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Sample records for brain capillary endothelial

  1. Characterization of angiogenin receptors on bovine brain capillary endothelial cells.

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    Chamoux, M; Dehouck, M P; Fruchart, J C; Spik, G; Montreuil, J; Cecchelli, R

    1991-04-30

    The mitogenic effect of bovine milk angiogenin was studied on bovine brain capillary and aortic endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The proliferation of only bovine brain capillary endothelial cells was detected at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1,000 ng/ml, with a maximum effect at 100 ng/ml. This mitogenic activity may be correlated with a specific binding of angiogenin which was demonstrated only to bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. [125I]-labeled angiogenin binding was time and concentration dependent and saturable. Scatchard analyses of binding data showed evidence of a single class of binding sites with an apparent dissociation constant of 5.10(-10)M. The molecular mass of the angiogenin receptor (49 kDa) was determined by ligand blotting.

  2. Barrier Functionality of Porcine and Bovine Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells

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    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, isolated cell based blood-brain barrier (BBB models have been widely used for brain drug delivery and targeting, due to their relatively proper bioelectrical and permeability properties. However, primary cultures of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs isolated from different species vary in terms of bioelectrical and permeability properties. Methods: To pursue this, in the current investigation, primary porcine and bovine BCECs (PBCECs and BBCECs, respectively were isolated and used as an in vitro BBB model. The bioelectrical and permeability properties were assessed in BCECs co-cultured with C6 cells with/without hydrocortisone (550 nM. The bioelectrical properties were further validated by means of the permeability coefficients of transcellular and paracellular markers. Results: The primary PBCECs displayed significantly higher trans-endothelial electrical resistance (~900 W.cm2 than BBCECs (~700 W.cm2 - both co-cultured with C6 cells in presence of hydrocortisone. Permeability coefficients of propranolol/diazepam and mannitol/sucrose in PBCECs were ~21 and ~2 (×10-6 cm.sec-1, where these values for BBCECs were ~25 and ~5 (×10-6 cm.sec-1. Conclusion: Upon our bioelectrical and permeability findings, both models display discriminative barrier functionality but porcine BCECs seem to provide a better platform than bovine BCECs for drug screening and brain targeting.

  3. A nanoengineered peptidic delivery system with specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells

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    Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    avidity of the majority of the so-called ‘brain-specific’ nanoparticles to the brain capillary endothelial cells has been poor, even during in vitro conditions. We have addressed this issue and designed a versatile peptidic nanoplatform with high binding avidity to the human cerebral capillary endothelial...... cells. This was achieved by selecting an appropriate phage-derived peptide with high specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells, which following careful structural modifications spontaneously formed a nanoparticle-fiber network. The peptidic network was characterized fully and its uptake...... by the human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was confirmed by live-cell fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. Recognition and internalization was medicated by two receptors leading to endolysosomal accumulation. Furthermore, the network was capable of delivering functional si...

  4. Upregulation of the low density lipoprotein receptor at the blood-brain barrier: intercommunications between brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the endothelial cells in large vessels where LDL receptors are downregulated, brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo express an LDL receptor. Using a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier consisting of a coculture of brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes, we observed that the capacity of endothelial cells to bind LDL is enhanced threefold when cocultured with astrocytes. We next investigated the ability of astrocytes to modulate endothelial cell LDL recept...

  5. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides into brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    cells (BCECs) and their intermingling tight junctions. Polypeptides like brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), erythropoietin (EPO), and FGL peptide (part of Neuronal adhesion molecule (NCAM)) are acknowledged for their neuroprotective and neurogenerative effects. Generally, however...... has been to investigate the usage of BCEC as factories for recombinant protein production. A non-viral gene carrier was prepared from pullulan-spermine conjugated with plasmid DNA (Thomsen et al., 2011). In vitro transfection of Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (RBE4) and Human Brain Microvascular......, Moos T. Gene delivery by pullulan derivatives in brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion. J Control Release. 2011 Jan 18....

  6. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides to brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    Background: The potential for treatment of chronic disorders affecting the CNS is complicated by the inability of several drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). None-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints...... in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion into the brain. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of transfection to primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBEC) for recombinant protein synthesis....... Results: mRNA expression of proteins with neuroprotective potential in RBEC were enabled. Their expression patters were compared with those of RBE4 and HeLa cells using RT-qPCR analyzes. The evidence for protein synthesis and secretion was obtained by detection of FLAG-tagged to the C-terminal of any...

  7. Gene delivery of the therapeutic polypeptide erythropoietin to primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Moos, Torben

    2016-01-01

    The potential for treatment of chronic disorders affecting the CNS is complicated by the inability of several drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). None-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints...... in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion into the brain. The non-mitotic BCECs might, however, not be very susceptible to non-viral gene therapy in vivo, since this strategy is believed to be dependent on active cell division. We have...

  8. Transfection of brain capillary endothelial cells in primary culture with defined blood-brain barrier properties.

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    Burkhart, Annette; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Lichota, Jacek; Fazakas, Csilla; Krizbai, István; Moos, Torben

    2015-08-07

    Primary brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are a promising tool to study the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro, as they maintain many important characteristics of the BBB in vivo, especially when co-cultured with pericytes and/or astrocytes. A novel strategy for drug delivery to the brain is to transform BCECs into protein factories by genetic modifications leading to secretion of otherwise BBB impermeable proteins into the central nervous system. However, a huge challenge underlying this strategy is to enable transfection of non-mitotic BCECs, taking a non-viral approach. We therefore aimed to study transfection in primary, non-mitotic BCECs cultured with defined BBB properties without disrupting the cells' integrity. Primary cultures of BCECs, pericytes and astrocytes were generated from rat brains and used in three different in vitro BBB experimental arrangements, which were characterised based on a their expression of tight junction proteins and other BBB specific proteins, high trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), and low passive permeability to radiolabeled mannitol. Recombinant gene expression and protein synthesis were examined in primary BCECs. The BCECs were transfected using a commercially available transfection agent Turbofect™ to express the red fluorescent protein HcRed1-C1. The BCECs were transfected at different time points to monitor transfection in relation to mitotic or non-mitotic cells, as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis after 5-and 6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinidyl ester incorporation. The cell cultures exhibited important BBB characteristics judged from their expression of BBB specific proteins, high TEER values, and low passive permeability. Among the three in vitro BBB models, co-culturing with BCECs and astrocytes was well suited for the transfection studies. Transfection was independent of cell division and with equal efficacy between the mitotic and non-mitotic BCECs. Importantly

  9. Transluminal gene transfer into brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo with HVJ-liposomes.

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    Jiang, Chen; Matsuo, Hirotami; Koyabu, Noriko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Fujimoto, Hidenori; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Narro, Mikihiko; Tsuruo, Takashi; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2002-06-01

    Bioactive proteins or peptides cannot be effectively delivered into brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) or brain parenchyma. In this study, we selectively transferred Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene (beta-gal) as a model gene into BCECs by using the hemagglutination virus of Japan (HVJ)-liposomes. HVJ-liposomes encapsulating a beta-gal plasmid were used to transfect MBEC4 cells in vitro, and were administrated via the internal carotid artery to rat in vivo. Success of the procedure was confirmed by the detection of 116 kDa beta-gal protein in transfected MBEC4 cells and in brain capillaries isolated from transfected rats, by Western blot analysis and histological staining. The enzymatic activities of beta-galactosidase were 5- to 10-fold and 20-fold higher than when beta-gal-containing liposomes without fusogenic activity (uncoated liposomes) or plasmid alone were employed in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Thus, HVJ-liposomes were demonstrated to be a useful vector to transfer a foreign gene into the brain capillary endothelium in vivo via the transluminal route.

  10. Efficient introduction of macromolecules and oligonucleotides into brain capillary endothelial cells using HVJ-liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, H; Okamura, T; Chen, J; Takanaga, H; Ohtani, H; Kaneda, Y; Naito, M; Tsuruo, T; Sawada, Y

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we examined the feasibility of introducing macromolecules into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4 cells) by utilizing the hemagglutating virus of Japan (HVJ)-liposomes with fusogenic activity. We used fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-Dextran) and FITC-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide (FITC-ODN) as models of a macromolecule and an ODN, respectively. Intracellular fluorescence appeared rapidly after the exposure of MBEC4 cells to FITC-Dextran-containing HVJ-liposomes, and remained detectable for at least 3 days. Only a control level of intracellular fluorescence was seen after treatment with FITC-Dextran alone, FITC-Dextran with empty HVJ-liposomes or FITC-Dextran-containing liposomes without fusogenic activity. In the early phase after administration (0-30 min), the introduction of FITC-Dextran into MBEC4 cells by the HVJ-liposome method resulted in a rapid and time-dependent increase of intracellular fluorescence intensity. Moreover, FITC-ODN was also introduced into MBEC4 cells by the HVJ-liposome method, although FITC-ODN alone was not introduced. These results indicate that the HVJ-liposome method is useful for the efficient introduction of macromolecules, including ODN, into brain capillary endothelial cells.

  11. Uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles on brain capillary endothelial cells as a blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sylvia; Zensi, Anja; Wien, Sascha L; Tschickardt, Sabrina E; Maier, Wladislaw; Vogel, Tikva; Worek, Franz; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kreuter, Jörg; von Briesen, Hagen

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents an insurmountable obstacle for most drugs thus obstructing an effective treatment of many brain diseases. One solution for overcoming this barrier is a transport by binding of these drugs to surface-modified nanoparticles. Especially apolipoprotein E (ApoE) appears to play a major role in the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB. However, at present the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. In this study, the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells was investigated to differentiate between active and passive uptake mechanism by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, different in vitro co-incubation experiments were performed with competing ligands of the respective receptor. This study confirms an active endocytotic uptake mechanism and shows the involvement of low density lipoprotein receptor family members, notably the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein, on the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells. This knowledge of the uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles enables future developments to rationally create very specific and effective carriers to overcome the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

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    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-05

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Expression and deposition of basement membrane proteins by brain capillary endothelial cells in a primary murine model of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Birkelund, Svend; Larsen, Annette Burkhart

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the interface between the blood and the brain parenchyma and consists of endothelial cells which are tightly sealed together by tight junction proteins. The endothelial cells are in addition supported by pericytes, which are embedded in the vascular basement...... membrane, and astrocyte endfeet. To study the interaction of the different cells of the BBB, construction of in vitro BBB models is valuable. However, the modulation and contribution of the cells of the BBB to the synthesis of basement membrane proteins in vitro is not fully elaborated. Thus, the aim...... of the present study was to create four different in vitro constructs of the murine BBB to characterise if the expression and secretion of basement membrane proteins by the murine brain capillary endothelial cells (mBCECs) was affected by co-culturing with pericytes, mixed glial cells, or both. Primary m...

  14. Transfection of primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein synthesis and secretion of recombinant erythropoietin: a strategy to enable protein delivery to the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhart, Annette; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Aigner, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of chronic disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated by the inability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Non-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints in this passage......, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion further into the brain. The present study aims to investigate the possibility of transfecting primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) for recombinant protein synthesis and secretion...... into the cell culture medium both luminally and abluminally, and despite lower levels of EPO reaching the abluminal chamber, the amount of recombinant EPO was sufficient to evolve a biological effect on astrocytes cultured at the abluminal side in terms of upregulated gene expression of brain...

  15. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells.

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    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4-5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca(2+) imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca(2+) entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

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    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba{sup 2+}-sensitive inward rectifier K{sup +} current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca{sup 2+} imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca{sup 2+} entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC

  17. Gene delivery into primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Lichota, Jacek

    -endothelial electrical resistance above 200 ohm*cm2, indicating that the BCECs formed a tight polar monolayer with functional tight junctions. This was confirmed by immunostaining for the thigh junction protein ZO-1. Rat BCECs were transfected with a red fluorescence protein Hc-RED for 24 hours. Positive transfection...

  18. TNAP and EHD1 are over-expressed in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Deracinois

    Full Text Available Although the physiological properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB are relatively well known, the phenotype of the component brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs has yet to be described in detail. Likewise, the molecular mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the BBB are largely unknown. Proteomics can be used to assess quantitative changes in protein levels and identify proteins involved in the molecular pathways responsible for cellular differentiation. Using the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory, we performed a differential nano-LC MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS study of Triton X-100-soluble protein species from bovine BCECs displaying either limited BBB functions or BBB functions re-induced by glial cells. Due to the heterogeneity of the crude extract, we increased identification yields by applying a repeatable, reproducible fractionation process based on the proteins' relative hydrophobicity. We present proteomic and biochemical evidence to show that tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP and Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 1(EDH1 are over-expressed by bovine BCECs after the re-induction of BBB properties. We discuss the impact of these findings on current knowledge of endothelial and BBB permeability.

  19. Transfection of primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein synthesis and secretion of recombinant erythropoietin: a strategy to enable protein delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Annette; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Aigner, Achim; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    2017-07-01

    Treatment of chronic disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated by the inability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Non-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion further into the brain. The present study aims to investigate the possibility of transfecting primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) for recombinant protein synthesis and secretion of the neuroprotective protein erythropoietin (EPO). We previously showed that 4% of RBECs with BBB properties can be transfected without disrupting the BBB integrity in vitro, but it can be questioned whether this is sufficient to enable protein secretion at therapeutic levels. The present study examined various transfection vectors, with regard to increasing the transfection efficiency without disrupting the BBB integrity. Lipofectamine 3000™ was the most potent vector compared to polyethylenimine (PEI) and Turbofect. When co-cultured with astrocytes, the genetically modified RBECs secreted recombinant EPO into the cell culture medium both luminally and abluminally, and despite lower levels of EPO reaching the abluminal chamber, the amount of recombinant EPO was sufficient to evolve a biological effect on astrocytes cultured at the abluminal side in terms of upregulated gene expression of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). In conclusion, non-viral gene therapy to RBECs leads to protein secretion and signifies a method for therapeutic proteins to target cells inside the CNS otherwise omitted due to the BBB.

  20. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

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    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  1. In vitro discrimination of the role of LRP1 at the BBB cellular level: focus on brain capillary endothelial cells and brain pericytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Pietra; Saint-Pol, Julien; Kuntz, Mélanie; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Lamartiniere, Yordenca; Gosselet, Fabien; Fenart, Laurence

    2015-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (dynamic cellular complex composed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and surrounded by astrocytic end feet and pericytes) regulates the exchanges of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide between the blood and the brain. Deregulation of these exchanges seems to be a key trigger for the brain accumulation of Aβ peptide observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas the involvement of receptor for advanced glycation end-products in Aβ peptide transcytosis has been demonstrated in our laboratory, low-density lipoprotein receptor's role at the cellular level needs to be clarified. For this, we used an in vitro BBB model that consists of a co-culture of bovine BCECs and rat glial cells. This model has already been used to characterize low-density lipoprotein receptor-related peptide (LRP)'s involvement in the transcytosis of molecules such as tPA and angiopep-2. Our results suggest that Aβ peptide efflux across the BCEC monolayer involves a transcellular transport. However, the experiments with RAP discard an involvement of LRP family members at BCECs level. In contrast, our results show a strong transcriptional expression of LRP1 in pericytes and suggest its implication in Aβ endocytosis. Moreover, the observations of pericytes contraction and local downregulation of LRP1 in response to Aβ treatment opens up perspectives for studying this cell type with respect to Aβ peptide metabolism and AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

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    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Yamazaki, Daiju [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  3. Transient signaling of Erk1/2, Akt and PLCgamma induced by nerve growth factor in brain capillary endothelial cells.

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    Lecht, Shimon; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Wagenstein, Yoav; Inoue, Seiji; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lelkes, Peter I; Lazarovici, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative evidences suggest that nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes angiogenic effects such as proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (ECs) from different vascular beds, induces capillary sprouting in chorioallantoic membrane and improves in vivo vascularization in a hind-limb ischemic model. In the present study, we sought to investigate the signaling properties of NGF in a microcapillary ECs model compared to those of a neuronal model. NGF-induced phosphorylation of signaling molecules Erk1/2, Akt and PLCgamma were measured using Western blotting and compared between mouse NGF (mNGF) and snake venom NGF analogues. NGFs-induced signaling was TrkA mediated as evident by inhibition with the TrkA antagonist K252a. NGF and its analogues-induced signaling in ECs were characterized by a transient effect in contrast to a prolonged stimulation in neuronal cells. The potency of mouse, cobra and viper NGFs to induce Erk1/2 phosphorylation in ECs was higher than in neurons. In ECs, mNGF exhibited the highest efficacy of stimulation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation, followed by viper and cobra NGFs. The efficacy of stimulation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation measured with neurons was opposite from that in ECs. NGF-induced temporal signaling differences between ECs and neurons may explain the dual vascular and neurotrophic effects of this growth factor. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  5. Characteristics of L-citrulline transport through blood-brain barrier in the brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-10

    L-Citrulline is a neutral amino acid and a major precursor of L-arginine in the nitric oxide (NO) cycle. Recently it has been reported that L-citrulline prevents neuronal cell death and protects cerebrovascular injury, therefore, L-citrulline may have a neuroprotective effect to improve cerebrovascular dysfunction. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the brain transport mechanism of L-citrulline through blood-brain barrier (BBB) using the conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells), as an in vitro model of the BBB. The uptake study of [14C] L-citrulline, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, and rLAT1, system b0,+, and CAT1 small interfering RNA study were performed in TR-BBB cells. The uptake of [14C] L-citrulline was a time-dependent, but ion-independent manner in TR-BBB cells. The transport process involved two saturable components with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 30.9 ± 1.0 μM (Km1) and 1.69 ± 0.43 mM (Km2). The uptake of [14C] L-citrulline in TR-BBB cells was significantly inhibited by neutral and cationic amino acids, but not by anionic amino acids. In addition, [14C]L-citrulline uptake in the cells was markedly inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), which is the inhibitor of the large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), B0, B0,+ and harmaline, the inhibitor of system b0,+. Gabapentin and L-dopa as the substrates of LAT1 competitively inhibited the uptake of [14C] L-citrulline. IC50 values for L-dopa, gabapentin, L-phenylalanine and L-arginine were 501 μM, 223 μM, 68.9 μM and 33.4 mM, respectively. The expression of mRNA for LAT1 was predominantly increased 187-fold in comparison with that of system b0,+ in TR-BBB cells. In the studies of LAT1, system b0,+ and CAT1 knockdown via siRNA transfection into TR-BBB cells, the transcript level of LAT1 and [14C] L-citrulline uptake by LAT1 siRNA were significantly reduced compared with those by

