. Quantum Brain States

    CERN Document Server

    Mould, R A

    2003-01-01

    If conscious observers are to be included in the quantum mechanical universe, we need to find the rules that engage observers with quantum mechanical systems. The author has proposed five rules that are discovered by insisting on empirical completeness; that is, by requiring the rules to draw empirical information from Schrodinger's solutions that is more complete than is currently possible with the (Born) probability interpretation. I discard Born's interpretation, introducing probability solely through probability current. These rules tell us something about brains. They require the existence of observer brain states that are neither conscious nor unconscious. I call them 'ready' brain states because they are on stand-by, ready to become conscious the moment they are stochastically chosen. Two of the rules are selection rules involving ready brain states. The place of these rules in a wider theoretical context is discussed. Key Words: boundary conditions, consciousness, decoherence, macroscopic superpositio...

  4. Brain abscess: Current management

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando Alvis-Miranda; Sandra Milena Castellar-Leones; Mohammed Awad Elzain; Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to ...

  5. Coping changes the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M. Nechvatal; Lyons, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished subsequen...

  6. Coping changes the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M. Nechvatal; Lyons, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished su...

  7. Brain derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Gede, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies are curre......Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies...

  8. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  9. BRAIN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY (REVIEW)

    OpenAIRE

    Yashin К.S.; Medyanik I.А.

    2014-01-01

    The review analyzes Russian and foreign reports concerned with a rapidly developing brain cancer treatment technique — immunotherapy. There has been presented a current view on the basic concept of antitumor immunity, on the problem of immune system interaction with a tumor in general and under the conditions of an immunologically privileged nervous system, shown the theoretical background of efficiency of immunotherapy used against brain cancer (the capability of tumor antigens and activated...

  10. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed. Ass et gutt e Kand méisproocheg ze erzéien? Wat sinn déi optimal Konditio...

  11. Is Brain Emulation Dangerous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersley, Peter; Sandberg, Anders

    2013-12-01

    Brain emulation is a hypothetical but extremely transformative technology which has a non-zero chance of appearing during the next century. This paper investigates whether such a technology would also have any predictable characteristics that give it a chance of being catastrophically dangerous, and whether there are any policy levers which might be used to make it safer. We conclude that the riskiness of brain emulation probably depends on the order of the preceding research trajectory. Broadly speaking, it appears safer for brain emulation to happen sooner, because slower CPUs would make the technology`s impact more gradual. It may also be safer if brains are scanned before they are fully understood from a neuroscience perspective, thereby increasing the initial population of emulations, although this prediction is weaker and more scenario-dependent. The risks posed by brain emulation also seem strongly connected to questions about the balance of power between attackers and defenders in computer security contests. If economic property rights in CPU cycles1 are essentially enforceable, emulation appears to be comparatively safe; if CPU cycles are ultimately easy to steal, the appearance of brain emulation is more likely to be a destabilizing development for human geopolitics. Furthermore, if the computers used to run emulations can be kept secure, then it appears that making brain emulation technologies ―open‖ would make them safer. If, however, computer insecurity is deep and unavoidable, openness may actually be more dangerous. We point to some arguments that suggest the former may be true, tentatively implying that it would be good policy to work towards brain emulation using open scientific methodology and free/open source software codebases

  12. Dyslexia singular brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of late ten years, neurologists are studying the brain of the dyslectics. The cerebral imagery (NMR imaging, positron computed tomography) has allowed to confirm the anatomical particularities discovered by some of them: asymmetry default of cerebral hemispheres, size abnormally large of the white substance mass which connect the two hemispheres. The functional imagery, when visualizing this singular brain at work, allows to understand why it labors to reading. (O.M.)

  13. Vortices in brain waves

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Interactions by mutual excitation in neural populations in human and animal brains cre- ate a mesoscopic order parameter that is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG). Spatially and spectrally distributed oscillations are imposed on the background activity by inhibitory feedback in the gamma range (30–80 Hz). Beats recur at theta rates (3–7 Hz), at which the order parameter transiently approaches zero and micro- scopic activity becomes disordered. After these null spikes, the or...

  14. Functional Brain Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vessal

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: The historical evolution of concepts of the mind has had a tremendous impact on human civilization. Aside from Smith’s surgical papyrus, there exists practically no documentation down to the era of Hippocrates. While in Corpus, the seat of all sensations is put in the brain, there is an amazing regression, for many centuries thereafter notably influenced by Aristotle, to displace it to the heart. This erroneous diversion promulgated in De Anima with minor corrections by Galen, has per-petuated to our time when we say, for example, that we love something with our very hearts or “knowing by heart” when we mean to memorize something. Avicenna challenged many of Aristotle’s ideas in El-monnafs (psychology section of Al Shafa, paving the road for the later European Renaissance. Cartesian choice of pineal body as the seat of soul in the first half of the 7th century was a fundamental departure from brain-soul dichotomy. It was followed by Gall’s pseudo-science, phrenology, as the first attempt of brain mapping in ascribing “mental faculties” to the speculative “organs” of the brain. Brain mapping through Functional Brain Imaging has flourished ex-tensively in the past decades -starting from PET with later substitution by fMRI- as robust tools for interro-gating mysteries of the brain. With a surprising pace of development, Functional Brain Imaging heralds a welcome adjunct to the science of radiology in ex-ploring mind and human behavior. Given the multi-tude of appropriate MRI machines operating across the country, attention to this aspect of imaging can invigorate research in radiology and boost generation of knowledge in this rapidly growing field. Recent advances in MRI fast imaging, fMRI, as well as clini-cal and spectroscopic imaging with present clinical application and future trends are discussed.

