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Sample records for brain computed tomography

  1. Reconstructing cetacean brain evolution using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Uhen, Mark D; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Frohlich, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    Until recently, there have been relatively few studies of brain mass and morphology in fossil cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) because of difficulty accessing the matrix that fills the endocranial cavity of fossil cetacean skulls. As a result, our knowledge about cetacean brain evolution has been quite limited. By applying the noninvasive technique of computed tomography (CT) to visualize, measure, and reconstruct the endocranial morphology of fossil cetacean skulls, we can gain vastly more information at an unprecedented rate about cetacean brain evolution. Here, we discuss our method and demonstrate it with several examples from our fossil cetacean database. This approach will provide new insights into the little-known evolutionary history of cetacean brain evolution.

  2. Brain computed tomography of the hypertensive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, W. K.; Park, C. K.; Cho, O. K.; Hahm, C. K. [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Now a day, hypertension is more increasing in frequency and ranked the top of the causes of death in Korea and other nations. Most of cerebrovascular accidents in hypertensive patients are composed of vascular occlusive changes and hemorrhages. In cerebral angiogram, we can only detect occlusion of large artery and large mass effect from hematoma or cerebral infarction without identification of its entity. The computed tomogram, however, is the best way for evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. This study includes evaluation of computed tomograms of 106 patients with hypertension during the period of 17 months from Feb. 1979 to June 1980 in the department of radiology, college of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 106 patients was broad ranging from 25 years to 76 years. 67.9% of patients were over the age of 50. The male and female sex ratio was 3:2. 2. 28 out of 106 patients were normal and 78 patients revealed abnormal on C. T. findings; those were intracranial hemorrhage (35 patients), cerebral infarction (32 patients) and brain atrophy (11 patients). 3. All of the intracranial hemorrhage except one were intracerebral hemorrhage; those were located in the cerebral hemisphere (19 patients), basal ganglia (15 patients) and brain stem (1 patient). The except one case of intracranial hemorrhage was subdural hematoma. 7 patients of intraventricular hemorrhage and 1 patient of subarachnoid hemorrhage were combined with intracerebral hemorrhage. 2/3 of patients who had hemorrhage in cerebral hemisphere revealed lesions in the parietal and temporal lobes. 4. In cases of cerebral infarction, the cerebral hemisphere was most common site of lesion (20 cases), and the next was basal ganglia (11 cases). Most of the infarcts in cerebral hemisphere were located in the parietal and temporal lobes. The left basal ganglia was more commonly involved

  3. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Manni, Carlo; Santoni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomic imaging procedures (computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) have become essential tools for brain tumor assessment. Functional images (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) can provide additional information useful during the diagnostic workup to determine the degree of malignancy and as a substitute or guide for biopsy. After surgery and/or radiotherapy, nuclear medicine examinations are essential to assess persistence of tumor, to differentiate recurrence from radiation necrosis and gliosis, and to monitor the disease. The combination of functional images with anatomic ones is of the utmost importance for a full evaluation of these patients, which can be obtained by means of imaging fusion. Despite the fast-growing diffusion of PET, in most cases of brain tumors, SPECT studies are adequate and provide results that parallel those obtained with PET. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with brain tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is the lack of precise anatomic details; this drawback is overcome by the fusion with morphological studies that provide an anatomic map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or MRI demonstrated usefulness for brain tumor assessment, but this process is often time consuming and not practical for everyday nuclear medicine studies. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which allow the acquisition of SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, and their co-registration by means of the hardware, has facilitated this process. In SPECT studies of brain tumors with various radiopharmaceuticals, fused images are helpful in providing the precise localization of neoplastic lesions, and in excluding the disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. This information is useful for optimizing diagnosis, therapy monitoring, and radiotherapy treatment planning, with a

  4. CENTRAL ASSESSMENT OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY BRAIN SCANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Ann Cala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of multislice CT (MSCT scanners since 1998 has resulted in submillimetre thick slices being able to be acquired, without increasing the radiation dose to the patient. Although the incident x-ray beam is widened in the slice thickness direction (Z-direction, the emergent x-rays fall upon multiple rows of small detectors. This means data can be collected simultaneously for more than one slice per rotation of the x-ray tube. For example, the dose received by the patient will be the same for four thin slices of 2.5 mm, as for one slice of 10 mm thickness. A 64-slice MSCT can create 0.625 mm thick slices. This leads to high diagnostic value in the detection of small abnormalities in stroke patients and in the reconstruction of data from CT angiography (CTA of the brain.

  5. Quality Criteria Implementation for Brain Computed Tomography Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzado, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Munoz, A

    1998-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to implement the quality criteria proposed by the European Commission for brain computed tomography (CT) examinations. The proposed criteria were evaluated for 102 brain CT examinations, with a special emphasis on the diagnostic and radiation dose requirements. The examinations were selected at random from brain examinations performed over a period of a month at eight scanners of the CT Pace range. Achievement of image criteria was evaluated by two independent observers. The most important preliminary findings concerning image criteria fulfilment or lack of it and disagreements between observers are presented and discussed. The mean values of the proposed dosimetric quantities are compared to the reference values. The examinations performed with and without injection of a contrast agent are also analysed in relation to dosimetric quantities and criteria fulfilment. (author)

  6. Cysticercosis of the brain. The value of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida-Pinto, J.; Veiga-Pires, J.A.; Stocker, A.; Coelho, T.; Monteiro, L.

    Incidence and radiologic findings of neurocysticercosis were investigated in a series of 23 800 consecutive head examinations using computed tomography (CT). The condition was diagnosed in 168 case (0.7%). The parenchymatous form was the most common presentation (96.3%), while the meningeal form corresponded to only 11.9% of cases. These two forms coexisted in some cases. These findings reversed the knowledge on the condition based on conventional radiography. The different CT appearances in the brain are described and a new radiologic protocol for the CT evaluation of the condition is advocated, which includes a follow-up after a trial cure with Praziquantel in the presence of cysts not associated with suggestive brain calcifications. CT were more sensitive than conventional radiography in the differentiation between dead and living larvae, thus having an impact on the therapeutic management of the patients.

  7. Brain perfusion: computed tomography and magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copen, William A; Lev, Michael H; Rapalino, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion imaging provides assessment of regional microvascular hemodynamics in the living brain, enabling in vivo measurement of a variety of different hemodynamic parameters. Perfusion imaging techniques that are used in the clinical setting usually rely upon X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This chapter reviews CT- and MRI-based perfusion imaging techniques, with attention to image acquisition, clinically relevant aspects of image postprocessing, and fundamental differences between CT- and MRI-based techniques. Correlations with cerebrovascular physiology and potential clinical applications of perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing upon the two major classes of neurologic disease in which perfusion imaging is most often performed: primary perfusion disorders (including ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and reperfusion syndrome), and brain tumors. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. (Free Universities of Brussels (Belgium))

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  9. Computed tomography of the brain in kwashiorkor: a follow up study.

    OpenAIRE

    Househam, K C

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain was performed initially and after nutritional rehabilitation on 12 children with kwashiorkor. The severe cerebral shrinkage evident initially resolved after nutritional rehabilitation. The mechanism and significance of this reversible abnormality remains to be determined.

  10. Evaluating the microstructure of human brain tissues using synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Georg; Morel, Anne; Imholz, Martha S.; Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Pfeiffer, Franz; David, Christian; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Minimally invasive deep brain neurosurgical interventions require a profound knowledge of the morphology of the human brain. Generic brain atlases are based on histology including multiple preparation steps during the sectioning and staining. In order to correct the distortions induced in the anisotropic, inhomogeneous soft matter and therefore improve the accuracy of brain atlases, a non-destructive 3D imaging technique with the required spatial and density resolution is of great significance. Micro computed tomography provides true micrometer resolution. The application to post mortem human brain, however, is questionable because the differences of the components concerning X-ray absorption are weak. Therefore, magnetic resonance tomography has become the method of choice for three-dimensional imaging of human brain. Because the spatial resolution of this method is limited, an alternative has to be found for the three-dimensional imaging of cellular microstructures within the brain. Therefore, the present study relies on the synchrotron radiationbased micro computed tomography in the recently developed grating-based phase contrast mode. Using data acquired at the beamline ID 19 (ESRF, Grenoble, France) we demonstrate that grating-based tomography yields premium images of human thalamus, which can be used for the correction of histological distortions by 3D non-rigid registration.

  11. Value of Whole Brain Computed Tomography Perfusion for Predicting Outcome after TIA or Minor Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Wijngaard, Ido R.; Algra, Ale; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Wermer, Marieke J H; Van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction About 15% of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor ischemic stroke have functional impairment after 3 months. We studied the role of whole brain computed tomography perfusion (WB-CTP) in the emergency diagnosis of TIA or minor stroke in predicting disability at 3 months

  12. Evaluation of a 99Tcm bound brain scanning agent for single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A R; Hasselbalch, S G; Paulson, O B

    1986-01-01

    D,L HM-PAO-99Tcm (PAO) is a lipophilic tracer complex which is avidly taken up by the brain. We have compared the regional distribution of PAO with regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by Tomomatic 64 after 133Xe inhalation in 41...

  13. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Avsenik Jernej; Bisdas Sotirios; Popovic Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with patholog...

  15. Impact of Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) in the Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Vicenty, Irma L; Santiago-Sánchez, Michelaldemar; Vélez-Miró, Iván; Motta-Valencia, Keryl

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as damage to the brain resulting from an external force. TBI, a global leading cause of death and disability, is associated with serious social, economic, and health problems. In cases of mild-to-moderate brain damage, conventional anatomical imaging modalities may or may not detect the cascade of metabolic changes that have occurred or are occurring at the intracellular level. Functional nuclear medicine imaging and neurophysiological parameters can be used to characterize brain damage, as the former provides direct visualization of brain function, even in the absence of overt behavioral manifestations or anatomical findings. We report the case of a 30-year-old Hispanic male veteran who, after 2 traumatic brain injury events, developed cognitive and neuropsychological problems with no clear etiology in the presence of negative computed tomography (CT) findings.

  16. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/Computed Tomography for Primary Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind; Hess, Søren; Grupe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Structural imaging with computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging is the mainstay in primary diagnosis of primary brain tumors, but these modalities depend on morphologic appearance and an intact blood-brain barrier, and important aspects of tumor biology are not addressed. Such issues may...... be alleviated by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and FDG-PET/CT imaging, which may provide clinically important information with regard to primary differentiation between tumor types, initial staging and risk stratification, therapy planning, response evaluation, and recurrence detection. This article...... describes some of the potential contemporary applications of FDG and PET in primary brain tumors....

  17. Brain neuroimaging of domestic cats: correlation between computed tomography and cross-sectional anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepomuceno, A.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Zanatta, R. [Universidade de Cuiaba, MT (Brazil); Chung, D.G.; Costa, P.F.; Feliciano, M.A.R.; Avante, M.L.; Canola, J.C., E-mail: marcusfeliciano@yahoo.com.br [Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil); Lopes, L.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Computed tomography of the brain is necessary as part of the diagnosis of lesions of the central nervous system. In this study we used six domestic cats, male or female, aged between one and five years, evaluated by Computed Tomography (CT) examination without clinical signs of central nervous system disorders. Two euthanized animals stating a condition unrelated to the nervous system were incorporated into this study. The proposal consisted in establishing detailed anatomical description of tomographic images of normal brain of cats, using as reference anatomical images of cross sections of the stained brain and cranial part, with thicknesses similar to the planes of the CT images. CT examinations were performed with and without intravenous iodinated contrast media for live animals. With one euthanized animal, the brain was removed and immediately preserved in 10% formalin for later achievement in cross-sectional thickness of approximately 4mm and staining technique of Barnard, and Robert Brown. The head of another animal was disarticulated in the Atlanto-occipital region and frozen at -20 deg C then sliced to a thickness of about 5mm. The description of visualized anatomical structures using tomography is useful as a guide and allows transcribing with relative accuracy the brain region affected by an injury, and thus correlating it with the clinical symptoms of the patient, providing additional information and consequent improvement to veterinarians during the course of surgical clinic in this species. (author)

  18. Brain neuroimaging of domestic cats: correlation between computed tomography and cross- sectional anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Nepomuceno

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Computed tomography of the brain is necessary as part of the diagnosis of lesions of the central nervous system. In this study we used six domestic cats, male or female, aged between one and five years, evaluated by Computed Tomography (CT examination without clinical signs of central nervous system disorders. Two euthanized animals stating a condition unrelated to the nervous system were incorporated into this study. The proposal consisted in establishing detailed anatomical description of tomographic images of normal brain of cats, using as reference anatomical images of cross sections of the stained brain and cranial part, with thicknesses similar to the planes of the CT images. CT examinations were performed with and without intravenous iodinated contrast media for live animals. With one euthanized animal, the brain was removed and immediately preserved in 10% formalin for later achievement in cross-sectional thickness of approximately 4mm and staining technique of Barnard, and Robert Brown. The head of another animal was disarticulated in the Atlanto-occipital region and frozen at -20ºC then sliced to a thickness of about 5mm. The description of visualized anatomical structures using tomography is useful as a guide and allows transcribing with relative accuracy the brain region affected by an injury, and thus correlating it with the clinical symptoms of the patient, providing additional information and consequent improvement to veterinarians during the course of surgical clinic in this species.

  19. Perfusion imaging with computed tomography: brain and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A. [Div. of Clinical and Lab. Investigation, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-10

    The availability of rapid imaging with multidetector CT systems and commercial analysis software has made perfusion imaging with CT an everyday technique, not only for the brain but also for other body organs. Perfusion imaging is usually performed as an adjunct to a conventional CT examination and is therefore particularly appropriate when a conventional CT is part of routine clinical protocols. The derived values are reproducible and have been validated against a range of reference techniques. Within neuroradiology, perfusion CT has attracted interest in the assessment of acute stroke but can also be used to assess secondary injury in head trauma and as an adjunct to CT angiography to evaluate cerebral spasm in subarachnoid haemorrhage. Within oncology, perfusion CT provides an imaging correlate for tumour vascularity that can be used to discriminate benign and malignant lesions, as an indicator of tumour aggressiveness, to reveal occult tumour and improve the delineation of tumours during radiotherapy planning, and as a functional assessment of tumour response to therapy. By exploiting the ability of CT systems to quantify contrast enhancement. CT perfusion imaging uses contrast media to assess vascular physiology and so improve diagnosis, prognosis, treatment selection and therapy monitoring. (orig.)

  20. [Brain changes in patients on chronic hemodialysis recorded by computed axial tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V; Penkova, S; Boneva, R; Kiuchukov, G

    1988-01-01

    The brain changes in patients with chronic renal failure treated by chronic hemodialysis were studied with the help of computed tomography. The results showed the development of internal hydrocephalus in the patients in whose treatment "hard" water was used. In some of these patients the hydrocephalus was accompanied by clinical manifestations of the "disequilibrium" syndrome and the "hard water" syndrome. The patients dialyzed with "soft" water showed no brain changes and clinical signs. Hydrocephalus is probably the main pathogenetic factor for the development of the "hard water" syndrome which later develops in dialysis encephalopathy.

  1. Analysis of computed X-ray tomography of the brain in incontinence patients with senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Machida, Toyohei; Oishi, Yukihiko (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Kamachi, Chikahumi; Okabe, Tsutomu; Akazawa, Kouhei; Takasaka, Satoshi

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the condition of incontinence in patients with senile dementia, we performed computed tomography X-rays to the brain and analyzed the relationship among the circulatory defect of the brain, the brain atrophy and the degree of incontinence. There were 92 patients subjected to this study who were hospitalised due to senile dementia; 74 patients had vascular dementia, 10 patients had senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and 8 patients had the mixed type. (age range: 54-95 years; mean: 80.3 years). The degree of incontinence in these patients varied as follows: 18 patients with continence, 16 patients with moderate incontinence, 58 patients with total incontinence. The diagnosis of circulatory defect of the brain was based on computed tomography observation of periventricular lucency (P.V.L.), and the degree of brain atrophy was evaluated based on 4 criteria: the Lateral body ratio, the Huckman number, the Evans ratio, and the enlargement of the subarachnoid space. Among the 92 patients, P.V.L. was present in 31 patients, among them 27 patients suffered from incontinence. There was a significant correlation between P.V.L. and incontinence (p<0.001). As the incontinence progressively worsened (Continence, Moderate incontinence, Total incontinence), the lateral body ratio increased to 24.8, 27.8, 28.6, (p<0.05). The Huckman number also increased to 18.3, 19.3, 21.3, (p<0.01), and the evans ratio likewise 29.9, 32.3, 33.7 (p<0.01). The enlargement of the subarachnoid space was also correlated with the severity of incontinence. We conclude that urinary incontinence originating from senile dememtia is connected to brain atrophy and is strongly influenced by the circulatory disorders of the brain. (author).

  2. Incidental Diagnosis of Cerebral Cortical Venous Thrombosis in Postdural Puncture Headache on Brain Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbertjean, Lisa; Ducrocq, Xavier; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Mione, Gioia; Richard, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of cerebral cortical venous thrombosis in patients with postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is usually secondary to changes in headache pattern or cerebral infarctions. Nevertheless, incidental discovery of asymptomatic forms on brain imaging has never been reported before and its management thus remains ill-defined. We describe 2 cases of patients with asymptomatic cortical vein thrombosis in the context of PDPH. In both cases, brain computed tomography (CT) scans showed an isolated cortical vein thrombosis without cerebral damage. Neurological examination revealed the typical orthostatic feature of PDPH, independently of cortical vein thrombosis which was considered as a radiological incidental finding. Clinical and radiological signs resolved after bed rest, oral caffeine, and anticoagulation therapy. Asymptomatic cortical vein thrombosis may be found on radiological exploration, even basic like brain CT scan without contrast, of PDPH. Utility of anticoagulation therapy, which could increase the risk of cerebral hemorrhagic complications in this specific context, has to be assessed.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  5. Racking the brain: Detection of cerebral edema on postmortem computed tomography compared with forensic autopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Nicole [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Schweitzer, Wolf; Ross, Steffen G.; Gascho, Dominic [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Ruder, Thomas D. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Freiburgstrasse, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Thali, Michael J. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.uzh.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, Virtopsy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Postmortem swelling of the brain is a typical finding on PMCT and occurs concomitant with potential antemortem or agonal brain edema. •Cerebral edema despite normal postmortem swelling is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebral tonsils on PMCT. •Cases with intoxication or asphyxia demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units) and a ratio >1.58 between the gray and white matter. •The Hounsfield measurements of the white and gray matter help to determine the cause of death in cases of intoxication or asphyxia. -- Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare postmortem computed tomography with forensic autopsy regarding their diagnostic reliability of differentiating between pre-existing cerebral edema and physiological postmortem brain swelling. Materials and methods: The study collective included a total of 109 cases (n = 109/200, 83 male, 26 female, mean age: 53.2 years) and were retrospectively evaluated for the following parameters (as related to the distinct age groups and causes of death): tonsillar herniation, the width of the outer and inner cerebrospinal fluid spaces and the radiodensity measurements (in Hounsfield Units) of the gray and white matter. The results were compared with the findings of subsequent autopsies as the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral edema. p-Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Cerebellar edema (despite normal postmortem swelling) can be reliably assessed using postmortem computed tomography and is indicated by narrowed temporal horns and symmetrical herniation of the cerebellar tonsils (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between intoxication (or asphyxia) and all other causes of death; the former causes demonstrated higher deviations of the attenuation between white and gray matter (>20 Hounsfield Units), and the gray to

  6. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Ohta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires’ disease.

  7. High resolution functional photoacoustic computed tomography of the mouse brain during electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Mohammad R. N.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is an emerging imaging technique which is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from tissue chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin. An important application of PACT is functional brain imaging of small animals. The conversion of light to acoustic waves allows PACT to provide high resolution images of cortical vasculatures through the intact scalp. Here, PACT was utilized to study the activated areas of the mouse brain during forepaw and hindpaw stimulations. Temporal PACT images were acquired enabling computation of hemodynamic changes during stimulation. The stimulations were performed by trains of pulses at different stimulation currents (between 0.1 to 2 mA) and pulse repetition rates (between 0.05 Hz to 0.01Hz). The response at somatosensory cortex-forelimb, and somatosensory cortex-hindlimb, were investigated. The Paxinos mouse brain atlas was used to confirm the activated regions. The study shows that PACT is a promising new technology that can be used to study brain functionality with high spatial resolution.

  8. Clinical study on eating disorders. Brain atrophy revealed by cranial computed tomography scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiwaki, Shinichi

    1988-06-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed in 34 patients with anorexia nervosa (Group I) and 22 with bulimia (Group II) to elucidate the cause and pathological significance of morphological brain alterations. The findings were compared with those from 47 normal women. The incidence of brain atrophy was significantly higher in Group I (17/34, 50%) and Group II (11/22, 50%) than the control group (3/47, 6%). In Group I, there was a significant increase in the left septum-caudate distance, the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure, the width of the both-side Sylvian fissures adjacent to the skull, and the maximum width of the third ventricle. A significant increase in the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure and the width of the left-side Sylvian fissure adjacent to the skull were noted as well in Group II. Ventricular brain ratios were significantly higher in Groups I and II than the control group (6.76 and 7.29 vs 4.55). Brain atrophy did not correlate with age, body weight, malnutrition, eating behavior, depression, thyroid function, EEG findings, or intelligence scale. In Group I, serum cortisol levels after the administration of dexamethasone were correlated with ventricular brain ratio. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs.

  9. The brain morphology of Homo Liujiang cranium fossil by three-dimensional computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XiuJie; LIU Wu; DONG Wei; QUE JieMin; WANG YanFang

    2008-01-01

    The Liujiang cranium is the most complete and well-preserved late Pleistocene human fossils ever unearthed in south China.Because the endocranial cavity is filled with hard stone matrix,earlier stud-ies focused only on the exterior morphology of the specimen using the traditional methods.In order to derive more information for the phyletic evaluation of the Liujiang cranium,high-resolution industrial computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the fossil,and the three-dimensional (3D) brain image was reconstructed.Compared with the endocasts of the hominin fossils (Hexian,Zhoukoudian,KNM-WT 15000,Sm 3,Kabwe,Brunn 3,Predmost) and modern Chinese,most morphological features of the Liujiang brain are in common with modern humans,including a round brain shape,bulged and wide frontal lobes,an enlarged brain height,a full orbital margin and long parietal lobes.A few differ-ences exist between Liujiang and the modern Chinese in our sample,including a strong posterior pro-jection of the occipital lobes,and a reduced cerebellar lobe.The measurement of the virtual endocast shows that the endocranial capacity of Liujiang is 1567 cc,which is in the range of Late Homo sapiens and much beyond the mean of modern humans.The brain morphology of Liujiang is assigned to Late Homo sapiens.

  10. Brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Anosmic Subjects Ater Closed Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Banan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anosmia following head trauma is relatively common and in many cases is persistent and irreversible. The ability to objectively measure such a decline in smelling, for both clinical and medicolegal goals, is very important. The aim of this study was to find results of brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT in anosmic subjects after closed head trauma. This case-control cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary referral University Hospital. The brain perfusion state of nineteen anosmic patients and thirteen normal controls was evaluated by means of the SPECT with 99mtc- ECD infusion- before and after olfactory stimulation. The orbitofrontal lobe of the brain was assumed as the region of interest and changes in perfusion of this area before and after the stimulations were compared in two groups. The mean of brain perfusion in controls before and after the stimulation was 8.26% ± 0.19% and 9.89% ± 0.54%, respectively (P < 0.0001. Among patients group, these quantities were 7.97% ± 1.05% and 8.49% ± 1.5%, respectively (P < 0.004. The difference between all the measures in cases and controls were statistically significant (P < 0.0001. There were no differences in age and sex between two groups. The brain SPECT is an objective technique suitable for evaluating anosmia following the head trauma and it may be used with other diagnostic modalities

  11. The prevalence of undiagnosed abnormalities on non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography compared to contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Minné

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even though magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the gold standard investigation for intracranial pathology, it is not widely available in developing countries and computed tomography (CT of the brain remains the first-line investigation for patients with suspected intracranial pathology. It is generally accepted that certain intracranial pathology can be missed on non-contrast-enhanced CT (NECT of the brain if a contrast-enhanced CT (CECT is not done. We have to consider on the one hand the risk of delayed or missed diagnosis and on the other hand the cost, increased radiation exposure and contrast-induced reactions. Advances in CT technology have also improved the resolution of CT scan images, making it easier to identify pathology on an NECT of the brain. To date, no study comparing NECT to CECT of the brain, utilising 64-slice CT technology, has been published.Objectives: To determine the prevalence of undiagnosed abnormalities on non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (NECT scans of the brain reported as normal, on a 64-slice CT scanner.Method: A descriptive retrospective study was undertaken of CT brain scans done during a 12-month period at a tertiary provincial hospital in the Northern Tshwane district of Gauteng, South Africa. The CT brain scans were evaluated by three reviewers (general radiologists. The NECT and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT scans of the brain were reviewed independently on separate occasions. Reviewers were blinded to patient history, each other’s interpretation, and to their own interpretation of the NECT when evaluating the CECT and vice versa. Discrepancies in interpretation were resolved during a consensus meeting between all three reviewers. The reviewers also re-evaluated the NECT scans of the cases with undiagnosed abnormal findings during this session. A decision was made pertaining to the visibility of the abnormal findings on the NECT scan.Results: In this study, 3.28% of cases

  12. Statistical parametric mapping in brain single photon computed emission tomography after carbon monoxide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N; Nohara, S; Matsuda, H; Sumiya, H; Noguchi, K; Shimizu, M; Tsuji, S; Kinuya, S; Shuke, N; Yokoyama, K; Seto, H

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess regional cerebral blood flow in patients after carbon monoxide intoxication by using brain single photon emission computed tomography and statistical parametric mapping. Eight patients with delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae and ten patients with no neuropsychiatric symptoms after carbon monoxide intoxication were studied with brain single photon emission tomography imaging with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime. Forty-four control subjects were also studied. We used the adjusted regional cerebral blood flow images in relative flow distribution (normalization of global cerebral blood flow for each subject to 50 ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) with proportional scaling) to compare these groups with statistical parametric mapping. Using this technique, significantly decreased regional cerebral blood flow was noted extensively in the bilateral frontal lobes as well as the bilateral insula and a part of the right temporal lobe in the patients with delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae as compared with normal volunteers (Pparametric mapping is a useful technique for highlighting differences in regional cerebral blood flow in patients following carbon monoxide intoxication as compared with normal volunteers. The selectively reduced blood flow noted in this investigation supports the contention that the decrease following carbon monoxide intoxication may be prolonged and further worsen in the frontal lobe. In addition, the present study may help to clarify the characteristics of the pathophysiological alteration underlying delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae.

  13. Treatment of bacterial brain abscess by repeated aspiration. Follow up by serial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takeo; Hirakawa, Katsuyuki; Kimura, Hideo; Tomonaga, Masamichi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-02-01

    Bacterial brain abscess often requires repeated aspiration before the abscess finally resolves. However, there are no guidelines for treatment by aspiration; for example, when should the abscess be tapped again, or when can an abscess be treated by antibiotics alone without further aspiration. Eleven patients with bacterial brain abscess treated by aspiration were evaluated to establish treatment guidelines for brain abscess, in particular the abscess size on serial computed tomography (CT) after aspiration. CT was performed about 24 hours after aspiration to evaluate the size of the abscess, and almost weekly during follow up. The diameter of the brain abscess before and after the initial and last aspirations were reviewed. In eight of the 11 patients, abscesses were aspirated repeatedly: two to three times in most patients. The diameter of the abscesses was 2.5-4.5 cm (mean 3.5 cm) before the last aspiration, and 1.4-3.4 cm (mean 2.3 cm) after the last aspiration, or when continuous drainage was discontinued. Perifocal edema was moderately decreased within 3 weeks after the last aspiration by medical treatment alone, with a concomitant decrease in the volume of the abscess. There were no deaths, and most patients had a favorable outcome. These results suggest that after the diameter of the abscess becomes less than 2 to 3 cm and does not increase anymore on serial CT, medical treatment alone can be anticipated to give satisfactory results without further aspiration. (author)

  14. Relationship between Carotid Computed Tomography Dual-Energy and Brain Leukoaraiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Luca; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Balestrieri, Antonella; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Suri, Jasjit S; Montisci, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if there is a correlation between the carotid computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield unit (HU)-based plaque attenuation values measured using dual-energy CT (DECT) scanner and brain leukoaraiosis (LA). Fifty consecutive patients (34 males, 16 females; mean age, 69 years; age range, 46-84 years) who underwent carotid CT and brain magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. CT examinations were performed with a DECT scanner, and LA lesion volume quantification was performed using a semiautomated segmentation technique. We found an inverse statistically significant correlation between the HU-based carotid artery plaque attenuation and the LA lesion volume. Because of the presence of calcified plaques, a second model was calculated at low kiloelectron volt levels from 66 to 100 and 100 kV by taking into consideration the fatty and mixed plaques, and this further led to the associations between HU-based attenuation and LA volume in brain and vascular territories. The results of our study suggest that the associations between HU attenuation of the carotid artery plaques (with the exclusion of calcified plaques) and the volume of LA are emphasized at low keV energy levels. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calculation of brain atrophy using computed tomography and a new atrophy measurement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Mikheev, Artem; Yang, Andrew Il; Samadani, Uzma; Rusinek, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine if brain atrophy can be calculated by performing volumetric analysis on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in spite of relatively low contrast for this modality. Materials & Method: CTs for 73 patients from the local Veteran Affairs database were selected. Exclusion criteria: AD, NPH, tumor, and alcohol abuse. Protocol: conventional clinical acquisition (Toshiba; helical, 120 kVp, X-ray tube current 300mA, slice thickness 3-5mm). Locally developed, automatic algorithm was used to segment intracranial cavity (ICC) using (a) white matter seed (b) constrained growth, limited by inner skull layer and (c) topological connectivity. ICC was further segmented into CSF and brain parenchyma using a threshold of 16 Hu. Results: Age distribution: 25-95yrs; (Mean 67+/-17.5yrs.). Significant correlation was found between age and CSF/ICC(r=0.695, patrophy among elderly VA patients is attributable to the presence of other comorbidities. Conclusion: Brain atrophy can be reliably calculated using automated software and conventional CT. Compared to MRI, CT is more widely available, cheaper, and less affected by head motion due to ~100 times shorter scan time. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the measurements, possibly leading to assessment of longitudinal changes within the patient.

  16. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy based on MRI only (MRI-only RT) shows a promising potential for the brain. Much research focuses on creating a pseudo computed tomography (pCT) from MRI for treatment planning while little attention is often paid to the treatment delivery. Here, we investigate if cone beam...

  17. Computed tomography and outcome in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: hematoma volume and midline shift revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, B.; Beems, T.; Vliet, T.M. van der; Diaz-Arrastia, R.R.; Borm, G.F.; Vos, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial lesion volume and midline shift are powerful outcome predictors in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and therefore they are used in TBI and computed tomography (CT) classification schemes, like the Traumatic Coma Data Bank (TCDB) classification. In this study we aimed to

  18. Automated Quantification of Stroke Damage on Brain Computed Tomography Scans: e-ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hampton-Till

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emergency radiological diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke requires the accurate detection and appropriate interpretation of relevant imaging findings. Non-contrast computed tomography (CT provides fast and low-cost assessment of the early signs of ischaemia and is the most widely used diagnostic modality for acute stroke. The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS is a quantitative and clinically validated method to measure the extent of ischaemic signs on brain CT scans. The CE-marked electronic-ASPECTS (e-ASPECTS software automates the ASPECTS score. Anglia Ruskin Clinical Trials Unit (ARCTU independently carried out a clinical investigation of the e-ASPECTS software, an automated scoring system which can be integrated into the diagnostic pathway of an acute ischaemic stroke patient, thereby assisting the physician with expert interpretation of the brain CT scan. Here we describe a literature review of the clinical importance of reliable assessment of early ischaemic signs on plain CT scans, and of technologies automating these processed scoring systems in ischaemic stroke on CT scans focusing on the e-ASPECTS software. To be suitable for critical appraisal in this evaluation, the published studies needed a sample size of a minimum of 10 cases. All randomised studies were screened and data deemed relevant to demonstration of performance of ASPECTS were appraised. The literature review focused on three domains: i interpretation of brain CT scans of stroke patients, ii the application of the ASPECTS score in ischaemic stroke, and iii automation of brain CT analysis. Finally, the appraised references are discussed in the context of the clinical impact of e-ASPECTS and the expected performance, which will be independently evaluated by a non-inferiority study conducted by the ARCTU.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  2. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  3. Accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance image fusion for assessing deep brain stimulation electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thani, Nova B; Bala, Arul; Swann, Gary B; Lind, Christopher R P

    2011-07-01

    Knowledge of the anatomic location of the deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode in the brain is essential in quality control and judicious selection of stimulation parameters. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to document the electrode location safely. The accuracy of this method, however, depends on many factors, including the quality of the source images, the area of signal artifact created by the DBS lead, and the fusion algorithm. To calculate the accuracy of determining the location of active contacts of the DBS electrode by coregistering postoperative CT image to intraoperative MRI. Intraoperative MRI with a surrogate marker (carbothane stylette) was digitally coregistered with postoperative CT with DBS electrodes in 8 consecutive patients. The location of the active contact of the DBS electrode was calculated in the stereotactic frame space, and the discrepancy between the 2 images was assessed. The carbothane stylette significantly reduces the signal void on the MRI to a mean diameter of 1.4 ± 0.1 mm. The discrepancy between the CT and MRI coregistration in assessing the active contact location of the DBS lead is 1.6 ± 0.2 mm, P Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) software. CT/MRI coregistration is an acceptable method of identifying the anatomic location of DBS electrode and active contacts.