  6. Drug-induced trafficking of p-glycoprotein in human brain capillary endothelial cells as demonstrated by exposure to mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  7. Major involvement of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) in uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid by human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yasuo; Ito, Katsuaki; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the expression of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) and its contribution to the supply of biotin and pantothenic acid to the human brain via the blood-brain barrier. DNA microarray and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that SLC5A6 is expressed in microvessels of human brain. The absolute expression levels of SLC5A6 protein in isolated human and monkey brain microvessels were 1.19 and 0.597 fmol/μg protein, respectively, as determined by a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. Using an antibody-free method established by Kubo et al. (2015), we found that SLC5A6 was preferentially localized at the luminal membrane of brain capillary endothelium. Knock-down analysis using SLC5A6 siRNA showed that SLC5A6 accounts for 88.7% and 98.6% of total [(3) H]biotin and [(3) H]pantothenic acid uptakes, respectively, by human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. SLC5A6-mediated transport in hCMEC/D3 was markedly inhibited not only by biotin and pantothenic acid, but also by prostaglandin E2, lipoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, indomethacin, ketoprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone, and flurbiprofen. This study is the first to confirm expression of SLC5A6 in human brain microvessels and to provide evidence that SLC5A6 is a major contributor to luminal uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid at the human blood-brain barrier. In humans, it was unclear (not concluded) about what transport system at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the brain uptakes of two vitamins, biotin and pantothenic acid, which are necessary for brain proper function. This study clarified for the first time that the solute carrier 5A6/Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter SLC5A6/SMVT is responsible for the supplies of biotin and pantothenic acid into brain across the BBB in humans. DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; NSAID, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; PGE2, prostaglandin E2. © 2015

  8. A large-scale electrophoresis- and chromatography-based determination of gene expression profiles in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duban-Deweer Sophie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs form the physiological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The barrier function is (at least in part due to well-known proteins such as transporters, tight junctions and metabolic barrier proteins (e.g. monoamine oxidase, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase and P-glycoprotein. Our previous 2-dimensional gel proteome analysis had identified a large number of proteins and revealed the major role of dynamic cytoskeletal remodelling in the differentiation of bovine BCECs. The aim of the present study was to elaborate a reference proteome of Triton X-100-soluble species from bovine BCECs cultured in the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory. Results A total of 215 protein spots (corresponding to 130 distinct proteins were identified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, whereas over 350 proteins were identified by a shotgun approach. We classified around 430 distinct proteins expressed by bovine BCECs. Our large-scale gene expression analysis enabled the correction of mistakes referenced into protein databases (e.g. bovine vinculin and constitutes valuable evidence for predictions based on genome annotation. Conclusions Elaboration of a reference proteome constitutes the first step in creating a gene expression database dedicated to capillary endothelial cells displaying BBB characteristics. It improves of our knowledge of the BBB and the key proteins in cell structures, cytoskeleton organization, metabolism, detoxification and drug resistance. Moreover, our results emphasize the need for both appropriate experimental design and correct interpretation of proteome datasets.

  9. Functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, a human blood–brain barrier model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimomura Keita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the molecular basis and transport function of the human blood–brain barrier (BBB is important for not only understanding human cerebral physiology, but also development of new central nervous system (CNS-acting drugs. However, few studies have been done using human brain capillary endothelial cells, because human brain materials are difficult to obtain. The purpose of this study is to clarify the functional expression of a proton-coupled organic cation (H+/OC antiporter in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, which has been recently developed as an in vitro human BBB model. Methods Diphenhydramine, [3H]pyrilamine and oxycodone were used as cationic drugs that proved to be H+/OC antiporter substrates. The in vitro uptake experiments by hCMEC/D3 cells were carried out under several conditions. Results Diphenhydramine and [3H]pyrilamine were both transported into hCMEC/D3 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with Km values of 59 μM and 19 μM, respectively. Each inhibited uptake of the other in a competitive manner, suggesting that a common mechanism is involved in their transport. The diphenhydramine uptake was significantly inhibited by amantadine and quinidine, but not tetraethylammonium and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (substrates for well-known organic cation transporters. The uptake was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors, but was insensitive to extracellular sodium and membrane potential. Further, the uptake was increased by extracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification. These transport properties are completely consistent with those of previously characterized H+/OC antiporter in rat BBB. Conclusions The present results suggest that H+/OC antiporter is functionally expressed in hCMEC/D3 cells.

  10. Actin filament-associated protein 1 (AFAP-1) is a key mediator in inflammatory signaling-induced rapid attenuation of intrinsic P-gp function in human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Yutaro; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify regulatory molecule(s) involved in the inflammatory signaling-induced decrease in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that may occur in brain diseases. We confirmed that in vivo P-gp efflux activity at the BBB was decreased without any change in P-gp protein expression level in a mouse model of acute inflammation induced by 3 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide. In a human BBB model cell line (human brain capillary endothelial cells; hCMEC/D3), 1-h treatment with 10 ng/mL tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; an inflammatory mediator) rapidly reduced P-gp efflux activity, but had no effect on P-gp protein expression level. To clarify the non-transcriptional mechanism that causes the decrease in intrinsic efflux activity of P-gp in acute inflammation, we applied comprehensive quantitative phosphoproteomics to compare hCMEC/D3 cells treated with TNF-α and vehicle (control). Actin filament-associated protein-1 (AFAP-1), MAPK1, and transcription factor AP-1 (AP-1) were significantly phosphorylated in TNF-α-treated cells, and were selected as candidate proteins. In validation experiments, knockdown of AFAP-1 expression blocked the reduction in P-gp efflux activity by TNF-α treatment, whereas inhibition of MAPK function or knockdown of AP-1 expression did not. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics revealed that the reduction in P-gp activity by TNF-α did not require any change in P-gp protein expression levels in the plasma membrane. Our results demonstrate that AFAP-1 is a key mediator in the inflammatory signaling-induced, translocation-independent rapid attenuation of P-gp efflux activity in human brain capillary endothelial cells. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Targeting immunoliposomes to transferrin receptors on brain capillary endothelial cells as a mean for cargo transport across the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Bruun, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    transport further into the CNS. We studied transferrin receptor-targeted (OX26) immunoliposomes containing oxaliplatin with the aim of quantifying the uptake of OX26, liposomes and oxaliplatin in BCECs and the remaining CNS. The uptake of the immunoliposomes and their cargo was studied in 18-dayold rats...... higher both in vitro and in vivo when compared to isotypic IgG-conjugated liposomes. Quantitative analyses after capillary depletion revealed cargo transport from BCECs to the remaining CNS, but not differences could be detected between OX26- conjugated and isotype IgG control liposomes in vivo, whereas...

  12. Reelin expression in brain endothelial cells: an electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Costas, Emma; Fenton, Erin Y; Caruncho, Hector J

    2015-03-24

    Reelin expression and function have been extensively studied in the brain, although its expression has been also reported in other tissues including blood. This raises the possibility that reelin might be able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which could be functionally relevant. Up-to-date no studies have been conducted to assess if reelin is present in the blood-brain barrier, which is mainly constituted by tightly packed endothelial cells. In this report we assessed the expression of reelin in brain capillaries using immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. At the light microscope, reelin immunolabeling appeared in specific endothelial cells in brain areas that presented abundant diffuse labeling for this protein (e.g., layer I of the cortex, or the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the hippocampus), while it was mostly absent from capillaries in other brain areas (e.g., deeper cortical layers, or the CA1 layer of the hippocampus). As expected, at the electron microscope reelin labeling was observed in neurons of the cortex, where most of the labeling was associated with the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, reelin was also observed in some endothelial cells located in small capillaries, which confirmed the findings obtained at the light microscope. In these cells, reelin labeling was located primarily in caveolae (i.e., vesicles of transcytosis), and associated with the plasma membrane of the luminal side of endothelial cells. In addition, some scarce labeling was observed in the nuclear membrane. The presence of reelin immunolabeling in brain endothelial cells, and particularly in caveolar vesicles within these cells, suggests that reelin and/or reelin peptides may be able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which could have important physiological, pathological, and therapeutic implications.

  13. Somatic GNAQ Mutation is Enriched in Brain Endothelial Cells in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Couto, Javier A; Pinto, Anna; Alexandrescu, Sanda; Madsen, Joseph R; Greene, Arin K; Sahin, Mustafa; Bischoff, Joyce

    2017-02-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital neurocutaneous disorder characterized by facial and extracraniofacial capillary malformations and capillary-venule malformations in the leptomeninges. A somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ (c.548G>A; p.R183Q) was found in SWS brain and skin capillary malformations. Our laboratory showed endothelial cells in skin capillary malformations are enriched for the GNAQ mutation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the GNAQ mutation is also enriched in endothelial cells in affected SWS brain. Two human SWS brain specimens were fractionated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting into hematopoietic (CD45), endothelial (CD31, VE-Cadherin, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2), and perivascular (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) cells and cells negative for all markers. The sorted cell populations were analyzed for GNAQ p.R183Q mutation by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells were selected by anti-CD31-coated magnetic beads and cultured in endothelial growth medium in vitro. The GNAQ p.R183Q mutation was present in brain endothelial cells in two SWS specimens, with mutant allelic frequencies of 34.7% and 24.0%. Cells negative for all markers also harbored the GNAQ mutation. The mutant allelic frequencies in these unidentified cells were 9.2% and 8.4%. SWS patient-derived brain endothelial cells with mutant allelic frequencies of 14.7% and 21% survived and proliferated in vitro. Our study provides evidence that GNAQ p.R183Q mutation is enriched in endothelial cells in SWS brain lesions and thereby reveals endothelial cells as a source of aberrant Gαq signaling. This will help to understand the pathophysiology of SWS, to discover biomarkers for predicting cerebral involvement, and to develop therapeutic targets to prevent neurological impairments in SWS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Apicobasal polarity of brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worzfeld, Thomas; Schwaninger, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Normal brain homeostasis depends on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier that controls the access of nutrients, humoral factors, and immune cells to the CNS. The blood-brain barrier is composed mainly of brain endothelial cells. Forming the interface between two compartments, they are highly polarized. Apical/luminal and basolateral/abluminal membranes differ in their lipid and (glyco-)protein composition, allowing brain endothelial cells to secrete or transport soluble factors in a polarized manner and to maintain blood flow. Here, we summarize the basic concepts of apicobasal cell polarity in brain endothelial cells. To address potential molecular mechanisms underlying apicobasal polarity in brain endothelial cells, we draw on investigations in epithelial cells and discuss how polarity may go awry in neurological diseases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Down-regulation of selected Blood-brain Barrier Specific Genes from Capillaries to Bovine In Vitro Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Brodin, Birger

    the in vivo gene expression of brain capillary endothelial cells. Primary bovine endothelial cells and rat astrocytes were cultured in different culture configurations and the mRNA expression of selected genes (vWF, Glut-1, P-gp, claudin-1,-5, occludin, JAM-1, LAT-1, SLC16A1, MRP-1,-4, BCRP, ZO-1, AP, TPA...... and SLCO4A1) was investigated by qPCR and compared with the expression in freshly isolated bovine capillaries. Occludin was the only tight junction protein where a decrease in mRNA expression from capillaries to culture configurations was observed. JAM-1 and ZO-1 maintained mRNA expression, while...

  17. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  18. Elongation, proliferation & migration differentiate endothelial cell phenotypes and determine capillary sprouting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popel Aleksander S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of capillaries from preexisting blood vessels, has been extensively studied experimentally over the past thirty years. Molecular insights from these studies have lead to therapies for cancer, macular degeneration and ischemia. In parallel, mathematical models of angiogenesis have helped characterize a broader view of capillary network formation and have suggested new directions for experimental pursuit. We developed a computational model that bridges the gap between these two perspectives, and addresses a remaining question in angiogenic sprouting: how do the processes of endothelial cell elongation, migration and proliferation contribute to vessel formation? Results We present a multiscale systems model that closely simulates the mechanisms underlying sprouting at the onset of angiogenesis. Designed by agent-based programming, the model uses logical rules to guide the behavior of individual endothelial cells and segments of cells. The activation, proliferation, and movement of these cells lead to capillary growth in three dimensions. By this means, a novel capillary network emerges out of combinatorially complex interactions of single cells. Rules and parameter ranges are based on literature data on endothelial cell behavior in vitro. The model is designed generally, and will subsequently be applied to represent species-specific, tissue-specific in vitro and in vivo conditions. Initial results predict tip cell activation, stalk cell development and sprout formation as a function of local vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations and the Delta-like 4 Notch ligand, as it might occur in a three-dimensional in vitro setting. Results demonstrate the differential effects of ligand concentrations, cell movement and proliferation on sprouting and directional persistence. Conclusion This systems biology model offers a paradigm closely related to biological phenomena and highlights previously

  19. Mapping human brain capillary water lifetime: high-resolution metabolic neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, William D; Li, Xin; Sammi, Manoj K; Bourdette, Dennis N; Neuwelt, Edward A; Springer, Charles S

    2015-06-01

    Shutter-speed analysis of dynamic-contrast-agent (CA)-enhanced normal, multiple sclerosis (MS), and glioblastoma (GBM) human brain data gives the mean capillary water molecule lifetime (τ(b)) and blood volume fraction (v(b); capillary density-volume product (ρ(†)V)) in a high-resolution (1)H2O MRI voxel (40 μL) or ROI. The equilibrium water extravasation rate constant, k(po) (τ(b)(-1)), averages 3.2 and 2.9 s(-1) in resting-state normal white matter (NWM) and gray matter (NGM), respectively (n = 6). The results (italicized) lead to three major conclusions. (A) k(po) differences are dominated by capillary water permeability (P(W)(†)), not size, differences. NWM and NGM voxel k(po) and v(b) values are independent. Quantitative analyses of concomitant population-averaged k(po), v(b) variations in normal and normal-appearing MS brain ROIs confirm P(W)(†) dominance. (B) P(W)(†) is dominated (>95%) by a trans(endothelial)cellular pathway, not the P(CA)(†) paracellular route. In MS lesions and GBM tumors, P(CA)(†) increases but P(W)(†) decreases. (C) k(po) tracks steady-state ATP production/consumption flux per capillary. In normal, MS, and GBM brain, regional k(po) correlates with literature MRSI ATP (positively) and Na(+) (negatively) tissue concentrations. This suggests that the P(W)(†) pathway is metabolically active. Excellent agreement of the relative NGM/NWM k(po)v(b) product ratio with the literature (31)PMRSI-MT CMR(oxphos) ratio confirms the flux property. We have previously shown that the cellular water molecule efflux rate constant (k(io)) is proportional to plasma membrane P-type ATPase turnover, likely due to active trans-membrane water cycling. With synaptic proximities and synergistic metabolic cooperativities, polar brain endothelial, neuroglial, and neuronal cells form "gliovascular units." We hypothesize that a chain of water cycling processes transmits brain metabolic activity to k(po), letting it report neurogliovascular unit Na

  20. In vitro models of the blood–brain barrier: An overview of commonly used brain endothelial cell culture models and guidelines for their use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Hans C; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata; Cecchelli, Romeo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Deli, Maria A; Förster, Carola; Galla, Hans J; Romero, Ignacio A; Shusta, Eric V; Stebbins, Matthew J; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Weksler, Babette

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells lining the brain capillaries separate the blood from the brain parenchyma. The endothelial monolayer of the brain capillaries serves both as a crucial interface for exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolites between blood and brain, and as a barrier for neurotoxic components of plasma and xenobiotics. This “blood-brain barrier” function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug transport to the brain and studies of endothelial cell biology and pathophysiology. In this review, we aim to give an overview of established in vitro blood–brain barrier models with a focus on their validation regarding a set of well-established blood–brain barrier characteristics. As an ideal cell culture model of the blood–brain barrier is yet to be developed, we also aim to give an overview of the advantages and drawbacks of the different models described. PMID:26868179

  1. Tumor endothelial marker 5 expression in endothelial cells during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallon, Mario, E-mail: m.vallon@arcor.de [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Rohde, Franziska; Janssen, Klaus-Peter [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    Tumor endothelial marker (TEM) 5 is an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor upregulated in endothelial cells during tumor and physiologic angiogenesis. So far, the mechanisms leading to upregulation of TEM5 and its function during angiogenesis have not been identified. Here, we report that TEM5 expression in endothelial cells is induced during capillary-like network formation on Matrigel, during capillary morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen I matrix, and upon confluence on a two-dimensional matrix. TEM5 expression was not induced by a variety of soluble angiogenic factors, including VEGF and bFGF, in subconfluent endothelial cells. TEM5 upregulation was blocked by toxin B from Clostridium difficile, an inhibitor of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The Rho inhibitor C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum did not affect TEM5 expression, whereas the Rac inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed TEM5 upregulation. An excess of the soluble TEM5 extracellular domain or an inhibitory monoclonal TEM5 antibody blocked contact inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation resulting in multilayered islands within the endothelial monolayer and increased vessel density during capillary formation. Based on our results we conclude that TEM5 expression during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells.

  2. The secretome of endothelial progenitor cells promotes brain endothelial cell activity through PI3-kinase and MAP-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie; Fuchs, Anna-Lena; Staudigl, Jennifer; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodelling are crucial events in tissue repair mechanisms promoted by cell transplantation. Current evidence underscores the importance of the soluble factors secreted by stem cells in tissue regeneration. In the present study we investigated the effects of paracrine factors derived from cultured endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) on rat brain endothelial cell properties and addressed the signaling pathways involved. Endothelial cells derived from rat brain (rBCEC4) were incubated with EPC-derived conditioned medium (EPC-CM). The angiogenic response of rBCEC4 to EPC-CM was assessed as effect on cell number, migration and tubular network formation. In addition, we have compared the outcome of the in vitro experiments with the effects on capillary sprouting from rat aortic rings. The specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 were used to study the involvement of these two signaling pathways in the transduction of the angiogenic effects of EPC-CM. Viable cell number, migration and tubule network formation were significantly augmented upon incubation with EPC-CM. Similar findings were observed for aortic ring outgrowth with significantly longer sprouts. The EPC-CM-induced activities were significantly reduced by the blockage of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Similarly to the outcome of the rBCEC4 experiments, inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways significantly interfered with capillary sprouting induced by EPC-CM. The present study demonstrates that EPC-derived paracrine factors substantially promote the angiogenic response of brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, our findings identified the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways to play a central role in mediating these effects.

