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Sample records for brain computed tomography

  1. Computed tomography studies of human brain movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhythmic brain movements have been revealed by sets of sequential computed tomography scans of human brains (seen retrospectively to be normal). These scans have shown that both (unenhanced) brain parenchymal density and the shapes of the elements of the supratentorial ventricular/cisternal system are subject to wave motions having similar periods - ranging from 26 s through 56 s, 77-96 s, 109 s and 224 s to 224 X 2 s (or even longer), with good correlation between peak values. These motions, as well as phase variations between the waves, suggest a peristaltic movement of cerebrospinal fluid through the ventricular/cisternal system with progressive axial damping

  2. Computed tomography in brain metastases

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    Oda, J.; Inoue, Y.; Fukuda, T. (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-05-01

    CT scan of the one hundred and sixteen metastatic brain tumors in 50 patients was reviewed and compared to the previous reports. The most common primary organ was lung (43%) followed by breast (18%), colon (10%) and kidney (6%). Solitary nodule was found in 20 patients (40%). On plain CT scan, tumor nodules were demonstrated as slightly high density in 38 (33%), isodensity in 50 (43%) and slightly low density in 28 (24%). Majority of tumor nodules were present in the corticomedullary junction (82%). Brain edema seen as a peritumoral low density was extensive in comparison with the edema in the glioma of the similar size. On contrast CT scan, ring like enhancement was seen in 41 (35%). Intra-tumoral bleeding was shown in 2 metastatic nodules from choriocarcinoma and in one metastatic nodule from renal cell carcinoma. All 3 cases were proved by surgery or autopsy.

  3. Dynamic computed tomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic computed tomography (CT) studies of the brain are based on a rapid intravenous bolus injection of radiographic contrast material immediately followed by serial CT scans. The recycling times for this technique are 1 sec or less. Dynamic studies, which are relatively non-invasive, add considerable information to the static cerebral scan as it is presently performed. The resulting time-density patterns are described and typical examples of each are shown. (orig.)

  4. Brain computed tomography of the hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Now a day, hypertension is more increasing in frequency and ranked the top of the causes of death in Korea and other nations. Most of cerebrovascular accidents in hypertensive patients are composed of vascular occlusive changes and hemorrhages. In cerebral angiogram, we can only detect occlusion of large artery and large mass effect from hematoma or cerebral infarction without identification of its entity. The computed tomogram, however, is the best way for evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. This study includes evaluation of computed tomograms of 106 patients with hypertension during the period of 17 months from Feb. 1979 to June 1980 in the department of radiology, college of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 106 patients was broad ranging from 25 years to 76 years. 67.9% of patients were over the age of 50. The male and female sex ratio was 3:2. 2. 28 out of 106 patients were normal and 78 patients revealed abnormal on C. T. findings; those were intracranial hemorrhage (35 patients), cerebral infarction (32 patients) and brain atrophy (11 patients). 3. All of the intracranial hemorrhage except one were intracerebral hemorrhage; those were located in the cerebral hemisphere (19 patients), basal ganglia (15 patients) and brain stem (1 patient). The except one case of intracranial hemorrhage was subdural hematoma. 7 patients of intraventricular hemorrhage and 1 patient of subarachnoid hemorrhage were combined with intracerebral hemorrhage. 2/3 of patients who had hemorrhage in cerebral hemisphere revealed lesions in the parietal and temporal lobes. 4. In cases of cerebral infarction, the cerebral hemisphere was most common site of lesion (20 cases), and the next was basal ganglia (11 cases). Most of the infarcts in cerebral hemisphere were located in the parietal and temporal lobes. The left basal ganglia was more commonly involved

  5. Computer tomography investigation of epilepsy the brain atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of brain atrophy in patients with epilepsy is often discussed in literature. The aim of the study is to present the results of computer tomography measurements of ventricular size and sulci of brain of 90 patients with various electro-clinical forms of epilepsy, including males and females at the age of 15 to 70 years. Computer tomography measurements were performed having in mind 6 parameters (frontal horn index, FHI; Huckman's number, HZ; cella media index,CMI; width of the third and the fourth ventricles; sulci). The results were compared to the CT measurements of a control group of 40 healthy males and females in the same age range.The obtained data indicate high percentage of subcortical atrophy among patients with epilepsy. Ventricular dilatation was found to be in light extent occurring most early in the frontal brain regions (frontal horns and lateral ventricles)., furthermore observed in the young age. (author)

  6. Brain computed tomography findings of aged schizophrenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain CT was performed in a total of 30 aged schizophrenic patients, consisting of 20 with no history of psychosurgery (lobotomy) and the other 10 lobotomized patients. The CT findings were compared with those from healthy aged persons. The group of schizophrenic patients had marked atrophy of the frontal lobe and dilatated Sylvian fissure as compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in ventricular factors between the two groups. These findings may have implications for the different mechanisms of the occurrence of atrophied brain surface and enlarged ventricle. The cerebral cortex involved in the occurrence of schizophrenia may be affected by aging-related cerebral atrophy, in addition to the morphological changes due to schizophrenia. Thus, schizophrenic cerebral atrophy was more noticeable than physiological aging-related atrophy. However, enlargement of the ventricle in the schizophrenic group progressed with aging in the same manner as that in the normal group. In comparing schizophrenic patients with or without a history of lobotomy, atrophy of the brain surface and enlargement of the ventricle were more marked in the lobotomized patients than the non-lobotomized patients. This confirmed that lobotomy, as well as surgical scar, is involved in the morphology of schizophrenic brain. (N.K.)

  7. Computed tomography brain changes in Parkinsonian dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the relationship between brain atrophy and the motor and cognitive function in Parkinson's disease, we have evaluated CT changes in 132 consecutive patients and compared them to measures of physical and mental decline, using intercorrelations and variance analysis. The result demonstrated age as a most important factor relating to brain atrophy. After correction for this determinant, it became clear that the motor and cognitive parameters were interdependent but they affected similar CT parameters. The effect of motor decline was the stronger of the two and it was the only one which correlated with cortical atrophy. The results support the notion of subcortical changes underlying the dementia of Parkinson's disease. (orig.)

  8. Brain paracoccidioidomycosis - evaluation by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brain CT scans of 11 patients with known paracoccidioidomycosis of the central nervous system were retrospectively studied regarding the granulomas characteristics and the progression of the treated lesions. CT aspects of mycotic meningeal involvement were also described, as small cortical nodules and leptomeningeal contrast enhancement, both of which were not reported in the author's references. Six patients were meticulously followed and one of them had CT scans performed periodically during a seven years follow-up period. The most common aspect of the granulomatous form was that of isodense nodules with central hipodensity, exhibiting peripheral contrast enhancement. The most frequent imaging aspect consisted of multiple lesions predominating at the supratentorial compartment, specially on the lobes of the telencephalon. The lesions tend to regress and to calcify, as well as to loose contrast enhancement following the onset of treatment. (author)

  9. Brain computed tomography findings of schizophrenia, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between brain CT findings and the total dose of antipsychotic drugs was examined in 47 cases with schizophrenia ranging from 20 to 42 years in age (31 males and 16 females). The methods of Gyldensted et al. and Okamoto et al. were modified for CT measurements. The total dose during the entire course was converted into the dose of chlorpromazine (CPZ) for each case. For comparisons with CT findings, the total dose was classified into three types each for both sexes: ''less than'' 100 g, ''less than'' 500 g and ''more than'' 500 g for the males and ''more than'' 500 g, ''less than'' 1,000 g and ''more than'' 1,000 g for the females. For similar comparisons, the same subjects were matched for the age and sex distinction, and were divided into the ''less than'' and ''more than'' groups for 500 g and 800 g, respectively. In both the matched and non-matched cases, each measurement value of the ventricular system on CT tended to be higher in the ''more than'' groups than in the ''less than'' groups. The relationship between CT findings and the total dose was nogligible. (Chiba, N.)

  10. Cysticercosis of the brain. The value of computed tomography

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    Almeida-Pinto, J.; Veiga-Pires, J.A.; Stocker, A.; Coelho, T.; Monteiro, L.

    Incidence and radiologic findings of neurocysticercosis were investigated in a series of 23 800 consecutive head examinations using computed tomography (CT). The condition was diagnosed in 168 case (0.7%). The parenchymatous form was the most common presentation (96.3%), while the meningeal form corresponded to only 11.9% of cases. These two forms coexisted in some cases. These findings reversed the knowledge on the condition based on conventional radiography. The different CT appearances in the brain are described and a new radiologic protocol for the CT evaluation of the condition is advocated, which includes a follow-up after a trial cure with Praziquantel in the presence of cysts not associated with suggestive brain calcifications. CT were more sensitive than conventional radiography in the differentiation between dead and living larvae, thus having an impact on the therapeutic management of the patients.

  11. Inflammatory disease of the brain diagnosed by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory disease of the brain, particularly of pyogenic etiology, may be most accurately assessed by the use of computed tomography and contrast enhancement. Examples of cerebritis, evolving and mature intracerebral abcesses, and inflammatory extracerebral collections are presented and discussed, particularly with reference to differential diagnosis and the problem of infectious versus neoplastic etiology. Ancillary studies, particulary selective arteriography, are reviewed where appropriate. The residual changes of inflammatory disease of the brain after medical and/or surgical therapy are illustrated, and the value of serial examinations is emphasized. The rural indigent patient population (American Indian) served by the University of New Mexico Medical Center is a source of case material providing several examples of severe and untreated intracerebral infectious processes heretofore not described in the literature. (orig.)

  12. Computed tomography of virally induced monkey brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five (35) Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) were inoculated intracerebrally with chickembryo fibroblasts which were producing the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of the Rous sarcoma virus. These were then studied by means of computed tomography (CT) to detect brain tumors. Tumors were induced in 54.3% (19/35), with an average latency of 32.6 (15 - 43) days before a CT image appeared. The brains were sectioned into 5-mm slices, coplanar with the CT images. Various CT features, such as necrosis, hemorrhage, and peritumoral edema, correlated with the pathological findings. Contrast-enhanced CT detected tumors greater than 4-6 mm in diameter, and it was accurate within 2 mm in determining. Following brain tumors by CT in 6 monkeys revealed changes in the tumor size. One monkey was treated by differential hypothermia following craniectomy; the therapeutic effect and the tumor size, as subsequently evaluated for six months, revealed tumor regression during the initial 5 weeks, followed by stabilization and late (6 months) progression. The large brain size, 90-110 grams in adults, and the availability of these monkeys make them an excellent model system for neurological, neurosurgical, CT, and multimodality therapeutic experimentation. (author)

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for single-photon emission computed tomography brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hank F; Kung, Mei-Ping; Choi, Seok Rye

    2003-01-01

    In the past 10 years, significant progress on the development of new brain-imaging agents for single-photon emission computed tomography has been made. Most of the new radiopharmaceuticals are designed to bind specific neurotransmitter receptor or transporter sites in the central nervous system. Most of the site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals are labeled with (123)I. Results from imaging of benzodiazepine (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptors by [(123)I]iomazenil are useful in identifying epileptic seizure foci and changes of this receptor in psychiatric disorders. Imaging of dopamine D2/D3 receptors ([(123)I]iodobenzamide and [(123)I]epidepride) and transporters [(123)I]CIT (2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta(4-iodophenyl)tropane) and [(123)I]FP-beta-CIT (N-propyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta(4-iodophenyl)-nortropane has proven to be a simple but powerful tool for differential diagnosis of Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. A (99m)Tc-labeled agent, [(99m)Tc]TRODAT (technetium, 2-[[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo [3,2,1]oct-2-yl]methyl](2-mercaptoethyl)amino]ethyl]amino] ethanethiolato(3-)]oxo-[1R-(exo-exo)]-), for imaging dopamine transporters in the brain has been successfully applied in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Despite the fact that (123)I radiopharmaceuticals have been widely used in Japan and in Europe, clinical application of (123)I-labeled brain radiopharmaceuticals in the United States is limited because of the difficulties in supplying such agents. Development of (99m)Tc agents will likely extend the application of site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals for routine applications in aiding the diagnosis and monitoring treatments of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. PMID:12605353

  14. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

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    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. (Free Universities of Brussels (Belgium))

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  15. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of [123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) or [99mTc] hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that [123I]IMP or [99mTc]HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit

  16. Study of brain metabolism using positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography permits the three-dimensional regional measurement of metabolism and blood flow in the brain. For the determination of cerebral metabolic rates of glucose by PET 18fluordeoxyglucose is usually applied: cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was found to be 36 to 47 μmol/100 g/min in the grey matter and 23 to 29 μmol/100 g/min in the white matter of normal volunteers. During physiologic activation metabolic rate of glucose is increased in the respective brain areas in relation to the strength and complexity of the stimulation. In patients suffering from ischaemic stroke glucose metabolism is markedly decreased within the infarction. Additonally, glucose metabolism is reduced by 20% in morphologically intact areas of the homolateral cortex, in the basal ganglia, in the cortical area contralateral to the infarction and in the contralateral cerebellum. This remote reduction of glucose utilization is probably caused by functional inactivation of these brain structures; it could be responsible for the diffuse organic syndrome in stroke victims not caused by the focal lesion. In patients suffering from dementia of the multi-infarct type and of the Alzheimer type glucose metabolism is reduced; the lesions in Alzheimer cases are most prominent in partietal and frontal cortical areas. In Chorea Huntington cases glucose metabolism is primarily disturbed in the striate, especially in the caudate nucleus; in these cases the metabolic disturbance can be detected earlier than the atrophy in computed tomograms. Disturbances of glucose and oxygen utilization are not necessary causes, but may also be sequelae od functional impairment. Additional information on pathogentic mechanisms may be obtained by the investigation of the protein synthesis. (orig.)

  17. Brain computer tomography in critically ill patients -- a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Purmer Ilse M; van Iperen Erik P; Beenen Ludo F M; Kuiper Michael J; Binnekade Jan M; Vandertop Peter W; Schultz Marcus J; Horn Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Brain computer tomography (brain CT) is an important imaging tool in patients with intracranial disorders. In ICU patients, a brain CT implies an intrahospital transport which has inherent risks. The proceeds and consequences of a brain CT in a critically ill patient should outweigh these risks. The aim of this study was to critically evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic yield of brain CT in ICU patients. Methods In a prospective observational study data were collected ...

  18. Correlation of echoencephalography and computer tomography in expansive brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    50 patients with confirmed expansive intracranial processes were examined by two methods - echoencephalography and computer tomography. The deviation of the middle echo from two points on the calva and the corresponding deviation of septum pellucidum and epiphysis according to the computer tomography examination were compared. The findings are not quite identical. As a rule there is a minor deviation in echoencephalography examinations as compared with the deviation of corresponding structures according to computer tomography, the difference, however, does not exceed 3 mm. Echoencephalography examinations made at two different points on the calva increase the accuracy and sensitivity of the finding. In expansive processes with a more lateral and posterior localization we usually do not only find greater shifts of the echoencephalography in the anterior as well as posterior temporal region but also an increased difference between the two deviations. Despite the use of most up-to-date diagnostic methods echoencephalography remains a rapid, low-cost and unpretentious method in neurology and neurosurgery. It provides, however, only information for orientation and is biassed with an 5 to 8% error. (author)

  19. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  20. Evaluation of a 99Tcm bound brain scanning agent for single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A R; Hasselbalch, S G; Paulson, O B;

    1986-01-01

    D,L HM-PAO-99Tcm (PAO) is a lipophilic tracer complex which is avidly taken up by the brain. We have compared the regional distribution of PAO with regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by Tomomatic 64 after 133Xe inhalation in 41...

  1. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    SK Sah; ND Subedi; K. Poudel; Mallik, M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT) findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours) cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS) was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A s...

  2. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in major psychiatric disorders: From basics to clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a well-established and reliable method to assess brain function through measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). It can be used to define a patient's pathophysiological status when neurological or psychiatric symptoms cannot be explained by anatomical neuroimaging findings. Though there is ample evidence validating brain SPECT as a technique to track human behavior and correlating psychiatric disorders with dysfunction of specific brain regions, only few psychiatrists have adopted brain SPECT in routine clinical practice. It can be utilized to evaluate the involvement of brain regions in a particular patient, to individualize treatment on basis of SPECT findings, to monitor the treatment response and modify treatment, if necessary. In this article, we have reviewed the available studies in this regard from existing literature and tried to present the evidence for establishing the clinical role of brain SPECT in major psychiatric illnesses

  3. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

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    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Active microwave computed brain tomography: the response to a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, H; Broquetas, A; Jofre, L

    1991-02-01

    The potential application of active microwave techniques to brain imaging is studied by numerical simulations and experimentally using a recently developed cylindrical microwave scanner. The potential advantages and limitations of this method in static and dynamic brain imaging are presented and compared with other imaging techniques. PMID:2062119

  5. Computed tomography in brain metastases of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic brain tumors from colorectal cancers are relatively rare. In previous reports, the incidence ranged from 3 to 5 percent of all metastatic brain tumors. We report 7 cases of metastatic brain tumors from colorectal cancers. The time interval from the diagnosis of the primary tumors to the brain metastasis was 3 years on the average. Metastasis to the lung and liver were also found in 6 cases at the time of the diagnosis of the brain metastasis. The CEA levels in the serum were highly elevated in all cases. Solitary metastasis was found in all cases; cancers tend to metastasize in the deep area of the cerebrum or cerebellum. On a plain CT scan, tumors were demonstrated as ring-type, with a high-density mass, and ring-like enhancement was seen in 6 cases. Prognosis was very poor in most cases. The median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis was 4.5 months in the 2 cases with surgery and 3.5 months in the 4 cases without surgery. (author)

  6. Screening of brain metastasis through computed tomography in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The screening of brain metastasis through CT was carried out on 338 patients with malignant tumors of various origins before they manifested neurological symptoms. The primary site of the tumors was a lung in 132 cases, a breast in 48, the gastrointestinal tract in 42, the head or neck in 36, and others (80). Silent (asymptomatic) brain metastasis was detected in 10 cases (2.9%). Nine of these cases harboured lung carcinoma (6.9% out of 132 cases), while one harboured carcinoma of the parotid gland metastasizing in the lungs. Multiple intracerebral metastases were detected in 8 of them and a metastasis single in one, while silent meningeal carcinomatosis was diagnosed in the remaining case. The total number of metastatic foci in the brain from the 9 cases was 66. They ranged from 0.4 to 3.0 cm in diameter; 70% of them were less than 1 cm in diameter. A large lesion was usually found in the silent areas of the cerebral hemispheres. Most of the foci were isodense on CT, and the perifocal low density and mass effects were often defective or, when present, slight, so that a post-contrast study was indispensable for their detection. Adequate treatment(whole-brain irradiation, removal, and/or chemotherapy) for brain metastasis was effectively completed in 9 cases, while one patient refused to be treated. The metastatic foci disappeared on CT in 6 cases and decreased in size in 3. Most of them remained asymptomatic in neurological examination until they died 3-7 months later, mainly of systemic metastases outside the CNS. These results indicate the clinical efficacy of the CT screening of brain metastasis for their early detection; this ensures a length of time sufficient to treat them effectively before neurological deficits develop. The timing and interval at which CT screening should be performed are also discussed. (author)

  7. Computed tomography of primary inflammatory brain disorders in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 22 animals with histologically confirmed, primary inflammatory brain disease was undertaken to determine the value of computed tomography in such patients. The histologic diagnosis was confirmed at necropsy in 18 patients and by surgical biopsy in four. All affected animals had neurologic deficits; the most common presenting complaint was seizures. Abnormalities were identified on computed tomography images in 21 of the 22 patients. The abnormalities included ventricular changes, falcial deviation, edema, focal changes in parenchymal opacity, focal contrast enhancement, periventricular contrast enhancement, and a ring-like pattern of contrast enhancement. Many lesion types identified in this study, such as falcial deviation, changes in parenchymal opacity, and ring-pattern enhancement, have previously been associated with neoplasia. The abnormalities correlated well with the lesion localization predicted by neurologic examination and confirmed by surgery or necropsy. Although computed tomography findings were often judged to be compatible with inflammatory disease, they did not predict the type of pathologic process. The findings suggest that computed tomography is valuable in the evaluation of animals with primary inflammatory brain disorders, but differentiation of neoplasia from non-neoplastic diseases is not always possible

  8. Computed tomography of malignant lymphoma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correct diagnosis of malignant lymphoma of the brain and differentiation from malignant glioma, metastases, meningeoma and infection is often difficult. With the aim of finding characteristics pointing to the correct diagnosis all CT examinations from 16 patients with primary or secondary lymphoma of the brain were analysed. In 3 of 10 patients with primary lymphoma and 4 of 6 with secondary lymphoma the tumors were multiple. No differences between the CT appearance of primary and secondary lymphoma were found except that secondary lymphomas were generally smaller and more often multiple. The lymphomas were most often well demarcated, had a density equal to or slightly higher than normal brain tissue, were surrounded by no or slight edema and showed a moderate to marked contrast enhancement. The tumors were situated in the basal ganglia, corpus callosum or cerebellum in high frequency and were always in contact with either the ependyma of the ventricles or the superficial subarachnoid space. A tumor with widespread infiltration of the surroundings of the ventricles seen in 6 patients in the material is highly characteristic of lymphoma. (orig.)

  9. Brain computer tomography in critically ill patients - a prospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain computer tomography (brain CT) is an important imaging tool in patients with intracranial disorders. In ICU patients, a brain CT implies an intrahospital transport which has inherent risks. The proceeds and consequences of a brain CT in a critically ill patient should outweigh these risks. The aim of this study was to critically evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic yield of brain CT in ICU patients. In a prospective observational study data were collected during one year on the reasons to request a brain CT, expected abnormalities, abnormalities found by the radiologist and consequences for treatment. An “expected abnormality” was any finding that had been predicted by the physician requesting the brain CT. A brain CT was “diagnostically positive”, if the abnormality found was new or if an already known abnormality was increased. It was “diagnostically negative” if an already known abnormality was unchanged or if an expected abnormality was not found. The treatment consequences of the brain CT, were registered as “treatment as planned”, “treatment changed, not as planned”, “treatment unchanged”. Data of 225 brain CT in 175 patients were analyzed. In 115 (51%) brain CT the abnormalities found were new or increased known abnormalities. 115 (51%) brain CT were found to be diagnostically positive. In the medical group 29 (39%) of brain CT were positive, in the surgical group 86 (57%), p 0.01. After a positive brain CT, in which the expected abnormalities were found, treatment was changed as planned in 33%, and in 19% treatment was changed otherwise than planned. The results of this study show that the diagnostic and therapeutic yield of brain CT in critically ill patients is moderate. The development of guidelines regarding the decision rules for performing a brain CT in ICU patients is needed

  10. Use of routine computed tomography brain scanning of psychiatry patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of CT of the brain in patients presenting with a psychiatric condition without focal neurological signs. The reports of 397 consecutive CT brain scans of patients presenting to two acute tertiary hospital psychiatric services over a 2-year period were assessed retrospectively. Of the 397 patients, 241 had psychosis, 87 had depression, 44 had bipolar affective disorder, seven had alcohol dependence, five had dementia, and the remaining 13 had a variety of diagnoses including personality disorder and transient ischaemic attack. Findings on 377 (95%) of the CT scans showed no abnormality. Specific abnormalities were described in 20 (5%) of the CT scans. Three scans showed non-specific minor abnormalities, which, when followed up by MRI, showed no relevant abnormality. All the abnormalities shown on CT were considered to be clinically unrelated to the patient's psychiatric condition. In conclusion, the pretest probability of finding a space-occupying lesion or other pertinent abnormality in patients presenting with psychiatric illnesses in this retrospective study appears not to be greater than that of the general population. The outcome of this study could be implemented to develop a clinical pathway for limiting assessment by CT for possible organic pathology in acute psychiatric illness. Copyright (2006) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Brain abscess in a Japanese Black calf: Utility of computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) was used for diagnosis of brain abscess in a 6-month-old, Japanese Black calf presented with neurological dysfunction, compulsive circling and vision disturbance. CT images showed asymmetric lateral ventricles, and presence of intra-cranial multiple low absorption lesions surrounded by capsule suggestive of abscess in the right cerebral hemisphere. Postmortem examination revealed marked swelling of right cerebral hemisphere and olfactory bulb. Multilocular large abscess containing creamy pus was found to occupy most area of periventricular and lateral ventricle. Fusobacterium necrophrum was isolated from the abscess contents as the causative agent. These results demonstrate that CT is useful tool for tentative diagnosis of bovine brain abscess

  12. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/Computed Tomography for Primary Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind; Hess, Søren; Grupe, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Structural imaging with computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging is the mainstay in primary diagnosis of primary brain tumors, but these modalities depend on morphologic appearance and an intact blood-brain barrier, and important aspects of tumor biology are not addressed. Such issues may be...... alleviated by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and FDG-PET/CT imaging, which may provide clinically important information with regard to primary differentiation between tumor types, initial staging and risk stratification, therapy planning, response evaluation, and recurrence detection. This article...

  13. Selective value of computed tomography of the brain in Cerebritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaylis, N.B.; Altman, R.D.; Ostrov, S.; Quencer, R. (Miami Univ., FL (USA). School of Medicine)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and steroid effects on the brain were measured by computed tomography (CT). Of 14 patients with SLE cerebritis, 10 (71%) had marked cortical atrophy and 4 (29%) minimal atrophy. None were normal by CT. Controls included 22 patients with SLE without cerebritis receiving cortiocosteroids; this group had normal CT scans in 16 (73%) and minimal cortical atrophy in the remaining 6 (27%). Follow-up CT on 5 patients with cerebritis was unchanged. CT of the brain is a minimally invasive technique for documenting SLE cerebritis. CT may also help differentiate cerebritis from the neuropsychiatric side effects of corticosteroids.

  14. The selective value of computed tomography of the brain in Cerebritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and steroid effects on the brain were measured by computed tomography (CT). Of 14 patients with SLE cerebritis, 10 (71%) had marked cortical atrophy and 4 (29%) minimal atrophy. None were normal by CT. Controls included 22 patients with SLE without cerebritis receiving cortiocosteroids; this group had normal CT scans in 16 (73%) and minimal cortical atrophy in the remaining 6 (27%). Follow-up CT on 5 patients with cerebritis was unchanged. CT of the brain is a minimally invasive technique for documenting SLE cerebritis. CT may also help differentiate cerebritis from the neuropsychiatric side effects of corticosteroids

  15. Demonstration of blood brain barrier injury by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) injury was evoked by the injection of hypertonic solution, 50% glucose or 80% sodium iothalamate, through the catheter placed in the common carotid artery of the adult mongrel dogs. Plain CT and then contrast CT were performed at 30 minutes intervals until 3 hours to determine the relationship between the degrees of contrast enhancement (CE) and the amount of injected hypertonic solution, and to examine the diminishing rates of CE according to time elapsed after the intravenous contrast injection. Another four groups of dogs received contrast CT immediately, at 1, 2 and 3 hours after the injection of hypertonic solution to examine the degree of repair of BBB injury. Contrast media, which was leaked through BBB injured by the injection of hypertonic solution, was recognized by CT, and the area of CE coincided exactly with the dyed area by Evans blue, injected intravenously after induction of BBB injury. Degrees of CE were found to correlate linearly to the amount of hypertonic solution within a certain range. These results indicate that CT can demonstrate BBB injury qualitatively and quantitatively. In sequential CT after the artificial injury of BBB, degree of CE diminished linearly with a half life of about 3 hours. Hydrocortisone accelerated this washout of leaked contrast media. Repair of BBB itself, determined by contrast CT which were performed at 1, 2 and 3 hours after the induction of BBB injury, has been accomplished until 3 hours, and not affected by the administration of hydrocortisone. These experimental results suggest that CT is the most promising method to detect quantitatively and non-invasively the degree and the extent of BBB injury in clinical cases. (J.P.N.)

  16. Computed tomography of the brain stem with intrathecal metrizamide. Part 1: the normal brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed anatomy of the brain stem and cervicomedullary junction can be accurately demonstrated with metrizamide computed tomographic cisternography. Specifically surface anatomy is unusually well outlined. Nine distinct and easily recognizable levels of section are described: four levels in the medulla, three in the pons, and two in the mesencephalon. Surface features of the brain stem, fine details in the floor of the fourth ventricle, cranial nerves, and vascular structures are shown and discussed

  17. Analysis of computed X-ray tomography of the brain in incontinence patients with senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Machida, Toyohei; Oishi, Yukihiko (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Kamachi, Chikahumi; Okabe, Tsutomu; Akazawa, Kouhei; Takasaka, Satoshi

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the condition of incontinence in patients with senile dementia, we performed computed tomography X-rays to the brain and analyzed the relationship among the circulatory defect of the brain, the brain atrophy and the degree of incontinence. There were 92 patients subjected to this study who were hospitalised due to senile dementia; 74 patients had vascular dementia, 10 patients had senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and 8 patients had the mixed type. (age range: 54-95 years; mean: 80.3 years). The degree of incontinence in these patients varied as follows: 18 patients with continence, 16 patients with moderate incontinence, 58 patients with total incontinence. The diagnosis of circulatory defect of the brain was based on computed tomography observation of periventricular lucency (P.V.L.), and the degree of brain atrophy was evaluated based on 4 criteria: the Lateral body ratio, the Huckman number, the Evans ratio, and the enlargement of the subarachnoid space. Among the 92 patients, P.V.L. was present in 31 patients, among them 27 patients suffered from incontinence. There was a significant correlation between P.V.L. and incontinence (p<0.001). As the incontinence progressively worsened (Continence, Moderate incontinence, Total incontinence), the lateral body ratio increased to 24.8, 27.8, 28.6, (p<0.05). The Huckman number also increased to 18.3, 19.3, 21.3, (p<0.01), and the evans ratio likewise 29.9, 32.3, 33.7 (p<0.01). The enlargement of the subarachnoid space was also correlated with the severity of incontinence. We conclude that urinary incontinence originating from senile dememtia is connected to brain atrophy and is strongly influenced by the circulatory disorders of the brain. (author).

  18. Analysis of computed X-ray tomography of the brain in incontinence patients with senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the condition of incontinence in patients with senile dementia, we performed computed tomography X-rays to the brain and analyzed the relationship among the circulatory defect of the brain, the brain atrophy and the degree of incontinence. There were 92 patients subjected to this study who were hospitalised due to senile dementia; 74 patients had vascular dementia, 10 patients had senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and 8 patients had the mixed type. (age range: 54-95 years; mean: 80.3 years). The degree of incontinence in these patients varied as follows: 18 patients with continence, 16 patients with moderate incontinence, 58 patients with total incontinence. The diagnosis of circulatory defect of the brain was based on computed tomography observation of periventricular lucency (P.V.L.), and the degree of brain atrophy was evaluated based on 4 criteria: the Lateral body ratio, the Huckman number, the Evans ratio, and the enlargement of the subarachnoid space. Among the 92 patients, P.V.L. was present in 31 patients, among them 27 patients suffered from incontinence. There was a significant correlation between P.V.L. and incontinence (p<0.001). As the incontinence progressively worsened (Continence, Moderate incontinence, Total incontinence), the lateral body ratio increased to 24.8, 27.8, 28.6, (p<0.05). The Huckman number also increased to 18.3, 19.3, 21.3, (p<0.01), and the evans ratio likewise 29.9, 32.3, 33.7 (p<0.01). The enlargement of the subarachnoid space was also correlated with the severity of incontinence. We conclude that urinary incontinence originating from senile dememtia is connected to brain atrophy and is strongly influenced by the circulatory disorders of the brain. (author)

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses What is CT (Computed Tomography) of ... of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  2. Measurement of brain atrophy of aging using x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured brain volume of 1,045 subjects with no brain damage using x-ray computed tomography and investigated brain atrophy of aging. Severity of brain atrophy was estimated by brain atrophy index (BAI): BAI (%)=100 (%)x(cerebrospinal fluid space volume/cranial cavity volume). Atrophy of the brain began with statistical significance in the forties in both sexes. In males 40-49 years of age the mean BAI was 1.0% greater (p<0.001) and the S.D. of BAI was 1.1% greater (p<0.001) than those in their thirties. In females of 40-49 years the mean BAI was 0.5% greater (p<0.001) than that in their thirties, but there was no statistical significance between the two S.D.'s of both decades. The BAI increased exponentially with the increasing age from thirties in both sexes. Correlation coefficients were 0.702 (p< 0.001, n=471) in males and 0.721 (p<0.001, n=480) in females. From the regression coefficients it was calculated that the BAI was doubled in 19.4 years in males and 17.4 years in females after thirties. (author)

  3. Brain blood flow studies with single photon emission computed tomography in patients with plateau waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied brain blood flow with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in two patients with plateau waves. The intracranial pressure and blood pressure were also monitored continuously in these patients. They included one patient with brain-tumor (rt. sphenoid ridge meningioma) and another with hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of lt. internal carotid aneurysm. The intracranial pressure was monitored through an indwelling ventricular catheter attached to a pressure transducer. The blood pressure was recorded through an intraarterial catheter placed in the dorsalis pedis artery. Brain blood flow was studied with Headtome SET-011 (manufactured by Shimazu Co., Ltd.). For this flow measurement study, an intravenous injection of Xenon-133 of about 30 mCi was given via an antecubital vein. The position of the slice for the SPECT was selected so as to obtain information not only from the cerebral hemisphere but also from the brain stem : a cross section 25 deg over the orbito-meatal line, passing through the inferior aspect of the frontal horn, the basal ganglia, the lower recessus of the third ventricle and the brain stem. The results indicated that, in the cerebral hemisphere, plateau waves were accompanied by a decrease in blood flow, whereas, in the brain stem, the blood flow showed little change during plateau waves as compared with the interval phase between two plateau waves. These observations may explain why there is no rise in the blood pressure and why patients are often alert during plateau waves. (author)

  4. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease.

  5. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Ohta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires’ disease.

  6. Racking the brain: Detection of cerebral edema on postmortem computed tomography compared with forensic autopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Postmortem swelling of the brain is a typical finding on PMCT and occurs concomitant with potential antemortem or agonal brain edema. •Cerebral edema despite normal postmortem swelling is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebral tonsils on PMCT. •Cases with intoxication or asphyxia demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units) and a ratio >1.58 between the gray and white matter. •The Hounsfield measurements of the white and gray matter help to determine the cause of death in cases of intoxication or asphyxia. -- Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare postmortem computed tomography with forensic autopsy regarding their diagnostic reliability of differentiating between pre-existing cerebral edema and physiological postmortem brain swelling. Materials and methods: The study collective included a total of 109 cases (n = 109/200, 83 male, 26 female, mean age: 53.2 years) and were retrospectively evaluated for the following parameters (as related to the distinct age groups and causes of death): tonsillar herniation, the width of the outer and inner cerebrospinal fluid spaces and the radiodensity measurements (in Hounsfield Units) of the gray and white matter. The results were compared with the findings of subsequent autopsies as the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral edema. p-Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Cerebellar edema (despite normal postmortem swelling) can be reliably assessed using postmortem computed tomography and is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebellar tonsils (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between intoxication (or asphyxia) and all other causes of death; the former causes demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units), and the gray to

  7. Racking the brain: Detection of cerebral edema on postmortem computed tomography compared with forensic autopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Nicole [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Schweitzer, Wolf; Ross, Steffen G.; Gascho, Dominic [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Ruder, Thomas D. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Freiburgstrasse, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Thali, Michael J. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.uzh.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Postmortem swelling of the brain is a typical finding on PMCT and occurs concomitant with potential antemortem or agonal brain edema. •Cerebral edema despite normal postmortem swelling is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebral tonsils on PMCT. •Cases with intoxication or asphyxia demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units) and a ratio >1.58 between the gray and white matter. •The Hounsfield measurements of the white and gray matter help to determine the cause of death in cases of intoxication or asphyxia. -- Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare postmortem computed tomography with forensic autopsy regarding their diagnostic reliability of differentiating between pre-existing cerebral edema and physiological postmortem brain swelling. Materials and methods: The study collective included a total of 109 cases (n = 109/200, 83 male, 26 female, mean age: 53.2 years) and were retrospectively evaluated for the following parameters (as related to the distinct age groups and causes of death): tonsillar herniation, the width of the outer and inner cerebrospinal fluid spaces and the radiodensity measurements (in Hounsfield Units) of the gray and white matter. The results were compared with the findings of subsequent autopsies as the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral edema. p-Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Cerebellar edema (despite normal postmortem swelling) can be reliably assessed using postmortem computed tomography and is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebellar tonsils (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between intoxication (or asphyxia) and all other causes of death; the former causes demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units), and the gray to

  8. Computer tomography in management and prognosis of patients with severe brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the influence of computer tomography on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe brain damage, and investigates whether it is possible to make predictions on the outcome of these patients, based on CT findings. To this end, a series of computer tomograms was made of 173 consecutive patients with severe brain damage. One hundred and twenty-one of the 173 patients were comatose on admission. The other 52 patients were non-comatose, but showed impaired consciousness and/or neurological deficit. The computer tomograms were made, as far as possible, at predetermined intervals after the accident. There was a high percentage of abnormal findings on the computer tomograms made on admission. In 61 patients, the abnormalities detected on the CT scans could be checked by operation or autopsy. In all cases the CT diagnosis was confirmed. This study shows that accurate predictions of death can be made for a number of patients with severe brain damage. Accurate predictions of survival were also made, albeit for a much smaller number of patients. The formulation of probability statements about the quality of survival proved to be impossible, because of the relatively small number of survivors and because of the technical limitations of the scanner used. (Auth.)