  4. Computed tomography vs magnetic resonance imaging for identifying acute lesions in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Sandra D W; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Miller, Jeffrey; Youssfi, Mostafa; Brown, S Danielle; Dalton, Heidi J; Adelson, P David

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice to screen for brain injuries. MRI may provide more clinically relevant information. The purpose of this study was to compare lesion detection between CT and MRI after TBI. Retrospective cohort of children (0-21 years) with TBI between 2008 and 2010 at a Level 1 pediatric trauma center with a head CT scan on day of injury and a brain MRI scan within 2 weeks of injury. Agreement between CT and MRI was determined by κ statistic and stratified by injury mechanism. One hundred five children were studied. Of these, 78% had mild TBI. The MRI scan was obtained a median of 1 day (interquartile range, 1-2) after CT. Overall, CT and MRI demonstrated poor agreement (κ=-0.083; P=.18). MRI detected a greater number of intraparenchymal lesions (n=36; 34%) compared with CT (n=16; 15%) (P<.001). Among patients with abusive head trauma, MRI detected intraparenchymal lesions in 16 (43%), compared with only 4 (11%) lesions with CT (P=.03). Of 8 subjects with a normal CT scan, 6 out of 8 had abnormal lesions on MRI. Compared with CT, MRI identified significantly more intraparenchymal lesions in pediatric TBI, particularly in children with abusive head trauma. The prognostic value of identification of intraparenchymal lesions by MRI is unknown but warrants additional inquiry. Risks and benefits from early MRI (including sedation, time, and lack of radiation exposure) compared with CT should be weighed by clinicians. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. [Computed tomography as a tool to detect potential brain-dead donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelto-Rey, Jaume; Aldabó-Pallás, Teresa; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Vilches-Arenas, Ángel; Lara, Enrique Javier; Gordillo-Escobar, Elena

    2015-06-22

    To assess the ability of urgent head computed tomography (CT) scan screening to detect patients who can evolve to brain death (BD). Patients who underwent urgent head CT scan and meet the following criteria: midline shift greater than 5mm and/or decrease or absence of basal cisterns. A follow-up for 28 days of each patient was made. Epidemiological data (sex, age, cause of brain injury), clinical data (level of consciousness, severity index in the CT) and patient outcomes (death, BD, discharge or transfer) were recorded. This was a prospective observational study. One hundred and sixty-six patients were selected for study, with mean age 60.08 (SD 21.8) years. A percentage of 49.4 were men and the rest women. In the follow-up, 20,5% (n=34) had BD. In univariate analysis, intracerebral hemorrhage, Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 8 and alteration of basal cisterns were statistically significant in predicting BD (P<.05). Multivariate analysis showed that patients with compression of basal cisterns were 20 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.61 to 153.78; P=.004] times more likely to progress to brain death, while the absence there of 62.6 (95% CI 13.1 to 738.8; P<.001] times more. Our work shows that data as easy to interpret as compression/absence of basal cisterns can be a powerful tool for screening patients at risk for progression to BD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain Swelling and Loss of Gray and White Matter Differentiation in Human Postmortem Cases by Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Shirota

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brain by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT versus antemortem computed tomography (AMCT using brains from the same patients. We studied 36 nontraumatic subjects who underwent AMCT, PMCT, and pathological autopsy in our hospital between April 2009 and December 2013. PMCT was performed within 20 h after death, followed by pathological autopsy including the brain. Autopsy confirmed the absence of intracranial disorders that might be related to the cause of death or might affect measurements in our study. Width of the third ventricle, width of the central sulcus, and attenuation in gray matter (GM and white matter (WM from the same area of the basal ganglia, centrum semiovale, and high convexity were statistically compared between AMCT and PMCT. Both the width of the third ventricle and the central sulcus were significantly shorter in PMCT than in AMCT (P < 0.0001. GM attenuation increased after death at the level of the centrum semiovale and high convexity, but the differences were not statistically significant considering the differences in attenuation among the different computed tomography scanners. WM attenuation significantly increased after death at all levels (P<0.0001. The differences were larger than the differences in scanners. GM/WM ratio of attenuation was significantly lower by PMCT than by AMCT at all levels (P<0.0001. PMCT showed an increase in WM attenuation, loss of GM-WM differentiation, and brain swelling, evidenced by a decrease in the size of ventricles and sulci.

  7. Computed tomography and clinical outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Maud; Koskinen, Lars-Owe D; Jonasson, Per; Levi, Richard; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2017-01-01

    To study: (i) acute computed tomography (CT) characteristics and clinical outcome; (ii) clinical course and (iii) Corticosteroid Randomisation after Significant Head Injury acute calculator protocol (CRASH) model and clinical outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Initial CT (CTi) and CT 24 hours post-trauma (CT24) were evaluated according to Marshall and Rotterdam classifications. Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale-Revised (RLAS-R) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) were assessed at three months and one year post-trauma. The prognostic value of the CRASH model was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included. Marshall CTi and CT24 were significantly correlated with RLAS-R at three months. Rotterdam CT24 was significantly correlated with GOSE at three months. RLAS-R and the GOSE improved significantly from three months to one year. CRASH predicted unfavourable outcome at six months for 81% of patients with bad outcome and for 85% of patients with favourable outcome according to GOSE at one year. Neither CT nor CRASH yielded clinically useful predictions of outcome at one year post-injury. The study showed encouragingly many instances of significant recovery in this population of sTBI. The combination of lack of reliable prognostic indicators and favourable outcomes supports the case for intensive acute management and rehabilitation as the default protocol in the cases of sTBI.

  8. Accuracy of Intraoperative Computed Tomography during Deep Brain Stimulation Procedures: Comparison with Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Maarten; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Bakay, Roy; Stebbins, Glenn; Verhagen Metman, Leo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) in localizing deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes by comparing this modality with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Optimal lead placement is a critical factor for the outcome of DBS procedures and preferably confirmed during surgery. iCT offers 3-dimensional verification of both microelectrode and lead location during DBS surgery. However, accurate electrode representation on iCT has not been extensively studied. DBS surgery was performed using the Leksell stereotactic G frame. Stereotactic coordinates of 52 DBS leads were determined on both iCT and postoperative MRI and compared with intended final target coordinates. The resulting absolute differences in X (medial-lateral), Y (anterior-posterior), and Z (dorsal-ventral) coordinates (ΔX, ΔY, and ΔZ) for both modalities were then used to calculate the euclidean distance. Euclidean distances were 2.7 ± 1.1 and 2.5 ± 1.2 mm for MRI and iCT, respectively (p = 0.2). Postoperative MRI and iCT show equivalent DBS lead representation. Intraoperative localization of both microelectrode and DBS lead in stereotactic space enables direct adjustments. Verification of lead placement with postoperative MRI, considered to be the gold standard, is unnecessary. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional computed tomography of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Deguchi, Jun; Arai, Motohiro; Tanaka, Hideo; Ohta, Tomio; Narabayashi, Isamu [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of contrast-enhanced spiral (helical) scanning computed tomography (CT) in patients with various brain tumors, a non ionic contrast medium was injected intravenously in ten patients with meningioma, five with vestibular schwannoma, and five with pituitary adenoma. Images were taken by spiral scan at an X-ray beam width of 1 or 2 mm. The volume data obtained were combined at 0.5-1 mm intervals for the three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction, by the volume rendering method. Each image was separated by CT number into bone, blood vessel, contrast-enhanced tumor, and cerebral parenchyma. In some subjects, a pair of images was reconstructed to allow stereoscopic viewing at a parallax angle of 6 degrees. Three-dimensional relationship between tumors and other structures was easily understood, permitting pre-operative prediction of the operative field and also a view of the area after tumor excision. The present method surpassed conventional CT techniques in terms of clarity of the 3-D relationship, and surpassed MRI and MRA in terms of clarity of relationship between the tumor and skull. These results confirm that this method appears to be applicable in routine clinical situations with minimal invasiveness, high degree of safety, and short examination time. (author)

  10. A study of cerebral perfusion using single photon emission computed tomography in neonates with brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, J.; Contantinesco, A.; Brunot, B.; Messer, J. (Hospital Universitaire de Strasbourg (France))

    1994-03-01

    In this study the authors used a single photon emission computed tomography technique (SPECT) with radiolabelled [sup 99m]Tc HMPAO to assess cerebral perfusion in newborn infants with documented cerebral lesions and to determine to what extent brain SPECT might be useful in the neonatal period. A total of 15 newborn infants with the following cerebral pathologies were enrolled: severe parietal bilateral periventricular leucomalacia; moderate parietal bilateral PVL; intraventricular haemorrhage grade II with unilateral parietal parenchymal extension; cerebral infarction in the zone of middle cerebral artery; and post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Follow-up was available in all infants. Alterations in cerebral perfusion were seen in only 12 of 15 infants and at the location of severe PVL, PE and CI. It was noted that the regions of diminished perfusion extended beyond the apparent extent of cerebral pathology delineated by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Markedly diminished perfusion was seen in one infant with hydrocephalus, which recovered following placement of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Regarding outcome, SPECT data failed to provide additional information than that of neuroradiological investigations. It is concluded that the use of SPECT, under these conditions, to assess alteration of cerebral perfusion in the neonatal period will not provide any additional information than that of neuroradiological investigations. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landon A. Jones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant health concern. While 70-90% of TBI cases are considered mild, decision-making regarding imaging can be difficult. This survey aimed to assess whether clinicians’ decision-making was consistent with the most recent American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP clinical recommendations regarding indications for a non-contrast head computed tomography (CT in patients with mild TBI. Methods: We surveyed 2 academic emergency medicine departments. Six realistic clinical vignettes were created. The survey software randomly varied 2 factors: age (30, 59, or 61 years old and presence or absence of visible trauma above the clavicles. A single important question was asked: “Would you perform a non-contrast head CT on this patient?” Results: Physician decision-making was consistent with the guidelines in only 62.8% of total vignettes. By age group (30, 59, and 61, decision-making was consistent with the guidelines in 66.7%, 47.4%, and 72.7% of cases, respectively. This was a statistically-significant difference when comparing the 59- and 61-year-old age groups. In the setting of presence/absence of trauma above the clavicles, respondents were consistent with the guidelines in 57.1% of cases. Decision-making consistent with the guidelines was significantly better in the absence of trauma above the clavicles. Conclusion: Respondents poorly differentiated the “older” patients from one another, suggesting that respondents either inappropriately apply the guidelines or are unaware of the recommendations in this setting. No particular cause for inconsistency could be determined, and respondents similarly under-scanned and over-scanned in incorrect vignettes. Improved dissemination of the ACEP clinical policy and recommendations is a potential solution to this problem.

  12. Clinical manifestations that predict abnormal brain computed tomography (CT in children with minor head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Alharthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography (CT used in pediatric pediatrics brain injury (TBI to ascertain neurological manifestations. Nevertheless, this practice is associated with adverse effects. Reports in the literature suggest incidents of morbidity and mortality in children due to exposure to radiation. Hence, it is found imperative to search for a reliable alternative. Objectives: The aim of this study is to find a reliable clinical alternative to detect an intracranial injury without resorting to the CT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients (1-14 years with blunt head injury and having a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 13-15 who had CT performed on them. Using statistical analysis, the correlation between clinical examination and positive CT manifestation is analyzed for different age-groups and various mechanisms of injury. Results: No statistically significant association between parameteres such as Loss of Consciousness, ′fall′ as mechanism of injury, motor vehicle accidents (MVA, more than two discrete episodes of vomiting and the CT finding of intracranial injury could be noted. Analyzed data have led to believe that GCS of 13 at presentation is the only important clinical predictor of intracranial injury. Conclusion: Retrospective data, small sample size and limited number of factors for assessing clinical manifestation might present constraints on the predictive rule that was derived from this review. Such limitations notwithstanding, the decision to determine which patients should undergo neuroimaging is encouraged to be based on clinical judgments. Further analysis with higher sample sizes may be required to authenticate and validate findings.

  13. Findings of chronic sinusitis on brain computed tomography are not associated with acute headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Katherine E; Camacho, Marc A; Gautam, Shiva; Levenson, Robin B; Edlow, Jonathan A

    2014-06-01

    Headache is a common complaint in emergency department (ED) patients. Nearly 15% of ED headache patients will have brain computed tomography (CT) done. One frequent finding on these scans is "chronic sinusitis." Assuming that "chronic sinusitis" is the cause of the patient's headache is a potential source of mis-diagnosis. We hypothesized that CT findings of chronic sinusitis occur with equal frequency in patients with atraumatic headache as in control patients with minor head injury. This is a retrospective, single-center medical record review of consecutive discharged patients who received noncontrast head CT scans in an urban ED for either minor closed head injury or atraumatic headache. Each patient's head CT radiologic report was reviewed for findings of sinusitis and classified as chronic sinusitis, indeterminate for sinusitis, air-fluid levels, or no findings of sinusitis. We enrolled 500 patients (234 in the atraumatic headache group, 266 in the minor head injury group). The two groups were similar except that more women were enrolled in the atraumatic headache group. CT findings of chronic sinusitis in the atraumatic headache group (22.2%) and the minor head injury group (17.7%; difference 4.5%; 95% confidence interval of -2.5-11.6%). Prevalence of CT findings of sinusitis in ED patients with atraumatic headaches and mild head injury are similar. This strongly suggests that CT findings of chronic sinusitis in patients with atraumatic headache may be incidental, and are rarely the cause of a patient's acute headache. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automated Outcome Classification of Computed Tomography Imaging Reports for Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kabir; Sarioglu, Efsun; Choi, Hyeong Ah; Cartwright, Walter B; Hinds, Pamela S; Chamberlain, James M

    2016-02-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated highly reliable automated classification of free-text computed tomography (CT) imaging reports using a hybrid system that pairs linguistic (natural language processing) and statistical (machine learning) techniques. Previously performed for identifying the outcome of orbital fracture in unprocessed radiology reports from a clinical data repository, the performance has not been replicated for more complex outcomes. To validate automated outcome classification performance of a hybrid natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning system for brain CT imaging reports. The hypothesis was that our system has performance characteristics for identifying pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). This was a secondary analysis of a subset of 2,121 CT reports from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) TBI study. For that project, radiologists dictated CT reports as free text, which were then deidentified and scanned as PDF documents. Trained data abstractors manually coded each report for TBI outcome. Text was extracted from the PDF files using optical character recognition. The data set was randomly split evenly for training and testing. Training patient reports were used as input to the Medical Language Extraction and Encoding (MedLEE) NLP tool to create structured output containing standardized medical terms and modifiers for negation, certainty, and temporal status. A random subset stratified by site was analyzed using descriptive quantitative content analysis to confirm identification of TBI findings based on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Common Data Elements project. Findings were coded for presence or absence, weighted by frequency of mentions, and past/future/indication modifiers were filtered. After combining with the manual reference standard, a decision tree classifier was created using data mining tools WEKA 3.7.5 and Salford Predictive Miner 7

  15. Assessment of murine brain tissue shrinkage caused by different histological fixatives using magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrl, Hans F; Bezrukov, Ilja; Wiehr, Stefan; Lehnhoff, Mareike; Fuchs, Kerstin; Mannheim, Julia G; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Kneilling, Manfred; Pichler, Bernd J; Sauter, Alexander W

    2015-05-01

    Especially for neuroscience and the development of new biomarkers, a direct correlation between in vivo imaging and histology is essential. However, this comparison is hampered by deformation and shrinkage of tissue samples caused by fixation, dehydration and paraffin embedding. We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging to analyze the degree of shrinkage on murine brains for various fixatives. After in vivo imaging using 7 T MRI, animals were sacrificed and the brains were dissected and immediately placed in different fixatives, respectively: zinc-based fixative, neutral buffered formalin (NBF), paraformaldehyde (PFA), Bouin-Holland fixative and paraformaldehyde-lysine-periodate (PLP). The degree of shrinkage based on mouse brain volumes, radiodensity in Hounsfield units (HU), as well as non-linear deformations were obtained. The highest degree of shrinkage was observed for PLP (68.1%, P brain shrinkage and only small deformations and is therefore recommended for in vivo ex vivo comparison studies.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computed tomography combined atlas of developing and adult mouse brains for stereotaxic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M; Zhang, J; Miller, M I; Sidman, R L; Mori, S

    2009-09-15

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: postnatal day (P) 7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140-P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo magnetic resonance imaging adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography Combined Atlas of Developing and Adult Mouse Brains for Stereotaxic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Zhang, Jiangyang; Miller, Michael I.; Sidman, Richard L.; Mori, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: P7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140–P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo MRI adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains. PMID:19490934

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  19. Emission Computed Tomography: A New Technique for the Quantitative Physiologic Study of Brain and Heart in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Schelbert, H. R.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Emission computed tomography can provide a quantitative in vivo measurement of regional tissue radionuclide tracer concentrations. This facility when combined with physiologic models and radioactively labeled physiologic tracers that behave in a predictable manner allow measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. This integrated technique has been referred to as Physiologic Tomography (PT). PT requires labeled compounds which trace physiologic processes in a known and predictable manner, and physiologic models which are appropriately formulated and validated to derive physiologic variables from ECT data. In order to effectively achieve this goal, PT requires an ECT system that is capable of performing truly quantitative or analytical measurements of tissue tracer concentrations and which has been well characterized in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity and signal to noise ratios in the tomographic image. This paper illustrates the capabilities of emission computed tomography and provides examples of physiologic tomography for the regional measurement of cerebral and myocardial metabolic rate for glucose, regional measurement of cerebral blood volume, gated cardiac blood pools and capillary perfusion in brain and heart. Studies on patients with stroke and myocardial ischemia are also presented.

  20. Effect of expression of P-glycoprotein on technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile single photon emission computed tomography of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Yasushi; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2002-08-01

    The expression of P-glycoprotein was investigated imunohistochemically in 26 brain tumor tissues and compared with the findings of technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT) to clarify the effect of P-glycoprotein on the diagnostic accuracy. P-glycoprotein labeling index of both tumor cells and vascular endothelial cells showed no clear relationship with the findings of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT imaging. Expression of P-glycoprotein has no effect on the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT. (author)

  1. Pure ground glass nodular adenocarcinomas: Are preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging useful or necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyoun; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Joon Young; Um, Sang-Won; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2015-09-01

    The utility of (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a staging workup for lung adenocarcinoma manifesting as pure ground glass opacity (GGO) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of these 2 tests for preoperative staging of pure GGO nodular lung adenocarcinoma. The study included 164 patients (male:female, 73:91; mean age, 62 years) with pure GGO nodular lung adenocarcinoma who underwent PET/CT (in 136 patients) and/or brain MRI (in 109 patients) before surgery. Pathologic N staging and dedicated standard imaging or follow-up imaging findings for M staging were used as reference standards. The median follow-up time was 47.9 months. On PET/CT scan, abnormal FDG uptake of lymph nodes was found in 2 of 136 patients (1.5%); both were negative on final pathology. Abnormal FDG uptake of the liver was detected in 1 patient, which was also confirmed to be negative by dedicated abdominal CT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET/CT in detecting metastases were not applicable, 98% (95% confidence interval [CI], 94%-100%), 0% (95% CI, 0%-71%), 100% (95% CI, 97%-100%), and 98% (95% CI, 94%-100%), respectively. No brain metastasis was found in preoperative brain MRI of 109 patients. Of 109 patients, 1 (0.9%) developed brain metastasis 30 months after surgical resection. PET/CT and brain MRI is not necessary in the staging of pure GGO nodular lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  9. Whole brain analysis of postmortem density changes of grey and white matter on computed tomography by statistical parametric mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Katsube, Takashi; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kanayama, Hidekazu; Tada, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yasushi [Shimane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Takeshita, Haruo [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Legal Medicine, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kawakami, Kazunori [Fujifilm RI Pharma, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    This study examined the usefulness of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for investigating postmortem changes on brain computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study included 128 patients (23 - 100 years old) without cerebral abnormalities who underwent unenhanced brain CT before and after death. The antemortem CT (AMCT) scans and postmortem CT (PMCT) scans were spatially normalized using our original brain CT template, and postmortem changes of CT values (in Hounsfield units; HU) were analysed by the SPM technique. Compared with AMCT scans, 58.6 % and 98.4 % of PMCT scans showed loss of the cerebral sulci and an unclear grey matter (GM)-white matter (WM) interface, respectively. SPM analysis revealed a significant decrease in cortical GM density within 70 min after death on PMCT scans, suggesting cytotoxic brain oedema. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the density of the WM, lenticular nucleus and thalamus more than 120 min after death. The SPM technique demonstrated typical postmortem changes on brain CT scans, and revealed that the unclear GM-WM interface on early PMCT scans is caused by a rapid decrease in cortical GM density combined with a delayed increase in WM density. SPM may be useful for assessment of whole brain postmortem changes. (orig.)

  10. Automatic brain matter segmentation of computed tomography images using a statistical model: A tool to gain working time!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertè, Francesco; Lamponi, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco S

    2015-10-01

    Brain computed tomography (CT) is useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of several neurological disorders due to its accuracy, reliability, safety and wide availability. In this field, a potentially interesting research topic is the automatic segmentation and recognition of medical regions of interest (ROIs). Herein, we propose a novel automated method, based on the use of the active appearance model (AAM) for the segmentation of brain matter in CT images to assist radiologists in the evaluation of the images. The method described, that was applied to 54 CT images coming from a sample of outpatients affected by cognitive impairment, enabled us to obtain the generation of a model overlapping with the original image with quite good precision. Since CT neuroimaging is in widespread use for detecting neurological disease, including neurodegenerative conditions, the development of automated tools enabling technicians and physicians to reduce working time and reach a more accurate diagnosis is needed.

  11. Hypoxic injury of all deep nuclei of the brain. A case report from computed tomography; Hypoxischer Schaden aller tiefen Kerngebiete des Gehirns. Ein Fallbericht aus der Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, S.A.; Bautz, W.A.; Uder, M.; Alibek, S. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Richter, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Neuroradiologische Abt.

    2008-07-01

    Though being inferior to magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography (CT) of the brain is the most frequently applied imaging modality in the diagnostic workup of acute cerebral Ischaemia. We report on a case of a comatose 53-year-old man who was brought to the emergency room after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The CT of the brain showed a diffuse brain oedema with an explicit hypodense demarcation of all deep nuclei. (orig.)

  12. Results of Non-contrast Brain Computed Tomography Scans of 1-18 Year Old Epileptic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh FALLAH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Fallah R, Nafisi Moghadam R, Fallah Tafti M, Salmani Nodoushan M. Results of Noncontrast Brain Computed Tomography Scans of 1-18 Year Old Epileptic Children. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3: 33-38.ObjectiveThe advent of computed tomography (CT scan revolutionized the diagnosticevaluation of neurologic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate brain CTresults of epileptic children.Materials & MethodsIn a descriptive cross-sectional study, noncontrast brain CT scan of 150 consecutive1-18 year old epileptic children whom were referred to pediatric neurology clinic ofShahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, from May 2008 to October 2010 inYazd-Iran, evaluated.ResultsSixty two girls and 88 boys with mean age of 6.6 ± 4.3 years were evaluated.In 38 (25.3 % children, seizure onset age was under one year and 38 others hadabnormal mental / developmental status. Fifty three children (35.3 % and 97 (64.7%had partial and generalized seizures, respectively. Partial seizures were more prevalentin children with seizure onset in < 1 year [41.5% (22/53 vs. 16.5% (16/97] Result of CT was normal in 74 % (n=111. Among the patients with abnormalresults, 18(46% had brain atrophy, 10 (25.6% structural CNS dysgenesia, six (15.4%intracranial calcification, three (7.8% hydrocephaly and two had (5.2% brain tumor.Abnormal brain CT was more prevalent in patients with seizure onset in less than oneyear of age [60.5% (23 of 38 vs. 14.3% (16 of 112, p = 0.003], partial epilepsy [51% (27of 53 vs. 12% (12/97], and abnormal developmental status [ 81.5% (31 of 38 vs.7% (8of 112]. Mean age of seizure onset in epileptic children with abnormal brain CT scanwas less (M ± SD:1/17 ± 0.6 years versus 4.02±1.9 years.ConclusionBrain CT scan might be considered in evaluation of epileptic children with partialseizures, seizure onset in less than one year of age or neurodevelopmental delay.ReferencesJagoda A, Gupta K. The emergency department

  13. Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-03-03

    Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma. Future improvement in radionuclide imaging by means of emission composition potential. The compound plating approacl threshold for all the investigated transistors and fast neutron spectra lies within the raal. The value of the potential slightly changes with the coordinate change in this region, i.e. the charge on a collecting electrode is not practically guided up to a certain moment of time during the movement of nonequilibrium carriers.

  14. Brain computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N. Abdulkader

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface technology represents a highly growing field of research with application systems. Its contributions in medical fields range from prevention to neuronal rehabilitation for serious injuries. Mind reading and remote communication have their unique fingerprint in numerous fields such as educational, self-regulation, production, marketing, security as well as games and entertainment. It creates a mutual understanding between users and the surrounding systems. This paper shows the application areas that could benefit from brain waves in facilitating or achieving their goals. We also discuss major usability and technical challenges that face brain signals utilization in various components of BCI system. Different solutions that aim to limit and decrease their effects have also been reviewed.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... the best imaging modality for sinusitis. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you are pregnant and ...

  16. Comparison of Cerebral Oxygen Saturation and Cerebral Perfusion Computed Tomography in Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Grigoryeva, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cerebral tissue oxygen saturation and cerebral blood volume in patients with traumatic brain injury. Perfusion computed tomography of the brain was performed in 25 patients with traumatic brain injury together with simultaneous SctO2 level measurement using cerebral near-infrared oxymetry. The mean age of the injured persons was 34.5±15.6 years (range 15-65); 14 men, 11 women. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) values were 44.4±9.7 (range 25-81). The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) mean value before the study was 10.6±2.1 (range 5-13). SctO2 ranged from 51 to 89%, mean 62±8.2%. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) values were 2.1±0.67 ml/100 g (min 1.1; max 4.3 ml/100 g). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 31.99±13.6 ml/100 g×min. Mean transit time (MTT) values were 5.7±4.5 s (min 2.8; max 34.3 s). The time to peak (TTP) was 22.2±3.1 s. A statistically significant correlation was found between SctO2 level and cerebral blood volume (CBV) level (R=0.9; pperfusion.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... for a recovery period and will be given instructions on any limitations in activity for the day. ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment ... period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography ( ... more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment ... period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless ... table. Other imaging methods such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can provide pictures of certain areas ...

  4. A computer tomography-based spatial normalization for the analysis of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We developed a new computed tomography (CT)-based spatial normalization method and CT template to demonstrate its usefulness in spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images with [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in healthy controls. Seventy healthy controls underwent brain CT scan (120 KeV, 180 mAs, and 3 mm of thickness) and [{sup 18}F] FDG PET scans using a PET/CT scanner. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired for all subjects. By averaging skull-stripped and spatially-normalized MR and CT images, we created skull-stripped MR and CT templates for spatial normalization. The skull-stripped MR and CT images were spatially normalized to each structural template. PET images were spatially normalized by applying spatial transformation parameters to normalize skull-stripped MR and CT images. A conventional perfusion PET template was used for PET-based spatial normalization. Regional standardized uptake values (SUV) measured by overlaying the template volume of interest (VOI) were compared to those measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOI (FSVOI). All three spatial normalization methods underestimated regional SUV values by 0.3-20% compared to those measured with FSVOI. The CT-based method showed slightly greater underestimation bias. Regional SUV values derived from all three spatial normalization methods were correlated significantly (p < 0.0001) with those measured with FSVOI. CT-based spatial normalization may be an alternative method for structure-based spatial normalization of [18F] FDG PET when MR imaging is unavailable. Therefore, it is useful for PET/CT studies with various radiotracers whose uptake is expected to be limited to specific brain regions or highly variable within study population.

  5. Brain areas involved in acupuncture needling sensation of de qi: a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Rong; Li, Gan-Long; Zhang, Gui-Feng; Huang, Yong; Wang, Shu-Xia; Lu, Na

    2012-12-01

    De qi is a sensory response elicited by acupuncture stimulation. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), de qi is essential for clinical efficacy. However, the understanding of the neurobiological basis of de qi is still limited. To investigate the relationship between brain activation and de qi by taking a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan while applying acupuncture at TE5. A total of 24 volunteers were randomly divided into 4 groups, and received verum or sham acupuncture at true acupuncture point TE5 or a nearby sham point according to grouping. All subjects then received a (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT scan. All six subjects in the verum acupuncture at true acupuncture point group experienced de qi sensation; in contrast, all six subjects in the sham acupuncture at the sham point group responded with nothing other than non-sensation. Compared to the scan results from subjects who experienced non-sensation, SPECT scans from subjects with de qi sensation demonstrated significant activated points mainly located in brodmann areas 6, 8, 19, 21, 28, 33, 35, 37, 47, the parahippocampal gyrus, lentiform nucleus, claustrum and red nucleus; deactivated points were seen in brodmann areas 9 and 25. Verum acupuncture at true acupuncture points is more likely to elicit de qi sensation. De qi sensations mainly resulted in brain area activations, but not deactivations. These brain areas are related to the curative effect of Te5. The acupuncture needle sensations of de qi and sharp pain are associated with different patterns of activations and deactivations in the brain.

  6. 23.4% saline decreases brain tissue volume in severe hepatic encephalopathy as assessed by a quantitative computed tomography marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Eric M; Lizza, Bryan D; Romanova, Anna L; Guth, James C; Berman, Michael D; Carroll, Timothy J; Francis, Brandon; Ganger, Daniel; Ladner, Daniela P; Maas, Matthew B; Naidech, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral edema is common in severe hepatic encephalopathy and may be life-threatening. Bolus 23.4% hypertonic saline (HTS) improves surveillance neuromonitoring scores, although its mechanism of action is not clearly established. We investigated the hypothesis that bolus HTS decreases cerebral edema in severe hepatic encephalopathy utilizing a quantitative technique to measure brain and CSF volume changes. Design Retrospective analysis of serial computed tomography (CT) scans and clinical data for a case-control series was performed. Setting Intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital. Patients Patients with severe hepatic encephalopathy treated with 23.4% HTS and control patients who did not receive 23.4% HTS. Methods We used clinically obtained CT scans to measure volumes of the ventricles, intracranial CSF, and brain using a previously validated semi-automated technique (Analyze Direct; Overland Park, KS). Volumes before and after 23.4% HTS were compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Associations between total CSF volume, ventricular volume, serum sodium, and Glasgow Coma Scale Scores were assessed using Spearman correlation. Results Eleven patients with 18 administrations of 23.4% HTS met inclusion criteria. Total CSF (median 47.6 [35.1–69.4] to 61.9 [47.7–87.0] mL, pbrain tissue volume. Total CSF and ventricular volume change may be useful quantitative measures to assess cerebral edema in severe hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:26308431

  7. Cephalic Index in the First Three Years of Life: Study of Children with Normal Brain Development Based on Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirginia Likus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cephalic index is a highly useful method for planning surgical procedures, as well as assessing their effectiveness in correcting cranial deformations in children. There are relatively very few studies measuring cephalic index in healthy Caucasian young children. The aim of our study was to develop a classification of current cephalic index for healthy Caucasian children up to 3 years of age with normal brain development, using axial slice computer tomography performed with very thin slices (0.5 mm resulting in more accurate measurements. 180 healthy infants (83 females and 97 males were divided into 5 age categories: 0–3, 4–6, 7–12, 13–24, and 25–36 months. The average value of cephalic index in children up to 3 years of age amounted to 81.45 ± 7.06. The index value in case of children under 3 months was 80.19, 4 to 6 months was 81.45, 7 to 12 months was 83.15, in children under 2 years was 81.05, and in children under 3 years was 79.76. Mesocephaly is the dominating skull shape in children. In this study, we formulated a classification of current cephalic indices of children with normal brain development. Our date appears to be of utmost importance in anthropology, anatomy forensic medicine, and genetics.

  8. Proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain with a rotating gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Wappenschmidt, J.

    1981-08-01

    In 471 patients SPECT of the brain was performed in addition to conventional serial brain scintigraphy using a rotating gamma camera (GAMMATOME T 9000). 23 patients had tumorous lesions, 26 had vascular lesions, and 422 patients revealed normal brain findings. 5 of the 23 patients with tumorous lesion and 5 of the 12 patients with vascular lesion (anamnesis shorter than 4 weeks) showed positive SPECT results but false negative conventional brain scans. Specificity could be improved up to 98% (412 out of 422 patients) using SPECT and conventional scintigraphy.

  10. Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  11. Single-photon emission computed tomography imaging for brain death donor counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayanand Palaniswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donation awareness is very poor in India. We have a high demand for transplant organs with poor supply. Apnea test is the confirmatory test for brain death in our country. The Transplantation of Human Organs Act does not support any ancillary testing for the confirmation of brain death in our country. Radionuclide scan is used widely in western countries as a confirmatory test. We in our institution used this as a tool for family counseling with successful conversion rate.

  12. Volumetric analysis of day of injury computed tomography is associated with rehabilitation outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majercik, Sarah; Bledsoe, Joseph; Ryser, David; Hopkins, Ramona O; Fair, Joseph E; Brock Frost, R; MacDonald, Joel; Barrett, Ryan; Horn, Susan; Pisani, David; Bigler, Erin D; Gardner, Scott; Stevens, Mark; Larson, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Day-of-injury (DOI) brain lesion volumes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients are rarely used to predict long-term outcomes in the acute setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute brain injury lesion volume and rehabilitation outcomes in patients with TBI at a level one trauma center. Patients with TBI who were admitted to our rehabilitation unit after the acute care trauma service from February 2009-July 2011 were eligible for the study. Demographic data and outcome variables including cognitive and motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores, length of stay (LOS) in the rehabilitation unit, and ability to return to home were obtained. The DOI quantitative injury lesion volumes and degree of midline shift were obtained from DOI brain computed tomography scans. A multiple stepwise regression model including 13 independent variables was created. This model was used to predict postrehabilitation outcomes, including FIM scores and ability to return to home. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Ninety-six patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 43 ± 21 years, admission Glasgow Coma Score was 8.4 ± 4.8, Injury Severity Score was 24.7 ± 9.9, and head Abbreviated Injury Scale score was 3.73 ± 0.97. Acute hospital LOS was 12.3 ± 8.9 days, and rehabilitation LOS was 15.9 ± 9.3 days. Day-of-injury TBI lesion volumes were inversely associated with cognitive FIM scores at rehabilitation admission (p = 0.004) and discharge (p = 0.004) and inversely associated with ability to be discharged to home after rehabilitation (p = 0.006). In a cohort of patients with moderate to severe TBI requiring a rehabilitation unit stay after the acute care hospital stay, DOI brain injury lesion volumes are associated with worse cognitive FIM scores at the time of rehabilitation admission and discharge. Smaller-injury volumes were associated with eventual discharge to home. Volumetric neuroimaging in the acute

  13. Clinical studies of brain functional images by motor activation using single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Masahiro [Gifu Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Thirty participants (10 normal controls; group A, 5 patients with brain tumors located near central sulcus without hemiparesis; group B, 10 patients with brain tumors located near central sulcus with hemiparesis; group C, and 5 patients with brain tumors besides the central regions with hemiparesis; group D) were enrolled. The images were performed by means of split-dose method with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD at rest condition (SPECT 1) and during hand grasping (SPECT 2). The activation SPECT were obtained by subtracting SPECT 1 from SPECT 2, and the functional mapping was made by the strict registration of the activation SPECT with 3D MRI. To evaluate the changes of CBF (%{Delta}CBF) of the sensorimotor and supplementary motor areas on the functional mapping, ratio of the average counts of SPECT 1 and SPECT 2 was calculated and statistically compared. The functional activation paradigms caused a significant increase of CBF in the sensorimotor area contra-lateral to the stimulated hand, although the sensorimotor area and the central sulcus in groups B and C were dislocated, compared with hemisphere of non-tumor side. The sensorimotor area ipsi-lateral to the stimulated hand could be detected in almost of all subjects. The supplementary motor area could be detected in all subjects. In group A, the average %{Delta}CBF were up 24.1{+-}4.3% in the contra-lateral sensorimotor area, and 22.3{+-}3.6% in the supplementary motor area, respectively. The average %{Delta}CBF in the contra-lateral sensorimotor area of group D was significantly higher than that of group A. The brain functional mapping by motor activation using SPECT could localize the area of cortical motor function in normal volunteers and patients with brain tumors. The changes of regional CBF by activation SPECT precisely assess the cortical motor function even in patients with brain tumors located near central sulcus. (K.H.)

  14. Computer processing of tomography data

    OpenAIRE

    Konečný, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Computer processing of tomography data Tomographs are one of the most important diagnostic devices, which are used in every hospital nowadays; they have already been so for a considerable period of time. The different types of tomographs and the processing of tomographic data and imaging of these data are the subject of this thesis. I have described the four most common types of tomography: X-ray Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon E...