  3. Endothelial progenitor cells physiology and metabolic plasticity in brain angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malinovskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons. Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies.

  4. Endothelial calcium dynamics, connexin channels and blood-brain barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Decrock, Elke; Bol, Mélissa; Gadicherla, Ashish K; Culot, Maxime; Cecchelli, Romeo; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Situated between the circulation and the brain, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from circulating toxins while securing a specialized environment for neuro-glial signaling. BBB capillary endothelial cells exhibit low transcytotic activity and a tight, junctional network that, aided by the cytoskeleton, restricts paracellular permeability. The latter is subject of extensive research as it relates to neuropathology, edema and inflammation. A key determinant in regulating paracellular permeability is the endothelial cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) that affects junctional and cytoskeletal proteins. Ca(2+) signals are not one-time events restricted to a single cell but often appear as oscillatory [Ca(2+)]i changes that may propagate between cells as intercellular Ca(2+) waves. The effect of Ca(2+) oscillations/waves on BBB function is largely unknown and we here review current evidence on how [Ca(2+)]i dynamics influence BBB permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aggressive Antioxidant Reductive Stress Impairs Brain Endothelial Cell Angiogenesis and Blood Brain Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentor, Shireen; Fisher, David

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the brain microvasculature is a common characteristic in models of cerebrovascular disease. Considering the effects of reactive oxygen species activity in vascular-derived insults, it is naturally prudent to hypothesize those interventions inhibiting reactive oxygen species activity, such as antioxidant supplementation, may be beneficial for cerebrovascular disease. Hyper doses of antioxidant supplements, and foods with high antioxidant concentrations, are commonly used as an ongoing remedial and 'over-the-counter' treatments for most seasonal ailments. For the first time, this study reports the adverse effects of excess antioxidants on angiogenic properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which have clinical implications. A medicinal tea, known as Rooibos, commonly used in South Africa and marketed globally, for its prominent antioxidant profile, demonstrated its effects on brain endothelial cellular proliferation, toxicology, mitochondrial activity and permeability. Mouse brain endothelial cells were seeded at cell densities ranging from 103-106 cells/ml and were incubated at pre-determined time intervals of 24 to120 hours. Daily exposure of a selected concentration range of fermented Rooibos tea caused dose-related decreases in cellular proliferation, and unequivocally decreased permeability across our in vitro BBB model. Despite the negative effects on cellular proliferation, no toxicity was observed for all selected fermented Rooibos concentrations. Our data conclusively shows that the use of excess antioxidants perturbs BBB functionality and angiogenic properties, adversely implicating the homeostatic regulation of the brain microenvironment, while suppression in cellular proliferation impacts both the maintenance and repair function of brain capillaries. Our study indicates that excess antioxidants will lead to an impaired response to mechanical-induced injury and pathogenic infection of the BBB, compromising patient recovery. Copyright

  6. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  7. CD146 coordinates brain endothelial cell-pericyte communication for blood-brain barrier development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianan; Luo, Yongting; Hui, Hui; Cai, Tanxi; Huang, Hongxin; Yang, Fuquan; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Jingjing; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-09-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) establishes a protective interface between the central neuronal system and peripheral blood circulation and is crucial for homeostasis of the CNS. BBB formation starts when the endothelial cells (ECs) invade the CNS and pericytes are recruited to the nascent vessels during embryogenesis. Despite the essential function of pericyte-EC interaction during BBB development, the molecular mechanisms coordinating the pericyte-EC behavior and communication remain incompletely understood. Here, we report a single cell receptor, CD146, that presents dynamic expression patterns in the cerebrovasculature at the stages of BBB induction and maturation, coordinates the interplay of ECs and pericytes, and orchestrates BBB development spatiotemporally. In mouse brain, CD146 is first expressed in the cerebrovascular ECs of immature capillaries without pericyte coverage; with increased coverage of pericytes, CD146 could only be detected in pericytes, but not in cerebrovascular ECs. Specific deletion of Cd146 in mice ECs resulted in reduced brain endothelial claudin-5 expression and BBB breakdown. By analyzing mice with specific deletion of Cd146 in pericytes, which have defects in pericyte coverage and BBB integrity, we demonstrate that CD146 functions as a coreceptor of PDGF receptor-β to mediate pericyte recruitment to cerebrovascular ECs. Moreover, we found that the attached pericytes in turn down-regulate endothelial CD146 by secreting TGF-β1 to promote further BBB maturation. These results reveal that the dynamic expression of CD146 controls the behavior of ECs and pericytes, thereby coordinating the formation of a mature and stable BBB.

  8. Bidirectional apical-basal traffic of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor in brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siupka, Piotr; Hersom, Maria N. S.; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    in the process. Here, we elucidate the endosomal trafficking of the retrograde transported cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) in primary cultures of brain endothelial cells (BECs) of porcine and bovine origin. Receptor expression and localisation of MPR300 in the endo-lysosomal system......Brain capillary endothelium mediates the exchange of nutrients between blood and brain parenchyma. This barrier function of the brain capillaries also limits passage of pharmaceuticals from blood to brain, which hinders treatment of several neurological disorders. Receptor-mediated transport has...... been suggested as a potential pharmaceutical delivery route across the brain endothelium, e.g. reports have shown that the transferrin receptor (TfR) facilitates transcytosis of TfR antibodies, but it is not known whether this recycling receptor itself traffics from apical to basal membrane...

  9. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  10. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan W Howland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA, parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention.

  11. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  12. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters the effect of matrix stiffness on the formation of endothelial networks and capillary lumens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundavaram, Madhu S; Shentu, Tzu Pin; Kowalsky, Gregory B; Volkov, Suncica; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Levitan, Irena

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Formation of new blood vessels is essential for vascular repair and remodeling, and it is known that biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix play a major role in this process. Our earlier studies have also shown that exposing endothelial cells to oxidized modification of low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) increases endothelial stiffness and facilitates their ability to form cellular networks, suggesting that it facilitates endothelial angiogenic potential. The goal of this study, therefore, was to test the interrelationship between matrix stiffness and oxLDL in the regulation of angiogenesis. Our results show that, as expected, an increase in matrix stiffness inhibited endothelial network formation and that exposure to oxLDL significantly facilitated this process. We also show, however, that oxLDL-induced facilitation of endothelial networks was observed only in stiff (3 mg/mL) but not in soft (1 mg/mL) collagen gels, resulting in blunting the effect of matrix stiffness. Also unexpectedly, we show that an increase in matrix stiffness results in a significant increase in the number of capillary lumens that are formed by single cells or pairs of cells, suggesting that while endothelial connectivity is impaired, formation of single-cell lumens is facilitated. oxLDL facilitates lumen formation, but this effect is also matrix dependent and is observed only in soft gels and not in stiff gels. Finally, an increase in both matrix stiffness and oxLDL exposure results in changes in capillary morphology, with the formation of larger capillary lumens. Overall, our study suggests that oxLDL plays an important role in formation of new capillaries and their morphology and that this effect is critically dependent on the extracellular environment's compliance, thereby underlining the importance of the interdependence of these parameters.

  13. Protective effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Deng, Jiangshan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Yuwu

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin. Clinical studies have demonstrated that hypoglycemic edema is involved in the initiation of hypoglycemic brain damage. However, the mechanisms of this edema are poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent regulator of blood vessel function, has been observed an important candidate hormone induced by hypoglycemia to protect neurons by restoring plasma glucose. Whether VEGF has a protective effect against hypoglycemia-induced damage in brain endothelial cells is still unknown. To investigate the effects of hypoglycemia on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells and assess the protective effect of exogenous VEGF on endothelial cells during hypoglycemia, confluent monolayers of the brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3 were treated with normal (5.5 mM glucose), hypoglycemic (0, 0.5, 1 mM glucose) medium or hypoglycemic medium in the presence of VEGF. The results clearly showed that hypoglycemia significantly downregulated the expression of claudin-5 in bEnd.3 cells, without affecting ZO-1 and occludin expression and distribution. Besides, transendothelial permeability significantly increased under hypoglycemic conditions compared to that under control conditions. Moreover, the hypoglycemic medium in presence of VEGF decreased endothelial permeability via the inhibition of claudin-5 degradation and improved hypoglycemia-induced cell toxicity. Furthermore, Glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 expression were significantly upregulated. Taken together, hypoglycemia can significantly increase paraendocellular permeability by downregulating claudin-5 expression. We further showed that VEGF protected brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia by enhancing glucose passage, reducing endothelial cell death, and ameliorating paraendocellular permeability.

  14. Control of intracellular pH and growth by fibronectin in capillary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Frangioni, J. V.; Cragoe, E. J. Jr; Lechene, C.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the mechanism by which fibronectin (FN) regulates capillary endothelial cell proliferation. Endothelial cell growth can be controlled in chemically-defined medium by varying the density of FN coated on the substratum (Ingber, D. E., and J. Folkman. J. Cell Biol. 1989. 109:317-330). In this system, DNA synthetic rates are stimulated by FN in direct proportion to its effect on cell extension (projected cell areas) both in the presence and absence of saturating amounts of basic FGF. To investigate direct growth signaling by FN, we carried out microfluorometric measurements of intracellular pH (pHi), a cytoplasmic signal that is commonly influenced by soluble mitogens. pHi increased 0.18 pH units as FN coating densities were raised and cells progressed from round to spread. Intracellular alkalinization induced by attachment to FN was rapid and followed the time course of cell spreading. When measured in the presence and absence of FGF, the effects of FN and FGF on pHi were found to be independent and additive. Furthermore, DNA synthesis correlated with pHi for all combinations of FGF and FN. Ethylisopropylamiloride, a specific inhibitor of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter, completely suppressed the effects of FN on both pHi and DNA synthesis. However, cytoplasmic pH per se did not appear to be a critical determinant of growth since DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited when pHi was lowered over the physiological range by varying the pH of the medium. We conclude that FN and FGF exert their growth-modulating effects in part through activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger, although they appear to trigger this system via separate pathways.

  15. Purification from a human hepatoma cell line of a basic fibroblast growth factor-like molecule that stimulates capillary endothelial cell plasminogen activator production, DNA synthesis, and migration.

    OpenAIRE

    Presta, M; Moscatelli, D; Joseph-Silverstein, J; Rifkin, D B

    1986-01-01

    A 17,500-dalton protein which stimulates plasminogen activator production in cultured bovine capillary endothelial cells has been purified from a SK-Hep-1 human hepatoma cell lysate by using heparin affinity chromatography and fast protein-liquid ion exchange chromatography. The purified molecule stimulated plasminogen activator production in a dose-dependent manner between 0.01 and 1 ng/ml. It also stimulated collagenase synthesis, DNA synthesis, and motility in capillary endothelial cells i...

  16. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Jin

    Full Text Available Interleukin-34 (IL-34 is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R, and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Endothelial glycocalyx on brain endothelial cells is lost in experimental cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Al

    2014-01-01

    electron microscopy and measured circulating glycosaminoglycans by dot blot and ELISA. The glycocalyx was degraded in brain vasculature in cerebral and to a lesser degree uncomplicated malaria. It was affected on both intact and apoptotic endothelial cells. Circulating glycosaminoglycan levels suggested...

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression in mdx mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Beatrice; Corsi, Patrizia; Vacca, Angelo; Roncali, Luisa; Ribatti, Domenico

    2002-10-25

    Recent data have demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is expressed by subsets of neurons, coincident with angiogenesis within its developing cerebral cortex. In this study, with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of vascular involvement during brain impairment in Duchenne muscular distrophy (DMD), we have correlated the vascular density with VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) expression in the brain cortex of normal and mdx mouse, an animal model with a genetic defect in a region homologous with the human DMD gene. Results showed that in mdx mouse, tissue area occupied by microvessels positive to factor VIII related antigen and VEGFR-2 increased in parallel to the tissue area occupied by neurons positive to VEGF. Our data suggest that increased vascularity in the brain of mdx mouse may be due, at least in part, to proliferation of endothelial cells in response to VEGF secreted by neuronal cells.

  19. MicroRNA-30b controls endothelial cell capillary morphogenesis through regulation of transforming growth factor beta 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Grant A; Kazda, Kayla; Addison, Christina L

    2017-01-01

    The importance of microRNA (miRNA) to vascular biology is becoming increasingly evident; however, the function of a significant number of miRNA remains to be determined. In particular, the effect of growth factor regulation of miRNAs on endothelial cell morphogenesis is incomplete. Thus, we aimed to identify miRNAs regulated by pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and determine the effects of VEGF-regulated miRNAs and their targets on processes important for angiogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were thus stimulated with VEGF and miRNA levels assessed using microarrays. We found that VEGF altered expression of many miRNA, and for this study focused on one of the most significantly down-regulated miRNA in HUVECs following VEGF treatment, miR-30b. Using specific miRNA mimics, we found that overexpression of miR-30b inhibited capillary morphogenesis in vitro, while depletion of endogenous miR-30b resulted in increased capillary morphogenesis indicating the potential significance of down-regulation of miR-30b as a pro-angiogenic response to VEGF stimulation. MiR-30b overexpression in HUVEC regulated transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2) production, which led to increased phosphorylation of Smad2, indicating activation of an autocrine TGFβ signaling pathway. Up-regulation of TGFβ2 by miR-30b overexpression was found to be dependent on ATF2 activation, a transcription factor known to regulate TGFβ2 expression, as miR-30b overexpressing cells exhibited increased levels of phosphorylated ATF2 and depletion of ATF2 inhibited miR-30b-induced TGFβ2 expression. However, miR-30b effects on ATF2 were indirect and found to be via targeting of the known ATF2 repressor protein JDP2 whose mRNA levels were indirectly correlated with miR-30b levels. Increased secretion of TGFβ2 from HUVEC was shown to mediate the inhibitory effects of miR-30b on capillary morphogenesis as treatment with a neutralizing antibody to TGFβ2 restored

  20. MicroRNA-30b controls endothelial cell capillary morphogenesis through regulation of transforming growth factor beta 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Howe

    Full Text Available The importance of microRNA (miRNA to vascular biology is becoming increasingly evident; however, the function of a significant number of miRNA remains to be determined. In particular, the effect of growth factor regulation of miRNAs on endothelial cell morphogenesis is incomplete. Thus, we aimed to identify miRNAs regulated by pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and determine the effects of VEGF-regulated miRNAs and their targets on processes important for angiogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were thus stimulated with VEGF and miRNA levels assessed using microarrays. We found that VEGF altered expression of many miRNA, and for this study focused on one of the most significantly down-regulated miRNA in HUVECs following VEGF treatment, miR-30b. Using specific miRNA mimics, we found that overexpression of miR-30b inhibited capillary morphogenesis in vitro, while depletion of endogenous miR-30b resulted in increased capillary morphogenesis indicating the potential significance of down-regulation of miR-30b as a pro-angiogenic response to VEGF stimulation. MiR-30b overexpression in HUVEC regulated transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2 production, which led to increased phosphorylation of Smad2, indicating activation of an autocrine TGFβ signaling pathway. Up-regulation of TGFβ2 by miR-30b overexpression was found to be dependent on ATF2 activation, a transcription factor known to regulate TGFβ2 expression, as miR-30b overexpressing cells exhibited increased levels of phosphorylated ATF2 and depletion of ATF2 inhibited miR-30b-induced TGFβ2 expression. However, miR-30b effects on ATF2 were indirect and found to be via targeting of the known ATF2 repressor protein JDP2 whose mRNA levels were indirectly correlated with miR-30b levels. Increased secretion of TGFβ2 from HUVEC was shown to mediate the inhibitory effects of miR-30b on capillary morphogenesis as treatment with a neutralizing antibody to

  1. Intense intermittent exercise provides weak stimulus for vascular endothelial growth factor secretion and capillary growth in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Passos, Madla; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The effect of acute intense intermittent exercise compared to moderate intensity exercise, on angiogenic factors and the effect of four weeks of intense intermittent training on capillary growth were examined in nine young healthy males, pre-conditioned by moderate intensity endurance training...... for VEGF secretion and endothelial cell proliferation and that intense intermittent training does not induce a sufficient angiogenic stimulus to induce capillary growth in muscle previously conditioned by moderate intensity exercise........ The intense training consisted of 24 one-min cycling bouts at an initial work rate of 316 ± 19W (~117% of pre VO2 max), performed 3 times/week. Skeletal muscle biopsies and muscle microdialysates were otained from m.v. lateralis before, during, and after acute exercise performed at either moderate or high...

  2. Bidirectional apical-basal traffic of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siupka, Piotr; Hersom, Maria Ns; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Johnsen, Kasper B; Thomsen, Louiza B; Andresen, Thomas L; Moos, Torben; Abbott, N Joan; Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Morten S

    2017-07-01

    Brain capillary endothelium mediates the exchange of nutrients between blood and brain parenchyma. This barrier function of the brain capillaries also limits passage of pharmaceuticals from blood to brain, which hinders treatment of several neurological disorders. Receptor-mediated transport has been suggested as a potential pharmaceutical delivery route across the brain endothelium, e.g. reports have shown that the transferrin receptor (TfR) facilitates transcytosis of TfR antibodies, but it is not known whether this recycling receptor itself traffics from apical to basal membrane in the process. Here, we elucidate the endosomal trafficking of the retrograde transported cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) in primary cultures of brain endothelial cells (BECs) of porcine and bovine origin. Receptor expression and localisation of MPR300 in the endo-lysosomal system and trafficking of internalised receptor are analysed. We also demonstrate that MPR300 can undergo bidirectional apical-basal trafficking in primary BECs in co-culture with astrocytes. This is, to our knowledge, the first detailed study of retrograde transported receptor trafficking in BECs, and the study demonstrates that MPR300 can be transported from the luminal to abluminal membrane and reverse. Such trafficking of MPR300 suggests that retrograde transported receptors in general may provide a mechanism for transport of pharmaceuticals into the brain.