  9. Brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Anosmic Subjects Ater Closed Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Banan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anosmia following head trauma is relatively common and in many cases is persistent and irreversible. The ability to objectively measure such a decline in smelling, for both clinical and medicolegal goals, is very important. The aim of this study was to find results of brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT in anosmic subjects after closed head trauma. This case-control cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary referral University Hospital. The brain perfusion state of nineteen anosmic patients and thirteen normal controls was evaluated by means of the SPECT with 99mtc- ECD infusion- before and after olfactory stimulation. The orbitofrontal lobe of the brain was assumed as the region of interest and changes in perfusion of this area before and after the stimulations were compared in two groups. The mean of brain perfusion in controls before and after the stimulation was 8.26% ± 0.19% and 9.89% ± 0.54%, respectively (P < 0.0001. Among patients group, these quantities were 7.97% ± 1.05% and 8.49% ± 1.5%, respectively (P < 0.004. The difference between all the measures in cases and controls were statistically significant (P < 0.0001. There were no differences in age and sex between two groups. The brain SPECT is an objective technique suitable for evaluating anosmia following the head trauma and it may be used with other diagnostic modalities

  10. Clinical study on eating disorders. Brain atrophy revealed by cranial computed tomography scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiwaki, Shinichi

    1988-06-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed in 34 patients with anorexia nervosa (Group I) and 22 with bulimia (Group II) to elucidate the cause and pathological significance of morphological brain alterations. The findings were compared with those from 47 normal women. The incidence of brain atrophy was significantly higher in Group I (17/34, 50%) and Group II (11/22, 50%) than the control group (3/47, 6%). In Group I, there was a significant increase in the left septum-caudate distance, the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure, the width of the both-side Sylvian fissures adjacent to the skull, and the maximum width of the third ventricle. A significant increase in the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure and the width of the left-side Sylvian fissure adjacent to the skull were noted as well in Group II. Ventricular brain ratios were significantly higher in Groups I and II than the control group (6.76 and 7.29 vs 4.55). Brain atrophy did not correlate with age, body weight, malnutrition, eating behavior, depression, thyroid function, EEG findings, or intelligence scale. In Group I, serum cortisol levels after the administration of dexamethasone were correlated with ventricular brain ratio. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs.

  11. The brain morphology of Homo Liujiang cranium fossil by three-dimensional computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XiuJie; LIU Wu; DONG Wei; QUE JieMin; WANG YanFang

    2008-01-01

    The Liujiang cranium is the most complete and well-preserved late Pleistocene human fossils ever unearthed in south China.Because the endocranial cavity is filled with hard stone matrix,earlier stud-ies focused only on the exterior morphology of the specimen using the traditional methods.In order to derive more information for the phyletic evaluation of the Liujiang cranium,high-resolution industrial computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the fossil,and the three-dimensional (3D) brain image was reconstructed.Compared with the endocasts of the hominin fossils (Hexian,Zhoukoudian,KNM-WT 15000,Sm 3,Kabwe,Brunn 3,Predmost) and modern Chinese,most morphological features of the Liujiang brain are in common with modern humans,including a round brain shape,bulged and wide frontal lobes,an enlarged brain height,a full orbital margin and long parietal lobes.A few differ-ences exist between Liujiang and the modern Chinese in our sample,including a strong posterior pro-jection of the occipital lobes,and a reduced cerebellar lobe.The measurement of the virtual endocast shows that the endocranial capacity of Liujiang is 1567 cc,which is in the range of Late Homo sapiens and much beyond the mean of modern humans.The brain morphology of Liujiang is assigned to Late Homo sapiens.

  12. Clinical implications of brain atrophy by computed tomography in patients with age-related dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study is to clarify the clinical significance of brain atrophy by computed tomography in age-related dementia. Eighty elderly patients with clinical diagnosis of presenile or senile dementia whose mental states were assessed clinically and by several psychometric test were studied by computed tomography. Patients with suspected cerebrovascular disorders and normal pressure hydrocephalus were excluded. Three tomographic sections through anterior and posterior horns and cella media of lateral ventricles and cortex with intracranial space of 60 - 80 cm2 were evaluated. CSF spaces (%) were measured as an index of brain atrophy. The measurement of CSF spaces (%) was carried out by the computerized planimetric method to avoid visual definition of ventricular borders. In this study, CSF spaces comprised ventricular and subarachnoid spaces. Hasegawa's dementia scale, Bender-Gestalt test and Kohs' block design test were employed for the cognitive assessment of the subjects. In two sections through lateral ventricles, significant correlations were obtained between CSF spaces (%) and scores of Hasegawa's dementia scale and Kohs' block design test. Scores of Bender-Gestalt test did not correlate with CSF spaces (%) in these two sections. In the section through cortex, no correlation were found between CSF spaces (%) and scores of any psychometric test. Also, no positive correlations were obtained between age and CSF spaces (%) in the three sections. (author)

  13. Detection of brain atrophy due to ACTH or corticosteroid therapy with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, I.; Takei, T. (National Sagamihara Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan)); Oota, H.; Maekawa, K.

    1981-07-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or corticosteroids seemed to cause brain atrophy in infants. We studied the atrophy which was caused by these drugs with computed tomography (CT). 1) Nine cases of infantile spasms examined before, during and after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy on CT was observed immediately after the completion of ACTH therapy. The brain atrophy receded slightly after several months. It was more marked in younger patients, in cases treated by high doses of ACTH and in cases where brain atrophy had already been observed before ACTH therapy. 2) Twenty cases of infantile spasms or Lennox Gastaut syndrome were examined after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy was observed in twelve cases. Main features of brain atrophy were the enlargement of sylvian fissure and the widening of subarachnoid space at the frontal or temporal region. Mental retardation was observed in eighteen cases. 3) Two cases of nephrotic syndrome were treated with pulse therapy of prednisolone. CT was carried out before and after treatment. Atrophy of cerebrum was observed in these cases. 4) A case of infantile spasms treated with anticonvulsants without ACTH was studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and CT. The abnormal pattern of EEG was markedly corrected, while brain atrophy on CT was not observed after the therapy. Because of these observations the use of ACTH has to be reconsidered. ACTH should be the drug of second choice for the therapy of infantile spasms and should be used in case other anticonvulsants have no effect. ACTH should be used at lower dosages and for shorter periods of time.

  14. The prevalence of undiagnosed abnormalities on non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography compared to contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Minné

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even though magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the gold standard investigation for intracranial pathology, it is not widely available in developing countries and computed tomography (CT of the brain remains the first-line investigation for patients with suspected intracranial pathology. It is generally accepted that certain intracranial pathology can be missed on non-contrast-enhanced CT (NECT of the brain if a contrast-enhanced CT (CECT is not done. We have to consider on the one hand the risk of delayed or missed diagnosis and on the other hand the cost, increased radiation exposure and contrast-induced reactions. Advances in CT technology have also improved the resolution of CT scan images, making it easier to identify pathology on an NECT of the brain. To date, no study comparing NECT to CECT of the brain, utilising 64-slice CT technology, has been published.Objectives: To determine the prevalence of undiagnosed abnormalities on non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (NECT scans of the brain reported as normal, on a 64-slice CT scanner.Method: A descriptive retrospective study was undertaken of CT brain scans done during a 12-month period at a tertiary provincial hospital in the Northern Tshwane district of Gauteng, South Africa. The CT brain scans were evaluated by three reviewers (general radiologists. The NECT and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT scans of the brain were reviewed independently on separate occasions. Reviewers were blinded to patient history, each other’s interpretation, and to their own interpretation of the NECT when evaluating the CECT and vice versa. Discrepancies in interpretation were resolved during a consensus meeting between all three reviewers. The reviewers also re-evaluated the NECT scans of the cases with undiagnosed abnormal findings during this session. A decision was made pertaining to the visibility of the abnormal findings on the NECT scan.Results: In this study, 3.28% of cases

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  16. Computed tomography in epidural abscess, subdural empyema, meningitis, and brain abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerised tomography cannot be of great help in diagnosing meningitis. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid remains essential. After the inflammation of the meninges has progressed to some stage of encephalitis, the formation of an abscess can be located via computed tomography. It is characterised by the ring-type abscess capsule. Computed tomography for diagnostic purposes is superior to cerebral scanning, which demonstrates enhanced activity, but does not show the formation of a membrane, so essential for differential diagnosis. Furthermore, computed tomography shows the adjacent anatomical structures and answers the questions of displacements and threatening invasion of the ventricle system. Epidural and subdural abscesses can also be located by computed tomography. Therapy can begin directly after computerised tomography, whereas in scintigraphy only a non-specific enhanced activity is present, which often does not allow differentiation between epidural and subdural location. (orig.)

  17. Complementary single photon emission computed tomography of the brain: Xe-133 and iodoamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xe-133 and I-123 iodoamphetamin (IMP) emission computed tomography studies of 32 patients with neurologic (n = 7) or psychiatric (n = 25) diagnoses were used to determine whether the modalities yield complementary diagnostic information. The images, interpreted by two observers, differed in 15 (47%) cases. In schizophrenic patients, 11(61%) abnormalities were identified by Xe-133 imaging and 15(83%) by IMP. The abnormalities involved principally the frontal lobes and were identified in eight (73%) cases by Xe-133 imaging and in ten (67%) cases by IMP. In all four patients with arteriovenous malformations the imaging results were abnormal: Xe-133 showed increased flow while IMP revealed localized decreased activity in one patient. Imaging patterns for seizures, depression and psychoses also differed. Thus, Xe-133 and IMP appear complementary in their portrayal of brain function

  18. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy based on MRI only (MRI-only RT) shows a promising potential for the brain. Much research focuses on creating a pseudo computed tomography (pCT) from MRI for treatment planning while little attention is often paid to the treatment delivery. Here, we investigate if cone beam...

  19. Brain hypoperfusion on Tc-99m-ethylene dicysteine diethyl ester single-photon emission computed tomography in Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a 17-year-old female, previously diagnosed of autoimmune hyperthyroidism who had an acute neurological episode and presented high antithyroid antibodies titers, cerebral spinal fluid and electroencephalogram changes. 99mTc ethylene dicysteine diethyl ester brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed global and patchy hypoperfusion. With glucocorticoid therapy, clinical symptoms disappeared; there was a decrease in antithyroid antibody levels and repeat brain SPECT revealed improvement of perfusion. (author)

  20. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  1. Computed Tomography. Chapter 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After its clinical introduction in 1971, computed tomography (CT) developed from an X ray modality that was limited to axial imaging of the brain in neuroradiology into a versatile 3-D whole body imaging modality for a wide range of applications, including oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and interventional radiology. CT is applied for diagnosis and follow-up studies of patients, for planning of radiotherapy, and even for screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors

  2. Role of scintigraphy and computer-assisted tomography in brain examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the role of computer-assisted tomography (CAT) and scintigraphy in brain exploration, the authors analysed: (1) the diagnostic effectiveness of the two methods in 300 patients examined over a period of seven months; (2) the role assigned to each investigation in 169 patients operated on for intracranial lesion during the same period. The isotopic brain examination always included an initial angiographic study after the intravenous injection of a technetium compound. Study of the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid was made with 111In-DTPA. The detection efficiency of CAT is higher than for scintigraphy in expansive processes, whereas, conversely, in cerebrovascular accidents of ischaemic origin, isotope angiography coupled with static imaging enables one to gain more information on cerebral perfusion than CAT. Similarly, when studying the cerebrospinal fluid, scintigraphy provides a greater amount of specific data on the mechanisms governing hydrocephalus, the mode of operation of a shunt, or the site of a cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Within a neurosurgical context, CAT by and large takes precedence in brain examination, but the investigation is usually accompanied by scintigraphy or a conventional neuroradiological examination. Scintigraphy was performed on 66% of the patients, whereas for neuroradiological examination the figure was 44%. Most of the scintigraphy came after CAT so as to obtain additional diagnostic information on the vascularization, the nature and, on occasion, the exact location of the lesion revealed by CAT. In more than one case out of two, scintigraphy provides enough additional information for one to avoid neuroradiological examination, which is more 'aggressive' and more dangerous. Hence scintigraphy represents an effective complement to CAT and can compete with the conventional neuroradiological technique. (author)

  3. A case of burn encephalopathy with reversible brain atrophy on brain computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an interesting case of burn encephalopathy. The patient is a three-year-old girl with second to third degree and 30 % scald burn. She developed central nervous symptom on the second day with high fever and systemic convulsions and was transferred to our clinic on the third day from a local hospital. Her level of consciousness was 30 to 100 (3-3-9 formula) and she developed extra-pyramidal involuntary movement; these neurological signs persisted untill 66th day when she spoke for the first time since admission. Her EEG showed diffuse brain dysfunction and CT showed marked brain atrophy. She began to improve after around 50 days systematically as well as neurologically and was discharged after four months. EEG, CT findings and neurological signs were normal 1.5 years later. We could not find a case of reversible brain atrophy in the reports on burn encephalopathy or other neurological disorders except for the cases of long-term steroid administration on autoimmune diseases or ACTH therapy on infantile spasm. In our case, the reversible brain atrophy might be caused by the rise of endogenous steroid under burn stress, or transient malfunction of cerebro-spinal fluid absorption, or some other causes. (author)

  4. Neuro-Behcet's syndrome with contrast enhancement on brain computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of neuro-Behcet's syndrome (N-B) with contrast enhancement (enhancement) on brain computed tomography (CT) are reported. Case 1. A 34-year-old man, who had a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, developed a left inferior homonymous quadrantanopsia. CT scans showed a large lucent area with a ring-like enhancement (3 cm in diameter) lesion in the right parietooccipital region. When he developed a left hemiplegia, CT scans showed a irregular lucent area with heterogenous enhancement lesions in the right basal ganglia and midbrain. Case 2. A 38-year-old woman, who had a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis and genital ulcer, developed mental confusion. CT scans showed a large lucent area with a homogenous marked round enhancement lesion in the left basal ganglia. When she developed generalized convulsion, CT scans showed a large lucent area with a heterogenous irregular enhancement lesion in the right occipital lobe. Enhancement lesions were observed in the area corresponded to their neurological symptoms during acute exacerbations and disappeared within three months. Our cases suggest that N-B with acute exacerbations could show transient enhancement on CT. (author)

  5. Computerized detection of acute ischemic stroke in brain computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interpretation of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in computed tomography (CT) images is a very difficult challenge for radiologists. To assist radiologists in CT image interpretation, we have developed a computerized method for the detection of AIS using 100 training cases and 60 testing cases. In our computerized method, the inclination of the isotropic brain CT volume data is corrected by rotation and shifting. The subtraction data for the contralateral volume is then derived by subtraction from the mirrored (right-left reversed) volume data. Initial candidates suspected to have experienced AIS were identified using multiple-thresholding and filtering techniques. Twenty-one image features of these candidates were extracted and applied to a rule-based test to identify final candidates for AIS. The detection sensitivity values for the training cases and for the testing cases were 95.0% with 3.1 false positives per case and 85.7% with 3.4 false positives per case, respectively. Our computerized method showed good performance in the detection of AIS by CT and is expected to be useful in decision-making by radiologists. (author)

  6. Regional brain hematocrit in stroke by single photon emission computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nineteen studies on 18 subjects were performed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the head after the successive intravenous administration of a plasma label (/sup 99m/Tc-human serum albumin [HSA]) and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled autologous red blood cells (RBC). Two sets of cerebral tomographic sections were generated: for cerebral /sup 99m/Tc-HSA alone and for combined /sup 99m/Tc-HSA and /sup 99m/Tc-RBC. By relating counts in regions of interest from the cerebral tomograms to counts from blood samples obtained during each tomographic acquisition, regional cerebral haematocrit (Hct) was calculated by the application of a simple formula. Results show 1) lower cerebral Hct than venous Hct (ratio of HCT brain/Hct venous 0.65-0.90) in all subjects, and 2) comparison between right and left hemisphere Hct in 3/3 normal subjects, 6/6 patients with transient ischaemic attacks and 3/8 patients with stroke showed no significant difference. However, in 3/8 patients with stroke (most recent strokes) significant differences were found, the higher Hct value corresponding to the affected side

  7. Evaluation of radiation therapy for pediatric brain stem glioma by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of radiation therapy on 29 brain stem gliomas in childhood were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). The patients received radiation of 2 Gy/day as a single fraction, 5 day a week with a total dose of 40 to 60 Gy. Initial CT findings of brain stem gliomas were divided into two types; diffuse and localized. Of 29 children, 5 had localized and 24 had diffuse tumor. Histological diagnoses were available for 18 patients, 4 with localized and 14 with diffuse tumor. All of the localized tumors were astrocytomas and diffuse tumors included 13 anaplastic gliomas (glioblastomas), 3 anaplastic astrocytomas, and one astrocytoma. Complete response or partial response to radiation therapy was observed on CT in 100% (5/5) of the localized tumors and 46% (11/13) of the diffuse tumors at the first evaluation. Contrary to expectation, low-grade gliomas responded much better to radiation therapy than high-grade gliomas. The response rates were 80% (4/5) in astrocytoma, 67% (2/3) in anaplastic astrocytoma, and 38% (5/13) in anaplastic glioma. In the follow-up CT after radiation therapy, a delayed effect was observed in only one of the 24 diffuse tumors. Nine of 10 children who had a re-irradiation following the recurrence experienced very little benefit. None of the patients with localized tumors have shown evidence of tumor progression or recurrence, and the quality of their life has been exellent. On the other hand, all of the patients with diffuse tumor died within 20 months after initial treatment. The results of this study suggest that radiation therapy is beneficial for localized tumors but not for diffuse tumors, and new treatments need to be developed for diffuse tumors. (author)

  8. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  9. A study on brain ventricle measurement of normal Korean adults using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was undertaken to assess the ventricular system of the brain in normal Korean adults on the base of computed tomography. The computerized tomographic examinations of 334 Korean adults between ages of 15 to 50 years, performed at Seoul National University Hospital, were evaluated. The cerebro- or cerebello-ventricular ratio, between ventricular size and brain parenchyme width, has been known to be a reliable indicator of the ventricular size. This ratio was measured at the level of the lateral, third and fourth ventricles respectively. The shape of the quardigeminal and suprasellar cistern was analyzed. The results are as follows: 1. The cerebroventricular ratios of the lateral ventricle at the level of the widest bifrontal and bicaudate diameters were 0.30 ± 0.04 and 0.14 ± 0.02, respectively. The lateral ventricle was asymmetric in 12.6%, of which the left side was usually larger than the right. 2. There was correlation between the cerebroventricular ratio and age, i.e., with increase of age, the C-V ratio increased slightly. 3. The cerebroventricular ratio of the third ventricle was 0.03 ± 0.01. 4. The cerebroventricular ratio of the fourth ventricle in width and height was 0.14± 0.02 and 0.10 ± 0.03, respectively. The anteroposterior position index of the fourth ventricle was 0.42 ± 0.04. 5. The quadrigeminal cistern showed W-shape in 76.6% and U-shape in 23.4%. 6. The suprasellar cistern showed pentagonal shape in 61.1%, round in 28.4% and hexagonal in 10.5%. 7. There was no significant difference between male and female according to the above results

  10. A study on brain ventricle measurements of normal Korean adults using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was undertaken to assess the ventricular system of the brain in normal Korean adults on the base of computed tomography. The computerized tomographic examinations of 334 Korean adults between ages of 15 to 50 years, performed at Seoul National University Hospital, were evaluated. The cerebro- or cerebello-ventricular ratio, between ventricular size and brain parenchyme width, has been known to be reliable indicator of the ventricular size. This ratio was measured at the level of the lateral, third and fourth ventricles respectively. The shape of the quardigeminal and suprasellar cistern was analyzed. The results are as follows: 1. The cerebroventricular ratios of the lateral ventricle at the level of the widest bifrontal and bicaudate diameters were 0.30 ± 0.04 and 0.14 ± 0.02, respectively. The lateral ventricle was asymmetric in 12.6%, of which the left side was usually larger than the right. 2. There was correlation between the cerebroventricular ratio and age, i.e., with increase of age, the C-V ratio increased slightly. 3. The cerebrocventricular ratio of the third ventricle was 0.03 ± 0.01. 4. The cerebroventricular ratio of the fourth ventricle in width and height was 0.14 ± 0.02 and 0.10 ± 0.03, respectively. The anteroposterior position index of the fourth ventricle was 0.42 ± 0.04. 5. The quadrigeminal cistern showed W-shape in 76.6% and U-shaped in 23.4%. 6. The suprasellar cistern showed pentagonal shape in 61.1%, round in 28.4% and hexagonal in 10.5%. 7. There was no significant difference between male and female according to the above results

  11. Establishment of a brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography database in children by statistical imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We made a 3-dimensional, 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) database in children by a statistical analysis. We selected 52 individuals between 1 and 15 years of age whose brain SPECT and brain MRI findings were normal, and divided them into three age groups: 1-5, 6-10 and 11-15 years. By comparing databases obtained for each group, an age-dependent change of regional cerebral blood flow was investigated. The results showed that the relative blood flow increases in the frontal lobe and cerebeller hemisphere and decrease in the occipital lobe with increasing age, findings consistent with those of previous reports. This database enabled us to easily find 3-dimensional brain perfusion abnormality in individual patient by SPECT, and may help elucidate the pathophysiology of many brain disorders. (author)

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head What is CT Scanning of the ... Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Blood flow measurement in human brain by 133Xe inhalation and single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerbral blood flow (rCBF) was studied tomographically in 39 volunteers in the resting state by single photon emission computed tomography with inhalation of 133Xe. In each study, rCBF in 3 slices of 2 cm thickness was measured simultaneously and changes of radioactivity in the brain were stored on the magnetic disk in 32 x 32 matrix. Activity in the arterial blood was measured by a stationary collimated scintillation detector kept over the upper chest on the right side. The algorithm for calculation of tomographic rCBF was based on a combination of ''sequence of picture method'' and ''early picture method''. Mean rCBF and its standard deviation were obtained in each pixel calculated from the rCBF value. The tomographic rCBF map having a resolution element of 17 x 17 x 20 mm were symmetrical in left and right pattern. The average cerebral and, cerebellar blood flow was 56+-8 and 54+-6 ml/100g/min respectively. Correlation between rCBF and PaCO2 was significant (P<0.01; r=0.7) and the one between rCBF and age was also significant (P<0.05; r=-0.3). When visual activation was made in one volunteer, rCBF in the occipital lobe increased and a slight increase was also noted in the frontal area. In auditory activation, rCBF in the temporal lobe increased on both sides. In stroke patients, abnormal findings appeared earlier in the rCBF study than in X-ray CT scan. (J.P.N.)

  15. Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landon A. Jones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant health concern. While 70-90% of TBI cases are considered mild, decision-making regarding imaging can be difficult. This survey aimed to assess whether clinicians’ decision-making was consistent with the most recent American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP clinical recommendations regarding indications for a non-contrast head computed tomography (CT in patients with mild TBI. Methods: We surveyed 2 academic emergency medicine departments. Six realistic clinical vignettes were created. The survey software randomly varied 2 factors: age (30, 59, or 61 years old and presence or absence of visible trauma above the clavicles. A single important question was asked: “Would you perform a non-contrast head CT on this patient?” Results: Physician decision-making was consistent with the guidelines in only 62.8% of total vignettes. By age group (30, 59, and 61, decision-making was consistent with the guidelines in 66.7%, 47.4%, and 72.7% of cases, respectively. This was a statistically-significant difference when comparing the 59- and 61-year-old age groups. In the setting of presence/absence of trauma above the clavicles, respondents were consistent with the guidelines in 57.1% of cases. Decision-making consistent with the guidelines was significantly better in the absence of trauma above the clavicles. Conclusion: Respondents poorly differentiated the “older” patients from one another, suggesting that respondents either inappropriately apply the guidelines or are unaware of the recommendations in this setting. No particular cause for inconsistency could be determined, and respondents similarly under-scanned and over-scanned in incorrect vignettes. Improved dissemination of the ACEP clinical policy and recommendations is a potential solution to this problem.

  16. Clinical manifestations that predict abnormal brain computed tomography (CT in children with minor head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Alharthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography (CT used in pediatric pediatrics brain injury (TBI to ascertain neurological manifestations. Nevertheless, this practice is associated with adverse effects. Reports in the literature suggest incidents of morbidity and mortality in children due to exposure to radiation. Hence, it is found imperative to search for a reliable alternative. Objectives: The aim of this study is to find a reliable clinical alternative to detect an intracranial injury without resorting to the CT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients (1-14 years with blunt head injury and having a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 13-15 who had CT performed on them. Using statistical analysis, the correlation between clinical examination and positive CT manifestation is analyzed for different age-groups and various mechanisms of injury. Results: No statistically significant association between parameteres such as Loss of Consciousness, ′fall′ as mechanism of injury, motor vehicle accidents (MVA, more than two discrete episodes of vomiting and the CT finding of intracranial injury could be noted. Analyzed data have led to believe that GCS of 13 at presentation is the only important clinical predictor of intracranial injury. Conclusion: Retrospective data, small sample size and limited number of factors for assessing clinical manifestation might present constraints on the predictive rule that was derived from this review. Such limitations notwithstanding, the decision to determine which patients should undergo neuroimaging is encouraged to be based on clinical judgments. Further analysis with higher sample sizes may be required to authenticate and validate findings.

  17. Time-dependent changes of cranial computed tomography after brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children were retrospectively judged as having been in brain death state. Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained during 109 and 60 days from the judgement of brain death to cardiac arrest. Early CT scans showed noticeable diffuse low density area and lack of ventricular and cisternal compression. Subsequently, the low density area became marked in the deep-seated white matter, brain stem, and basal ganglia. High density area along the cistern and fissures appeared, some of which were considered calcified. Preserved intracranial circulation may be a possible mechanism of these phenomena; however, many questions remain unsolved. This study emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of brain death, especially the process from brain death to cardiac death. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Computed tomography in leptomeningeal and ventricular spread of primary brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 8000 consecutive patients studied with computed tomography, 10 patients with primary intracranial tumors (germinoma, medulloblastoma, malignant teratoma and glioblastoma) showed ventricular or leptomeningeal spread of the tumor cells. In patients with leptomeningeal spread, computed tomography showed obliteration of basal cisterns and sulci with isodense or slightly hyperdense mass, which was markedly enhanced following administration of the contrast medium. In cases of ventricular spread, a narrow zone of high density was noted on the ependymal surface, and it was also markedly enhanced with the contrast medium. Similar CT scan appearance of contrast enhancement in the subarachnoid space or the ventricular surface was, however, noted also in the infectious processes such as basal arachnoiditis or ependymitis, and the differentiation of the neoplastic process from the infectious lesions seemed impossible based on the CT scan appearance alone. (author)

  19. Emission Computed Tomography: A New Technique for the Quantitative Physiologic Study of Brain and Heart in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Schelbert, H. R.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Emission computed tomography can provide a quantitative in vivo measurement of regional tissue radionuclide tracer concentrations. This facility when combined with physiologic models and radioactively labeled physiologic tracers that behave in a predictable manner allow measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. This integrated technique has been referred to as Physiologic Tomography (PT). PT requires labeled compounds which trace physiologic processes in a known and predictable manner, and physiologic models which are appropriately formulated and validated to derive physiologic variables from ECT data. In order to effectively achieve this goal, PT requires an ECT system that is capable of performing truly quantitative or analytical measurements of tissue tracer concentrations and which has been well characterized in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity and signal to noise ratios in the tomographic image. This paper illustrates the capabilities of emission computed tomography and provides examples of physiologic tomography for the regional measurement of cerebral and myocardial metabolic rate for glucose, regional measurement of cerebral blood volume, gated cardiac blood pools and capillary perfusion in brain and heart. Studies on patients with stroke and myocardial ischemia are also presented.

  20. Evaluation of mild hypothermia therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy on brain energy metabolism using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Mei; Li, Qingping; DONG, WENBIN; Zhai, Xuesong; Kang, Lan

    2014-01-01

    It remains unclear whether mild hypothermia affects energy metabolism in the brain tissue of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). The current study aimed to investigate the effect of mild hypothermia on energy metabolism in neonatal HIE and assess brain energy metabolism using position emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning. The mean standardised uptake values of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) were used to determine the glucose metabolic rate in various b...

  1. Brain receptor single-photon emission computer tomography with 123I Datscan in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical aspects of Parkinson's disease are not enough for the early diagnosis of the disease. Positron emission tomography and the receptor single - photon emission tomography can be used for imaging functional integrity of nigrostriatal dopaminergic structures. 24 patient (17 men and 7 women) were investigated. 20 of them are with Parkinson's disease and 4 are with essential tremor. The radiopharmaceutical - 123I-Datscan (ioflupane, bind with 123I) represent a cocaine analogue with selective affinity to dopamine transporters, located in the dopaminergic nigrostriatal terminals in the striatum. Single - photon emission computer tomography was performed with SPECT gamma camera (ADAC, SH Epic detector). The scintigraphic study was made 3 to 6 hours after intravenous injection of the radiopharmaceutical - 123I- Datscan in dose 185 MBq. 120 frames are registered with duration of each one 22 seconds and gamma camera rotation 360. After generation of transversal slices we generated two composites pictures. The first composite picture image the striatum, the second - the occipital region. Two ratios were calculated representing the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical in the left and right striatum. Qualitative and quantitative criteria were elaborated for evaluating the scintigraphic patterns. Decreased, nonhomogeneous and asymmetric uptake of the radiopharmaceutical coupled with low quantitative parameters in range from 1.44 to 2.87 represents the characteristic scintigraphic pattern for Parkinson's disease with clear clinical picture. Homogenous with high intensity and symmetric uptake of the radiopharmaceutical in the striatum coupled with his clear frontier and with quantitative parameters up to 4.40 represent the scintigraphic pattern in two patients with essential tremor. Receptor single - photon emission computer tomography with 123I - Datscan represents an accurate nuclear-medicine method for precise diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and for its differentiation from

  2. A comparison of perfusion computed tomography and contrast enhanced computed tomography on radiation target volume delineation using rabbit VX2 brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of blood volume perfusion imaging (perfusion CT)with contrast enhanced 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CECT) in the evaluation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) using rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. Methods: Perfusion CT and CECT were performed in 20 rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. The GTV and CTV calculated with the maximal and minimal diameter of each tumor in the blood volume (BV) maps and CECT were measured and compared to those in pathological specimens. Results: The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of GTV was (8.19 ± 2.29) mm and (4.83 ± 1.31) mm in pathological specimens, (11.98 ±3.29) mm and (7.03±1.82) mm in BV maps, while (6.36±3.85) mm and (3.17±1.93) mm in CECT images, which were significantly different (pathological specimen vs. BV map, t = 7.17, P =0.000;pathological specimen vs. CECT, t = 8.37, P = 0.000, respectively). The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of CTV in pathologic specimens was (12.87 ± 3.74) mm and (7.71 ± 2.15) mm, which was significantly different from that of GTV and CTV in CECT (t = - 3. 18, P = 0. 005 and t = - 4.24, P =0.000; t= -11.59,P=0.000 and t= -9.39, P=0.000), while similar with that of GTV in BV maps (t = - 1.95,P = 0. 067; t = - 2. 06, P = 0. 054). For CECT, the margin from GTV to CTV was 81.83% ±40.33% for the maximal diameter and 276.73% ± 131.46% for the minimal. While for BV maps, the margin was 7.93% ± 17. 84% and 12.52% ± 27. 83%, which was significant different from that for CECT images (t=7.36, P=0. 000 and t= -8.78, P=0.000). Conclusions: Compared with CECT, the BV map from 64-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging might have higher accuracy in target volume delineation for brain tumor. (authors)

  3. Computed tomography in neurocysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three hundred and fifty seven computed tomography (CT) from 100 different patients with neurocysticercosis (NC) were studied between 1979 and 1988. All patients were treated with praziquantel (PZQ). A new classification attempting to recognize the CT evolution profile in NC as well as assigning a possible link between CT findings and biological conditions of cysts is evaluated. It was possible to conclude that: intact cysts remain unchanged in consecutive CTs by 11 months and exhibit signs of degeneration in about 18 months after PZQ drug therapy; degenerating cysts can be detected by 10.5 months, disappear in 11 months and become nodular calcifications in about 25 months. Therefore, a time period of at least 36 months can be estimated for the complete evolution profile of cysts in the brain parenchyma. (author)

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? What are ...

  5. The diagnostic contribution of computed tomography in intranasal carcinoma with retrobulbar, oral and brain invasion in a canine: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intranasal tumors are uncommon and in most cases are malignant, aggressive and with low to moderate potential for metastasis. Clinical signs are usually caused by progressive obstruction of the upper airways. The test cytopathological also is a diagnosis method, but the definitive diagnosis is made by histopathological. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended to treatment planning. A poodle was attended at the veterinary hospital with a clinical history of epistaxis and nasal and ocular secretions, seizures and severe dyspnoea. The animal underwent to radiographic examination of the chest and skull as well as helical computed tomography of the nasal cavity and brain before and after the administration of intravenous contrast. The CT findings revealed an expansive bilateral nasal cavity neoformation, with involvement of the retrobulbar space, right frontal sinus, brain and oral cavity, suggesting a neoplastic or an infectious process. The CT examination allowed the material collection, directly from the mass, to cytological examination, providing the diagnosis of carcinoma. CT also allowed the determination of the unfavorable prognosis of the patient and the treatment planning which not included the surgical excision of the neoformation. Although CT was not conclusive in the diagnosis of carcinoma, it was essential to accurately define the extent of the lesion, to guide the collection of material directly from the tumor and to determine the prognosis of the animal, proving to be an extremely useful tool in cases of tumors intranasal in dogs. (author)

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  7. Monochromatic computed tomography of the human brain using synchrotron x rays: Technical feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monochromatic computed tomography (CT) scanner is being developed at the X17 superconducting wiggler beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, to image the human head and neck. The system configuration is one of a horizontal fan beam and an upright seated rotating subject. The purpose of the project are to demonstrate improvement in the image contrast and in the image quantitative accuracy that can be obtained in monochromatic CT and to apply the system to specific clinical research programs in neuroradiology. This paper describes the first phantom studies carried out with a prototype system, using the dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) method at energies of 20 and 39 Kev. The results show that improvements in image contrast and quantitative accuracy are possible with monochromatic DPA CT. Estimates of the clinical performance of the planned CT system are made on the basis of these initial results

  8. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in children after acute encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of 15 children with acute encephalopathy after more than 1 year from the onset, using technetium-99 m-L, L-ethyl cystinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) and a three-dementional stereotaxic region of interest template. Regional cerebral blood flow was evaluated and divided in three groups according to the severity of disability: absent or mild, moderate, and severe. There was no abnormality on SPECT in the patients without disability or with mild disability. Diffuse hypoperfusion was shown in the groups with moderate and severe disability. The patients with severe disability showed hypoperfusion in the pericallosal, frontal and central areas which was more pronounced than in the patients with moderate disability. (author)

  9. Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma

  10. Evaluation of brain space occupying lesions in the Sudan using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a study to evaluate the use of computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial S.O.Ls in 100 consecutive patients in a period of 5/12/93-25/12/1994. Data was obtained from history, clinical examination, fudoscopy, plain skull x-ray and CT, the frequency of 25 variables were studied, data analysis was done using a computer. The statistical programme EPI version 6 was used in data analysis. Females constitute 53% and males 47%. The age ranged from 17 to 80 years. The majority of patients were in the range of 20-45 years compared to 55-65 years in the western countries. Central tribes constituted 46% of the population in then study. The common presenting symptoms were headache (83%), fits (53%) visual disturbance (52%), vomiting (21%), ataxia (6%) and deafiness (3%). Frequency of abnormal finding in plain skull x-ray was (21%). Frequency of bilateral papillodema was (42%) and (5%) unilateral papillodema. CT was normal in 29%, 20% glioma, 17% meningioma, 8% metastases, 5% pituitary adenoma, (6%) infections (tuberculoma, pyogenic abscesses and hydatid cyst) and (15%) were others. (Author)

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  15. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan

  16. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzmann, D.R.; Britt, R.H.; Lyons, B.; Carroll, B.; Wilson, D.A.; Buxton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan.