  15. A comparison study of 11C-methionine and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in evaluation of patients with recurrent brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajnish; D’Souza, Maria; Jaimini, Abhinav; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Saw, Sanjeev; Pandey, Santosh; Singh, Dinesh; Solanki, Yachna; Kumar, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K.; Mondal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: 11C-methonine ([11C]-MET) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a well-established technique for evaluation of tumor for diagnosis and treatment planning in neurooncology. [11C]-MET reflects amino acid transport and has been shown to be more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in stereotactic biopsy planning. This study compared fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT and MET PET-CT in the detection of various brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four subjects of brain tumor treated by surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy were subjected to [18F]-FDG, [11C]-MET, and MRI scan. The lesion was analyzed semiquantitatively using tumor to normal contralateral ratio. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery, stereotactic biopsy, clinical follow-up, MRI, or CT scans. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 5 out of 22 patients on [F-18] FDG scan while [11C]-MET was able to detect recurrence in 18 out of 22 patients in low-grade gliomas. Two of these patients were false positive for the presence of recurrence of tumor and later found to be harboring necrosis. Among oligodendroglioma, medulloblastoma and high-grade glioma out of 42 patients 39 were found to be concordant MET and FDG scans. On semiquantitative analysis, mean T/NT ratio was found to be 2.96 ± 0.94 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 1.18 ± 0.74 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumor on [11C]-MET scan. While the ratio for FDG scan on semiquantitative analysis was found to be 2.05 ± 1.04 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 0.52 ± 0.15 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumors. Conclusion: The study highlight that [11C]-MET is superior to [18F]-FDG PET scans to detect recurrence in low-grade glioma. A cut-off value of target to nontarget value of 1.47 is a useful parameter to distinguish benign from malignant lesion on an [11C]-MET Scan. Both [18F]-FDG and [11C]-MET scans were found to be useful in high-grade astrocytoma

  16. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  17. Outcome prediction in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: a focus on computed tomography variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, B.; Beems, T.; Vliet, T.M. van der; Vugt, A.B. van; Hoedemaekers, C.W.; Horn, J.; Franschman, G.; Haitsma, I.; Naalt, J. van der; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Borm, G.F.; Vos, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With this study we aimed to design validated outcome prediction models in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) using demographic, clinical, and radiological parameters. METHODS: Seven hundred consecutive moderate or severe TBI patients were included in this observational pros

  18. Outcome Prediction in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury : A Focus on Computed Tomography Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Bram; Beems, Tjemme; van der Vliet, Ton M.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia; Horn, Janneke; Franschman, Gaby; Haitsma, Ian; van der Naalt, Joukje; Andriessen, Teuntje M. J. C.; Borm, George F.; Vos, Pieter E.

    2013-01-01

    With this study we aimed to design validated outcome prediction models in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) using demographic, clinical, and radiological parameters. Seven hundred consecutive moderate or severe TBI patients were included in this observational prospective cohort study.

  19. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  20. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are important to test and optimize new therapeutic interventions. To evaluate the effect of these interventions, sensitive and accurate outcome measures are needed. The most commonly used endpoints are spirometric variables...... are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  1. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  2. Dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography for dopamine and serotonin transporters in normal and parkinsonian monkey brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I-H. [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, W.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C.-B. [Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Liao, M.-H.; Chen, C.-C.; Shen, L.-H. [Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyaun, 325 Taiwan (China); Liu, J.-C. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Ma, K.-H. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuohsing91@yahoo.com.tw

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Parkinson's disease (PD) affects both dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated dopamine and serotonin transporters in primates using dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and compared the results with traditional single-isotope imaging. Methods: Four healthy and one 6-OHDA-induced PD monkeys were used for this study. SPECT was performed over 4 h after individual or simultaneous injection of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 (a dopamine transporter imaging agent) and [{sup 123}I]ADAM (a serotonin transporter imaging agent). Results: The results showed that the image quality and uptake ratios in different brain regions were comparable between single- and dual-isotope studies. The striatal [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 uptake in the PD monkey was markedly lower than that in normal monkeys. The uptake of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the midbrain of the PD monkey was comparable to that in the normal monkeys, but there were decreased uptakes in the thalamus and striatum of the PD monkey. Conclusions: Our results suggest that dual-isotope SPECT using [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 and [{sup 123}I]ADAM can simultaneously evaluate changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in a PD model.

  3. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability on perfusion computed tomography predicts hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkul-Wermester, Ozlem; Guegan-Massardier, Evelyne; Triquenot, Aude; Borden, Alaina; Perot, Guillaume; Gérardin, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) is capable of measuring the permeability surface product (PS). PS reflects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, involved in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) of ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to determine if an increased PS can predict HT. A total of 86 patients with ischemic stroke were included. They underwent multimodality CT, including the measurement of PS. We compared the clinical and radiological characteristics of patients who developed HT to those who did not, using univariate analysis. Multivariate regression analyses were then used to determine HT predictors. HT was observed in 27 patients (31%). Infarct PS was significantly associated with HT (p = 0.047), as were atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03), admission National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score (p = 0.02), infarct volume (p = 0.0004), presence of large-vessel occlusion (p = 0.0005) and a poorer collateral status (p = 0.003). Using logistic regression modeling, an infarct PS >0.84 ml/100 g/min was an independent predictor of HT (OR 28, 95% CI 1.75-452.98; p = 0.02). Other independent predictors of HT were infarct volume and a history of atrial fibrillation. Our findings suggest that infarct PS can be a predictor of HT and may help clinicians to improve patient care around thrombolysis decisions in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The study of neuropsychological alterations following coronary artery bypass operation as predicted by computed tomography scan of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Atsushi; Sato, Kiyoharu (Sendai Tokushu-kai Hospital (Japan)); Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Endo, Masato; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ohmi, Mikio

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this clinical study is to provide information regarding the association between coexistent cerebrovascular disease and neuropsychological abnormalities after coronary artery bypass operations. Computed tomography scan of the brain was performed in 104 patients pre-operatively, and their post-operative neuropsychological functions were evaluated. The patients were categorized as follows according to the CT findings. Seventy-three patients showed normal or slight cerebral cortical atrophy which usually seen in patients over fifty of age (group A). Sixteen showed moderate or severe cortical atrophy (group B). Fifteen patients demonstrated the characteristic findings of Binswanger type; severe white matter hypodensity especially in frontal horns and dilated ventricles (group C). Overt neuropsychological dysfunction was not observed in patients in groups A and B. Six patients in group C showed a combination of dementia, bizarre behavior, disorientation and gait dyspraxia following bypass operations. The pseudobulbar signs were also found in 3 patients. These clinical abnormalities persisted for six days to three weeks, and were most often reversible. Although the underlying mechanism of these deleterious alterations is not elucidated, the ischemic nature of the characteristic white matter lesions was highly suspected. The arteriosclerotic changes of the arteriole of the cerebral cortex and hypoperfusion during cardio-pulmonary bypass were supposed to be responsible. Therefore it was concluded that special attention should be focused on neurological evaluation for bypass surgery in group C patients. (author).

  5. Brain computed tomography in morbid obesity before and after gastric restriction surgery: A prospective quantitative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berginer, V.M.; Solomon, H.; Charuz, I.; Hirsch, M.; Berginer, J.; Weitzman, S.; Friedman, L.

    1987-11-01

    Linear brain parameters were measured by CT in 19 patients with morbid obesity (mean weight 126.4 +- 20.5 kg) and 20 age and sex matched normal weight subjects (mean weight 62.6 +- 14.9 kg). Ventricular parameters were slightly smaller and cortical parameters were slightly larger in the preoperative obese than in control subjects. However, only the '4 cortical sulci ratio' was significantly different in the two groups (p=0.02). After gastric restriction surgery and drastic weight loss (mean postoperative weight 82.9 +- 27.4 kg), all the ventricular and cortical parameters increased, with significant change in the frontal interhemispheric fissure ratio (P<0.05). Obese patients followed for 23 months after surgery had less striking changes than those followed for 6 months. Morbidly obese subjects have altered brain CT dimensions which are partly reversible after weight correction.

  6. Computed tomography of the brain in children with early infantile autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Manome, Taei; Kaneko, Motohisa; Yashima, Yuko; Kumashiro, Hisashi

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the cranial CT of autistic children and investigate the etiological significance of CT scan findings, the CT of the brain was surveyed in 24 children with early infantile autism (3 to 17 years with a mean age of 7.6), and 179 children with the normal CT despite their medical histories such as headaches or febrile convulsions. According to their ages, the autistic and normal children were divided into the following three groups: Group I (age ranging from 3 to 5), Group II (age: 6 to 9) and Group III (age: 10 to 17). 1) There was no significant difference between the bifrontal CVI of the autistic children and that of the normal children. However, in Group III, the bifrontal CVI of the autistic children was significantly higher than that of the normal children. 2) There was no significant difference between the bicaudate CVI of the autistic children and that of the normal children. However, in Groups I and II, the bicaudate CVI of the autistic children was significantly lower than that of the normal children. 3) The maximum widths of the third ventricle showed no significant difference between the autistic and normal children. However, in Groups II and III, those of the autistic children were wider than those of the normal children. In the autistic children, as the age increases, the difference becomes significantly wider. A positive correlation was observed between the width of the third ventricle and ages of the autistic children. 4) An examination of the right-left ratio of maximum transverse diameter of the brain showed that there was no significant difference between the autistic and normal children. The above mentioned results (1)-4)) might suggest a progressive disorder of the brain structure surrounding the third ventricle or lateral ventricles in the autistic children. (author).

  7. New computer-aided diagnosis of dementia using positron emission tomography: brain regional sensitivity-mapping method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kakimoto

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We devised a new computer-aided diagnosis method to segregate dementia using one estimated index (Total Z score derived from the Brodmann area (BA sensitivity map on the stereotaxic brain atlas. The purpose of this study is to investigate its accuracy to differentiate patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI from normal adults (NL. METHODS: We studied 101 adults (NL: 40, AD: 37, MCI: 24 who underwent (18FDG positron emission tomography (PET measurement. We divided NL and AD groups into two categories: a training group with (Category A and a test group without (Category B clinical information. In Category A, we estimated sensitivity by comparing the standard uptake value per BA (SUVR between NL and AD groups. Then, we calculated a summated index (Total Z score by utilizing the sensitivity-distribution maps and each BA z-score to segregate AD patterns. To confirm the validity of this method, we examined the accuracy in Category B. Finally, we applied this method to MCI patients. RESULTS: In Category A, we found that the sensitivity and specificity of differentiation between NL and AD were all 100%. In Category B, those were 100% and 95%, respectively. Furthermore, we found this method attained 88% to differentiate AD-converters from non-converters in MCI group. CONCLUSIONS: The present automated computer-aided evaluation method based on a single estimated index provided good accuracy for differential diagnosis of AD and MCI. This good differentiation power suggests its usefulness not only for dementia diagnosis but also in a longitudinal study.

  8. New computer-aided diagnosis of dementia using positron emission tomography: brain regional sensitivity-mapping method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Kamekawa, Yuichi; Ito, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2011-01-01

    We devised a new computer-aided diagnosis method to segregate dementia using one estimated index (Total Z score) derived from the Brodmann area (BA) sensitivity map on the stereotaxic brain atlas. The purpose of this study is to investigate its accuracy to differentiate patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal adults (NL). We studied 101 adults (NL: 40, AD: 37, MCI: 24) who underwent (18)FDG positron emission tomography (PET) measurement. We divided NL and AD groups into two categories: a training group with (Category A) and a test group without (Category B) clinical information. In Category A, we estimated sensitivity by comparing the standard uptake value per BA (SUVR) between NL and AD groups. Then, we calculated a summated index (Total Z score) by utilizing the sensitivity-distribution maps and each BA z-score to segregate AD patterns. To confirm the validity of this method, we examined the accuracy in Category B. Finally, we applied this method to MCI patients. In Category A, we found that the sensitivity and specificity of differentiation between NL and AD were all 100%. In Category B, those were 100% and 95%, respectively. Furthermore, we found this method attained 88% to differentiate AD-converters from non-converters in MCI group. The present automated computer-aided evaluation method based on a single estimated index provided good accuracy for differential diagnosis of AD and MCI. This good differentiation power suggests its usefulness not only for dementia diagnosis but also in a longitudinal study.

  9. New Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography: Brain Regional Sensitivity-Mapping Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Kamekawa, Yuichi; Ito, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We devised a new computer-aided diagnosis method to segregate dementia using one estimated index (Total Z score) derived from the Brodmann area (BA) sensitivity map on the stereotaxic brain atlas. The purpose of this study is to investigate its accuracy to differentiate patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal adults (NL). Methods We studied 101 adults (NL: 40, AD: 37, MCI: 24) who underwent 18FDG positron emission tomography (PET) measurement. We divided NL and AD groups into two categories: a training group with (Category A) and a test group without (Category B) clinical information. In Category A, we estimated sensitivity by comparing the standard uptake value per BA (SUVR) between NL and AD groups. Then, we calculated a summated index (Total Z score) by utilizing the sensitivity-distribution maps and each BA z-score to segregate AD patterns. To confirm the validity of this method, we examined the accuracy in Category B. Finally, we applied this method to MCI patients. Results In Category A, we found that the sensitivity and specificity of differentiation between NL and AD were all 100%. In Category B, those were 100% and 95%, respectively. Furthermore, we found this method attained 88% to differentiate AD-converters from non-converters in MCI group. Conclusions The present automated computer-aided evaluation method based on a single estimated index provided good accuracy for differential diagnosis of AD and MCI. This good differentiation power suggests its usefulness not only for dementia diagnosis but also in a longitudinal study. PMID:21966405

  10. Clinical significance of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in computed tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, O.; Agnoli, A.L.; Lippmann, R.; Schuetz, H.J.

    1981-02-01

    The diagnosis of atrophy of the brain based on the visual interpretation of CT findings appears questionable. In 56 patients there was no correlation between the CT findings of enlarged ventricles and sulci and clinical findings of psychoorganic syndromes. Only the group of 60 to 80 year old patients showed a statistically significant correlation between psychoorganic findings and the area of the lateral ventricles - measured planimetrically - and the diameter of the cella medica, but not the group of the 40 to 60 year old. There was no relationship between the number of cortical sulci and psychopathology. The morphological findings of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in CT - even with exact measurements - do not allow any conclusions in regard to psychoorganic findings.

  11. Arterial injuries after penetrating brain injury in civilians: risk factors on admission head computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodanapally, Uttam K; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Aarabi, Bizhan; Roy, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the specific CT findings of the injury profile in penetrating brain injury (PBI) that are risk factors related to intracranial arterial injuries. The authors retrospectively evaluated admission head CTs and accompanying digital subtraction angiography (DSA) studies from patients with penetrating trauma to the head in the period between January 2005 and December 2012. Two authors reviewed the CT images to determine the presence or absence of 30 injury profile variables and quantified selected variables. The CT characteristics in patients with and without arterial injuries were compared using univariate analysis, multivariate analysis, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to determine the respective risk factors, independent predictors, and optimal threshold values for the continuous variables. Fifty-five patients were eligible for study inclusion. The risk factors for an intracranial arterial injury on univariate analysis were an entry wound over the frontobasal-temporal regions, a bihemispheric wound trajectory, a wound trajectory in proximity to the circle of Willis (COW), a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a higher SAH score, an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and a higher IVH score. A trajectory in proximity to the COW was the best predictor of injury (OR 6.8 and p = 0.005 for all penetrating brain injuries [PBIs]; OR 13.3 and p = 0.001 for gunshot wounds [GSWs]). Significant quantitative variables were higher SAH and IVH scores. An SAH score of 3 (area under the ROC curve [AUC] for all PBIs 0.72; AUC for GSWs 0.71) and an IVH score of 3 (AUC for all PBIs 0.65; AUC for GSWs 0.65) could be used as threshold values to suggest an arterial injury. The risk factors identified may help radiologists suggest the possibility of arterial injury and prioritize neurointerventional consultation and potential DSA studies.

  12. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, Tall; Shibata, Yoshiki [Southern Tohoku Fukushima Hospital (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  13. Brain Abscess in the Computed Tomography Era: A 10-year Experience from Auckland, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJ Holland

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Notes were reviewed for 68 patients with brain abscess diagnosed at Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand between 1978 and 1988. Mean age was 30 years (range one week to 74 years. There were 48 men and 40% were Maori or Pacific Island Polynesians. Seventy-two per cent of patients had headache, 54% had fever and 72% had lateralizing neurological signs. Thirty-one per cent of abscesses were associated with contiguous infection (otic, sinus, dental. Forty-four per cent were in the frontal lobe. Two abscesses were sterile; 197 bacterial isolates were cultured from the remainder. Fifty-four per cent contained obligate anaerobes, which were the only isolates in 22%. Streptococcus anginosus was the single most common isolate present in 22% of the abscesses. Amoxycillin plus metronidazole provided cover for approximately 95% of the total isolates on the basis of sensitivity testing. Treatment was with surgery and antibiotics in all but three patients, who were cured with antibiotics alone. Sixty per cent had a definitive regimen of penicillin (or ampicillin/amoxycillin and/or metronidazole, always intravenous initially but subsequently often orally. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 57 days (range 28 to 206. Seventy-five per cent had initial aspiration, 9% open drainage and 7% were excised initially. Seventy-one per cent had a good functional outcome. Mortality was 8.8%. Factors associated with a poor outcome were trauma as a cause, and delays after admission of more than seven days to diagnosis and/or operation.

  14. Hemimegalencephaly: A rare cause of hemihypoperfusion on 99m technetium-ethyl cysteinate dimer brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Nishikant A; Singhal, Abhinav; Mukherjee, Anirban; Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2013-04-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare congenital neuronal migration disorder that can presents with the equally rare finding of hemihypoperfusion on brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). It is an extremely rare cause of intractable epilepsy. Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain perfusion SPECT is useful in excluding other foci of hypoperfusion in the contralateral since hemispherectomy has been suggested to be the treatment of choice. Furthermore, hemimegalencephaly may present with hyper as well as hypoperfusion on ECD SPECT. We present the case of an 11-year-old male child with intractable seizures who showed hemihypoperfusion in the hemimegalecephalic hemisphere.

  15. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Hideo; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Mikako; Kitamura, Youji; Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Iida, Yasuhiko; Shimazu, Seiichiro; Yoneda, Fumiro [Fujimoto Pharmaceutical Corporation, Matsubara, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [{sup 123}I]2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [{sup 123}I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  16. External validation of the rotterdam computed tomography score in the prediction of mortality in severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose D Charry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a public health problem. It is a pathology that causes significant mortality and disability in Colombia. Different calculators and prognostic models have been developed to predict the neurological outcomes of these patients. The Rotterdam computed tomography (CT score was developed for prognostic purposes in TBI. We aimed to examine the accuracy of the prognostic discrimination and prediction of mortality of the Rotterdam CT score in a cohort of trauma patients with severe TBI in a university hospital in Colombia. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 127 patients with severe TBI treated in a regional trauma center in Colombia over a 2-year period. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used. The discriminatory power of the score, its accuracy, and precision were assessed by logistic regression and as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Shapiro–Wilk, Chi-square, and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the real outcomes in the cohort against the predicted outcomes. Results: The median age of the patient cohort was 33 years, and 84.25% were male. The median injury severity score was 25, the median Glasgow Coma Scale motor score was 3, the basal cisterns were closed in 46.46% of the patients, and a midline shift of >5 mm was seen in 50.39%. The 6-month mortality was 29.13%, and the Rotterdam CT score predicted a mortality of 26% (P < 0.0001 (area under the curve: 0.825; 95% confidence interval: 0.745–0.903. Conclusions: The Rotterdam CT score predicted mortality at 6 months in patients with severe head trauma in a university hospital in Colombia. The Rotterdam CT score is useful for predicting early death and the prognosis of patients with TBI.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography of the Brain-50 Years of Innovation, With a Focus on the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M; Aoki, Shigeki; Bradley, William G; Chang, Kee-Hyun; Essig, Marco; Ma, Lin; Ross, Jeffrey S; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-09-01

    This review focuses specifically on the developments in brain imaging, as opposed to the spine, and specifically conventional, clinical, cross-sectional imaging, looking primarily at advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). These fields are viewed from a perspective of landmark publications in the last 50 years and subsequently more in depth using sentinel publications from the last 5 years. It is also written from a personal perspective, with the authors having witnessed the evolution of both fields from their initial clinical introduction to their current state. Both CT and MRI have made tremendous advances during this time, regarding not only sensitivity and spatial resolution, but also in terms of the speed of image acquisition. Advances in CT in recent years have focused in part on reduced radiation dose, an important topic for the years to come. Magnetic resonance imaging has seen the development of a plethora of scan techniques, with marked superiority to CT in terms of tissue contrast due to the many parameters that can be assessed, and their intrinsic sensitivity. Future advances in MRI for clinical practice will likely focus both on new acquisition techniques that offer advances in speed and resolution, for example, simultaneous multislice imaging and data sparsity, and on standardization and further automation of image acquisition and analysis. Functional imaging techniques including specifically perfusion and functional magnetic resonance imaging will be further integrated into the workflow to provide pathophysiologic information that influence differential diagnosis, assist treatment decision and planning, and identify and follow treatment-related changes.

  18. Metrizamide computed tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, T.; Tamakawa, Y.; Arii, H. (Akita Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, M.; Hirota, K.

    1981-11-01

    Serial computed tomography of the cervical cord was performed following metrizamide myelography in five cases of clinically suspected syringomyelia. The syrinx filled with refluxed metrizamide was demonstrated in all of the cases. The reflux of metrizamide into the syrinx was most marked several hours following intrathecal injection of metrizamide. Computed tomography combined with metrizamide myelography is essential in the diagnosis of communicating syringomyelia.

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain in Sturge-Weber syndrome using N-isopropyl-p-( sup 123 I) iodoamphetamine; A comparative study with X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Hideki; Nozaki, Hidetsugu; Hamano, Shinichiro; Aihara, Toshinori (Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan))

    1990-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) was performed in 11 children with port wine stain on the face or head, aged 1.0{approx}14.2 years at investigation. Four cases without neurologic symptoms had no specific abnormality on SPECT and X-ray computed tomography (CT). In 4 cases of so-called Sturge-Weber syndrome with developmental quotients (DQ) or intelligence quotients (IQ) more than 80 and the neurologic symptoms consisting of seizures and hemiplegia, SPECT showed localized reduction of IMP accumulation, and CT exhibited calcification, atrophy and enhancement in 2 cases of 3 with contrast medium infusion in the same areas. In 3 cases with DQ of 50{approx}60 and severer neurologic symptoms, SPECT showed diffuse reduction or defect of IMP accumulation in the ipsilateral hemisphere, and CT exhibited remarkable atrophy, calcifications and enhancement in 2 cases with contrast medium infusion in the same hemisphere. In one case with severe neurologic symptoms, SPECT performed at an early stage showed high IMP accumulation in the ipsilateral hemisphere. (author).

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in ... X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities ( ... brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations through a technique called CT angiography. For more information, see the ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  4. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von;

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  10. Computed tomography of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Engelshoven, J M; Kreel, L

    1979-02-01

    The conventional anatomy of the prostate is reviewed and the computed tomography (CT) anatomy described and illustrated. The results of 55 "normal" cases were analyzed for size and relationship to the symphysis pubis, retropubic space, and bladder, as shown on CT sections correlating the features with age and possible urinary symptoms. Attention is also drawn to the differences between phleboliths and prostatic calcification. Computed tomography is an effective method of demonstrating the prostate and surrounding structures and of assessing prostatic enlargement.

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it ... changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, ... radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, ... other changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, ... radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough ...

  2. Low risk of late intracranial complications in mild traumatic brain injury patients using oral anticoagulation after an initial normal brain computed tomography scan: education instead of hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonman, G G; Bakker, D P; Jellema, K

    2014-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common neurological disorder. Whether oral anticoagulation (OAC) use is a risk factor for secondary deterioration in mTBI patients after a normal computed tomography (CT) scan is unclear. Therefore data were retrospectively collected on patients with mTBI who used OAC to determine the incidence of secondary clinical deterioration after an initial normal head CT scan. This was a retrospective single-centre patient record study. All patients with an mTBI who presented at the emergency department between January 2007 and October 2011 were selected. Inclusion criteria were mTBI and at least 1 week of OAC use resulting in an international normalized radio > 1.1. CT scans were re-evaluated for this study. A total of 211 mTBI patients using OAC and with an initial CT scan without abnormalities were included in the analysis. In five patients a secondary deterioration was found. One patient developed a subdural hematoma after 15 h of clinical observation. The other four patients became symptomatic between 2 and 28 days after trauma. A low risk of secondary deterioration within 24 h in mTBI patients taking OAC with a normal first head CT scan was found. Our study does not support the recommendation of the current guidelines that these patients should be clinically observed for at least 24 h. The fact that in our series the majority of secondary deteriorations occurred between 2 and 28 days after trauma underscores the importance of patient instructions upon discharge from the hospital. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  3. Comparison of computed tomography and radionuclide scanning for detection of brain metastases in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J.M.; Nelson, M.J.; Ihde, D.C.; Makuch, R.W.; Glatstein, E.; Zabell, A.; Johnston-Early, A.; Bates, H.R.; Saini, N.; Cohen, M.H.

    1984-09-01

    Neurologic history and examination, radionuclide brain scans (RN), and computed tomographic brain scans (CT) were performed at diagnosis and sequentially in 153 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) to assess the sensitivity and accuracy of these screening methods and to determine whether the early detection of brain metastases influences survival. CT scans (sensitivity, 98%; positive predictive accuracy, 98%) were superior to RN scans (sensitivity, 71%; positive predictive accuracy, 86%) in patients with or without neurologic signs or symptoms. However, CT scans were positive in only 6% of asymptomatic patients at diagnosis and 13% of asymptomatic patients after systemic therapy. Brain metastases detected by CT scan were the sole site of extensive-stage disease in 6% of patients at diagnosis. Despite the enhanced ability of CT scans to detect asymptomatic lesions, survival after therapeutic cranial irradiation was similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The results suggest that CT brain scans should be used routinely in SCLC patients with neurologic signs or symptoms, at diagnosis (when treatment decisions are based on stage), and at six-month intervals in patients with prior brain metastases and in whom erratic follow-up is likely.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... does the equipment look like? The CT scanner is typically a ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the passage of a ...

  7. Are There Any Additional Benefits to Performing Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scans and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Patients with Ground-Glass Nodules Prior to Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae Uk; Song, Junwhi; Lee, Kyung Jong; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Jhingook; Han, Joungho; Um, Sang Won

    2017-10-01

    A ground-glass nodule (GGN) represents early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. However, there is still no consensus for preoperative staging of GGNs. Therefore, we evaluated the need for the routine use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during staging. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in 72 patients with 74 GGNs of less than 3 cm in diameter, which were confirmed via surgery as malignancy, at the Samsung Medical Center between May 2010 and December 2011. The median age of the patients was 59 years. The median GGN diameter was 18 mm. Pure and part-solid GGNs were identified in 35 (47.3%) and 39 (52.7%) cases, respectively. No mediastinal or distant metastasis was observed in these patients. In preoperative staging, all of the 74 GGNs were categorized as stage IA via chest CT scans. Additional PET/CT scans and brain MRIs classified 71 GGNs as stage IA, one as stage IIIA, and two as stage IV. However, surgery and additional diagnostic work-ups for abnormal findings from PET/CT scans classified 70 GGNs as stage IA, three as stage IB, and one as stage IIA. The chest CT scans did not differ from the combined modality of PET/CT scans and brain MRIs for the determination of the overall stage (94.6% vs. 90.5%; kappa value, 0.712). PET/CT scans in combination with brain MRIs have no additional benefit for the staging of patients with GGN lung adenocarcinoma before surgery.

  8. Acute effect of electroconvulsive therapy on brain perfusion assessed by Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajc, M.; Basic, M.; Topuzovic, N.; Babic, D.; Ivancevic, D. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Rebro, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Medved, V. (Psychiatric Clinic, University Hospital Rebro, Zagreb (Yugoslavia))

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in relative terms with Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim and single photon emission computed tomography in 11 patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The patients suffered from major depressive disorder (n=8) or schizoaffective disorders (n=3). rCBF was measured under general anesthesia 3 days prior to the ECT treatment and coinciding with the ECT stimualtion. ECT caused a redistribution of the tracers uptake. The uptake became more pronounced in frontal parts of the brain and in the basal ganglia than in posterior parts of the cortex, and the thalamus. This selective effect of ECT on rCBF may be related to catecholaminergic projections to anterior parts of the brain. (author).

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of a needle used to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous ... sedation may be needed for children who cannot hold still. Motion will cause blurring of the images ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and ... generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save ... to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a needle used to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations ... eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... which may be causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal ... CT scans . CT is not sensitive in detecting inflammation of the meninges —the membranes covering the brain. ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your ... emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. Tell your ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... aneurysm in a patient with a sudden severe headache. a blood clot or bleeding within the brain ... a few seconds, and even faster in small children. Such speed is beneficial for all patients but ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to ... cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  18. Computed tomography of ancient Egyptian mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood-Nash, D C

    1979-12-01

    This first report of the application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of ancient mummies, the desiccated brain of a boy and the body of a young woman within her cartonnage, shows that CT is uniquely suitable for the study of such antiquities, a study that does not necessitate destruction of the mummy or its cartonnage. Exquisite images result that are of great paleoanatomical, paleopathological, and archeological significance.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  3. Neuroscience, brains, and computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorno Maria Innocenti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the role of the neurosciences in establishing what the brain is and how states of the brain relate to states of the mind. The brain is viewed as a computational deviceperforming operations on symbols. However, the brain is a special purpose computational devicedesigned by evolution and development for survival and reproduction, in close interaction with theenvironment. The hardware of the brain (its structure is very different from that of man-made computers.The computational style of the brain is also very different from traditional computers: the computationalalgorithms, instead of being sets of external instructions, are embedded in brain structure. Concerningthe relationships between brain and mind a number of questions lie ahead. One of them is why andhow, only the human brain grasped the notion of God, probably only at the evolutionary stage attainedby Homo sapiens.

  4. Quantification of Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer brain single photon emission computed tomography images using statistical probabilistic brain atlas in depressive end-stage renal disease patients Correlation with disease severity and symptom factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heeyoung Kim; In Joo Kim; Seong-Jang Kim; Sang Heon Song; Kyoungjune Pak; Keunyoung Kim

    2012-01-01

    This study adapted a statistical probabilistic anatomical map of the brain for single photon emission computed tomography images of depressive end-stage renal disease patients. This research aimed to investigate the relationship between symptom clusters, disease severity, and cerebral blood flow. Twenty-seven patients (16 males, 11 females) with stages 4 and 5 end-stage renal disease were enrolled, along with 25 healthy controls. All patients underwent depressive mood assessment and brain single photon emission computed tomography. The statistical probabilistic anatomical map images were used to calculate the brain single photon emission computed tomography counts. Asymmetric index was acquired and Pearson correlation analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between symptom factors, severity, and regional cerebral blood flow. The depression factors of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale showed a negative correlation with cerebral blood flow in the left amygdale. The insomnia factor showed negative correlations with cerebral blood flow in the left amygdala, right superior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and left middle frontal gyrus. The anxiety factor showed a positive correlation with cerebral glucose metabolism in the cerebellar vermis and a negative correlation with cerebral glucose metabolism in the left globus pallidus, right inferior frontal gyrus, both temporal poles, and left parahippocampus. The overall depression severity (total scores of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) was negatively correlated with the statistical probabilistic anatomical map results in the left amygdala and right inferior frontal gyrus. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that the disease severity and extent of cerebral blood flow quantified by a probabilistic brain atlas was related to various brain areas in terms of the overall severity and symptom factors in end-stage renal disease patients.

  5. Relationship between brain atrophy estimated by a longitudinal computed tomography study and blood pressure control in patients with essential hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamano, Shigeru; Sawai, Fuyuki; Yamamoto, Yuta [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)] [and others

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between blood pressure control and the progression of brain atrophy in the elderly, patients with essential hypertension and brain atrophy were longitudinally evaluated using computerized tomography (CT). The study evaluated 48 patients with essential hypertension aged 46-78 years, and 30 sex- and age-matched normotensive control subjects. The extent of brain atrophy as determined by caudate head index (CHI), the inverse cella media index (iCMI), and Evans` ratio (ER) was estimated twice at an interval of 5-9 years (mean, 6.9 years). The mean annual increases in CHI ({Delta}CHI), iCMI ({Delta}iCMI), and ER ({Delta}ER) were evaluated. Mean blood volume in the common carotid artery (BF) and the decrease in BF per year ({Delta}BF) were also determined. The {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER increased with age in the hypertensive subjects as well as the control group across all age groups evaluated. The {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER were significantly greater in the patients with essential hypertension in their 50s as compared with the controls. In patients with essential hypertension aged 65 years or older, the {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER were significantly lower in the group in whom the blood pressure was controlled within the range of borderline hypertension than the groups in which it was controlled in the range of normal or mild hypertension. In the younger patients under the age of 65 with essential hypertension, blood pressure control did not affect the {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER. The {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER were significantly correlated with {Delta}BF in both groups. These findings indicate that control of systolic blood pressure within the range of borderline hypertension may delay the progression of brain atrophy in elderly patients with essential hypertension. (author)

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a sudden severe headache. a blood clot or bleeding within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ...

  15. Brain perfusion imaging using a Reconstruction-of-Difference (RoD) approach for cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mow, M.; Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Koliatsos, V.; Aygun, N.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To improve the timely detection and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage or ischemic stroke, recent efforts include the development of cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems for perfusion imaging and new approaches to estimate perfusion parameters despite slow rotation speeds compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems. This work describes development of a brain perfusion CBCT method using a reconstruction of difference (RoD) approach to enable perfusion imaging on a newly developed CBCT head scanner prototype. Methods: A new reconstruction approach using RoD with a penalized-likelihood framework was developed to image the temporal dynamics of vascular enhancement. A digital perfusion simulation was developed to give a realistic representation of brain anatomy, artifacts, noise, scanner characteristics, and hemo-dynamic properties. This simulation includes a digital brain phantom, time-attenuation curves and noise parameters, a novel forward projection method for improved computational efficiency, and perfusion parameter calculation. Results: Our results show the feasibility of estimating perfusion parameters from a set of images reconstructed from slow scans, sparse data sets, and arc length scans as short as 60 degrees. The RoD framework significantly reduces noise and time-varying artifacts from inconsistent projections. Proper regularization and the use of overlapping reconstructed arcs can potentially further decrease bias and increase temporal resolution, respectively. Conclusions: A digital brain perfusion simulation with RoD imaging approach has been developed and supports the feasibility of using a CBCT head scanner for perfusion imaging. Future work will include testing with data acquired using a 3D-printed perfusion phantom currently and translation to preclinical and clinical studies.

  16. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  17. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  18. Receptor binding characterization of the benzodiazepine radioligand sup 125 I-Ro16-0154: Potential probe for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, E.W.; Woods, S.W.; Zoghbi, S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Innis, R.B. (Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (USA)); McBride, B.J. (Medi-Physics, Inc., Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The binding of an iodinated benzodiazepine (BZ) radioligand has been characterized, particularly in regard to its potential use as a neuroreceptor brain imaging agent with SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). Ro16-0154 is an iodine-containing BZ antagonist and a close analog of Ro15-1788. In tissue homogenates prepared from human and monkey brain, the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Ro16-0154 was saturable, of high affinity, and had high ratios of specific to non-specific binding. Physiological concentrations of NaCl enhanced specific binding approximately 15% compared to buffer without this salt. Kinetic studies of association and dissociation demonstrated a temperature dependent decrease in affinity with increasing temperature. Drug displacement studies confirmed that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 binds to the central type BZ receptor: binding is virtually identical to that of {sup 3}H-Ro15-1788 except that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 shows an almost 10 fold higher affinity at 37{degree}C. These in vitro results suggest that {sup 123}I-labeled Ro16-0154 shows promise as a selective, high affinity SPECT probe of the brain's BZ receptor.