  3. Calcium antagonists decrease capillary wall damage in aging hypertensive rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, E.; Jong, G.I. de; Apro, E.; Keuker, J.I.H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hypertension during aging is a serious threat to the cerebral vasculature. The larger brain arteries can react to hypertension with an abnormal wall thickening, a loss of elasticity and a narrowed lumen. However, little is known about the hypertension-induced alterations of cerebral capillaries. The present study describes ultrastructural alterations of the cerebrocortical capillary wall, such as thickening and collagen accumulation in the basement membrane of aging spontaneously hype...

  4. Circulating endothelial microparticles involved in lung function decline in a rat exposed in cigarette smoke maybe from apoptotic pulmonary capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Ding, Liang; Zhang, Yanju; Ni, Songshi

    2014-06-01

    Plasma levels of endothelial microparticles (EMPs), small membrane vesicles, shed from activated or apoptotic endothelial cells are elevated in patients with COPD and in smokers with normal lung function. Whether plasma EMPs levels are elevated in a rat exposed in cigarette smoke, whether the elevated EMPs derived from pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis, and the relationship between EMP and lung function are obscure. All 60 wister rats were divided into six groups, three groups of ten rats were exposed to cigarette smoke of ten non-filter cigarettes per day, 5 days a week, using a standard smoking machine (Beijing BeiLanBo Company, China) for a period of 2, 4 and 6 months (n=10, respectively). Age-matched three control groups were sham-smoked. Pulmonary function parameters, including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 0.3 second over forced vital capacity (FEV0.3/FVC) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn), were tested at the end of each period (2, 4, 6 months). Blood samples were collected and platelet-free plasma was isolated. Then CD42b-/CD31+ EMPs were analysed by flow cytometry. In parallel, lungs were removed and Colocalization with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL), Hoeschts and CD31 was performed to evaluate pulmonary capillaries-specific apoptosis and identify the origins of the EMPs. At 2, 4 and 6 months, in comparison with control groups, rats in cigarette smoke exposed groups had a significant increase in CD42b-/CD31+ EMPs (Pfunction indicated that FEV0.3/FVC (Pfunction in the rats exposed cigarette smoke. The increased EMPs may derive from pulmonary capillaries-specific apoptosis.

  5. Dabigatran abrogates brain endothelial cell permeability in response to thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brian Thomas; Gu, Yu-Huan; Izawa, Yoshikane; del Zoppo, Gregory John

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk and severity of thromboembolic stroke. Generally, antithrombotic agents increase the hemorrhagic risk of thromboembolic stroke. However, significant reductions in thromboembolism and intracerebral hemorrhage have been shown with the antithrombin dabigatran compared with warfarin. As thrombin has been implicated in microvessel injury during cerebral ischemia, we hypothesized that dabigatran decreases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage by direct inhibition of the thrombin-mediated increase in cerebral endothelial cell permeability. Primary murine brain endothelial cells (mBECs) were exposed to murine thrombin before measuring permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran. Thrombin increased mBEC permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, without significant endothelial cell death. Pretreatment of mBECs with dabigatran completely abrogated the effect of thrombin on permeability. Neither the expressions of the endothelial cell β1-integrins nor the tight junction protein claudin-5 were affected by thrombin exposure. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) also increased permeability; this effect was abrogated by treatment with dabigatran, as was the additive effect of thrombin and OGD on permeability. Taken together, these results indicate that dabigatran could contribute to a lower risk of intracerebral hemorrhage during embolism-associated ischemia from AF by protection of the microvessel permeability barrier from local thrombin challenge.

  6. Transcellular transport of CCL2 across brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shujun; Song, Li; Serwanski, David R; Kuziel, William A; Pachter, Joel S

    2008-03-01

    The means by which the chemokine CCL2 produced in the brain parenchyma can recruit leukocytes lying behind the highly impervious endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has remained a paradox. As other chemokines have been evidenced to stimulate their own synthesis and release by peripheral microvascular endothelial cells, and/or undergo transcytosis in the abluminal-to-luminal direction, we determined whether CCL2 experiences similar fates across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Using cultured BMEC as a paradigm of the BBB, it was observed that exogenous unlabeled CCL2 actually depressed the release of endogenous CCL2, and further caused diminished CCL2 mRNA levels in these cells. On the other hand, exogenous (125)I-labeled CCL2 exhibited transport across BMEC in a manner that was sensitive to temperature, competition by excess unlabeled CCL2 but not unlabeled CCL3, knockdown of caveolin-1/caveolae, and elimination of the cognate CCL2 receptor CCR2. These results implied a facet of CCL2 transport by a transcellular mechanism partly involving binding of CCL2 to CCR2, and subsequent transfer to caveolae vesicles for transcytosis. This notion was supported by double-label immuno-electronmicroscopy, which revealed co-localization of caveolin-1 with exogenous CCL2, during this chemokine's transit across BMEC. Collectively, these findings provide a rationale by which CCL2, deposited on the abluminal side of the brain microvasculature during inflammatory episodes, can be relayed across the BBB to foster leukocyte recruitment.

  7. 3D study of capillary network derived from human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated into endothelial cell with VEGFR2 protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Tahmasbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New blood forming vessels are produced by differentiation of mesodermal precursor cells to angioblasts that become endothelial cells (ECs which in turn give rise to primitive capillary network. Human cord blood (HCB contains large subsets of mononuclear cells (MNCs that can be differentiated into endothelial-like cells in vitro. Human mononuclear progenitor cells were purified from fresh umbilical cord blood by the expression of CD34 and FLK-1 antigens expressed in both angioblasts and hematopoetic stem cells. The HCB derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be differentiated into adipocyte, osteocyte, chondrocyte and ECs. In this study, the differentiation of human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hCBMSCs into endothelial-like cells was induced in the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1. The differentiated ECs were then examined for their ability to express VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2 and von Willebrand factor (vWF. These cells were adopted to grow, proliferate and develop into a capillary network in a semisolid gel matrix in vitro. The capillary network formation in each well of 24-well plate was found to be 80% in presence of VEGF (40 ng/ml and IGF-1 (20 ng/ml of culture media, suggesting that the capillary network formation is associated with endothelial-like cells derived from hCBMSCs by expression of their markers.

  8. Prokineticin receptor-1 is a new regulator of endothelial insulin uptake and capillary formation to control insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular and kidney functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormishian, Mojdeh; Turkeri, Gulen; Urayama, Kyoji; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Messaddeq, Nadia; Renault, Gilles; Henrion, Daniel; Nebigil, Canan G

    2013-10-23

    Reciprocal relationships between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance result in a vicious cycle of cardiovascular, renal, and metabolic disorders. The mechanisms underlying these impairments are unclear. The peptide hormones prokineticins exert their angiogenic function via prokineticin receptor-1 (PKR1). We explored the extent to which endothelial PKR1 contributes to expansion of capillary network and the transcapillary passage of insulin into the heart, kidney, and adipose tissues, regulating organ functions and metabolism in a specific mice model. By combining cellular studies and studies in endothelium-specific loss-of-function mouse model (ec-PKR1-/-), we showed that a genetically induced PKR1 loss in the endothelial cells causes the impaired capillary formation and transendothelial insulin delivery, leading to insulin resistance and cardiovascular and renal disorders. Impaired insulin delivery in endothelial cells accompanied with defective expression and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the ec-PKR1-/- aorta, consequently diminishing endothelium-dependent relaxation. Despite having a lean body phenotype, ec-PKR1-/- mice exhibited polyphagia, polydipsia, polyurinemia, and hyperinsulinemia, which are reminiscent of human lipodystrophy. High plasma free fatty acid levels and low leptin levels further contribute to the development of insulin resistance at the later age. Peripheral insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation in mutant skeletal muscle, heart, and kidneys were accompanied by impaired insulin-mediated Akt signaling in these organs. The ec-PKR1-/- mice displayed myocardial fibrosis, low levels of capillary formation, and high rates of apoptosis, leading to diastolic dysfunction. Compact fibrotic glomeruli and high levels of phosphate excretion were found in mutant kidneys. PKR1 restoration in ec-PKR1-/- mice reversed the decrease in capillary recruitment and insulin uptake and improved heart and kidney function and

  9. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  10. Lymphocyte subpopulations in high endothelial venules and lymphatic capillaries of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Y; Ito, Y; Magari, S

    1989-02-01

    The subpopulations of lymphocytes and non-lymphoid cells in high endothelial venules (HEV) and in lymphatic capillaries surrounding lymphoid follicles in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) were examined by electron microscopy after preembedding the tissue and staining with an immunoperoxidase technique. The results were compared with those obtained in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) reported previously. Monoclonal mouse-anti-rat T cell, IgG, IgM, IgA, and Ia antisera were used. Plasma cells that were reactive to anti-IgG, anti-IgM, and anti-IgA were detected as cells in which the 3',3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydroxychloride reaction product was localized in rough endoplasmic reticulum and perinuclear spaces but not on plasma membranes. These plasma cells did not occur in either lymphatic capillaries or HEV in BALT as they did in GALT. Cells with surface Ig (sIg cells), T-cell antigen (T cells), and Ia antigen (Ia cells) were present in BALT. T cells were located predominantly in the follicular area opposite the bronchial epithelium; IgM- and IgG-reactive cells were found in the follicular area adjacent to the bronchial epithelium; and IgA-positive cells were found in the lateral part of the area where the T cells were localized (T-cell area). Ia cells were abundant throughout BALT and in moderate numbers in the epithelium. A striking observation was the presence of "nurse-cell"-like structures in the periphery of BALT. The percentages of T, sIgG, sIgM, and sIgA cells in the HEV were 54.7%, 2.4%, 28.9%, and 27.3%, respectively, and in the lymphatic capillaries, 41.2%, 3.8%, 38.2%, and 21.2%, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on brain microvascular endothelial cells in rat ischemic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Siren, A L; Liu, Y; Yue, T L; Barone, F C; Feuerstein, G Z

    1994-10-01

    The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was studied in rat focal ischemic cortex. A significant increase in ICAM-1 mRNA expression in the ischemic cortex over levels in contralateral (nonischemic) site was observed by means of Northern blot analysis following either permanent or temporary occlusion with reperfusion of the middle cerebral artery (PMCAO or MCAO with reperfusion) in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In the ischemic cortex, levels of ICAM-1 mRNA increased significantly at 3 h (2.6-fold, n = 3, P hypertensive rats than in two normotensive rat strains. Immunostaining using anti-ICAM-1 antibodies indicated that upregulated ICAM-1 expression was localized to endothelial cells of intraparenchymal blood vessels in the ischemic but not contralateral cortex. The data suggest that an upregulation of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein on brain capillary endothelium may play an important role in leukocyte migration into ischemic brain tissue.

  12. Effects of Coix seed oil on human retinal capillary endothelial cells proliferation and VEGF expression in high glucose environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the effects of different concentrations of Coix seed oil on human retinal capillary endothelial cells(HRCECsproliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFexpression in high glucose environment.METHODS: HRCECs extracted from human fresher eyeball and cultured in vitro, and ultimately used in the experiment were the growth of 3rd~4th cells, the experimental were divided into blank control group, low glucose control group, high glucose control group, high glucose +(50μL/mL, 100μL/mL, 200μL/mLdifferent concentrations Coix seed oil group. Detecting the multiplication of HRCECs by MTT, the immunocytochemical method was employed to detect the each group HRCECs of VEGF expression.RESULTS:MTT assay results showed that: different concentrations of coix seed oil acted at HRCECs for 48h, inhibition of cell proliferation was significant difference compared with high glucose control group(PP>0.05. Immunocytochemical assay showed that: 50μL/mL, 100μL/mL, 200μL/mL Coix seed oil acted at HRCECs 48h, the expression of VEGF decreased significantly compared with the high glucose control group(PPCONCLUSION:Coix seed oil can inhibit the HRCECs proliferation and suppress the VEGF expression in high glucose environment.

  13. Effect of shear stress on iPSC-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Jackson G; Xu, Zinnia S; Williams, Ashley J; Yimam, Nahom; Searson, Peter C

    2017-08-04

    The endothelial cells that form the lumen of capillaries and microvessels are an important component of the blood-brain barrier. Cell phenotype is regulated by transducing a range of biomechanical and biochemical signals in the local microenvironment. Here we report on the role of shear stress in modulating the morphology, motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and protein and gene expression, of confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. To assess the response of derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs) to shear stress, confluent monolayers were formed in a microfluidic device. Monolayers were subjected to a shear stress of 4 or 12 dyne cm -2 for 40 h. Static conditions were used as the control. Live cell imaging was used to assess cell morphology, cell speed, persistence, and the rates of proliferation and apoptosis as a function of time. In addition, immunofluorescence imaging and protein and gene expression analysis of key markers of the blood-brain barrier were performed. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells exhibit a unique phenotype in response to shear stress compared to static conditions: (1) they do not elongate and align, (2) the rates of proliferation and apoptosis decrease significantly, (3) the mean displacement of individual cells within the monolayer over time is significantly decreased, (4) there is no cytoskeletal reorganization or formation of stress fibers within the cell, and (5) there is no change in expression levels of key blood-brain barrier markers. The characteristic response of dhBMECs to shear stress is significantly different from human and animal-derived endothelial cells from other tissues, suggesting that this unique phenotype that may be important in maintenance of the blood-brain barrier. The implications of this work are that: (1) in confluent monolayers of dhBMECs, tight junctions are formed under static conditions, (2) the formation

  14. Site-specific and endothelial-mediated dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary barrier in response to lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janga, Harshavardhan; Cassidy, Liam; Wang, Fanlu; Spengler, Dietmar; Oestern-Fitschen, Stefanie; Krause, Martin F; Seekamp, Andreas; Tholey, Andreas; Fuchs, Sabine

    2017-12-05

    Infectious agents such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge the functional properties of the alveolar-capillary barrier (ACB) in the lung. In this study, we analyse the site-specific effects of LPS on the ACB and reveal the effects on the individual cell types and the ACB as a functional unit. Monocultures of H441 epithelial cells and co-cultures of H441 with endothelial cells cultured on Transwells® were treated with LPS from the apical or basolateral compartment. Barrier properties were analysed by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), by transport assays, and immunostaining and assessment of tight junctional molecules at protein level. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune-modulatory molecules were evaluated by ELISA and semiquantitative real-time PCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics (LS-MS) was used to identify proteins and effector molecules secreted by endothelial cells in response to LPS. In co-cultures treated with LPS from the basolateral compartment, we noticed a significant reduction of TEER, increased permeability and induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conversely, apical treatment did not affect the barrier. No changes were noticed in H441 monoculture upon LPS treatment. However, LPS resulted in an increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 in OEC and in turn induced the reduction of TEER and an increase in SP-A expression in H441 monoculture, and H441/OEC co-cultures after LPS treatment from basolateral compartment. LS-MS-based proteomics revealed factors associated with LPS-mediated lung injury such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, Angiopoietin 2, complement factors and cathepsin S, emphasizing the role of epithelial-endothelial crosstalk in the ACB in ALI/ARDS. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  15. Tesmilifene modifies brain endothelial functions and opens the blood-brain/blood-glioma barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fruzsina R; Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Péterfi, Zoltán A; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Cervenak, László; Ábrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2015-09-01

    Tesmilifene, a tamoxifen analog with antihistamine action, has chemopotentiating properties in experimental and clinical cancer studies. In our previous works, tesmilifene increased the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in animal and culture models. Our aim was to investigate the effects of tesmilifene on brain microvessel permeability in the rat RG2 glioma model and to reveal its mode of action in brain endothelial cells. Tesmilifene significantly increased fluorescein extravasation in the glioma. Short-term treatment with tesmilifene reduced the resistance and increased the permeability for marker molecules in a rat triple co-culture BBB model. Tesmilifene also affected the barrier integrity in brain endothelial cells co-cultured with RG2 glioblastoma cells. Tesmilifene inhibited the activity of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 efflux pumps and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, efflux pumps, solute carriers, and metabolic enzymes important for BBB functions. Among the possible signaling pathways that regulate BBB permeability, tesmilifene activated the early nuclear translocation of NFκB. The MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt kinase pathways were also involved. We demonstrate for the first time that tesmilifene increases permeability marker molecule extravasation in glioma and inhibits efflux pump activity in brain endothelial cells, which may have therapeutic relevance. Tesmilifene, a chemopotentiator in experimental and clinical cancer studies increases vascular permeability in RG2 glioma in rats and permeability for marker molecules in a culture model of the blood-brain barrier. Tesmilifene inhibits the activity of efflux pumps and down-regulates the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, transporters, and metabolic enzymes important for the blood-brain barrier functions, which may have therapeutic relevance. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Shear Stress Inhibits Apoptosis of Ischemic Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiafeng Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke, to restore or increase cerebral blood flow (CBF is the most fundamental option. Laminar shear stress (LS, as an important force generated by CBF, mainly acts on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. In order to study whether LS was a protective factor in stroke, we investigated LS-intervented ischemic apoptosis of rat BMECs (rBMECs through PE Annexin V/7-AAD, JC-1 and Hoechst 33258 staining to observe the membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear dysfunction. Real-time PCR and western blot were also used to test the gene and protein expressions of Tie-2, Bcl-2 and Akt, which were respectively related to maintain membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear norm. The results showed that LS could be a helpful stimulus for ischemic rBMECs survival. Simultaneously, membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear regulation played an important role in this process.