  15. Cytokines and brain excitability

    OpenAIRE

    Galic, Michael A.; Riazi, Kiarash; Pittman, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines are molecules secreted by peripheral immune cells, microglia, astrocytes and neurons in the central nervous system. Peripheral or central inflammation is characterized by an upregulation of cytokines and their receptors in the brain. Emerging evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory cytokines modulate brain excitability. Findings from both the clinical literature and from in vivo and in vitro laboratory studies suggest that cytokines can increase seizure susceptibility and may be in...

  16. Expressions of enkephalin and dopamine in brain tissue and their significance in cerebral coneussionai rats%脑啡肽和多巴胺在实验性脑震荡大鼠脑组织中的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭瑞云; 高亚兵; 王德文; 肖兴义; 陈浩宇; 杨瑞; 刘杰; 胡文华; 马俊杰

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms of cerebral concussion have remained poorly understood, and so do the expression profiles of enkephalin and dopamine and their significance in this injury.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expressions of enkephalin and dopamine and explore their significance in rat cerebral concussion tissue.DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial.SETTING and MATERIALS: This study was conducted in the Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA. Totally 80 male Wistar rats of clean grade, provided by the Animal Center of Academy of Military Medical Sciences and given free access to water and food, were used for preparing animal models of cerebral concussion. The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the different cerebral impact for model establishment using counterweights, namely the control group, 50, 100 and 200 g groups.INTERVENTIONS: The rats were sacrificed on the day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 30 following brain concussion, respectively, and the brain tissue were taken for examination of the expressions of enkephalin and dopamine by means of immunohistochemical staining.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The manifestations, pathological changes, and the result of immunohistochemical staining on enkephalin and dopamine were observed.RESULTS: Typical features of cerebral concussion were seen in rats of the 100 g group. The main pathological changes .included cerebral vascular constriction and dilation, hemostasis and edema of the cerebral tissue and neuronal degeneration and necrosis. Enkephalin expression was enhanced on the day 1 after the injury, as seen in the cytoplasm of the endothelial cells in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, and reached the peak level on day 7. From day 14, the expression of enkephalin decreased gradually, but still remained at higher-than-normal level until day 30. The expression of dopamine increased on day 7 and was seen in the cytoplasm of the endothelial cells and in the vascular wall in the cerebral cortex

  17. A Novel Closed-head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Caused by Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium Produces Sustained Emotional Deficits in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Heldt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, which we have used to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25-40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50-60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2-8 weeks after blast, 50-60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, however, and only scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50-60 psi mice 3-8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50-60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to diffuse axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI.

  18. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain...... transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait......-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified...

  19. Functional brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive method that has become one of the major tools for understanding human brain function and in recent years has also been developed for clinical applications. Changes in hemodynamic signals correspond to changes in neuronal activity with good spatial and temporal resolution in fMRI. Using high-field MR systems and increasingly dedicated statistics and postprocessing, activated brain areas can be detected and superimposed on anatomical images. Currently, fMRI data are often combined in multimodal imaging, e. g. with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. This method is helping to further understand the physiology of cognitive brain processes and is also being used in a number of clinical applications. In addition to the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, this article deals with the construction of fMRI investigations, selection of paradigms and evaluation in the clinical routine. Clinically, this method is mainly used in the planning of brain surgery, analyzing the location of brain tumors in relation to eloquent brain areas and the lateralization of language processing. As the BOLD signal is dependent on the strength of the magnetic field as well as other limitations, an overview of recent developments is given. Increases of magnetic field strength (7 T), available head coils and advances in MRI analytical methods have led to constant improvement in fMRI signals and experimental design. Especially the depiction of eloquent brain regions can be done easily and quickly and has become an essential part of presurgical planning. (orig.)

  20. 安宫牛黄丸对脑震荡后记忆力下降的影响%Effect of “Angong Niuhuang Bolus” on hyponnesis after head concussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡佩浩; 沈知彼; 邱锋; 孔令军; 费智敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of "Angong Niuhuang Bolus" on hypomnesis after head concussion. Methods Eighty-eight cases were randomized into two groups; control group was treated with routine modality, and treatment group was treated by routine modality and "Angong Niuhuang Bolus" , with the course of 5 days. The changes of memory were evaluated by clinical memory scale before and 1 month after treatment. Results After treatment, the scores of MQ, associative learning, pointing memory, recognition of the meaningless pictures, free memory for design and memory of human characteristics were all improved significantly in both groups(P <0.01). The improvements in treatment group were better than those in the control group (P <0.05). Conclusion " Angong Niuhuang Bolus" has positive effect on hypomnesis after head concussion.%目的 探讨安宫牛黄丸对脑震荡后记忆力下降的影响.方法 将88例脑震荡患者随机分为两组;对照组给予西医常规治疗,治疗组在常规治疗基础上加用安宫牛黄丸,疗程均为5天.治疗前和治疗后1个月应用临床记忆量表评价记忆力变化情况.结果 治疗后两组记忆商(MQ)、联想学习、指向记忆、无意义图形再认、图像自由回忆、人像特点联系回忆分值均较治疗前显著改善(P<0.01),且治疗组各项改善优于对照组(P<0.05).结论 安宫牛黄丸可改善脑震荡后记忆力下降.