  17. The evaluation of the radiation therapy of brain metastasis from lung cancer by means of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the effect of radiation therapy (RT) on 132 patients with brain metastasis from lung cancer between April 1978 and May 1987; evaluation was done by means of computed tomography (CT) scans. The CT findings of brain metastasis had some relationship to the histological types of lung cancer. Besides, the response to RT on CT images correlated with the histological diagnosis and the CT findings, both solid-contrast enhancement (S type) and ring-contrast enhancement (R type), of metastatic lesions. The results were as follows. A shrinkage of the brain metastases following RT was observed in 98.3% for small-cell carcinoma, in 75.0% for adenocarcinoma, and in 72.7% for squamous-cell carcinoma. The S type showed a better response to RT than did the R type, irrespective of their histological type, during RT. During RT, a decrease in tumor size was observed in the S type, while a decrease in the thickness of the ring wall, without any remarkable change in tumor size, was observed in the R type. In cases with small-cell carcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma, smaller metastatic lesions had greater effects than larger ones. After the completion of RT, a delayed effect was found on the follow-up CT in the cases with adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma in the S type and squamous-cell carcinoma in the R type showed the best delayed effect. (author)

  18. Interobserver variations in gross tumor volume delineation of brain tumors on computed tomography and impact of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: (1) To assess the interobserver variability of brain tumor delineation on computed tomography (CT). (2) To assess the impact of the addition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information. Methods: Nine physicians were asked to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) of five patients with supratentorial inoperable brain tumors on CT scans and 2 weeks (or more) later on MRIs. The delineations were performed on a computer screen. During delineation on MRI, the registered CT images (without delineation) were displayed on the screen (MRI+CT). Results: A high interobserver variability in GTV delineation on CT is found: the ratio of the largest to the smallest defined volumes varies for the five patients by factors of resp. 2.8, 1.8, 1.8, 1.9 and 1.7. The interobserver variability is as large on MRI+CT as on CT alone (ratio largest/smallest volume: 2.4, 1.7, 1.9, 2.7 and 1.5). Volumes delineated on MRI+CT (mean: 69.6 cm3) are larger than on CT alone (mean: 59.5 cm3). Residual volumes (volume delineated on one image modality but not on the other) are >0 for CT alone and for MRI+CT. Conclusions: A large interobserver variability in GTV delineation of brain tumors is demonstrated. The addition of MRI to CT does not reduce interobserver variability. GTVs delineated on MRI+CT are larger than on CT alone, but some volumes are delineated on CT and not on MRI. Therefore, a combination of the two image modalities is recommended for brain tumor delineation for treatment planning

  19. Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-03-03

    Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma. Future improvement in radionuclide imaging by means of emission composition potential. The compound plating approacl threshold for all the investigated transistors and fast neutron spectra lies within the raal. The value of the potential slightly changes with the coordinate change in this region, i.e. the charge on a collecting electrode is not practically guided up to a certain moment of time during the movement of nonequilibrium carriers.

  20. Cervical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the possibilities of cervical computed tomography with the apparatus available at present. The normal anatomy of the cervical region as it appears in computed tomography is described with special regard to its compartimental structure and functional aspects; this is supplemented by anatomically normal measures obtained from cervical computed tomograms of 60 healthy individuals of different age and both sexes. The morphology of cervical anomalies obtained via CT and of the various acquired cervical disease processes is discussed and illustrated by means of the authors' own observations; the diagnostic value of the findings obtained by CT is discussed, a diagnosis is set up. (orig./MG)

  1. A computer tomography-based spatial normalization for the analysis of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We developed a new computed tomography (CT)-based spatial normalization method and CT template to demonstrate its usefulness in spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images with [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in healthy controls. Seventy healthy controls underwent brain CT scan (120 KeV, 180 mAs, and 3 mm of thickness) and [{sup 18}F] FDG PET scans using a PET/CT scanner. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired for all subjects. By averaging skull-stripped and spatially-normalized MR and CT images, we created skull-stripped MR and CT templates for spatial normalization. The skull-stripped MR and CT images were spatially normalized to each structural template. PET images were spatially normalized by applying spatial transformation parameters to normalize skull-stripped MR and CT images. A conventional perfusion PET template was used for PET-based spatial normalization. Regional standardized uptake values (SUV) measured by overlaying the template volume of interest (VOI) were compared to those measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOI (FSVOI). All three spatial normalization methods underestimated regional SUV values by 0.3-20% compared to those measured with FSVOI. The CT-based method showed slightly greater underestimation bias. Regional SUV values derived from all three spatial normalization methods were correlated significantly (p < 0.0001) with those measured with FSVOI. CT-based spatial normalization may be an alternative method for structure-based spatial normalization of [18F] FDG PET when MR imaging is unavailable. Therefore, it is useful for PET/CT studies with various radiotracers whose uptake is expected to be limited to specific brain regions or highly variable within study population.

  2. Image processing and quantitative assessment in computer tomography for non-surgical treatment of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the EMI computer tomographic (CT) system, EMI-1010, a series of new programmes were developed for the digital analysis of the CT images in order to make a more objective and quantitative assessment possible of two non-surgical methods of treatment of brain tumours such as irradiation and chemotherapy. Amongst the various therapeutic effects demonstrable from the CT data, a reduction of the mass effect was found to lower the average CT number, with a dilatation of the cisterns and ventricles. In contrast, an improvement in the amount of perifocal oedema increased the average CT number of the region, however the changes in CT number of the tumour itself may be variable. The separate evaluation of these factors, therefore, gives more information about the results of the treatment than a simple analysis of the histogram of the region. Circumscribed tumours are fairly well evaluated with our programme for the statistical analysis of the volume and the CT weight of tumours and the degree of contrast enhancement using histograms and subtraction scans. For the digital analysis of the ventricular system, the subarachnoid space, perifocal oedema, and irregularly shaped infiltrating tumours, our programmes for the character-image print-out and edge correction for the partial-volume effect of skull and air are much more useful than the CRT display for data extraction and geographic-pattern recognition. (Author)

  3. Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain with a rotating gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Wappenschmidt, J.

    1981-08-01

    In 471 patients SPECT of the brain was performed in addition to conventional serial brain scintigraphy using a rotating gamma camera (GAMMATOME T 9000). 23 patients had tumorous lesions, 26 had vascular lesions, and 422 patients revealed normal brain findings. 5 of the 23 patients with tumorous lesion and 5 of the 12 patients with vascular lesion (anamnesis shorter than 4 weeks) showed positive SPECT results but false negative conventional brain scans. Specificity could be improved up to 98% (412 out of 422 patients) using SPECT and conventional scintigraphy.

  4. Neutron Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography is a non-destructive testing method which can visualize cross-section of materials based on their nuclear characteristics. In the previous work, X-ray was used as its radiation media. The aim of this experiment was to improve the computed tomography technique using neutron beam. For reconstructing the cross-section image of materials, a filtered back projection was used. Result indicated that a minimum hole shown was 3 mm in diameter using a black and white presentation. While using eight colour levels, a hole of 2 mm in diameter could be seen clearly. It is expected that neutron computed tomography can improve the results of non-destructive testing. (author). 5 refs., 6 figs

  5. Results of Non-contrast Brain Computed Tomography Scans of 1-18 Year Old Epileptic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh FALLAH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Fallah R, Nafisi Moghadam R, Fallah Tafti M, Salmani Nodoushan M. Results of Noncontrast Brain Computed Tomography Scans of 1-18 Year Old Epileptic Children. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3: 33-38.ObjectiveThe advent of computed tomography (CT scan revolutionized the diagnosticevaluation of neurologic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate brain CTresults of epileptic children.Materials & MethodsIn a descriptive cross-sectional study, noncontrast brain CT scan of 150 consecutive1-18 year old epileptic children whom were referred to pediatric neurology clinic ofShahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, from May 2008 to October 2010 inYazd-Iran, evaluated.ResultsSixty two girls and 88 boys with mean age of 6.6 ± 4.3 years were evaluated.In 38 (25.3 % children, seizure onset age was under one year and 38 others hadabnormal mental / developmental status. Fifty three children (35.3 % and 97 (64.7%had partial and generalized seizures, respectively. Partial seizures were more prevalentin children with seizure onset in < 1 year [41.5% (22/53 vs. 16.5% (16/97] Result of CT was normal in 74 % (n=111. Among the patients with abnormalresults, 18(46% had brain atrophy, 10 (25.6% structural CNS dysgenesia, six (15.4%intracranial calcification, three (7.8% hydrocephaly and two had (5.2% brain tumor.Abnormal brain CT was more prevalent in patients with seizure onset in less than oneyear of age [60.5% (23 of 38 vs. 14.3% (16 of 112, p = 0.003], partial epilepsy [51% (27of 53 vs. 12% (12/97], and abnormal developmental status [ 81.5% (31 of 38 vs.7% (8of 112]. Mean age of seizure onset in epileptic children with abnormal brain CT scanwas less (M ± SD:1/17 ± 0.6 years versus 4.02±1.9 years.ConclusionBrain CT scan might be considered in evaluation of epileptic children with partialseizures, seizure onset in less than one year of age or neurodevelopmental delay.ReferencesJagoda A, Gupta K. The emergency department

  6. Ultrasound computed tomography and magnetic resonance of a neonatal ganglioglioma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganglioglioma is an uncommon nervescell tumour (0,4% of all brain tumours). In 800 brain tumours in children, Garrido et al. (Toronto) found 14 gangliogliomas (1.7%). To our knowledge, ganglioglioma has not been reported in children under 2 1/2 years of age. We have incidentally discovered a ganglioglioma in a 3-day-old-girl. Appearence on US, CT and MR are described and discussed. (orig.)

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head What is CT Scanning of the Head? What are some ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... used in your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... used in your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if ...

  10. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret;

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ... CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ... visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  15. Intraoperative sonographic delineation of low-grade brain neoplasms defined poorly by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-four consecutive primary of metastatic brain tumors were reviewed to assess the efficacy of intraoperative sonography for localization, biopsy, and/or drainage. In 12 cases, preoperative CT data were incomplete or confusing, usually due to low-density, non-enhanced areas in which low-grade tumor could not be reliably differentiated from necrosis, edema, or cyst. In each case, intraoperative sonography clarified the nature of the solid tumor component by its distinct hyperechogenicity, facilitating biopsy. As a guide to surgical biopsy of brain tumors, sonography has some advantages even over stereotactic systems, which depend upon accurate CT definition of the lesion

  16. Computed tomography in the evaluation of migrational disorders of the brain. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migrational disorders are a rare group of congenital malformations of the brain which are almost exclusively seen in children. They are comprised of four types, lissencephaly, schizencephaly, heterotopia and polymicrogyria. They have received little attention in the radiology literature because until recently the radiographic modalities to evaluate these disorders (which are primarily abnormalities of the cortex of the brain (gyri and sulci) and gray matter) were not available. Advanced CT scanners have allowed better resolution of the pediatric brain, and in turn better delineation of this group of congenital malformations. The development of the neocortex of the brain is reviewed and the entity of lissencephaly is emphasized. The characteristic CT appearance of lissencephaly is discussed with a delineation of the major findings of (1) agyric-pachygyric cortex (2) shallow sylvian grooves producing a 'figure of eight' appearance and (3) thickened cortical gray matter with loss of the gray-white matter interdigitations. A classification of lissencephaly is proposed, based on the 13 patients of this study and the patients' reviews in the medical literature. 24 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Outcome Prediction in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury : A Focus on Computed Tomography Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Bram; Beems, Tjemme; van der Vliet, Ton M.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia; Horn, Janneke; Franschman, Gaby; Haitsma, Ian; van der Naalt, Joukje; Andriessen, Teuntje M. J. C.; Borm, George F.; Vos, Pieter E.

    2013-01-01

    With this study we aimed to design validated outcome prediction models in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) using demographic, clinical, and radiological parameters. Seven hundred consecutive moderate or severe TBI patients were included in this observational prospective cohort study.

  18. Computed tomography in severe protein energy malnutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Househam, K C; Villiers, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain was performed on eight children aged 1 to 4 years with severe protein energy malnutrition. Clinical features typical of kwashiorkor were present in all the children studied. Severe cerebral atrophy or brain shrinkage according to standard radiological criteria was present in every case. The findings of this study suggest considerable cerebral insult associated with severe protein energy malnutrition.

  19. The study of neuropsychological alterations following coronary artery bypass operation as predicted by computed tomography scan of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Atsushi; Sato, Kiyoharu (Sendai Tokushu-kai Hospital (Japan)); Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Endo, Masato; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ohmi, Mikio

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this clinical study is to provide information regarding the association between coexistent cerebrovascular disease and neuropsychological abnormalities after coronary artery bypass operations. Computed tomography scan of the brain was performed in 104 patients pre-operatively, and their post-operative neuropsychological functions were evaluated. The patients were categorized as follows according to the CT findings. Seventy-three patients showed normal or slight cerebral cortical atrophy which usually seen in patients over fifty of age (group A). Sixteen showed moderate or severe cortical atrophy (group B). Fifteen patients demonstrated the characteristic findings of Binswanger type; severe white matter hypodensity especially in frontal horns and dilated ventricles (group C). Overt neuropsychological dysfunction was not observed in patients in groups A and B. Six patients in group C showed a combination of dementia, bizarre behavior, disorientation and gait dyspraxia following bypass operations. The pseudobulbar signs were also found in 3 patients. These clinical abnormalities persisted for six days to three weeks, and were most often reversible. Although the underlying mechanism of these deleterious alterations is not elucidated, the ischemic nature of the characteristic white matter lesions was highly suspected. The arteriosclerotic changes of the arteriole of the cerebral cortex and hypoperfusion during cardio-pulmonary bypass were supposed to be responsible. Therefore it was concluded that special attention should be focused on neurological evaluation for bypass surgery in group C patients. (author).

  20. The study of neuropsychological alterations following coronary artery bypass operation as predicted by computed tomography scan of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this clinical study is to provide information regarding the association between coexistent cerebrovascular disease and neuropsychological abnormalities after coronary artery bypass operations. Computed tomography scan of the brain was performed in 104 patients pre-operatively, and their post-operative neuropsychological functions were evaluated. The patients were categorized as follows according to the CT findings. Seventy-three patients showed normal or slight cerebral cortical atrophy which usually seen in patients over fifty of age (group A). Sixteen showed moderate or severe cortical atrophy (group B). Fifteen patients demonstrated the characteristic findings of Binswanger type; severe white matter hypodensity especially in frontal horns and dilated ventricles (group C). Overt neuropsychological dysfunction was not observed in patients in groups A and B. Six patients in group C showed a combination of dementia, bizarre behavior, disorientation and gait dyspraxia following bypass operations. The pseudobulbar signs were also found in 3 patients. These clinical abnormalities persisted for six days to three weeks, and were most often reversible. Although the underlying mechanism of these deleterious alterations is not elucidated, the ischemic nature of the characteristic white matter lesions was highly suspected. The arteriosclerotic changes of the arteriole of the cerebral cortex and hypoperfusion during cardio-pulmonary bypass were supposed to be responsible. Therefore it was concluded that special attention should be focused on neurological evaluation for bypass surgery in group C patients. (author)

  1. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [123I]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [123I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [123I]β-CIT and [123I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [123I]β-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [123I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  2. Dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography for dopamine and serotonin transporters in normal and parkinsonian monkey brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I-H. [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, W.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C.-B. [Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Liao, M.-H.; Chen, C.-C.; Shen, L.-H. [Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyaun, 325 Taiwan (China); Liu, J.-C. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Ma, K.-H. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuohsing91@yahoo.com.tw

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Parkinson's disease (PD) affects both dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated dopamine and serotonin transporters in primates using dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and compared the results with traditional single-isotope imaging. Methods: Four healthy and one 6-OHDA-induced PD monkeys were used for this study. SPECT was performed over 4 h after individual or simultaneous injection of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 (a dopamine transporter imaging agent) and [{sup 123}I]ADAM (a serotonin transporter imaging agent). Results: The results showed that the image quality and uptake ratios in different brain regions were comparable between single- and dual-isotope studies. The striatal [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 uptake in the PD monkey was markedly lower than that in normal monkeys. The uptake of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the midbrain of the PD monkey was comparable to that in the normal monkeys, but there were decreased uptakes in the thalamus and striatum of the PD monkey. Conclusions: Our results suggest that dual-isotope SPECT using [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 and [{sup 123}I]ADAM can simultaneously evaluate changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in a PD model.

  3. A comparison study of 11C-methionine and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in evaluation of patients with recurrent brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajnish; D’Souza, Maria; Jaimini, Abhinav; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Saw, Sanjeev; Pandey, Santosh; Singh, Dinesh; Solanki, Yachna; Kumar, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K.; Mondal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: 11C-methonine ([11C]-MET) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a well-established technique for evaluation of tumor for diagnosis and treatment planning in neurooncology. [11C]-MET reflects amino acid transport and has been shown to be more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in stereotactic biopsy planning. This study compared fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT and MET PET-CT in the detection of various brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four subjects of brain tumor treated by surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy were subjected to [18F]-FDG, [11C]-MET, and MRI scan. The lesion was analyzed semiquantitatively using tumor to normal contralateral ratio. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery, stereotactic biopsy, clinical follow-up, MRI, or CT scans. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 5 out of 22 patients on [F-18] FDG scan while [11C]-MET was able to detect recurrence in 18 out of 22 patients in low-grade gliomas. Two of these patients were false positive for the presence of recurrence of tumor and later found to be harboring necrosis. Among oligodendroglioma, medulloblastoma and high-grade glioma out of 42 patients 39 were found to be concordant MET and FDG scans. On semiquantitative analysis, mean T/NT ratio was found to be 2.96 ± 0.94 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 1.18 ± 0.74 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumor on [11C]-MET scan. While the ratio for FDG scan on semiquantitative analysis was found to be 2.05 ± 1.04 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 0.52 ± 0.15 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumors. Conclusion: The study highlight that [11C]-MET is superior to [18F]-FDG PET scans to detect recurrence in low-grade glioma. A cut-off value of target to nontarget value of 1.47 is a useful parameter to distinguish benign from malignant lesion on an [11C]-MET Scan. Both [18F]-FDG and [11C]-MET scans were found to be useful in high-grade astrocytoma

  4. Brain computed tomography in morbid obesity before and after gastric restriction surgery: A prospective quantitative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berginer, V.M.; Solomon, H.; Charuz, I.; Hirsch, M.; Berginer, J.; Weitzman, S.; Friedman, L.

    1987-11-01

    Linear brain parameters were measured by CT in 19 patients with morbid obesity (mean weight 126.4 +- 20.5 kg) and 20 age and sex matched normal weight subjects (mean weight 62.6 +- 14.9 kg). Ventricular parameters were slightly smaller and cortical parameters were slightly larger in the preoperative obese than in control subjects. However, only the '4 cortical sulci ratio' was significantly different in the two groups (p=0.02). After gastric restriction surgery and drastic weight loss (mean postoperative weight 82.9 +- 27.4 kg), all the ventricular and cortical parameters increased, with significant change in the frontal interhemispheric fissure ratio (P<0.05). Obese patients followed for 23 months after surgery had less striking changes than those followed for 6 months. Morbidly obese subjects have altered brain CT dimensions which are partly reversible after weight correction.

  5. Brain computed tomography in morbid obesity before and after gastric restriction surgery: A prospective quantitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear brain parameters were measured by CT in 19 patients with morbid obesity (mean weight 126.4 ± 20.5 kg) and 20 age and sex matched normal weight subjects (mean weight 62.6 ± 14.9 kg). Ventricular parameters were slightly smaller and cortical parameters were slightly larger in the preoperative obese than in control subjects. However, only the '4 cortical sulci ratio' was significantly different in the two groups (p=0.02). After gastric restriction surgery and drastic weight loss (mean postoperative weight 82.9 ± 27.4 kg), all the ventricular and cortical parameters increased, with significant change in the frontal interhemispheric fissure ratio (P<0.05). Obese patients followed for 23 months after surgery had less striking changes than those followed for 6 months. Morbidly obese subjects have altered brain CT dimensions which are partly reversible after weight correction. (orig.)

  6. Transient gyriform brightness on non-contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) brain scan of seven infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous gyriform brightness seen on CT scan is an unusual finding unless associated with arteriovenous malformations (AVM). There are sporadic case reports in the literature of its occurrence in association with herpex simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE), purulent meningitis, following chemotherapy for leukaemia, in a child with chronic renal failure, and in a child with folic acid deficiency. We present a series of seven cases exhibiting this phenomenon, none of whom have AVMs, who have been scanned at this hospital in the first 2 1/2 years following the installation of a CT scanner. Four of the cases had congenital heart disease requiring corrective surgery or cardiac catheterisation. The other three had probable meningo-encephalitis. In all cases the gyriform brightness followed an ischaemic insult to the child's brain. We hypothesise that this phenomenon is an ischaemic response in the immature brain and that its occurrence is not so rare as the literature may suggest. (orig.)

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  8. Positron computed tomography: current state, clinical results and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends

  9. Computed tomography of the brain in children with early infantile autism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to examine the cranial CT of autistic children and investigate the etiological significance of CT scan findings, the CT of the brain was surveyed in 24 children with early infantile autism (3 to 17 years with a mean age of 7.6), and 179 children with the normal CT despite their medical histories such as headaches or febrile convulsions. According to their ages, the autistic and normal children were divided into the following three groups: Group I (age ranging from 3 to 5), Group II (age: 6 to 9) and Group III (age: 10 to 17). 1) There was no significant difference between the bifrontal CVI of the autistic children and that of the normal children. However, in Group III, the bifrontal CVI of the autistic children was significantly higher than that of the normal children. 2) There was no significant difference between the bicaudate CVI of the autistic children and that of the normal children. However, in Groups I and II, the bicaudate CVI of the autistic children was significantly lower than that of the normal children. 3) The maximum widths of the third ventricle showed no significant difference between the autistic and normal children. However, in Groups II and III, those of the autistic children were wider than those of the normal children. In the autistic children, as the age increases, the difference becomes significantly wider. A positive correlation was observed between the width of the third ventricle and ages of the autistic children. 4) An examination of the right-left ratio of maximum transverse diameter of the brain showed that there was no significant difference between the autistic and normal children. The abovementioned results (1)-4)) might suggest a progressive disorder of the brain structure surrounding the third ventricle or lateral ventricles in the autistic children. (author)

  10. Dynamic computed tomography study of the brain in patients managed by vascular reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential changes of cerebral regional blood flow and parenchymal perfusion were examined with dynamic CT in 12 patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive disease before and after vascular reconstructive surgery. ROI density values were recorded bilaterally in corresponding regions of the brain tissue and vessels. Interpretation is based on transient time of the bolus (timing of peak), delay of the peak and amplitude of the change of density-time curve. Differences of hemodynamics before and after surgery are demonstrated, a practical technique for measuring the relative perfusion. (orig.)

  11. Computed tomography of the dog's brain: normal aspects and anatomical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal tomographic images of dog's heads were obtained, aimed to familiarize them with the normal aspects of the brain and correlate these findings with the relevant anatomy of the region studied. Several anatomical structures, such as the parenchyma of the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, the longitudinal fissure, the ventricular system, the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, the corpus callosum, diencephalon, the pons, the medulla oblongata and the chiasmatic sulcus were directly identified or were related to neighboring structures which helped in their identification. (author)

  12. Computed Tomography Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  13. Brain paracoccidioidomycosis - evaluation by computed tomography; Estudo da paracoccidioidomicose encefalica por tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noro, Fabio [Universidade Federa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Silva, Ana Lucia Aguirre

    1998-10-01

    The brain CT scans of 11 patients with known paracoccidioidomycosis of the central nervous system were retrospectively studied regarding the granulomas characteristics and the progression of the treated lesions. CT aspects of mycotic meningeal involvement were also described, as small cortical nodules and leptomeningeal contrast enhancement, both of which were not reported in the author`s references. Six patients were meticulously followed and one of them had CT scans performed periodically during a seven years follow-up period. The most common aspect of the granulomatous form was that of isodense nodules with central hipodensity, exhibiting peripheral contrast enhancement. The most frequent imaging aspect consisted of multiple lesions predominating at the supratentorial compartment, specially on the lobes of the telencephalon. The lesions tend to regress and to calcify, as well as to loose contrast enhancement following the onset of treatment. (author) 12 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Clinical significance of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in computed tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, O.; Agnoli, A.L.; Lippmann, R.; Schuetz, H.J.

    1981-02-01

    The diagnosis of atrophy of the brain based on the visual interpretation of CT findings appears questionable. In 56 patients there was no correlation between the CT findings of enlarged ventricles and sulci and clinical findings of psychoorganic syndromes. Only the group of 60 to 80 year old patients showed a statistically significant correlation between psychoorganic findings and the area of the lateral ventricles - measured planimetrically - and the diameter of the cella medica, but not the group of the 40 to 60 year old. There was no relationship between the number of cortical sulci and psychopathology. The morphological findings of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in CT - even with exact measurements - do not allow any conclusions in regard to psychoorganic findings.

  15. The clinical significance of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in computed tomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of atrophy of the brain based on the visual interpretation of CT findings appears questionable. In 56 patients there was no correlation between the CT findings of enlarged ventricles and sulci and clinical findings of psychoorganic syndromes. Only the group of 60 to 80 year old patients showed a statistically significant correlation between psychoorganic findings and the area of the lateral ventricles - measured planimetrically - and the diameter of the cella medica, but not the group of the 40 to 60 year old. There was no relationship between the number of cortical sulci and psychopathology. The morphological findings of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in CT - even with exact measurements - do not allow any conclusions in regard to psychoorganic findings. (orig.)

  16. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  17. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, Tall; Shibata, Yoshiki [Southern Tohoku Fukushima Hospital (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  18. Quantification of Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer brain single photon emission computed tomography images using statistical probabilistic brain atlas in depressive end-stage renal disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Seong-Jang; Song, Sang Heon; Pak, Kyoungjune; Kim, Keunyoung

    2012-01-01

    This study adapted a statistical probabilistic anatomical map of the brain for single photon emission computed tomography images of depressive end-stage renal disease patients. This research aimed to investigate the relationship between symptom clusters, disease severity, and cerebral blood flow. Twenty-seven patients (16 males, 11 females) with stages 4 and 5 end-stage renal disease were enrolled, along with 25 healthy controls. All patients underwent depressive mood assessment and brain sin...

  19. Correlation of computed tomography with the histopathology of primary malignant lymphoma of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present seven autopsy cases of non-AIDS primary malignant lymphoma of the central nervous system to correlate the pathology with the findings of the most recent pre-mortem computed tomogram (CT). Of 10 primary contrast-enhancing (CE) lesions treated by chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone, radiochemotherapy, or surgery combined with radiochemotherapy, all but one completely disappeared after the initial course of therapy. However, in six of the seven patients, the final pre-mortem CT demonstrated CE lesions. In three cases CE lesions were at the same site as the primary lesion, in one case in a remote location, and in two cases in diffuse and multiple locations. In all but one case these CE lesions corresponded histologically to tumor nodules or to white matter densely infiltrated by tumor cells. The sole exception was diagnosed pathologically as delayed radiation necrosis. The final CT also showed five low-density areas (LDAs) which had evolved from CE lesions after the completion of therapy. These LDAs corresponded to rarefied or necrotic parenchyma in which tumor cells remained, mainly in the perivascular spaces. One case exhibited diffuse tumor infiltration of periventricular structures which appeared to have normal density and no CE on the final pre-mortem CT. (orig.)

  20. Brain computed tomography of patients with HIV/AIDS before the advent of subsidized treatment program in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Eze

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective is to study intracranial complications of HIV/AIDS using brain-computed tomography in patients who presented with neurological features before the advent of subsidized HIV/AIDS treatment program with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of patients′ records retrieved from radiology and medical records departments of the hospital. The studied patients had HIV/AIDS and presented with neurological features and underwent CT scan. Results: A total of 36 patients who tested positive for HIV and who presented with neurological features suspected to be complications of AIDS were examined with CT scan. They consisted of 24 male and 12 females. The male to female ratio was 2:1. The age of the patients ranged from 27 to 45 years. Seventeen patients (47.2% were aged 30-34 years. Twenty-four patients (60% were single while 12 (40% were married. Twenty-seven patients (75% were infected with HIV 1 and 2, five patients (13.9% were infected only with HIV-1 while four were infected with only HIV-2. Presenting neurological complaints include left hemiplegia 13 (36.1%, right hemiplegia 6 (16.7%, coma 7 (19.4%, memory loss/dementia complex 5 (13.9%, convulsion with coma 2 (5.6%, left hemi-pariesis with memory loss 2 (5.6%, and staggering gait 1 (2.8%. The findings in CT scan include infarcts-like lesions 14 (38.9%, multiple ring-enhancing lesions 7 (19.4%, cerebral atrophy 5 (13.9%, multiple nodular lesions 4 (11.1%, acute intracerebral hemorrhage 3 (8.3%, cerebral hemiatrophy 2 (5.6%, and solitary ring-enhancing lesions 1 (2.8%. Eight patients with single or multiple ring enhancing lesions were treated with empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis but only three (37.5% made full recovery. Conclusion: Brain CT scan showed extensive structural damages in patients with HIV/AIDS who were not treated with HAART. Out-of-pocket payment for investigations and treatment and absence of

  1. Quantitative Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Balda, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a wide-spread medical imaging modality. Traditional CT yields information on a patient's anatomy in form of slice images or volume data. Hounsfield Units (HU) are used to quantify the imaged tissue properties. Due to the polychromatic nature of X-rays in CT, the HU values for a specific tissue depend on its density and composition but also on CT system parameters and settings and the surrounding materials. The main objective of Quantitative CT (QCT) is measuring ch...

  2. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  3. Computed tomography device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computed tomography device comprising a subtraction unit which obtains differential data strings representing the difference between each time-serial projection data string of a group of projection data strings corresponding to a prospective reconstruction image generated by projection data strings acquired by a data acquisition system, a convolution unit which convolves each time-serial projection data string of the group of projection data strings corresponding to the prospective reconstruction image, and a back-projection unit which back-projects the convolved data strings

  4. Computed tomography of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Kruse, Robert J.; Knutson, Benjamin W.

    1989-12-01

    The application of Computed Tomography (CT) and laminography was tested on a variety of electronic components. The effort was performed as a preliminary testing task assignment in the Advanced Development of X ray Computed Tomography Application program. A key area for testing was printed circuit boards for the inspection of solder bonds and in particular for leadless chip carrier devices. During the course of the task assignment several other categories of electronic devices were examined including transformers, connectors, switches from solution and contrast sensitivity phantoms developed for the programs were used to establish quantitative measures of capability used to generate images. This preliminary testing of electronics lead to the conclusion that higher resolution CT scanning is needed to resolve details of interest. CT testing on commercially available system could resolve high contrast details in the range of 2 to 4 lp/mm; however, in many electronic components finer resolution is needed to detect microcracking, voiding and other features. Further testing on high resolution system is recommended. Two areas of immediate potential economic payback for electronics inspection were identified; the inspection of high volume printed circuit board production using high speed laminography and nondestructive failure analysis studies components using high-resolution CT.

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x- ... especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . ...

  6. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Cademartiri, Filippo

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield of EMI Laboratories, England, and independently by South Mrican born physicist Allan Cormack of Tufts University, Massachusetts.1 • 2 Hounsfield was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and honoured with K...

  7. Computed Tomography Measuring Inside Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, James F.; Scudder, Henry J.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography applied to obtain approximate measurements of radial distances from centerline of turbopump to leading edges of diffuser vanes in turbopump. Use of computed tomography has significance beyond turbopump application: example of general concept of measuring internal dimensions of assembly of parts without having to perform time-consuming task of taking assembly apart and measuring internal parts on coordinate-measuring machine.

  8. Computed tomography of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal lesions following an accident or surgical interventions are becoming more frequently indications for investigations by computed tomography. Changes of spleen, liver, kidneys, pancreas, and of the retroperitoneal space are discussed. Advantages of computed tomography compared to other investigative methods are shown. (orig.)

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than ... head is typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  11. Intraoperative ultrasound in determining the extent of resection of parenchymal brain tumors - a comparative study with computed tomography and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radical excision of parenchymal brain tumours is generally associated with a better long-term outcome; however, it is difficult to ascertain the extent of resection at surgery. We used intra-operative ultrasound [IOUS] to help detect residual tumour and define the tumour-brain interface. Thirty-five patients with parenchymal brain lesions including 11 low-grade and 22 high-grade tumours and 2 inflammatory granulomata were included in the study. The IOUS was used to localize tumours not seen on the surface, define their margins and assess the extent of resection at the end of surgery. Multiple samples from the tumour-brain interface which were reported as tumour or normal tissue an IOUS were submitted to histopathology. The IOUS findings were compared with a postoperative contrast enhanced computed tomogram [CT] and with histopathology. All tumours irrespective of histology were hyperechoic an IOUS. IOUS was useful in localizing those tumours not seen on the surface of the brain. In 71.4 % of cases IOUS was useful in defining their margins, however in the remaining cases the margins were ill-defined. The tumour margins were ill-defined in those treated previously by radiation. With regard to the extent of excision, after excluding the cases who were irradiated, it was found that in the 28 patients who had parenchymal neoplasms, there was concordance between the ultrasound findings and the postoperative CT scan in 23 cases. Of the 79 samples taken from the tumor-brain interface which were reported as tumour on ultrasound, 66 had histopathological evidence of tumour while 13 samples were negative for tumour. On the other hand, in the tissue sent from 17 sites where the IOUS showed no residual tumour, 2 were positive for tumour on histopathology while 15 were negative. In conclusion, IOUS is a cheap and useful real-time tool for localizing tumours not seen on the brain surface, for defining their margins and for determining the extent of resection. (author)

  12. Comparative study on findings of the brain computed tomography (X-ray-CT) and dynamic topography of VEP (VDT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative study between morphological Xray-CT and functional VDT was conducted on 20 cases of cerebral diseases with visual dysfunction. Subjects were patients with cerebral infarction, intracranial hemorrhage, hemispherectomy, traumatic brain atrophy, brain tumor, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, anoxic encephalopathy, porencephaly, microcephaly and optic tract lesion. VEP topography was performed by flash stimulation and brain electrical activity mappings were displayed by EEG topography computer. In 9 cases out of 20, abolished function in VDT was correlated to the defective findings of Xray-CT. Cases with homonymous hemianopsia showed 2 types of BEAM. In cases with a lesion in the inner surface of the occipital lobe, asymmetric electric activity was distributed along the sagittal axis of the scalp. While, in cases with outer surface lesion of the occipital lobe, asymmetric electric activity appeared along the coronary axis. In cases with multi focal brain lesions in Xray-CT, there was no regular tendency in abnormality of VDT. Various aberration of VEP and VDT, such as component defect, stagnation, reduction, condensation and abnormal flow were demonstrated. In a case of optic tract lesion, Xray-CT showed no pathological findings but VDT showed a remarkable asymmetry of brain activity. (author)

  13. Spinal computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartor, K.

    1980-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine and spinal cord is gaining more and more importance as a valuable investigative method in neuroradiology. Performed as a noninvasive procedure, with or without intravenous contrast enhancement, it can be used to diagnose paravertebral soft tissue lesions, constrictive lesions of the bony spinal canal, structure changes of the vertebral column or of individual vertebrae, vascular intraspinal lesions, and intraspinal tumors with abnormally high or abnormally low attenuation values. Performed as an invasive procedure, after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide, spinal CT can in selected cases be used in conjunction with conventional metrizamide myelography as an additional procedure (secondary CT-myelography) or even as initial procedure ( primary CT-myelography), taking advantage of its unique properties, namely to provide a transverse axial image of the spine and related soft tissue structures and to detect even small differences in density. Further improvement of spinal CT, particularly the routine non-invasive demonstration of the intraspinal soft tissues, is to be expected.

  14. Computed tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fan-beam computed tomography apparatus, timing reference pulses, normally occurring at intervals t, for data transfer and reset of approx. 500 integrators in the signal path from the detector array, are generated from the scan displacement, e.g. using a graticule and optical sensor to relate the measurement paths geometrically to the body section. Sometimes, a slow scan rate is required to provide a time-averaged density image, e.g. for planning irradiation therapy, and then the sensed impulses will occur at extended intervals and can cause integrator overload. An improvement is described which provides a pulse generator which responds to a reduced scan rate by generating a succession of further transfer and reset pulses at intervals approximately equal to t starting a time t after each timing reference pulse. Then, using an adding device and RAM, all the transferred signals integrated in the interval t' between two successive slow scan reference pulses are accumulated in order to form a corresponding measurement signal. (author)

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. ... of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ... shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No To submit ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, ... radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough ...