  17. Prokineticin Receptor‐1 Is a New Regulator of Endothelial Insulin Uptake and Capillary Formation to Control Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular and Kidney Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormishian, Mojdeh; Turkeri, Gulen; Urayama, Kyoji; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Messaddeq, Nadia; Renault, Gilles; Henrion, Daniel; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Reciprocal relationships between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance result in a vicious cycle of cardiovascular, renal, and metabolic disorders. The mechanisms underlying these impairments are unclear. The peptide hormones prokineticins exert their angiogenic function via prokineticin receptor‐1 (PKR1). We explored the extent to which endothelial PKR1 contributes to expansion of capillary network and the transcapillary passage of insulin into the heart, kidney, and adipose tissues, regulating organ functions and metabolism in a specific mice model. Methods and Results By combining cellular studies and studies in endothelium‐specific loss‐of‐function mouse model (ec‐PKR1−/−), we showed that a genetically induced PKR1 loss in the endothelial cells causes the impaired capillary formation and transendothelial insulin delivery, leading to insulin resistance and cardiovascular and renal disorders. Impaired insulin delivery in endothelial cells accompanied with defective expression and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the ec‐PKR1−/− aorta, consequently diminishing endothelium‐dependent relaxation. Despite having a lean body phenotype, ec‐PKR1−/− mice exhibited polyphagia, polydipsia, polyurinemia, and hyperinsulinemia, which are reminiscent of human lipodystrophy. High plasma free fatty acid levels and low leptin levels further contribute to the development of insulin resistance at the later age. Peripheral insulin resistance and ectopic lipid accumulation in mutant skeletal muscle, heart, and kidneys were accompanied by impaired insulin‐mediated Akt signaling in these organs. The ec‐PKR1−/− mice displayed myocardial fibrosis, low levels of capillary formation, and high rates of apoptosis, leading to diastolic dysfunction. Compact fibrotic glomeruli and high levels of phosphate excretion were found in mutant kidneys. PKR1 restoration in ec‐PKR1−/− mice reversed the decrease in capillary

  18. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  19. Collecting peptide release from the brain using porous polymer monolith-based solid phase extraction capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Jamie M.; Ren, Shifang; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Porous polymer monolithic (PPM) columns are employed to collect and concentrate neuronal release from invertebrate and vertebrate model systems, prior to their characterization with mass spectrometry. The monoliths are fabricated in fused silica capillaries from lauryl methacrylate (LMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA). The binding capacities for fluorescein and for fluorescently labeled peptides are on the order of nanomoles per millimeter length of monolith material for a 200 μm inner diameter capillary. To evaluate this strategy for collecting peptides from physiological solutions, angiotensin I and insulin in artificial seawater are loaded onto, and then released from the monoliths after a desalination rinse, resulting in femtomole limits of detection via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Positioned in the extracellular media near Aplysia californica bag cell neurons, upon electrical stimulation, these LMA-EDMA monoliths are also used to collect and concentrate peptide release, with egg laying hormone and acidic peptide detected. In addition, the collection of several known peptides secreted from chemically stimulated mouse brain slices demonstrates their ability to collect releasates from a variety of neuronal tissues. When compared to collection approaches using individual beads placed on brain slices, the PPM capillaries offer greater binding capacity. Moreover, they maintain higher spatial resolution as compared to the larger-volume, solid phase extraction collection strategies. PMID:19485405

  20. Calcium antagonists decrease capillary wall damage in aging hypertensive rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, E; De Jong, G I; Apró, E; Keuker, J I; Luiten, P G

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hypertension during aging is a serious threat to the cerebral vasculature. The larger brain arteries can react to hypertension with an abnormal wall thickening, a loss of elasticity and a narrowed lumen. However, little is known about the hypertension-induced alterations of cerebral capillaries. The present study describes ultrastructural alterations of the cerebrocortical capillary wall, such as thickening and collagen accumulation in the basement membrane of aging spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats. The ratio of cortical capillaries with such vascular pathology occurred significantly more frequently in hypertensive animals. Nimodipine and nifedipine are potential drugs to decrease blood pressure in hypertension but their beneficial effects in experimental studies reach beyond the control of blood pressure. Nimodipine and nifedipine can alleviate ischemia-related symptoms and improve cognition. These drugs differ in that nifedipine, but not nimodipine reduces blood pressure at the here-used concentration while both drugs can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Here we show that chronic treatment of aging hypertensive stroke-prone rats with nimodipine or nifedipine could preserve microvascular integrity in the cerebral cortex.

  1. The NR1 subunit of NMDA receptor regulates monocyte transmigration through the brain endothelial cell barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijerkerk, A.; Kooij, G.; van der Pol, S.M.A.; Leyen, T.A.; Lakeman, K.; Van Het Hof, B; Vivien, D.; de Vries, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Normal neuronal functioning is dependent on the blood-brain barrier. This barrier is confined to specialized brain endothelial cells lining the inner vessel wall, and tightly controlling transport of nutrients, efflux of potentially harmful molecules and entry of immune cells into the brain. Loss of

  2. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

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    Megan C. Mladinich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59 persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs, without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7, IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread.

  4. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladinich, Megan C.; Schwedes, John

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC) lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59) persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs), without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α) and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread. PMID:28698279

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate augments blood-brain barrier and tight junction protein expression in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2017-08-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) between brain endothelial cells are essential for formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although loss of BBB integrity is associated with several neuropathological disorders, treatments that augment or stabilise the BBB are scarce. Here we show that physiological concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) stimulate the expression of the TJ proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-3 in the brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 and promote TJ formation between neighbouring cells, demonstrated by augmented transendothelial resistance across cell monolayers. Silencing androgen receptor expression by siRNA does not prevent DHEAS-induced stimulation of ZO-1 expression, indicating that conversion of DHEAS into testosterone is not required for its actions. Suppression of Gnα11 expression by siRNA prevents DHEAS actions, pointing towards a G-protein-coupled receptor as being a mediator of the DHEAS effects. These results are consistent with the idea that DHEAS, acting as a hormone in its own right, supports the integrity of the BBB. The current findings might help in developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders associated with BBB defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuropilin-1 modulates interferon-γ-stimulated signaling in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Cao, Ying; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Guo, Yong; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Atanga, Pascal Aliihnui; Clarkson, Benjamin D; Zhang, Yuebo; Wang, Enfeng; Angom, Ramcharan Singh; Dutta, Kirthica; Ji, Baoan; Pirko, Istvan; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Howe, Charles L; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-10-15

    Inflammatory response of blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells plays an important role in pathogenesis of many central nervous system inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis; however, the molecular mechanism mediating BBB endothelial cell inflammatory response remains unclear. In this study, we first observed that knockdown of neuropilin-1 (NRP1), a co-receptor of several structurally diverse ligands, suppressed interferon-γ (IFNγ)-induced C-X-C motif chemokine 10 expression and activation of STAT1 in brain microvascular endothelial cells in a Rac1-dependent manner. Moreover, endothelial-specific NRP1-knockout mice, VECadherin-Cre-ERT2/NRP1flox/flox mice, showed attenuated disease progression during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse neuroinflammatory disease model. Detailed analysis utilizing histological staining, quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that deletion of endothelial NRP1 suppressed neuron demyelination, altered lymphocyte infiltration, preserved BBB function and decreased activation of the STAT1-CXCL10 pathway. Furthermore, increased expression of NRP1 was observed in endothelial cells of acute multiple sclerosis lesions. Our data identify a new molecular mechanism of brain microvascular endothelial inflammatory response through NRP1-IFNγ crosstalk that could be a potential target for intervention of endothelial cell dysfunction in neuroinflammatory diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Initial contact of glioblastoma cells with existing normal brain endothelial cells strengthen the barrier function via fibroblast growth factor 2 secretion: a new in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Ujifuku, Kenta; Kamada, Kensaku; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Niwa, Masami

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells invade along the existing normal capillaries in brain. Normal capillary endothelial cells function as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that limits permeability of chemicals into the brain. To investigate whether GBM cells modulate the BBB function of normal endothelial cells, we developed a new in vitro BBB model with primary cultures of rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs), pericytes, and astrocytes. Cells were plated on a membrane with 8 μm pores, either as a monolayer or as a BBB model with triple layer culture. The BBB model consisted of RBEC on the luminal side as a bottom, and pericytes and astrocytes on the abluminal side as a top of the chamber. Human GBM cell line, LN-18 cells, or lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299 cells, placed on either the RBEC monolayer or the BBB model increased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values against the model, which peaked within 72 h after the tumor cell application. The TEER value gradually returned to baseline with LN-18 cells, whereas the value quickly dropped to the baseline in 24 h with NCI-H1299 cells. NCI-H1299 cells invaded into the RBEC layer through the membrane, but LN-18 cells did not. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) strengthens the endothelial cell BBB function by increased occludin and ZO-1 expression. In our model, LN-18 and NCI-H1299 cells secreted FGF-2, and a neutralization antibody to FGF-2 inhibited LN-18 cells enhanced BBB function. These results suggest that FGF-2 would be a novel therapeutic target for GBM in the perivascular invasive front.

  8. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  9. Immune-induced fever is mediated by IL-6 receptors on brain endothelial cells coupled to STAT3-dependent induction of brain endothelial prostaglandin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskilsson, Anna; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Dufour, Sylvie; Schwaninger, Markus; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2014-11-26

    The cytokine IL-6, which is released upon peripheral immune challenge, is critical for the febrile response, but the mechanism by which IL-6 is pyrogenic has remained obscure. Here we generated mice with deletion of the membrane bound IL-6 receptor α (IL-6Rα) on neural cells, on peripheral nerves, on fine sensory afferent fibers, and on brain endothelial cells, respectively, and examined its role for the febrile response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide. We show that IL-6Rα on neural cells, peripheral nerves, and fine sensory afferents are dispensable for the lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, whereas IL-6Rα in the brain endothelium plays an important role. Hence deletion of IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells strongly attenuated the febrile response, and also led to reduced induction of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme Cox-2 in the hypothalamus, the temperature-regulating center in the brain, as well as reduced expression of SOCS3, suggesting involvement of the STAT signaling pathway. Furthermore, deletion of STAT3 in the brain endothelium also resulted in attenuated fever. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6Rα on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells, probably in concerted action with other peripherally released cytokines. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415957-05$15.00/0.

  10. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  11. Generation of primary cultures of bovine brain endothelial cells and setup of cocultures with rat astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans C; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are useful tools to study blood-brain barrier function as well as drug permeation from the systemic circulation to the brain parenchyma. However, a large number of the available in vitro models fail to reflect the tightness of the in vivo blood-brain...... barrier. The present protocol describes the setup of an in vitro coculture model based on primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. The model displays a high electrical tightness and expresses blood-brain barrier marker proteins....

  12. Low density lipoprotein inhibits accumulation of nitrites in murine brain endothelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, M; Bereta, J; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1992-07-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide which is considered to serve as a major source of endothelial derived relaxing factor activity. It has been demonstrated that activation of mouse brain endothelium by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma led to accumulation of nitrite which is presumably formed by oxidation of nitric oxide. A number of studies suggest that reactive oxygen species produced by cytokine-activated cells are involved in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrites and nitrates. We investigated whether low density lipoprotein (LDL), acting as a radical scavenger, is able to inhibit nitrite accumulation in mouse brain endothelial cell cultures and in a cell-free system in which sodium nitroprusside was used as a source of nitric oxide. A comparison of these two models indicates the active involvement of LDL in suppressing nitrite accumulation in murine endothelial cultures.

  13. Higher vascular endothelial growth factor-C concentration in plasma is associated with increased forearm capillary filtration capacity in breast cancer-related lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Simonsen, Lene; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2015-01-01

    shown that the forearm capillary filtration coefficient (CFC) is increased bilaterally in BCRL. In this study, we aimed to elucidate if increased CFC is associated with low-grade inflammation and/or vascular endothelial growth factor-c (VEGF-C) signaling. Fourteen patients with unilateral BCRL and nine......Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a frequent, chronic and debilitating swelling that mainly affects the ipsilateral arm and develops as a complication to breast cancer treatment. The pathophysiology is elusive opposing development of means for prediction and treatment. We have earlier...... increased forearm CFC in BCRL subjects. Interstitially increased MCP-1 levels may augment local microvascular protein permeability in BCRL....

  14. CXCL1 can be regulated by IL-6 and promotes granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries during bacterial toxin exposure and encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Monica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocytes generally exert protective roles in the central nervous system (CNS, but recent studies suggest that they can be detrimental in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the most common model of multiple sclerosis. While the cytokines and adhesion molecules involved in granulocyte adhesion to the brain vasculature have started to be elucidated, the required chemokines remain undetermined. Methods CXCR2 ligand expression was examined in the CNS of mice suffering from EAE or exposed to bacterial toxins by quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. CXCL1 expression was analyzed in IL-6-treated endothelial cell cultures by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Granulocytes were counted in the brain vasculature after treatment with a neutralizing anti-CXCL1 antibody using stereological techniques. Results CXCL1 was the most highly expressed ligand of the granulocyte receptor CXCR2 in the CNS of mice subjected to EAE or infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or pertussis toxin (PTX, the latter being commonly used to induce EAE. IL-6 upregulated CXCL1 expression in brain endothelial cells by acting transcriptionally and mediated the stimulatory effect of PTX on CXCL1 expression. The anti-CXCL1 antibody reduced granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries in the three conditions under study. Importantly, it attenuated EAE severity when given daily for a week during the effector phase of the disease. Conclusions This study identifies CXCL1 not only as a key regulator of granulocyte recruitment into the CNS, but also as a new potential target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  15. Normal saline influences coagulation and endothelial function after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. These insults disrupt coagulation and endothelial systems. This study investigated whether previously reported differences in lesion size and brain swelling during normal saline (NS......), colloids (Hextend [HEX]), and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation are associated with differential effects on coagulation and endothelial systems. METHODS: We subjected 15 Yorkshire swine to TBI and HS (40% blood volume), and kept in HS for 2 hours before resuscitation with NS, HEX, or FFP. Markers...... of endothelial activation (E-selectin, Intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1), coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment 1 + 2), and natural anticoagulation (activated protein C [aPC]) were determined in serum and brain whole cell lysates. RESULTS: Serum levels of aPC were greater in the NS group (203 ± 30...

  16. Glioblastoma cell-secreted interleukin-8 induces brain endothelial cell permeability via CXCR2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dwyer

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma constitutes the most aggressive and deadly of brain tumors. As yet, both conventional and molecular-based therapies have met with limited success in treatment of this cancer. Among other explanations, the heterogeneity of glioblastoma and the associated microenvironment contribute to its development, as well as resistance and recurrence in response to treatments. Increased vascularity suggests that tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in glioblastoma progression. However, the molecular crosstalk between endothelial and glioblastoma cells requires further investigation. To examine the effects of glioblastoma-derived signals on endothelial homeostasis, glioblastoma cell secretions were collected and used to treat brain endothelial cells. Here, we present evidence that the glioblastoma secretome provides pro-angiogenic signals sufficient to disrupt VE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions and promote endothelial permeability in brain microvascular endothelial cells. An unbiased angiogenesis-specific antibody array screen identified the chemokine, interleukin-8, which was further demonstrated to function as a key factor involved in glioblastoma-induced permeability, mediated through its receptor CXCR2 on brain endothelia. This underappreciated interface between glioblastoma cells and associated endothelium may inspire the development of novel therapeutic strategies to induce tumor regression by preventing vascular permeability and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  17. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

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    Haqqani Arsalan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes. Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially

  18. Interleukin 2 Activates Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Resulting in Destabilization of Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hawiger, Jacek

    2016-10-28

    The pleiotropic cytokine interleukin 2 (IL2) disrupts the blood-brain barrier and alters brain microcirculation, underlying vascular leak syndrome that complicates cancer immunotherapy with IL2. The microvascular effects of IL2 also play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological disorders. The mechanism of IL2-induced disruption of brain microcirculation has not been determined previously. We found that both human and murine brain microvascular endothelial cells express constituents of the IL2 receptor complex. Then we established that signaling through this receptor complex leads to activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB, resulting in expression of proinflammatory interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. We also discovered that IL2 induces disruption of adherens junctions, concomitant with cytoskeletal reorganization, ultimately leading to increased endothelial cell permeability. IL2-induced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a constituent of adherens junctions, leads to dissociation of its stabilizing adaptor partners, p120-catenin and β-catenin. Increased phosphorylation of VE-cadherin was also accompanied by a reduction of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2, known to maintain vascular barrier function. These results unravel the mechanism of deleterious effects induced by IL2 on brain microvascular endothelial cells and may inform the development of new measures to improve IL2 cancer immunotherapy, as well as treatments for autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Iron uptake and transport at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    The mechanism by which iron is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial, and in this study we aimed to further clarify mechanisms by which iron is transported into the brain. We analyzed and compared the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of proteins involved...... in the transport of iron (transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter I (DMT1), steap 2, steap 3, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and ferroportin) in both primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) and immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (RBE4) grown in co-culture with defined polarity....... The mRNA expression of the iron-related molecules was also investigated in isolated brain capillaries from iron deficiency, iron reversible and normal rats. We also performed iron transport studies to analyze the routes by which iron is transported through the brain capillary endothelial cells: i) We...

  20. Organization of Endothelial Cells, Pericytes, and Astrocytes into a 3D Microfluidic in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jack D; Khafagy, El-Sayed; Khanafer, Khalil; Takayama, Shuichi; ElSayed, Mohamed E H

    2016-03-07

    The endothelial cells lining the capillaries supplying the brain with oxygen and nutrients form a formidable barrier known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which exhibits selective permeability to small drug molecules and virtually impermeable to macromolecular therapeutics. Current in vitro BBB models fail to replicate this restrictive behavior due to poor integration of the endothelial cells with supporting cells (pericytes and astrocytes) following the correct anatomical organization observed in vivo. We report the coculture of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (b.End3), pericytes, with/without C8-D1A astrocytes in layered microfluidic channels forming three-dimensional (3D) bi- and triculture models of the BBB. The live/dead assay indicated high viability of all cultured cells up to 21 days. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values confirmed the formation of intact monolayers after 3 days in culture and showed statistically higher values for the triculture model compared to the single and biculture models. Screening the permeability of [(14)C]-mannitol and [(14)C]-urea showed the ability of bi- and triculture models to discriminate between different markers based on their size. Further, permeability of [(14)C]-mannitol across the triculture model after 18 days in culture matched its reported permeability across the BBB in vivo. Mathematical calculations also showed that the radius of the tight junctions pores (R) in the triculture model is similar to the reported diameter of the BBB in vivo. Finally, both the bi- and triculture models exhibited functional expression of the P-glycoprotein efflux pump, which increased with the increase in the number of days in culture. These results collectively indicate that the triculture model is a robust in vitro model of the BBB.

  1. Early gene response of human brain endothelial cells to Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to Listeria monocytogenes at 4 hour infection was analyzed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 456 genes of HBMEC had changed (p<0.05). We noted that many active genes were involved in the formyl-methionylleucylph...