  19. Cranial computed tomography in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltshauser, E. (Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Kinderklinik)

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals mainly with methodical aspects (such as sedation, intravenous and intrathecal application of contrast media) and with common difficulties in interpretation of computed tomography images. The indications for cranial CT are discussed in respect to probable therapeutic consequences and expected diagnostic yield. In the view of the author CT is, as a rule, not required in assessing chronic headache, generalised epileptic convulsions, non-specific mental retardation and cerebral palsy.

  20. Computed tomography in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valavanis, A.; Schubiger, O.; Hayek, J.; Friede, R.L

    1981-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) findings in a verified case of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are presented. CT revealed diffuse and severe cerebral atrophy, reflected by generalized subarachnoid space enlargement and symmetric ventricular dilatation. There was no evidence of abnormalities of the white matter. The CT features in our case of NCL correspond perfectly with the neuropathologic changes of the disease mentioned in the literature. Furthermore, CT is of considerable help in differentiating between those inherited metabolic brain diseases characterized primarily by white matter involvement and those presenting predominantly with changes of grey matter.

  1. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultras...

  2. Image quality and radiation dose of brain computed tomography in children: effects of decreasing tube voltage from 120 kVp to 80 kVp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun Suk; Ryu, Young Jin; Kim, Yu Jin [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Computed tomography (CT) has generated public concern associated with radiation exposure, especially for children. Lowering the tube voltage is one strategy to reduce radiation dose. To assess the image quality and radiation dose of non-enhanced brain CT scans acquired at 80 kilo-voltage peak (kVp) compared to those at 120 kVp in children. Thirty children who had undergone both 80- and 120-kVp non-enhanced brain CT were enrolled. For quantitative analysis, the mean attenuation of white and gray matter, attenuation difference, noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and posterior fossa artifact index were measured. For qualitative analysis, noise, gray-white matter differentiation, artifact and overall image quality were scored. Radiation doses were evaluated by CT dose index, dose-length product and effective dose. The mean attenuations of gray and white matter and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly increased at 80 kVp, while parameters related to image noise, i.e. noise, signal-to-noise ratio and posterior fossa artifact index were higher at 80 kVp than at 120 kVp. In qualitative analysis, 80-kVp images showed improved gray-white differentiation but more artifacts compared to 120-kVp images. Subjective image noise and overall image quality scores were similar between the two scans. Radiation dose parameters were significantly lower at 80 kVp than at 120 kVp. In pediatric non-enhanced brain CT scans, a decrease in tube voltage from 120 kVp to 80 kVp resulted in improved gray-white matter contrast, comparable image quality and decreased radiation dose. (orig.)

  3. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...... contains a survey of application examples from the manufacturing industry as well as from other industries, e.g., electrical and electronic devices, inhomogeneous materials, and from the food industry. Challenges as well as major national and international coordinated activities in the field of industrial...

  4. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    Modern diagnostic imagining techniques are gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Denmark has been involved in the development of this use of imaging techniques from the beginning. The Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Southern Denmark acquired a helical computed tomography (CT...... AND METHODS: This thesis investigated 900 forensic cases that were CT-scanned and autopsied at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, from 2006-2011. The scanner was a Siemens Somatom Spirit dual-slice CT-scanner with a Siemens Syngo MultiModality workstation. Contrast enhancement...

  5. Detecting brain tumor in computed tomography images using Markov random fields and fuzzy C-means clustering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulbaqi, Hayder Saad [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11700, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Education, University of Al-Qadisiya, Al-Qadisiya (Iraq); Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Mustafa, Iskandar Shahrim Bin [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11700, Penang (Malaysia); Abood, Loay Kadom [Department of Computer Science, College of Science, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2015-04-24

    Brain tumors, are an abnormal growth of tissues in the brain. They may arise in people of any age. They must be detected early, diagnosed accurately, monitored carefully, and treated effectively in order to optimize patient outcomes regarding both survival and quality of life. Manual segmentation of brain tumors from CT scan images is a challenging and time consuming task. Size and location accurate detection of brain tumor plays a vital role in the successful diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Brain tumor detection is considered a challenging mission in medical image processing. The aim of this paper is to introduce a scheme for tumor detection in CT scan images using two different techniques Hidden Markov Random Fields (HMRF) and Fuzzy C-means (FCM). The proposed method has been developed in this research in order to construct hybrid method between (HMRF) and threshold. These methods have been applied on 4 different patient data sets. The result of comparison among these methods shows that the proposed method gives good results for brain tissue detection, and is more robust and effective compared with (FCM) techniques.

  6. Future of cardiac computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo N De Cecco; U Joseph Schoepf

    2015-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography(CCTA)has become an integral tool in the noninvasive diagnostic workup of patients with suspected coronary artery disease in both elective and emergency settings. Today, it represents a mature technique providing accurate, non-invasive morphological assessment of the coronary arteries and atherosclerotic plaque burden. Iterative reconstruction algorithms, low kV imaging, and single-heart beat acquisitions hold promise to further reduce dose requirements and improve the safety and robustness of the technique in several circumstances including imaging of heavily calcified vessels, patients with morbid obesity or irregular heart rates, and assessment in the emergency setting. However, it has become clear over recent years that cardiac radiologists need to take further steps towards the development and integration of functional imaging with morphological CCTA assessment to truly provide a comprehensive evaluation of the heart. Computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, including both dynamic and static dual-energy approaches, has demonstrated the ability to directly assess and quantify myocardial ischemia with simultaneous CCTA acquisition with a reasonable contrast medium volume and radiation dose delivered to the patient. In order to promote CCTA in the clinical and research environments, radiologists should prepare to embrace the change from morphological to functional imaging, furnishing all the necessary resources and information to referring clinicians.

  7. Brain computed tomography findings of aged schizophrenics; Comparison with healthy aged controls and aged schizophrenics with a history of psychosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oomori, Masao; Koshino, Yoshifumi; Murata, Tetsuhito; Murata, Ichirou; Tani, Kazuhiko; Horie, Tan; Isaki, Kiminori (Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan))

    1992-05-01

    Brain CT was performed in a total of 30 aged schizophrenic patients, consisting of 20 with no history of psychosurgery (lobotomy) and the other 10 lobotomized patients. The CT findings were compared with those from healthy aged persons. The group of schizophrenic patients had marked atrophy of the frontal lobe and dilatated Sylvian fissure as compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in ventricular factors between the two groups. These findings may have implications for the different mechanisms of the occurrence of atrophied brain surface and enlarged ventricle. The cerebral cortex involved in the occurrence of schizophrenia may be affected by aging-related cerebral atrophy, in addition to the morphological changes due to schizophrenia. Thus, schizophrenic cerebral atrophy was more noticeable than physiological aging-related atrophy. However, enlargement of the ventricle in the schizophrenic group progressed with aging in the same manner as that in the normal group. In comparing schizophrenic patients with or without a history of lobotomy, atrophy of the brain surface and enlargement of the ventricle were more marked in the lobotomized patients than the non-lobotomized patients. This confirmed that lobotomy, as well as surgical scar, is involved in the morphology of schizophrenic brain. (N.K.).

  8. Clinical usefulness of scatter and attenuation correction for brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Itaru; Doi, Kenji; Komori, Tsuyoshi; Hou, Nobuyoshi; Tabuchi, Koujirou; Matsui, Ritsuo; Sueyoshi, Kouzou; Utsunomiya, Keita; Narabayashi, Isamu [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study clinical usefulness of scatter and attenuation correction (SAC) of brain SPECT in infants to compare the standard reconstruction (STD). The brain SPECT was performed in 31 patients with 19 epilepsy, 5 cerebro-vascular disease, 2 brain tumor, 3 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus and psychosis (mean age 5.0{+-}4.9 years old). Many patients was necessary to be injected sedatives for restraining body motion after Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) was injected at the convulsion or rest. Brain SPECT data were acquired with triple detector gamma camera (GCA-9300 Toshiba Japan). These data were reconstructed by filtered backprojection after the raw data were corrected by triple energy windows method of scatter correction and Chang filtered method of attenuation correction. The same data was reconstructed by filtered backprojection without these corrections. Both SAC and STD SPECT images were analyzed by the visual interpretation. The uptake ratio of cerebral basal nuclei was calculated by the counts of the thalamus or lenticular nuclei divided by the cortex. All images of SAC method were excellent than that of STD method. The thalamic uptake ratio in SAC method was higher than that of STD method (1.22{+-}0.09>0.87{+-}0.22 p<0.01). The lenticular nuclear uptake ratio in SAC method was higher than that of STD method (1.26{+-}0.15>1.02{+-}0.16 p<0.01). Transmission scan is the most suitable method of absorption correction. But the transmission scan is not adequate for examination of children, because this scan needs a lot of time and the infants are exposed by the line source radioisotope. It was concluded that these scatter and absorption corrections were most suitable method for brain SPECT in pediatrics. (author)

  9. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can "instantaneously"...

  10. New high-resolution computed tomography data of the Taung partial cranium and endocast and their bearing on metopism and hominin brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ralph L; Broadfield, Douglas C; Carlson, Kristian J

    2014-09-09

    Falk and colleagues [Falk D, Zollikofer CP, Morimoto N, Ponce de León MS (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(22):8467-8470] hypothesized that selective pressures favored late persistence of a metopic suture and open anterior fontanelle early in hominin evolution, and they put an emphasis on the Taung Child (Australopithecus africanus) as evidence for the antiquity of these adaptive features. They suggested three mutually nonexclusive pressures: an "obstetric dilemma," high early postnatal brain growth rates, and neural reorganization in the frontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we obtained the first high-resolution computed tomography (CT) data from the Taung hominin. These high-resolution image data and an examination of the hominin fossil record do not support the metopic and fontanelle features proposed by Falk and colleagues. Although a possible remnant of the metopic suture is observed in the nasion-glabella region of the Taung partial cranium (but not along the frontal crest), this character state is incongruent with the zipper model of metopic closure described by Falk and colleagues. Nor do chimpanzee and bonobo endocast data support the assertion that delayed metopic closure in Taung is necessary because of widening (reorganization) of the prefrontal or frontal cortex. These results call into question the adaptive value of delaying metopic closure, and particularly its antiquity in hominin evolution. Further data from hominoids and hominins are required to support the proposed adaptive arguments, particularly an obstetric dilemma placing constraints on neural and cranial development in Australopithecus.

  11. Brain MRI and single photon emission computed tomography in severe athetotic cerebral palsy. A comparative study with mental and motor disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Tsuzura, Shigenobu [Metropolitan Medical Center of the Severely Handicapped, Fuchu, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1995-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]-iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) was performed in twelve patients with severe athetotic cerebral palsy (Ath; 5 males and 7 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move) and mental retardation (I.Q, or D.Q, below 30). The neuroimaging findings of those patients were compared with those of patients mental and motor disorders. In five caes suffering from neonatal asphyxia, SPECT demonstrated a decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in corpus striatum, thalamus, orbitofrontal areas, pericentral gyrus areas, prefrontal areas and medial temporal areas. In seven cases suffering from neonatal jaundice, SPECT demonstrated a decreased rCBF in orbito-frontal areas, prefrontal areas and medial temporal areas. SPECT showed hypoperfusion of peri-central gyrus areas in cases with complications of spastic palsy. The decreased rCBF in medial temporal areas mostly corresponded to an alteration in hippocampal formation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cases with hypoperfusion of bilateral medial temporal areas showed a lower score of language understanding than those with the unilateral damage. In cases with hypofusion of bilateral prefrontal areas and bilateral medial temporal areas, the grade of understanding of language was almost below 12 months. In cases with hypoperfusion of orbitofrontal areas, psychomotor hypersensitivity had been observed. Those results suggest that IMP-SPECT and MRI of the brain is useful tool for neurological assessment in handicapped patients with athetotic cerebral palsy. (author).

  12. Comparative yield of positive brain Computed Tomography after implementing the NICE or SIGN head injury guidelines in two equivalent urban populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerfield, R., E-mail: ruth.summerfield@uhns.nhs.u [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom); Macduff, R. [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF (United Kingdom); Davis, R. [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom); Sambrook, M. [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow G4 0SF (United Kingdom); Britton, I. [Medical Imaging, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 6QG (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aims: To compare the yield of positive computed tomography (CT) brain examinations after the implementation of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) or the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) guidelines, in comparable urban populations in two teaching hospitals in England and Scotland. Materials and methods: Four hundred consecutive patients presenting at each location following a head injury who underwent a CT examination of the head according to the locally implemented guidelines were compared. Similar matched populations were compared for indication and yield. Yield was measured according to (1) positive CT findings of the sequelae of trauma and (2) intervention required with anaesthetic or intensive care unit (ICU) support, or neurosurgery. Results: The mean ages of patients at the English and Scottish centres were 49.9 and 49.2 years, respectively. Sex distribution was 64.1% male and 66.4% male respectively. Comparative yield was 23.8 and 26.5% for positive brain scans, 3 and 2.75% for anaesthetic support, and 3.75 and 2.5% for neurosurgical intervention. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <13 (NICE) and GCS {<=}12 and radiological or clinical evidence of skull fracture (SIGN) demonstrated the greatest statistical association with a positive CT examination. Conclusion: In a teaching hospital setting, there is no significant difference in the yield between the NICE and SIGN guidelines. Both meet the SIGN standard of >10% yield of positive scans. The choice of guideline to follow should be at the discretion of the local institution. The indications GCS <13 and clinical or radiological evidence of a skull fracture are highly predictive of intracranial pathology, and their presence should be an absolute indicator for fast-tracking the management of the patient.

  13. Sensitivity of radionuclide brain scan and computed tomography in early detection of viral meningoencephalitis. [/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA or /sup 99m/Tc-sodium pertechnetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.E.; DeLand, F.H.; Montebello, J.

    1979-08-01

    The sensitivity of radionuclide imaging and computed tomography (CT) was evaluated in 25 patients for early detection of viral meningoencephalitis. Diagnosis was based on clinical evidence, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies, electroencephalography (EEG) and radionuclide imaging. Computed tomography with contrast enhancement was performed within four days after onset of neurological signs or symptoms in 23 patients; no significant findings such as low-absorption abnormalities, mass effect or abnormal enhancement were seen. Radionuclide imaging demonstrated a sensitivity of 90% in the detection of viral meningoencephalitis; the temporal lobe was most commonly involved in patients with herpes encephalitis. Radionuclide imaging should be considered as the first diagnostic procedure in suspected early viral meningoencephalitis.

  14. Computed tomography of the gallbladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrilla, T R; Reich, N E; Haaga, J R; Seidelmann, F E; Cooperman, A M; Alfidi, R J

    1978-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to study 79 patients with suspected gallbladder disease. First and second generation scanners were used to determine the efficacy of CT in detecting cholecystitis or cholelithiasis. Manifestations of gallbladder disease such as hydrops, opaque and nonopaque gallstones, chronic cholecystitis with thickened inflammatory walls, and secondary liver abscesses can be easily detected. It is a useful technique for individuals in whom the gallbladder has failed to opacity on oral cholecystography. The scanning method is described, and estimates of reliability are given including its accuracy, limitations, and place in the management of gallbladder disease, especially cholelithiasis. When conventional radiographic examinations or ultrasound fail to give definitive diagnostic information, CT can be a useful alternative with an overall diagnostic accuracy greater than 80%.

  15. [Computer tomography of sports injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Rupp, N

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability.

  16. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability.

  17. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  18. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 19, ... The ECG is also needed to help the computer that is connected to the CT scanner create ...

  19. RADIATION DOSE IN PAEDIATRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for the accurate ... increasing, and estimates suggest that quantitative lifetime ... Keywords: Computed Tomography, Radiation Risk, Radiation Dose, Patient Dose ... techniques, such as MRI and ultrasound, which do not ..... in the course of management are not monitored to.

  20. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultrasound signal attenuation and distortion caused by a relatively thick skull.

  1. Brain-Computer Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Gerwin

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical groundwork of the 1930’s and 1940’s and the technical advance of computers in the following decades provided the basis for dramatic increases in human efficiency. While computers continue to evolve, and we can still expect increasing benefits from their use, the interface between humans and computers has begun to present a serious impediment to full realization of the potential payoff. This article is about the theoretical and practical possibility that direct communication between the brain and the computer can be used to overcome this impediment by improving or augmenting conventional forms of human communication. It is about the opportunity that the limitations of our body’s input and output capacities can be overcome using direct interaction with the brain, and it discusses the assumptions, possible limitations, and implications of a technology that I anticipate will be a major source of pervasive changes in the coming decades. PMID:18310804

  2. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  3. Cranial computed tomography in psychiatry. Kraniale Computertomographie in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkai, P. (Rheinische Landes- und Hochschulklinik Duesseldorf, Psychiatrische Klinik der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet (Germany)); Bogerts, B. (Rheinische Landes- und Hochschulklinik Duesseldorf, Psychiatrische Klinik der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Computed tomography has gained importance as a diagnostic tool in psychiatry to exclude structural brain pathology, but has passed on its role in research to magnetic resonance tomography. It helps to distinguish between senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. The enlargement of the ventricular system and cortical sulci is well established in schizophrenic and affective psychosis. Some alcohol addicts show a considerable degree of cerebral atrophy, only exceeded by demented patients, but this condition is potentially reversible. To screen psychiatric patients by CT is recommendable, as 2-10% of hospitalized psychiatric patients have structural brain disease. (orig.)

  4. X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, Willi A [Institute of Medical Physics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestr. 91, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-07

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  5. Computed tomography of arachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Min Gi; Bae, Weon Tae; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyun De [College of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The preoperative diagnosis of intracranial arachnoid cysts has been simplified, and made more rapid and accurate with computed tomography (CT). Using CT cisternography, detailed anatomic and physiologic information of arachnoid cysts could be obtained. CT features of pathologically proven 21 arachnoid cysts that were examined at Chonnam National University Hospital from June 1983 to May 1987 were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1.Prevalent age group was the 1st decade (8 cases) and male to female ratio was 17:4. 2.Clinical features were related to the location of arachnoid cyst, common symptoms were headache (53.3%), convulsion, mental change and walking disturbance. 3.Location of the arachnoid cyst were in supratentorial region (15 cases) most in middle cranial fossa (12 cases), and infratentorial region (6 cases), common at the retrocerebellar cisternal space (3 cases). 4.Shapes of arachnoid cyst were biconvex with straight inner margin (8 cases), spherical (7 cases), simple biconvex (3 cases) and others (3 cases). 5.Size of the arachnoid cyst, in the greatest dimension, was ranged from 2cm to 9cm and commonly distributed between 3cm to 5cm (14 cases). 6.Of all 14 cases, who did CT cisternography using metrizamide (11 cases) and iopamidol (3 cases), 2 cases had communication with the subarachnoid space.

  6. Optical tomography of the neonatal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebden, Jeremy C. [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Austin, Topun [University College London, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    A new method of assessing neurological function and pathology in the newborn infant is being developed based on the transmission of near-infrared light across the brain. Absorption by blood over a range of wavelengths reveals a strong dependency on oxygenation status, and measurements of transmitted light enable the spatial variation in the concentrations of the oxygenated and de-oxygenated forms of hemoglobin to be derived. Optical tomography has so far provided static three-dimensional maps of blood volume and oxygenation as well as dynamic images revealing the brain's response to sensory stimulation and global hemodynamic changes. The imaging modality is being developed as a safe and non-invasive tool that can be utilized at the cotside in intensive care. Optical tomography of the healthy infant brain is also providing a means of studying neurophysiological processes during early development and the potential consequences of prematurity. (orig.)

  7. A Freeware Path to Neutron Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillinger, Burkhard; Craft, Aaron E.

    Neutron computed tomography has become a routine method at many neutron sources due to the availability of digital detection systems, powerful computers and advanced software. The commercial packages Octopus by Inside Matters and VGStudio by Volume Graphics have been established as a quasi-standard for high-end computed tomography. However, these packages require a stiff investment and are available to the users only on-site at the imaging facility to do their data processing. There is a demand from users to have image processing software at home to do further data processing; in addition, neutron computed tomography is now being introduced even at smaller and older reactors. Operators need to show a first working tomography setup before they can obtain a budget to build an advanced tomography system. Several packages are available on the web for free; however, these have been developed for X-rays or synchrotron radiation and are not immediately useable for neutron computed tomography. Three reconstruction packages and three 3D-viewers have been identified and used even for Gigabyte datasets. This paper is not a scientific publication in the classic sense, but is intended as a review to provide searchable help to make the described packages usable for the tomography community. It presents the necessary additional preprocessing in ImageJ, some workarounds for bugs in the software, and undocumented or badly documented parameters that need to be adapted for neutron computed tomography. The result is a slightly complicated, but surprisingly high-quality path to neutron computed tomography images in 3D, but not a replacement for the even more powerful commercial software mentioned above.

  8. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  9. Iterative Reconstruction for Cardiopulmonary Computed Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of computed tomography (CT) examinations has increased rapidly since CT became commercially available. This resulted in growing concerns regarding the risk of malignancies induced by application of medical ionizing radiation. Therefore, radiation dose reduction strategies ar

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... materials and a metallic taste in his/her mouth that lasts for a few minutes. Occasionally, a ...

  11. Quantitative computed tomography evaluation of pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcevoy, Fintan J; Buelund, Lene; Strathe, Anders B

    2009-01-01

    Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present.......Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present....

  12. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  13. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  14. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of the skull in malignant otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe, rare infective condition of the external auditory canal and skull base. The diagnosis is generally made from a range of clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy is known to detect osteomyelitis earlier than computed tomography. The authors present a patient with bilateral malignant otitis externa where the extent of skull base involvement was determined on 3-phase bone scintigraphy with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

  15. Dopamine transporter distribution in patients with Parkinson disease of different stages detected using single-photon emission computed tomography brain imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiwu Zhang; Lijuan Zhu; Jianqiang Du; Bo Liu

    2007-01-01

    . Following injection, image was collected using scanner for single photon emission computed tomography (ADAC Company, USA). Matrix was 64 × 64, each detecting head revolved 180 ° ,1 frame/60 s. Sixty-four frames were collected with double detecting heads, 50 K/frame. Faultages with clearest image of corpora striatum were selected. Regions of interest (ROI) of caudate nucleus, anterior and posterior putamen and thalamic region in bilateral corpora striata were radioactively counted, and mean value of radioactive counting of ROI was used as the mean value of pixel in each region of bilateral corpora striata.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of radioactive uptake in each region of brain between healthy persons and patients with PD.RESULTS: Thirty patients with PD and six healthy persons who received body examination participated in the final result. Comparison of radioactive uptake in each region between healthy persons and patients with PD: ①In the healthy persons, high-density radioactive uptake was found in bilateral corpora striata;Structures of caudate nucleus, anterior and posterior putamen, and thalamus were clear with eudipleural radioactive distribution, and the background of peripheral brain tissue was very low. ②Radioactive intakes in opposite anterior and posterior putamen of patients with mild PD were significantly inferior to those in homolateral ones(70.45 ±3.35, 87.64±2.65, t =15.82, P < 0.05). Structures of bilateral caudate nucleus and Corresponding author: Jiwu Zhang,Department of Imageology, Second Hospital Affiliated to Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong Province, China E-mail:zh-j-u@sohu.comthalamus were clear with eudipleural radioactive distribution (P > 0.05). ③ Radioactive intakes in anterior and posterior putamen and thalamus of patients with moderate PD were significantly reduced as compared with healthy persons. There were significant differences in mean radioactive counting of ROI between patients

  16. Determining the orientation angle of directional leads for deep brain stimulation using computed tomography and digital x-ray imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitz, Alexander; Hoevels, Mauritius; Hellerbach, Alexandra; Gierich, Andreas; Luyken, Klaus; Dembek, Till A; Klehr, Martin; Wirths, Jochen; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Treuer, Harald

    2017-09-01

    Orientating the angle of directional leads for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in an axial plane introduces a new degree of freedom that is indicated by embedded anisotropic directional markers. Our aim was to develop algorithms to determine lead orientation angles from computed tomography (CT) and stereotactic x-ray imaging using standard clinical protocols, and subsequently assess the accuracy of both methods. In CT the anisotropic marker artifact was taken as a signature of the lead orientation angle and analyzed using discrete Fourier transform of circular intensity profiles. The orientation angle was determined from phase angles at a frequency 2/360° and corrected for aberrations at oblique leads. In x-ray imaging, frontal and lateral images were registered to stereotactic space and sub-images containing directional markers were extracted. These images were compared with projection images of an identically located virtual marker at different orientation angles. A similarity index was calculated and used to determine the lead orientation angle. Both methods were tested using epoxy phantoms containing directional leads (Cartesia™, Boston Scientific, Marlborough, USA) with known orientation. Anthropomorphic phantoms were used to compare both methods for DBS cases. Mean deviation between CT and x-ray was 1.5° ± 3.6° (range: -2.3° to 7.9°) for epoxy phantoms and 3.6° ± 7.1° (range: -5.6° to 14.6°) for anthropomorphic phantoms. After correction for imperfections in the epoxy phantoms, the mean deviation from ground truth was 0.0° ± 5.0° (range: -12° to 14°) for x-ray. For CT the results depended on the polar angle of the lead in the scanner. Mean deviation was -0.3° ± 1.9° (range: -4.6° to 6.6°) or 1.6° ± 8.9° (range: -23° to 34°) for polar angles ≤ 40° or > 40°. The results show that both imaging modalities can be used to determine lead orientation angles with high accuracy. CT is superior to x-ray imaging, but oblique leads (polar

  17. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  18. Thermoacoustic tomography arising in brain imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanov, Plamen

    2010-01-01

    We study the mathematical model of thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography when the sound speed has a jump across a smooth surface. This models the change of the sound speed in the skull when trying to image the human brain. We derive an explicit inversion formula in the form of a convergent Neumann series under the assumptions that all singularities from the support of the source reach the boundary.

  19. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  20. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  1. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Presti, D. Lo; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.

    2017-02-01

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to 1% and spatial resolutions CT in hadron-therapy.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  4. Application of computed tomography in paleoanthropological research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiujie Wu; Lynne A.Schepartz

    2009-01-01

    Hominin fossils are the most important materials for exploring questions about human origins and evolution. Because human fossils are very rare, it is impossible to use highly destructive techniques in order to study their morphology. Traditional analyses can only rely on the information gained from the study of the external morphology of specimens, and these approaches limited the study of human evolution. The application of computed tomography (CT) has facilitated major developments in paleoanthropology. To date, few studies on Chinese hominin fossils have used CT scanning methodology, but this is rapidly changing. In order to better understand the appli-cation of CT methodology in paleoanthropology, we review the applications of CT scanning on hominin fossils throughout the world.Studies examined include virtual fossil reconstruction, the use of endocasts to elucidate brain morphology, biomechanical analyses of bone distribution, imaging of mummies and research on early human health, and skeletal and dental microanatomical research.2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain emotional learning based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Asadi Ghanbari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface (BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction and classification operations. Classification is crucial as it has a substantial effect on the BCI speed and bit rate. Recent developments of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs bring forward some challenging problems to the machine learning community, of which classification of time-varying electrophysiological signals is a crucial one. Constructing adaptive classifiers is a promising approach to deal with this problem. In this paper, we introduce adaptive classifiers for classify electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The adaptive classifier is brain emotional learning based adaptive classifier (BELBAC, which is based on emotional learning process. The main purpose of this research is to use a structural model based on the limbic system of mammalian brain, for decision making and control engineering applications. We have adopted a network model developed by Moren and Balkenius, as a computational model that mimics amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, thalamus, sensory input cortex and generally, those parts of the brain thought responsible for processing emotions. The developed method was compared with other methods used for EEG signals classification (support vector machine (SVM and two different neural network types (MLP, PNN. The result analysis demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed approach.

  6. Comparison of detection results of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at different degrees in infant patients between brain electrical activity mapping, transcranial Doppler sonography and computer tomography examinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongruo He; Xiaoying Xu; Yinghui Zhang; Guochao Han

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND; It has been proved that brain electrical activity mapping (BEAM) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) detection can reflect the function of brain cell and its diseased degree of infant patients with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).OBJECTIVE: To observe the abnormal results of HIE at different degrees detected with BEAM and TCD in infant patients, and compare the detection results at the same time point between BEAM, TCD and computer tomography (CT) examinations.DESTGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Departments of Neuro-electrophysiology and Pediatrics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Qiqihar Medical College.PARTICTPANTS: Totally 416 infant patients with HIE who received treatment in the Department of Newborn Infants, Second Affiliated Hospital of Qiqihar Medical College during January 2001 and December 2005. The infant patients, 278 male and 138 female, were at embryonic 37 to 42 weeks and weighing 2.0 to 4.1 kg, and they were diagnosed with CT and met the diagnostic criteria of HIE of newborn infants compiled by Department of Neonatology, Pediatric Academy, Chinese Medical Association. According to diagnostic criteria, 130patients were mild abnormal, 196 moderate abnormal and 90 severe abnormal. The relatives of all the infant patients were informed of the experiment.METHODS: BEAM and TCD examinations were performed in the involved 416 infant patients with HIE at different degrees with DYD2000 16-channel BEAM instrument and EME-2000 ultrasonograph before preliminary diagnosis treatment (within 1 month after birth) and 1,3,6,12 and 24 months after birth, and detected results were compared between BEAM, TCD and CT examinations.MATN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of detection results of HIE at different time points in infant patients between BEAM, TCD and CT examinations. RESULTS: All the 416 infant patients with HIE participated in the result analysis. ① Comparison of the detected results in infant patients with mild HIE at different

  7. The diagnostic contribution of computed tomography in intranasal carcinoma with retrobulbar, oral and brain invasion in a canine: case report; Contribuicao da tomografia computadorizada no diagnostico de carcinoma intranasal com invasao retrobular, oral e cerebral em canino: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zardo, Karen Maciel, E-mail: kmz@bol.com.br; Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Zanoni, Diogo Souza; Costa, Denis Carvalho [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Clinica Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Intranasal tumors are uncommon and in most cases are malignant, aggressive and with low to moderate potential for metastasis. Clinical signs are usually caused by progressive obstruction of the upper airways. The test cytopathological also is a diagnosis method, but the definitive diagnosis is made by histopathological. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended to treatment planning. A poodle was attended at the veterinary hospital with a clinical history of epistaxis and nasal and ocular secretions, seizures and severe dyspnoea. The animal underwent to radiographic examination of the chest and skull as well as helical computed tomography of the nasal cavity and brain before and after the administration of intravenous contrast. The CT findings revealed an expansive bilateral nasal cavity neoformation, with involvement of the retrobulbar space, right frontal sinus, brain and oral cavity, suggesting a neoplastic or an infectious process. The CT examination allowed the material collection, directly from the mass, to cytological examination, providing the diagnosis of carcinoma. CT also allowed the determination of the unfavorable prognosis of the patient and the treatment planning which not included the surgical excision of the neoformation. Although CT was not conclusive in the diagnosis of carcinoma, it was essential to accurately define the extent of the lesion, to guide the collection of material directly from the tumor and to determine the prognosis of the animal, proving to be an extremely useful tool in cases of tumors intranasal in dogs. (author)

  8. Computed tomography versus invasive coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napp, Adriane E; Haase, Robert; Laule, Michael

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: More than 3.5 million invasive coronary angiographies (ICA) are performed in Europe annually. Approximately 2 million of these invasive procedures might be reduced by noninvasive tests because no coronary intervention is performed. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate noninva...... angiography (ICA) is the reference standard for detection of CAD. • Noninvasive computed tomography angiography excludes CAD with high sensitivity. • CT may effectively reduce the approximately 2 million negative ICAs in Europe. • DISCHARGE addresses this hypothesis in patients with low...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special image recording plate . Bones appear ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... of the machine, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ...

  13. Robust brain-computer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuderink, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables direct communication from the brain to devices, bypassing the traditional pathway of peripheral nerves and muscles. Current BCIs aimed at patients require that the user invests weeks, or even months, to learn the skill to intentionally modify their brain sign

  14. Paradoxical emboli: demonstration using helical computed tomography of the pulmonary artery associated with abdominal computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delalu, P.; Ferretti, G.R.; Bricault, I.; Ayanian, D.; Coulomb, M. [Service Central de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale, CHU Grenoble (France)

    2000-02-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with a recent history of a cerebrovascular accident. Because of clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism and negative Doppler ultrasound findings of the lower limbs, spiral computed tomography of the pulmonary artery was performed and demonstrated pulmonary emboli. We emphasize the role of computed tomography of the abdomen, performed 3 min after the thoracic acquisition, which showed an unsuspected thrombus within the abdominal aorta and the left renal artery with infarction of the left kidney. Paradoxical embolism was highly suspected on computed tomography data and confirmed by echocardiography which demonstrated a patent foramen ovale. (orig.)

  15. Cervical diplomyelia revealed by computed tomography (CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, G.B.; Davidovits, P.; Cerisoli, M.; Giulioni, M.

    1982-05-01

    An unusual case of cervical diplomyelia diagnosed by Computed Tomography (CT) is reported. The usefulness of CT examination in the evaluation of spinal dysraphic defects is emphasized, though performed without CSF enhancement. Visualisation of spinal cord splitting in the absence of bony spicula allows the authors to differentiate between diplomyelia and diastematomyelia which have been often described by using both terms interchangeably.

  16. Computed tomography demonstration of cholecystogastric fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Kuao Chou, MD, MPH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystogastric fistula is a rare complication of chronic cholecystitis or long-standing cholelithiasis. It results from the gradual erosion of the approximated, chronically inflamed wall of the gall bladder and stomach with fistulous tract formation. The present case describes the direct visualization of a cholecystogastric fistula by computed tomography in a patient without prior biliary system complaints.

  17. Computed tomography in untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harinarayana, C.V.; Renu, G.; Ammini, A.C.; Khurana, M.L.; Ved, P.; Karmarkar, M.G.; Ahuja, M.M.S.; Berry, M. (AIIMS, New Delhi (India))

    1991-02-01

    Six children with untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were examined by computed tomography (CT). Three cases demonstrated diffuse enlargement of both adrenal glands with preservation of normal configuration and two showed tumorous transformation in one of the enlarged glands. One had equivocal in this group (age 2 years) also showed bilateral hyperplasia. (orig.).

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstruc

  19. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstruc

  20. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzke, R W; Wall, W A [Institute for Computational Mechanics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Runck, H; Stahl, C A; Schneider, M; Guttmann, J [Department of Anesthesiology, Section for Experimental Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Schillinger, B; Calzada, E; Muehlbauer, M; Schulz, M [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) and Fakultaet fuer Physik E21 at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Priebe, H-J, E-mail: metzke@lnm.mw.tum.d [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-01-07

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 {mu}m, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. (note)

  1. Parallel Computing for the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    This software computes the tomographic reconstruction of spatial-spectral data from raw detector images of the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which enables transient-level, multi-spectral imaging by capturing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot.

  2. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Noriko; Sato, Hiromi; Kawaguchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tanaka, Makoto (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis.