  1. Relationship between brain atrophy estimated by a longitudinal computed tomography study and blood pressure control in patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the relationship between blood pressure control and the progression of brain atrophy in the elderly, patients with essential hypertension and brain atrophy were longitudinally evaluated using computerized tomography (CT). The study evaluated 48 patients with essential hypertension aged 46-78 years, and 30 sex- and age-matched normotensive control subjects. The extent of brain atrophy as determined by caudate head index (CHI), the inverse cella media index (iCMI), and Evans' ratio (ER) was estimated twice at an interval of 5-9 years (mean, 6.9 years). The mean annual increases in CHI (ΔCHI), iCMI (ΔiCMI), and ER (ΔER) were evaluated. Mean blood volume in the common carotid artery (BF) and the decrease in BF per year (ΔBF) were also determined. The ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER increased with age in the hypertensive subjects as well as the control group across all age groups evaluated. The ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER were significantly greater in the patients with essential hypertension in their 50s as compared with the controls. In patients with essential hypertension aged 65 years or older, the ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER were significantly lower in the group in whom the blood pressure was controlled within the range of borderline hypertension than the groups in which it was controlled in the range of normal or mild hypertension. In the younger patients under the age of 65 with essential hypertension, blood pressure control did not affect the ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER. The ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER were significantly correlated with ΔBF in both groups. These findings indicate that control of systolic blood pressure within the range of borderline hypertension may delay the progression of brain atrophy in elderly patients with essential hypertension. (author)

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . diseases or ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of ... the head is typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head ...

  4. Quantitative computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Judith E. [Royal Infirmary and University, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: judith.adams@manchester.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) was introduced in the mid 1970s. The technique is most commonly applied to 2D slices in the lumbar spine to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cm{sup 3}). Although not as widely utilized as dual-energy X-ray absortiometry (DXA) QCT has some advantages when studying the skeleton (separate measures of cortical and trabecular BMD; measurement of volumetric, as opposed to 'areal' DXA-BMDa, so not size dependent; geometric and structural parameters obtained which contribute to bone strength). A limitation is that the World Health Organisation (WHO) definition of osteoporosis in terms of bone densitometry (T score -2.5 or below using DXA) is not applicable. QCT can be performed on conventional body CT scanners, or at peripheral sites (radius, tibia) using smaller, less expensive dedicated peripheral CT scanners (pQCT). Although the ionising radiation dose of spinal QCT is higher than for DXA, the dose compares favorably with those of other radiographic procedures (spinal radiographs) performed in patients suspected of having osteoporosis. The radiation dose from peripheral QCT scanners is negligible. Technical developments in CT (spiral multi-detector CT; improved spatial resolution) allow rapid acquisition of 3D volume images which enable QCT to be applied to the clinically important site of the proximal femur, more sophisticated analysis of cortical and trabecular bone, the imaging of trabecular structure and the application of finite element analysis (FEA). Such research studies contribute importantly to the understanding of bone growth and development, the effect of disease and treatment on the skeleton and the biomechanics of bone strength and fracture.

  5. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von;

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature th...

  6. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy

  7. Automatic Diagnosis of Abnormal Tumor Region from Brain Computed Tomography Images Using Wavelet Based Statistical Texture Features

    CERN Document Server

    Padma, A

    2011-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper is to achieve the tissue classification and automatically diagnosis the abnormal tumor region present in Computed Tomography (CT) images using the wavelet based statistical texture analysis method. Comparative studies of texture analysis method are performed for the proposed wavelet based texture analysis method and Spatial Gray Level Dependence Method (SGLDM). Our proposed system consists of four phases i) Discrete Wavelet Decomposition (ii) Feature extraction (iii) Feature selection (iv) Analysis of extracted texture features by classifier. A wavelet based statistical texture feature set is derived from normal and tumor regions. Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to select the optimal texture features from the set of extracted texture features. We construct the Support Vector Machine (SVM) based classifier and evaluate the performance of classifier by comparing the classification results of the SVM based classifier with the Back Propagation Neural network classifier(BPN...

  8. Emission tomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission tomography (ET) is a method for visualization of radionuclide distribution in transaxial sections of a body region, especially the brain. Both single-photon emitting and positron emitting radionuclides may be utilized. Conventional radiopharmaceuticals are used for single-photon ET: it shows three-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in normal and pathological brain structures and, when fast scanning techniques are used, permits the quantitative measurement of flow in small brain regions without interference from overprojection of differently perfused tissues. Coincidence detection of short-lived positron emitting radionuclides has the advantage of good attenuation correction so that quantitative determination of the concentration of the radionuclide in small tissue volumes is possible. With these short-lived, usually cyclotron-produced radionuclides, dynamic and metabolic processes may be followed (e.g. regional oxygen consumption with 15O2, regional blood volume with 11CO, C15O or 68Ga, regional perfusion with 13NH3, C15O2or77Kr) and the consumption and distribution of labelled organic compounds may be quantified (e.g. local metabolic rate of glucose with 18F-deoxyglucose or glucose distribution with 11C-methylglucose). The clinical application of these techniques may render new insight into pathophysiological mechanisms and the therapeutic management of diseases of the central nervous system. (author)

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the passage of a ... detecting inflammation of the meninges —the membranes covering the brain. top of ... American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head is typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused by a ruptured or leaking aneurysm in a patient with a sudden severe headache. a blood clot or bleeding within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a ...

  11. Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain in Sturge-Weber syndrome using N-isopropyl-p-[123I] iodoamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain using N-isopropyl-p-[123I] iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) was performed in 11 children with port wine stain on the face or head, aged 1.0∼14.2 years at investigation. Four cases without neurologic symptoms had no specific abnormality on SPECT and X-ray computed tomography (CT). In 4 cases of so-called Sturge-Weber syndrome with developmental quotients (DQ) or intelligence quotients (IQ) more than 80 and the neurologic symptoms consisting of seizures and hemiplegia, SPECT showed localized reduction of IMP accumulation, and CT exhibited calcification, atrophy and enhancement in 2 cases of 3 with contrast medium infusion in the same areas. In 3 cases with DQ of 50∼60 and severer neurologic symptoms, SPECT showed diffuse reduction or defect of IMP accumulation in the ipsilateral hemisphere, and CT exhibited remarkable atrophy, calcifications and enhancement in 2 cases with contrast medium infusion in the same hemisphere. In one case with severe neurologic symptoms, SPECT performed at an early stage showed high IMP accumulation in the ipsilateral hemisphere. (author)

  12. Cerebrovascular diseases in patients with arteriosclerotic aortic aneurysm and arteriosclerosis obliterans studied by carotid ultrasonography and by computed tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Oyama, Tetsuo; Takasaki, Masaru [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    To estimate the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases in arteriosclerotic aortic aneurysm (AA) and arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) and their characteristics, 92 patients with AA and 102 patients with ASO were studied with carotid ultrasonography and brain computed tomography (CT), and were compared with 49 patients with hypertension. The mean ages of the patients were 70 to 72 years old and all were male. Hypertension was common in the AA group; diabetes and cigarette smoking were common in the ASO group. Carotid plaque lesions seen on ultrasonography were significantly more common in the AA (66%) and ASO (85%) groups than in the patients with hypertension (39%). The mean carotid diameter was significantly greater in the AA group than in the other two groups. The mean wall thicknesses in the AA and ASO groups were greater than in the patients with hypertension. Computed tomography showed that low-density areas were also common in the AA group (56%) and ASO (53%) groups than in the patients with hypertension (24%). Most of the low-density areas were thought to be lacunae or dilated perivascular spaces in the subinsula and putamen. Moderately and highly severe periventricular lucencies were also common in the AA group. These findings indicate that carotid changes, seen in AA and ASO, reflected the characteristics of arterial lesions, and that arteriosclerotic lesions were common in patients with AA and ASO. Therefore, cerebrovascular diseases should be taken into account in the management of patients with AA and ASO. (author)

  13. Cerebrovascular diseases in patients with arteriosclerotic aortic aneurysm and arteriosclerosis obliterans studied by carotid ultrasonography and by computed tomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases in arteriosclerotic aortic aneurysm (AA) and arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) and their characteristics, 92 patients with AA and 102 patients with ASO were studied with carotid ultrasonography and brain computed tomography (CT), and were compared with 49 patients with hypertension. The mean ages of the patients were 70 to 72 years old and all were male. Hypertension was common in the AA group; diabetes and cigarette smoking were common in the ASO group. Carotid plaque lesions seen on ultrasonography were significantly more common in the AA (66%) and ASO (85%) groups than in the patients with hypertension (39%). The mean carotid diameter was significantly greater in the AA group than in the other two groups. The mean wall thicknesses in the AA and ASO groups were greater than in the patients with hypertension. Computed tomography showed that low-density areas were also common in the AA group (56%) and ASO (53%) groups than in the patients with hypertension (24%). Most of the low-density areas were thought to be lacunae or dilated perivascular spaces in the subinsula and putamen. Moderately and highly severe periventricular lucencies were also common in the AA group. These findings indicate that carotid changes, seen in AA and ASO, reflected the characteristics of arterial lesions, and that arteriosclerotic lesions were common in patients with AA and ASO. Therefore, cerebrovascular diseases should be taken into account in the management of patients with AA and ASO. (author)

  14. What is Computed Tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... word "tomography" is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphe" meaning "drawing." A CT imaging system produces cross-sectional ... The patient may receive an injection of a "contrast material" to facilitate visualization of vascular structure. Detectors ...

  15. Computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a new non-invasive diagnostic imaging method, which has ability to differentiate C.S.F., hematoma, and even edematous brain from normal brain tissue. Prior to the introduction of the CT, the diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult and was confirmed by surgery of autopsy. Intracranial hemorrhages are visible on the CT with density higher than brain tissue in acute phase. CT is an accurate method for detecting of intraventricular hemorrhage including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. CT is also useful as a guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematomas by easily performable follow up studies. The causes of the intraventricular hemorrhages are hypertension, rupture of aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, head trauma, brain tumor, and others. This study included evaluation of CT of 69 patients who show the high density in cerebral ventricular system during the period of 31 months from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1981 in the Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 69 patient was broad ranging from 1 month to 80 years. 28% of patients were in the 6th decade. The mate to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The consciousness of patients at CT study: Those were conscious in 11 cases, stuporous in 41 cases and unconscious in 17 cases. 3. The causes of intraventricular hemorrhages were hypertension in 28 cases, head trauma in 12 cases, aneurysm in 4 cases, tumor in 2 cases and others in 23 cases. 4. 9 cases showed intraventricular hematomas only, other 60 cases showed associated intracranial hematomas: Those were intracerebral hematomas in 53 cases including 30 cases of basal ganglial and thalamic hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 17 cases, epidural hematomas in 3 cases, and subdural hematomas in 2 cases. 5. All cases of the intraventricular hematomas except one sowed hematoma in the lateral

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shield may stay in the room with their child. However, the technologist will always be able to ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Brain Tumors ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a needle used to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations ... eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine ... of soft tissue (particularly the brain, including the disease processes) are less visible on CT scans . CT ...

  1. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions

  2. Evaluation of intracranial space-occupying lesion with Tc99m-glucoheptonate brain single photon emission computed tomography in treatment-naïve patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Glucoheptonate is a glucose analog with strong affinity for neoplastic brain tissues. Though extensively used as a tracer for detection of brain tumor recurrence, it′s utility for characterization of intracranial lesions as neoplastic or otherwise has not been evaluated in treatment-naοve patients. Aim : The study was conducted to determine if glucoheptonate has sufficient specificity for neoplastic lesions of brain so that it can be utilized as a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-tracer for differentiating neoplastic intracranial lesions from non-neoplastic ones in treatment-naοve patients. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional analysis of treatment-naοve patients with intracranial space-occupying lesion done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods : Fifty-four consecutive patients with clinical and radiological features of space-occupying lesion were included in this study. Glucoheptonate brain SPECT was performed before any definitive therapeutic intervention. Histopathological verification of diagnosis was obtained in all cases. Statistical Analysis Used : Descriptive statistics and student′s ′t′ test. Result : Increased glucoheptonate uptake over the site of radiological lesion was noted in 41 patients and no uptake was noticed in 13 patients. Histopathology of 12 out of the 13 glucoheptonate non-avid lesions turned out to be non-neoplastic lesion; however, one lesion was reported as a Grade-2 astrocytoma. Histology from all the glucoheptonate concentrating lesions was of mitotic pathology. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of glucoheptonate for neoplastic lesion was 97.6%, 100% and 98.1%. Conclusions : Glucoheptonate has high degree of specificity for neoplastic tissues of brain and may be used as a tracer for SPECT study to differentiate neoplastic intracranial lesions from non-neoplastic ones.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... planning surgical reconstruction. diagnose diseases of the temporal bone on the side of the skull, which may be causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ...

  8. Cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have adopted the traditional approach with a systematic examination of a wide range of disorders. There is an introductory section on physics and instrumentation which is treated with considerable detail. Concise discussions of neoplastic, inflammatory, vascular, degenerative, and traumatic disorders of the brain and craniofacial area follow. Pediatric and developmental abnormalities are also addressed

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... planning surgical reconstruction. diagnose diseases of the temporal bone on the side of the skull, which may be causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. ...

  10. Computer tomography in acute pyelonephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triller, J.; Scheidegger, J.; Terrier, F.

    1983-07-01

    Computer tomography of the kidneys was performed on 30 patients with acute renal infections (acute suppurative pyelonephritis, acute renal abscess, infected cyst, pyelonephrosis, calculus perforation, retroperitoneal abscess). Computer tomography provided more accurate information concerning the extent of the renal and extra-renal inflammatory process than did the urogram or sonogram. This may significantly affect the choice of treatment, particularly concerning the use of drugs or of surgery. Angiography and retrograde pyelography may be used in selected cases, especially where there is a suspicion of acute bacterial nephritis, renal vein thrombosis or ureteric obstruction.

  11. Computed tomography of retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in children. The clinical features are leucocoria and/or strabismus. The ophthalmic diagnosis is straight forward in clear eye media with a white gray mass in the fundus. With opaque ocular media, other diagnostic procedures such as CT and ultrasonography are important. In the present study the results of CT examinations of 23 patients with histologically proven retinoblastomas are presented. The mean age of the patients was two years. The characteristic CT finding is a partly calcified intravitreous mass lesion mostly confined within the eyeball. Two cases showed retrobulbar extension and two intracranical tumor extension. No metastasis was found in the brain, liver, spleen, long bones, chest or skull. The radiologic screening procedures for retinoblastoma metastasis are discussed. In patients suspected to have a retinoblastoma, it is recommended to perform CT of the orbits and brain in order to detect the tumor and its possible retrobulbar and intracranial extension. (orig.)

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a ... by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a ... by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional ...

  14. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there are many common aspects to x-ray transmission and radionuclide emission (ECT) computerized tomography, there are added difficulties and a number of particular factors which form the basis of ECT. The relationship between the physical factors, system design, methodologic approach and assumptions of ECT is discussed. The instrumentation design and application strategies in ECT at this time are diverse and in a rapid stage of development. The approaches are divided into two major categories of Single Photon Counting (SPC) employing scanner and camera concepts with radionuclides of 99/sup m/Tc, 201Tl, 123I etc., and Annihilation Coincidence Detection (ACD) of positron-emitting radionuclides. Six systems in the former and ten systems in the latter category, with examples of typical studies, illustrate the different approaches

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... look like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short ... spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross- ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... look like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short ... spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross- ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications generally need to be taken 12 hours ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications generally need to be taken 12 hours ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  5. Comparative yield of positive brain Computed Tomography after implementing the NICE or SIGN head injury guidelines in two equivalent urban populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims: To compare the yield of positive computed tomography (CT) brain examinations after the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) or the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) guidelines, in comparable urban populations in two teaching hospitals in England and Scotland. Materials and methods: Four hundred consecutive patients presenting at each location following a head injury who underwent a CT examination of the head according to the locally implemented guidelines were compared. Similar matched populations were compared for indication and yield. Yield was measured according to (1) positive CT findings of the sequelae of trauma and (2) intervention required with anaesthetic or intensive care unit (ICU) support, or neurosurgery. Results: The mean ages of patients at the English and Scottish centres were 49.9 and 49.2 years, respectively. Sex distribution was 64.1% male and 66.4% male respectively. Comparative yield was 23.8 and 26.5% for positive brain scans, 3 and 2.75% for anaesthetic support, and 3.75 and 2.5% for neurosurgical intervention. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 10% yield of positive scans. The choice of guideline to follow should be at the discretion of the local institution. The indications GCS <13 and clinical or radiological evidence of a skull fracture are highly predictive of intracranial pathology, and their presence should be an absolute indicator for fast-tracking the management of the patient.

  6. Computed tomography of intramuscular myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in seven patients with intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well demarcated, of homogeneous appearance and attenuation values ranging from 10 to 60 (HU). The tumor size, as estimated at CT, correlated well with the size of the surgical specimen, which is in contrast to the findings in some high grade malignant sarcomas. (orig.)

  7. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  8. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.;

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...

  9. Computed tomography for dimensional metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruth, J.P.; Bartscher, M.; Carmignato, S.;

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives a survey of the upcoming use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) for dimensional quality control purposes: i.e. for traceable measurement of dimensions of technical (mechanical) components and for tolerance verification of such components. It describes the basic principles of CT...

  10. Facility for positron computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron computed tomography facility has got scintillator detector rings simultaneously recording more than one tomogrphic image of different cross-sections of the patient. The detectors in neighboring rings are staggered and can be rotated with respect to each other in order to increase the count rate without loss of efficiency. (DG)

  11. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  12. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, where ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, where ...

  17. Evaluation by computed tomography in premature and newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of cranio-cerebral computed tomography hypoxic brain damage of varying degrees and different types may be demonstrated in premature infants and high-risk newborns. Paraventricular leucomalacia of varying extent up to porencephalic defects are found, as well as cortical infarctions, hemorrhage into brain tissue or ventricles, cerebral atrophy, developing hydrocephalus and congenital anomalies. (orig.)

  18. The role of computed tomography in the laryngeal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hoon Sik [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    Computed tomography of the larynx represents a major advance in laryngology. Even in severe injury the larynx can be examined easily and conveniently by CT at the same time as the brain and facial structures without moving the patient, who need only lie down and breathe quietly during the study. Computed tomography permitted a much more detailed appraisal of laryngeal dysfunction in patients with blunt laryngeal trauma (3 cases) and strangulation injury (2 cases). Computed tomography of the larynx undoubtedly played a determinant role in patient management. Computed tomography was helpful in evaluating the laryngeal cartilages and deep spaces of the larynx which was difficult to examine by the laryngoscope. Follow-up computed tomography made it possible to evaluate the postoperative results.

  19. The role of computed tomography in the laryngeal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography of the larynx represents a major advance in laryngology. Even in severe injury the larynx can be examined easily and conveniently by CT at the same time as the brain and facial structures without moving the patient, who need only lie down and breathe quietly during the study. Computed tomography permitted a much more detailed appraisal of laryngeal dysfunction in patients with blunt laryngeal trauma (3 cases) and strangulation injury (2 cases). Computed tomography of the larynx undoubtedly played a determinant role in patient management. Computed tomography was helpful in evaluating the laryngeal cartilages and deep spaces of the larynx which was difficult to examine by the laryngoscope. Follow-up computed tomography made it possible to evaluate the postoperative results

  20. The evolution of a brain abscess the complementary roles of radionuclide (RN) and computed tomography (CT) scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serial /sup 99m/Tc glucoheptonate brain scans demonstrated a brain abscess in a patient from the earliest phase of acute focal encephalitis (cerebritis) through the capsule formation and the recovery phase. The role of the RN and CT scans in the diagnosis of the early stage of cerebritis and the complementary nature of RN and CT scans in intracranial infections, particularly abscesses, are discussed. Guidelines for the use of RN and CT scans are suggested

  1. The evolution of a brain abscess the complementary roles of radionuclide (RN) and computed tomography (CT) scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masucci, E.F.; Sauerbrunn, B.J.

    1982-04-01

    Serial /sup 99m/Tc glucoheptonate brain scans demonstrated a brain abscess in a patient from the earliest phase of acute focal encephalitis (cerebritis) through the capsule formation and the recovery phase. The role of the RN and CT scans in the diagnosis of the early stage of cerebritis and the complementary nature of RN and CT scans in intracranial infections, particularly abscesses, are discussed. Guidelines for the use of RN and CT scans are suggested.

  2. Detecting brain tumor in computed tomography images using Markov random fields and fuzzy C-means clustering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain tumors, are an abnormal growth of tissues in the brain. They may arise in people of any age. They must be detected early, diagnosed accurately, monitored carefully, and treated effectively in order to optimize patient outcomes regarding both survival and quality of life. Manual segmentation of brain tumors from CT scan images is a challenging and time consuming task. Size and location accurate detection of brain tumor plays a vital role in the successful diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Brain tumor detection is considered a challenging mission in medical image processing. The aim of this paper is to introduce a scheme for tumor detection in CT scan images using two different techniques Hidden Markov Random Fields (HMRF) and Fuzzy C-means (FCM). The proposed method has been developed in this research in order to construct hybrid method between (HMRF) and threshold. These methods have been applied on 4 different patient data sets. The result of comparison among these methods shows that the proposed method gives good results for brain tissue detection, and is more robust and effective compared with (FCM) techniques

  3. Detecting brain tumor in computed tomography images using Markov random fields and fuzzy C-means clustering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulbaqi, Hayder Saad [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11700, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Education, University of Al-Qadisiya, Al-Qadisiya (Iraq); Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Mustafa, Iskandar Shahrim Bin [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11700, Penang (Malaysia); Abood, Loay Kadom [Department of Computer Science, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2015-04-24

    Brain tumors, are an abnormal growth of tissues in the brain. They may arise in people of any age. They must be detected early, diagnosed accurately, monitored carefully, and treated effectively in order to optimize patient outcomes regarding both survival and quality of life. Manual segmentation of brain tumors from CT scan images is a challenging and time consuming task. Size and location accurate detection of brain tumor plays a vital role in the successful diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Brain tumor detection is considered a challenging mission in medical image processing. The aim of this paper is to introduce a scheme for tumor detection in CT scan images using two different techniques Hidden Markov Random Fields (HMRF) and Fuzzy C-means (FCM). The proposed method has been developed in this research in order to construct hybrid method between (HMRF) and threshold. These methods have been applied on 4 different patient data sets. The result of comparison among these methods shows that the proposed method gives good results for brain tissue detection, and is more robust and effective compared with (FCM) techniques.

  4. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders

  5. Practical Brain Computer Interfacing

    OpenAIRE

    Valbuena Varon, Diana Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that enables users to voluntary send messages or commands without movement. The classical goal of BCI research is to support communication and control for users with impaired communication due to illness or injury. Typical BCI applications are the operation of computer cursors, spelling programs or external devices, such as wheelchairs, robots and neural prostheses. The user sends modulated information to the BCI by engaging in mental...

  6. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, David W

    2008-05-01

    Accurate anatomical localization of functional abnormalities obtained with the use of positron emission tomography (PET) is known to be problematic. Although tracers such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) visualize certain normal anatomical structures, the spatial resolution is generally inadequate for accurate anatomic localization of pathology. Combining PET with a high-resolution anatomical imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) can resolve the localization issue as long as the images from the two modalities are accurately coregistered. However, software-based registration techniques have difficulty accounting for differences in patient positioning and involuntary movement of internal organs, often necessitating labor-intensive nonlinear mapping that may not converge to a satisfactory result. Acquiring both CT and PET images in the same scanner obviates the need for software registration and routinely provides accurately aligned images of anatomy and function in a single scan. A CT scanner positioned in line with a PET scanner and with a common patient couch and operating console has provided a practical solution to anatomical and functional image registration. Axial translation of the couch between the 2 modalities enables both CT and PET data to be acquired during a single imaging session. In addition, the CT images can be used to generate essentially noiseless attenuation correction factors for the PET emission data. By minimizing patient movement between the CT and PET scans and accounting for the axial separation of the two modalities, accurately registered anatomical and functional images can be obtained. Since the introduction of the first PET/CT prototype more than 6 years ago, numerous patients with cancer have been scanned on commercial PET/CT devices worldwide. The commercial designs feature multidetector spiral CT and high-performance PET components. Experience has demonstrated an increased level of accuracy and confidence in the

  7. Computed tomography of gynecologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although computed tomography (CT) provides superb images of all areas of the body, sonography, because of its lack of ionizing radiation and its real-time and multiplanar capacities, has become the preferred initial method of evaluating the female pelvis. This has resulted in a relative paucity of information in the literature concerning CT features of benign pelvic disorders in particular and prompted the authors to review our experience with third-generation CT scanning of the uterus and ovaries

  8. Hermaphroditism demonstrated by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The categorization of disorders of gender differentiation is based on chromosome analysis, physical examination, gonadal histology, and endocrine evaluation. In most cases of hermaphroditism, radiologic studies have been limited to assessment of associated urinary tract anomalies before surgical revconstruction. Noninvasive evaluation with computed tomography (CT) or sonography is potentially useful for investigation of internal pelvic anatomy in these cases. A case report of a 65-year-old man is reported

  9. Hermaphroditism demonstrated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    The categorization of disorders of gender differentiation is based on chromosome analysis, physical examination, gonadal histology, and endocrine evaluation. In most cases of hermaphroditism, radiologic studies have been limited to assessment of associated urinary tract anomalies before surgical revconstruction. Noninvasive evaluation with computed tomography (CT) or sonography is potentially useful for investigation of internal pelvic anatomy in these cases. A case report of a 65-year-old man is reported. (KRM)

  10. Cranial computed tomography in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals mainly with methodical aspects (such as sedation, intravenous and intrathecal application of contrast media) and with common difficulties in interpretation of computed tomography images. The indications for cranial CT are discussed in respect probable therapeutic consequences and expected diagnostic yield. In view of the author CT is, as a rule, not required in assessing chronic headache, generalised epileptic convulsions, non-specific mental retardation and cerebral palsy. (Author)

  11. Brain MRI and single photon emission computed tomography in severe athetotic cerebral palsy. A comparative study with mental and motor disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Tsuzura, Shigenobu [Metropolitan Medical Center of the Severely Handicapped, Fuchu, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1995-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]-iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) was performed in twelve patients with severe athetotic cerebral palsy (Ath; 5 males and 7 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move) and mental retardation (I.Q, or D.Q, below 30). The neuroimaging findings of those patients were compared with those of patients mental and motor disorders. In five caes suffering from neonatal asphyxia, SPECT demonstrated a decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in corpus striatum, thalamus, orbitofrontal areas, pericentral gyrus areas, prefrontal areas and medial temporal areas. In seven cases suffering from neonatal jaundice, SPECT demonstrated a decreased rCBF in orbito-frontal areas, prefrontal areas and medial temporal areas. SPECT showed hypoperfusion of peri-central gyrus areas in cases with complications of spastic palsy. The decreased rCBF in medial temporal areas mostly corresponded to an alteration in hippocampal formation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cases with hypoperfusion of bilateral medial temporal areas showed a lower score of language understanding than those with the unilateral damage. In cases with hypofusion of bilateral prefrontal areas and bilateral medial temporal areas, the grade of understanding of language was almost below 12 months. In cases with hypoperfusion of orbitofrontal areas, psychomotor hypersensitivity had been observed. Those results suggest that IMP-SPECT and MRI of the brain is useful tool for neurological assessment in handicapped patients with athetotic cerebral palsy. (author).

  12. Symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage: assessment of brain damage by diffusion and perfusion-weighted MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to assess the usefulness of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI for the detection of ischaemic brain damage in patients with suspected vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We studied 11 patients admitted with a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior circulation and suspected of intracranial vasospasm on clinical examination and transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD). All were investigated by technetium-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (Tc-HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and diffusion and perfusion-weighted MRI (DWI, PWI) within 2 weeks of their SAH. Trace images and TTP maps were interpreted by two examiners and compared with clinical and imaging follow-up. PWI revealed an area of slowed flow in seven patients, including four with major and three with minor hypoperfusion on SPECT. In two patients, PWI did not demonstrate any abnormality, while SPECT revealed major hypoperfusion in one and a minor deficit hypoperfusion in the other. Two patients with high signal on DWI had a permanent neurological deficit. (orig.)

  13. Brain MRI and single photon emission computed tomography in severe athetotic cerebral palsy. A comparative study with mental and motor disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) was performed in twelve patients with severe athetotic cerebral palsy (Ath; 5 males and 7 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move) and mental retardation (I.Q, or D.Q, below 30). The neuroimaging findings of those patients were compared with those of patients mental and motor disorders. In five caes suffering from neonatal asphyxia, SPECT demonstrated a decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in corpus striatum, thalamus, orbitofrontal areas, pericentral gyrus areas, prefrontal areas and medial temporal areas. In seven cases suffering from neonatal jaundice, SPECT demonstrated a decreased rCBF in orbito-frontal areas, prefrontal areas and medial temporal areas. SPECT showed hypoperfusion of peri-central gyrus areas in cases with complications of spastic palsy. The decreased rCBF in medial temporal areas mostly corresponded to an alteration in hippocampal formation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cases with hypoperfusion of bilateral medial temporal areas showed a lower score of language understanding than those with the unilateral damage. In cases with hypofusion of bilateral prefrontal areas and bilateral medial temporal areas, the grade of understanding of language was almost below 12 months. In cases with hypoperfusion of orbitofrontal areas, psychomotor hypersensitivity had been observed. Those results suggest that IMP-SPECT and MRI of the brain is useful tool for neurological assessment in handicapped patients with athetotic cerebral palsy. (author)

  14. Comparative yield of positive brain Computed Tomography after implementing the NICE or SIGN head injury guidelines in two equivalent urban populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerfield, R., E-mail: ruth.summerfield@uhns.nhs.u [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom); Macduff, R. [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF (United Kingdom); Davis, R. [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom); Sambrook, M. [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF (United Kingdom); Britton, I. [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aims: To compare the yield of positive computed tomography (CT) brain examinations after the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) or the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) guidelines, in comparable urban populations in two teaching hospitals in England and Scotland. Materials and methods: Four hundred consecutive patients presenting at each location following a head injury who underwent a CT examination of the head according to the locally implemented guidelines were compared. Similar matched populations were compared for indication and yield. Yield was measured according to (1) positive CT findings of the sequelae of trauma and (2) intervention required with anaesthetic or intensive care unit (ICU) support, or neurosurgery. Results: The mean ages of patients at the English and Scottish centres were 49.9 and 49.2 years, respectively. Sex distribution was 64.1% male and 66.4% male respectively. Comparative yield was 23.8 and 26.5% for positive brain scans, 3 and 2.75% for anaesthetic support, and 3.75 and 2.5% for neurosurgical intervention. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <13 (NICE) and GCS {<=}12 and radiological or clinical evidence of skull fracture (SIGN) demonstrated the greatest statistical association with a positive CT examination. Conclusion: In a teaching hospital setting, there is no significant difference in the yield between the NICE and SIGN guidelines. Both meet the SIGN standard of >10% yield of positive scans. The choice of guideline to follow should be at the discretion of the local institution. The indications GCS <13 and clinical or radiological evidence of a skull fracture are highly predictive of intracranial pathology, and their presence should be an absolute indicator for fast-tracking the management of the patient.

  15. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Updated:Sep 11,2015 What is a ... Heart Attack Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radionuclide Ventriculography, Radionuclide Angiography, MUGA Scan Heart ...

  16. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 What is Computerized Tomography (CT)? CT is a noninvasive test that uses ...

  17. The history of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New scientific discoveries are often made by the synthetising of other discoveries. Computed tomography is such an example. The three necessary elements were: 1/ the fact that certain simple crystals scintillate when exposed to X-rays, 2/ the advent of electronics and 3/ that of computers. The fact that X-rays cause crystals to scintillate was learnt very shortly after Roentgen's discovery, electronics and computers coming very much later. To put all these together and apply them to diagnostic radiology, and at the same time dismiss the concept so firmly ingrained in everyone's mind that an X-ray picture must be produced on photographic film, required a genius. (orig./VJ)

  18. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  19. Facility for positron computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For positron computed tomography two or more rings of scintillation detectors are used by which three or more sections of the object may be determined at a time. The rings are placed in parallel planes having got some distance from each other, axially movable collimator rings being provided for. Each collimator can be moved towards the opposite collimator and towards a central collimator which also is ring-shaped and is placed between the rows of detectors. The external and internal collimator are used for data selection and image-forming. (DG)

  20. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    Modern diagnostic imagining techniques are gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Denmark has been involved in the development of this use of imaging techniques from the beginning. The Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Southern Denmark acquired a helical computed tomography (CT...... AND METHODS: This thesis investigated 900 forensic cases that were CT-scanned and autopsied at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, from 2006-2011. The scanner was a Siemens Somatom Spirit dual-slice CT-scanner with a Siemens Syngo MultiModality workstation. Contrast enhancement...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and computer tomography of brain lesions in water buffaloes and cattle stunned with handguns or captive bolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Barbara K; Lechner, Isabel; Ross, Steffen G; Gascho, Dominic; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Glardon, Matthieu; Stoffel, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the demand for genuine mozzarella, some 330 water buffaloes are being slaughtered every year in Switzerland albeit a stunning procedure meeting animal welfare and occupational safety requirements remains to be established. To provide a basis for improvements, we sized anatomical specifics in water buffaloes and cattle and we assessed brain lesions after stunning with captive bolts or handguns by diagnostic imaging. In water buffaloes and cattle, the median distance from the frontal skin surface to the inner bone table was 74.0mm (56.0-100.0mm) vs 36.6mm (29.3-44.3mm) and from skin to the thalamus 144.8mm (117.1-172.0mm) vs 102.0 (101.0-121.0mm), respectively. Consequently, customary captive bolt stunners may be inadequate. Free bullets are potentially suitable for stunning buffaloes but involve occupational safety hazards. The results of the present study shall be used to develop a device allowing effective and safe stunning of water buffaloes. PMID:26610289

  2. Gliomatosis cerebri mimicking encephalitis evaluated using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is a rare condition in which an infiltrative glial neoplasm spreads through the brain with preservation of the underlying structure. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has an important role in demonstrating the appropriate metabolism and differentiating pathologies mimicking GC on CT and magnetic resonance imaging. We describe imaging findings of FDG PET/CT in GC in a 9-year-old male child mimicking encephalitis

  3. Computed tomography of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the advent of Computed Tomography (CT), axial studies of the spine were limited in the main to gross bony anatomy and to conventional transaxial tomography (TAT). Others studied the upper cervical cord in transverse section during gas myelography and encephalography. The potential role of CT in the evaluation of spinal anatomy and disease was recognized, however, at an early stage in the development of the general purpose CT scanner. CT is not organ specific and therefore provides a uniformly thin (1.5-13 mm) axial section displaying detailed spinal topographical anatomy against a background of paravertebral muscles, vascular structures and body cavity organs. The relationships of the apophyseal joints to the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina are particularly well displayed. The study of neural tissue and pathology within the spinal canal is facilitated by the use of a non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium (viz. metrizamide) in the subarachnoid spaces. The high sensitivity of CT to very small changes in X-ray attenuation permits studies to be continued over several hours. The digital derivation of the sequential CT transaxial sections enables not only interrogation of data and quantitative studies to be made but also makes possible computer-generated reconstructions in other planes

  4. Computed tomography of the brain, hepatotoxic drugs and high alcohol consumption in male alcoholic patients and a random sample from the general male population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain was performed in a random sample of a total of 195 men and 211 male alcoholic patients admitted for the first time during a period of two years from the same geographically limited area of Greater Stockholm as the sample. Laboratory tests were performed, including liver and pancreatic tests. Toxicological screening was performed and the consumption of hepatotoxic drugs was also investigated. The groups were then subdivided with respect to alcohol consumption and use of hepatotoxic drugs: group IA, men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption and no use of hepatotoxic drugs; IB, men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption with use of hepatotoxic drugs; IIA, alcoholic inpatients with use of alcohol and no drugs; and IIB, alcoholic inpatients with use of alcohol and drugs. Group IIB was found to have a higher incidence of cortical and subcortical changes than group IA. Group IB had a higher incidence of subcortical changes than group IA, and they differed only in drug use. Groups IIN and IIA only differed in drug use, and IIB had a higher incidence of brian damage except for anterior horn index and wide cerebellar sulci indicating vermian atrophy. Significantly higher serum levels of bilirubin, GGT, ASAT, ALAT, CK LD, and amylase were found in IIB. The results indicate that drug use influences the incidence of cortical and subcortical aberrations, except anterior horn index. It is concluded that the groups with alcohol abuse who used hepatotoxic drugs showed a picture of cortical changes (wide transport sulci and clear-cut of high-grade cortical changes) and also of subcortical aberrations, expressed as an increased widening on the third ventricle

  5. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can...

  6. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and comp

  7. Sistema Brain Computer Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Barraza, Juan Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    En este trabajo de final de grado se realizará una aplicación de un sistema Brain Computer Interface en el cual, a partir del dipositivo Mind Wave de la compañía Neurosky, se pretenderá controlar el prototipo de una mano humana. Esta será controlada a partir de las ondas cerebrales medidas por el sensor que el dispositivo dispone. A continuación, la información captada por nuestro medidor de señales de electroencefalográficas será enviada por radiofrecuencia a un stick USB que viene incorpora...