  2. Brain endothelial cells control fertility through ovarian-steroid-dependent release of semaphorin 3A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacobini, Paolo; Parkash, Jyoti; Campagne, Céline; Messina, Andrea; Casoni, Filippo; Vanacker, Charlotte; Langlet, Fanny; Hobo, Barbara; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Gallet, Sarah; Hanchate, Naresh Kumar; Mazur, Danièle; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Verhaagen, J.; Ciofi, Philippe; Bouret, Sébastien G; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent

    Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) guides the development of the nervous and vascular systems, but its role in the mature brain remains to be explored. Here we report that the expression of the 65 kDa isoform of Sema3A, the ligand of Nrp1, by adult vascular endothelial cells, is regulated during the ovarian cycle

  3. Zika Virus Infects, Activates, and Crosses Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells, without Barrier Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P. Papa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has been associated to central nervous system (CNS harm, and virus was detected in the brain and cerebrospinal fluids of microcephaly and meningoencephalitis cases. However, the mechanism by which the virus reaches the CNS is unclear. Here, we addressed the effects of ZIKV replication in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, as an in vitro model of blood brain barrier (BBB, and evaluated virus extravasation and BBB integrity in an in vivo mouse experimental model. HBMECs were productively infected by African and Brazilian ZIKV strains (ZIKVMR766 and ZIKVPE243, which induce increased production of type I and type III IFN, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infection with ZIKVMR766 promoted earlier cellular death, in comparison to ZIKVPE243, but infection with either strain did not result in enhanced endothelial permeability. Despite the maintenance of endothelial integrity, infectious virus particles crossed the monolayer by endocytosis/exocytosis-dependent replication pathway or by transcytosis. Remarkably, both viruses' strains infected IFNAR deficient mice, with high viral load being detected in the brains, without BBB disruption, which was only detected at later time points after infection. These data suggest that ZIKV infects and activates endothelial cells, and might reach the CNS through basolateral release, transcytosis or transinfection processes. These findings further improve the current knowledge regarding ZIKV dissemination pathways.

  4. Acute hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia enhance vasodilatation in type 1 diabetes mellitus without increasing capillary permeability and inducing endothelial dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, GD; Dullaart, RPF; Smit, AJ

    Uncomplicated Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is characterized by generalized vasodilatation. Its possible correlates, increased microvascular permeability and endothelial dysfunction, have been associated with long-term complications. The objective was to study the effects of acute

  5. Peptide derived from HIV-1 TAT protein destabilizes a monolayer of endothelial cells in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier and allows permeation of high molecular weight proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Itzik; Sasson, Keren; Teichberg, Vivian I; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Fridkin, Mati; Shechter, Yoram

    2012-12-28

    Most chemotherapeutic agents are blood-brain barrier (BBB) impermeants. HIV-1-derived TAT protein variants contain a transmembrane domain, which may enable them to cross the BBB and reach the brain. Here we synthesized CAYGRKKRRQRRR, a peptide containing a cysteine moiety attached to the N terminus of the transmembrane domain (C-TAT peptide), and studied its effects in an in vitro BBB model, which we found to reflect penetration by a receptor-independent pathway. Incubation of the brain capillary endothelial cell monolayer with 0.3-0.6 μmol/ml of this C-TAT peptide, for a period of 1-2 h, destabilizes brain capillary endothelial cell monolayer and introduces the ability of impermeant therapeutic agents including high molecular weight proteins to penetrate it substantially. The cysteinyl moiety at position 1 of the C-TAT peptide contributes largely to the destabilizing potency and the penetration efficacy of impermeant substances. The destabilizing effect was reversed using heparin. In summary, experimental conditions allowing a significant increase in entry of impermeant low and high molecular weight substances from the luminal (blood) to the abluminal side (brain) were found in an in vitro BBB model reflecting in vivo protein penetrability by a receptor-independent pathway.

  6. C5a induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in brain vascular endothelial cells in experimental lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Tutino, Vincent M; Redae, Yonas; Meng, Hui; Siddiqui, Adnan; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Hennon, Teresa; Schwartz, Stanley; Quigg, Richard J; Alexander, Jessy J

    2016-08-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction complicates central nervous system lupus, an important aspect of systemic lupus erythematosus. To gain insight into the underlying mechanism, vascular corrosion casts of brain were generated from the lupus mouse model, MRL/lpr mice and the MRL/MpJ congenic controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the casts showed loss of vascular endothelial cells in lupus mice compared with controls. Immunostaining revealed a significant increase in caspase 3 expression in the brain vascular endothelial cells, which suggests that apoptosis could be an important mechanism causing cell loss, and thereby loss of BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in lupus resulting in increased generation of circulating C5a, which caused the endothelial layer to become 'leaky'. In this study, we show that C5a and lupus serum induced apoptosis in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVECs), whereas selective C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) antagonist reduced apoptosis in these cells, demonstrating C5a/C5aR1-dependence. Gene expression of initiator caspases, caspase 1 and caspase 8, and pro-apoptotic proteins death-associated protein kinase 1, Fas-associated protein (FADD), cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor 45 000 MW subunit A-like effector B (CIDEB) and BCL2-associated X protein were increased in HBMVECs treated with lupus serum or C5a, indicating that both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways could be critical mediators of brain endothelial cell apoptosis in this setting. Overall, our findings suggest that C5a/C5aR1 signalling induces apoptosis through activation of FADD, caspase 8/3 and CIDEB in brain endothelial cells in lupus. Further elucidation of the underlying apoptotic mechanisms mediating the reduced endothelial cell number is important in establishing the potential therapeutic effectiveness of C5aR1 inhibition that could prevent and/or reduce BBB alterations and preserve the physiological function of BBB in

  7. Transcriptional Profile of HIV-induced Nuclear Translocation of Amyloid β in Brain Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    András, Ibolya E.; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Increased amyloid deposition in HIV-infected brains may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. We have previously shown that exposure to HIV results in enhanced amyloid β (Aβ) levels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, suggesting that brain endothelial cells contribute to accumulation of Aβ in HIV-infected brains. Importantly, Aβ not only accumulates in the cytoplasm of HIV-exposed cells but also enters the nuclei of brain endothelial cells. Methods cDNA microarray analysis was performed in order to examine changes in the transcriptional profile associated with Aβ nuclear entry in the presence of HIV-1. Results Gene network analysis indicated that inhibition of nuclear entry of Aβ resulted in enrichment in gene sets involved in apoptosis and survival, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, immune response, cell cycle, DNA damage, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton remodeling and transforming growth factor b (TGFβ) receptor signaling. Conclusions The obtained data indicate that HIV-induced Aβ nuclear uptake affects several cellular stress-related pathways relevant for HIV-induced Aβ pathology. PMID:25446617

  8. Murine brain endothelial cells differently modulate interferon-γ and interleukin-17 production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Miljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain endothelial cells (BEC are the major constituents of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, the structure that controls entrance of immune cells into CNS parenchyma. Our aim was to investigate the influence of BEC on production of IL-17 and IFN-γ-cytokines that are important for CNS inflammation. To that end, co-cultivations of the bEnd.3 brain endothelial cell line and lymph node cells (LNC were performed, and gene expression and production of IL-17 and IFN-γ were determined. It was found that bEnd.3 cells inhibited expression and production of IFN-γ, but not of IL-17. Additionally, bEnd.3 cells also reduced production of the major IFN-γ-promoting cytokine - IL-12 - in LNC. The observed variation in modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by BEC could be of importance for the understanding of CNS inflammation.

  9. PINK1 and its familial Parkinson's disease-associated mutation regulate brain vascular endothelial inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunfu, Wang; Guangjian, Liu; Ping, Zhong; Yanpeng, Sun; Xiaoxia, Fang; Wei, Hu; Jiang, Yuan; Jingquan, Hu; Songlin, Wang; Hongyan, Zhang; Yong, Liu; Shi, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating disorder that affects movement. Inflammation-mediated endothelial dysfunction has been found to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. More than 40 PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) mutations have been found in PD patients. The effects of PINK1 in vascular inflammation are as yet unknown. In this study, our findings revealed that PINK1 can be increased by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). We found that wild-type PINK1 prevents expression of the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), thus inhibiting the attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. However, PINK1G309D, the loss-of-function mutation associated with early-onset familial PD, promotes expression of VCAM-1 and exacerbates attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. Mechanism studies revealed that overexpression of wild-type PINK1 inhibits the VCAM-1 promoter by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1). However, PINK1G309D promotes the VCAM-1 promoter by increasing the transcriptional activity of IRF-1.

  10. A simple method for isolating and culturing the rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Qiang; Tang, Qing; Hou, Min; Qi, Hongyi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jifen; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), a main component of the blood-brain barrier, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of many brain diseases. The primary culture of BMECs has been used in various models for studying cerebrovascular diseases in vitro. However, there are still several problems existing in the isolation and cultivation of primary rat BMECs, such as low yield, contamination with other cell types, and requirement of a large number of animals and expensive growth factor. In this study, we describe a simple, economical (without any growth factor) and repeatable method to obtain endothelial cells with high purity (>99%) and yield (about 2.2×10(7) per rat) from cerebral cortexes of neonatal rat, mainly from gray matter. In vitro examinations determined that the isolated cells expressed typical phenotypic markers of differentiated brain endothelium such as multiple drug resistant protein, von Willebrand factor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31), and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). These cells also possessed morphological and ultra-structural characteristics that were observed by phase contrast microscope and electric microscope. Then GFAP and α-SMA were used, respectively, to identify astrocyte and pericyte which were potential to contaminate primary culturing of BMECs. And specific reaction of endothelial cells to external stimulation was tested by culture with TNF-α for 24h. All these results of our experiments supply that our protocol provides an effective and reliable method to obtain high purity and yield of rat BMECs and offers a useful tool for studying cellular physiology, cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, blood-brain barrier and neurovascular units, etc. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA to Inhibit Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Zebrafish Using Natural Brain Endothelia Cell-Secreted Exosome Nanovesicles for the Treatment of Brain Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Fogarty, Brittany; LaForge, Bret; Aziz, Salma; Pham, Thuy; Lai, Leanne; Bai, Shuhua

    2017-03-01

    Although small interfering RNA (siRNA) holds great therapeutic promise, its delivery to the disease site remains a paramount obstacle. In this study, we tested whether brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could deliver siRNA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in zebrafish. Natural exosomes were isolated from brain endothelial bEND.3 cell culture media and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) siRNA was loaded in exosomes with the assistance of a transfection reagent. While fluorescence-activated cell flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry staining studies indicated that wild-type exosomes significantly increased the uptake of fluorescence-labeled siRNA in the autologous brain endothelial cells, decreased fluorescence intensity was observed in the cells treated with the tetraspanin CD63 antibody-blocked exosome-delivered formulation (p brain endothelial bEND.3 cell and astrocyte. Inhibition at the expression of VEGF RNA and protein levels was observed in glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG cells treated with exosome-delivered siRNAs. Imaging results showed that exosome delivered more siRNAs across the BBB in Tg(fli1:GFP) zebrafish. In a xenotransplanted brain tumor model, exosome-delivered VEGF siRNAs decreased the fluorescence intensity of labeled cancer cells in the brain of zebrafish. Brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could be potentially used as a natural carrier for the brain delivery of exogenous siRNA.

  12. Mechanisms of modulation of brain microvascular endothelial cells function by thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Shipsky, Megan M; Yan, Guang; Abood, Mary E; Brailoiu, G Cristina

    2017-02-15

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the blood-brain barrier. They form a tight monolayer which is essential for maintaining the brain homeostasis. Blood-derived proteases such as thrombin may enter the brain during pathological conditions like trauma, stroke, and inflammation and further disrupts the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, via incompletely characterized mechanisms. We examined the underlying mechanisms evoked by thrombin in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Our results indicate that thrombin, acting on protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in RBMVEC via Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular space. Thrombin increases nitric oxide production; the effect is abolished by inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase or by antagonism of PAR1 receptors. In addition, thrombin increases mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species production via PAR1-dependent mechanisms. Immunocytochemistry studies indicate that thrombin increases F-actin stress fibers, and disrupts the tight junctions. Thrombin increased the RBMVEC permeability assessed by a fluorescent flux assay. Taken together, our results indicate multiple mechanisms by which thrombin modulates the function of RBMVEC and may contribute to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inflammation-induced brain endothelial activation leads to uptake of electrostatically stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles via sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Dominique; Millward, Jason M; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Stangl, Verena; Paul, Friedemann; Wagner, Susanne; Wuerfel, Jens T; Sack, Ingolf; Ludwig, Antje; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2017-05-01

    Based on our previous data on the presence of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP) on brain endothelial structures during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we investigated the mechanisms of VSOP binding on inflamed brain endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. After intravenous application, VSOP were detected in brain endothelial cells of EAE animals at peak disease and prior to clinical onset. In vitro, inflammatory stimuli increased VSOP uptake by brain endothelial bEnd.3 cells, which we confirmed in primary endothelial cells and in bEnd.3 cells cultured under shear stress. Transmission electron microscopy and blocking experiments revealed that during inflammation VSOP were endocytosed by bEnd.3. Modified sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) on inflamed brain endothelial cells were the primary binding site for VSOP, as GAG degradation and inhibition of GAG sulfation reduced VSOP uptake. Thus, VSOP-based MRI is sensitive to visualize early neuroinflammatory processes such as GAG modifications on brain endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Amplification and propagation of interleukin-1β signaling by murine brain endothelial and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Stephanie M; Knoll, J Gabriel; Verghese, Santhosh Chakkaramakkil; Levasseur, Peter R; Marks, Daniel L

    2017-07-01

    During acute infections and chronic illnesses, the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) acts within the brain to elicit metabolic derangements and sickness behaviors. It is unknown which cells in the brain are the proximal targets for IL-1β with respect to the generation of these illness responses. We performed a series of in vitro experiments to (1) investigate which brain cell populations exhibit inflammatory responses to IL-1β and (2) examine the interactions between different IL-1β-responsive cell types in various co-culture combinations. We treated primary cultures of murine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMEC), astrocytes, and microglia with PBS or IL-1β, and then performed qPCR to measure inflammatory gene expression or immunocytochemistry to evaluate nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation. To evaluate whether astrocytes and/or BMEC propagate inflammatory signals to microglia, we exposed microglia to astrocyte-conditioned media and co-cultured endothelial cells and glia in transwells. Treatment groups were compared by Student's t tests or by ANOVA followed by Bonferroni-corrected t tests. IL-1β increased inflammatory gene expression and NF-κB activation in primary murine-mixed glia, enriched astrocyte, and BMEC cultures. Although IL-1β elicited minimal changes in inflammatory gene expression and did not induce the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in isolated microglia, these cells were more robustly activated by IL-1β when co-cultured with astrocytes and/or BMEC. We observed a polarized endothelial response to IL-1β, because the application of IL-1β to the abluminal endothelial surface produced a more complex microglial inflammatory response than that which occurred following luminal IL-1β exposure. Inflammatory signals are detected, amplified, and propagated through the CNS via a sequential and reverberating signaling cascade involving communication between brain endothelial cells and

  15. Binding characteristics of S fimbriated Escherichia coli to isolated brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stins, M. F.; Prasadarao, N. V.; Ibric, L.; Wass, C. A.; Luckett, P.; Kim, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the role of S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli meningitis, transformants of E. coli strains with or without S fimbriae plasmid were compared for their binding to microvessel endothelial cells isolated from bovine brain cortices (BMEC). The BMEC's displayed a cobblestone appearance, were positive for factor VIII, carbonic anhydrase IV, took up fluorescent-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein, and exhibited gamma glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Binding of S fimbriated E. coli to BMEC was approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli Similarly S fimbriated E. coli bound to human brain endothelial cells approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli. Binding was reduced approximately 60% by isolated S fimbriae and about 80% by anti-S adhesin antibody. Mutating the S adhesin gene resulted in a complete loss of the binding, whereas mutagenesis of the major S fimbriae subunit gene sfaA did not significantly affect binding. Pretreatment of BMEC with neuraminidase or prior incubation of S fimbriated E. coli with NeuAc alpha 2,3-sialyl lactose completely abolished binding. These findings indicate that S fimbriated E. coli bind to NeuAc alpha 2,3-galactose containing glycoproteins on brain endothelial cells via a lectin-like activity of SfaS adhesin. This might be an important early step in the penetration of bacteria across the blood-brain barrier in the development of E. coli meningitis. Images Figure 6 PMID:7977653

  16. Prostacyclin mediates endothelial COX-2-dependent neuroprotective effects during excitotoxic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ying An,1,2 Natalya Belevych,1,2 Yufen Wang,1,2 Hao Zhang,1 Jason S Nasse,3 Harvey Herschman,4 Qun Chen,1,2 Andrew Tarr,1,2 Xiaoyu Liu,1,2 Ning Quan1,21Institute for Behavior Medicine Research, 2Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, 3Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 4Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In a previous study, we found that intracerebral administration of excitotoxin (RS-(tetrazole-5yl glycine caused increased neural damage in the brain in an endothelial COX-2 deleted mouse line (Tie2Cre COX-2flox/flox. In this study, we investigated whether prostacyclin might mediate this endothelial COX-2-dependent neuroprotection. Administration of excitotoxin into the striatum induced the production of prostacyclin (PGI2 in wild type, but not in endothelial COX-2 deleted mice. Inhibition of PGI2 synthase exacerbated brain lesions induced by the excitotoxin in wild type, but not in endothelial COX-2 deleted mice. Administration of a PGI2 agonist reduced neural damage in both wild type and endothelial COX-2 deleted mice. Increased PGI2 synthase expression was found in infiltrating neutrophils. In an ex vivo assay, PGI2 reduced the excitotoxin-induced calcium influx into neurons, suggesting a cellular mechanism for PGI2 mediated neuroprotection. These results reveal that PGI2 mediates endothelial COX-2 dependent neuroprotection.Keywords: neural injury, prostaglandins, neutrophil, conditional COX-2 deletion, PGI2

  17. Early events in kidney donation : Progression of endothelial activation, oxidative stress and tubular injury after brain death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morariu, Aurora M.; Schuurs, Theo A.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Oeveren, Wim; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Ploeg, Rutger J.