  3. Computed tomography in meningeal carcinomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; Ono, N.; Horikoshi, S.; Uki, J.; Takeda, F. (Saitama Cancer Center (Japan))

    1982-04-01

    CT findings of meningeal carcinomatosis were studied in 17 patients (seven with lung cancer, two with breast cancer, one with gastric cancer, one with malignant melanoma, five with leukemia, and one with malignant lymphoma). The diagnosis was confirmed by a cytological survey of the cerebrospinal fluid and/or autopsy. Signs and symptoms caused by meningeal carcinomatosis at the CT examination varied from individual to individual. Those most frequently observed were signs of increased intracranial pressure, often accompanied by cranial nerve palsies, paresthesia, motor weakness, cerebellar signs, and nuchal stiffness, CT scan revealed evidence of meningeal carcinomatosis in ten cases out of the seventeen. CT evidences were obtained in 16.7% of the cases with hematologic malignancy and in 81.8% of those with non-hematologic malignancies. The CT findings of meningeal carcinomatosis may be summarized as follows: I. 1) Obliteration and narrowing of the cisterns and sulci, with contrast enhancement along them. 2) Enhanced spots/areas beneath the brain surface, with contrast enhancement. 3) Diffuse, slightly high density of the brain surface, with contrast enhancement. 4) Enhancement of the ventricular wall. 5) Hydrocephalus. II. 1) No CT abnormalities.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detectors rotate around the patient. At the same time, the examination table is moving through the scanner, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series of pictures, or slices of the body, to ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ...

  6. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for malignant otitis externa: lesion not shown on planar image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Hung-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe and rare infection of the external acoustic meatus. Triphasic bone and (67)Ga scintigraphies are used to initial detect and follow-up the response of therapy. With single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images, the diagnostic sensitivity is higher. We presented a case with malignant otitis externa with initial negative planar scintigraphic finding. The lesion was detected by photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images. We concluded that the photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography should be performed routinely for patients with suspected malignant otitis externa, even without evidence of lesion on planar images.

  7. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara C, A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Osorio V, M. [ISSSTE, Centro Medico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, Felix Cuevas 540, Col. del Valle, 03100 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez O, O., E-mail: armando_lara_cam@yahoo.com.mx [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we studied the dosimetry performed on CT scan in two different equipment, SOMATOM and Phillips, with 16 and 64 slice respectively. We used 51 pellets of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF: Mg, Ti) also knows as TLD-100 due to its physical properties and its easy of use, in this study, first analysis a batch of 56 pellets, but only 53 pellets were optimal for this study, cesium-137 was used as source irradiation, then proceeded to calibrate the batch with X-rays source, measuring the corresponding dose in a Farmers ionization chamber, then, we obtained a calibration curve, and we used as reference to calculation of the applied dose, finally designing ergonomic mesh, were it was deposited a TLD 100, placed in a regions of interest were made to each scan type. Once characterized our material proceeded to testing in 30 patients, which were irradiated with X-ray tube, whose operation was performed at 80, 120 kV with a current of 100, 300 and 400 m A according to scanning protocol. Overall we measured dose of 5 mGy to 53 mGy, these measurements reflect significant dose to can induced cancer, due previous reports published, that doses greater than 20 mGy there is a risk of developing cancer in the long term, but in practice when it assigned a medical diagnosis, there are no dose limits due to benefits patients, however, IAEA publish recommendations that allow us to carry out optimum handling of ionizing radiation, among these is the quality control of the tomography equipment that helps greatly reduce patient dose. (Author)

  8. [Diagnosis of toxic lesions of the brain using computerized tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, I I; Karpova, M N; Tskhovrebov, T M

    1990-01-01

    X-ray computerized tomography was used to examine the brain in 39 patients aged 14 to 39 years with different experience of using volatile narcotically acting substances. The discovered alterations make it possible to appraise the influence of toxic substances and the degree of brain atrophy, which attests to the diagnostic value of computerized tomography in patients with toxicomanias.

  9. Computed tomography of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the computed tomographic (CT) techniques for imaging the different elements comprising the spinal column and canal. The use of intravenous and intrathecal contrast enhancement and of xenon enhancement is briefly mentioned. Reconstruction techniques and special problems regarding CT of the spine are presented. CT of the spinal cord, meninges and subarachnoid space, epidural space, intervertebral discs, facet joints, and vertebrae present normal anatomy, and several common pathologic conditions. (KRM)

  10. Computed tomography in mitochondrial cytopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, J.; Kendall, B.E.

    1981-10-01

    The clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in 11 proven cases of mitochondrial cytopathy (mitochondrial myopathy, Kearns Sayre syndrome, ophthalmoplegia plus) were studied. The CT changes included focal low density lesions in the basal ganglia and white matter and atrophy which could be slight or diffuse and severe. Calcification has been described in the basal ganglia, but did not occur in our series. Serial CT showed progression of the abnormalities. The differential diagnosis is discussed.

  11. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  12. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  13. Trip report: Marshall Space Center computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, J. R.; Andrews, M. K.

    BIR Inc. is a small company out of the Chicago area which sells equipment for producing images by tomography. They have built a relatively large instrument, called ACTIS, for NASA at the Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama and still gave access to this instrument. BIR has a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the utility of computed tomography (CT) for characterization of nuclear and hazardous waste within the DOE complex. As part of this effort, the potential of this technique for obtaining images of canistered waste forms has been investigated. Funding for data acquisition was provided through this grant.

  14. Label-free structural photoacoustic tomography of intact mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Capitalizing on endogenous hemoglobin contrast, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a deep-tissue highresolution imaging modality, has drawn increasing interest in neuro-imaging. However, most existing studies are limited to functional imaging on the cortical surface, and the deep-brain structural imaging capability of PACT has never been demonstrated. Here, we explicitly studied the limiting factors of deep-brain PACT imaging. We found that the skull distorted the acoustic signal and blood suppressed the structural contrast from other chromophores. When the two effects are mitigated, PACT can provide high-resolution label-free structural imaging through the entire mouse brain. With 100 μm in-plane resolution, we can clearly identify major structures of the brain, and the image quality is comparable to that of magnetic resonance microscopy. Spectral PACT studies indicate that structural contrasts mainly originate from cytochrome and lipid. The feasibility of imaging the structure of the brain in vivo has also been discussed. Our results demonstrate that PACT is a promising modality for both structural and functional brain imaging.

  15. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  16. Computed tomography of bones and joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, J; Sehr, A

    1989-01-01

    The monograph sums up the problem of CT diagnosis of bones and joints making use of predominantly the authors' own experience based on CT tests of more than 45,000 patients examined at the Department of Radiology, Charles University Medical Faculty of Hygiene teaching hospital in Prague in the years 1980-1988. Specific scans of the skeleton were made in 4,500 patients, mostly for suspicion or closer assessment of neoplasms (43.5%), the radicular lumbosacral syndrome (34.5%), and injuries (12%). The opening chapters sum up basic facts about the principle of computed tomography, the apparatus in use, the evaluation of CT images, CT radiation doses, and the patients' preparation for CT scanning. The use of contrast media is discussed with regard to the possible hazards involved and to the need to hear allergological opinion first. For spinal canal visualization non-ionogenic contrast media are used exclusively. The management of side reactions to contrast medium application is also reviewed. Indications for bone and joint computed tomography now comprise a whole series of traumatological, orthopaedic, oncological, rheumatological, neurological and rehabilitation conditions, each of which is discussed in detail in a separate chapter. CT anatomical studies offer the advantage of being applicable even in patients examined for other than bone or articular diseases. The option of simultaneous soft tissue assessment represents another advantage. The authors describe different anatomical structures in terms of CT images, some of them complete with dimensional and density values. The chapter on anomalies and developmental variants stresses the relevance of computed tomography for precise characteristics of clefts of the spinal column and facial bones and for the diagnosis of anomalies and dysplasias of the spinal column and the chest. A rare case of cephalothoracopagus is demonstrated. As for traumatology, computed tomography is found useful in diagnosing fractures of the

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography for Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    Recently, there has been growing interest in using OCT for brain imaging. A feasibility study of OCT for guiding deep brain probes has found that OCT can differentiate the white matter and gray matter because the white matter tends to have a higher peak reflectivity and steeper attenuation rate compared to gray matter. In vivo 3D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb with OCT has been demonstrated. OCT has been used for single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling. The refractive index in the rat somatosensory cortex has also been measured with OCT. In addition, functional extension of OCT, such as Doppler-OCT (D-OCT), polarization sensitive-OCT (PS-OCT), and phase-resolved-OCT (PR-OCT), can image and quantify physiological parameters in addition to the morphological structure image. Based on the scattering changes during neural activity, OCT has been used to measure the functional activation in neuronal tissues. PS-OCT, which combines polarization sensitive detection with OCT to determine tissue birefringence, has been used for the localization of nerve fiber bundles and the mapping of micrometer-scale fiber pathways in the brain. D-OCT, also named optical Doppler tomography (ODT), combines the Doppler principle with OCT to obtain high resolution tomographic images of moving constituents in highly scattering biological tissues. D-OCT has been successfully used to image cortical blood flow and map the blood vessel network for brain research. In this chapter, the principle and technology of OCT and D-OCT are reviewed and examples of potential applications are described.

  18. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    -CCTR, showed that coronary CT angiographies accounted for only 23% of all nonregistered cardiac CTs, indicating >90% completeness of coronary CT angiographies in the WDHR-CCTR. The completeness of individual variables varied substantially (range: 0%-100%), but was >85% for more than 70% of all variables. Using......BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... expected numbers; and 4) positive predictive values as well as negative predictive values of 19 main patient and procedure variables. RESULTS: By December 31, 2012, almost 22,000 cardiac CTs with up to 40 variables for each procedure have been registered. Of these, 87% were coronary CT angiography...

  19. [Pneumothorax revealed by postoperative computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shizuka; Katori, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Nitahara, Keiichi; Higa, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    We report a case of pneumothorax revealed by postoperative computed tomography. A 39-year-old obese woman (height 153 cm, weight 70 kg) with fractures of the radius, ulna, clavicle, and femur in a traffic accident, was scheduled for osteosynthesis. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental and maintained with 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen and sevoflurane. The Spo2 decreased from 99% to 94% during the surgery. Bilateral chest sounds were symmetrical. The Spo2 increased to 100% after discontinuation of nitrous oxide. Pneumothorax was not evident on a postoperative chest X-ray, but computed tomography of the chest demonstrated right-sided pneumothorax. An ECG electrode had overlapped the fractured rib on the preoperative chest X-ray.

  20. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  1. Contrast-induced nephropathy after computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano da Silva Selistre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast induced nephropathy is the third most prevalent preventable cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. It defined as an absolute increase in serum creatinine ≥ 0.5 mg/dL and relative ≥ 25% increase. Objective: We studied the risk factors to intravenous injection contrast nephropathy after computed tomography. Methods: We studied 400 patients prospectively. Results: The incidence of contrast induced nephropathy, with an absolute or a relative increase were 4.0% and 13.9%, respectively. Diabetes and cardiac failure were independent risk factors for CIN a relative increase de serum creatinine (O.R.: 3.5 [95% CI: 1.92-6.36], p < 0.01, 2.61 [95% CI: 1.14-6.03%], p < 0.05, respectively. Conclusions: We showed association between uses of intravenous injection contrast after computed tomography with acute injury renal, notably with diabetes and heart failure.

  2. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillo-facial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontics. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice.

  3. Computed tomography and obstructive biliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrilla, T R; Haaga, J R; Alfidi, R J; Reich, N E

    1977-05-01

    Forty-four patients with confirmed biliary diseases were studied to determine the value of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of biliary pathology. The results indicate that CT is useful and highly accurate in differentiating between obstructive (surgical) and nonobstructive (medical) disease entities. Of the cases with proved obstruction, 88% were correctly identified. All of the nonobstructive cases had positive CT correlation. In addition, the underlying cause of the occlusion was determined in the majority of cases.

  4. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article...

  5. Computed Tomography of Transverse Phase Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, A. [Fermilab; Johnstone, C. [Fermilab; Johnstone, J. [Fermilab

    2016-09-19

    Two computed tomography techniques are explored to reconstruct beam transverse phase space using both simulated beam and multi-wire profile data in the Fermilab Muon Test Area ("MTA") beamline. Both Filtered Back-Projection ("FBP") and Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique ("SART") algorithms [2] are considered and compared. Errors and artifacts are compared as a function of each algorithm’s free parameters, and it is shown through simulation and MTA beamline profiles that SART is advantageous for reconstructions with limited profile data.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography use in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervina, J M

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used by orthodontists to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of their patients. This is of value as malocclusion results from discrepancies in three planes of space. This review tracks the use of CBCT in orthodontics, from its validation as an accurate and reliable tool, to its use in diagnosing and treatment planning, and in assessing treatment outcomes in orthodontics.

  7. Encapsulating peritonitis: computed tomography and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadow, Juliana Santos; Fingerhut, Carla Jeronimo Peres; Fernandes, Vinicius de Barros; Coradazzi, Klaus Rizk Stuhr; Silva, Lucas Marciel Soares; Penachim, Thiago Jose, E-mail: vinicius.barros.fernandes@gmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Campinas (PUC-Campinas), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Hospital e Maternidade Celso Pierro

    2014-07-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a rare and frequently severe entity characterized by total or partial involvement of small bowel loops by a membrane of fibrous tissue. The disease presents with nonspecific clinical features of intestinal obstruction, requiring precise imaging diagnosis to guide the treatment. The present report emphasizes the importance of computed tomography in the diagnosis of this condition and its confirmation by surgical correlation. (author)

  8. Transcranial photoacoustic tomography of the monkey brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Liming; Huang, Chao; Guo, Zijian; Anastasio, Mark; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    A photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using a virtual point ultrasonic transducer was developed for transcranial imaging of monkey brains. The virtual point transducer provided a 10 times greater field-of-view (FOV) than finiteaperture unfocused transducers, which enables large primate imaging. The cerebral cortex of a monkey brain was accurately mapped transcranially, through up to two skulls ranging from 4 to 8 mm in thickness. The mass density and speed of sound distributions of the skull were estimated from adjunct X-ray CT image data and utilized with a timereversal algorithm to mitigate artifacts in the reconstructed image due to acoustic aberration. The oxygenation saturation (sO2) in blood phantoms through a monkey skull was also imaged and quantified, with results consistent with measurements by a gas analyzer. The oxygenation saturation (sO2) in blood phantoms through a monkey skull was also imaged and quantified, with results consistent with measurements by a gas analyzer. Our experimental results demonstrate that PAT can overcome the optical and ultrasound attenuation of a relatively thick skull, and the imaging aberration caused by skull can be corrected to a great extent.

  9. Correlation of brain cell glucose metabolism and patient's condition in children with epileptic encephalopathy An assessment using fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongxiang Zhai; Yuxiong Guo; Yuxin Zhang; Zhihong Chen; Jian Ding; Juan Gui; Ying Hao

    2011-01-01

    We examined a total of 16 children with epileptic encephalopathy using fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission computed tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography.Children with infantile spasms showed significant mental retardation, severely abnormal electroencephalogram recordings, and bilateral diffuse cerebral cortex hypometabolism with 18F-FDG PET imaging.MRI in these cases showed brain atrophy, multi-micropolygyria, macrogyria, and porencephalia.In cases with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, 18F-FDG PET showed bilateral diffuse glucose hypometabolism, while MRI showed cortical atrophy, heterotopic gray matter and tuberous sclerosis.MRI in cases with myoclonic encephalopathy demonstrated bilateral frontal and temporal cortical and white matter atrophy and 18F-FDG PET imaging showed bilateral frontal lobe atrophy with reduced bilateral frontal cortex, occipital cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellar glucose uptake.In children who could not be clearly classified, MRI demonstrated cerebral cortical atrophy and 18F-FDG PET exhibited multifocal glucose hypometabolism.Overall, this study demonstrated that the degree of brain metabolic abnormality was consistent with clinical seizure severity.In addition, 18F-FDG PET imaging after treatment was consistent with clinical outcomes.These findings indicate that 18F-FDG PET can be used to assess the severity of brain injury and prognosis in children with epileptic encephalopathy.

  10. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  11. Angiography and computed tomography in cerebro-arterial occlusive diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradac, G.B.; Oberson, R.

    1983-01-01

    This second edition provides an exposition of occlusive diseases of the extra- and intracranial arterial circulation. The contents include: (1) pathology of the causes of cerebrovascular arterial occlusion; (2) the indications, hazards, technical aspects, and routine technique of cerebral angiography; (3) angiographic findings of the extracranial segments of the circulation to the brain; (4) computed tomography in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases; (5) other investigations in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular occlusive disease; (6) conclusive considerations on the pathogenesis of transient ischemic attacks and infarctions.

  12. Reconstruction Algorithms for Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and their Numerical Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Fokas, A S; Marinakis, V

    2004-01-01

    The modern imaging techniques of Positron Emission Tomography and of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography are not only two of the most important tools for studying the functional characteristics of the brain, but they now also play a vital role in several areas of clinical medicine, including neurology, oncology and cardiology. The basic mathematical problems associated with these techniques are the construction of the inverse of the Radon transform and of the inverse of the so called attenuated Radon transform respectively. We first show that, by employing mathematical techniques developed in the theory of nonlinear integrable equations, it is possible to obtain analytic formulas for these two inverse transforms. We then present algorithms for the numerical implementation of these analytic formulas, based on approximating the given data in terms of cubic splines. Several numerical tests are presented which suggest that our algorithms are capable of producing accurate reconstruction for realistic phanto...

  13. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  14. Whole brain imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Amato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. The has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography, in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches

  15. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  16. Computed tomography appearances of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, C. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: cheriangeorge@hotmail.com; Al-Zwae, K. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom); Nair, S. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom); Cast, J.E.I. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) characterized by thickened peritoneal membranes, which lead to decreased ultra-filtration and intestinal obstruction. Its early clinical features are nonspecific, and it is often diagnosed late following laparotomy and peritoneal biopsy, when the patient develops small bowel obstruction, which can be a life-threatening complication. However, this is changing with increasing awareness of computed tomography (CT) findings in SEP. CT can yield an early, non-invasive diagnosis that may improve patient outcome. We present a review of the CT appearances of SEP.

  17. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... and limitations of sparse reconstruction methods in CT, in particular in a quantitative sense. For example, relations between image properties such as contrast, structure and sparsity, tolerable noise levels, suficient sampling levels, the choice of sparse reconstruction formulation and the achievable image...

  18. Comparison on Computed Tomography using industrial items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In a comparison involving 27 laboratories from 8 countries, measurements on two common industrial items, a polymer part and a metal part, were carried out using X-ray Computed Tomography. All items were measured using coordinate measuring machines before and after circulation, with reference...... measurement uncertainties in the range 1.5–5.5 μm, showing a good stability over the 6 months of the circulation. The comparison has shown that CT measurements on the industrial parts used lie in the range 6–53 μm, with maximum values up to 158 μm....

  19. Tomography and spectroscopy as quantum computations

    CERN Document Server

    Miquel, C; Saraceno, M; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R; Negrevergne, C; Miquel, Cesar; Paz, Juan Pablo; Saraceno, Marcos; Knill, Emmanuel; Laflamme, Raymond; Negrevergne, Camille

    2001-01-01

    Determining the state of a system and measuring properties of its evolution are two of the most important tasks a physicist faces. For the first purpose one can use tomography, a method that after subjecting the system to a number of experiments determines all independent elements of the density matrix. For the second task, one can resort to spectroscopy, a set of techniques used to determine the spectrum of eigenvalues of the evolution operator. In this letter, we show that tomography and spectroscopy can be naturally interpreted as dual forms of quantum computation. We show how to adapt the simplest case of the well-known phase estimation quantum algorithm to perform both tasks, giving it a natural interpretation as a simulated scattering experiment. We show how this algorithm can be used to implement an interesting form of tomography by performing a direct measurement of the Wigner function of a quantum system. We present results of such measurements performed on a system of three qubits using liquid state...

  20. Mapping distributed brain function and networks with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Hershey, Tamara; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-06-01

    Mapping of human brain function has revolutionized systems neuroscience. However, traditional functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used when applications require portability, or are contraindicated because of ionizing radiation (positron emission tomography) or implanted metal (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Optical neuroimaging offers a non-invasive alternative that is radiation free and compatible with implanted metal and electronic devices (for example, pacemakers). However, optical imaging technology has heretofore lacked the combination of spatial resolution and wide field of view sufficient to map distributed brain functions. Here, we present a high-density diffuse optical tomography imaging array that can map higher-order, distributed brain function. The system was tested by imaging four hierarchical language tasks and multiple resting-state networks including the dorsal attention and default mode networks. Finally, we imaged brain function in patients with Parkinson's disease and implanted deep brain stimulators that preclude functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF TOOTH RESORPTION IN CATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Linda G; Wilkinson, Thomas E; White, Tammy L; Farnsworth, Raelynn K; Potter, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Tooth resorption is the most common dental disease in cats and can be a source of oral pain. The current clinical gold standard for diagnosis includes a combination of oral exam and dental radiography, however early lesions are not always detected. Computed tomography (CT) of the skull, including the dental arches, is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure, however the appearance of tooth resorption on CT and the diagnostic ability of CT to detect tooth resorption have not been evaluated. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive, diagnostic accuracy study was to characterize the CT appearance of tooth resorption in a sample of affected cats and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT for tooth resorption compared to the clinical gold standard of oral exam and intraoral dental radiography. Twenty-eight cat cadaver specimens were recruited for inclusion. Each specimen was evaluated using oral exam, intraoral dental radiography, and computed tomography (four different slice thicknesses). Each tooth was evaluated for the presence or absence of tooth resorption. Teeth with lesions and a subset of normal teeth were evaluated with histopathology. On CT, tooth resorption appeared as irregularly marginated hypoattenuating defects in the mineral attenuating tooth components, most commonly involving the root or cementoenamel junction. Sensitivity for CT detection of tooth resorption was fair to poor (42.2-57.7%) and specificity was good to excellent (92.8-96.3%). Findings from this study indicated that CT has high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of tooth resorption in cats.

  2. Computed tomography in pelvic and acetabular fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, H.; Schmidt, C.

    1988-06-01

    In a retrospective study we analyzed the results of 127 patients, who were examined not only by means of conventional radiography but also by means of computed tomography after a trauma of the pelvic. Our investigations were based upon such patients, to whom a definite diagnostic procedure of plain radiography had been performed. Therefore all polytraumatized patients were inapplicable. They were only examined by computed tomography because of other more important accompanying injuries of other body regions. We compared the results of 127 patients with pelvic trauma. The results of the CT were in accordance with the results of the plain radiography for 103 patients. The results of the CT concerning the availability and the localization of the fractures were basically coincident with the plain radiography for 22 patients, but the CT showed a higher degree of trauma and additional intraarticular fragments. Two isolated lesions of the sacroiliac joint could not be recognized by both methods. They could only be diagnosed by bone scintigraphy on the third day after trauma.

  3. SADMFR guidelines for the use of cone-beam computed tomography/ Digital Volume Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Karl; Bornstein, Michael M.; Buser, Daniel; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Ettlin, Dominik A; Filippi, Andreas; Gabioud, François; Katsaros, Christos; Krastl, Gabriel; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Lauber, Roland; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Pazera, Pawel; Türp, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has been introduced in 1998. This radiological imaging procedure has been provided for dentistry and is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in medicine. It is expected that CBCT will have the same success in dental diagnostic imaging as computed tomography had in medicine. Just as CT is responsible for a significant rise in radiation dose to the population from medical X-ray diagnostics, CBCT studies will be accompanied by a significant increase of the ...

  4. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Experience with (S)-5-[123I]iodo-3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-[123I]IA) in the Living Human Brain of Smokers and Nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAŠIĆ, JAMES ROBERT; ZHOU, YUN; MUSACHIO, JOHN L.; HILTON, JOHN; FAN, HONG; CRABB, ANDREW; ENDRES, CHRISTOPHER J.; REINHARDT, MELVIN J.; DOGAN, AHMET S.; ALEXANDER, MOHAB; ROUSSET, OLIVIER; MARIS, MARIKA A.; GALECKI, JEFFREY; NANDI, AYON; WONG, DEAN F.

    2009-01-01

    (S)-5-[123I]iodo-3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-[123I]IA), a novel potent radioligand for high-affinity α4β2* neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), provides a means to evaluate the density and the distribution of nAChRs in the living human brain. We sought in healthy adult smokers and nonsmokers to (1) evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 5-[123I]IA in an open nonblind trial and (2) to estimate the density and distribution of α4β2* nAChRs in the brain. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed for five hours after the intravenous administration of approximately 0.001 μg/kg (approximately 10 mCi) 5-[123I]IA. Blood pressure, heart rate, and neurobehavioral status were monitored before, during, and after the administration of 5-[123I]IA to twelve healthy adults (8 men and 4 women) (6 smokers and 6 nonsmokers) ranging in age from 19 to 46 years (mean = 28.25, standard deviation = 8.20). High plasma nicotine level was significantly associated with low 5-[123I]IA binding in (1) the caudate head, the cerebellum, the cortex, and the putamen, utilizing both the Sign and Mann-Whitney U tests, (2) the fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus, the parahippocampus, and the pons utilizing the Mann-Whitney U test, and (3)the thalamus utilizing the Sign test. We conclude that 5-[123I]IA is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective pharmacologic agent for human subjects to estimate high-affinity α4/β2 nAChRs in the living human brain. PMID:19140167

  5. A semi-automated volumetric software for segmentation and perfusion parameter quantification of brain tumors using 320-row multidetector computed tomography: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Soo Young; Suh, Sangil; Ryoo, Inseon; Park, Arim; Seol, Hae Young [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Kyoung Jin [Soonchunhyang University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hackjoon [Toshiba Medical Systems Korea Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    We developed a semi-automated volumetric software, NPerfusion, to segment brain tumors and quantify perfusion parameters on whole-brain CT perfusion (WBCTP) images. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of the software and to validate its performance compared with manual segmentation. Twenty-nine patients with pathologically proven brain tumors who underwent preoperative WBCTP between August 2012 and February 2015 were included. Three perfusion parameters, arterial flow (AF), equivalent blood volume (EBV), and Patlak flow (PF, which is a measure of permeability of capillaries), of brain tumors were generated by a commercial software and then quantified volumetrically by NPerfusion, which also semi-automatically segmented tumor boundaries. The quantification was validated by comparison with that of manual segmentation in terms of the concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. With NPerfusion, we successfully performed segmentation and quantified whole volumetric perfusion parameters of all 29 brain tumors that showed consistent perfusion trends with previous studies. The validation of the perfusion parameter quantification exhibited almost perfect agreement with manual segmentation, with Lin concordance correlation coefficients (ρ {sub c}) for AF, EBV, and PF of 0.9988, 0.9994, and 0.9976, respectively. On Bland-Altman analysis, most differences between this software and manual segmentation on the commercial software were within the limit of agreement. NPerfusion successfully performs segmentation of brain tumors and calculates perfusion parameters of brain tumors. We validated this semi-automated segmentation software by comparing it with manual segmentation. NPerfusion can be used to calculate volumetric perfusion parameters of brain tumors from WBCTP. (orig.)

  6. Computer screens and brain cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, A.W. [Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC (Australia). School of Biophysical Sciences and Electrical Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Australia, both in the media and at the federal government level, over possible links between screen-based computer use and cancer, brain tumour in particular. The screen emissions assumed to be the sources of the putative hazard are the magnetic fields responsible for horizontal and vertical scanning of the display. Time-varying fluctuations in these magnetic fields induce electrical current flows in exposed tissues. This paper estimates that the induced current densities in the brain of the computer user are up to 1 mA/m{sup 2} (due to the vertical flyback). Corresponding values for other electrical appliances or installations are in general much less than this. The epidemiological literature shows no obvious signs of a sudden increase in brain tumour incidence, but the widespread use of computers is a relatively recent phenomenon. The occupational use of other equipment based on cathode ray tubes (such as TV repair) has a much longer history and has been statistically linked to brain tumour in some studies. A number of factors make this an unreliable indicator of the risk from computer screens, however. 42 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  7. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  8. Use of high-resolution computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of stage IA adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yoshihiro; Tsutani, Yasuhiro; Okada, Morihito

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative determination of malignant behavior is critical in choosing suitable therapeutic strategies such as sublobar resection for patients with small lung cancers. The aim of present review was to evaluate high-resolution computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography as tools for management of clinical stage IA adenocarcinoma.

  9. Spatiotemporal computed tomography of dynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Anders; Münch, Beat; Trtik, Pavel; Butler, Les

    2011-12-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) equipment allowing fast 3-D imaging also makes it possible to monitor dynamic processes by 4-D imaging. Because the acquisition time of various 3-D-CT systems is still in the range of at least milliseconds or even hours, depending on the detector system and the source, the balance of the desired temporal and spatial resolution must be adjusted. Furthermore, motion artifacts will occur, especially at high spatial resolution and longer measuring times. We propose two approaches based on nonsequential projection angle sequences allowing a convenient postacquisition balance of temporal and spatial resolution. Both strategies are compatible with existing instruments, needing only a simple reprograming of the angle list used for projection acquisition and care with the projection order list. Both approaches will reduce the impact of artifacts due to motion. The strategies are applied and validated with cold neutron imaging of water desorption from originally saturated particles during natural air-drying experiments and with x-ray tomography of a polymer blend heated during imaging.

  10. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices. PMID:22438708

  11. Brain computer interfaces, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or 'locked in' by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  12. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Nicolas-Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  13. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in a patient with cerebellar mutism after operation in posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Gonca Kara; Sari, Oktay; Köktekir, Ender; Akdemir, Gökhan

    2017-04-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a transient period of speechlessness that evolves after posterior fossa surgery in children. Although direct cerebellar and brain stem injury and supratentorial dysfunction have been implicated in the mediation of mutism, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the evolution of this kind of mutism remain unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dentatothalamocortical tract injuries and single photon emission computed tomography showed cerebellar and cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with cerebellar mutism. However, findings with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in this group of patients have not been documented previously. In this clinical case, we report a patient who experienced cerebellar mutism after undergoing a posterior fossa surgery. Right cerebellar and left frontal lobe hypometabolism was shown using FDG PET/CT. The FDG metabolism of both the cerebellum and the frontal lobe returned to normal levels after the resolution of the mutism symptoms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in a patient with cerebellar mutism after operation in posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Kara Gedik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar mutism is a transient period of speechlessness that evolves after posterior fossa surgery in children. Although direct cerebellar and brain stem injury and supratentorial dysfunction have been implicated in the mediation of mutism, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the evolution of this kind of mutism remain unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dentatothalamocortical tract injuries and single photon emission computed tomography showed cerebellar and cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with cerebellar mutism. However, findings with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT in this group of patients have not been documented previously. In this clinical case, we report a patient who experienced cerebellar mutism after undergoing a posterior fossa surgery. Right cerebellar and left frontal lobe hypometabolism was shown using FDG PET/CT. The FDG metabolism of both the cerebellum and the frontal lobe returned to normal levels after the resolution of the mutism symptoms.

  15. Imaging of Cardiac Valves by Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Feuchtner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes “how to” examine cardiac valves with computed tomography, the normal, diseased valves, and prosthetic valves. A review of current scientific literature is provided. Firstly, technical basics, “how to” perform and optimize a multislice CT scan and “how to” interpret valves on CT images are outlined. Then, diagnostic imaging of the entire spectrum of specific valvular disease by CT, including prosthetic heart valves, is highlighted. The last part gives a guide “how to” use CT for planning of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, an emerging effective treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. A special focus is placed on clinical applications of cardiac CT in the context of valvular disease.

  16. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  17. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...... have become the standard with which to assess emphysema extent but airway abnormalities have so far been more challenging to quantify. Automated methods for analysis are indispensable as the visible airway tree in a CT scan can include several hundreds of individual branches. However, automation...... of scan on airway dimensions in subjects with and without COPD. The results show measured airway dimensions to be affected by differences in the level of inspiration and this dependency is again influenced by COPD. Inspiration level should therefore be accounted for when measuring airways, and airway...

  18. Findings of computed tomography in intracranial tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, H. G.; Bae, K. S.; Lee, H. K.; Kwon, K. H.; Kim, K. J. [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    In intracranial tuberculosis, the Computed Tomography (CT) is a new radiological technique which is helpful in diagnosis and determining the location, extents of the lesion. It can also make it possible to assess the presence and degree of the complications and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. 25 cases of clinically proven intracranial tuberculosis were studied by CT, in Soonchunhyang hospital from Jun. 1980 to Jun. 1983. The result were as follows; 1. 4 cases were normal in CT finding, despite of the clinically proven tuberculous meningitis. 2. Total or partial obliteration of cisterns were observed in 13 cases. 3. Intense abnormal contrast enhancement of the cisterns were observed in 8 cases. 4. 19 cases show moderate to marked ventricular dilatation. 5. 2 cases of cerebral infarction were observed. 6. One case of tuberculoma was observed.

  19. Computed Tomography in the Modern Slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb

    of technology. Recently, the use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) coupled with methods from image analysis has been introduced as a powerful means to optimise production, by providing detailed information on the raw materials. This thesis covers two aspects of the application of CT in the modern abattoir...... concerns measurements of each single carcass, to improve the raw material utilisation by individually adapted processing. Measurements performed online in the abattoir demand fast, robust and cost-effective imaging. We propose a tomographic reconstruction algorithm, enabling a substantial reduction...... of the subject-specific X-ray data needed to produce high quality images for accurate measurements. This is very beneficial for the abattoirs, as a reduction in acquired data translates directly into higher speed and a lower cost. The thesis demonstrates the great potential of CT as a technology for improving...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion is an evolving method to visualize perfusion in organs and tissue. With the introduction of multidetector CT scanners, it is now possible to cover up to 16 cm in one rotation, and thereby making it possible to scan entire organs such as the liver with a fixed...... table position. Advances in reconstruction algorithms make it possible to reduce the radiation dose for each examination to acceptable levels. Regarding abdominal imaging, CT perfusion is still considered a research tool, but several studies have proven it as a reliable non-invasive technique...... for assessment of vascularity. CT perfusion has also been used for tumor characterization, staging of disease, response evaluation of newer drugs targeted towards angiogenesis and as a method for early detection of recurrence after radiation and embolization. There are several software solutions available...

  1. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  2. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  3. Computed tomography findings of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, Yutaro; Sato, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Ono, Tetsuya; Kaji, Masaro; Niiya, Harutaka (Kure Kyosai Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings were assessed in 7 patients with malignant mesothelioma. CT findings were also reviewed in 9 patients with lung cancer and pleuritis carcinomatosa and in 11 patients with tuberculous pleuritis. Five patients with malignant mesothelioma underwent CT scans twice, on admission and from 1 to 7 months after admission. Tuberculous pleuritis could be distinguished from pleuritis carcinomatosa and malignant mesothelioma by the presence or absence of pleural nodularity and chest wall invasion. Although it was difficult to identify specific CT features clearly distinguishing malignant mesothelioma from pleuritis carcinomatosa, characteristic findings of malignant mesothelioma appeared to include the rapid development and progression of pleural rind and a tendency to spread directly into the chest wall. We divided the pleural into the four regions; upper anterior, upper posterior, lower anterior and lower posterior regions. Pleural changes were more frequently seen in the lower pleural regions than in the upper pleural regions in malignant mesothelioma. (author).