  8. An optical brain computer interface

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, S; Ward, Tomas; Markham, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to brain computer interfacing that uses optical analysis to provide physiological measures of brain function. We describe the optical analysis technique involved and the application of this method to development of our first prototype optical brain computer interface

  9. Atypical findings on computed tomography in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 3 patients with tuberous sclerosis computed tomography showed numerous low-density areas suggestive of brain demyelination. In addition, solitary small subependymal calcifications were noted. These features in an infant or child with unexplained seizures should alert one to the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis

  10. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability. (orig.)

  11. Diagnostic usefulness of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Tsugawa, R.; Yamakawa, Y. (Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as a diagnostic technique in various urological diseases. Here demonstrated is a case of ureteral incontinence with double renal pelvis whose upper one has ectopic ureteral orifice. Also a case of ureteral stricture in transplanted kidney and three cases of uric acid calculi are demonstrated. CT provides accurate information in each diagnostic procedure. The use of CT in the diagnosis of urinary stones is estimated. CT number of 75 stones with single component shows specific distribution in relation to the component; ex. calcium stones: 900 - 1000, cystine: 700 - 800, struvite: 600 - 700, uric acid: 400 - 500. Structure and component of the stone is easily demonstrated by CT, especially about nonopaque calculi, whose image is positively displayed only by CT.

  12. Computed tomography in hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients with hepatic injury from blunt upper abdominal trauma were examined by computed tomography (CT). The spectrum of CT findings was recorded, and the size of the hepatic laceration and the associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs nonoperative). While the need for surgery correlated roughly with the size of the hepatic laceration, the size of the associated hemoperitoneum was an important modifying factor. Fifteen patients with hepatic lacerations but little or no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. CT seems to have significant advantages over hepatic scintigraphy, angiography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage. By combining inforamtion on the clinical state of the patient and CT findings, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased

  13. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PERITONEAL CANCER INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiutiuca RC

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal surface malignancy results from seeding of gastrointestinal cancer or abdomino-pelvic sarcoma, or it can occur as a primary disease, such as peritoneal mesothelioma. In the past, this clinical situation was treated only with palliative intent. Actual treatment options for surgical management uses cytoreductive surgery which combines peritonectomy and visceral resection in an effort to remove all visible cancer within the abdomen and pelvis. Then the peritoneal cavity is flooded with chemotherapy solution. To select patients for this agressive approach quantitative prognostic indicators for carcinomatosis must be evaluated. The peritoneal cancer index (PCI is a synthesis of the distribution of tumor and a lesion size score. In such conditions abdominal medium contrast computed-tomography it is very helpful in identification of neoplasic implants.

  14. Diagnostic usefulness of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as a diagnostic technique in various urological diseases. Here demonstrated is a case of ureteral incontinence with double renal pelvis whose upper one has ectopic ureteral orifice. Also a case of ureteral stricture in transplanted kidney and three cases of uric acid calculi are demonstrated. CT provides the accurate information in each diagnostic procedure. The use of CT in the diagnosis of urinary stones is estimated. CT number of 75 stones with single component shows specific distribution in relation to the component; ex. calcium stones: 900 - 1000, cystine: 700 - 800, struvite: 600 - 700, uric acid: 400 - 500. Structure and component of the stone is easily demonstrated by CT, especially about nonopaque calculi, whose image is positively displayed only by CT. (author)

  15. Metabolic Brain-Computer Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2010-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) utilise neurophysiological signals originating in the brain to activate or deactivate external devices or computers (Donoghue 2002; Wolpaw, Birbaumer et al. 2002; Nicolelis 2003; Birbaumer and Cohen 2007). The neuronal signals can be recorded from inside the brain (invasive BCIs) or outside (non-invasive BCIs) of the brain. Most BCIs developed so far have used operant training of direct neuroelectric responses, Electroencephalography (EEG) waves, event-related ...

  16. Brain emotional learning based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Asadi Ghanbari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface (BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction and classification operations. Classification is crucial as it has a substantial effect on the BCI speed and bit rate. Recent developments of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs bring forward some challenging problems to the machine learning community, of which classification of time-varying electrophysiological signals is a crucial one. Constructing adaptive classifiers is a promising approach to deal with this problem. In this paper, we introduce adaptive classifiers for classify electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The adaptive classifier is brain emotional learning based adaptive classifier (BELBAC, which is based on emotional learning process. The main purpose of this research is to use a structural model based on the limbic system of mammalian brain, for decision making and control engineering applications. We have adopted a network model developed by Moren and Balkenius, as a computational model that mimics amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, thalamus, sensory input cortex and generally, those parts of the brain thought responsible for processing emotions. The developed method was compared with other methods used for EEG signals classification (support vector machine (SVM and two different neural network types (MLP, PNN. The result analysis demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed approach.

  17. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...

  18. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  19. Dopamine transporter distribution in patients with Parkinson disease of different stages detected using single-photon emission computed tomography brain imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiwu Zhang; Lijuan Zhu; Jianqiang Du; Bo Liu

    2007-01-01

    . Following injection, image was collected using scanner for single photon emission computed tomography (ADAC Company, USA). Matrix was 64 × 64, each detecting head revolved 180 ° ,1 frame/60 s. Sixty-four frames were collected with double detecting heads, 50 K/frame. Faultages with clearest image of corpora striatum were selected. Regions of interest (ROI) of caudate nucleus, anterior and posterior putamen and thalamic region in bilateral corpora striata were radioactively counted, and mean value of radioactive counting of ROI was used as the mean value of pixel in each region of bilateral corpora striata.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of radioactive uptake in each region of brain between healthy persons and patients with PD.RESULTS: Thirty patients with PD and six healthy persons who received body examination participated in the final result. Comparison of radioactive uptake in each region between healthy persons and patients with PD: ①In the healthy persons, high-density radioactive uptake was found in bilateral corpora striata;Structures of caudate nucleus, anterior and posterior putamen, and thalamus were clear with eudipleural radioactive distribution, and the background of peripheral brain tissue was very low. ②Radioactive intakes in opposite anterior and posterior putamen of patients with mild PD were significantly inferior to those in homolateral ones(70.45 ±3.35, 87.64±2.65, t =15.82, P < 0.05). Structures of bilateral caudate nucleus and Corresponding author: Jiwu Zhang,Department of Imageology, Second Hospital Affiliated to Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong Province, China E-mail:zh-j-u@sohu.comthalamus were clear with eudipleural radioactive distribution (P > 0.05). ③ Radioactive intakes in anterior and posterior putamen and thalamus of patients with moderate PD were significantly reduced as compared with healthy persons. There were significant differences in mean radioactive counting of ROI between patients

  20. Role of computed tomography scores and findings to predict early death in patients with traumatic brain injury: A reappraisal in a major tertiary care hospital in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakomi, Sunil; Bhattarai, Binod; Srinivas, Balaji; Cherian, Iype

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glasgow Coma Scale has been a long sought model to classify patients with head injury. However, the major limitation of the score is its assessment in the patients who are either sedated or under the influence of drugs or intubated for airway protection. The rational approach for prognostication of such patients is the utility of scoring system based on the morphological criteria based on radiological imaging. Among the current armamentarium, a scoring system based on computed tomography (CT) imaging holds the greatest promise in conquering our conquest for the same. Methods: We included a total of 634 consecutive neurosurgical trauma patients in this series, who presented with mild-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from January 2013 to April 2014 at a tertiary care center in rural Nepal. All pertinent medical records (including all available imaging studies) were reviewed by the neurosurgical consultant and the radiologist on call. Patients’ worst CT image scores and their outcome at 30 days were assessed and recorded. We then assessed their independent performance in predicting the mortality and also tried to seek the individual variables that had significant interplay for determining the same. Results: Both imaging score (Marshall) and clinical score (Rotterdam) can be used to reliably predict mortality in patients with acute TBI with high prognostic accuracy. Other specific CT characteristics that can be used to predict early mortality are traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, midline shift, and status of the peri-mesencephalic cisterns. Conclusion: We demonstrated in this cohort that though the Marshall score has the high predictive power to determine the mortality, better discrimination could be sought through the application of the Rotterdam score that encompasses various individual CT parameters. We thereby recommend the use of such comprehensive prognostic model so as to augment our predictive power for properly dichotomizing the prognosis

  1. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  2. F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with corticobasal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Marti, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that often eludes clinical diagnosis. The present case shows the F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) of a 62-year-old man with a progressive movement disorder with asymmetric features. PET/CT examination showed a markedly right-brain hemispheric hypometabolism also involving basal ganglia.

  3. F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with corticobasal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corticobasal degeneration is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that often eludes clinical diagnosis. The present case shows the F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) of a 62-year-old man with a progressive movement disorder with asymmetric features. PET/CT examination showed a markedly right-brain hemispheric hypometabolism also involving basal ganglia

  4. Fracture of the orbit: computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main mechanisms of orbital fractures and their clinical symptoms are exposed. The computed tomographic appearance is described and the implication of computed tomography for therapeutic indications is evaluated as a function of clinical symptoms: visual impairment, anomaly of pupillary reaction to light, ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos and associated injuries such as intracranial hematomas. The role of computed tomography for the follow-up of these patients is considered

  5. Computed tomography of obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice. We have studied 55 cases of obstructive jaundice with whole body scanner from Jun.1980 to Jun. 1981. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution was 36 males and 19 females, and 40 cases of obstructive jaundice were seen in fifth, sixth, and seventh decades. 2. Causes of obstructive jaundice were 25 cases of pancreas cancer, 8 cases of common duct cancer, 4 cases of gallbladder cancer, 4 cases of ampulla vater cancer, 12 cases of common duct stone, and 2 cases of common duct stricture. 3. Levels of obstruction were 8 cases of hepatic portion, 15 cases of suprapancreatic portion, 28 cases of pancreatic portion, and 4 cases of ampullary portion. 4. In tumorous condition, CT demonstrated metastasis of other organs, 9 cases of the liver, 1 case of the lung, 3 cases of the pancreas, 3 cases of the common bile duct, 1 case of the stomach, and 12 cases of adjacent lymph nodes. 5. Associated diseases were 12 cases of intrahepatic stone, 4 cases of clonorchiasis, 2 cases of pancreas pseudocyst, 1 cases of hydronephrosis, and 1 case of renal cyst

  6. Computed tomography of obstructive jaundice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Hek; Lee, Joong Suk; Chun, Beung He; Suh, Soo Jhi [Kosin Medical College, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-09-15

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice. We have studied 55 cases of obstructive jaundice with whole body scanner from Jun.1980 to Jun. 1981. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution was 36 males and 19 females, and 40 cases of obstructive jaundice were seen in fifth, sixth, and seventh decades. 2. Causes of obstructive jaundice were 25 cases of pancreas cancer, 8 cases of common duct cancer, 4 cases of gallbladder cancer, 4 cases of ampulla vater cancer, 12 cases of common duct stone, and 2 cases of common duct stricture. 3. Levels of obstruction were 8 cases of hepatic portion, 15 cases of suprapancreatic portion, 28 cases of pancreatic portion, and 4 cases of ampullary portion. 4. In tumorous condition, CT demonstrated metastasis of other organs, 9 cases of the liver, 1 case of the lung, 3 cases of the pancreas, 3 cases of the common bile duct, 1 case of the stomach, and 12 cases of adjacent lymph nodes. 5. Associated diseases were 12 cases of intrahepatic stone, 4 cases of clonorchiasis, 2 cases of pancreas pseudocyst, 1 cases of hydronephrosis, and 1 case of renal cyst.

  7. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods

  8. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerized Tomography. has become, during the past few years, one of the mostly used apparatus in X-ray diagnosis. Its clinical applications has penetrated to various fields, like operational guidance, cardiac imaging, computer aided surgery etc. The first second-generation CT scanners consisted of a rotate-rotate system detectors array and an X-ray tube. These scanners were capable of acquiring individual single slices, the duration of each being several seconds. The slow scanning rate, and the then poor computers power, limited the application range of these scanners, to relatively stable organs, short body coverage at given resolutions. Further drawbacks of these machines were weak X-ray sources and low efficiency gas detectors. In the late 80's the first helical scanners were introduced by Siemens. Based on a continuous patient couch movement during gantry rotation, much faster scans could be obtained, increasing significantly the volume coverage at a given time. In 1992 the first dual-slice scanners, equipped with high efficiency solid state detectors were introduced by Elscint. The acquisition of data simultaneously from two detector arrays doubled the efficiency of the scan. Faster computers and stronger X-ray sources further improved the performance, allowing for a new range of clinical applications. Yet, the need for even faster machines and bigger volume coverage led to further R and D efforts by the leading CT manufacturers. In order to accomplish the most demanding clinical needs, innovative 2 dimensional 4-rows solid-state detector arrays were developed, together with faster rotating machines and bigger X-ray tubes, all demanding extremely accurate and robust mechanical constructions. Parallel, multi-processor custom computers were made, in order to allow the on-line reconstruction of the growing amounts of raw data. Four-slice helical scanners, rotating at 0.5 sec per cycle are being tested nowadays in several clinics all over the world. This talk

  9. The current concepts of computed tomography for acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroke is one of a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The major advances in stroke therapy in particular invasive therapy lead to application of new imaging techniques. The aim of this review is to present state-of-the-art concepts of computed tomography for acute stroke. The goals of a neuroimaging in acute stroke are to establish a diagnosis as early as possible and to evaluate brain perfusion and intracranial vessels' patency. State-of-the-art imaging in the era of multidetector computed tomography (CT) with high spatial and temporal resolution consists of multimodal CT imaging. Non enhanced CT is necessary for depiction of hemorrhage or early ischemic signs. CT angiography evaluates intravascular thrombi or significant stenosis, and CT perfusion demonstrates salvageable tissue at risk. By combining different imaging techniques in multimodal approach we can acquire information necessary for therapeutic planning and could select patients for thrombolysis. The imaging protocol should be tailored to the patient regarding to the time of onset, necessity and availability of CT modalities. (authors) Key words: Stroke. Computed Tomography (CT). Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA). Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP)

  10. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip join can be measured by means of computed tomography. (Auth.)

  11. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  12. Computed Tomography For Internal Inspection Of Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Timothy L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography used to detect internal flaws in metal castings before machining and otherwise processing them into finished parts. Saves time and money otherwise wasted on machining and other processing of castings eventually rejected because of internal defects. Knowledge of internal defects gained by use of computed tomography also provides guidance for changes in foundry techniques, procedures, and equipment to minimize defects and reduce costs.

  13. Quantitative computed tomography evaluation of pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan; Buelund, Lene Elisabeth; Strathe, Anders Bjerring;

    2009-01-01

    Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present.......Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present....

  14. Computer tomography of posterior cranial fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobota, J.; Dutka, J. (Ustredni Vojenska Nemocnice, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-11-01

    The problems and possibilities are presented of computer tomography examinations of the posterior cranial fossa. The apparatus used was Somatom 2 by Siemens. Such examinations make it possible to introduce specific measurements and evaluations of pathological processes. Computer tomography in itself, however, may not always be successful in this respect and in the examination of the posterior cranial fossa invasive methods, suitably used, will make the diagnosis more accurate and adequate therapy possible.

  15. Computer tomography of posterior cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems and possibilities are presented of computer tomography examinations of the posterior cranial fossa. The apparatus used was Somatom 2 by Siemens. Such examinations make it possible to introduce specific measurements and evaluations of pathological processes. Computer tomography in itself, however, may not always be successful in this respect and in the examination of the posterior cranial fossa invasive methods, suitably used, will make the diagnosis more accurate and adequate therapy possible. (J.O.)

  16. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  17. The diagnostic contribution of computed tomography in intranasal carcinoma with retrobulbar, oral and brain invasion in a canine: case report; Contribuicao da tomografia computadorizada no diagnostico de carcinoma intranasal com invasao retrobular, oral e cerebral em canino: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zardo, Karen Maciel, E-mail: kmz@bol.com.br; Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Zanoni, Diogo Souza; Costa, Denis Carvalho [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Clinica Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Intranasal tumors are uncommon and in most cases are malignant, aggressive and with low to moderate potential for metastasis. Clinical signs are usually caused by progressive obstruction of the upper airways. The test cytopathological also is a diagnosis method, but the definitive diagnosis is made by histopathological. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended to treatment planning. A poodle was attended at the veterinary hospital with a clinical history of epistaxis and nasal and ocular secretions, seizures and severe dyspnoea. The animal underwent to radiographic examination of the chest and skull as well as helical computed tomography of the nasal cavity and brain before and after the administration of intravenous contrast. The CT findings revealed an expansive bilateral nasal cavity neoformation, with involvement of the retrobulbar space, right frontal sinus, brain and oral cavity, suggesting a neoplastic or an infectious process. The CT examination allowed the material collection, directly from the mass, to cytological examination, providing the diagnosis of carcinoma. CT also allowed the determination of the unfavorable prognosis of the patient and the treatment planning which not included the surgical excision of the neoformation. Although CT was not conclusive in the diagnosis of carcinoma, it was essential to accurately define the extent of the lesion, to guide the collection of material directly from the tumor and to determine the prognosis of the animal, proving to be an extremely useful tool in cases of tumors intranasal in dogs. (author)

  18. Computed tomography of traumatic intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cranial computed tomography (CT) is a new radiological technique with which, for the first time, minimal differences an attenuation by intracranial soft tissue can be measured exactly. The basic physical principles of computed tomography have been extensively presented by Hounsfield (1973). It is well established that the attenuation of extravasated blood measures between 35 and 45 Hounsfield units. Therefore no difficulty should be encountered in the recognition and diagnosis of extra-axial hematoma and cerebral contusion since the density of the brain parenchyma never measures more than 25 units. As the constant increase in high velocity accidents and violence, the problem of acute head injury is one of the matters of great importance in today's medical practice. Therefore it is very important to figure out the method that would allow us to diagnose easily and precisely the effects of trauma upon the brain in order to institute the proper treatment at the earliest possible moment. Computed tomography allows us to make a diagnosis quickly and in a non-invasive manner. The CT scan was carried out on 310 head trauma cases in the department of radiology, St. Mary's and Kang Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Medical College, for 16 months from June 1979 to October 1980. All the scans were obtained with the Hitachi CT-H2 scanner and the scans were repeated following intravenous injection of high dose of contrast media (roughly 1.8 cc per kg body weight of 60% Conray). We have reviewed the CT scans of 310 patients got acute head injury in order to assess the location of brain lesions, the relationship between the CT densities of hematomas and their stage, the shape and mass effect of the extra-axial hematomas, and the effect of contrast enhancement. The results were as follows: 1. Of all 310 cases of the head injuries, epidural hematoma was 13.5%, subdural hematoma was 8.7%, subdural hygroma was 10%, cerebral contusion was 39%, hydrocephalus and atrophy was 3.9% and

  19. Array tomography: rodent brain fixation and embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the fixation and processing required to prepare tissues for immunofluorescence array tomography. PMID:21041396

  20. Cranium-brain trauma in computed tomographs - diagnosis and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the successful treatment of intracranial complications in the case of cranium-brain trauma a quick and exact diagnosis is necessary. The goal of this work was to test and evaluate the effectivity of computed tomography for neurotraumatology. Using 565 patients, who were acutely or at one time suffering from a cranium-brain trauma, the high validity of computed tomography for these injuries was proven. The following areas in question were studied with respect to the value of computed tomography in comparison to them: angiography, X-ray diagnostic, echoencephalography, brain scintigraphy, electroencephalography and neurological-psychopathological findings from cranium-brain trauma. Statement possibilities and difficulties of computed tomography are discussed in the cases of the following neurotraumatological diseases: extracranial hematomas; acute cranium-brain traumas; traumatic arachnoidal bleeding; diffuse brain edema; transtentorial herniation and brain contusions. At the end the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the case of cranium-brain trauma are presented. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of detection results of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at different degrees in infant patients between brain electrical activity mapping, transcranial Doppler sonography and computer tomography examinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongruo He; Xiaoying Xu; Yinghui Zhang; Guochao Han

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND; It has been proved that brain electrical activity mapping (BEAM) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) detection can reflect the function of brain cell and its diseased degree of infant patients with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).OBJECTIVE: To observe the abnormal results of HIE at different degrees detected with BEAM and TCD in infant patients, and compare the detection results at the same time point between BEAM, TCD and computer tomography (CT) examinations.DESTGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Departments of Neuro-electrophysiology and Pediatrics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Qiqihar Medical College.PARTICTPANTS: Totally 416 infant patients with HIE who received treatment in the Department of Newborn Infants, Second Affiliated Hospital of Qiqihar Medical College during January 2001 and December 2005. The infant patients, 278 male and 138 female, were at embryonic 37 to 42 weeks and weighing 2.0 to 4.1 kg, and they were diagnosed with CT and met the diagnostic criteria of HIE of newborn infants compiled by Department of Neonatology, Pediatric Academy, Chinese Medical Association. According to diagnostic criteria, 130patients were mild abnormal, 196 moderate abnormal and 90 severe abnormal. The relatives of all the infant patients were informed of the experiment.METHODS: BEAM and TCD examinations were performed in the involved 416 infant patients with HIE at different degrees with DYD2000 16-channel BEAM instrument and EME-2000 ultrasonograph before preliminary diagnosis treatment (within 1 month after birth) and 1,3,6,12 and 24 months after birth, and detected results were compared between BEAM, TCD and CT examinations.MATN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of detection results of HIE at different time points in infant patients between BEAM, TCD and CT examinations. RESULTS: All the 416 infant patients with HIE participated in the result analysis. ① Comparison of the detected results in infant patients with mild HIE at different

  2. Computed tomography of rambouillet sheep affected with neuronal ceroid lepofuscinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 3 normal Rambouillet sheep and 6 Rambouillet sheep affected with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Characteristic lesions seen in the brain of affected sheep included dramatically enlarged lateral ventricles and reduced cerebral thickness. The lesions were seen in sheep as young as 4 months of age. Antemortem CT observations correlated well with postmortem findings in this model of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  3. ROLE OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN CERBROVASCULAR ACCID ENT

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra; Kiran

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Cerebrovascular accident is characterized by the s udden loss of blood circulation to an area of the brain resulting in a corresponding lo ss of neurologic function. Stroke is mainly of two types ischaemic or haemorrhagic and differentiat ion is important as the management differs substantially with the type of stroke. Aim o f the study was to compare the clinical diagnosis with computed tomography diagnosis and to d ifferentiate between the types of ...

  4. Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Neurotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Devous, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful clinical and research tool. There are several clinical applications now documented, a substantial number under active investigation, and a larger number yet to be studied. Standards regarding patient imaging environment and image presentation are becoming established. This article reviews key aspects of SPECT functional brain imaging in clinical practice, with a ...

  5. The actual state of computerized tomography (CT) - computer assisted tomography (CAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of computerised tomography in diagnosis of various brain diseases (brain tumors, lesions, brain trauma, circulary disorders, atrophic disorders, inflammatory disease, malformations, demyelating disease, spinal processes) is discussed. (VJ)

  6. Computed tomography studies on patients with mucopolysaccharidoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearances on computed tomography (CT) in eight patients with mucopolysaccharidosis Type I, two with mucopolysaccharidosis Type II and two with mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB are presented. Reference is also made to two further cases in which the CT showed special features. Follow-up scans were obtained to assess the evolution of the changes. The place of CT in the diagnosis of complications due to thecal involvement is examined. The density of grey matter on the CT scans was similar to that of normal brain. Inhaled xenon did not produce any special enhancement which could be helpful in assessing the degree of the mucopolysaccharide deposition within cerebral cells. Symmetrical low attenuation in the white matter was a very common finding. This work has shown that the stage in the evolution of the mucopolysaccharidoses at which hydrocephalus develops as a complication is highly variable and CSF diversion procedures are sometimes indicated to improve the quality of the patients' lives. These indications are briefly discussed. We consider that CT is essential for the adequate appraisal of these patients and to identify some treatable complications. (orig./MG)

  7. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology. PMID:27432657

  8. Computer tomography following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer tomographic appearances of lesions of parenchymatous organs following blunt abdominal trauma are described in 13 patients (five liver, four renal, two splenic and two pancreatic injuries). The value of abdominal computer tomography is discussed in relation to the interval between injury and time of abdominal examination and compared with the diagnostic value of abdominal angiography. (orig.)

  9. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    -selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  10. Computer axial tomography in geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer Axial Tomography (CAT) is one of the most adequate non-invasive techniques for the investigation of the internal structure of a large category of objects. Initially designed for medical investigations, this technique, based on the attenuation of X- or gamma-ray (and in some cases neutrons), generates digital images which map the numerical values of the linear attenuation coefficient of a section or of the entire volume of the investigated sample. Shortly after its application in medicine, CAT has been successfully used in archaeology, life sciences, and geosciences as well as for the industrial materials non-destructive testing. Depending on the energy of the utilized radiation as well as on the effective atomic number of the sample, CAT can provide with a spatial resolution of 0.01 - 0.5 mm, quantitative as well as qualitative information concerning local density, porosity or chemical composition of the sample. At present two types of axial Computer Tomographs (CT) are in use. One category, consisting of medical as well as industrial CT is equipped with X-ray tubes while the other uses isotopic gamma-ray sources. CT provided with intense X-ray sources (equivalent to 12-15 kCi or 450-550 TBq) has the advantage of an extremely short running time (a few seconds and even less) but presents some disadvantages known as beam hardening and absorption edge effects. These effects, intrinsically related to the polychromatic nature of the X-rays generated by classical tubes, need special mathematical or physical corrections. A polychromatic X-ray beam can be made almost monochromatic by means of crystal diffraction or by using adequate multicomponent filters, but these devices are costly and considerably diminish the output of X-ray generators. In the case of CT of the second type, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by radioisotopic sources, such as 169 Yb (50.4 keV), 241 Am (59 keV), 192 Ir (310.5 and 469.1 keV ) or 137 Cs (662.7 keV), are used in combination with

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  12. Computed tomography of cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy patients who had suffered from severe damages in the brain in their early lives were examined using a CT scanner, DELTA-25. The results are summerized as follows: 1. CT findings of the brain were classified into four groups; (1) low density in 11 cases, (2) atrophy in 23, (3) hydrocephalus in 12, and (4) no findings in 24. 2. The low density in the CT finding was assumed as cystic degeneration due to circulatory disturbance in the cerebral hemispheres in their early developmental stages. 3. The ''acerebrate'' state denotes no or little development in mental and motor functions which is attributed to a severe damage in the developing brain. According to the CT findings, the ''acerebrate'' state was resulted from extensive destruction in the greater part of both hemispheres. (author)

  13. Age-related cerebral white matter changes on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of cerebral white matter on computed cranial tomography related to aging were studied in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and no abnormalities in the central nervous system were shown by physical examinations and CT scans. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39cm2) in the bilateral thalamus and twelve areas of deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. We also studied the association between brain CT numbers and brain atrophy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus. CT numbers of frontal white matter surrounding anterior horns decreased with aging in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. No significant correlation between age and brain CT numbers was found in any other region by multivariate analysis, because of the prominent effect of cranial bone CT numbers on brain CT numbers. Although no age-related changes of white matter CT numbers was found in 41 subjects aged 30 to 65 years, there were significant negative correlations between age and white matter CT numbers at all regions in 29 subjects aged 66 to 94 years. Brain atrophy was associated with brain CT numbers. No association was found for hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Brain CT numbers decreased with aging even in neurologically healthy persons in older age. Brain CT numbers also decreased as cerebral atrophy advanced. (author)

  14. Age-related cerebral white matter changes on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shotai; Koide, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Shimote, Kouichi; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1989-01-01

    Changes of cerebral white matter on computed cranial tomography related to aging were studied in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and no abnormalities in the central nervous system were shown by physical examinations and CT scans. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39cm/sup 2/) in the bilateral thalamus and twelve areas of deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. We also studied the association between brain CT numbers and brain atrophy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus. CT numbers of frontal white matter surrounding anterior horns decreased with aging in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. No significant correlation between age and brain CT numbers was found in any other region by multivariate analysis, because of the prominent effect of cranial bone CT numbers on brain CT numbers. Although no age-related changes of white matter CT numbers was found in 41 subjects aged 30 to 65 years, there were significant negative correlations between age and white matter CT numbers at all regions in 29 subjects aged 66 to 94 years. Brain atrophy was associated with brain CT numbers. No association was found for hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Brain CT numbers decreased with aging even in neurologically healthy persons in older age. Brain CT numbers also decreased as cerebral atrophy advanced. (author).

  15. Indication for dental computed tomography. Case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on case reports, common indications for dental computed tomography are demonstrated and typical findings are analysed. From a group of 110 patients who had a reformatted computed tomography of the maxilla and mandibula, 10 typical cases were chosen as examples and are presented with a detailed description of the findings. The most important indication was the analysis of the morphology of the alveolar ridge needed in presurgical planning for osseointegrated implants as well as in special cases of postsurgical control. Apart from implantology, the method could be used in cases of mandibular cysts and bony destructions. In conclusion, dental computed tomography has become established mainly in implantology. It can provide valuable results in cases where a demonstration of the bone in all dimensions and free of overlappings and distortions is needed. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of laryngeal carcinoma by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limitation of direct or indirect laryngoscopy and laryngogram in determining the exact site and anatomic location of laryngeal carcinoma were well documented by many authors. As compared with laryngoscopy and laryngogram, computed tomographic study for laryngeal cancer is more exact and accurate method demonstrating anatomic sites of involvement, invasion into deep soft tissue spaces of endolarynx, destruction of laryngeal cartilages and cervical metastasis. Fourteen laryngeal cancer patients proven by laryngoscopic biopsy were further examined by computed tomography for staging. The authors compared laryngoscopic findings with those of computed tomography, and their clinical, surgical and computed tomographic findings were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. All patients were proved as squamous cell carcinoma. They were 12 males and 2 females aged over 50 yr. 2. Common clinical symptoms were hoarsense, dysphagia and swallowing difficulty. The primary anatomic sites determined by CT were 8 transglottic, 2 glottic, 2 supraglottic and 1 pyriform sinus respectively. They were 2 T1, 7 T2,1 T3, 3 T4 by TNM systems, respectively. (One case was difficult to evaluate exactly). 3. Invasion into deep soft tissue spaces of endolarynx, cartilage destruction, and neck metastasis were relatively predominant in transglottic carcinomas. 4. Compute tomography was superior in evaluating tumor invasion, especially into deep sift tissue spaces of endolarynx, laryngeal cartilages and metastasis to soft tissue and lymph nodes of neck. However computed tomography had some limitation in determining primary site of laryngeal cancer.

  17. Brain dopaminergic systems : imaging with positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the dopaminergic system in the human brain with the in vivo use of Positron Emission Tomography emerged in the late 1980s as a tool of major importance in clinical neurosciences and pharmacology. The last few years have witnessed rapid development of new radiotracers specific to receptors, reuptake sites and enzymes of the dopamine system; the application of these radiotracers has led to major break-troughs in the pathophysiology and therapy of movement disorders and schizophrenic-like psychoses. This book is the first to collect, in a single volume, state-of-the-art contributions to the various aspects of this research. Its contents address methodological issues related to the design, labelling, quantitative imaging and compartmental modeli-sation of radioligands of the post-synaptic, pre-synaptic and enzyme sites of the dopamine system and to their use in clinical research in the fields of Parkinson's disease as well as other movement disorders, psychoses and neuroleptic receptor occupancy. The chapters were written by leading European scientists in the field of PET, gathered together in Caen (France, November 1990) under the aegis of the EEC Concerted Action on PET Investigations of Cellular Regeneration and Degeneration. This book provides a current and comprehensive overview on PET studies of the brain dopamine system which should aid and interest neurologists , psychiatrists, pharmacologists and medical imaging scientists. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  18. Contrast enhancement in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There appears little question that cerebral contrast enhancement by iodinated material is to a great extent a reflection of a loss of integrity of the blood-brain barrier, expect in those instances where large vascular channels contain a sufficiently large pool of iodinated material of sufficient density and size to be visualized directly. (orig./VJ)

  19. Epiploic appendicitis - ultrasonography and computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiploic appendicitis is an uncommon inflammatory condition, which is presently better diagnosed by current imaging methods such as computed tomography and ultrasonography that allow a non-invasive and efficient diagnostic approach. The author studied 6 patients with epiploic appendicitis. The patients were submitted to computed tomography that showed paracolic oval lesions of 1 to 2 cm of diameter, fat attenuation and a thin peripheral hyperdense rim associated with adjacent fat stranding. Ultrasound examination performed in two patients showed hyperechoic ovoid noncompressible masses at the site of maximum abdominal tenderness. (author)

  20. Usefulness of computed tomography in recurrent nephrolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For five cases of recurrent stone formers we performed Computed Tomography, which revealed non-visualized small stones on KUB and uric acid stones. Case 1 was primary hyperparathyroidism. Case 2 had several episodes of spontaneous stone passage without any stone shadow on routine X-ray examination. Case 3 had single ureteral stone on X-ray film. Case 4 had several episodes of spontaneous passage of mixed stones (uric acid and calcium oxalate). Case 5 had bilateral radiolucent large renal stones. We emphasized the superiority of Computed Tomography in search and prophylactic therapy of the stone formation. (author)

  1. Computed tomography in spinal canal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobota, J.; Dutka, J. (Ustredni Vojenska Nemocnice, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-09-01

    On a sample of 128 patients examined for suspected disorders of the spinal canal by computed tomography, the experience with the diagnostic possibilities of this quick, accurate and noninvasive imaging technique is demonstrated. The methodology of the examination and the range of obtained information in diagnosing congenital anomalies, traumas and degenerative changes are briefly described. Certain problems and limitations of this method for the diagnosis of tumors are presented. For the assessment of vascular changes and inflammatory processes, computed tomography cannot be expected to be used on a wider scale.

  2. Computed tomography in spinal canal diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On a sample of 128 patients examined for suspected disorders of the spinal canal by computed tomography, the experience with the diagnostic possibilities of this quick, accurate and noninvasive imaging technique is demonstrated. The methodology of the examination and the range of obtained information in diagnosing congenital anomalies, traumas and degenerative changes are briefly described. Certain problems and limitations of this method for the diagnosis of tumors are presented. For the assessment of vascular changes and inflammatory processes, computed tomography cannot be expected to be used on a wider scale

  3. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography has provided excellent opportunities for advancement of computed tomography (CT) technology and clinical applications. It has a wide range of applications in the abdomen including vascular pathologies either occlusive or aneurysmal; enables the radiologist to produce vascular mapping that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to mass lesions. MDCTA can be used in preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation. MDCTA can also provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of ischemic bowel disease, active Crohn disease, the extent and location of collateral vessels in cirrhosis

  4. Computed tomography in malignant primary bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of computed tomography is examined in malignant primary bone tumours using a strongly defined examination group of 13 Patients (six Ewing's-sarcomas, five osteosarcomas, one chondrosarcoma and one spindle-shaped cell sarcoma). Computed tomography is judged superior compared to plain radiographs in recognition of bone marrow infiltration and presentation of parosteal tumour parts as well as in analysis of tissue components of tumours, CT is especially suitable for therapy planning and evaluating response to therapy. CT does not provide sufficient diagnostic information to determine dignity and exact diagnosis of bone tumours. (orig.)

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are located in ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series of pictures, or slices of the ...

  6. Computed tomography of the brain following prophylactic treatment with irradiation therapy and intraspinal metho-trexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 28 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) computed tomography (CT) was performed in order to demonstrate possible cerebral changes following treatment with prophylactic irradiation and intraspinal methotrexate (MTX). The time of CT-scan examination varied from 1 year and 1 month to 10 years and 1 month after diagnosis of ALL. The age of the children ranged from 3 years and 11 months to 14 years and 5 months. Six children had normal CT scans, 12 children had slight atrophylike changes, and nine had severe cerebral atrophy. Two patients in the latter group presented an enlarged ventricular system as well. In one patient intracerebral calcification was the only pathologic finding. The severe changes were seen in children of all age groups, but predominantly-in children with a short duration of their disease, severe symptoms, and frequent marrow relapse. Changes induced by steroid therapy may be reversible. No satisfactory explanation of the demonstrated cerebral pathologic findings can be given, except that they are the consequences of the combination of total therapy and severity of disease in the individual patient. Measurement of attenuation coefficients in grey and white matter shows increasing values with age during childhood. A combination of decreasing attenuation coefficients, especially in the white matter, and the finding of severe atrophy seems to be a bad prognostic sign. (orig.)

  7. F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with corticobasal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that often eludes clinical diagnosis. The present case shows the F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) of a 62-year-old man with a progressive movement disorder with asymmetric features. PET/CT examination showed a markedly right-brain hemispheric hypometabolism also involving basal ganglia. PMID:25829747

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed ...

  10. Coordinate Metrology by Traceable Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a measuring technique which has become an important technology in the production environment over the last years. Due to a number of advantages of CT compared to, e.g., coordinate measuring machines (CMMs), CT has been recently spread in the field of manufacturin...