    Cerebral injury leading to brain death (BD) causes major physiologic derangements in potential organ donors, which may result in vascular-endothelial activation and affect posttransplant graft function. We investigated the kinetic of pro-coagulatory and pro-inflammatory endothelial activation and

  18. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  20. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...... in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p

  3. Complement component C3a plays a critical role in endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment into the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fengjiao; Zou, Qiang; Ding, Xiaodan; Shi, Dongyan; Zhu, Xingxing; Hu, Weiguo; Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-28

    The complement system is becoming increasingly recognized as a key participant in many neurodegenerative diseases of the brain. Complement-deficient animals exhibit reduced neuroinflammation. In the present study, we administered intracerebroventricularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic local infection of the brain and investigated the role of key complement component C3 in brain vasculature endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment. The degree of neutrophil infiltration was determined by esterase staining. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions were measured using intravital microscopy. Cerebral endothelial activation was evaluated using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Neutrophil infiltration into the brain cortex and hippocampus was significantly reduced in C3(-/-) mice and C3aR(-/-) mice but not in C6(-/-) mice. We detected markedly attenuated leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the brain microvasculature of C3(-/-) mice. Accordingly, in response to LPS administration, the brain microvasculature in these mice had decreased expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Depletion of C3 from the circulation also caused reduction in VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression and leukocyte recruitment, suggesting that C3 in the circulation contributed to brain endothelial activation. Furthermore, C3(-/-) mice exhibited decreased leukocyte recruitment into the brain upon tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation. C3a activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and induced the upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression in murine primary cerebral endothelial cells in vitro. Our study provides the first evidence that C3a plays a critical role in cerebral endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment during inflammation in the brain.

  4. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator enhances microparticle release from mouse brain-derived endothelial cells through plasmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Marie; Khacef, Kahina; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Leconte, Claire; Yin, Min; Renard, Jean-Marie; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Boulanger, Chantal M; Margaill, Isabelle; Beray-Berthat, Virginie

    2016-11-15

    Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is currently the only approved pharmacological strategy for acute ischemic stroke. However, rt-PA exhibits vascular toxicity mainly due to endothelial damage. To investigate the mechanisms underlying rt-PA-induced endothelial alterations, we assessed the role of rt-PA in the generation of endothelial microparticles (EMPs), emerging biological markers and effectors of endothelial dysfunction. The mouse brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 was used. Cells were treated with rt-PA at 20, 40 or 80μg/ml for 15 or 24h, and EMPs were quantified in the culture media using Annexin-V staining coupled with flow cytometry. Rt-PA enhanced EMP release from bEnd.3 cells with a maximal increase at the 40μg/ml dose for 24h (+78% compared to controls). Using tranexamic acid and aprotinin we demonstrated that plasmin is responsible for rt-PA-induced EMP release. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitor PJ34 also reduced rt-PA-induced EMP production, suggesting that p38 MAPK and PARP are downstream intracellular effectors of rt-PA/plasmin. Rt-PA also altered through plasmin the morphology and the confluence of bEnd.3 cells. By contrast, these changes did not implicate p38 MAPK and PARP. This study demonstrates that rt-PA induces the production of microparticles by cerebral endothelial cells, through plasmin, p38 MAPK and PARP pathways. Determining the phenotype of these EMPs to clarify their role on the endothelium in ischemic conditions could thus be of particular interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Low intracellular ATP levels exacerbate carcinogen-induced inflammatory stress response and inhibit in vitro tubulogenesis in human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Tahanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian, Sabrina Peiro, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de Recherche BioMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Solid tumor development requires angiogenesis and is correlated to the expression of inflammatory markers through cellular metabolic and energetic adaptation. While high glycolysis rates enable the cancer cell compartment to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP, very little is known about the impact of low intracellular ATP concentrations within the vascular endothelial cell compartment, which is responsible for tumor angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the effect of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, a glucose analog that inhibits glycolysis through intracellular ATP depletion, on human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC angiogenic properties. While preformed capillaries remained unaffected, we found that in vitro tubulogenesis was dose-dependently decreased by 2-DG and that this correlated with reduced intracellular ATP levels. Procarcinogenic signaling was induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and found to trigger the proinflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress marker GRP78 expression, whose inductions were potentiated when PMA was combined with 2-DG treatment. Inversely, PMA-induced matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 gene expression and protein secretion were abrogated in the presence of 2-DG, and this can be partially explained by reduced nuclear factor-κB signaling. Collectively, we provide evidence for an intracellular ATP requirement in order for tubulogenesis to occur, and we link increases in ER stress to inflammation. A better understanding of the metabolic adaptations of the vascular endothelial cells that mediate tumor vascularization will help the development of new drugs and therapies.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, MMP-9, COX-2, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, endothelial

  6. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (10 6 pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  8. Effects of asymmetric dimethylarginine on bovine retinal capillary endothelial cell proliferation, reactive oxygen species production, permeability, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and occludin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hui; Xu, Xun; Sheng, Min-Jie; Zheng, Zhi; Gu, Qing

    2011-02-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is associated with impaired endothelial dysfunction, such as chronic heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, and pulmonary hypertension. The effects of ADMA on cell proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell permeability, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and tight-junction protein occludin levels in bovine retinal capillary endothelial cells (BRCECs) were investigated. A cell proliferation assay was performed using the novel tetrazolium compound 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and an electron coupling reagent. Intracellular ROS levels were determined using the fluorescent probe CM-H(2)DCFDA. Horseradish peroxidase was used for a permeability assay. ICAM-1 and tight-junction protein occludin were assessed by western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by ADMA. ADMA increased intracellular ROS generation in BRCECs. The increased ROS production induced by ADMA was markedly inhibited by the angiotensin II receptor-blocker telmisartan, the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor benazepril, the reduced form of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium (DPI), or the antioxidant and free-radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). ADMA significantly increased horseradish peroxidase (HRP) permeability in BRCECs. Benazepril, telmisartan, DPI, and NAC downregulated cell permeability. ADMA markedly upregulated ICAM-1 expression in BRCECs, which were downregulated by telmisartan, DPI, and NAC. ADMA significantly downregulated occludin expression in BRCECs. Benazepril and telmisartan upregulated occludin expression in BRCECs exposed to ADMA. Our results provide the first reported evidence that ADMA has potent adverse effects on cell proliferation, intracellular ROS generation, cell permeability

  9. Visfatin Mediates SCLC Cells Migration across Brain Endothelial Cells through Upregulation of CCL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized as an aggressive tumor with brain metastasis. Although preventing SCLC metastasis to the brain is immensely important for survival, the molecular mechanisms of SCLC cells penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB are largely unknown. Recently, visfatin has been considered as a novel pro-inflammatory adipocytokine involved in various cancers. Herein, we present evidence that elevated levels of visfatin in the serum of SCLC patients were associated with brain metastasis, and visfain was increased in NCI-H446 cells, a SCLC cell line, during interacting with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. Using in vitro BBB model, we found that visfatin could promote NCI-H446 cells migration across HBMEC monolayer, while the effect was inhibited by knockdown of visfatin. Furthermore, our findings indicated that CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 was involved in visfatin-mediated NCI-H446 cells transendothelial migtation. Results also showed that the upregulation of CCL2 in the co-culture system was reversed by blockade of visfatin. In particular, visfatin-induced CCL2 was attenuated by specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling in NCI-H446 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that visfatin was a prospective target for SCLC metastasis to brain, and understanding the molecular mediators would lead to effective strategies for inhibition of SCLC brain metastasis.

  10. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective...

  11. Reactive oxygen species alter brain endothelial tight junction dynamics via RhoA, PI3 kinase, and PKB signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreibelt, Gerty; Kooij, Gijs; Reijerkerk, Arie; van Doorn, Ruben; Gringhuis, Sonja I.; van der Pol, Susanne; Weksler, Babette B.; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Piontek, Jörg; Blasig, Ingolf E.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; Ronken, Eric; de Vries, Helga E.

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the entrance of circulating molecules and immune cells into the central nervous system. The barrier is formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions (TJ). A defective function of the BBB has been described for a

  12. Reactive oxygen species alter brain endothelial tight junction dynamics via RhoA, PI3 kinase, and PKB signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreibelt, G.; Kooij, G.; Reijerkerk, A.; Doorn, R. van; Gringhuis, S.I.; Pol, S. van der; Weksler, B.B.; Romero, I.A.; Couraud, P.O.; Piontek, J.; Blasig, I.E.; Dijkstra, C.D.; Ronken, E.; Vries, H.E. de

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the entrance of circulating molecules and immune cells into the central nervous system. The barrier is formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions (TJ). A defective function of the BBB has been described for a

  13. The role of shear stress in Blood-Brain Barrier endothelial physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvenna Vikram

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most important and often neglected physiological stimuli contributing to the differentiation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs into a blood-brain barrier (BBB phenotype is shear stress (SS. With the use of a well established humanized dynamic in vitro BBB model and cDNA microarrays, we have profiled the effect of SS in the induction/suppression of ECs genes and related functions. Results Specifically, we found a significant upregulation of tight and adherens junctions proteins and genes. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER and permeability measurements to know substances have shown that SS promoted the formation of a tight and highly selective BBB. SS also increased the RNA level of multidrug resistance transporters, ion channels, and several p450 enzymes. The RNA level of a number of specialized carrier-mediated transport systems (e.g., glucose, monocarboxylic acid, etc. was also upregulated. RNA levels of modulatory enzymes of the glycolytic pathway (e.g., lactate dehydrogenase were downregulated by SS while those involved in the Krebs cycle (e.g., lactate and other dehydrogenases were upregulated. Measurements of glucose consumption versus lactate production showed that SS negatively modulated the glycolytic bioenergetic pathways of glucose metabolism in favor of the more efficient aerobic respiration. BBB ECs are responsive to inflammatory stimuli. Our data showed that SS increased the RNA levels of integrins and vascular adhesion molecules. SS also inhibited endothelial cell cycle via regulation of BTG family proteins encoding genes. This was paralleled by significant increase in the cytoskeletal protein content while that of membrane, cytosol, and nuclear sub-cellular fractions decreased. Furthermore, analysis of 2D gel electrophoresis (which allows identifying a large number of proteins per sample of EC proteins extracted from membrane sub-cellular endothelial fractions showed that SS increased

  14. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  15. Lipocalin-2 enhances angiogenesis in rat brain endothelial cells via reactive oxygen species and iron-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limin; Du, Yang; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a key part of central nervous system pathophysiology. However, inflammatory factors are now thought to have both beneficial and deleterious effects. Here, we examine the hypothesis that lipocalin-2 (LCN2), an inflammatory molecule that can be up-regulated in the distressed central nervous system, may enhance angiogenesis in brain endothelial cells. Adding LCN2 (0.5-2.0 μg/mL) to RBE (Rat brain endothelial cells). 4 rat brain endothelial cells significantly increased matrigel tube formation and scratch migration, and also elevated levels of iron and reactive oxygen species. Co-treatment with a radical scavenger (U83836E), a Nox inhibitor (apocynin) and an iron chelating agent (deferiprone) significantly dampened the ability of LCN2 to enhance tube formation and scratch migration in brain endothelial cells. These findings provide in vitro proof of the concept that LCN2 can promote angiogenesis via iron- and reactive oxygen species-related pathways, and support the idea that LCN2 may contribute to the neurovascular recovery aspects of inflammation. Angiogenesis is an important part of stroke recovery. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that lipocalin-2 (LCN2) may enhance angiogenesis in brain endothelial cells. LCN2 promoted tube formation and migration via iron and ROS-related pathways in rat brain endothelial cells. ROS scavengers, Nox inhibitors and iron chelators all dampened the ability of LCN2 to enhance in vitro angiogenesis. These findings support the idea that LCN2 that is released by damaged neurons may act as a 'help me' signal that promotes neurovascular recovery after stroke and brain injury. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Induction of angiogenesis and modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 by simvastatin after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongtao; Jiang, Hao; Lu, Dunyue; Qu, Changsheng; Xiong, Ye; Zhou, Dong; Chopp, Michael; Mahmood, Asim

    2011-05-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that simvastatin reduced neuronal death, increased neurogenesis, and promoted functional recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). To investigate the effect of simvastatin on angiogenesis after TBI and the related signaling pathways. Saline or simvastatin (1 mg/kg) was administered orally to rats starting at day 1 after TBI or sham surgery and then daily for 14 days. Rats were sacrificed at 3 and 14 days after treatment. Brain sections and tissues were prepared for immunohistochemical staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot analysis. Cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by immunocytochemical staining with phallotoxins and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Western blot analysis was carried out to examine the simvastatin-induced activation of the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) signaling pathway. The expression of VEGFR-2 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Simvastatin significantly increased the length of vascular perimeter, promoted the proliferation of endothelial cells, and improved the sensorimotor function after TBI. Simvastatin stimulated endothelial cell tube formation after oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. VEGFR-2 expression in both brain tissues and cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells was enhanced after simvastatin treatment, which may be modulated by activation of Akt. Akt-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation was also induced by simvastatin in vivo and in vitro. Simvastatin augments TBI-induced angiogenesis in the lesion boundary zone and hippocampus and improves functional recovery. Simvastatin also promotes angiogenesis in vitro. These beneficial effects on angiogenesis may be related to simvastatin-induced activation of the VEGFR-2/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway.

  17. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and endothelial glycocalyx disruption after fluid percussion brain injury in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge

    2018-01-01

    ), vehicle (n = 16), or sham (n = 5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal.......555). We found no effect of propranolol and propranolol/clonidine on blood-brain barrier permeability and animal motor scores. Unexpectedly, propranolol and propranolol/clonidine caused an increase in epinephrine and syndecan-1 levels. CONCLUSION: This study does not provide any support for unselective......BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury causes a disruption of the vascular endothelial glycocalyx layer that is associated with an overactivation of the sympathoadrenal system. We hypothesized that early and unselective beta-blockade with propranolol alone or in combination with the alfa2-agonist...

  18. Functional role of endothelial adhesion molecules in the early stages of brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Serres, Sébastien; Anthony, Daniel C; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-04-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs), which are normally associated with leukocyte trafficking, have also been shown to play an essential role in tumor metastasis to non-CNS sites. However, the role played by CAMs in brain metastasis is largely unexplored. It is known that leukocyte recruitment to the brain is very atypical and that mechanisms of disease in peripheral tissues cannot be extrapolated to the brain. Here, we have established the spatiotemporal expression of 12 key CAMs in the initial phases of tumor seeding in 2 different models of brain metastasis. BALB/c or SCID mice were injected intracardially (10(5) cells/100 μL phosphate-buffered saline with either 4T1-GFP or MDA231BR-GFP cells, respectively (n = 4-6/group), and expression of the CAMs was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence colocalisation. Endothelial expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1, ALCAM, ICAM-1, VLA-4, and β4 integrin was markedly increased early in tumor seeding. At the same time, the natural ligands to these adhesion molecules were highly expressed on the metastatic tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Two of these ligands showed particularly high tumor cell expression (ALCAM and VLA-4), and consequently their functional role in tumor seeding was determined. Antibody neutralization of either ALCAM or VLA-4 significantly reduced tumor seeding within the brain (>60% decrease in tumor number/mm(2) brain; P seeding in the brain. Moreover, this work identifies a specific subset of ligand-receptor interactions that may yield new therapeutic and diagnostic targets for brain metastasis.

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factors enhance the permeability of the mouse blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Jiang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse, while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001. Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS.

  20. Simvastatin Combined with Antioxidant Attenuates the Cerebral Vascular Endothelial Inflammatory Response in a Rat Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI leads to important and deleterious neuroinflammation, as evidenced by indicators such as edema, cytokine production, induction of nitric oxide synthase, and leukocyte infiltration. After TBI, cerebral vascular endothelial cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammation. In our previous study, we proved that simvastatin could attenuate cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response in a rat traumatic brain injury. This purpose of this study was to determine whether simvastatin combined with an antioxidant could produce the same effect or greater and to examine affected surrogate biomarkers for the neuroinflammation after traumatic brain injury in rat. In our study, cortical contusions were induced, and the effect of acute and continuous treatment of simvastatin and vitamin C on behavior and inflammation in adult rats following experimental TBI was evaluated. The results demonstrated that simvastatin combined with an antioxidant could provide neuroprotection and it may be attributed to a dampening of cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response.

  1. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  2. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  3. Resistance of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in culture to methylmercury: cell-density-dependent defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Satoh, Masahiko; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2010-06-01

    Vascular toxicity is important for understanding the neurotoxicity of methylmercury, because microvessels strongly influence the construction of microenvironment around neurons. Previously, we found that low density-human brain microvascular pericytes are markedly susceptible to methylmercury cytotoxicity due to high expression levels of the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1) that transports methylmercury into the cells. Although LAT-1 can be, in general, highly expressed in sparse cells that require amino acids for growth, we found that human brain microvascular endothelial cells, regardless of cell density, were resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this resistance, we exposed the endothelial cells at low and high cell densities to methylmercury and determined the extent of nonspecific cell damage, intracellular accumulation of methylmercury, expression of LAT-1 and LAT-2 mRNAs, and intracellular expression of reduced glutathione and metallothionein. These experiments indicate that sparse endothelial cells intracellularly accumulate more methylmercury via the highly expressed LAT-1, but are resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity by higher expression of the protective sulfhydryl peptides, namely, reduced glutathione and metallothionein. It is suggested that both nonspecific and functional damage is caused in pericytes, whereas functional abnormalities rather than nonspecific damage may occur to a greater extent in the endothelial cells in the brain microvessels exposed to methylmercury. The previous and present data also suggest that methylmercury exhibits toxicity in endothelial cells in a manner different from that in pericytes in the brain microvessels.

  4. Plasma from preeclamptic women increases blood-brain barrier permeability: role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, Odül A; Chapman, Abbie C; May, Victor; Bernstein, Ira M; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2010-11-01

    Circulating factors in preeclamptic women are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and thereby contribute to the progression of this hypertensive condition. Despite the involvement of neurological complications in preeclampsia, there is a paucity of data regarding the effect of circulating factors on cerebrovascular function. Using a rat model of pregnancy, we investigated blood-brain barrier permeability, myogenic activity, and the influence of endothelial vasodilator mechanisms in cerebral vessels exposed intraluminally to plasma from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. In addition, the role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mediating changes in permeability in response to plasma was investigated. A 3-hour exposure to 20% normal pregnant or preeclamptic plasma increased blood-brain barrier permeability by ≈6.5- and 18.0-fold, respectively, compared with no plasma exposure (Pvascular endothelial growth factor receptor kinase activity prevented the increase in permeability in response to preeclamptic plasma but had no effect on changes in permeability of vessels exposed to normal pregnant plasma. Circulating factors in preeclamptic plasma did not affect myogenic activity or the influence of endothelium on vascular tone. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to preeclamptic plasma has little effect on reactivity of cerebral arteries but significantly increases blood-brain barrier permeability. Prevention of increased permeability by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling suggests that activation of this pathway may be responsible for increased blood-brain barrier permeability after exposure to preeclamptic plasma.