  4. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  5. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An interlaboratory comparison on industrial X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning...... - CIA-CT”. In the comparison, 27 laboratories from 8 countries were involved, and CT scanned two items selected among common industrial parts: a polymer part and a metal part. Altogether, 27 sets of items were circulated in parallel to the participants. Different measurands are considered, encompassing...... influence from the surrounding wall thickness on the measurement of roundness was documented for the metal item. The comparison shows that CT scanning on small industrial parts, generally speaking, is connected with uncertainties in the range 8-53 μm, as compared to an uncertainty range of 1.5-5.5 μm using...

  6. Intravenous coronary angiography using electron beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensing, B J; Bongaerts, A H; van Geuns, R J; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    Intravenous coronary angiography with electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) allows for the noninvasive visualisation of coronary arteries. With dedicated computer hardware and software, three-dimensional renderings of the coronary arteries, veins, and other cardiac structures can be constructed f

  7. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on

  8. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J.N.; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  9. Computed tomography in traumatic defects of the diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, T C; Solomon, C; Posniak, H V; Flisak, M J

    1989-03-01

    Two patients with traumatic diaphragmatic defects visible on computed tomography are presented. The diagnosis was delayed for several years in both patients. The diagnosis of these acquired diaphragmatic defects is often difficult. Computed tomography can lead to earlier diagnosis by demonstrating the defect in some patients when radiographic studies are not diagnostic.

  10. Diagnosis of lumbar disc hernia with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizumi, Atsuro; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Ojima, Tadashi; Oshida, Midori; Horaguchi, Mitsuru (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan))

    1982-07-01

    Results of computed tomography performed on patients with clinically diagnosed hernia were compared with those of myelography and operative findings. This comparative study suggested that computed tomography is quite different from other methods and very useful in diagnosis of hernia. Some cases of hernia were shown, and the characteristics of CT were reviewed.

  11. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on t

  12. Study of 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 Imaging on Human Brain with Children Autism by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the application values of 99mTc-2 β [ N, N'-bis( 2-mercaptoethy1 ) ethylenediamino ] methyl, 3 β -(4-chlorophenyl) tropane ( TRODAT-1 ) dopamine transporter (DAT) SPECT imaging in children autism, and offer the academic foundation to etiology, mechanism and clinical therapy of autism. Methods:Ten autistic children and ten healthy controls were examined with 99mTc-TRODAT-1 DAT SPECT imaging.Striatal specific uptake of 99mTc-TRODAT-1 was calculated with region of interest analysis according to the ratios between striatum and cerebellum [ (STR-BKG)/BKG]. Results:There was no difference in semiquantitative dopamine transporter between bilateral striatum in autistic children ( P = 0. 562) and in normal controls ( P = 0. 573 ); dopamine transporter in brain of patients with autism increased more significantly than that in normal controls ( P = 0. 017 ). Conclusion: Dopaminergic nervous system is dysfunction in human brain with children autism, and DAT 99mTc-TRODAT-1 SPECT imaging on human brain will help the imaging diagnosis of children autism.

  13. Simulation of computed tomography dose based on voxel phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyu; Lv, Xiangbo; Li, Zhaojun

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the preferred and the most valuable imaging tool used in diagnostic radiology, which provides a high-quality cross-sectional image of the body. It still causes higher doses of radiation to patients comparing to the other radiological procedures. The Monte-Carlo method is appropriate for estimation of the radiation dose during the CT examinations. The simulation of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) phantom was developed in this paper. Under a similar conditions used in physical measurements, dose profiles were calculated and compared against the measured values that were reported. The results demonstrate a good agreement between the calculated and the measured doses. From different CT exam simulations using the voxel phantom, the highest absorbed dose was recorded for the lung, the brain, the bone surface. A comparison between the different scan type shows that the effective dose for a chest scan is the highest one, whereas the effective dose values during abdomen and pelvis scan are very close, respectively. The lowest effective dose resulted from the head scan. Although, the dose in CT is related to various parameters, such as the tube current, exposure time, beam energy, slice thickness and patient size, this study demonstrates that the MC simulation is a useful tool to accurately estimate the dose delivered to any specific organs for patients undergoing the CT exams and can be also a valuable technique for the design and the optimization of the CT x-ray source.

  14. Brain-Computer Interaction: Can Multimodality Help?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Allison, Brendan Z.; Jacobs, Robert J.K.; Vidal, E.; Gatica-Perez, D.; Morency, L.P.; Sebe, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a short introduction to a special ICMI session on brain-computer interaction. During this paper, we first discuss problems, solutions, and a five-year view for brain-computer interaction. We then talk further about unique issues with multimodal and hybrid brain-computer interfaces,

  15. Computed tomography of the dog's brain: normal aspects and anatomical correlation; Tomografia computadorizada do encefalo do cao: aspectos da normalidade e correlacao anatomica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorigados, C.A.B., E-mail: clorigados@usp.br [Faculdades Metropolitanas Unidas (UniFMU), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pinto, A.C.B.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2013-06-15

    Normal tomographic images of dog's heads were obtained, aimed to familiarize them with the normal aspects of the brain and correlate these findings with the relevant anatomy of the region studied. Several anatomical structures, such as the parenchyma of the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, the longitudinal fissure, the ventricular system, the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, the corpus callosum, diencephalon, the pons, the medulla oblongata and the chiasmatic sulcus were directly identified or were related to neighboring structures which helped in their identification. (author)

  16. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdziel, J.C.; Dondelinger, R.F.; Hemmer, M.

    1987-01-01

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients.

  17. X-Ray Computed Tomography for Advanced Materials and Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-30

    percent. In this example, we have assumed $I M, $5(X)K and $200K CT systems operating at 10 percent of the capital investment per year for maintenance...Computed Tomo &:aphy of Composites," WRDC-TR-90-4014, July 1990. 5. P. Burstein and R. H. Bossi, "A Guide to Computed Tomography System Specifications," WRDC...Lannutti, "Applications of High- Resolution Computed Tomography," Proceedings of the 1991 Industrial Computed Tomography II Topical Conference, May 20-24

  18. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow by single photon emission computed tomography of CBF-tracer combined with whole-brain CBF; A comparison between [sup 123]I-IMP and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Imaizumi, Masatoshi; Ashida, Keiichi; Ohe, Yosuke; Okamoto, Masaya; Abe, Tohru; Tanaka, Seiji (Osaka National Hospital (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    A simple, noninvasive method of measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) that uses single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of CBF-tracer and whole brain CBF obtained by xenon-133 ([sup 133]Xe) clearance technique was developed. In nine healthy volunteers, SPECT data were normalized to the count density of [sup 123]I-IMP or [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO uptake in the whole-brain, and then converted to the absolute units of CBF by multiplying average [sup 133]Xe-CBF in the whole brain. The CBF values measured by [sup 99m]Tc-HMPA CBF-SPECT was significantly lower in the high flow regions of cortical gray matter (bilateral frontal lobe; p<0.05 and right occipital lobe; p<0.05), and was significantly higher in the bilateral white matter (p<0.05 or 0.01) and the cerebellum (p<0.005) compared with the flow values measured by [sup 123]I-IMP CBF-SPECT. Whereas, the IMP-CBF values were significantly lower in the bilateral striatum (p<0.02 or 0.05) compared with the HMPAO-CBF values. Good correlations were found between IMP-CBF and the HMPAO-CBF values in the cortical gray matter (r[sub s]=0.761; p<0.001, n=108), the white matter (r[sub s]=0.739; p<0.001, n=18) and the cerebellum (r[sub s]=0.731; p<0.001, n=18). In the striatum (r[sub s]=0.58; p<0.05, n=18) and the thalamus (r[sub s]=0.628; p<0.05, n=18), the correlations between IMP-CBF and HMPAO-CBF values were inferior to those of the other three regions. The results indicated that the contrast between high and low CBF regions in the HMPAO CBF-SPECT was significantly less than that in the IMP CBF-SPECT. However, this assumption is not applicable in all of the cerebral regions. (author).

  19. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  20. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  1. Micro computed tomography for vascular exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Zhen W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vascular exploration of small animals requires imaging hardware with a very high spatial resolution, capable of differentiating large as well as small vessels, in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Micro Computed Tomography (micro-CT has emerged in recent years as the preferred modality for this purpose, providing high resolution 3D volumetric data suitable for analysis, quantification, validation, and visualization of results. The usefulness of micro-CT, however, can be adversely affected by a range of factors including physical animal preparation, numerical quantification, visualization of results, and quantification software with limited possibilities. Exacerbating these inherent difficulties is the lack of a unified standard for micro-CT imaging. Most micro-CT today is aimed at particular applications and the software tools needed for quantification, developed mainly by imaging hardware manufacturers, lack the level of detail needed to address more specific aims. This review highlights the capabilities of micro-CT for vascular exploration, describes the current state of imaging protocols, and offers guidelines and suggestions aimed at making micro-CT more accurate, replicable, and robust.

  2. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors) 28 refs., 11 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it; Russo, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia, Napoli I-80126, Italy and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli I-80126 (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed.

  4. Computed tomography characterisation of additive manufacturing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibb, Richard; Thompson, Darren; Winder, John

    2011-06-01

    Additive manufacturing, covering processes frequently referred to as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing, provides new opportunities in the manufacture of highly complex and custom-fitting medical devices and products. Whilst many medical applications of AM have been explored and physical properties of the resulting parts have been studied, the characterisation of AM materials in computed tomography has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the CT number of commonly used AM materials. There are many potential applications of the information resulting from this study in the design and manufacture of wearable medical devices, implants, prostheses and medical imaging test phantoms. A selection of 19 AM material samples were CT scanned and the resultant images analysed to ascertain the materials' CT number and appearance in the images. It was found that some AM materials have CT numbers very similar to human tissues, FDM, SLA and SLS produce samples that appear uniform on CT images and that 3D printed materials show a variation in internal structure.

  5. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  6. Computed Tomography Following Body Stuffing Heroin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Nordt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED in police custody for “medical clearance” before being taken to jail. The patient was approached by police officers for suspicion of selling illicit drugs. When approached by police he ran away and was witnessed to swallow several small plastic baggies suspected to contain heroin. He was apprehended and brought to the ED. On arrival, he was asymptomatic with a blood pressure 144/83mmHg, heart rate 67bpm, respiratory rate of 19bpm, oxygen saturation of 99% on room air and afebrile. A Glasgow coma score was 15 and he was alert and oriented to person, place and time. Patient had a negative review of systems. On physical examination pupils were 4mm and reactive to light, lungs clear to auscultation and had normal respiratory rate with normal cardiovascular exam. Abdomen was soft, non-tender and non-distended with present bowel sounds. The patient admitted to ingesting approximately 20 packets of heroin to avoid being charged with possession. The patient declined activated charcoal and whole bowel irrigation (WBI with polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG-ELS. The patient declined a urine toxicology immunoassay screen. A computed tomography (CT of his abdomen with contrast was obtained and read as normal except for a cluster of foreign bodies within the distal stomach likely contained within a plastic bag.

  7. Virtual computed tomography cystoscopy in bladder pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Arslan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessed the usefulness of virtual cystoscopy performed with multidetector computed tomography (CT in patients with different urinary bladder pathologies compared to the conventional cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with different bladder pathologies, which consisted of 11 tumors, 3 diverticula, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones, were assessed with conventional cystoscopy and virtual CT cystoscopy. The results of virtual CT cystoscopy were compared with the findings of conventional cystoscopy. We determined the detection rate and positive predictive value of CT imaging based virtual cystoscopy in the diagnosis of urinary bladder lesions. RESULTS: CT scanning was well tolerated by all patients, and no complications occurred. Images in 16 (88% of the 18 virtual cystoscopic examinations were either of excellent or good quality. All tumors except one, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones were characterized with similar findings in the both of methods. The masses ranged from 0.4 to 7.0 cm in diameter. While conventional cystoscopy could not evaluate interior part of the diverticulum, virtual CT cystoscopy could demonstrate clearly within it. There were no false-positive findings in our series. CONCLUSION: Virtual CT cystoscopy is a promising technique to be used in the detection of bladder lesions. It should be considered especially at the evaluation of bladder diverticula. In the future, it may be possible or even advantageous to incorporate into the imaging algorithm for evaluation of bladder lesion.

  8. Virtual computed tomography cystoscopy in bladder pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Halil; Ceylan, Kadir; Harman, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Yuksel; Temizoz, Osman; Can, Saban [Yuzuncu Yil University School of Medicine, Van (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology and Urology]. E-mail: drhalilarslan@hotmail.com

    2006-03-15

    Objective: assessed the usefulness of virtual cystoscopy performed with multidetector computed tomography (CT) in patients with different urinary bladder pathologies compared to the conventional cystoscopy.Materials and methods: eighteen patients with different bladder pathologies, which consisted of 11 tumors, 3 diverticula, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones, were assessed with conventional cystoscopy and virtual CT cystoscopy. The results of virtual CT cystoscopy were compared with the findings of conventional cystoscopy. We determined the detection rate and positive predictive value of CT imaging based virtual cystoscopy in the diagnosis of urinary bladder lesions. Results: CT scanning was well tolerated by all patients, and no complications occurred. Images in 16 (88%) of the 18 virtual cystoscopic examinations were either of excellent or good quality. All tumors except one, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones were characterized with similar findings in the both of methods. The masses ranged from 0.4 to 7.0 cm in diameter. While conventional cystoscopy could not evaluate interior part of the diverticulum, virtual CT cystoscopy could demonstrate clearly within it. There were no false-positive findings in our series. Conclusion: virtual CT cystoscopy is a promising technique to be used in the detection of bladder lesions. It should be considered especially at the evaluation of bladder diverticula. In the future, it may be possible or even advantageous to incorporate into the imaging algorithm for evaluation of bladder lesion. (author)

  9. Application of computed tomography to spinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, N.; Kurihara, A.; Kataoka, O. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1980-08-01

    The axial tomographic examination of the spine and its soft tissues is now readily available for orthopaedic surgery. If the appropriate conditions are maintained, computed tomography (CT) can provide useful information concerning the diagnosis and the treatment of spinal diseases. There are, however, some pitfalls in interpreting CT scans: 1) the existence of the lesion may be masked, and 2) its extent and configuration may be over- or under-evaluated depending on such technical factors as the slicing level, the slicing angle, the window width, and the window level. Experimental studies were carried out on a plaster of Paris model of the spine and a cadaver spine to determine the appropriate technical factors by which the CT (EMI whole body CT scanner 5005) can be applied accurately to a diseased spine. The factors obtained were then applied in examining ninety-nine patients with various spinal disorders. Window levels ranging between 100 and 150 were found to be most appropriate. The slicing angle should be 90/sup 0/, or perpendicular to the long axis of the object under study. However, deviations of +10 or -10 degrees are acceptable. The CT view of the spine may be divided into two patterns at the cervical and thoracic levels and into three patterns at the lumbar level. In addition, the usefulness and the diagnostic value of CT for various spinal problems are discussed based on our clinical material.

  10. Computed tomography in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, Karl-Olof [HUG-Geneva University Hospital, Geneva University Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Baird, Alison E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Cerebrovascular Disease and Stroke, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Box 1213, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Stroke remains the third most important cause of mortality in industrialized countries; this has prompted research for improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with signs of acute cerebral ischemia. Over the last decade, there has been a parallel in progress in techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic options. While previously only used for excluding hemorrhage, imaging now has the possibility to detect ischemia, vascular occlusion, as well as detect tissue at risk in one setting. It should also allow to monitor treatment and predict/exclude therapeutic complications. Parallel to advances in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke, computed tomography has improved immensely over the last decade due to the development of CT scanners that are faster and that allow to acquire studies such as CT perfusion or CT angiography in a reliable way. CT can detect many signs that might help us detect impending signs of massive infarction, but we still lack the experience to use these alone to prevent a patient from benefitting from possible therapy. (orig.)

  11. Computed tomography of the orbital lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Eon; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    The use of computed tomography in investigation of orbital lesions was of value for the localization of the lesions as well as making the specific diagnosis. We advocated the combined use of transverse axial section and contrast enhancement in CT as a routine procedure often including coronal section in the diagnosis of orbital lesions because of its usefulness and more precise three dimensional imaging. The authors examined 68 patients with various ophthalmic problems by EMI-CT scanner 5005 from October 1977 to November 1979. Fifty one orbital lesions out of 68 CT scans were analyzed by CT, angiography and operative findings and results were as follows; 1. Among 43 males and 25 females, their age range was from 4 months to 66 years with the most frequent age group of first decade (17 cases; 25%) 2. The distribution of the lesions was mucocele, pseudotumor, optic nerve atrophy, metastasis, lacrimal gland tumor, persistent hypertrophic primary vitreous, granulosa cell myoblastoma, hemangioma in order with 13 malignancies (25%). 3. It was difficult to differentiate pathological diagnosis of the lesions, but the character of the lesions was determined by its characteristic location, and its relationship to eyeball, optic nerve, extraocular muscles and bony orbit. 4. It was thought that more accurate diagnosis of orbital lesions could be made by development of CT scanner having fine matrix, short time exposure and thin slice in the future.

  12. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  13. Gradient computation for VTI acoustic wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a pseudospectral operator that employes a separable approximation of the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified stack-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for the data-domain objective function, which can incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are compared to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations. Whereas the kernels computed with the two wave-equation operators are similar, the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show that the modified stack-power objective function produces cleaner gradients than the more conventional DSO operator.

  14. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandan; J; Das; Usha; Thingujam; Ananya; Panda; Sanjay; Sharma; Arun; Kumar; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma(RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography(CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT(p CT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. p CT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using p CT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of p CT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs.

  15. REVIEW: X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention.

  16. Computer tomography-aided ventriculography and cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernoch, Z.; Sercl, M.; Heger, L.; Parizek, J. (Karlova Univ., Hradec Kralove (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta)

    1983-01-28

    Computer tomography was used in 42 patients for the exploration of ventricular and subarachnoidal spaces following intraventricular, lumbar or suboccipital injections of 3 to 5 ml Amipaque using the kind of manoeuvre to permit optimum filling of the region concerned. This type of CT ventriculo- or cisternography is a significant supplement to plain CT examination particularly because it supplies data on the causes of CSF passage blocks. Thus, in two female patients it proved possible to localize cysts in the 3rd ventricle, the density of which was no different from that of CSF. As regards benign stenoses of the aqueduct, it is likely to yield less information than conventional specific ventriculography. On the other hand, the technique gives perfect visualization of all possible communications between pathological intracranial cavities and the ventricular system. CT cisternography proved useful for the identification of small-size isodense growths in the region of the sella turcica, and brought convincing evidence of the causes of profuse liquorrhea by demonstrating the presence of nasal meningocele. It was also found helpful in the analysis of the craniocervical region, otherwise difficult to survey.

  17. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: computed tomography features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; Dong; Jing-Jing; Chen; Xi-Zhen; Wang; Ya-Qin; Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography(CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess(IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis(TB). All IPTAs(11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis.

  18. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazey, G.; et al.

    2013-12-06

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak – the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  19. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Mari Aparici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-positron emission tomography (PET/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results.

  20. Playing with your Brain: Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Tan, Desney; Bernhaupt, R.; Tscheligi, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this workshop we investigate a possible role of brain-computer interaction in computer games and entertainment computing. The assumption is that brain activity, whether it is consciously controlled and directed by the user or just recorded in order to obtain information about the user’s affective

  1. Playing with your Brain: Brain-Computer Interfaces and Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Tan, Desney; Bernhaupt, R.; Tscheligi, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this workshop we investigate a possible role of brain-computer interaction in computer games and entertainment computing. The assumption is that brain activity, whether it is consciously controlled and directed by the user or just recorded in order to obtain information about the user’s affective

  2. Diffuse abnormalities of the trachea: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com; Pozes, Aline Serfaty [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [The Cardiothoracic Centre NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Araujo Neto, Cesar de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Barillo, Jorge Luiz; Zanetti, Glaucia [Faculdade de Medicina de Petropolis (FMP), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia Clinica; Souza, Carolina Althoff [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this pictorial essay was to present the main computed tomography findings seen in diffuse diseases of the trachea. The diseases studied included amyloidosis, tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica, tracheobronchomegaly, laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis, lymphoma, neurofibromatosis, relapsing polychondritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, tuberculosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, and tracheobronchomalacia. The most common computed tomography finding was thickening of the walls of the trachea, with or without nodules, parietal calcifications, or involvement of the posterior wall. Although computed tomography allows the detection and characterization of diseases of the central airways, and the correlation with clinical data reduces the diagnostic possibilities, bronchoscopy with biopsy remains the most useful procedure for the diagnosis of diffuse lesions of the trachea. (author)

  3. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tânia Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanês, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mário Flores

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results Abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion Computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:25987748

  4. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tania Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanes, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mario Flores, E-mail: marlivermelho@globo.com [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (IIER), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  5. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groen, J M; Kofoed, K F; Zacho, M;

    2013-01-01

    Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which ena...

  6. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  7. Assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency by multidetector computed tomography and electron-beam tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, LH; Dorgelo, J; Tio, RA; Jessurun, GAJ; Oudkerk, M; Zijlstra, F

    2005-01-01

    This case report describes the use of retrospectively ECG-gated 16-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and electron-beam tomography (EBT) for assessing bypass graft patency in two patients with recurrent angina after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The results of each tomographic mo

  8. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  9. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography for optimized colon cancer staging and follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Optimal management of colon cancer (CC) requires detailed assessment of extent of disease. This study prospectively investigates the diagnostic accuracy of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and detection of recurrence...

  10. The Use of GPUs for Solving the Computed Tomography Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Kovtanyuk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is a widespread method used to study the internal structure of objects. The method has applications in medicine, industry and other fields of human activity. In particular, Electronic Imaging, as a species CT, can be used to restore the structure of nanosized objects. Accurate and rapid results are in high demand in modern science. However, there are computational limitations that bound the possible usefulness of CT. On the other hand, the introduction of high-performance calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs provides improving quality and performance of computed tomography investigations. Moreover, parallel computing with GPUs gives significantly higher computation speeds when compared with (Central Processing Units CPUs, because of architectural advantages of the former. In this paper a computed tomography method of recovering the image using parallel computations powered by NVIDIA CUDA technology is considered. The implementation of this approach significantly reduces the required time for solving the CT problem.

  11. Dose Assessment in Computed Tomography Examination and Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels in Mazandaran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janbabanezhad Toori A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical X-rays are the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. While the benefits of Computed Tomography (CT are well known in accurate diagnosis, those benefits are not risk-free. CT is a device with higher patient dose in comparison with other conventional radiation procedures. Objective: This study is aimed at evaluating radiation dose to patients from Computed Tomography (CT examination in Mazandaran hospitals and defining diagnostic reference level (DRL. Methods: Patient-related data on CT protocol for four common CT examinations including brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic were collected. In each center, Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI measurements were performed using pencil ionization chamber and CT dosimetry phantom according to AAPM report No. 96 for those techniques. Then, Weighted Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIW, Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI vol and Dose Length Product (DLP were calculated. Results: The CTDIw for brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic ranged (15.6- 73, (3.8-25. 8, (4.5-16.3 and (7-16.3, respectively. Values of DLP had a range of (197.4-981, (41.8-184, (131-342.3 and (283.6-486 for brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic, respectively. The 3rd quartile of CTDIW, derived from dose distribution for each examination is the proposed quantity for DRL. The DRLs of brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic are measured 59.5, 17, 7.8 and 11 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrated large scales of dose for the same examination among different centers. For all examinations, our values were lower than international reference doses.

  12. Measurement of the glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products GFAP-BDP biomarker for the detection of traumatic brain injury compared to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul J; Panczykowski, David M; Yue, John K; Puccio, Ava M; Inoue, Tomoo; Sorani, Marco D; Lingsma, Hester F; Maas, Andrew I R; Valadka, Alex B; Yuh, Esther L; Mukherjee, Pratik; Manley, Geoffrey T; Okonkwo, David O

    2015-04-15

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) are brain-specific proteins released into serum as part of the pathophysiological response after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We performed a multi-center trial to validate and characterize the use of GFAP-BDP levels in the diagnosis of intracranial injury in a broad population of patients with a positive clinical screen for head injury. This multi-center, prospective, cohort study included patients 16-93 years of age presenting to three level 1 trauma centers with suspected TBI (loss of consciousness, post-trauma amnesia, and so on). Serum GFAP-BDP levels were drawn within 24 h and analyzed, in a blinded fashion, using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The ability of GFAP-BDP to predict intracranial injury on admission computed tomography (CT) as well as delayed magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed by multiple regression and assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Utility of GFAP-BDP to predict injury and reduce unnecessary CT scans was assessed utilizing decision curve analysis. A total of 215 patients were included, of which 83% suffered mild TBI, 4% moderate, and 12% severe; mean age was 42.1±18 years. Evidence of intracranial injury was present in 51% of the sample (median Rotterdam Score, 2; interquartile range, 2). GFAP-BDP demonstrated very good predictive ability (AUC=0.87) and demonstrated significant discrimination of injury severity (odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.64). Use of GFAP-BDP yielded a net benefit above clinical screening alone and a net reduction in unnecessary scans by 12-30%. Used in conjunction with other clinical information, rapid measurement of GFAP-BDP is useful in establishing or excluding the diagnosis of radiographically apparent intracranial injury throughout the spectrum of TBI. As an adjunct to current screening practices, GFAP-BDP may help avoid unnecessary CT scans without sacrificing

  13. Computed tomography (CT) and diastematomyelia's diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, M.B. dos; Luca, V. de; Ferreira, M.A.S. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina); Barros, A.P. de (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Hospital Universitario)

    After a case of diastematomyelia observed at the University Hospital (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) a review is done of the pertaining literature, and the contribution of the computed tomography for the diagnosis of this disease is emphasized.

  14. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key elements of feasibility for a high speed automated time domain terahertz computed axial tomography (TD-THz CT) non destructive...

  15. Perfusion computed tomography to assist decision making for stroke thrombolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Christopher; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; McElduff, Patrick; Miteff, Ferdi; Spratt, Neil J.; Bateman, Grant; Donnan, Geoffrey; Davis, Stephen; Parsons, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of perfusion imaging to guide selection of patients for stroke thrombolysis remains controversial because of lack of supportive phase three clinical trial evidence. We aimed to measure the outcomes for patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) at a comprehensive stroke care facility where perfusion computed tomography was routinely used for thrombolysis eligibility decision assistance. Our overall hypothesis was that patients with ‘target’ mismatch on perfusion computed tomography would have improved outcomes with rtPA. This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive ischaemic stroke patients who fulfilled standard clinical/non-contrast computed tomography eligibility criteria for treatment with intravenous rtPA, but for whom perfusion computed tomography was used to guide the final treatment decision. The ‘real-time’ perfusion computed tomography assessments were qualitative; a large perfusion computed tomography ischaemic core, or lack of significant perfusion lesion-core mismatch were considered relative exclusion criteria for thrombolysis. Specific volumetric perfusion computed tomography criteria were not used for the treatment decision. The primary analysis compared 3-month modified Rankin Scale in treated versus untreated patients after ‘off-line’ (post-treatment) quantitative volumetric perfusion computed tomography eligibility assessment based on presence or absence of ‘target’ perfusion lesion-core mismatch (mismatch ratio >1.8 and volume >15 ml, core perfusion computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients to an Australian historical cohort of non-contrast computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients. Of 635 patients with acute ischaemic stroke eligible for rtPA by standard criteria, thrombolysis was given to 366 patients, with 269 excluded based on visual real-time perfusion computed tomography assessment. After off-line quantitative perfusion computed tomography classification

  16. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase 2 project, we propose to develop, construct, and deliver to NASA a computed axial tomography time-domain terahertz (CT TD-THz) non destructive...

  17. Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... the subjects who had cranial scans done in five years were children with seizures disorders.

  18. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques...

  19. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of dental implant site dimensions. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2011;40:67-75...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science in Oral Biology June 2013 Naval Postgraduate Dental

  1. Computed tomography of the mediastinum in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertler, K.F.; Janzen, R.W.C.; Hagemann, J.; Otto, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography of the mediastinum was performed in 45 patients with myasthenia gravis. Surgery was carried out in fourteen. Amongst these, there were four thymomas, one thymolipoma, eight thymic hyperplasias and one normal thymus gland. A further patient, who did not have surgery, probably also had a thymic tumour. The normal thymus and thymic hyperplasia cannot be distinguished on computed tomography. Differentiation of small thymomas from normal thymus is not always possible. Invasion by thymomas can only be appreciated with large tumours.

  2. Evaluation of computer tomography in cerebro-vascular disease (Strokes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Sik; Baek, Seung Yon; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    Most of cerebrovascular disease are composed of vascular occulusive changes and hemorrhage. Now a day, the computed tomography is the best way for evaluation of cerebrovascular disease including detection of nature, location, and associated changes. This study includes evaluation of computed tomography of 70 patients with cerebrovascular disease during the period of 10 months from April. 1983 to Feb. 1984 in Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution of the total 70 patients was broad ranging from 25 years to 79 years. 78.6% of patients were over the age of 50. The male and female sex ratio was 1.4:1. 2. 4 out of 70 patients were normal and 66 patients revealed abnormal on C.T. findings; those were intracranial hemorrhage (28 patients), cerebral infarction (34 patients) and brain atrophy (4 patients). 3. In cases of cerebral infarction, the cerebral hemisphere was most common site of lesion (28 cases), and next was basal ganglia (2 cases). Most of the infarcts in cerebral hemisphere were located in the parietal and temporal lobes. 4. In cases of intracranial hemorrhage, the basal ganglia was most common site of lesion (15 cases). The next common site was cerebral hemisphere (9 cases). 6 patients of all intracranial hemorrhage were combined with intraventricular hemorrhage. Ratio of right and left was 2:3. 5. In patients with motor weakness or hemiparesis, more common findings on CT scan were cerebral infarction. In case with hemiplegia, more common CT findings were intracerebral hemorrhage. 6. Of the 40 cases thought to be cerebral infarction initially by clinical findings and spinal tap. 8 cases (20.0%) were proved to be cerebral hemorrhage by the CT scan. However, of the 22 cases thought to be cerebral hemorrhage, initially, only two cases (9.0%) were cerebral infarction.

  3. Actinomycosis involving the liver. Computed tomography/ultrasound correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, S; Fishman, E K; Sanders, R

    1987-06-01

    The clinical profile of pelvic actinomycosis, which is being recognized with increased frequency in IUD users, can be misleading in such patients and lead to dangerous delays in diagnosis. The authors present a case in which an IUD user initially sought medical attention for multiple liver abscesses secondary to spread from unsuspected ovarian actinomycosis. The 43-year-old patient, who was admitted with right upper quadrant pain and fever, had a 15-year history of IUD use, although the device had been removed 1 year prior to admission for apparent infection in the left ovary. Ultrasound revealed mixed cystic and solid liver lesions as well as a complex subcapsular fluid collection. A solid left adnexal mass was demonstrated in the pelvis. Computed tomography scan indicated extension of 1 of the complex cystic liver lesions through the liver capsule and into the abdominal wall. Needle aspirations of the liver lesions yielded thick pus that was later identified as Actinomyces israelii. Actinomycosis was evident in the ovarian lesion. Colonization of the vagina and uterus by actinomycosis has been reported by 1.6-5.3% of IUD users, and the risk appears to increase when the same IUD is used for a prolonged time period. In this case, neither the computed tomography scan nor ultrasound suggested an inflammatory process of the left ovary. Aspiration of a liver lesion under ultrasound guidance was necessary for the correct diagnosis. Since actinomycosis has the potential to spread to extrapelvic organs such as the peritoneum, liver, and brain, early diagnosis is essential.

  4. Comparison between conventional tomography and computer tomography in diseases of the sacroiliac joints. Vergleich von konventioneller Tomographie und Computertomographie bei Erkrankungen der Sakroiliakalgelenke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, J.D.; Ganter, H.; Winter, C. (Bundeswehrkrankenhaus, Giessen (Germany, F.R.). Roentgenabteilung Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Giessen (Germany, F.R.). Roentgenabteilung)

    1990-10-01

    16 patients with diseases of the sacroiliac joints were examined both with computer tomography and with conventional tomography. Both techniques were characterized by a high sensitivity. Computer tomography was superior in exactly delineating the extent of the pathologic changes. In conventional tomography the joint surface was more blurred, erosions were larger, and signs of ankylosis were more expanded, so that the joints seemed to be more altered in 8 cases than demonstrated by computer tomography. Very accurate changes like subchondral cysts were recognized only in the computer tomograms. In all cases in which anteroposterior radiographs revealed no clear result, the authors recommend to additionally employ computer tomography. (orig.).

  5. Computed tomography of congenital brain malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book is illustrated showing each condition. This book is designed to correlate the pathology of CNS malformations with their CT scan appearance, mainly on the axial images. The author has drawn upon his personal experience and the information gleaned from the literature dealing with the description of the CT scan findings of these malformations. The emphasis is on simplicity of description. Since a large degree of morphological variation exists in each entity, numerous illustrations (wherever applicable) are shown to depict those variations. When appropriate, deficiency of the CT scan in the evaluation of these CNS malformations also is indicated. A description of CNS embryology is included as well.

  6. Interfacing with the computational brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2011-10-01

    Neuroscience is just beginning to understand the neural computations that underlie our remarkable capacity to learn new motor tasks. Studies of natural movements have emphasized the importance of concepts such as dimensionality reduction within hierarchical levels of redundancy, optimization of behavior in the presence of sensorimotor noise and internal models for predictive control. These concepts also provide a framework for understanding the improvements in performance seen in myoelectric-controlled interface and brain-machine interface paradigms. Recent experiments reveal how volitional activity in the motor system combines with sensory feedback to shape neural representations and drives adaptation of behavior. By elucidating these mechanisms, a new generation of intelligent interfaces can be designed to exploit neural plasticity and restore function after neurological injury.