  11. Computed Tomography For Inspection Of Thermistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) enables identification of cracked thermistors without disassembly of equipment containing them. CT unit used to scan equipment and locate thermistors. Further scans made in various radial orientations perpendicular to plane of devices to find cracks. Cracks invisible in conventional x-radiographs seen.

  12. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...

  13. Comparison on Computed Tomography using industrial items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In a comparison involving 27 laboratories from 8 countries, measurements on two common industrial items, a polymer part and a metal part, were carried out using X-ray Computed Tomography. All items were measured using coordinate measuring machines before and after circulation, with reference...

  14. Computed Tomography in the Modern Slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb

    technology. Recently, the use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) coupled with methods from image analysis has been introduced as a powerful means to optimise production, by providing detailed information on the raw materials. This thesis covers two aspects of the application of CT in the modern abattoir. In...

  15. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An interlaboratory comparison on industrial X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning...

  16. Investigation of measuring strategies in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; Hiller, Jochen; Cantatore, Angela;

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography has entered the industrial world in 1980’s as a technique for non-destructive testing and has nowadays become a revolutionary tool for dimensional metrology, suitable for actual/nominal comparison and verification of geometrical and dimensional tolerances. This paper evaluates...

  17. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzke, R W; Wall, W A [Institute for Computational Mechanics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Runck, H; Stahl, C A; Schneider, M; Guttmann, J [Department of Anesthesiology, Section for Experimental Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Schillinger, B; Calzada, E; Muehlbauer, M; Schulz, M [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) and Fakultaet fuer Physik E21 at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Priebe, H-J, E-mail: metzke@lnm.mw.tum.d [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-01-07

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 {mu}m, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. (note)

  18. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...

  19. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  20. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Cha, Soon Joo; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion is an evolving method to visualize perfusion in organs and tissue. With the introduction of multidetector CT scanners, it is now possible to cover up to 16 cm in one rotation, and thereby making it possible to scan entire organs such as the liver with a fixed...

  2. Computed tomography scanning during a traumatic resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.F.M. Beenen; R. Adams; R.W. Koster; T. Otto

    2011-01-01

    In cardiopulmonary resuscitation, computed tomography (CT) imaging could be of decisive importance to therapeutic strategy making but is yet unavailable because of incompatibility of CT scanning and manual chest compressions. In this report, we describe a case in which CT scanning was performed on a

  3. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 μm, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. (note)

  4. Parallel Computing for the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    This software computes the tomographic reconstruction of spatial-spectral data from raw detector images of the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which enables transient-level, multi-spectral imaging by capturing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot.

  5. Lung Nodule Detection in Screening Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, I; Cerello, P; Cheran, S C; De Nunzio, G; Fantacci, M E; Kasae, P; Masala, G L; Pérez-Martínez, A; Retico, A

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images with 1.25 mm slice thickness is presented. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on the collected database of lung CT scans are discussed.

  6. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  7. Whole brain imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Amato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. The has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography, in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches

  8. Whole Brain Imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Stephen P.; Pan, Feng; Schwartz, Joel; Ragan, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. This has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this article, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP) tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches. PMID:27047350

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child may have, and if there is a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ... in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices ...

  10. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I. [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 (United States); Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada)

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  11. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, B R B; Ding, G X; Kramer, R; Kawrakow, I

    2009-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12 x 0.12 x 0.12 cm3, with 17 x 17 x 17 microm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/ MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (approximately 8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only approximately 50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19673190

  12. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm3, with 17x17x17 μm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (∼8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only ∼50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  13. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  14. Computer screens and brain cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia, both in the media and at the federal government level, over possible links between screen-based computer use and cancer, brain tumour in particular. The screen emissions assumed to be the sources of the putative hazard are the magnetic fields responsible for horizontal and vertical scanning of the display. Time-varying fluctuations in these magnetic fields induce electrical current flows in exposed tissues. This paper estimates that the induced current densities in the brain of the computer user are up to 1 mA/m2 (due to the vertical flyback). Corresponding values for other electrical appliances or installations are in general much less than this. The epidemiological literature shows no obvious signs of a sudden increase in brain tumour incidence, but the widespread use of computers is a relatively recent phenomenon. The occupational use of other equipment based on cathode ray tubes (such as TV repair) has a much longer history and has been statistically linked to brain tumour in some studies. A number of factors make this an unreliable indicator of the risk from computer screens, however. 42 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  15. Emotional brain-computer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.; Tsoneva, T.; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, A.; Heylen, D.K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Research in brain-computer interface (BCI) has significantly increased during the last few years. Additionally to their initial role as assisting devices for the physically challenged, BCIs are now proposed for a wider range of applications. As any human-machine interaction system, BCIs can benefit

  16. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  17. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  19. Acute pancreatitis: diagnostic value of ultrasonography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blery, M.; Hautefeuille, P.; Jacquenod, P. and others

    1987-09-01

    The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography for the diagnosis, extension, pronostic, complications and etiology of acute pancreatitis is discussed. Ultrasonography and computed tomography guided interventional radiology techniques are valuable in the management of pancreatitis complications such as abscesses.

  20. Acute pancreatitis: diagnostic value of ultrasonography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography for the diagnosis, extension, pronostic, complications and etiology of acute pancreatitis is discussed. Ultrasonography and computed tomography guided interventional radiology techniques are valuable in the management of pancreatitis complications such as abscesses

  1. Real-time computed optical interferometric tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Ahmad, Adeel; Adie, Steven G.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution tomography is of great importance to many areas of biomedical imaging, but with it comes several apparent tradeoffs such as a narrowing depth-of-field and increasing optical aberrations. Overcoming these challenges has attracted many hardware and computational solutions. Hardware solutions, though, can become bulky or expensive and computational approaches can require high computing power or large processing times. This study demonstrates memory efficient implementations of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) - two computational approaches for overcoming the depthof- field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Traditionally requiring lengthy post processing, here we report implementations of ISAM and CAO on a single GPU for real-time in vivo imaging. Real-time, camera-limited ISAM processing enabled reliable acquisition of stable data for in vivo imaging, and CAO processing on the same GPU is shown to quickly correct static aberrations. These algorithmic advances hold the promise for high-resolution volumetric imaging in time-sensitive situations as well as enabling aberrationfree cellular-level volumetric tomography.

  2. Computed tomography in Minamata disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine cases of Minamata disease (MD) were examined by CT scan and the results were compared with those of 40 cases of spinocerebellar degenerations (SCD) and age-matched 70 controls. Forty cases of SCD were classified into 5 types; 9 OPCA, 14 LCCA, 9 cerebellospinal form, 4 hereditary spastic paraplegia, and 4 Friedreich's ataxia according to their clinical manifestations. CTs in MD, compared with those in SCD and normal controls, was characterized as follows; 1) All 9 cases of MD showed a symmetrical ''belt-like'' low density area in bilateral visual cortices with enlargement of posterior horns of the lateral ventricles, corresponding well with the severity of the concentric constriction of visual fields. 2) Three out of 9 MD patients showed a prominent enlargement of cerebral sulci localized around the central sulci. It is strongly suggested that sensory impairment in MD correlates not only with the lesion of the peripheral nerve, but also with that of the sensory cortex. 3) As well as OPCA and LCCA, all 9 cases of MD showed atrophy of the vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. However, prominent enlargement of the cerebellar vallecula was a characteristic pattern in MD. Correlation of cerebellar atrophy with the severity of clinical symptoms, such as dysarthria and incoordination, was not apparent. 4) Atrophy of the brain stem and cerebellar peduncle in MD was mild or slight, in contrast to OPCA which revealed a prominent atrophy of these portions. (J.P.N.)

  3. Computed tomography of tibial plateau fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients with tibial plateau fractures were studied by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the role and feasibility of CT in management of such patients. CT resulted in less discomfort to the patient and provided optimal visualization of the plateau defect and the split fragments. It proved more accurate than conventional tomography in assessing depressed and split fractures when they involved the anterior or posterior border of the plateau and in demonstrating the extent of fracture comminution. Split fragments with an oblique plane of fracture also were seen better by CT. The degree of fracture depression and separation as measured by the computerized technique was often more accurate than measurements obtained from conventional tomograms

  4. Computed tomography of the medulla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medulla was studied in cadavers and in 100 patients both with and without the intrathecal administration of contrast material. The computed tomographic (CT) anatomy was correlated with the appearance on anatomic dissections. The pyramids, olives, and inferior cerebellar peduncles produced characteristic contours on cross sections of the medulla. The hypoglossal nerve by its location and course in the medullary cistern could be distinguished from the glossopharyngeal, vagal, and spinal accessory nerves. For optimal evaluation of the medulla, intrathecal administration of metrizamide and 5- and/or 1.5-mm-thick axial and coronal sections are recommended

  5. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  6. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Nicolas-Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  7. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  8. Practical management of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For examinations of the spinal canal is used computed myelography as an adjunct to water-soluble conventional myelography. For CT alone about 3.5 g. of metrizamide in isotonic solution is adequate for all investigations. If the constrast medium has to be run into the head by gravity, as in the detection of cerebrospinal fluid fistula or empty sella, or for detailed examination of the basal cisterns, phenobarbitone 100 mg. t.d.s. is commenced on the eve of the examination and continued for 48 hours. A similar dose is also administered to epileptic subject. If fits should occur they are treated with intravenous diazepam and prophylactic phenobarbitone is administered. (orig./AJ)

  9. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  10. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  11. Biliary obstruction: Helical computed tomography cholangiography evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helical computed tomography cholangiography (HCTC) takes advantage of the improvement in the quality of multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions resulting from the volumetric acquisition of data achieved with helical computed tomography and the indirect opacification of the bile ducts provided by cholangiographic contrast media. This method was used to evaluate 31 patients with suspected biliary obstruction over a one-year period and the findings were compared with those of direct cholangiography and/or surgery. Biliary opacification was sufficient to allow three-dimensional reconstructions in 90,3% of cases. Sensitivity was 81% for the diagnosis of choledochoolithiasis and 100% for ascariasis, choledochal cysts and anatomic variants of the biliary tree. Our results indicate that HCTC is a valuable alternative as a diagnostic method prior to direct cholangiography. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for those patients who require it as part of a therapeutic procedure

  12. Spontaneous cerebral intraparenchymatous hematoma: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to identify the most frequent aspects of spontaneous cerebral intraparenchymatous hematoma found at computed tomography examinations. We reviewed, retrospectively, the computed tomography studies of 250 patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage carried out in three hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results showed deep intracerebral hematomas showed the highest incidence and were observed in 54.4% of the cases (136 patients) followed by lobar hemorrhage in 34.8% of the cases (87 patients). Cerebellar hemorrhage and brainstem bleeding were more rarely observed, occurring in 8.4% (21 patients) and 2.4% (six patients) of the cases, respectively. Chronic headache was the most frequent symptom whereas hypertension was observed in the majority of the cases. Blood draining into the ventricular system occurred more frequently in patients with deep hematomas. (author)

  13. Computed tomography after radical pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipple's procedure (radical pancreaticoduodenectomy) is currently the only curative option for patients with periampullary malignancy. The surgery is highly complex and involves multiple anastomoses. Complications are common and can lead to significant postoperative morbidity. Early detection and treatment of complications is vital, and high-quality multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is currently the best method of investigation. This review outlines the surgical technique and illustrates the range of normal postoperative appearances together with the common complications

  14. Computed tomography of ano-rectal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 9 patients with faecal incontinence more than 8 years after rectoplasty for high imperforate anus. The radiologic findings were correlated with the clinical evaluation of faecal incontinence. No statistically significant correlation was found between function and anatomic findings as demonstrated by CT. Thus, although CT demonstrates the post-operative anatomy in a detailed way, the information does not seem to be directly applicable when selecting the type of reoperation for faecal incontinence. (orig.)

  15. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad availability and use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in recent years has increased the radiation dose for patients. Multiphase MDCT protocols are used in abdominal imaging for various indications. Dose reduction though novel technologies, such as dual energy CT or adapted contrast injection protocols (split bolus etc.) for reduction of scans. An optimized dose reduction can be achieved by using strict protocols which are adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. (orig.)

  16. Computed tomography diagnostic of chronic rhino sinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordinary conventional roentgenological examinations of paranasal sinuses does not satisfy the latest needs of otorinolaringologysta, especially for functional endoscopic surgery. Computed tomography of paranasal sinuses because more important for diagnostics of chronic rhino sinusitis and for choosing the appropriate therapy of it. The examination enables to localize pathology precisely, to exactly evaluate anatomic structures, ostiomeatalic complex, the status of mucous membrane of paranasal sinuses and the effectiveness of surgical treatment of chronic rhino sinusitis. (author)

  17. Encapsulating peritonitis: computed tomography and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadow, Juliana Santos; Fingerhut, Carla Jeronimo Peres; Fernandes, Vinicius de Barros; Coradazzi, Klaus Rizk Stuhr; Silva, Lucas Marciel Soares; Penachim, Thiago Jose, E-mail: vinicius.barros.fernandes@gmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Campinas (PUC-Campinas), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Hospital e Maternidade Celso Pierro

    2014-07-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a rare and frequently severe entity characterized by total or partial involvement of small bowel loops by a membrane of fibrous tissue. The disease presents with nonspecific clinical features of intestinal obstruction, requiring precise imaging diagnosis to guide the treatment. The present report emphasizes the importance of computed tomography in the diagnosis of this condition and its confirmation by surgical correlation. (author)

  18. Computed Tomography Findings in Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Arumugam Rajesh; George Jakanani; Nick Mayer; Kevin Mulcahy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGN) is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. Purpose: To review the computed tomography (CT) findings of patients diagnosed with XGN. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of CT findings in patients with histologically proven XGN was carried out. Results: Thirteen CT examinations of 11 patients were analyzed. Renal enlargement was demonstrable on ...

  19. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST (5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  20. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106, Freiburg (Germany); Furtwaengler, Alex [Department of Abdominal Surgery, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106, Freiburg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST (<5 cm) showed a sharp tumor margin with homogeneous density and structure on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, and were characterized by an intraluminal tumor growth. Intermediate sized GIST (>5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography

  1. Analysis of computed tomography of ovarian tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omura, Makoto; Taniike, Keiko; Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu

    1987-07-01

    One hundred and twenty six patients with ovarian mass were studied with computed tomography (CT) and classified into five groups according to its margin and inner structure. The incidence of malignancy of cystic ovarian mass with smooth margin was low and that of solid ovarian mass with irreglar margin was high. Three cases (6.7 %) of malignant ovarian tumor demonstrated completely cystic pattern. Ovarian teratomas contained well defined component of fat density.

  2. Improvement in computed tomography spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important recent developments in transmission computed tomography is the improvement in spatial resolution. Applications of this technical advance to the neuroradiographic exploration of such structures as spinal cord, nerve roots and pituitary gland - as well as the orbits and inner and middle ear - is still limited to a few centers. Increased spatial resolution appears to be an effective means to increase our diagnostic capabilities. The higher dosimetry connected with this modality needs to be emphasized. (orig.)

  3. Computed tomography in opportunistic lung infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiography in two teenage boys, one with Wiscott-Aldrich's syndrome and one with acute lymphatic leucemia in remission showed increased interstitial pattern. In both computed tomography (CT) of the lungs showed heavy interstitial pneumonia, rather different in appearance but in both cases equal to the CT findings in opportunistic lung infections known from immunoincompetent patients with for instance pneumocystis carinii and/or cytomegalo virus infections. In both patients the CT findings led to lung biopsy establishing the etiologic agent. (orig.)

  4. Single photon radionuclide computed tomography with Tomogscanner II, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single photon radionuclide computed tomography (RCT) was examined in 214 patients with the Tomogscanner-II. The RCT of brain was superior to the conventional brain scan, especially in the detection of lesions at the base of brain or the postoperated condition. The blood pool RCT of brain depicted an arterio-venous malformation and a giant aneurysma at the base of brain. The RCT of cisternography was useful to understand the anatomical relationship of the activity. The RCT of cerebral blood perfusion was possible with a method of continuous infusion of sup(81m)Kr into an internal carotid artery. In the body study, the reconstructed image of the Tomogscanner was excellent. The area of myocardial infarction showed clear defect in the horse-shaped myocardial section image after injection of 4 mCi of 201TlCl. The RCT of liver was available to detect defects and evaluated the activity and size of spleen. The RCT of kidney, lung or bone also showed good image, respectively. The Tomogscanner-II gave very good images in clinical examination of body as well as brain. (author)

  5. HORSESHOE KIDNEY: A MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma V

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Horseshoe kidney is the most common renal fusion anomaly with a reported prevalence of 1 in 400 persons with a male to female ratio of 2:1. In many cases its presence may go unnoticed and undiagnosed because the patient may remain asymptomatic throughout life. The objective of our study is to report radiological and anatomical features of horseshoe kidney detected incidentally during retrospective evaluation of multidetector computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: Contrast enhanced multidetector computed tomography scans of 682 patients, 355 males and 327 females, were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Seven cases of horseshoe kidney were detected incidentally, six males and one female, with an incidence of 1.02 %. In all cases, malrotation of the kidneys were observed with the hilum facing anteriorly or anterolaterally. The isthmus was made up of parenchymal tissue in all the cases and the fusion was midline in four cases and lateral in three cases. Horseshoe kidney in all cases was supplied by multiple renal arteries, varying from 3 to 6. In three cases symmetrical arterial supply and in the rest asymmetrical supply was observed. Nephrolithiasis and hydronephrosis were noted in two patients. No other associated congenital anomaly was observed in all seven patients. Conclusion: Contrast enhanced multidetector computed tomography evaluation of patients with horseshoe kidney provide excellent information about its vascularity, collecting system and other associated conditions.

  6. Feasibility of using the computed tomography dose indices to estimate radiation dose to partially and fully irradiated brains in pediatric neuroradiology examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Frush, Donald P.; Hoang, Jenny K.; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to measure the dose to the brain using clinical protocols at our institution, and (b) to develop a scanner-independent dosimetry method to estimate brain dose. Radiation dose was measured with a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and MOSFET detectors. Six current neuroradiology protocols were used: brain, sinuses, facial bones, orbits, temporal bones, and craniofacial areas. Two different CT vendor scanners (scanner A and B) were used. Partial volume correction factors (PVCFs) were determined for the brain to account for differences between point doses measured by the MOSFETs and average organ dose. The CTDIvol and DLP for each protocol were recorded. The dose to the brain (mGy) for scanners A and B was 10.7 and 10.0 for the brain protocol, 7.8 and 3.2 for the sinus, 10.2 and 8.6 for the facial bones, 7.4 and 4.7 for the orbits and 1.6 and 1.9 for the temporal bones, respectively. On scanner A, the craniofacial protocol included a standard and high dose option; the dose measured for these exams was 3.9 and 16.9 mGy, respectively. There was only one craniofacial protocol on scanner B; the brain dose measured on this exam was 4.8 mGy. A linear correlation was found between DLP and brain dose with the conversion factors: 0.049 (R2 = 0.87), 0.046 (R2 = 0.89) for scanner A and B, and 0.048 (R2 = 0.89) for both scanners. The range of dose observed was between 1.8 and 16.9 mGy per scan. This suggests that brain dose estimates may be made from DLP.

  7. Feasibility of using the computed tomography dose indices to estimate radiation dose to partially and fully irradiated brains in pediatric neuroradiology examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to measure the dose to the brain using clinical protocols at our institution, and (b) to develop a scanner-independent dosimetry method to estimate brain dose. Radiation dose was measured with a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and MOSFET detectors. Six current neuroradiology protocols were used: brain, sinuses, facial bones, orbits, temporal bones, and craniofacial areas. Two different CT vendor scanners (scanner A and B) were used. Partial volume correction factors (PVCFs) were determined for the brain to account for differences between point doses measured by the MOSFETs and average organ dose. The CTDIvol and DLP for each protocol were recorded. The dose to the brain (mGy) for scanners A and B was 10.7 and 10.0 for the brain protocol, 7.8 and 3.2 for the sinus, 10.2 and 8.6 for the facial bones, 7.4 and 4.7 for the orbits and 1.6 and 1.9 for the temporal bones, respectively. On scanner A, the craniofacial protocol included a standard and high dose option; the dose measured for these exams was 3.9 and 16.9 mGy, respectively. There was only one craniofacial protocol on scanner B; the brain dose measured on this exam was 4.8 mGy. A linear correlation was found between DLP and brain dose with the conversion factors: 0.049 (R2 = 0.87), 0.046 (R2 = 0.89) for scanner A and B, and 0.048 (R2 = 0.89) for both scanners. The range of dose observed was between 1.8 and 16.9 mGy per scan. This suggests that brain dose estimates may be made from DLP. (paper)

  8. Reconstruction Algorithms for Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and their Numerical Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Fokas, A S; Marinakis, V

    2004-01-01

    The modern imaging techniques of Positron Emission Tomography and of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography are not only two of the most important tools for studying the functional characteristics of the brain, but they now also play a vital role in several areas of clinical medicine, including neurology, oncology and cardiology. The basic mathematical problems associated with these techniques are the construction of the inverse of the Radon transform and of the inverse of the so called attenuated Radon transform respectively. We first show that, by employing mathematical techniques developed in the theory of nonlinear integrable equations, it is possible to obtain analytic formulas for these two inverse transforms. We then present algorithms for the numerical implementation of these analytic formulas, based on approximating the given data in terms of cubic splines. Several numerical tests are presented which suggest that our algorithms are capable of producing accurate reconstruction for realistic phanto...

  9. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Larsen, Erik;

    The ‘CIA-CT comparison - Inter laboratory comparison on industrial Computed Tomography” is organized by DTU Department of Mechanical Engineering within the Danish project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning - CIA-CT”. The project is co-financed by the Danish Ministry of Science......, Technology and Innovation. The comparison aims to collect information about measurement performance in state-of the-art industrial CT (Computed Tomography) scanning. Since CT scanning has entered the field of manufacturing and coordinate metrology, evaluation of uncertainty of measurement with assessment of...

  10. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  11. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  12. Mathematics in computed tomography and related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical basis of computed tomography (CT) was formulated in 1917 by Radon. His theorem states that the 2-D function f(x,y) can be determined at all points from a complete set of its line integrals. Modern methods of image reconstruction include three approaches: algebraic reconstruction techniques with simultaneous iterative reconstruction or simultaneous algebraic reconstruction; convolution back projection; and the Fourier transform method. There is no one best approach. Because the experimental data do not strictly satisfy theoretical models, a number of effects have to be taken into account; in particular, the problems of beam geometry, finite beam dimensions and distribution, beam scattering, and the radiation source spectrum. Tomography with truncated data is of interest, employing mathematical approximations to compensate for the unmeasured projection data. Mathematical techniques in image processing and data analysis are also extensively used. 13 refs

  13. Fluorescence Computed Tomography with Polychromatic Source Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence computed tomography is a synchrotron imaging technique aiming at reconstructing the fluorescence emission within a sample object. For a polychromatic source hitting the object, the amount of fluorescence detected is defined by a linear equation. For the monochromatic case, the operator is a Generalized Attenuated Radon Transform (GART). The main goal is to reconstruct the density function, given the sinogram data and the weight function. An eficient iterative algorithm for the inversion of the GART was presented recently by the authors. This inversion can only be performed if the weight function is previously known, which means that μ = μ(·, ε) and λ are also known. For monochromatic XFCT (acronym for x-rays fluorescence computed tomography), the determination of λ is a dificult task, and we have considered the approximation λ ≈ μ, which is valid for low energies ranging from 3Kev to 10Kev. So, for solving our problem, the first step is to find μ given the polychromatic sinogram. There are different approaches for this in the literature. Recently, an elegant and efficient method for solving this problem was introduced, using a fixed point algorithm. Opposite to this, where μ(·, ε) needs to be computed for all ε element of E, we claim that the integral of μ(·, ε) for all ε has a physical meaning and provides a good aproximation for the solution. Also we present fast algorithm for computations.

  14. Correlative neuroanatomy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the development of computed tomography (CT) more than a decade ago, still another form of imaging has become available that provides displays of normal and abnormal human structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is given complete coverage in this book. It describes both CT and MR anatomy that explains basic principles and the current status of imaging the brain and spine. The author uses three-dimensional concepts to provide the reader with a simple means to compare the main structures of the brain, skull and spine. Combining normal, gross neuroanatomic illustrations with CT and MR images of normal and abnormal conditions, the book provides diagnostic guidance. Drawings, photographs and radiologic images are used to help

  15. Intraindividual evaluation of the influence of iterative reconstruction and filter kernel on subjective and objective image quality in computed tomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To intraindividually evaluate the potential of 4th generation iterative reconstruction (IR) on brain CT with regard to subjective and objective image quality. Methods: 31 consecutive raw data sets of clinical routine native sequential brain CT scans were reconstructed with IR level 0 (= filtered back projection), 1, 3 and 4; 3 different brain filter kernels (smooth/standard/sharp) were applied respectively. Five independent radiologists with different levels of experience performed subjective image rating. Detailed ROI analysis of image contrast and noise was performed. Statistical analysis was carried out by applying a random intercept model. Results: Subjective scores for the smooth and the standard kernels were best at low IR levels, but both, in particular the smooth kernel, scored inferior with an increasing IR level. The sharp kernel scored lowest at IR 0, while the scores substantially increased at high IR levels, reaching significantly best scores at IR 4. Objective measurements revealed an overall increase in contrast-to-noise ratio at higher IR levels, which was highest when applying the soft filter kernel. The absolute grey-white contrast decreased with an increasing IR level and was highest when applying the sharp filter kernel. All subjective effects were independent of the raters' experience and the patients' age and sex. Conclusion: Different combinations of IR level and filter kernel substantially influence subjective and objective image quality of brain CT. (orig.)

  16. Intraindividual evaluation of the influence of iterative reconstruction and filter kernel on subjective and objective image quality in computed tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhk, J.H. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Laqmani, A.; Schultzendorff, H.C. von; Hammerle, D.; Adam, G.; Regier, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Sehner, S. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Inst. of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology; Fiehler, J. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Neuroradiology; Nagel, H.D. [Dr. HD Nagel, Science and Technology for Radiology, Buchholz (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To intraindividually evaluate the potential of 4th generation iterative reconstruction (IR) on brain CT with regard to subjective and objective image quality. Methods: 31 consecutive raw data sets of clinical routine native sequential brain CT scans were reconstructed with IR level 0 (= filtered back projection), 1, 3 and 4; 3 different brain filter kernels (smooth/standard/sharp) were applied respectively. Five independent radiologists with different levels of experience performed subjective image rating. Detailed ROI analysis of image contrast and noise was performed. Statistical analysis was carried out by applying a random intercept model. Results: Subjective scores for the smooth and the standard kernels were best at low IR levels, but both, in particular the smooth kernel, scored inferior with an increasing IR level. The sharp kernel scored lowest at IR 0, while the scores substantially increased at high IR levels, reaching significantly best scores at IR 4. Objective measurements revealed an overall increase in contrast-to-noise ratio at higher IR levels, which was highest when applying the soft filter kernel. The absolute grey-white contrast decreased with an increasing IR level and was highest when applying the sharp filter kernel. All subjective effects were independent of the raters' experience and the patients' age and sex. Conclusion: Different combinations of IR level and filter kernel substantially influence subjective and objective image quality of brain CT. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic value for extrahepatic metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluated the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and extrahepatic metastases.

  18. Adverse effects of intravenous acetazolamide administration for evaluation of cerebrovascular reactivity using brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with major cerebral artery steno-occlusive diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adverse effects of intravenous acetazolamide administration for evaluation of cerebrovascular reactivity using brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were prospectively investigated in 100 patients with major cerebral artery, atherosclerotic, and steno-occlusive diseases. All patients underwent two SPECT studies (with and without acetazolamide challenge) at an interval of 2 or 3 days, received a questionnaire immediately after each SPECT study, and returned the answered questionnaire within 7 days after the study. None of the 100 patients studied experienced any symptoms during the SPECT study without acetazolamide challenge. Sixty-three patients (63%) developed symptoms during the SPECT study with acetazolamide challenge, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, tinnitus, numbness of the extremities, motor weakness of the extremities, and general malaise 1-3 hours (mean 1.6 hours) after administration of acetazolamide, and these symptoms lasted for 0.5-72 hours (mean 7.9 hours). Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that younger age (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.896-0.980, p=0.0047) and female sex (95% CI 1.178-16.129, p=0.0274) were significantly associated with development of symptoms with acetazolamide challenge. The incidences of the development of symptoms with acetazolamide challenge were 91% (21/23) and 41% (12/29) in subgroups of women <70 years and men ≥70 years, respectively. Patients should be informed of such adverse effects of intravenous acetazolamide administration prior to the acetazolamide challenge test for evaluation of cerebrovascular reactivity. (author)

  19. The penetration of metrizamide into the brain after routine lumbar myelography as shown by cerebral computed tomography and its effect on auditory brainstem transmission time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metrizamide is a widely used contrast medium with some well known adverse reactions. In a preliminary study, CT scans and Brain Stem Evoked Potentials (BAEP) were done before and 18 hours following lumbar myelography on 12 patients. A statistically significant prolongation of the BAEP was observed. Metrizamide therefore seems to be a potent substance in clinical use as indicated by its effect on BAEP. BAEP should not be done within the first few days after myelography with metrizamide. (orig.)

  20. Study of 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 Imaging on Human Brain with Children Autism by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the application values of 99mTc-2 β [ N, N'-bis( 2-mercaptoethy1 ) ethylenediamino ] methyl, 3 β -(4-chlorophenyl) tropane ( TRODAT-1 ) dopamine transporter (DAT) SPECT imaging in children autism, and offer the academic foundation to etiology, mechanism and clinical therapy of autism. Methods:Ten autistic children and ten healthy controls were examined with 99mTc-TRODAT-1 DAT SPECT imaging.Striatal specific uptake of 99mTc-TRODAT-1 was calculated with region of interest analysis according to the ratios between striatum and cerebellum [ (STR-BKG)/BKG]. Results:There was no difference in semiquantitative dopamine transporter between bilateral striatum in autistic children ( P = 0. 562) and in normal controls ( P = 0. 573 ); dopamine transporter in brain of patients with autism increased more significantly than that in normal controls ( P = 0. 017 ). Conclusion: Dopaminergic nervous system is dysfunction in human brain with children autism, and DAT 99mTc-TRODAT-1 SPECT imaging on human brain will help the imaging diagnosis of children autism.

  1. Computed tomography of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on five infants with hepatic hemangioendothelioma. Precontrast scans showed solitary or multiple, homogeneous, circumscribed areas with reduced attenuation values. Tiny tumoral calcifications were identified in two patients. Serial scans, after injection of a bolus of contrast material, showed early massive enhancement, which was either diffuse or peripheral. On delayed scans, multinocular tumors became isodense with surrounding liver, while all solitary ones showed varied degrees of centripetal enhancement and persistent central cleftlike unenhanced areas. The authors believe that these CT features are characteristic and obviate arteriographic confirmation

  2. Multidetector Computed Tomography in Acute Joint Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haapamaeki, V.V.; Kiuru, M.J.; Mustonen, A.O.; Koskinen, S.K. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Helsinki Medical Imaging Center

    2005-10-01

    Conventional radiography plays an essential diagnostic role in the primary evaluation of acute joint trauma. In complex fractures, however, computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality often used second to radiography. As a result of technical breakthroughs in the field, multidetector CT (MDCT) allows faster imaging and better temporal, spatial, and contrast resolution compared with conventional single-slice spiral CT. MDCT with multiplanar reformation is helpful in disclosing fracture patterns, particularly in complex joint fractures, where they reveal occult fractures and show the exact number of fracture components and their degree of displacement.

  3. Quantitative computed tomography in assessment of osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoporosis is a common disorder with considerable health risk and medical care cost. Recent advances in technology have provided new opportunities for evaluating bone mass noninvasively that may impact substantially on the detection and course of osteoporotic conditions. The laboratory and clinical results presented herein indicate that quantitative computed tomography provides a reliable means to evaluate and monitor the many forms of osteoporosis and the various interventions aimed at ameliorating this condition. The greatest advantages of spinal QCT for noninvasive bone mineral measurement lie in the high precision of the technique, the high sensitivity of the vertebral spongiosa measurement site, and the potential for widespread application

  4. Multidetector Computed Tomography in Acute Joint Fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional radiography plays an essential diagnostic role in the primary evaluation of acute joint trauma. In complex fractures, however, computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality often used second to radiography. As a result of technical breakthroughs in the field, multidetector CT (MDCT) allows faster imaging and better temporal, spatial, and contrast resolution compared with conventional single-slice spiral CT. MDCT with multiplanar reformation is helpful in disclosing fracture patterns, particularly in complex joint fractures, where they reveal occult fractures and show the exact number of fracture components and their degree of displacement

  5. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  6. Computed tomography after percutaneous renal stone extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty patients were examined with computed tomography (CT) of the kidney and the retroperitoneal space after percutaneous stone extraction. Most examinations were done within a week after the operation. The morphologic changes were usually small or none. In 7 patients minor renal or perirenal fluid collections were found. Their operations had been complicated by bleeding or leakage. In 66 patients CT was compared with conventional radiographs. Residual stones were more often detected by CT. They were usually small. Percutaneous renal stone extraction is considered a safe and efficient method. (orig.)

  7. Calculation of profitability in computer tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comments do not refer to a specific type of whole body computer tomography which made it necessary to base the calculations on mean values with regard to both initial costs and operating costs. The calculation of the receipts was based on the resulting costs, mean long-term utilization of the unit and on a reasonable period of amortization. The model calculation indicates that the break-even point is reached with 1,920 annual examinations and a five-year amortization period. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB

  8. EEG Based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M. Saddique

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interface (BCI has added a new value to efforts being made under human machine interfaces. It has not only introduced new dimensions in machine control but the researchers round the globe are still exploring the possible uses of such applications. BCIs have given a hope where alternative communication channels can be created for the persons having severe motor disabilities. This work is based upon utilizing the brain signals of a human being via scalp Electroencephalography (EEG to get the control of a robot’s navigation which can be visualized as controlling one’s surrounding environment without physical strain. In this work when a person thinks of a motor activity, it gets performed. The procedure includes acquisition and analysis of brain signals via EEG equipment, development of a classification system using AI techniques and propagating the subsequent control signals to Lego-robot via parallel port. This has been depicted in [1] as a generic block diagram.

  9. Wilson's disease clinical correlation with cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial computed tomograms of 12 patients with proven Wilson's disease were correlated with clinical disturbances. CT abnormalities occurred only in the eight patients with neurological manifestations. The presence of atrophy and low density lesions of the basal ganglia shown on CT correlated well with clinical signs of extrapyramidal dysfunction. Cerebral atrophy and cerebellar cortical atrophy were only moderately related to the degree of intellectual dysfunction and ataxia, respectively; there were no specific clinical signs in cases with brainstem involvement. Abnormalities may be marked in scans taken within a year of neuropsychiatric symptoms, but the most severly abnormal CT scans occurred in patients with a relatively longer duration of untreated disease. Computed tomography provides the opportunity to follow the response of the abnormalities of the brain to cupruresis and can give some assistance in management. (orig.)

  10. Computed tomography of the dog's brain: normal aspects and anatomical correlation; Tomografia computadorizada do encefalo do cao: aspectos da normalidade e correlacao anatomica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorigados, C.A.B., E-mail: clorigados@usp.br [Faculdades Metropolitanas Unidas (UniFMU), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pinto, A.C.B.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2013-06-15

    Normal tomographic images of dog's heads were obtained, aimed to familiarize them with the normal aspects of the brain and correlate these findings with the relevant anatomy of the region studied. Several anatomical structures, such as the parenchyma of the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, the longitudinal fissure, the ventricular system, the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, the corpus callosum, diencephalon, the pons, the medulla oblongata and the chiasmatic sulcus were directly identified or were related to neighboring structures which helped in their identification. (author)

  11. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguori C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlo Liguori,1 Giulia Frauenfelder,2 Carlo Massaroni,3 Paola Saccomandi,3 Francesco Giurazza,4 Francesca Pitocco,4 Riccardo Marano,5 Emiliano Schena,3 1Radiology Unit, AORN A Cardarelli, 2Radiology Unit, AOU Federico II, Naples, 3Measurement and Biomedical Instrumentation Unit, 4Radiology Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, 5Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, A Gemelli University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. Keywords: computed tomography, X-ray, thermometry, dual-energy, ultrafast scanner, guidance, photon-counting technology

  12. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  13. Computed tomography colonography (virtual colonoscopy): review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography examination of the colon performed after bowel cleansing and distension of the lumen with gas goes by several different names-CT colonography (CTC) and CT colography perhaps being the most common. Strictly, the term 'virtual colonoscopy' (VC), should be reserved for the process of examining 3-D, simulated endo-luminal images with a capability to navigate through the bowel using appropriate software. Computed tomography colonography appears to be the name that has gained favour among radiologists, although it is suspected that 'virtual colonoscopy' will persist as a generic term due to its attractive 'high-tech' connotations for non-radiological medical and lay persons. Whatever the name, the technique has been made possible through the advent of fast helical CT scanners which allow acquisition of a volume of data, and of proprietary software which enables multiplanar reformatting and 3-D endoluminal reconstructions. It is evident that if CTC/VC can be shown to be acceptable to patients, safe, affordable and accurate, it has enormous potential as a diagnostic and screening tool for colorectal neoplasia. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Computed tomography of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that computed tomography (CT) is useful in detecting accurately the location, extent, erosion and relationship of angiofibroma to surrounding structures such as pterygopalation fossa. It is well known that computed tomography (CT) is useful in detecting accurately the location, sphenoid sinus, and etc. CT of 20 patients with juvenile angiofibroma, which were examined for 5 yeas from February, 1979 to May, 1984 at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, were retrospectively analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. All 20 patients of juvenile angiofibroma had tumors in nasopharynx and posterior nasal cavity showing homogeneously dense-enhancing soft tissue mass on CT. There was extension of the tumor from nasopharynx and posterior nasal cavity into paranasal sinus (60%, 12/20), pterygopalatine fossa (55%, 11/20), infratemporal fossa (30%, 6/20), posterior orbit (10%, 2/20) and cranial cavity (15%, 3/20). 2. Angiogrpahy usually adds little diagnostic information, but is still needed to identify the precise source of blood supply to the tumor, and to perform the pre-operative embolization. The use of CT has deferred angiography until just before surgery, permitting embolization at optimal time. 3. CT is almost always necessary to reveal accurately the full extent of the tumor, especially intracranial space in the axial and coronal planes with contrast enhancement. CT is useful both in diagnosis as a guide to angiography and in planning the adequate therapy of juvenile angiofibroma

  15. Brain-Computer Interfacing for Intelligent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nijholt, Anton; Tan, Desney; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Brunner, Clemens; R. Millán, del, José; Allison, Brandan; Graimann, Bernhard; Florin POPESCU; Blankertz, Benjamin; Müller, Klaus-R

    2008-01-01

    Advances in cognitive neuroscience and brain-imaging technologies give us the unprecedented ability to interface directly with brain activity. These technologies let us monitor physical processes in the brain that correspond with certain forms of thought. Researchers have begun using these technologies to build brain-computer interfaces (BCIs)—communication systems that don't depend on the brain's normal output pathways of peripheral nerves and muscles. Four short articles provide a quick ove...

  16. Evaluation of changes in the parameters of brain tissue perfusion in multi-slice computed tomography in patients after carotid artery stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT perfusion of the brain allows functional evaluation of cerebral blood flow. Patients with chronic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may suffer from malperfusion. Improvement of cerebral blood flow and remission of neurological symptoms indicate the effectiveness of treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis. Material/Methods: The aim of the study was to analyze alterations within cerebral perfusion parameters in CT brain perfusion examination in patients who were scheduled for endovascular therapy due to ICA stenosis. Forty patients with ICA stenosis of over 79% who were included in this prospective study underwent perfusion CT examination twice - 24 hours prior to stenting and after 6-8 weeks following the procedure. CBF, CBV, MTT and TTP were evaluated. Results: Prior to endovascular therapy, an increase in MTT and TTP, and a decrease in CBV and CBF were observed within arterial supply of the hemisphere ipsilateral to stenosis. After the procedure, a decrease in MTT and TTP was seen in all cases, while no statistically significant changes of CBF or CBV were observed. MTT proved to be the most sensitive indicator of ICA stenosis, as its values allowed differentiation between critical and non-critical stenosis. No correlation between the degree of ICA stenosis and TTP values was found. Mild cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) was observed in only one patient and the difference between pre-treatment MTT values calculated for both hemispheres was shown to be a prognostic factor for CHS incidence. Conclusions: Endovascular stent placing in patients with hemodynamically significant internal carotid artery stenosis results in alteration of perfusion parameters, especially concerning TTP and MTT. (authors)

  17. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup

  18. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  19. Computed tomography of post-traumatic orbito-palpebral emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, H.; Kohno, K. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Two cases of orbito-palpebral emphysema are described. Both having a history of recent facial trauma, emphysema occurred after blowing the nose. They were studied by computed tomography and plain x-ray film, including tomograms of the orbit. The emphysema was revealed by computed tomography and x-ray film, but more clearly by the former technique. The fracture lines of the orbit were revealed in only one case by x-ray film, but in both cases by computed tomography. The authors stress that computed tomography is the best technique for the study of orbital emphysema.

  20. Computed tomography of post-traumatic orbito-palpebral emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of orbito-palpebral emphysema are described. Both having a history of recent facial trauma, emphysema occurred after blowing the nose. They were studied by computed tomography and plain x-ray film, including tomograms of the orbit. The emphysema was revealed by computed tomography and x-ray film, but more clearly by the former technique. The fracture lines of the orbit were revealed in only one case by x-ray film, but in both cases by computed tomography. The authors stress that computed tomography is the best technique for the study of orbital emphysema. (author)

  1. 首发精神分裂症患者脑形态CT研究%Computed Tomography Study of the Brain Morphology of Patients with First-episode Schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程祖胜; 夏国园; 夏瑞明

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the computed tomography(CT) changes of the brain morphology of patients with first-episode schizophrenia(FES).Methods 100 cases that diagnosed FES by clinical were analyzed retrospectively.According to the diagnostic criteria of ICD10,first attacked,first treated by antipsychotic drug and the duration of disease less than two years were enrolled.Meanwhile,they were compared with the healthy matched groups( n = 100).All subjects received brain CT scan and the CT images were obtained.Relevant data and index were measured, calculated and observed.CT changes of the brain morphology of patients with FES were analyzed by statistical processing.Results The index indicated the ventricular dilatation and cerebral atrophy changes in patients of FES ,such as the number of FHI ,VBR, HZ increased;the number of PFAI and CMI decreased.The lateral and the third ventricles had a modest expansion, the sulci enlarged, the lateral fissure widened and presented RASF, the cerebral lobe was diffuse and limitations atrophied.The incidence of pineal calculus was obvious increased and prematured.Conclusion FES patients had the decrease of the brain volume, abnormal dilatation of ventricular and cerebral atrophy as a result of the brain tissue lose ,which was the further evidence of neurodevelopment hypothesis of FES brain.The results of the research can provide important imaging evidence for the schizophernia etiology research.%目的 探讨首发精神分裂症(FES)患者脑形态CT变化.方法 回顾性分析100例经临床确诊的FES患者,符合ICD10诊断标准、首次发病、首次经抗精神药物治疗且病程≤2年,并和对照组(n=100)进行对照.所有研究对象经头部CT扫描获得脑部CT图像,测量、计算及观察有关数据和指标,经过统计学处理后分析FES患者脑形态CT改变.结果 FES患者反映脑室扩大、脑萎缩的指标发生改变,如FHI、VBR、HZ等增大;PFAI、CMI等减小.表现为侧脑室、第三脑室

  2. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography in the management of lung cancer: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication presents an update on the current role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT in the various clinical decision-making steps in lung carcinoma. The modality has been reported to be useful in characterizing solitary pulmonary nodules, improving lung cancer staging, especially for the detection of nodal and metastatic site involvement, guiding therapy, monitoring treatment response, and predicting outcome in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Its role has been more extensively evaluated in NSCLC than small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Limitations in FDG PET-CT are encountered in cases of tumor histotypes characterized by low glucose uptake (mucinous forms, bronchioalveolar carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, in the assessment of brain metastases (high physiologic 18F-FDG uptake in the brain and in cases presenting with associated inflammation. The future potentials of newer PET tracers beyond FDG are enumerated. An evolving area is PET-guided assessment of targeted therapy (e.g., EGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinase overexpression in tumors which have significant potential for drug development.

  3. Imaging of brain activity by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain function is associated with regional energy metabolism and blood flow increase. Such brain activity is visualized by using external scintigraphy. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the currently available most superior technique, allowing three-dimensional imaging of subtle blood flow. In this article, imaging methods and application of PET are discussed in terms of the following items: (1) measurement of cerebral glucose consumption, (2) PET in persons with visual impairment, (3) association between brain function and regional cerebral blood flow, (4) measurement of cerebral blood flow, (5) method for decreasing noise in PET imaging, (6) anatomic standardization of PET images, and (7) speech load and regional cerebral activity images. (N.K.)

  4. Regional cerebral function and blood flow: complementary single photon emission computed tomography of the brain using xenon-133 and [123I]iodoamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral function and blood flow can be imaged using isopropyl[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP), or 133Xe (DSPECT), respectively. This study assessed the in vivo information about intracerebral disease provided by IMP and DSPECT techniques to determine the optimal diagnostic use of these modalities. Single photon emission computed tomograms of 53 subjects were acquired using similar displays for IMP and DSPECT data. Overall, both IMP and DSPECT had similar patterns. However, while similar, one or the other technique often displayed abnormalities not present on both. Although technical factors may account for some differences between the modalities, a case of arteriovenous malformation proves that discordant findings can result directly from tracer localization properties. Thus at least some discordances provide truly complementary diagnostic information lacking in either single study taken alone. (author)

  5. Technological Evolution on Computed Tomography and Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) has been available since the 70s and has experienced a dramatic technical evolution. Multi-detector technology is our current standard, offering capabilities unthinkable only a decade ago. Yet, we must nor forget the ionizing nature of CT's scanning energy (X-rays). It represents the most important cause of medical-associated radiation exposure to the general public, with a trend to increase. It is compulsory to intervene with the objective of dose reduction, following ALARA policies. Currently there are some technical advances that allow dose reduction, without sacrificing diagnostic image capabilities. However, human intervention is also essential. We must keep investment on education so that CT exams are don when they are really useful in clinical decision. Alternative techniques should also be considered. Image quality must not be searched disregarding the biological effects of radiation. Generally, it is possible to obtain clinically acceptable images with lower dose protocols. (author)

  6. Computed Tomography findings in Fournier's gangrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the utility of computed tomography (CT) as an imaging technique in the diagnosis and determination of the extension of Fournier's gangrene (FG). We report the cases of six patients who had been clinically diagnosed as having FG, CT, enhanced by oral and intravenous contrast media, was performed in all the patients. All six patients presented soft tissue masses and gas in the scrotal region, which were also detected in the perineal region in five. In two patients, the gas extended toward anterior abdominal wall and in one of them, it also observed in anterior and posterior para renal space. The major predisposing factors were diabetes and alcoholism and the most common triggering factor was urologic disease. CT confirms the existence of FG and aids in assessing its extension and, in some cases, in identifying the underlying cause. (Author) 15 refs

  7. Computed tomography of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen patients with primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy (cholangiocarcinoma in 13, biliary cystadenocarcinoma in two) were examined by computed tomography (CT). The CT features were classified into three types: (A) a well-defined round cystic mass with internal papillary projections, (B) a localized intrahepatic biliary dilatation without a definite mass lesion, and (C) miscellaneous low-density masses. Intraphepatic biliary dilatation was noted in all cases of Types A and B and half of those of Type C; dilatation of extrahepatic bile ducts occurred in 4/4, 1/3, and 0/8, respectively. CT patterns, such as a well-defined round cystic mass with papillary projections or dilatation of intra- and extrahepatic ducts, give important clues leading to a correct diagnosis of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy

  8. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of examinations with radiation exposure has been increasing mainly due to advances in computed tomography (CT) technology, with a rapid expansion of CT utilization. Annually, 3.6 billion diagnostic and medical and dental examinations involving radiation are performed worldwide. The contribution of CT to collective dose due to medical X rays is up to 47–59%. A 2009 report of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) estimates that 8–10% of CT examinations in the United States of America are performed on children; the growth in CT utilization is higher in the paediatric than adult population in the USA; and there is a particularly pronounced rise in adolescents undergoing chest CT in the emergency department setting for suspected pulmonary embolism or trauma. The reasons for the growing incidence of CT are new indications for CT with the advent of multidetector CT, overcautious ordering related to medico-legal problems and probably financial incentive systems

  9. Radiation Protection of Patients in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radiation for medical diagnostic examinations contributes over 95% of human-made radiation exposure and is only exceeded by natural background as a source of exposure to the world’s population. In fact, for several developed countries, the increased use of high dose X ray technology, in particular, computed tomography (CT), has resulted in a situation in which the annual collective and per capita doses of ionizing radiation due to diagnostic radiology have exceeded those from natural background radiation. In light of this marked increase in worldwide collective effective dose from medical diagnostic procedures, and with CT scans accounting for half of this, there is great emphasis on the subject of radiation protection of patients in CT

  10. Quality assessment of clinical computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Dorothea; Luckow, Marlen; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional images are vital for the diagnosis in dentistry and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Artifacts caused by highly absorbing components such as metallic implants, however, limit the value of the tomograms. The dominant artifacts observed are blowout and streaks. Investigating the artifacts generated by metallic implants in a pig jaw, the data acquisition for the patients in dentistry should be optimized in a quantitative manner. A freshly explanted pig jaw including related soft-tissues served as a model system. Images were recorded varying the accelerating voltage and the beam current. The comparison with multi-slice and micro computed tomography (CT) helps to validate the approach with the dental CT system (3D-Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The data are rigidly registered to comparatively quantify their quality. The micro CT data provide a reasonable standard for quantitative data assessment of clinical CT.

  11. Polychromatic phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychromatic phase-contrast radiography differs from traditional (absorption-only) radiography in that the method requires at least a partially coherent x-ray source and the resulting images contain information about the phase shifts of x-rays in addition to the traditional absorption information. In a typical embodiment, this effect results in a measurable enhancement in image contrast at the edges of objects. In this study, a phase-contrast imaging system was adapted to allow an object to be imaged at multiple projections, and these projections were used to generate phase-contrast computed tomography images. The images obtained with this technique show edge enhancements surrounding the objects within the image

  12. Data processing device for computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data processing device applied to a computed tomography system which examines a living body utilizing radiation of X-rays is disclosed. The X-rays which have penetrated the living body are converted into electric signals in a detecting section. The electric signals are acquired and converted from an analog form into a digital form in a data acquisition section, and then supplied to a matrix data-generating section included in the data processing device. By this matrix data-generating section are generated matrix data which correspond to a plurality of projection data. These matrix data are supplied to a partial sum-producing section. The partial sums respectively corresponding to groups of the matrix data are calculated in this partial sum-producing section and then supplied to an accumulation section. In this accumulation section, the final value corresponding to the total sum of the matrix data is calculated, whereby the calculation for image reconstruction is performed

  13. Computed tomography findings in convergent strabismus fixus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) of the eyeball and orbit revealed the cause of eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus. The findings suggest that the disease can be diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Twelve cases of progressive esotropia with high myopia and 20 cases with normal visual acuity served as subjects in this study. The CT slice was parallel to the German horizontal plane, and the lens and medial and lateral rectus muscles were scanned. The average axial length of the affected eyes was significantly longer than in normal eyes. In progressive esotropia, the characteristic CT findings are an elongated eyeball, mechanical contact between the eyeball and lateral wall of the orbit, and a downward displacement of the lateral rectus muscle. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus results from weakness of the lateral rectus muscle which has been displaced downward due to compression of the eyeball against the orbital wall. (author)

  14. PRIMA+: a proton computed tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a medical imaging method, based on the use of proton beams with kinetic energy of the order of 250 MeV, aimed to directly measure the stopping power distribution of tissues thus improving the present accuracy of treatment planning in hadron therapy. A pCT system should be capable to measure tissue electron density with an accuracy better than 1% and a spatial resolution better than 1 mm. The blurring effect due to multiple Coulomb scattering can be mitigated by single proton tracking technique. As a first step towards pCT the PRIMA+ Collaboration built a prototype capable to carry out a single radiography and a tomographic image of a rotating object. This apparatus includes a silicon microstrip tracker to identify the proton trajectory and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to measure the particle residual energy.

  15. Interpolation method in simple computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiguna, Gede A.

    2015-03-01

    A method for sinogram data interpolation based on a sinusoidal pattern in computed tomography has been developed. Sampled sinograms were acquired based on angular interval scanning of 5o, 10o, and 20o. Then each resulted sinogram was interpolated following sinusoidal pattern to make a complete full scanning sinogram as if they were sampled at 1o. After that, a formal summation convolved filtered back projection was applied to each sinogram to yield a crosssectional image. This method was successfully interpolated limited number of projections data to obtained complete sinogram. It works for simple and homogenous object. However, for high variation of physical properties, e.g. linear attenuation coefficient values, this method needs more consideration on interpolation strategies to produce good image.

  16. Reporting of Dose in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaningful measurement and reporting of dose is an ongoing quest in computed tomography (CT). Expressions such as CTDIvol and dose length product are frequently used, but they describe machine output rather than dose to the patient. Further, they can be misleading when certain dose sparing technologies are employed. Size specific dose estimate has been proposed by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine as a more meaningful measure, but it approximates the mean dose to the patient centre rather than the dose to any specific organ. For estimates of patient risk, doses to specific organs are needed, but these are difficult to obtain. Medical physicists continue to try to resolve these issues, so that more meaningful estimates of dose from CT can be acquired. In the meantime, authors of scientific articles should be dissuaded from using meaningless expressions such as ‘low dose’ and ‘ultra-low dose’ in their descriptions of CT procedures. (author)

  17. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  18. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  19. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  20. Computed tomography findings of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) findings were assessed in 7 patients with malignant mesothelioma. CT findings were also reviewed in 9 patients with lung cancer and pleuritis carcinomatosa and in 11 patients with tuberculous pleuritis. Five patients with malignant mesothelioma underwent CT scans twice, on admission and from 1 to 7 months after admission. Tuberculous pleuritis could be distinguished from pleuritis carcinomatosa and malignant mesothelioma by the presence or absence of pleural nodularity and chest wall invasion. Although it was difficult to identify specific CT features clearly distinguishing malignant mesothelioma from pleuritis carcinomatosa, characteristic findings of malignant mesothelioma appeared to include the rapid development and progression of pleural rind and a tendency to spread directly into the chest wall. We divided the pleural into the four regions; upper anterior, upper posterior, lower anterior and lower posterior regions. Pleural changes were more frequently seen in the lower pleural regions than in the upper pleural regions in malignant mesothelioma. (author)

  1. Computed tomography findings in convergent strabismus fixus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Michitaka; Iwashige, Hiroyasu; Hayashi, Takao; Maruo, Toshio [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) of the eyeball and orbit revealed the cause of eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus. The findings suggest that the disease can be diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Twelve cases of progressive esotropia with high myopia and 20 cases with normal visual acuity served as subjects in this study. The CT slice was parallel to the German horizontal plane, and the lens and medial and lateral rectus muscles were scanned. The average axial length of the affected eyes was significantly longer than in normal eyes. In progressive esotropia, the characteristic CT findings are an elongated eyeball, mechanical contact between the eyeball and lateral wall of the orbit, and a downward displacement of the lateral rectus muscle. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus results from weakness of the lateral rectus muscle which has been displaced downward due to compression of the eyeball against the orbital wall. (author).

  2. [Spontaneous intraparenchymatous hemorrhage: findings at computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Celso Monteiro; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Rodrigues, Andréa de Jesus

    2004-09-01

    Computed tomography studies of 250 patients with spontaneous hemorrhage were examined in three hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The goal of this study was to identify the aspects of this disease that appear most frequently in this type of exam. Deep intracerebral hematomas have had the highest incidence followed by lobar hemorrhage, with thalamus being more frequently affected. Cerebellar hemorrhage was much rarer, with brainstem bleeding observed in few patients. The age group with a peak incidence was at 61 to 70 years. Headache was the most frequently related symptom and elevated levels of blood pressure were found in most of the cases. There was no pronounced difference as to predominance in either sex or side most affected but it was observed that the onset of this disease occurs at an earlier age in men than in women. Blood draining into the ventricular system occurred more frequently in deep hematomas. PMID:15334231

  3. Myocardial hypoperfusion on conventional contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Shing; Chung, Tak Shun

    2015-10-01

    Non–electrocardiogram (ECG)–gated contrast computed tomography (CT) is commonly performed to exclude aortic dissection in chest pain patients. Besides evaluating the aorta for dissection flap, attention should be paid to the myocardium for areas of hypoenhancement that may suggest ischemia. Current models of multidetector CT enable assessment of myocardial perfusion with minimal motion artifact even without ECG gating. Transmural hypoenhancement with preserved wall thickness in a coronary distribution is highly specific for acute myocardial infarction. We report 2 cases of acute chest pain with initial nondiagnostic studies that underwent CT aortogram to exclude dissection. Instead, the CT showed myocardial hypoenhancement in left anterior descending artery territory. Myocardial hypoenhancement occurred before ST-segment elevation on ECG, suggesting that recognition of this important finding may lead to earlier revascularization decisions. PMID:26321167

  4. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of autoimmune pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfusion computed tomography (P-CT) is now available for the analysis of pancreatic blood flow. The aim of this study was to clarify pancreatic blood perfusion in AIP patients and the changes after steroid treatment. Color map imaging of P-CT and pancreatic time CT density curve (TDC) demonstrated that the pancreatic blood flow was attenuated in AIP patients. Pancreatic volumetric blood flow FV values of 11 AIP patients (82.7/min) were significantly lower than those of 12 normal controls (163.5/min, p=0.0006). AIP patients received steroid treatment and were re-examined, of these, 9 patients showed significantly elevated FV values after treatment (76.2/min and 109.8/min, p=0.0391, respectively). However, the changes of the values after the treatment differed in varying degrees among the individuals. P-CT is a useful method for the analysis of the blood flow in pancreatic diseases. (author)

  5. Computed tomography of the pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is written entirely to include the imaging of the pituitary gland by computed tomography (CT). The first three chapters illustrated technical aspects of scanning, anatomic depiction of the gland by CT, and the use of dynamic CT scanning for detecting and displaying abnormalities. The chapters discuss and illustrate various types of pathologic processes in and around the pituitary gland. One short but very helpful chapter demonstrates potential pitfalls due to the combination of anatomic variants and the geometry of CT sections. Some illustrations of disease processed are depicted by magnetic resonance imaging. All major types of pituitary diseases are illustrated. Lists of readily available English-language references are available. A small subject index is provided at the end of the book in which the illustrations are identified by use of a special numeric front

  6. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia

  7. Computed tomography in Krabbe's disease: Comparison with neuropathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report computed tomography (CT) appearance of two patients with Krabbe's disease. The most common findings included severe brain atrophy: en enlarged frontal extracerebral space, dilatation of ventricles, enlarged cisterns and enlarged cortical sulci. There was low attenuation in the corpus medullaris of the cerebellum, and symmetrical focal hypodensity in the central periventricular white matter. CT at the terminal stage (16 months) showed marked cerebral atrophy including flattening of the heads of caudate nuclei and widening of the third ventricles confirmed by a neuropathological study. There was relatively less low density on the white matter of Krabbe's disease compared with that of other leukodystrophies. These CT findings may be useful in the diagnosis. The relative lack of low density in the white matter of Krabbe's disease might be related to severe gliosis and reduced total lipid contents. (orig.)

  8. Diagnosis of lumbar disc hernia with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizumi, Atsuro; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Ojima, Tadashi; Oshida, Midori; Horaguchi, Mitsuru (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan))

    1982-07-01

    Results of computed tomography performed on patients with clinically diagnosed hernia were compared with those of myelography and operative findings. This comparative study suggested that computed tomography is quite different from other methods and very useful in diagnosis of hernia. Some cases of hernia were shown, and the characteristics of CT were reviewed.

  9. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography (CT) equipment. 1020.33... Computed tomography (CT) equipment. (a) Applicability. (1) The provisions of this section, except for paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured...

  10. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J N; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  11. Diagnosis of lumbar disc hernia with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of computed tomography performed on patients with clinically diagnosed hernia were compared with those of myelography and operative findings. This comparative study suggested that computed tomography is quite different from other methods and very useful in diagnosis of hernia. Some cases of hernia were shown, and the characteristics of CT were reviewed. (Ueda, J.)

  12. Computed tomography of the central nervous system in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With computed tomography in 44 small animals some well defined anatomical structures and pathological processes of the central nervous system are described. Computed tomography is not only necessary for the diagnosis of tumors; malformations, inflammatory, degenerative and vascular diseases and traumas are also visible

  13. Efficacy of Navigation in Skull Base Surgery using Composite Computer Graphics of Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Images

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images,...

  14. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdziel, J.C.; Dondelinger, R.F.; Hemmer, M.

    1987-01-01

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients.

  15. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients

  16. Terahertz Computed Tomography of NASA Thermal Protection System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D. J.; Reyes-Rodriguez, S.; Zimdars, D. A.; Rauser, R. W.; Ussery, W. W.

    2011-01-01

    A terahertz axial computed tomography system has been developed that uses time domain measurements in order to form cross-sectional image slices and three-dimensional volume renderings of terahertz-transparent materials. The system can inspect samples as large as 0.0283 cubic meters (1 cubic foot) with no safety concerns as for x-ray computed tomography. In this study, the system is evaluated for its ability to detect and characterize flat bottom holes, drilled holes, and embedded voids in foam materials utilized as thermal protection on the external fuel tanks for the Space Shuttle. X-ray micro-computed tomography was also performed on the samples to compare against the terahertz computed tomography results and better define embedded voids. Limits of detectability based on depth and size for the samples used in this study are loosely defined. Image sharpness and morphology characterization ability for terahertz computed tomography are qualitatively described.

  17. Computed tomography of normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the shape and measurements of the normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis on computed tomographic scans and to identify features that could aid in the diagnosis of syndesmotic diastasis using computed tomography (CT). CT scans of 100 patients with normal distal tibiofibular syndesmoses were reviewed retrospectively. In 67% the incisura fibularis was deep, giving the syndesmosis a crescent shape. In 33% the incisura fibularis was shallow, giving the syndesmosis a rectangular shape. The measurements of both types were taken using the same reference points. The mean age of the patients was 40 years, and there were 53 men and 47 women. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anteriorly between the tip of the anterior tibial tubercle and the nearest point of the fibula was 2 mm. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis posteriorly between the medial border of the fibula and the nearest point of the lateral border of the posterior tibial tubercle was 4 mm. In men the mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis, anterior and posterior, was 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, and in women it was 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively. This study provides measurements of the normal tibiofibular syndesmosis to aid in the diagnosis of occult diastasis. (orig.)

  18. Computed tomography of normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgafy, Hossein; Semaan, Hassan B.; Blessinger, Brian; Wassef, Andrew; Ebraheim, Nabil A. [University of Toledo Medical Center, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Radiology, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the shape and measurements of the normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis on computed tomographic scans and to identify features that could aid in the diagnosis of syndesmotic diastasis using computed tomography (CT). CT scans of 100 patients with normal distal tibiofibular syndesmoses were reviewed retrospectively. In 67% the incisura fibularis was deep, giving the syndesmosis a crescent shape. In 33% the incisura fibularis was shallow, giving the syndesmosis a rectangular shape. The measurements of both types were taken using the same reference points. The mean age of the patients was 40 years, and there were 53 men and 47 women. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anteriorly between the tip of the anterior tibial tubercle and the nearest point of the fibula was 2 mm. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis posteriorly between the medial border of the fibula and the nearest point of the lateral border of the posterior tibial tubercle was 4 mm. In men the mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis, anterior and posterior, was 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, and in women it was 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively. This study provides measurements of the normal tibiofibular syndesmosis to aid in the diagnosis of occult diastasis. (orig.)

  19. Texture classification of lung computed tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pheng, Hang See; Shamsuddin, Siti M.

    2013-03-01

    Current development of algorithms in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme is growing rapidly to assist the radiologist in medical image interpretation. Texture analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is one of important preliminary stage in the computerized detection system and classification for lung cancer. Among different types of images features analysis, Haralick texture with variety of statistical measures has been used widely in image texture description. The extraction of texture feature values is essential to be used by a CAD especially in classification of the normal and abnormal tissue on the cross sectional CT images. This paper aims to compare experimental results using texture extraction and different machine leaning methods in the classification normal and abnormal tissues through lung CT images. The machine learning methods involve in this assessment are Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS), Naive Bayes, Decision Tree (J48) and Backpropagation Neural Network. AIRS is found to provide high accuracy (99.2%) and sensitivity (98.0%) in the assessment. For experiments and testing purpose, publicly available datasets in the Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) are used as study cases.

  20. Ventricles of brain: A morphometric study by computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Raj Singh, Ujwal Gajbe, Amit Agrawal, Anilkumar Reddy Y, Sunita Bhartiya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As the human brain ages, characteristic structural changes occur that are considered to be normal and are expected. Thus the thorough knowledge of the age related normal changes that occur in the brain is required before any abnormal findings are analyzed. As ageing advances, the brain undergoes many gross and histopathological changes with regression of the brain tissue leading to the enlargement of the ventricles. To understand these changes the knowledge of normal morphometry and size of normal ventricular system of brain is important. Materials & Methods: For the present study 358 (Males – 207 and Females – 151 individuals Computerized Tomography (CT images of brain studied. Measurements of fourth ventricle, third ventricle and lateral ventricle were noted down from CT images and it was statistically analyzed. Results: After analysis it was observed that the height and width of the fourth ventricle was larger in males as compared to females. The length of the third ventricle was observed to be greater in females than in males. The width of the third ventricle it was observed to be greater in males than in females. Antero-posterior extent of the left frontal horn (males = 26.26 ± 2.94, 95% CI 25.86 – 26.66 mm and females = 26.53 ± 3.38, 95% CI 25.99 – 27.08 mm was greater than that of the right ones (males = 25.00 ± 3.18, 95% CI 24.57 – 25.44 mm and females = 25.34 ± 3.50, 95% CI 24.78 – 25.90 mm. Conclusion: Advances in sensitive imaging techniques like the Computerized Tomography helps in dramatic expansion of our understanding of the normal structure of brain. The present study has defined the morphometric measurements of the lateral ventricles, third ventricle, and fourth ventricle of the brain which has clinical correlations in diagnosis and for further line of treatment.

  1. Positron emission tomography alone, positron emission tomography-computed tomography and computed tomography in diagnosing recurrent cervical carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Yi; Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yicheng; Xiong, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess systematically the accuracies of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/computed tomography (CT), and CT in diagnosing recurrent cervical cancer. Material and methods We searched for articles published from January 1980 to June 2013 using the following inclusion criteria: articles were reported in English; the use of PET, interpreted with or without the use of CT; use of CT to detect recurrent cervical cancer; and histopathologic analysis and/o...

  2. Competing and collaborating brains: multi-brain computer interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Hassanieu, Aboul Ella; Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we survey the possibilities of brain-computer interface applications that assume two or more users, where at least one of the users’ brain activity is used as input to the application. Such ‘applications’ were already explored by artists who introduced artistic EEG applications in th

  3. Anatomical Atlas-Guided Diffuse Optical Tomography of Brain Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Custo, Anna; Boas, David A.; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Dan, Ippeita; Mesquita, Rickson; Fischl, Bruce; Grimson, W. Eric L.; Wells, Williams

    2009-01-01

    We describe a neuro imaging protocol that utilizes an anatomical atlas of the human head to guide Diffuse optical tomography of human brain activation. The protocol is demonstrated by imaging the hemodynamic response to median nerve stimulation in three healthy subjects, and comparing the images obtained using a head atlas with the images obtained using the subject-specific head anatomy. The results indicate that using the head atlas anatomy it is possible to reconstruct the location of the b...

  4. Giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma. Findings on computed helical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe computed helical tomography characteristics of the giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma. Method: During five years, we evaluated 21 patients with 21 giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas with computed helical and multislice tomography. We included 18 women (86%) and 3 men (14%) with a mean age of 45 years. Results: The mean size of hemangiomas was 10.4 cm. Non enhanced computed tomography Showed 21 hemangiomas with lower density than adjacent hepatic parenchyma , all hemangiomas showed a central cleft area with low density. None hemangioma showed calcifications neither internal septa. In enhanced helical tomography all lesions demonstrated a globular, peripheral enhancing pattern with centripetal filling that begin in the arterial phase and continued in portal and delayed phases. None of the lesions showed complete filling. Conclusion: giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas showed low attenuation in non enhanced computed tomography. central cleft area was very frequently seen. The enhancement pattern is characteristic, starting at the periphery with centripetal filling but it was never complete.

  5. Patterns of brain activity in normals and schizophrenics with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated the functional interaction among brain areas under baseline and upon activation by a visual task to compare the response of normal subjects from the ones of chronic schizophrenics. Cerebral metabolic images were obtained on twelve healthy volunteers an eighteen schizophrenics with positron emission tomography and 11-C-Deoxyglucose. Correlation coefficients among the relative metabolic values (region of interest divided by the average of whole brain gray matter) of 11 brain regions; frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital left and right lobes, left and right basal ganglia and thalamus were computed for the baseline and for the task. Under baseline, normals showed more functional correlations than schizophrenics. Both groups showed a thalamo-occipital (positive) and thalamo-frontal (negative) interaction. The highest correlations among homologous brain areas were the frontal, occipital and basal ganglia

  6. Reproducibility in the assessment of acute pancreatitis with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire Filho, Edison de Oliveira; Vieira, Renata La Rocca; Yamada, Andre Fukunishi; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Bekhor, Daniel; Freire, Maxime Figueiredo de Oliveira; Ajzen, Sergio; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: eofilho@ig.com.br; eoffilho@uol.com.br

    2007-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the assessment of patients with acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Fifty-one unenhanced and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography studies of patients with acute pancreatitis were blindly reviewed by two radiologists (observers 1 and 2). The morphological index was separately calculated for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and the disease severity index was established. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of computed tomography was measured by means of the kappa index ({kappa}). Results: Interobserver agreement was {kappa} 0.666, 0.705, 0.648, 0.547 and 0.631, respectively for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced morphological index, presence of pancreatic necrosis, pancreatic necrosis extension, and disease severity index. Intraobserver agreement (observers 1 and 2, respectively) was {kappa} = 0.796 and 0.732 for unenhanced morphological index; {kappa} 0.725 and 0.802 for contrast- enhanced morphological index; {kappa} = 0.674 and 0.849 for presence of pancreatic necrosis; {kappa} = 0.606 and 0.770 for pancreatic necrosis extension; and {kappa} = 0.801 and 0.687 for disease severity index at computed tomography. Conclusion: Computed tomography for determination of morphological index and disease severity index in the staging of acute pancreatitis is a quite reproducible method. The absence of contrast- enhancement does not affect the computed tomography morphological index reproducibility. (author)

  7. Reproducibility in the assessment of acute pancreatitis with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the assessment of patients with acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Fifty-one unenhanced and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography studies of patients with acute pancreatitis were blindly reviewed by two radiologists (observers 1 and 2). The morphological index was separately calculated for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and the disease severity index was established. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of computed tomography was measured by means of the kappa index (κ). Results: Interobserver agreement was κ 0.666, 0.705, 0.648, 0.547 and 0.631, respectively for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced morphological index, presence of pancreatic necrosis, pancreatic necrosis extension, and disease severity index. Intraobserver agreement (observers 1 and 2, respectively) was κ = 0.796 and 0.732 for unenhanced morphological index; κ 0.725 and 0.802 for contrast- enhanced morphological index; κ = 0.674 and 0.849 for presence of pancreatic necrosis; κ = 0.606 and 0.770 for pancreatic necrosis extension; and κ = 0.801 and 0.687 for disease severity index at computed tomography. Conclusion: Computed tomography for determination of morphological index and disease severity index in the staging of acute pancreatitis is a quite reproducible method. The absence of contrast- enhancement does not affect the computed tomography morphological index reproducibility. (author)

  8. Analysis of the computed tomography in the acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This study tends to test the capacity of the computed tomography in assist in the diagnosis and the approach of the acute abdomen. Material and method: This is a longitudinal and prospective study, in which were analyzed the patients with the diagnosis of acute abdomen. There were obtained 105 cases of acute abdomen and after the application of the exclusions criteria were included 28 patients in the study. Results: Computed tomography changed the diagnostic hypothesis of the physicians in 50% of the cases (p 0.05), where 78.57% of the patients had surgical indication before computed tomography and 67.86% after computed tomography (p = 0.0546). The index of accurate diagnosis of computed tomography, when compared to the anatomopathologic examination and the final diagnosis, was observed in 82.14% of the cases (p = 0.013). When the analysis was done dividing the patients in surgical and nonsurgical group, were obtained an accuracy of 89.28% (p 0.0001). The difference of 7.2 days of hospitalization (p = 0.003) was obtained compared with the mean of the acute abdomen without use the computed tomography. Conclusion: The computed tomography is correlative with the anatomopathology and has great accuracy in the surgical indication, associated with the capacity of increase the confident index of the physicians, reduces the hospitalization time, reduces the number of surgeries and is cost-effective. (author)

  9. Radiation Doses from Computed tomography in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses to Patient during CT scanner and the radiological risk are significant. Patient dose survey has been conducted to investigate the Iraq patient radiation doses received in CT scanners in order to established reference dose levels. These doses are Entrance Surface Dose (ESD),computed tomography dose index(CTDI)), and dose length product (DLP). Two CT scanner were investigated in this study were, Siemens Somatom Plus 4, located in at medical city of Baghdad, and Philips, Optimus located in privet hospital at Baghdad. ESD were measured by TLD and Dosimax ionization chamber for head, chest, and abdomen for both sex and different weights. The TLD results were higher than that measured with Dosimax due to scattered radiation .The scattering factor which is the ratio between dose measured by TLD and that measured by ionization chamber range between (1.14-1.34) compare to international measurement which is range between (1.1-1.5).The (ESD) measured by the two methods were agree well after the subtraction of scattering dose, and have compered with original research. Dose profile were measured using array of TLD chips shows that its full width at half maximum is(7.99 mm) approximately equal the slice thickness(8 mm). Our results compare with reference level at U.K, European Guidelines and

  10. Cranial computed tomography in infantile spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of 109 children with infantile spasms (IS), prospectively tested during the years 1976 to 1979 in Denmark, 52 children were examined by cranial computed tomography (CT). The classification of IS into cryptogenic (CR), symptomatic (SY) and doubtful (DO) was done clinically without considering the CT-finding. Sixty per cent of the scannings were abnormal. Only 6/30 (20%) of the children in ACTH treatment were found to develop cerebral atrophy which means that this finding is not an obligatory side-effect of ACTH treatment of children with IS. Normal CT-findings were found in 50% of the CR and 50% of the SY + DO-groups, and could not be used as a prognostic tool for estimating the mental development. This was also the case for children with cerebral atrophy. Abnormal CT-findings (minus atrophy) were highly correlated to the group with clinical symptoms and indicate an extremely unsatisfying long-term mental prognosis. CT-scanning is a valuable tool for the examination of clearing children with infantile spasms. (authors)

  11. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors)

  12. Quantitative investigations of megavoltage computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Myron; Kerr, Andrew; Salomons, Greg; Schreiner, L. John

    2005-04-01

    Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) has been an active area of research and development in image guided radiation therapy. We have been investigating a particular implementation of MVCT in conjunction with studies of the potential for tomotherapy with a Cobalt-60 radiation source. In this paper, we present results comparing MVCT using a Co-60 source and a 4 MV linear accelerator to conventional kVCT imaging. The Co-60 and linac MVCT measurements were obtained with a first generation benchtop CT imager; the KVCT measurements were obtained using a Philips AcQSim CT Simulator). Phantoms containing various inserts ranging in density from air, through lung, soft tissue and bone equivalent materials and extending to high atomic number metals were imaged with the three modalities. The results enable characterization of image artifacts, CT number linearity and beam hardening. The MVCT images have sufficient contrast that soft tissue regions with 2.8% difference in electron density can be visualized. In MVCT, a linear relationship between CT numbers and electron densities extends to materials with Z ~ 60. In the 4MV CT imaging there is a position dependence of the CT numbers within a uniform water phantom, which is absent in Co-60 CT images, indicating the presence of beam hardening artifacts in the linac MVCT images. The differences between kVCT and MVCT will be discussed considering the variation of the photon interactions dominating the images. Our investigations indicate that MVCT has properties that may potentially extend its utility beyond radiation therapy.