  7. Computed tomography of the orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jai Korl; Lee, Hwang Bok; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byeong Yeob [Han Mi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    The development of computed tomography (CT) provided a noninvasive safe technique for imaging the orbit in any plane exquisitely demonstrating its normal anatomy as well as its pathologic process. The orbit is an ideal structure to be examined by CT because of large difference of absorption values between the intraorbital fat, muscle, optic nerve and vessels. In this study, the authors reviewed CT findings of 66 pathologically proven orbital tumors and tumorous conditions among the total of 98 cases who had taken orbital CT scan because if exophthalmos, ocular pain, diplopia and other ophthalmologic symptoms suggesting orbital masses during the period of 3 years. For the analysis of characteristic CT findings of the orbital lesions, all lesions are divided into 4 groups according to the site of origin, i.e., tumors arising in the eyeball (group 1); from intraconal space (group 2); from extraconal space (group 3); and from extraorbital regions (group 4). The results are as follows; 1.Extra tumor detection and localization was possible in 63 cases. Thus the detection rate was 95% with CT scan. 2.Among 36 males and 30 females, their age ranged from 10 months to 72 years. 3.Intraocular tumors (group 1) were 10 cases. Retinoblastoma occurred wholly in the young children under 5 years and combined with calcification in 57%. Choroidal melanoma occurred wholly in adults. 4.Intraconal tumors (group 2) were 9 cases. Vascular tumors (7 cases) were the most frequent and well enhancing mass. 5.The tumors arising in the extraconal region (group 3) were pseudotumor (12 cases), lymphoma (3 cases), dermoid cyst (4 cases), metastasis (2 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1 case) and teratoma (1 case). A case of lymphoma demonstrating retrobulbar ill defined mass with scleral l thickening could not be differentiated from the pseudotumor which showing similar finding. 6.The lesions arising from extraorbital region (group 4) were PNS cancer (9 cases), mucocele (3 cases), lid cancer (4

  8. Incidence of blunt craniocervical artery injuries: use of whole-body computed tomography trauma imaging with adapted computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Steffen K; Langner, Soenke; Baldauf, Joerg; Kirsch, Michael; Kohlmann, Thomas; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of traumatic craniocervical artery dissection varies in published trauma series. To determine the frequency of traumatic craniocervical artery injury in polytrauma patients by using standardized whole-body trauma computed tomography with adapted computed tomography angiography of the craniocervical vessels. A total of 718 consecutive patients requiring whole-body trauma computed tomography (16-row multislice) because of the mechanism of their injury patterns and an Injury Severity Scale score greater than 16 were analyzed prospectively. After a cranial scan, computed tomography angiography of the craniocervical vessels with 40 mL of iodinated contrast agent was performed using bolus tracking. The overall incidence of blunt carotid and vertebral injuries (BCVIs) in the screened population was 1.7%. BCVIs were observed in 27.3% of patients with detected isolated cervical spine injuries and in 3.9% of patients with isolated cranial fractures with or without intracranial hemorrhage, whereas 5.3% of patients with combined cervical and cranial lesions were associated with BCVIs. In addition, 0.4% of BCVIs occurred in patients without evidence of head or neck trauma. Whole-body trauma computed tomography with an adapted scanning protocol for the craniocervical vessels is a fast, safe, and feasible method for detecting vascular injuries. It allows prompt further treatment if necessary. Computed tomography angiography could be a part of a broad screening protocol for craniocervical vessels in documented injuries of the head and neck and in trauma mechanisms influencing the craniocervical region as well.

  9. Photoacoustic tomography of monkey brain using virtual point ultrasonic transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Liming; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    A photoacoustic tomography system (PAT) using virtual point ultrasonic transducers was developed and applied to image a monkey brain. The custom-built transducers provide a 10-fold greater field-of-view (FOV) than finite-aperture unfocused transducers as well as an improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reduced artifacts rather than negative-lens transducers. Their tangential resolution, radial resolution, and (SNR) improvements were quantified using tissue phantoms. Our PAT system can achi...

  10. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron-emission tomography assays for tissue oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D; Schneider, R F; Urbain, J L; Hanks, G E

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy prescription can now be customized to target the major mechanism(s) of resistance of individual tumors. In that regard, functional imaging techniques should be exploited to identify the dominant mechanism(s). Tumor biology research has identified several mechanisms of tumor resistance that may be unique to radiation treatments. These fall into 3 broad areas associated with (1) tumor hypoxic fraction, (2) tumor growth rate, (3) and the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor clonogens. Imaging research has markers in various stages of development for quantifying relevant information about each of these mechanisms, and those that measure tumor oxygenation and predict for radioresistance are the most advanced. Positron-emission tomography (PET) measurement of oxygen 15 has yielded important information, particularly about brain tissue perfusion, metabolism, and function. Indirect markers of tumor hypoxia have exploited the covalent binding of bioreductive intermediates of azomycin-containing compounds whose uptakes are inversely proportional to intracellular oxygen concentrations. Pilot clinical studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET detection of radiolabeled markers to tumor hypoxia have been reported. Recently, other studies have attempted to exploit the reduction properties of both technetium and copper chelates for the selective deposition of radioactive metals in hypoxic tissues. A growing number of potentially useful isotopes are now available for labeling several novel chemicals that could have the appropriate specificity and sensitivity. Preclinical studies with "microSPECT" and "microPET" will be important to define the optimal radiodiagnostic(s) for measuring tissue oxygenation and for determining the time after their administration for optimal hypoxic signal acquisition. Radiolabeled markers of growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells in solid tumors are also being developed. We conclude that

  11. Foveola pharyngea - demonstration in conventional tomography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiegler, W.; Stolle, E.

    1980-08-01

    The foveola pharyngea is a cavity on the underside of the clivus, located before the tuberculum pharyngeum and, as a larger pit it was detectable in approx. 1% overall in approx. 4% of the personally examined X-rays (11/284) and computed tomograms (6/154) of the skull base. The canalis basilaris medianus inferior and canalis basilaris medianus bifurcatus almost always empties into one of the three forms of the foveola pharyngea (foveola pharyngea infundibuliformis posterior). The differential diagnosis to canalis basilaris medianus, canalis craniopharyngeus, sutura sphenooccipitalis and bone destruction is discussed.

  12. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Naimuddin, Md; Blazey, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rukalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P

    2015-01-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantageous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  13. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md. [Delhi U.; Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Boi, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Erdelyi, B. [Northern Illinois U.; Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois U.; Krider, J. [Northern Illinois U.; Rukalin, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois U.; Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Fordt, R. [Fermilab; Sellberg, G. [Fermilab; Rauch, J. E. [Fermilab; Roman, M. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Wilson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-02-04

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  14. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  15. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyu; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d'). d' was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1-4 mm), contrast levels (10-100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d' values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDIvol: 3.4-64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d' values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction potentials (11-54 mGy, 77%-84%), followed by

  16. Lens dosimetry during examination of the sella turcica: comparison between conventional tomography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, O.; Bette, L.; Noseda, A.

    1986-01-01

    Lens irradiation measurements were performed with thermo-luminescent lithium fluoride dosimeters during tomographic examinations of the sella turcica, simulated on a phantom head. Lens dosimetry during linear or hypocycloidal conventional tomography was compared with that during computed tomography (CT). Results showed that CT involved much lower radiation exposure to the lens than did conventional tomography and that the major part of the irradiation delivered by CT was related to axial scanning. Therefore, the major finding was that lens irradiation during CT of the sella can be kept at a particularly low level (< 1 m Gy/8 sections) when only coronal scanning is performed.

  17. Acute mediastinitis: multidetector computed tomography findings following cardiac surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Clarissa Aguiar de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto do Coracao (InCor)]. E-mail: clarissaaguiarm@yahoo.com.br; Baena, Marcos Eduardo da Silva [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Ultrasonography; Uezumi, Kiyomi Kato [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Computed Tomography; Castro, Claudio Campi de [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Center of Diagnosis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Radiology

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative mediastinitis is defined as an infection of the organs and tissues in the mediastinal space, with an incidence ranging between 0.4% and 5% of cases. This disease severity varies from infection of superficial tissues in the chest wall to fulminant mediastinitis with sternal involvement. Diagnostic criterion for postoperative detection of acute mediastinitis at computed tomography is the presence of fluid collections and gas in the mediastinal space, which might or might not be associated with peristernal abnormalities such as edema of soft tissues, separation of sternal segments with marginal bone resorption, sclerosis and osteomyelitis. Other associated findings include lymphadenomegaly, pulmonary consolidation and pleural/ pericardial effusion. Some of these findings, such as mediastinal gas and small fluid collections can be typically found in the absence of infection, early in the period following thoracic surgery where the effectiveness of computed tomography is limited. After approximately two weeks, computed tomography achieves almost 100% sensitivity and specificity. Patients with clinical suspicion of mediastinitis should be submitted to computed tomography for investigating the presence of fluid collections to identify the extent and nature of the disease. Multidetector computed tomography allows 3D images reconstruction, contributing particularly to the evaluation of the sternum. (author)

  18. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...... study investigates the positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET-CT in stage I disease and the clinical impact of the scan results in all disease stages....

  19. Pigmented villonodular synovitis mimics metastases on fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumogo, Comfort O; Kochenderfer, James N; Civelek, A Cahid; Bluemke, David A

    2016-04-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign joint disease best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The role of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis or characterization remains unclear. PVNS displays as a focal FDG avid lesion, which can masquerade as a metastatic lesion, on PET-CET. We present a case of PVNS found on surveillance imaging of a lymphoma patient.

  20. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques....... Here, a new method for optimising cardiac coronary CT with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histopathology is presented. Materials and methods: Twenty human hearts obtained from autopsies were used. A contrast agent that solidifies after cooling was injected into the coronary arteries. CT...

  1. Multifocal sparganosis mimicking lymphoma involvement: Multimodal imaging findings of ultrasonography, CT, MRI, and position emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Kim, Tae Jung [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Dev. of Hematology-Omcology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Hyun Jung [Dev. of Hematology-Omcology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by the migrating plerocercoid larva of Spirometra species tapeworms. The most frequent clinical manifestation is a subcutaneous nodule resembling a neoplasm. In this study, we presented multimodal findings of ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography-computed tomography and follow-up imagings on multifocal sparganosis, mimicking lymphoma involvement in a patient with lymphoma.

  2. Computed tomography before lumbar puncture in acute meningitis: a review of the risks and benefits.

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, B D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the indications, if any, for routine computed tomography (CT) of the brain before lumbar puncture in the management of acute meningitis. DATA SOURCES: Original research papers, reviews and editorials published in English from 1965 to 1991 were retrieved from MEDLINE. The bibliographies of these articles and of numerous standard texts were examined for pertinent references. A survey of local neurologists was conducted, and legal opinion was sought from the Canadian Medi...

  3. Shielding Calculations for Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baasandorj, Khashbayar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jeongseon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Integrated PET-CT has been shown to be more accurate for lesion localization and characterization than PET or CT alone, and the results obtained from PET and CT separately and interpreted side by side or following software based fusion of the PET and CT datasets. At the same time, PET-CT scans can result in high patient and staff doses; therefore, careful site planning and shielding of this imaging modality have become challenging issues in the field. In Mongolia, the introduction of PET-CT facilities is currently being considered in many hospitals. Thus, additional regulatory legislation for nuclear and radiation applications is necessary, for example, in regulating licensee processes and ensuring radiation safety during the operations. This paper aims to determine appropriate PET-CT shielding designs using numerical formulas and computer code. Since presently there are no PET-CT facilities in Mongolia, contact was made with radiological staff at the Nuclear Medicine Center of the National Cancer Center of Mongolia (NCCM) to get information about facilities where the introduction of PET-CT is being considered. Well-designed facilities do not require additional shielding, which should help cut down overall costs related to PET-CT installation. According to the results of this study, building barrier thicknesses of the NCCM building is not sufficient to keep radiation dose within the limits.

  4. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  5. Photoacoustic tomography of monkey brain using virtual point ultrasonic transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Liming; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Lihong V

    2011-07-01

    A photoacoustic tomography system (PAT) using virtual point ultrasonic transducers was developed and applied to image a monkey brain. The custom-built transducers provide a 10-fold greater field-of-view (FOV) than finite-aperture unfocused transducers as well as an improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reduced artifacts rather than negative-lens transducers. Their tangential resolution, radial resolution, and (SNR) improvements were quantified using tissue phantoms. Our PAT system can achieve high uniformity in both resolution (8) within a large FOV of 6 cm in diameter, even when the imaging objects are enclosed by a monkey skull. The cerebral cortex of a monkey brain was accurately mapped transcranially, through a skull ranging from 2 to 4 mm in thickness. This study demonstrates that PAT can overcome the optical and ultrasound attenuation of a relatively thick skull and can potentially be applied to human neonatal brain imaging.

  6. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head containing inserted needles. We also image the coronal and axial sections of a 7-month-old monkey head. Brain features that are 3 cm deep in the head are imaged clearly. Our results demonstrate that TAT has potential for use in portable, cost-effective imagers for pediatric brains.

  7. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study wer

  8. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study

  9. Evaluation of myocardial ischemia by multiple detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Fabio Vieira, E-mail: rccury@me.com [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cury, Roberto Caldeira [Hospital Samaritano, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    For years, cardiovascular diseases have been the leading cause of death worldwide, bringing on important social and economic consequences. Given this scenario, the search for a method capable of diagnosing coronary artery diseases in an early and accurate way is increasingly higher. The coronary computed tomography angiogram is already widely established for the stratification of coronary artery diseases, and, more recently, the computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging has been providing relevant information by correlating ischemia and the coronary anatomy. The objective of this review is to describe the evaluation of myocardial ischemia by multiple detector computed tomography. This study will resort to controlled clinical trials that show the possibility of a single method to identify the atherosclerotic load, presence of coronary artery luminal narrowing and possible myocardial ischemia, by means of a fast, practical and reliable method validated by a multicenter study. (author)

  10. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  11. Computed tomography of sellar and parasellar lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Mitsunori; Aoki, Hideo (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-06-01

    Neuroradiological modalities, particularly CT, for sellar and parasellar lesions were reviewed. Although accurate preoperative diagnosis is sometimes difficult, CT diagnosed 83% as far as pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma and meningioma were concerned and demonstrated abnormal findings in 95% of parasellar tumors. At the authors' department, CT visualized abnormalities in all cases, with the exception of suprasellar arachnoid cyst, but a histological diagnosis was possible only in 84%. Since lesions including tumors cannot be completely denied even if CT shows normal images, findings by modalities such as plain craniography, cerebral tomography, cerebral angiography and cisternography should be judged comprehensively.

  12. Competing and collaborating brains: multi-brain computer interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Hassanieu, Aboul Ella; Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we survey the possibilities of brain-computer interface applications that assume two or more users, where at least one of the users’ brain activity is used as input to the application. Such ‘applications’ were already explored by artists who introduced artistic EEG applications in

  13. Competing and collaborating brains: multi-brain computer interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Hassanieu, Aboul Ella; Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we survey the possibilities of brain-computer interface applications that assume two or more users, where at least one of the users’ brain activity is used as input to the application. Such ‘applications’ were already explored by artists who introduced artistic EEG applications in th

  14. Anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, W; Taeger, K

    2000-08-01

    The need for general anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography investigations can be reduced by the implementation of structured sedation programmes supervised by anaesthetists. Despite its side-effects, chloral hydrate is still the drug most widely used. Rectal thiopental or intravenous propofol are suggested anaesthetic agents for pre-school children and uncooperative or claustrophobic individuals. Spiral computed tomography scans and ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging shorten immobilization times further. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging and intervention techniques in neuroradiology depend on a motionless patient. A useful strategy for testing anaesthesia equipment has been outlined.

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M C; Posniak, H V; McDonald, V; Wisniewski, R; Moncada, R

    1989-07-01

    Computed tomography is an established modality for the evaluation of the pericardium. It is used to evaluate complicated pericardial effusions, pericardial thickening, calcific pericarditis, pericardial cysts, postoperative changes and primary and metastatic neoplasms of the pericardium. Magnetic resonance imaging is being used with increasing frequency in the evaluation of pericardial disease. It offers advantages over computed tomography, including a potential for tissue characterization, absence of ionizing radiation or need for intravenous contrast medium, and the ability to scan in any plane. Disadvantages include greater cost, longer examination times and the inability to identify calcification positively.

  16. Investigation of a near-infrared-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Satoi, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    In the near-infrared-ray computed tomography (NIR-CT) scanner, NIR rays are produced from a light-emitting diode (LED) and detected using an NIR phototransistor (PT). The wavelengths of the LED peak intensity and the PT high sensitivity in the data table are both 940 nm. The photocurrents flowing through the PTR are converted into voltages using an emitter-follower circuit, and the output voltages are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter. The NIR projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object, and the scanning is conducted in both directions of its movement.

  17. Direct sagital computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzione, J.V. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA); Seltzer, S.E.; Katzberg, R.W.; Hammerschlag, S.B.; Chiango, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a common clinical problem that has been reported to affect 4%-28% of adults. Temporomandibular joint arthrography has shown that many of these patients have intraarticular abnormalities involving the meniscus. A noninvasive test that could demonstrate the meniscus as well as bony abnormalities of the joint would be an important advance. In an attempt to develop such a noninvasive test, we have performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on cadaver temporomandibular joints and have correlated the images with anatomic sections. We are currently applying this technique clinically and report one representative example in which direct sagittal computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint accurately demonstrated an anteriorly displaced meniscus.

  18. Cranial computed tomography in pediatric migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Cermeno, J.C.; Gobernado, J.M.; Freije, R.; Zaragoza, E.; Gimeno, A.

    1984-04-01

    Two migraine children showed low-density areas with irregular enhancement patterns on CT scans of the head after contrast infusion. Angiography was normal in both patients. These abnormalities probably were due to transient blood-brain barrier damage. This knowledge is important when excluding other disorders like vascular malformations.

  19. Brain architecture: A design for natural computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years ago, John von Neumann compared the architecture of the brain with that of computers that he invented and which is still in use today. In those days, the organisation of computers was based on concepts of brain organisation. Here, we give an update on current results on the global organisation of neural systems. For neural systems, we outline how the spatial and topological architecture of neuronal and cortical networks facilitates robustness against failures, fast processing, and balanced network activation. Finally, we discuss mechanisms of self-organization for such architectures. After all, the organization of the brain might again inspire computer architecture.

  20. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ka-Kit Wong; Arpit Gandhi; Benjamin L Viglianti; Lorraine M Fig; Domenico Rubello; Milton D Gross

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT)/computed tomography(CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders.METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and Pub Med searches using the terms: "SPECT/CT"; "functional anatomic mapping"; "transmission emission tomography"; "parathyroid adenoma"; "thyroid cancer"; "neuroendocrine tumor"; "adrenal"; "pheochromocytoma"; "paraganglioma"; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts(case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology.RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the biodistribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTclabeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol(NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy from CT, translating to

  1. Computed tomographic imaging of the brain of normal neonatal foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide a more complete description of normal cross-sectional anatomy of the neonatal brain of the foal and associated structures by computed tomography (CT and gross anatomical sections. Using a fourth-generation CT scanner, 2-mm contiguous transverse images were acquired from two neonatal 5-days-old Quarter horse foals. After the study the animals were euthanised for reasons unrelated to head pathology. To assist in the accurate identification of brain and associated structures, transverse CT images were obtained and compared with the corresponding frozen cross-sections of the head. CT images matched well with their corresponding transverse gross sections and provided good differentiation between the bones and the soft tissues of the head. These CT images are intended to be a useful initial anatomic reference in the interpretation for clinical CT imaging studies of the brain and associated structures in live neonatal foals.

  2. Industrial Computed Tomography using Proximal Algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Zang, Guangming

    2016-04-14

    In this thesis, we present ProxiSART, a flexible proximal framework for robust 3D cone beam tomographic reconstruction based on the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART). We derive the proximal operator for the SART algorithm and use it for minimizing the data term in a proximal algorithm. We show the flexibility of the framework by plugging in different powerful regularizers, and show its robustness in achieving better reconstruction results in the presence of noise and using fewer projections. We compare our framework to state-of-the-art methods and existing popular software tomography reconstruction packages, on both synthetic and real datasets, and show superior reconstruction quality, especially from noisy data and a small number of projections.

  3. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (< 1 MHz) are used to reconstruct the TAT images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head co...

  4. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Sanders, J. [Albuquerque VA Medical Center, NM (US); Belliveau, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  5. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Sanders, J. [Albuquerque VA Medical Center, NM (US); Belliveau, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  6. Computed tomography angiography and perfusion to assess coronary artery stenosis causing perfusion defects by single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rochitte, Carlos E; George, Richard T; Chen, Marcus Y

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the diagnostic power of integrating the results of computed tomography angiography (CTA) and CT myocardial perfusion (CTP) to identify coronary artery disease (CAD) defined as a flow limiting coronary artery stenosis causing a perfusion defect by single photon emission computed...... tomography (SPECT). METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a multicentre study to evaluate the accuracy of integrated CTA-CTP for the identification of patients with flow-limiting CAD defined by ≥50% stenosis by invasive coronary angiography (ICA) with a corresponding perfusion deficit on stress single photon...

  7. 重型颅脑外伤灌注CT结果与脑灌注压的相关性%Correlation of brain perfusion computed tomography results and cerebral perfusion pressure in patients with severe head trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐裕; 冯东侠; 高恒; 那汉荣; 徐伟东; 周新民

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨重型颅脑外伤患者灌注CF结果与脑灌注压监测结果的相关性.方法 50例重型颅脑外伤患者分为两组:T组28例,C组22例,人院时头颅CT平扫有明显异常.在行灌注CT时,同时监测平均动脉压(MAP)及颅内压(ICP),计算脑灌注压(CPP).应用直线回归分析灌注CT参数[局部脑血容量(rCBV)、局部脑血流(rCBF)和平均通过时间(MTT)]与CPP的相关性.结果 根据灌注CT结果,T组分为两个亚组:T1组,16例,灌注CT结果与CPP呈弱相关;T2组,12例,两者存在强相关.T1、T2和C组间的灌注CT参数均有明显差异.T1组的rCBF为(18.8±8.0)cm3·100g1·min-2,明显低于T2组的(60.2±21.3)cm3·100g1·min-1和C组的(48.3±11.0)CM3·100g1·min-1(P<0.01).T1、T2组灌注CT参数与相应CPP值之间均显著相关(P<0.01).结论 灌注CT结合ICP监测能提供有价值的评估脑血管自动调节功能是否完好的信息,有助于指导治疗.%Objective To investigate the correlation of brain perfusion computed tomography (CT) results and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in patients with severe head trauma. Methods Perfusion CT results of 50 patients with head trauma were analyzed , who were divided into two groups of T(28 cases, severe head trauma with abnormal CT findings during admission) and C(22 cases,head trauma with normal CT findings during admission). The patients underwent perfusion CT and MAP and ICP were measured at the same time, by which CPP was calculated. The correlation between perfusion CT results [regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and MTT] and corresponding CPP was analyzed using linear regression analysis. Results According to perfusion CT results, group T was divided into two subgroups of Tl (16 cases, characterized by a weak correlation between the perfusion-CT results and the corresponding CPP values) and T2(12 cases,characterized by a strong correlation between the perfusion-CT results and the corresponding

  8. Brain-Computer Interfaces : Beyond Medical Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Lotte, F.; Tangermann, M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interaction has already moved from assistive care to applications such as gaming. Improvements in usability, hardware, signal processing, and system integration should yield applications in other nonmedical areas.

  9. Brain-Computer Interfaces : Beyond Medical Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Lotte, F.; Tangermann, M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interaction has already moved from assistive care to applications such as gaming. Improvements in usability, hardware, signal processing, and system integration should yield applications in other nonmedical areas.

  10. Experiencing Brain-Computer Interface Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van de B.L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that extract information from the user’s brain activity and employ it in some way in an interactive system. While historically BCIs were mainly catered towards paralyzed or otherwise physically handicapped users, the last couple of years applications with

  11. Differentiating functional brain regions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Daniel A.; Bow, Hansen C.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    The human brain is made up of functional regions governing movement, sensation, language, and cognition. Unintentional injury during neurosurgery can result in significant neurological deficits and morbidity. The current standard for localizing function to brain tissue during surgery, intraoperative electrical stimulation or recording, significantly increases the risk, time, and cost of the procedure. There is a need for a fast, cost-effective, and high-resolution intraoperative technique that can avoid damage to functional brain regions. We propose that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can fill this niche by imaging differences in the cellular composition and organization of functional brain areas. We hypothesized this would manifest as differences in the attenuation coefficient measured using OCT. Five functional regions (prefrontal, somatosensory, auditory, visual, and cerebellum) were imaged in ex vivo porcine brains (n=3), a model chosen due to a similar white/gray matter ratio as human brains. The attenuation coefficient was calculated using a depth-resolved model and quantitatively validated with Intralipid phantoms across a physiological range of attenuation coefficients (absolute difference < 0.1cm-1). Image analysis was performed on the attenuation coefficient images to derive quantitative endpoints. We observed a statistically significant difference among the median attenuation coefficients of these five regions (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Nissl-stained histology will be used to validate our results and correlate OCT-measured attenuation coefficients to neuronal density. Additional development and validation of OCT algorithms to discriminate brain regions are planned to improve the safety and efficacy of neurosurgical procedures such as biopsy, electrode placement, and tissue resection.

  12. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  13. 3D artefact for concurrent scale calibration in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A novel artefact for calibration of the scale in 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is presented. The artefact comprises a carbon fibre tubular structure on which a number of reference ruby spheres are glued. The artefact is positioned and scanned together with the workpiece inside the CT scanner ...

  14. Computer tomography in Caisson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, F.; Csobaly, S.

    1981-07-01

    Computer tomography was performed on 20 patients with the early stages of Caisson osteoarthropathy, as well as in other patients with chronic bone infarcts. From their results the authors have formed the opinion that CT is valuable, not only in the diagnosis of early cases, but that it can provide significant information concerning the osteopathy and bone infarcts.

  15. A Clinical Evaluation Of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    subject number. The principal investigator collated all data collection sheets and organized them into a spreadsheet for final analysis. Data...available cone-beam computed tomography machine . Am J 01ihod Dentofacial Orthop 2008; 134:573-82. 7. Moshfeghi M, Tavakoli MA, Hosseini ET, et al

  16. Geometrical metrology on silicone rubber by computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; Pacurar, Ramona Alexandra; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) represents a suitable measuring technique for investigation of deformable materials, since no forces are developed on the part during scanning. As for any other measuring instruments, the traceability of the CT scanners needs to be assured. An investigation on geometrical...

  17. Traceability investigation in Computed Tomography using industry-inspired workpieces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraemer, Alexandra; Stolfi, Alessandro; Schneider, Timm

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns an investigation of the accuracy of Computed Tomography (CT) measurements using four industry-inspired workpieces. A total of 16 measurands were selected and calibrated using CMMs. CT measurements on industry-inspired workpieces were carried out using two CTs having different...

  18. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula diagnosed with multidetector computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, Pa

    2009-04-01

    This case highlights important issues in investigation of patients with suspected tracheo-oesophageal fistula including the value of multidetector computed tomography, the importance of thorough imaging evaluation when high clinical suspicion of tracheo-oesophageal fistula exists and the value of close interaction between radiologists and intensive care physicians in the investigation of these patients.

  19. Computed Tomography Features of Spontaneously Perforated Pyometra: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K.S.; Tan, C.K.; Mak, C.W.; Chia, C.C.; Kuo, C.Y.; Yu, W.L. [Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China). Depts. of Intensive Care Medicine, Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Surgery

    2006-03-15

    Spontaneous perforation of pyometra is an extremely rare emergent gynecologic disease. We report a 73-year-old woman with a spontaneously perforated pyometra presenting with acute abdomen in the emergency department. A dedicated computed tomography examination of the abdominal and pelvic regions revealed the diagnosis. The patient recovered well after surgical intervention and antibiotic treatment.

  20. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Ashkan; Min, James; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Fractional flow reserve (FFR) derived from coronary computed tomography (FFRCT) has high diagnostic performance in stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The diagnostic performance of FFRCT in patients with hypertension (HTN) and diabetes (DM), who are at risk of microvascular impairment, is...

  1. Computed tomography of the human developing anterior skull base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Loosen (J.); A.I.J. Klooswijk (A. I J); D. van Velzen (D.); C.D.A. Verwoerd (Carel)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The ossification of the anterior skull base, especially the lamina cribrosa, has been studied by computed tomography and histopathology. Sixteen human fetuses, (referred to our laboratory for pathological examination after spontaneous abortion between 18 and 32 weeks of ge

  2. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN HYDATID CYST OF THE ORBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abbassioun

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of hydatid cysts of the orbit causing unilateral exophthalmos are reported. Diagnosis were suspected by means of computed tomography (CT and confirmed at Operation. CT changes are described and its value in diagnosis of this lesion particularly in the endemic areas is stressed.

  3. Operator radiation exposure in cone-beam computed tomography guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, S.J.; Strijen Van, M. J L; Meijer, E.; Heesewijk Van, J. P M; Mali, W. P T M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Quantitative analysis of operator dose in cone-beam computed tomography guidance (CBCT-guidance) and the effect of protective shielding. Methods: Using a Rando phantom, a model was set-up to measure radiation dose for the operator hand, thyroid and gonad region. The effect of sterile rad

  4. Use of Computed Tomography Scans for Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Holden, Timothy A.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Finley, Charles C.; Skinner, Margaret W.

    2007-01-01

    While 3-dimensional (3D) imaging by computed tomography has long been desirable for research and treatment of cochlear-implant patients, technical challenges have limited its wide application. Recent developments in scanner hardware and image processing techniques now allow image quality improvements that make clinical applications feasible. Validation experiments were performed to characterize a new methodology and its imaging performance.

  5. Computed tomography diagnosis of partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posniak, H V; Dudiak, C M; Olson, M C

    1993-01-01

    A case of the rarely occurring partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage of the right upper lobe into the azygos arch is presented. Computed tomography (CT) clearly demonstrated the abnormal vessel coursing through the right upper lobe and draining into the azygos arch.

  6. Coronary computed tomography - present status and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apfaltrer, P.; Schoepf, U. J.; Vliegenthart, R.; Rowe, G. W.; Spears, J. R.; Fink, C.; Nance, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The use of coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) is growing rapidly, in large part because of fast-paced technical innovations that have increased diagnostic accuracy while providing new opportunities for radiation dose reduction. cCTA using recent generation CT scanners has been repeatedl

  7. Coronary artery fly-through using electron beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; van Geuns, R J; Rensing, B J; de Feyter, P J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality techniques have recently been introduced into clinical medicine. This study examines the possibility of coronary artery fly-through using a dataset obtained by noninvasive coronary angiography with contrast-enhanced electron-beam computed tomography. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  8. Cost-effectiveness of PET and PET/Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Hermansson, Ronnie; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    measure by means of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when considering the replacement of the standard regimen by a new diagnostic procedure. This article discusses economic assessments of PET and PET/computed tomography reported until mid-July 2014. Forty-seven studies on cancer and noncancer...

  9. Tolerance Verification of an Industrial Assembly using Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Regi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on results of tolerance verification of a multi-material assembly by using Computed Tomography (CT). The workpiece comprises three parts which are made out of different materials. Five different measurands were inspected. The calculation of measurement uncertainties was attempt...

  10. Position emission tomography with or without computed tomography in the primary staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Hansen, Mads;

    2006-01-01

    In order to receive the most appropriate therapy, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) must be accurately stratified into different prognostic staging groups. Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the conventional staging. The aim of the present study was to investigate the value...

  11. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Formiconi, A.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); De Cristofaro, M.T.E.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Pupi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Meldolesi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64 x 64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64 x 64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Global seismic tomography and modern parallel computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Piersanti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A fast technological progress is providing seismic tomographers with computers of rapidly increasing speed and RAM, that are not always properly taken advantage of. Large computers with both shared-memory and distributedmemory architectures have made it possible to approach the tomographic inverse problem more accurately. For example, resolution can be quantified from the resolution matrix rather than checkerboard tests; the covariance matrix can be calculated to evaluate the propagation of errors from data to model parameters; the L-curve method can be applied to determine a range of acceptable regularization schemes. We show how these exercises can be implemented efficiently on different hardware architectures.

  13. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Larsen, Erik

    The ‘CIA-CT comparison - Inter laboratory comparison on industrial Computed Tomography” is organized by DTU Department of Mechanical Engineering within the Danish project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning - CIA-CT”. The project is co-financed by the Danish Ministry of Science, Tec...

  14. Comparison of Computed Tomography Scout Based Reference Point Localization to Conventional Film and Axial Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C.H., E-mail: jchu@rush.edu

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  15. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  16. Assessment of asthmatic inflammation using hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaopeng; Prakash, Jaya; Ruscitti, Francesca; Glasl, Sarah; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Villetti, Gino; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging plays a critical role in asthma research but is limited in its readings of biology due to the short-lived signals of radio-isotopes. We employed hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for the assessment of asthmatic inflammation based on resolving cathepsin activity and matrix metalloproteinase activity in dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus species-challenged mice. The reconstructed multimodal fluorescence distribution showed good correspondence with ex vivo cryosection images and histological images, confirming FMT-XCT as an interesting alternative for asthma research.

  17. X-ray computed tomography of PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfrang, Andreas; Veyret, Damien; Tsotridis, Georgios [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Reseach Centre, Inst. for Energy; Janssen, Gaby [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands). Dept. of Hydrogen and Clean Fossil Fuels

    2010-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells were investigated by 3D x-ray computed tomography at a voxel size of 0.7 {mu}m. It is shown that this lab-based technique is not only suitable for the investigation of gas diffusion layers (GDL) as well as the investigation of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA), but also allows the calculation of macroscopic physical properties. The resolution of computed tomography is clearly sufficient to image the carbon fiber structure of gas diffusion layers in the as received GDLs as well as GDLs integrated into membrane electrode assemblies. It is also possible to visualize the catalyst layer within the MEA, which allows the investigation of layer thickness and structural defects on a larger scale than with conventional techniques. The macroscopic effective thermal conductivities of the gas diffusion layers were computed based on the 3D GDL structure reconstructed from tomography data to produce more reliable input data for fuel cell modeling. The computation was carried out by solving the energy equation considering a pure thermal conduction problem. The computations show - in agreement with the expectation and experimental data - that the through-plane thermal conductivities are lower than the in-plane thermal conductivities. (orig.)

  18. Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces: Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, Christian; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton; Mühl, Christian; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton

    2009-01-01

    These are the proceedings of ABCI 2009, Affective Brain Computer Interfaces, a workshop that was organized in conjunction with ACII 2009, the International Conference on Affective Computation and Intelligent Interaction, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2009. The workshop took place on

  19. Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces: Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Muhl, C.; Mühl, C.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Heylen, D.K.J.; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2009-01-01

    These are the proceedings of ABCI 2009, Affective Brain Computer Interfaces, a workshop that was organized in conjunction with ACII 2009, the International Conference on Affective Computation and Intelligent Interaction, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2009. The workshop took place on

  20. Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masdeu, J.C.; Yudd, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Grundman, M.; Hriso, E.; O' Connell, R.A.; Luck, D.; Camli, U.; King, L.N. (St. Vincent' s Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy.

  1. Clinico-radiological correlation of Wilson's disease by magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Ken; Sakata, Chigusa; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Fuji; Sunohara, Nobuhiko (National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)); Iio, Masaaki

    1991-02-01

    Five patients with Wilson's disease received repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) examinations at intervals from 6 to 29 months. Four patients, except for asymptomatic one, also underwent positron emission tomography (PET). The significance and limitations of these imaging modalities were examined in the light of their correlation with clinical manifestations and their therapeutic evaluation. The following focal regions, detected on MRI, had a strong positive correlation with clinical manifestations: the lenticular nuclei for dystonia, the brain stem for abnormality of smooth persuit eye movements, and the caudate and lenticular nuclei for severe dysarthria/dysphagia. Follow-up MRI for 3 patients showed an improvement of findings in the lenticular nuclei, lateral part of the putamen, and brain stem, that was in accordance with improved clinical or neurologic manifestations, such as dystonia and cerebellar symptoms. Severe abnormality in the caudate nucleus was associated with poor prognosis. Repeated CT failed to show serial changes in any of the patients. Regional blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate, obtained by PET examinations, were slightly decreased in the thalamus that had normal findings on both MRI and CT, as well as in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. PET was, however, inferior to MRI in detecting fine foci within the basal ganglia. In conclusion, there was a good correlation between MRI findings, particularly foci of the caudate and lenticular nuclei, and clinical manifestations. Repeated MRI examinations were the most useful approach to the evaluation of therapeutic effects and prognosis. (N.K.).

  2. Coordinate Metrology by Traceable Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel

    metrology and coordinate metrology and is currently becoming more and more important measuring technique for dimensional measurements. This is mainly due to the fact that with CT, a complete three-dimensional model of the scanned part is in a relatively short time visualized using a computer...... is an important factor for decision making about manufactured parts. However, due to many influences in CT, estimation of the uncertainty is a challenge, also because standardized procedures and guidelines are not available yet. In this thesis, several methods for uncertainty estimation were applied in connection...