  13. Computed Tomography Following Body Stuffing Heroin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Nordt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED in police custody for “medical clearance” before being taken to jail. The patient was approached by police officers for suspicion of selling illicit drugs. When approached by police he ran away and was witnessed to swallow several small plastic baggies suspected to contain heroin. He was apprehended and brought to the ED. On arrival, he was asymptomatic with a blood pressure 144/83mmHg, heart rate 67bpm, respiratory rate of 19bpm, oxygen saturation of 99% on room air and afebrile. A Glasgow coma score was 15 and he was alert and oriented to person, place and time. Patient had a negative review of systems. On physical examination pupils were 4mm and reactive to light, lungs clear to auscultation and had normal respiratory rate with normal cardiovascular exam. Abdomen was soft, non-tender and non-distended with present bowel sounds. The patient admitted to ingesting approximately 20 packets of heroin to avoid being charged with possession. The patient declined activated charcoal and whole bowel irrigation (WBI with polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG-ELS. The patient declined a urine toxicology immunoassay screen. A computed tomography (CT of his abdomen with contrast was obtained and read as normal except for a cluster of foreign bodies within the distal stomach likely contained within a plastic bag.

  14. Computed tomography findings in fibrosing mediastinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, A. [Departments of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: a.devaraj@rbht.nhs.uk; Griffin, N. [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Nicholson, A.G. [Department of Histopathology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Departments of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Aim: To describe the CT features of fibrosing mediastinitis. Materials and methods: The clinical notes, histology, and CT images from 12 patients with fibrosing mediastinitis were reviewed. Clinical data regarding the presentation and suspected aetiology were correlated with location of mediastinal disease, calcification, effect on mediastinal structures, and additional pulmonary findings on computed tomography (CT). Results: The mean age was 40.5 years, with seven female and five male patients. The most common presenting symptom was shortness of breath. Fibrosing mediastinitis diffusely infiltrated the mediastinum in five patients and was localized in seven. Calcification was present in two cases. Eleven of 12 cases had narrowing of mediastinal structures, including five with pulmonary artery narrowing, five with superior vena cava obstruction, four with bronchial narrowing, three with tracheal narrowing, and one with narrowing of the pulmonary vein. The disease was considered idiopathic in seven cases with a demonstrable aetiology in five cases. Eight out of 12 patients had additional pulmonary findings, including all patients with a known aetiology. Conclusions: In the present series of patients, fibrosing mediastinitis more commonly presented as a localized mediastinal mass than as diffuse mediastinal disease, with the anterior mediastinal compartment most frequently involved. Most cases were idiopathic compared with the majority of previous cases at this institution being ascribed to tuberculosis. There is a high incidence of concomitant pulmonary findings, in particular when an identifiable aetiology is present. Obstruction of vital structures frequently gives rise to complications.

  15. Computed tomography findings in pancreas divisum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 29 patients with abdominal pain the diagnosis of pancreas divisum (PD) was verified by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (EPR) via both the major and the minor papilla. Computed tomography (CT) was done in all patients to evaluate contour, volume, antero-posterior diameters and attenuation values of the gland in comparison with a normal reference series. Also, the validity of the CT grading of pancreatitis was assessed in comparison with ERP grading. Patients with PD had an increased cranio-caudal diameter of the pancreatic head (p<0.001). Further, the main pancreatic duct was visualized more often in patients with PD (p<0.01), who also had an increasing frequency of pancreatic calcifications (p<0.05). Otherwise there were no differences compared with the normal series. The observed reduction in the volume of the gland in patients with marked pancreatitis at ERP seemingly reflected the severity of inflammation. No cleavage between the dorsal and ventral anlage was identified. CT was found to be too unspecific to be of any use in grading of pancreatitis. In conclusion, CT findings in patients with PD are sparse, unspecific and preferably a reflection of pancreatitis, if present. ERP remains the ''gold standard'' for the diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Computed tomography phantom for radiochromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate in detail the dose distribution during computed tomography (CT), a sheet roll CT dosimetry phantom (SRCT-P) with a radiochromic film (RF) was experimentally developed. The SRCT-P was made by rolling up a vinyl chloride sheet in a cylindrical shape to arbitrarily select the SRCT-P diameter, dose measurement position, and depth. The SRCT-P centre core consisted of a plastic hose in which a 10 mm acrylic bar with a RF was inserted. To determine the availability of the SRCT-P, the surface and centre doses (at a 5 mm radius) at each SRCT-P diameter (6-16 cm; every 2 cm) were measured. The ratios of the centre-to-surface doses (Dcentre/Dsuface) systematically increased, from 80 to 111%, for decreasing SRCT-P diameters, between 16 and 6 cm, respectively. The centre dose approached the surface dose as the SRCT-P diameter decreased. To use a RF for a CT dose measurement, further detailed research and analysis is necessary. However, this study has shown that a SRCT-P is useful and beneficial for the measurement of the dose distribution during a CT examination

  17. Industrial computed tomography image size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the most useful modern detection technologies, Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) image size measurement can correctly non-destructively measure the size of workpieces' inner construction, and it is considered as the standard for quality assurance and reverse engineering. In view of the advantages and disadvantages compared to conventional methods, this paper improves the precision of image size measurement with a new algorithm that uses an approximate function to describe edge degradation. First, this algorithm constructs the approximate function and determines the optimal point of edge detection, based on image intensity and inflexions. Then, in order to accurately extract the image edge, this algorithm is used to revise the primary image, completing construction of the CT image. Excellent results are obtained from simulations and experiments. The experimental results indicate that the relative error is 2% for the CT image when the step evolution of the image edge is pooled. The relative error of this method is decreased by as much as 1.5% compared to wavelet transformation and ridgelet transformation. Therefore, this new algorithm demonstrates increased effectiveness in extracting an accurate measurement of the CT image edge.

  18. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it; Russo, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia, Napoli I-80126, Italy and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli I-80126 (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed.

  19. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: computed tomography features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; Dong; Jing-Jing; Chen; Xi-Zhen; Wang; Ya-Qin; Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography(CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess(IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis(TB). All IPTAs(11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis.

  20. Computed tomography of the ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) provides valuable informations in the diagnosis of the female pelvic masses. CT findings of 109 cases of surgically proved ovarian masses were reviewed regarding number, size, contour, and internal consistency (cystic, solid, and mixed masses). Differentiation between malignant and benign ovarian tumors depended on number and internal consistency of the mass. Most of malignant tumors showed bilateral mixed or solid masses and contained solid components. Most of metastatic ovarian cancer were demonstrated as bilateral mixed or solid masses. They were able to be differentiated from primary ovarian cancer because metastatic tumors contained more solid components than primary ones did and had ill-defined margins between cystic and solid components in mixed masses. In benign ovarian tumors, differentiation between mucinous cystadenomas, endometrial cysts, and dermoid cysts were possible. Mucinous cystadenomas showed the largest mulilocular cystic masses with band like septal thickening and their each locule demonstrated different densities. Endometrial cysts showed uni- or bilocular cystic masses with thick wall. Dermoid cysts were characterized by the presence of fatty component. It was concluded that CT is very useful in the tissue characterization of the ovarian masses by specific CT findings. (author)

  1. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandan; J; Das; Usha; Thingujam; Ananya; Panda; Sanjay; Sharma; Arun; Kumar; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma(RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography(CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT(p CT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. p CT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using p CT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of p CT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs.

  2. Dose profile in computed tomography chest scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the optimization of the patient dose in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation only established the diagnostic reference levels (DRL's) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a parameter of quality control of CT scanners. Conformity to the DRL's can be verified by measuring the dose distribution in CT scans and MSAD determination. An analysis of the quality of CT scans of the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte is necessary by conducting pertinent tests to the study that are presented in the ANVISA (National Agency of Sanitary Vigilance) Guide. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 Rod) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow us to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (41,58±5,10) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL's. (author)

  3. Computed tomography findings in middle ear anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone was studied in 45 ears with a middle ear anomaly but whose tympanic membranes were normal. The plane of the film was 30 degrees oblique to the orbito-meatal line. Four otorhinolaryngologists made radiological diagnoses of the CT film without having any information about the patients. CT films of 40 normal ears were also evaluated and served as controls. The incudo-stapedial joint (I-S joint) and the stapes were visualized in all control group subjects. The percentage of correct diagnoses was 77.8% for separation of the I-S joint, and 75.6% for fixation of the stapes. The monopedal stapes was not visualized. Fixation of the malleus and the incus could not be diagnosed correctly. Abnormalities in the location of the facial nerve were visualized in a few ears. CT of the temporal bone was clinically useful for differentiating I-S joint separation and fixation of the stapes. (author)

  4. Computed tomography of the alveolar bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the conventional radiological methods used in odontology, computed tomography (CT) provides superposition-free images of the mandible and maxilla. Its value has been proved not only in cases of malignancy but also in many other problems. If an examination is performed with a slice thickness of less than 1.5 mm, the form and position of retained teeth in the alveolar bone, as well as subsequent lesions of neighboring permanent teeth, can be visualized so that early treatment can be planned. If the parodontal space of a retained tooth is visible, orthodontic intervention is possible. Precise assessment of horizontal or vertical bone loss is essential in inflammatory dental diseases. The morphology and extent of benign cystic lesions are also shown by CT. With CT surgical strategy of an intended implant therapy can take into account the remaining bone substance and the exact position of nerves and foramina. If such therapy is possible, the location, form and number of implants are easily defined. (orig.)

  5. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the western world. Adenomatous colorectal polyps, which are found in 30-50% of Americans more than 50 years old, are recognized as important precursors of malignancy. Probably most of the invasive colon carcinomas arise from polyps. For this reason an early detection of these polyps and their complete removal is a recognized strategy for the prevention of colon cancer. So far no single method for an early diagnois of colon polyps or colon cancer offers high sensitivity and specificity along with low cost and good patient accccf Endo-opic colonoscopy allows the accurate detection of very small lesions and has since almost completely replaced fluooscopy. Cross-sectional imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), are increasingly being considered imaging modalities for the detection of colorectal polyps. CT and MR colonography are new techniques for imaging of the colon. In symptomatic patients, these new techniques show promising results for the detection of polyps equal to or larger than 1 cm in diameter. (author)

  6. Computed tomography experiments of Pantex high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D. E.; Martz, H. E.; Hester, L. O.; Sobczak, G.; Pratt, C. L.

    1992-04-01

    X-ray computed tomography is an advanced imaging technique which provide three-dimensional nondestructive characterization of materials, components and assemblies. The CT Project group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Pantex Plant are cooperating to examine the use of CT technology to inspect and characterize high-explosives pressings (e.g., PBX-9502, LX-10-2). High-explosives pressings manufactured by Pantex must be characterized prior to assembling into weapons systems; a nondestructive examination of all assembly parts would be preferable to the current sampling and destructive testing. The earlier in the processing cycle this can be done the more cost effective it will be. We have performed experiments that show that this characterization can be performed at the pressed billet stage using CT. We have detected 2-mm inclusions in a 15-cm diameter billet and 3.5-mm voids in a 20-cm diameter billet. Based on these results we show calculations that can be used to design production CT systems for characterization of high-explosives.

  7. Nano-computed tomography. Technique and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT) is an emerging, high-resolution cross-sectional imaging technique and represents a technical advancement of the established micro-CT technology. Based on the application of a transmission target X-ray tube, the focal spot size can be decreased down to diameters less than 400 nanometers (nm). Together with specific detectors and examination protocols, a superior spatial resolution up to 400 nm (10 % MTF) can be achieved, thereby exceeding the resolution capacity of typical micro-CT systems. The technical concept of nano-CT imaging as well as the basics of specimen preparation are demonstrated exemplarily. Characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques (intraplaque hemorrhage and calcifications) in a murine model of atherosclerosis (ApoE(-/-)/LDLR(-/-) double knockout mouse) are demonstrated in the context of superior spatial resolution in comparison to micro-CT. Furthermore, this article presents the application of nano-CT for imaging cerebral microcirculation (murine), lung structures (porcine), and trabecular microstructure (ovine) in contrast to micro-CT imaging. This review shows the potential of nano-CT as a radiological method in biomedical basic research and discusses the application of experimental, high resolution CT techniques in consideration of other high resolution cross-sectional imaging techniques.

  8. Computed Tomography Findings in Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGN is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. Purpose: To review the computed tomography (CT findings of patients diagnosed with XGN. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of CT findings in patients with histologically proven XGN was carried out. Results: Thirteen CT examinations of 11 patients were analyzed. Renal enlargement was demonstrable on the affected side in all patients. Nine patients (82% had multiple dilated calyces and abnormal parenchyma. Six patients (55% had a renal pelvis or upper ureteric calculus causing obstruction. Three patients (27% had focal fat deposits identifiable within the inflamed renal parenchyma. Two patients had renal abscesses. Ten patients (91% had extrarenal extension of the inflammatory changes. Three patients (27% demonstrated extensive retroperitoneal inflammation. Conclusion: Unilateral renal enlargement and inflammation were the most consistent findings of XGN on CT. Perinephric inflammation and collections or abscess should also alert the radiologist to the possibility of this diagnosis.

  9. Dynamic X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper Dynamic computed tomography (CT) imaging aims at reconstructing image sequences where the dynamic nature of the living human body is of primary interest. Main concerned applications are image-guided interventional procedures, functional studies and cardiac imaging. The introduction of ultra-fast rotating gantries along with multi-row detectors and in near future area detectors allows a huge progress toward the imaging of moving organs with low-contrast resolution. This paper gives an overview of the different concepts used in dynamic CT. A new reconstruction algorithm based on a voxel-specific dynamic evolution compensation is also presented. It provides four-dimensional image sequences with accurate spatio-temporal information, where each frame is reconstructed using a long-scan acquisition mode on several half-turns. In the same time, this technique permits to reduce the dose delivered per rotation while keeping the same signal to noise ratio for every frame using an adaptive motion-compensated temporal averaging. Results are illustrated on simulated data. (authors)

  10. Relevance of computed tomography in gynecological tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, J.R.; Hagemann, J.

    1983-11-01

    1. Abdominal CT examination is the method of choice when examining ovarial tumours. 2. Abdominal CT is redundant in the early stages of carcinoma of the collum and if the carcinoma has penetrated into the vagina. 3. In advanced stages of carcinoma of the collum, CT enables accurate staging. CT is at least equal in relevance to gynecological examination in respect of assessment of parametraneous infiltration. Distant metastases, as well as complications of the efferent urinary tract can be visualized. In view of this, the following procedure appears meaningful in advanced carcinoma of the collum: First of all, gynecological examination is performed without anaesthesia to confirm the findings in the regions of the portio and vagina; as far as possible, the existence of the central parametraneous infiltrations is confirmed. For the purpose of further staging of the parametraneous infiltration, as well as of the paraaortal lymphomas and possible metastases, as well as for the purpose of excluding hydronephrosis, computed tomography is performed. This avoids burdening the patient with an examination under anaesthesia, and it also avoids invasive examination methods, such as urography and lymphography.

  11. Relevance of computed tomography in gynaecological tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Abdominal CT examination is the method of choice when examining ovarial tumours. 2. Abdominal CT is redundant in the early stages of carcinoma of the collum and if the carcinoma has penetrated into the vagina. 3. In advanced stages of carcinoma of the collum, CT enables accurate staging. CT is at least equal in relevance to gynaecological examination in respect of assessment of parametraneous infiltration. Distant metastases, as well as complications of the efferent urinary tract can be visualized. In view of this, the following procedure appears meaningful in advanced carcinoma of the collum: First of all, gynaecological examination is performed without anaesthesia to confirm the findings in the regions of the portio and vagina; as far as possible, the existence of the central parametraneous infiltrations is confirmed. For the purpose of further staging of the parametraneous infiltration, as well as of the paraaortal lymphomas and possible metastases, as well as for the purpose of excluding hydronephrosis, computed tomography is performed. This avoids burdening the patient with an examination under anaesthesia, and it also avoids invasive examination methods, such as urography and lymphography. (orig.)

  12. Variations in measured computed tomography number values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) scans of a water phantom have been performed on a number of different CT scanners, and variations in the measured mean pixel value for a central region have been observed. In addition, a positional variation of mean CT number was noted. In particular, the head rest on an EMI CT1010 scanner had a significant effect on the pixel values. To simulate head scanning, a phantom with a Teflon annulus surrounding a water bath was used. This annulus affected both the mean and standard deviation of the pixels in a central area of the scan. Both an mAS and beam width dependence on CT numbers was noted. The effect of calibration on the measured CT numbers for each reconstruction filter was examined on one machine. The variation of CT number with reconstruction matrix and compensation filter was also investigated. These measurements suggest caution must be exercised when interpreting actual CT number values. This will be particularly relevant when the numbers are used to differentiate between tissue types for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. (author)

  13. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functional state of organs can be imaged by their accumulation of single photon emitter like 99mTc (γ-ray energy 140 keV), 201Tl (73 keV) and 201I (159 keV) with computed tomography. The emitted γ-ray is collimated to reach the NaI (Tl) detector for specifying its direction, which is called as the scintillation camera or gamma camera. The camera rotating around the patient gives the SPECT images. The NaI (Tl) detector is suitable for converting 60-300 keV γ-ray to fluorescence through the photoelectric effect. Photomultiplier receiving the fluorescence outputs X/Y signals for the emitting position and Z signal (energy) separately, giving imaging data. 3D images can be re-constructed by either method of the filtered back projection or maximum likelihood-expectation maximization. For quantitative reconstruction, correction of γ-ray absorption in water, of scattering and of collimator opening is necessary. Recently, semiconductor-detectors like CdZnTe and CdTe are being utilized in place of NaI for better resolution, which will reduce the size of the camera. Further, a camera with coincidence circuit for positron has appeared and will be applicable for both SPECT and PET. Compton camera having 2-step detectors without collimator is now under development. (N.I.)

  14. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  15. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy diagnosed with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rupture of ectopic pregnancy (EP) still remains the primary and direct cause of death in the first trimester of pregnancy. Ultrasonography is known to be a modality of choice in EP diagnostics. We found a severe discrepancy between the frequency of ectopic pregnancies (EP) and the number of available computed tomography (CT) examinations. A 29-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a history of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and collapse. Sonographic findings of a suspected EP were unclear. Moreover, not all features of intrauterine pregnancy were present. Due to the patient’s life-threatening condition, an emergency multi-slice CT with MPR and VRT reconstructions was performed, revealing symptoms of a ruptured EP. In the right adnexal area, a well-vascularized, solid-cystic abnormal mass lesion was found. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was confirmed intraoperatively, and the right fallopian tube with a tubal EP was resected. In the surgery in situ, as well as in the pathological examination of the tumor mass, a human embryo of approximately 1.5 cm in length (beginning of the 8th week of gestation) was found. Although ultrasonography still remains the first-line imaging examination in EP diagnostics, sometimes the findings of suspected EPs are unclear and not sufficient. The rupture of EP, with serious bleeding and symptoms of shock, may require an emergent pelvic and abdominal CT inspection. A clear correlation was found between the macroscopic CT images and the intraoperatively sampled material

  16. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed

  17. Patient doses for computed tomography in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest initiative of the National Patient Dose Evaluation Program was an overall evaluation of patient doses for computed tomography. The aim of the survey was to collect data from which the patient doses of the CT examination of different body parts can be estimated and the most important technical parameters affecting on the patient exposures can be evaluated. The 54 CT scanners in clinical use in Hungary can be categorized into 31 different models from 8 manufacturers. Per caput frequency for CT is about 62.3 examinations per 1000 inhabitants. 59% of all examinations are connected to the head imaging. The highest mean effective dose arising from the chest and pelvis examinations, 6.98 mSv and 6.64 mSv, respectively. The yearly collective effective dose has been estimated at about 1700 manSv. This total dose is as much as the figure of 1785 manSv previously assessed for photofluorography applied in mass chest screening in Hungary. (author)

  18. Computed tomography with selectable image resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computed tomography system x-ray detector has a central group of half-width detector elements and groups of full-width elements on each side of the central group. To obtain x-ray attenuation data for whole body layers, the half-width elements are switched effectively into paralleled pairs so all elements act like full-width elements and an image of normal resolution is obtained. For narrower head layers, the elements in the central group are used as half-width elements so resolution which is twice as great as normal is obtained. The central group is also used in the half-width mode and the outside groups are used in the full-width mode to obtain a high resolution image of a body zone within a full body layer. In one embodiment data signals from the detector are switched by electronic multiplexing and in another embodiment a processor chooses the signals for the various kinds of images that are to be reconstructed. (author)

  19. Computed tomography guidance. Fluoroscopy and more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are competitive imaging modalities for the guidance of needle-based interventions, computed tomography (CT) is the only modality suitable for image-guided interventions in all regions of the body, including the lungs and bone. The ongoing technical development of CT involves accelerated image acquisition, significantly improved spatial resolution, CT scanners with an extended gantry diameter, acceleration of the procedure through joystick control of relevant functions of interventional CT by the interventional radiologist and tube current modulation to protect the hands of the examiner and radiosensitive organs of the patient. CT fluoroscopy can be used as a real-time method (the intervention is monitored under continuous CT fluoroscopy) or as a quick check method (repeated acquisitions of individual CT fluoroscopic images after each change of needle or table position). For the two approaches, multislice CT fluoroscopy (MSCTF) technique with wide detectors is particularly useful because even in the case of needle deviation from the center slice the needle tip is simultaneously visualised in the neighboring slices. With the aid of this technique a precise placement of interventional devices is possible even in angled access routes and in the presence of pronounced respiratory organ movements. As the reduction of CT fluoroscopy time significantly reduces radiation exposure for the patient and staff, the combination of a quick check technique and a low milliampere technique with multislice CT fluoroscopy devices is advantageous. (orig.)

  20. Brain tumor imaging using small-angle x-ray scattering tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Torben H.; Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; Thomsen, Maria; Menzel, Andreas; Bouchet, Audrey; Le Duc, Géraldine; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution small-angle x-ray scattering computed tomography (SAXS-CT) of soft matter and soft tissue samples. Complete SAXS patterns over extended ranges of momentum transfer are reconstructed spatially resolved from volumes inside an extended sample. Several SAXS standard samples are used to quantitatively validate the method and demonstrate its performance. Further results on biomedical tissue samples (rat brains) are presented that demonstrate the advantages of the method compared to existing biomedical x-ray imaging approaches. Functional areas of the brains as well as tumor morphology are imaged. By providing insights into the structural organization at the nano-level, SAXS-CT complements and extends results obtainable with standard methods such as x-ray absorption tomography and histology.

  1. Brain architecture: a design for natural computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Marcus

    2007-12-15

    Fifty years ago, John von Neumann compared the architecture of the brain with that of the computers he invented and which are still in use today. In those days, the organization of computers was based on concepts of brain organization. Here, we give an update on current results on the global organization of neural systems. For neural systems, we outline how the spatial and topological architecture of neuronal and cortical networks facilitates robustness against failures, fast processing and balanced network activation. Finally, we discuss mechanisms of self-organization for such architectures. After all, the organization of the brain might again inspire computer architecture. PMID:17855223

  2. Evolution of Computed Tomography Findings in Secondary Aortoenteric Fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortoenteric fistula is a rare but significant clinical entity associated with high morbidity and mortality if remain untreated. Clinical presentation and imaging findings may be subtle and prompt diagnosis can be difficult. Herein, we present a patient who initially presented with abdominal pain and computed tomography showed an aortic aneurysm compressing duodenum without any air bubbles. One month later, the patient presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and computed tomography revealed air bubbles within aneurysm. With a diagnosis of aortoenteric fistula, endovascular aneurysm repair was carried out. This case uniquely presented the computed tomography findings in progression of an aneurysm to an aortoenteric fistula

  3. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  4. Computed tomography of the llama head: technique and normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography was performed on the head of 6 normal adult llamas. The animals were under general anesthesia and positioned in dorsal recumbency on the scanning table. The area scanned was from the external occipital protuberance to the rostral portion of the nasal passage, and the images are presented in both a bone window and a soft tissue window to allow evaluation and identification of the anatomy of the head. Computed tomography of the llama head can be accomplished by most computed tomography scanners utilizing a technique similar to that used in small animals with minor modification of the scanning table

  5. Diagnosis of hoof disease in horses using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Milomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes findings of computed tomography investigations at the Bergische Equine Clinic (Germany of 39 horses with hoof diseaseas. The most frequently findings were the navicular syndrome (eight horses, laminitis (seven horses, keratnoma (six horses and ossification of collateral cartilages in the distal phalanx (four horses. The special value of the computed tomography is in evaluating the size and courses fracture/fissure of the navicular and koffin bones, which were diagnose in five horses. In four of horses no pathologic changes of the hoof were determined by computed tomography.

  6. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tania Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanes, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mario Flores, E-mail: marlivermelho@globo.com [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (IIER), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  7. Diagnosis of sacral perineural cysts by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas, J H; Deeb, Z L

    1986-07-01

    Three cases of sacral perineural cysts associated with chronic low-back pain are described with their myelography, computed tomography, and plain film findings. Significant findings include multiple cystic dilatations of lumbosacral nerve root sheaths, enlargement of the sacral foramina by masses isodense with cerebrospinal fluid, and asymmetric epidural fat distribution. Recognition of these findings on unenhanced computed tomography scans should preclude further evaluation by myelography and intrathecal metrizamide (Amipaque) computed tomography. These cysts are usually not the primary cause of back and leg pain. PMID:2942338

  8. Diagnosis of hoof diseases in horses using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes findings of computed tomography investigations at the Bergische Equine Clinic (Bergische Tierklinik), Germany, of 39 horses with hoof diseases. The most frequently findings were the navicular syndrome (eight horses), laminitis (seven horses), keratnoma (six horses) and ossification of collateral cartilages in the distal phalanx (four horses). The special value of the computed tomography is in evaluating the size and courses fracture/fissure of the navicular and koffin bones, which were diagnose in five horses. In four of horses no pathologic changes of the hoof were determined by computed tomography

  9. Ability of Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1, and S100B To Differentiate Normal and Abnormal Head Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Suspected Mild or Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Robert D; Ayaz, Syed I; Lewis, Lawrence M; Unden, Johan; Chen, James Y; Mika, Valerie H; Saville, Ben; Tyndall, Joseph A; Nash, Marshall; Buki, Andras; Barzo, Pal; Hack, Dallas; Tortella, Frank C; Schmid, Kara; Hayes, Ronald L; Vossough, Arastoo; Sweriduk, Stephen T; Bazarian, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-15

    Head computed tomography (CT) imaging is still a commonly obtained diagnostic test for patients with minor head injury despite availability of clinical decision rules to guide imaging use and recommendations to reduce radiation exposure resulting from unnecessary imaging. This prospective multicenter observational study of 251 patients with suspected mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) evaluated three serum biomarkers' (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1] and S100B measured within 6 h of injury) ability to differentiate CT negative and CT positive findings. Of the 251 patients, 60.2% were male and 225 (89.6%) had a presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. A positive head CT (intracranial injury) was found in 36 (14.3%). UCH-L1 was 100% sensitive and 39% specific at a cutoff value >40 pg/mL. To retain 100% sensitivity, GFAP was 0% specific (cutoff value 0 pg/mL) and S100B had a specificity of only 2% (cutoff value 30 pg/mL). All three biomarkers had similar values for areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve: 0.79 (95% confidence interval; 0.70-0.88) for GFAP, 0.80 (0.71-0.89) for UCH-L1, and 0.75 (0.65-0.85) for S100B. Neither GFAP nor UCH-L1 curve values differed significantly from S100B (p = 0.21 and p = 0.77, respectively). In our patient cohort, UCH-L1 outperformed GFAP and S100B when the goal was to reduce CT use without sacrificing sensitivity. UCH-L1 values <40 pg/mL could potentially have aided in eliminating 83 of the 215 negative CT scans. These results require replication in other studies before the test is used in actual clinical practice. PMID:26467555

  10. What does the psychiatrist expect of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the author's opinion computed tomography should be applied as an instrument of basic research also in psychiatry. The problem of standardisation is, for the time being, not yet sufficiently solved. Wrong judgements on the cerebral cortex resulting from wrongly positive findings occur frequently. For re-handling the topic 'brain atrophy and psychosyndrome', which is important for clinical psychiatry, the CT-results should be compared with the findings obtained in the preceding systematical pneumoencephalographical-clinical correlation examinations. The excellent possibilities provided by the new method for practical diagnostics and research must be utilized with critical appreciation of the experience gained until now. If groups of examining of capacities closely co-operate over a long-term period, there may be some chances to bring some questions still open and unresolved closer to their solution and, maybe, even to finish the scientific handling of the complex of questions on 'brain atrophic and psychopathological finding' with radiological-morphological methods. (orig./MG)

  11. Computed tomography (CT) cisternography in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of 88 cases of so-called normal-pressure hydrocephalus by means of Metrizamide CT cisternography (CTC) and other special investigations, such as continuous intracranial pressure monitoring, computed tomography, and the intrathecal constant saline infusion test, revealed good correlation between CTC types, into which the present authors classified the results according to the grade of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamic pathology, and clinical improvement after shunting. Patients showing Type III-b, Type IV, and Type V in CTC responded well to CSF shunting: Type III-b is characterized by a presistent 24-hr ventricular and convexity stasis and by a convexity flow more prominent than ventriicular filling, while in Type IV the convexity flow and the ventricular filling of the contrast media take place simultaneously and to about the same degree. The characteristic CT cisternography findings of Type V were the more prominent entry of the contrast medium into the ventricular system than into the subarachnoid space, and the persistent ventricular filling of metrizamide at 24-hr. In cases of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, the prognosis was favorable when Type III-b, IV, or V was observed in CTC, in the absence of brain atrophy or in the presence of a marked dilatation of the ventricles on plain CT. The presence of abnormal pressure waves in the continuous monitoring of the CSF pressure and periventricular lucency and the absence of brain atrophy on CT were good prognostic criteria, even in patients showing Type III in CTC. (author)

  12. Computed tomography in the management of cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The radiological technique of computed tomography (CT) used in neurological diagnosis of vascular diseases of the brain is explained, and its application to specific clinical situations is described. Cerebral infarcts of varying ages can be visualized, with a recent ischemic infarct appearing as a region of decreased density. Hemorrhagic infarcts in acute and subacture stages also can be visualized, and the advantage to the patient is that the procedure is virtually without risk. CT is the procedure of choice in confirming a diagnosis of hemorrhage into the brain parenchyma or into the ventricular system. Hematomas not readily detectable by conventional angiography may be demonstrated by CT, particularly if they are large. Cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations cannot be detected by CT unless calcification or clotted blood is present. However, several radiologists have noted enhancement of the diagnostic capability for both neoplasms and vascular lesions such as aneurysms and AV malformations, when an intravenous infusion of angiographic contrast material is started prior to the scan. It is noted that considerable technical skill is required to keep CT equipment operating properly, and photographs of scans may be made a part of the patients's clinical record. An attachment to this document corrects an error on a previous technical assistance memorandum. (GRA)

  13. Hyperperfusion on Perfusion Computed Tomography Following Revascularization for Acute Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the findings of hyperperfusion on perfusion computed tomography (CT) in four patients following revascularization for acute stroke. Material and Methods: In 2002-2003, among a series of 6 patients presenting with an acute stroke and treated with intra-arterial thrombolysis, we observed the presence of hyperperfusion in 3 patients on the follow-up CT perfusion. We included an additional patient who was treated with intravenous thrombolysis and who had hyperperfusion on the follow-up CT perfusion. We retrospectively analyzed their CT perfusion maps. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were compared between the affected territory and the normal contralateral hemisphere. Results: In the four patients, the mean CBV and CBF were 3.6±2.0 ml/100 g and 39±25 ml/100 g/min in the affected territory compared to the normal side (mean CBV 2.7±2.1 ml/100 g, mean CBF = 27±23 ml/100 g/min). There was no intracranial hemorrhage in the hyperperfused territories. At follow-up CT, some hyperperfused brain areas progressed to infarction, while others retained normal white to gray matter differentiation. Conclusion: CT perfusion can demonstrate hyperperfusion, which can be seen in an ischemic brain territory following recanalization

  14. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Sanders, J. [Albuquerque VA Medical Center, NM (US); Belliveau, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  15. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groen, J M; Kofoed, K F; Zacho, M;

    2013-01-01

    Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which...

  16. Computed tomographic imaging of the brain of normal neonatal foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide a more complete description of normal cross-sectional anatomy of the neonatal brain of the foal and associated structures by computed tomography (CT and gross anatomical sections. Using a fourth-generation CT scanner, 2-mm contiguous transverse images were acquired from two neonatal 5-days-old Quarter horse foals. After the study the animals were euthanised for reasons unrelated to head pathology. To assist in the accurate identification of brain and associated structures, transverse CT images were obtained and compared with the corresponding frozen cross-sections of the head. CT images matched well with their corresponding transverse gross sections and provided good differentiation between the bones and the soft tissues of the head. These CT images are intended to be a useful initial anatomic reference in the interpretation for clinical CT imaging studies of the brain and associated structures in live neonatal foals.

  17. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in evaluation of residual intramuscular myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a rare benign neoplasm. In a patient diagnosed with IM of left thigh, we report the utility of a postoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in assessing the efficacy of surgical excision

  19. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  20. The brain-computer interface cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, M. van; Farquhar, J.D.R.; Schaefer, R.S.; Vlek, R.J.; Geuze, J.; Nijholt, A.; Ramsey, N.F.; Haselager, W.F.G.; Vuurpijl, L.G.; Gielen, S.C.A.M.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have attracted much attention recently, triggered by new scientific progress in understanding brain function and by impressive applications. The aim of this review is to give ail overview of the various steps in the BCI cycle, i.e., the loop from the measurement of b