  3. Invasive thymoma; Radiologic evaluation by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Choon Sik; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-04-15

    In 6 cases of invasive thymoma proved histologically from 1981 to 1984 in Yonsei University Medical Center, the CT findings and pattern were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. Of 6 cases, 4 were males and 2 were females. All cases were between 40-64 years and the average was 51 year old. 2. Of 6 cases, 2 female patients were associated with myasthenia gravis. 3. By the histological examination, 2 were confirmed as mixed cell type, 2 spindle cell type, 1 lymphocytic type and 1 epithelial cell type. 4. CT findings of invasive thymoma were 1) A discrete but lobulated and irregular marginated soft tissue mass in the superoanterior mediastinum replacing the normal mediastinal fat tissue. 2) Usually irregular low density areas within the mass suggesting central necrosis or calcification in 1 of 6 cases was noted. 3) Local invasiveness of the mass shown as obliteration of the normal fat plans surrounding great vessels, irregular thickening or nodular shadows of the pleura, diagphragm and pericardium and irregular and ragged tumor-lung interfaces if the tumor invade to the structures. 4) Frequent extension of tumor to middle and post. mediastinum along pericardium or mediastinal pleura with resultant extrinsic indentation and/or invasion of the hilar region. 5). Extensive tumor infiltration to middle and post. mediastinum in 1 case, indistinguishable from lymphoma. 6) Low attenuation numbered area of brain in another 1 case, but not confirmed histologically.

  4. Proton computed tomography from multiple physics processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Finck, Ch; Labalme, M.; Rousseau, M.; Brasse, D.

    2013-10-01

    Proton CT (pCT) nowadays aims at improving hadron therapy treatment planning by mapping the relative stopping power (RSP) of materials with respect to water. The RSP depends mainly on the electron density of the materials. The main information used is the energy of the protons. However, during a pCT acquisition, the spatial and angular deviation of each particle is recorded and the information about its transmission is implicitly available. The potential use of those observables in order to get information about the materials is being investigated. Monte Carlo simulations of protons sent into homogeneous materials were performed, and the influence of the chemical composition on the outputs was studied. A pCT acquisition of a head phantom scan was simulated. Brain lesions with the same electron density but different concentrations of oxygen were used to evaluate the different observables. Tomographic images from the different physics processes were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. Preliminary results indicate that information is present in the reconstructed images of transmission and angular deviation that may help differentiate tissues. However, the statistical uncertainty on these observables generates further challenge in order to obtain an optimal reconstruction and extract the most pertinent information.

  5. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  6. Computed tomography of the acetabular fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ho Young; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Kil Woo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    In a retrospective study of 21 patients, in whom the acetabular fractures were suspected on initial radiographs, we compared and analysed the computed tomographic findings and plain radiographic findings. The results were as follow: 1. In patients with multiple trauma, no further change in position was required during CT examinations. 2. CT showed intraarticular loose bodies, which were invisible on plain radiographs. 3. CT was useful in detecting the fractures of acetabular rims, medial wall of acetabulum, and femoral head. 4. CT permitted better evaluation of shape, extent, and degree of separation of fracture fragments. 5. CT was helpful in detecting the associated fractures and soft tissue injuries. 6. CT also demonstrated the adequacy of reduction, the position of metallic fixation devices, and the presence or absence of remaining intraarticular osseous fragments after surgery.

  7. Comparison of computed tomography scout based reference point localization to conventional film and axial computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C H

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  8. Computed tomography of human joints and radioactive waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, E; Bernardi, R; Hollerbach, K; Logan, C; Martz, H; Roberson, G P

    1999-06-01

    X- and gamma-ray imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and assay (NDA) have been increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications. Much of this growth in recent years is attributed to the rapid development of computed tomography (CT) and the use of NDE throughout the life-cycle of a product. Two diverse examples of CT are discussed. (1) The computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic human joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data from scanned joints are segmented, resulting in the identification of bone and other tissues of interest, with emphasis on the articular surfaces. (2) They are developing NDE and NDE techniques to analyze closed waste drums accurately and quantitatively. Active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) is a comprehensive and accurate gamma-ray NDA method that can identify all detectable radioisotopes present in a container and measure their radioactivity.

  9. Initial water quantification results using neutron computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, A.K. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States)], E-mail: axh174@psu.edu; Shi, L.; Brenizer, J.S.; Mench, M.M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Neutron computed tomography is an important imaging tool in the field of non-destructive testing and in fundamental research for many engineering applications. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, such as hydrogen, but can penetrate many heavy materials. Thus, neutron computed tomography is useful in obtaining important three-dimensional information about a sample's interior structure and material properties that other traditional methods cannot provide. The neutron computed tomography system at Pennsylvania State University's Radiation Science and Engineering Center is being utilized to develop a water quantification technique for investigation of water distribution in fuel cells under normal conditions. A hollow aluminum cylinder test sample filled with a known volume of water was constructed for purposes of testing the quantification technique. Transmission images of the test sample at different angles were easily acquired through the synthesis of a dedicated image acquisition computer driving a rotary table controller and an in-house developed synchronization software package. After data acquisition, Octopus (version 8.2) and VGStudio Max (version 1.2) were used to perform cross-sectional and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sample, respectively. The initial reconstructions and water quantification results are presented.

  10. Computed Tomography of the Normal Bovine Tarsus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M; Brehm, W; Gerlach, K

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a detailed multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) anatomic reference for the bovine tarsus. The tarsal regions from twelve healthy adult cow cadavers were scanned in both soft and bone windows via a 16-slice multidetector CT scanner. Tarsi were frozen at -20(o) C and sectioned to 10-mm-thick slices in transverse, dorsal and sagittal planes respecting the imaging protocol. The frozen sections were cleaned and then photographed. Anatomic structures were identified, labelled and compared with the corresponding CT images. The sagittal plane was indispensable for evaluation of bone contours, the dorsal plane was valuable in examination of the collateral ligaments, and both were beneficial for assessment of the tarsal joint articulations. CT images allowed excellent delineation between the cortex and medulla of bones, and the trabecular structure was clearly depicted. The tarsal soft tissues showed variable shades of grey, and the synovial fluid was the lowest attenuated structure. This study provided full assessment of the clinically relevant anatomic structures of the bovine tarsal joint. This technique may be of value when results from other diagnostic imaging techniques are indecisive. Images presented in this study should serve as a basic CT reference and assist in the interpretation of various bovine tarsal pathology. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Role of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Hee; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Oh, Sei Jung [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    At Yonsei University Hospital from January 1984 to August 1990, computed tomographic (CT) scans of 13 patients with surgically proven pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma, including 6 pancreatic lacerations or contusions, 6 pancreatic fractures, and one post-traumatic pseudocyst, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the role and accuracy of the CT in evaluating pancreatic injury. CT can document gross pancreatic injury by showing focal or diffuse enlargement (1), area of diminished attenuation (3), separation (5), focal hematoma (2), and peripancreatic change, including peripancreatic hematoma (2), fluid collection (11), perirenal fascial thickening (10), omental and mesenteric change (5), and bowel change (2). CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fracture in 5 cases, post-raumatic pseudocyst in 1 case, and pancreatic laceration in 3 cases in 9 of these patients. There were 4 false negative diagnoses, including 3 pancreatic lacerations and 1 pancreatic fracture. A CT is of pancreatic trauma could be difficult to diagnosis in patients who are scanned within 24 hrs after an injury or to distinguish a motion or streak artifact caused by a nasogastric tube or air-oral contrast fluid level in the stomach.

  12. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pio...

  13. Didactics and training in cardiovascular computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojraj, Sanjay D; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2009-01-01

    As the role of cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is further expanded through research, the use of this technology will expand as a result of demand both from medical professionals and the public. To ensure a standardized quality of interpretation of these scans in the face of an increased demand for physicians qualified to interpret these studies, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, along with several other professional societies, has proposed a didactic curriculum for the study of CCTA. This review highlights the currently proposed didactic curriculum for the study of CCTA, examines current trends in training for both medical trainees and physicians in practice, and proposes future directions for the study of CCTA.

  14. Project of evaluation of doses in computed tomography in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slusarczyk-Kacprzyk, W.; Skrzynski, W.; Bulski, W. [Centre of Oncology, Medical Physics Dept., Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    Project of evaluation of doses in computed tomography in Poland bases on the organization solutions implemented and evaluated at one of Polish oncological centres. In this study we analyzed doses for a group of 484 patients who underwent an examination with a G.E. HiSpeed CT scanner at the Centre of Oncology in Warsaw. Patient doses (weighted computed tomography dose index, C.T.D.I.w. and dose length product, D.L.P.) have been compared against reference values published by the Polish Ministry of Health. We found that typical patient doses do not exceed reference values. As reference dose levels are defined only for a standard-size patients, sometimes they may be exceeded for a properly done examination. Polish reference dose levels are not based on up-to-date data and should be revised. (authors)

  15. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  16. Brain computer interface for operating a robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Humaira; Balasubramaniam, Hari Chand; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2013-10-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a hardware/software based system that translates the Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals produced by the brain activity to control computers and other external devices. In this paper, we will present a non-invasive BCI system that reads the EEG signals from a trained brain activity using a neuro-signal acquisition headset and translates it into computer readable form; to control the motion of a robot. The robot performs the actions that are instructed to it in real time. We have used the cognitive states like Push, Pull to control the motion of the robot. The sensitivity and specificity of the system is above 90 percent. Subjective results show a mixed trend of the difficulty level of the training activities. The quantitative EEG data analysis complements the subjective results. This technology may become very useful for the rehabilitation of disabled and elderly people.

  17. Common findings and pseudolesions at computed tomography colonography: pictorial essay

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto Castelli von Atzingen; Dario Ariel Tiferes; Carlos Alberto Matsumoto; Thiago Franchi Nunes; Marcos Vinicius Alvim Soares Maia; Giuseppe D'Ippolito

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography colonography is a minimally invasive method for screening for polyps and colorectal cancer, with extremely unusual complications, increasingly used in the clinical practice. In the last decade, developments in bowel preparation, imaging, and in the training of investigators have determined a significant increase in the method sensitivity. Images interpretation is accomplished through a combined analysis of two-dimensional source images and several types of three-dimensiona...

  18. Moulding process characterization of paper bottles using computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxena, Prateek; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an approach of evaluating the moulding process for production of paper bottlesusing Computed Tomography (CT). Moulded Pulp Products (MPP) are made of a formed, dewateredand dried mixture of pulp fibers and water. Modern industrial pulp moulding is datedback to the year 1903 when...... a patent for MPP production was acquired by Martin L. Keyes1. Withan increasing demand for environmental friendly products, researchers are now focusing on investigatingadvance manufacturing process for production of MPP2....

  19. Computed tomography-based subclassification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, Asger; Wille, Mathilde M W

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an obvious modality for subclassification of COPD. Traditionally, the pulmonary involvement of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in smokers is understood as a combination of deleterious effects of smoking on small airways (chronic bronchitis and small airways...... observed in COPD are subtle. Furthermore, recent results indicate that emphysema may also be the essential pathophysiologic mechanism behind the airflow limitation of COPD. The definition of COPD excludes bronchiectasis as a symptomatic subtype of COPD, and CT findings in chronic bronchitis...

  20. Computed tomography changes following cryotherapy for hepatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.; Morris, D. L. [University of NSW, Sydney (Australia). Department of Surgery; Glenn, D. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, Sydney (Australia). Department of Radiology

    1997-05-01

    Encouraging survival and tumour marker results have been described in patients where the focally destructive technique, hepatic cryotherapy, is used to treat primary and secondary hepatic malignancy. Radiology allows assessment of the cryotherapy procedure and follow-up treatment. This paper aims to review and describe the appearance of hepatic cryotherapy by computed tomography which allows assessment of the adequacy of surgical technique and offers the ability to identify recurrences that may be suitable for further treatment. 11 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  1. Predicting Neck Abscess with Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neck abscesses are difficult to diagnose and treat. Currently, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the imaging modality of choice. The study aims to determine the predictive value of CECT findings in diagnosing neck abscess, causes of neck abscess and the most common neck space involved in the local population. 84 consecutive patients clinically suspected to have neck abscess who underwent CECT and surgical confirmation of pus were included. Demographic and clinical data were reco...

  2. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  3. The role of computed tomography in modern paediatric uroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maudgil, D.D.; McHugh, K. E-mail: kmchugh@gosh.nhs.uk

    2002-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has developed a well-recognised role within paediatric uroradiology, especially in imaging of trauma, malignancy (in particular Wilms' tumour), atypical infection, and congenital urogenital abnormalities. CT can also be used for problem solving in nephrolithiasis and renal transplant assessment. These applications are illustrated and discussed, with an emphasis on particular information that can be gained from the CT study.

  4. Contraindications to lumbar puncture as defined by computed cranial tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Gower, D. J.; Baker, A. L.; Bell, W O; Ball, M R

    1987-01-01

    Papilloedema is not always an adequate predictor of potential complications from lumbar puncture, and many clinicians are using computed tomography (CT) before lumbar puncture in an effort to identify more accurately the "at risk" patient. This paper identifies the following anatomical criteria defined by CT scanning that correlate with unequal pressures between intracranial compartments and predispose a patient to herniation following decompression of the spinal compartment: lateral shift of...

  5. Computed tomography angiography in the investigation of carotid stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, A.J.P.; Mendelow, A.D.; Birchall, D

    2001-07-01

    The assessment of carotid atherosclerotic disease is an essential pre-requisite for determining a patients suitability for carotid endarterectomy to prevent ischaemic stroke. Catheter angiography is regarded as the most accurate investigative tool for this purpose. However, with its finite morbidity and invasiveness, there is an increasing reliance upon non-invasive methods to accurately assess carotid disease. We present a review of the technique and applications of computed tomography angiography. Goddard, A.J. P.et al. (2001)

  6. Ureterolithiasis: classical and atypical findings on unenhanced helical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaswani, Kuldeep K; El-Dieb, Adam; Vitellas, Kenneth M; Bennett, William F; Bova, James G

    2002-03-01

    Evaluation of patients with acute flank pain using helical computed tomography (CT) is a well-accepted, rapid, and safe procedure in the emergency setting. Various primary and secondary signs are described in the literature for evaluation of these patients. Our purpose is to demonstrate both the classical findings associated with ureteral calculi on unenhanced helical CT and atypical findings and potential pitfalls. We also provide readers with a systematic approach to interpreting unenhanced helical CT scans performed for acute flank pain.

  7. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Scarfe, William C.; Martin D. Levin; David Gane; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imagin...

  8. Hypoplasia of the parotid gland: computed tomography sialography diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lisha; Sun, Zhipeng; Ma, Xuchen

    2013-10-01

    We report two unusual cases of non-syndromic hypoplasia of the parotid gland. The hypoplastic parotid gland mimicked a preauricular parotid tumor in one case and presented as an incidental image finding in the other case. Absence of the deep lobe and isthmus of the parotid parenchyma could be determined on axial computed tomography (CT) by revealing fat tissue composition of the parotid space. The underdeveloped superficial lobe of the gland was observed on three-dimensional CT sialography.

  9. Computed tomography of common congenital lesions of the temporal bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuen, H.Y. E-mail: drhyyuen@doctors.org.uk; Ahuja, A.T.; Wong, K.T.; Yue, V.; Hasselt, A.C. van

    2003-09-01

    This pictorial review describes the application of high-resolution computed tomography to the investigation and pre-operative work-up of the common lesions of congenital hearing loss, including congenital aural dysplasia, various congenital ossicular anomalies, inner ear dysmorphology, large vestibular aqueduct syndrome, and congenital absence of cochlear nerve and labyrinthitis ossificans from previous infection. The aim is to help radiologists to provide a more accurate diagnosis of underlying aetiology and assist in surgical planning.

  10. Computed tomography of partial unilateral agenesis of the pectoralis muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, T C; Johnson, C; Love, L; Posniak, H

    1985-01-01

    The most common congenitally absent muscles are the pectoralis major and minor. Absence is usually incomplete. This anomaly is often one component of a syndrome associated with other hand (Poland syndrome) and thoracic anomalies. Computed tomography can identify partial absence of the pectoralis muscle and exactly define the altered anatomy. A patient with myasthenia gravis and isolated partial agenesis of the pectoralis muscle is presented.

  11. Analysis of Multilayered Printed Circuit Boards using Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    resistors harder to identify as Carbon is lower in the periodic table than Aluminium Oxide . Sample 2: Colour Bar Appendix D.2...Aluminium Al2O3 Aluminium Oxide BGA Ball Grid Array Coronal XZ Plane COTS Commercial Off The Shelf C Carbon CT Computed Tomography DC Direct Current...encapsulated in steel housing. Red Circle: Thin film resistors harder to identify as Carbon is lower in the periodic table than Aluminium Oxide . Sample 2

  12. Soil Macropore Structure Characterized by X-Ray Computed Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jie; ZHANG Jia-Bao; ZHU An-Ning; BI Jing-Wei

    2003-01-01

    Undisturbed soil core with many macropores and disturbed soil core with only one macropore (diameter is 10 mm) were probed by x-ray computed tomography (CT). The size, number, shape and continuity of macropores in the transverse and vertical sections of soil were characterized using CT scanning images. The probability densities of macropores in the transverse section of soil core exhibited a logarithmic Γ distribution.Results indicated that CT scanning was a promising nondestructive method for characterizing macropores in soils.

  13. Role of computed tomography in the study of vascular pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procacci, C.; Bicego, E.; Bergamo, I.A. and others

    1988-01-01

    The most important indications to the use of computed tomography (CT) in the study of vascular pathology are considered. They may be divided as follows: 1) demonstration of vascular involvement by thoraco-abdominal neoplasms; 2) differential diagnosis between primary vascular and extra-vascular pathology; 3) assessment of primary arterial pathology. For each group, those pathologies are considered, for which CT plays a fundamental role.

  14. Computed tomography of the pathological temporal bone. Malformations. Otospongiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azais, O.; Drouineau, J.; Vandermarcq, P.; Barret, D.; Gasquet, C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors evaluate the value of computed tomography in the investigation of malformations and otospongiosis of the ear. Although the CT scan appears to be essential in the preoperative of malformations of the ear, especially as otological examination frequently contributes little to the evaluation of the middle ear, otospongiosis seems to be a less formal indication, except in the predominantly cochlear forms of the disease.

  15. Computed tomography in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Akitoshi; Eda, Isematsu; Takashima, Sachio; Takeshita, Kenzo

    1985-09-01

    Three patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome were reported. Unusual findings on computed tomography were seen in two of the three patients. One case showed peculiar and marked dilatation of the 4th ventricle, supracerebellar cistern and lateral ventricle. The other case presented disproportionate enlargement of the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle. These CT findings in the two patients suggest that developmental abnormalities may constitute a structural defect.

  16. Dosimetry in abdominal imaging by 6-slice computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Sonia Isabel [Hospital de Faro, EPE (Portugal); Abrantes, Antonio Fernando; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Almeida, Rui Pedro Pereira [University of Algarve (Portugal). School of Health. Dept. of Radiology

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To determine the effective dose in abdominal computed tomography imaging and to study the influence of patients' characteristics on the received dose. Materials and Methods: Dose values measurements were performed with an ionization chamber on phantoms to check the agreement between dose values and those presented by the computed tomography apparatus, besides their compliance with the recommended reference dose levels. Later, values of dose received by physically able patients submitted to abdominal computed tomography (n = 100) were measured and correlated with their anthropometric characteristics. Finally, the dose to organs was simulated with the Monte Carlo method using the CT-Expo V 1.5 software, and the effect of automatic exposure control on such examinations. Results: The main characteristics directly influencing the dose include the patients' body mass, abdominal perimeter and body mass index, whose correlation is linear and positive. Conclusion: The radiation dose received from abdominal CT scans depends on some patient's characteristics, and it is important to adjust the acquisition parameters to their dimensions (author)

  17. Multidetector computed tomography in the preoperative staging of gastric adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Ricardo Hoelz de Oliveira; Penachim, Thiago Jose; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Andreollo, Nelson Adami; Caserta, Nelson Marcio Gomes, E-mail: rhobarros@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of multidetector computed tomography in the preoperative investigation of tumor invasion depth and lymph node and metastatic involvement according to the TNM classification, in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four patients with biopsy-confirmed gastric cancer underwent preoperative staging with 64-channel multidetector computed tomography. Two independent radiologists analyzed the images and classified the findings. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and overall accuracy were calculated for each observer. The interobserver agreement was also evaluated. Results: The accuracy in the classification of categories T ranged from 74% to 96% for observer 1 and from 80% to 92% for observer 2. The overall accuracy was 70% for both observers. The weighted kappa index was 0.75, consistent with a significant interobserver agreement. The accuracy in the classification of lymph node involvement (category N) ranged from 55% to 79% for observer 1 and from 73% to 82% for observer 2. The evaluation of metastatic involvement showed an overall accuracy of 89.6% for both observers. Conclusion: 64-channel multidetector computed tomography demonstrated clinically relevant accuracy in the preoperative staging of gastric adenocarcinoma as regards invasion depth (T category) and metastatic involvement (M category). (author)

  18. Helical computed tomography in the assessment of abdominal aortic pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicaretti, M.; Young, N.; Jenkins, J.; Fletcher, J. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia)

    1997-05-01

    A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the role of helical computed tomography in the assessment of abdominal aortic pathology. A total of 17 patients underwent intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) and helical computed tomography, with eight patients undergoing subsequent operative intervention. A comparison of radiological findings between IADSA and helical computed tomography (CT) was made and, where applicable, a comparison was made with operative findings. Pathology included abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n=12), thoraco abdominal aneurysm (n=2) and dissection (n=1), graft distension following AAA repair (n=1) and plaque haemorrhage in the distal aorta following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the iliac artery (n=1). Planned operative management as based on pre-operative helical CT imaging findings, in particular with reference to the type of graft used (straight or bifurcated) was not changed at operation. Our findings on helical CT in regards to AAA, thoraco-abdominal aneurysm and dissection correlated well with angiography and surgery findings. (authors). 26 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  19. Efficacy of multislice computed tomography for gastroenteric and hepatic surgeries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Ohtani; Mitsuo Tsubakimoto; Hidemi Kawajiri; Yuichi Arimoto; Koichi Ohno; Yasuhisa Fujimoto; Hiroko Oba; Kenji Adachi; Masaya Hirano; Shoichi Terakawa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of multislice CT for gastroenteric and hepatic surgery.METHODS: Dual-phase helical computed tomography was performed in 50 of 51 patients who underwent gastroenteric and hepatic surgeries. Twenty-eight, eighteen and four patients suffering from colorectal cancer, gastric cancer,and liver cancer respectively underwent colorectal surgery (laparoscopic surgery: 6 cases), gastrectomy, and hepatectomy. Three-dimensional computed tomography imaging of the inferior mesenteric artery, celiac artery and hepatic artery was performed. And in the follow-up examination of postoperative patients, multiplanar reconstruction image was made in case of need.RESULTS: Scans in 50 patients were technically satisfactory and included in the analysis. Depiction of major visceral arteries, which were important for surgery and other treatments, could be done in all patients.Preoperative visualization of the left colic artery and sigmoidal arteries, the celiac artery and its branches, and hepatic artery was very useful to lymph node dissection,the planning of a reservoir and hepatectomy. And multiplanar reconstruction image was helpful to diagnosis for the postoperative follow-up of patients.CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional volume rendering or multiplanar reconstruction imaging performed by multislice computed tomography was very useful for gastroenteric and hepatic surgeries.

  20. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-15

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 {+-} 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 {+-} 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm {+-} 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm {+-} 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm {+-} 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  1. SADMFR guidelines for the use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/ Digital Volume Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Karl; Bornstein, Michael M; Buser, Daniel; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Ettlin, Dominik A; Filippi, Andreas; Gabioud, François; Katsaros, Christos; Krastl, Gabriel; Lambrecht, J Thomas; Lauber, Roland; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Pazera, Pawel; Türp, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has been introduced in 1998. This radiological imaging procedure has been provided for dentistry and is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in medicine. It is expected that CBCT will have the same success in dental diagnostic imaging as computed tomography had in medicine. Just as CT is responsible for a significant rise in radiation dose to the population from medical X-ray diagnostics, CBCT studies will be accompanied by a significant increase of the dose to our patients by dentistry. Because of the growing concern for an uncritical and consequently rapidly increasing use of CBCT the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology convened a first consensus conference in 2011 to formulate indications for CBCT, which can be used as guidelines. In this meeting, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics and temporomandibular joint disorders and diseases were treated and the most important and most experienced users of DVT in these areas were asked to participate. In general, a highly restrictive use of CBCT is required. Justifying main criterion for CBCT application is that additional, therapy-relevant information is expected that should lead to a significant benefit in patient care. All users of CBCT should have completed a structured, high-level training, just like that offered by the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology.

  2. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  3. Computed Tomography and Computed Radiography of late Bronze Age Cremation Urns from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise Lock; Lynnerup, Niels; Amsgaard Ebsen, Jannie

    2012-01-01

    To improve methods used to study prehistoric cremation rituals, cremation urns from the Danish late Bronze Age were examined using Computed Tomography and Computed Radiography (Digital X-ray). During microexcavation, the digital images were used as registration tool. Our results suggest...

  4. Multi-scale analysis of lung computed tomography images

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, I; Fantacci, M E; Preite Martinez, A; Retico, A; De Mitri, I; Donadio, S; Fulcheri, C

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of lung internal nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 project. The three modules of our lung CAD system, a segmentation algorithm for lung internal region identification, a multi-scale dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a multi-scale neural technique for false positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on a dataset of low-dose and thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  5. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  6. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, R.F. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. [Role of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnostic otorhinolaryngological imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perényi, Ádám; Bella, Zsolt; Baráth, Zoltán; Magyar, Péter; Nagy, Katalin; Rovó, László

    2016-01-10

    Accurate diagnosis and preoperative planning in modern otorhinolaryngology is strongly supported by imaging with enhanced visualization. Computed tomography is often used to examine structures within bone frameworks. Given the hazards of ionizing radiation, repetitive imaging studies exponentially increase the risk of damages to radiosensitive tissues. The authors compare multislice and cone-beam computed tomography and determine the role, advantages and disadvantages of cone-beam computed tomography in otorhinolaryngological imaging. They summarize the knowledge from the international literature and their individual imaging studies. They conclude that cone-beam computed tomography enables high-resolution imaging and reconstruction in any optional plane and in space with considerably lower effective radiation dose. Cone-beam computed tomography with appropriate indications proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool in otorhinolaryngological imaging. It makes an alternative to multislice computed tomography and it is an effective tool in perioperative and postoperative follow-up, especially in those cases which necessitate repetitive imaging with computed tomography.

  8. Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Seizure Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumnima Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seizure occurs in up to 10% of the population, whereas epilepsy is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent seizures that may affect up to 2% of the population. Modern neuroimaging is useful in diagnosis of  abnormalities underlying the epilepsies, but the information provided by imaging techniques can also contribute to proper classification of certain epileptic disorders and can delineate the genetics of some underlying syndromes. Neuroimaging is even more important for those patients who have medically intractable seizures. This study was carried out to establish different etiologies of seizures, to correlate the clinical data and radiological findings in cases of seizure, and to identify the common etiologies in different types of seizures.   Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study conducted in the Department of Radiodiagnosis of Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital. Records of patients of past two years, admitted in any department of the hospital with history of seizure disorder and underwent a Computed Tomography  (CT of brain were included. The CT patterns were assessed and the data were tabulated and statistically analyzed.   Results: There were a total of 480 cases out of which 263 (55% were male and 217 (45% were female with M:F ratio of 1.2:1. Generalized seizure was more frequent than partial seizure in both gender. In 274 cases of generalized seizures, CT scan findings were abnormal in 151 cases and normal finding observed in 123 cases. In 206 cases of partial seizures, 125 cases were abnormal and 81 having normal CT scan findings. Age wise distribution showed highest number (n=218 of cases in young group (60 yr. The most common cause of seizure  was  calcified granuloma (n=79, 16.5% followed by neurocysticercosis (NCC, n=64, 13%. Diffuse cerebral edema, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus was seen only in lower age group particularly among 1-20 years. Infarct and diffuse cortical

  9. Significance of Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Cerebrovascular Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumnima Acharya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA is defined as abrupt onset of a neurological deficit that is attributable to a focal vascular cause. CT scan is a widely available, affordable, non-invasive and relatively accurate investigation in patients with stroke and is important to identify stroke pathology and exclude mimics. Aim of this study is to establish the diagnostic significance of computed tomography in cerebrovascular accident and to differentiate between cerebral infarction and cerebral haemorrhage with CT for better management of CVA. Methods: A one year observational cross sectional study was conducted in 100 patients that presented at the department of radiodiagnosis from emergency or ward within the one year of study period with the clinical diagnosis of stroke, and had a brain CT scan done within one to fourteen days of onset. Results: A total of 100 patients were studied. 66 were male and 34 were female with a male/female ratio of 1.9:1. Maximum number of cases (39% was in the age group of 61-80 yrs. Among 100 patients, 55 cases were clinically diagnosed as hemorrhagic stroke and 45 cases were clinically diagnosed with an infarct. Out of the 55 hemorrhagic cases, two cases were diagnosed as both hemorrhage and infarct by CT scan, one case had normal CT scan findings and one had subdural haemorrhage. These four cases were excluded while comparing the clinical diagnosis with CT scan finding. Among 51 clinically diagnosed cases of hemorrhagic stroke, 32(62.7% cases were proved by CT scan as hemorrhagic stroke and among clinically diagnosed cases of infarct, 39(86.7% cases were proved by CT scan as infarct which is statistically significant (p <0.001. A significant agreement between clinical and CT diagnosis was observed as indicated by kappa value of 0.49. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of clinical findings as compared to CT in diagnosing hemorrhage were 84.2%, 67.2%, 62.8% and 86

  10. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance fusion imaging in cholesteatoma preoperative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Agustín; Mata, Federico; Reboll, Rosa; Peris, María Luisa; Basterra, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a method for developing fusion imaging for the preoperative evaluation of cholesteatoma. In 33 patients diagnosed with cholesteatoma, a high-resolution temporal bone computed tomography (CT) scan without intravenous contrast and propeller diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Both studies were then sent to the BrainLAB work station, where the images were fused to obtain a morphological and color map. Intraoperative findings coincided with fusion CT-MRI imaging in all but two patients. In addition, one false positive and one false negative case were observed. CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are complementary techniques that should be employed to assess a cholesteatoma prior to surgery in many cases. Hence, to combine the advantages of each technique, we developed a fusion image technique similar to those that are routinely employed for radiotherapy planning and positron emission tomography-CT imaging. Fusion images can prove useful in selected cases.

  11. [Spiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of limb osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Bulanova, T V; Onishchenko, M P

    2003-01-01

    The results of radiation studies in 121 patients of different age (4 to 75 years) examined for limb osteomyelitis are analyzed. All the patients underwent routine X-ray study and computed tomography (CT), 26 patients had X-ray fistulography; 8, linear tomography; 10, CT fistulography; 6, scintigraphy, and 15, ultrasound study. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO), chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis (CHO), and atypical (here Garre's sclerosing osteomyelitis and Brodie's abscess) osteomyelitis were ascertained in 10.6, 26.4, and 10.1% of cases, respectively. Posttraumatic osteomyelitis was diagnosed in almost 50% of the patients. CT defined the phase of chronic limb osteomyelitis. Spiral CT has proven to be the most effective technique for diagnosing limb osteomyelitis as compared with routine X-ray study: the accuracy of X-ray study was 81.8%, its sensitivity, 84.9%, and specificity, 60.0% and those of computed tomography were 96.7, 99.1, and 80.0%, respectively.

  12. Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots

    CERN Document Server

    Pessa, Eliano

    2009-01-01

    The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable coherence phenomena, in turn underlying high-level mental processes such as intentions and strategies. More precisely, within the context of a dissipative Quantum Field Theory of brain operation it is possible to introduce generalized coherent states associated, within the framework of logic, to the assertions of a quantum metalanguage. The latter controls the quantum-mechanical computing corresponding to standard mental operation. It thus become possible to conceive a Quantum Cyborg in which a human mind controls, through a qu...

  13. The Brain-Computer Interface Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, Marcel; Farquhar, Jason; Schaefer, Rebecca; Vlek, Rutger; Geuze, Jeroen; Nijholt, Antinus; Ramsay, Nick; Haselager, Pim; Vuurpijl, Louis; Gielen, Stan; Desain, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) have attracted much attention recently, triggered by new scientific progress in understanding brain function and by impressive applications. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various steps in the BCI cycle, i.e., the loop from the measurement of

  14. Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic…

  15. Brain-Computer Interfacing and Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass-Oude Bos, Danny; Reuderink, Boris; Laar, van de Bram; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Mühl, Christian; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Anton; Heylen, Dirk; Tan, D.; Nijholt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently research into Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI) applications for healthy users, such as games, has been initiated. But why would a healthy person use a still-unproven technology such as BCI for game interaction? BCI provides a combination of information and features that no other input modal

  16. Computed tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in adrenal candidiasis and histoplasmosis: two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinmakas, Emre; Guo, Ming; Kundu, Uma R; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Ng, Chaan

    2015-01-01

    We report the contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography findings in adrenal histoplasmosis and candidiasis. Both demonstrated bilateral hypermetabolic heterogeneous adrenal masses with limited wash-out on delayed CT. Adrenal candidiasis has not been previously reported, nor have the CT wash-out findings in either infection. The adrenal imaging findings are indistinguishable from malignancy, which is more common; but in this setting, physicians should be alert to the differential diagnosis of fungal infections, since it can be equally deadly.

  17. Right parietal stroke with Gerstmann's syndrome. Appearance on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M R; Saver, J L; Johnson, K A; Romero, J A

    1991-04-01

    We examined a patient who exhibited Gerstmann's syndrome (left-right disorientation, finger agnosia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia) in association with a perioperative stroke in the right parietal lobe. This is the first description of the Gerstmann tetrad occurring in the setting of discrete right hemisphere pathologic findings. A well-localized vascular lesion was demonstrated by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomographic studies. The patient had clinical evidence of reversed functional cerebral dominance and radiologic evidence of reversed anatomic cerebral asymmetries.

  18. The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in planning radiotherapy in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcock, Bryony; Narayan, Kailash; Drummond, Elizabeth; Bernshaw, David; Wells, Elizabeth; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-05-01

    The optimal method of assessing disease distribution in endometrial cancer is widely debated. Knowledge of disease distribution assists in planning adjuvant radiotherapy; in this study we used positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to assess disease distribution before radiotherapy. Seventy-three consecutive patients referred to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial cancer, with either high-risk disease after a hysterectomy or recurrent disease, had a PET/CT before treatment. The findings on PET/CT and clinical course were recorded. PET/CT found additional disease in 35% of postoperative patients, changing planned treatment in 31%. In the group with known recurrence, additional disease was found in 72%, changing management in 36%. PET/CT is a valuable tool for planning radiotherapy in endometrial cancer.

  19. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürücü, Erdem; Demir, Yusuf; Dülger, Ahmet C.; Batur, Abdüssamed; Ölmez, Şehmus; Kitapçı, Mehmet T.

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27751978

  20. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping, E-mail: zhusp2009@gmail.com; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.