  5. Effect of steroid hormones and retinoids on the formation of capillary-like tubular structures of human microvascular endothelial cells in fibrin matrices is related to urokinase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, M; Koolwijk, P; van Hinsbergh, V; Kooistra, T

    1998-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillary blood vessels, is a feature of a variety of pathological processes. To study the effects of a specific group of hormones (all ligands of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily) on the angiogenic process in humans, we have used a model system in which human microvascular endothelial cells from foreskin (hMVEC) are cultured on top of a human fibrin matrix in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. This model mimics the in vivo situation where fibrin appears to be a common component of the matrix present at sites of chronic inflammation and tumor stroma. Our results show that testosterone and dexamethasone are strong inhibitors and all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA) are potent stimulators of the formation of capillary-like tubular structures. These effects are mediated by their respective nuclear hormone receptors as demonstrated by the use of specific synthetic receptor agonists and antagonists. 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 did not affect or only weakly affected in vitro angiogenesis, which may be related to the lack of significant nuclear receptor expression. Although hMVEC express both thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta, no effect of thyroid hormone on tube formation was found. The effects of testosterone, dexamethasone, at-RA, and 9-cis RA on tube formation were accompanied by parallel changes in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) expression, at both mRNA and antigen levels. Exogenous suppletion of the medium with single chain u-PA enhances tube formation in our in vitro model, whereas quenching of u-PA activity (but not of tissue-type plasminogen activator activity) or of u-PA binding to u-PA receptor by specific antibodies suppressed basal and retinoid-stimulated tube formation. Moreover, addition of scu-PA to testosterone- or dexamethasone-treated hMVEC restored the suppressed

  6. Increased susceptibility to amyloid-β toxicity in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells under hyperglycemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristina; Katz, Paige S; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V G; Moreira, Paula I; Busija, David W

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are closely associated with amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in endothelial cells. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from rat (RBMEC) and mice (MBMEC) were isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats and homozygous db/db (Leprdb/Leprdb) and heterozygous (Dock7m/Leprdb) mice, and cultured under normo- and hyperglycemic conditions for 7 d followed by 24 h exposure to Aβ1-40. Some experiments were also performed with two mitochondrial superoxide (O2•-) scavengers, MitoTempo and Peg-SOD. Cell viability was measured by the Alamar blue assay and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial O2•- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and H2O2 production was confirmed by microplate reader. Hyperglycemia or Aβ1-40 alone did not affect cell viability in RBMEC. However, the simultaneous presence of high glucose and Aβ1-40 reduced cell viability and ΔΨm, and enhanced mitochondrial O2•- and H2O2 production. MitoTempo and PEG-SOD prevented Aβ1-40 toxicity. Interestingly, MBMEC presented a similar pattern of alterations with db/db cultures presenting higher susceptibility to Aβ1-40. Overall, our results show that high glucose levels increase the susceptibility of brain microvascular endothelial cells to Aβ toxicity supporting the idea that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for vascular injury associated with AD.

  7. Injury of the brain and liver capillaries in lethal car accidents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovický, Peter; Matlach, R.; Makovický, P.; Švecová, Ivana; Samasca, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 351-358 ISSN 1221-8618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : shock-wave lithotripsy * posttraumatic stress symptoms * blast exposure * gallbladder * arteries * vessels * bleeding * shock wave * veins * capillaries Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2016

  8. Surface Characteristics of Nanoparticles Determine Their Intracellular Fate in and Processing by Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Julia V.; Kalicharan, Dharamdajal; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    A polarized layer of endothelial cells that comprises the blood-brain barrier (BBB) precludes access of systemically administered medicines to brain tissue. Consequently, there is a need for drug delivery vehicles that mediate transendothelial transport of such medicines. Endothelial cells use a

  9. Ethanol suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cell trafficking across brain endothelial cells in immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola C Hudson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lola C Hudson1, Brenda A Colby1, Rick B Meeker21Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Earlier studies suggested that the combination of alcohol use and immunodeficiency virus infection resulted in more severe neurologic disease than either condition individually. These deleterious interactions could be due to increased immune cell and virus trafficking or may result from interactions between ethanol and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated toxicity within the brain. To determine the extent to which increased trafficking played a role, we examined the effect of ethanol on the migration of different peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs subsets across a brain endothelial cell monolayer. We utilized combinations of feline brain endothelial cells with astrocytes, and/or microglia with either acute exposure to 0.08 g/dL ethanol, a combination of ethanol and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, or FIV alone. Adherence of PBMCs to endothelium was increased in all combinations of cells with the addition of ethanol. Despite increased PBMC adhesion with ethanol treatment, transmigration of B cells, monocytes, CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells was not increased and was actually decreased in the presence of astrocytes. Expression of three common adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1, ICAM2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, was unchanged or slightly decreased by ethanol. This indicated that although adherence is increased by ethanol it is not due to an increased expression of adhesion molecules. RANTES, MIP1α, MIP1β, and MCP-1 mRNA expression was also studied in brain endothelial cells, astrocytes and microglia by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Ethanol treatment of astrocytes resulted in modest changes of

  10. Solutes, but not cells, drain from the brain parenchyma along basement membranes of capillaries and arteries: significance for cerebral amyloid angiopathy and neuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carare, R O; Bernardes-Silva, M; Newman, T A; Page, A M; Nicoll, J A R; Perry, V H; Weller, R O

    2008-04-01

    Elimination of interstitial fluid and solutes plays a role in homeostasis in the brain, but the pathways are unclear. Previous work suggests that interstitial fluid drains along the walls of arteries. to define the pathways within the walls of capillaries and arteries for drainage of fluid and solutes out of the brain. Fluorescent soluble tracers, dextran (3 kDa) and ovalbumin (40 kDa), and particulate fluospheres (0.02 microm and 1.0 microm in diameter) were injected into the corpus striatum of mice. Brains were examined from 5 min to 7 days by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. soluble tracers initially spread diffusely through brain parenchyma and then drain out of the brain along basement membranes of capillaries and arteries. Some tracer is takenf up by vascular smooth muscle cells and by perivascular macrophages. No perivascular drainage was observed when dextran was injected into mouse brains following cardiac arrest. Fluospheres expand perivascular spaces between vessel walls and surrounding brain, are ingested by perivascular macrophages but do not appear to leave the brain even following an inflammatory challenge with lipopolysaccharide or kainate. capillary and artery basement membranes act as 'lymphatics of the brain' for drainage of fluid and solutes; such drainage appears to require continued cardiac output as it ceases following cardiac arrest. This drainage pathway does not permit migration of cells from brain parenchyma to the periphery. Amyloid-beta is deposited in basement membrane drainage pathways in cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and may impede elimination of amyloid-beta and interstitial fluid from the brain in Alzheimer's disease. Soluble antigens, but not cells, drain from the brain by perivascular pathways. This atypical pattern of drainage may contribute to partial immune privilege of the brain and play a role in neuroimmunological diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  11. Multiple protocadherins are expressed in brain microvascular endothelial cells and might play a role in tight junction protein regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Christina; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y; Burek, Malgorzata

    2017-10-01

    Protocadherins (Pcdhs) are a large family of cadherin-related molecules. They play a role in cell adhesion, cellular interactions, and development of the central nervous system. However, their expression and role in endothelial cells has not yet been characterized. Here, we examined the expression of selected clustered Pcdhs in endothelial cells from several vascular beds. We analyzed human and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) lines and primary cells, mouse myocardial microvascular endothelial cell line, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of selected Pcdhs using RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunostaining. A strong mRNA expression of Pcdhs was observed in all endothelial cells tested. At the protein level, Pcdhs-gamma were detected using an antibody against the conserved C-terminal domain of Pcdhs-gamma or an antibody against PcdhgC3. Deletion of highly expressed PcdhgC3 led to differences in the tight junction protein expression and mRNA expression of Wnt/mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway genes as well as lower transendothelial electrical resistance. Staining of PcdhgC3 showed diffused cytoplasmic localization in mouse BMEC. Our results suggest that Pcdhs may play a critical role in the barrier-stabilizing pathways at the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl Cysteine against Diesel Exhaust Particles-Induced Intracellular ROS Generates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines to Mediate the Vascular Permeability of Capillary-Like Endothelial Tubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Tseng

    Full Text Available Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies using in vitro endothelial tubes as a simplified model of capillaries have found that DEP-induced ROS increase vascular permeability with rearrangement or internalization of adherens junctional VE-cadherin away from the plasma membrane. This allows DEPs to penetrate into the cell and capillary lumen. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines are up-regulated and mediate vascular permeability in response to DEP. However, the mechanisms through which these DEP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines increase vascular permeability remain unknown. Hence, we examined the ability of DEP to induce permeability of human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube cells to investigate these mechanisms. Furthermore, supplementation with NAC reduces ROS production following exposure to DEP. HUVEC tube cells contributed to a pro-inflammatory response to DEP-induced intracellular ROS generation. Endothelial oxidative stress induced the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from tube cells, subsequently stimulating the secretion of VEGF-A independent of HO-1. Our data suggests that DEP-induced intracellular ROS and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- α and IL-6, which would contribute to VEGF-A secretion and disrupt cell-cell borders and increase vasculature permeability. Addition of NAC suppresses DEP-induced ROS efficiently and reduces subsequent damages by increasing endogenous glutathione.

  13. Modeling the ischemic blood-brain barrier; the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp

    Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming...... pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for developing new medical therapies capable to exploit the barrier changes occurring during/after ischemia to permeate in the brain and treat this devastating disease. Materials and Methods - Primary cultures...

  14. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and endothelial glycocalyx disruption after fluid percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Pär Ingemar

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes a disruption of the vascular endothelial glycocalyx layer that is associated with an overactivation of the sympathoadrenal system. We hypothesized that early and unselective beta-blockade with propranolol alone or in combination with the alfa2-agonist clonidine would decrease brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and glycocalyx disruption at 24 hours after trauma. We subjected 53 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to lateral fluid percussion brain injury and randomized infusion with propranolol (n = 16), propranolol + clonidine (n = 16), vehicle (n = 16), or sham (n = 5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal motor function. We found no difference in brain water content (mean ± SD) between propranolol (80.8 ± 0.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (81.1 ± 0.6%; 95% CI, 80.8-81.4) (p = 0.668) or between propranolol/clonidine (80.8 ± 0.3%; 95% CI, 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (p = 0.555). We found no effect of propranolol and propranolol/clonidine on blood-brain barrier permeability and animal motor scores. Unexpectedly, propranolol and propranolol/clonidine caused an increase in epinephrine and syndecan-1 levels. This study does not provide any support for unselective beta-blockade with propranolol or the combination of propranolol and the alfa2-agonist clonidine on brain water content. The novel finding of an increase in plasma concentrations of epinephrine and syndecan-1 after propranolol treatment in traumatic brain injury is of unclear significance and should be investigated further.

  15. Low extracellular Ca2+ conditions induce an increase in brain endothelial permeability that involves intercellular Ca2+ waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Marijke; Culot, Maxime; Wang, Nan; da Costa, Anaelle; Decrock, Elke; Bol, Mélissa; Bultynck, Geert; Cecchelli, Romeo; Leybaert, Luc

    2012-12-03

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is an important factor determining the permeability of endothelial barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, nothing is known concerning the effect of spatially propagated intercellular Ca(2+) waves (ICWs). The propagation of ICWs relies in large part on channels formed by connexins that are present in endothelia. We hypothesized that ICWs may result in a strong disturbance of endothelial function, because the [Ca(2+)](i) changes are coordinated and involve multiple cells. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effect of ICWs on endothelial permeability. ICW activity was triggered in immortalized and primary brain endothelial cells by lowering the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Low extracellular Ca(2+) increased the endothelial permeability and this was significantly suppressed by buffering [Ca(2+)](i) with BAPTA-AM, indicating a central role of [Ca(2+)](i) changes. The endothelial permeability increase was furthermore inhibited by the connexin channel blocking peptide Gap27, which also blocked the ICWs, and by inhibiting protein kinase C (PKC), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and actomyosin contraction. We compared these observations with the [Ca(2+)](i) changes and permeability alterations provoked by the inflammatory agent bradykinin (BK), which triggers oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) changes without wave activity. BK-associated [Ca(2+)](i) changes and the endothelial permeability increase were significantly smaller than those associated with ICWs, and the permeability increase was not influenced by inhibition of PKC, CaMKII or actomyosin contraction. We conclude that ICWs significantly increase endothelial permeability and therefore, the connexins that underlie wave propagation form an interesting target to limit BBB alterations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Electrical Synapses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Adhesive properties of Enterobacter sakazakii to human epithelial and brain microvascular endothelial cells

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    Pospischil Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with sporadic cases and outbreaks causing meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis especially in neonates. However, up to now little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity in E. sakazakii. A necessary state in the successful colonization, establishment and ultimately production of disease by microbial pathogens is the ability to adhere to host surfaces such as mucous membranes, gastric and intestinal epithelial or endothelial tissue. This study examined for the first time the adherence ability of 50 E. sakazakii strains to the two epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and Caco-2, as well as the brain microvascular endothelial cell line HBMEC. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial culture conditions on the adherence behaviour were investigated. An attempt was made to characterize the factors involved in adherence. Results Two distinctive adherence patterns, a diffuse adhesion and the formation of localized clusters of bacteria on the cell surface could be distinguished on all three cell lines. In some strains, a mixture of both patterns was observed. Adherence was maximal during late exponential phase, and increased with higher MOI. The adhesion capacity of E. sakazakii to HBMEC cells was affected by the addition of blood to the bacteria growth medium. Mannose, hemagglutination, trypsin digestion experiments and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the adhesion of E. sakazakii to the epithelial and endothelial cells is mainly non-fimbrial based. Conclusion Adherence experiments show heterogeneity within different E. sakazakii strains. In agreement with studies on E. cloacae, we found no relationship between the adhesive capacities in E. sakazakii and the eventual production of specific fimbriae. Further studies will have to be carried out in order to determine the adhesin(s involved in the interaction of E. sakazakii with cells and to

  18. Differential effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A isoforms in a mouse brain metastasis model of human melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, B.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Wesseling, P.; Verrijp, K.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Ruiter, D.J.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We reported previously that vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) expression by Mel57 human melanoma cells led to tumor progression in a murine brain metastasis model in an angiogenesis-independent fashion by dilation of co-opted, pre-existing vessels and concomitant enhanced blood

  19. Differential activation of acid sphingomyelinase and ceramide release determines invasiveness of Neisseria meningitidis into brain endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Simonis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction with brain endothelial cells is central to the pathogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis infections. Here, we show that N. meningitidis causes transient activation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM followed by ceramide release in brain endothelial cells. In response to N. meningitidis infection, ASM and ceramide are displayed at the outer leaflet of the cell membrane and condense into large membrane platforms which also concentrate the ErbB2 receptor. The outer membrane protein Opc and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C that is activated upon binding of the pathogen to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, are required for N. meningitidis-mediated ASM activation. Pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ASM abrogated meningococcal internalization without affecting bacterial adherence. In accordance, the restricted invasiveness of a defined set of pathogenic isolates of the ST-11/ST-8 clonal complex into brain endothelial cells directly correlated with their restricted ability to induce ASM and ceramide release. In conclusion, ASM activation and ceramide release are essential for internalization of Opc-expressing meningococci into brain endothelial cells, and this segregates with invasiveness of N. meningitidis strains.

  20. Interesterified fat or palm oil as substitutes for partially hydrogenated fat during the perinatal period produces changes in the brain fatty acids profile and increases leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the cerebral microcirculation from the male offspring in adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misan, Vanessa; Estato, Vanessa; de Velasco, Patricia Coelho; Spreafico, Flavia Brasil; Magri, Tatiana; Dos Santos, Raísa Magno de Araújo Ramos; Fragoso, Thaiza; Souza, Amanda S; Boldarine, Valter Tadeu; Bonomo, Isabela T; Sardinha, Fátima L C; Oyama, Lila M; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças

    2015-08-07

    We investigated whether maternal intake of normolipidic diets with distinct fatty acid (FA) compositions alters the lipidic profile and influences the inflammatory status of the adult offsprings׳ brains. C57BL/6 female mice during pregnancy and lactation received diets containing either soybean oil (CG), partially hydrogenated vegetable fat rich in trans-fatty acids (TG), palm oil (PG), or interesterified fat (IG). After weaning, male offspring from all groups received control diet. The FA profile was measured in the offspring׳s brains at post-natal days 21 and 90. Brain functional capillary density as well as leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the cerebral post-capillary venules was assessed by intravital fluorescence microscopy at post-natal day 90. Inflammation signaling was evaluated through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) content in brain of the adult offspring. In the 21-day old offspring, the brains of the TG showed higher levels of trans FA and reduced levels of linoleic acid (LA) and total n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). At post-natal day 90, TG and IG groups showed reduced levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and total n-3 PUFA tended to be lower compared to CG. The offspring׳s brains exhibited an altered microcirculation with increased leukocyte rolling in groups TG, PG and IG and in TG group increased leukocyte adhesion. The TLR4 content of TG, IG and PG groups only tended to increase (23%; 20% and 35%, respectively). Maternal consumption of trans FA, palm oil or interesterified fat during pregnancy and lactation can trigger the initial steps of inflammatory pathways in the brain of offspring in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differentiation and characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Wilson, Hannah K; Canfield, Scott G; Qian, Tongcheng; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical component of the central nervous system (CNS) that regulates the flux of material between the blood and the brain. Because of its barrier properties, the BBB creates a bottleneck to CNS drug delivery. Human in vitro BBB models offer a potential tool to screen pharmaceutical libraries for CNS penetration as well as for BBB modulators in development and disease, yet primary and immortalized models respectively lack scalability and robust phenotypes. Recently, in vitro BBB models derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have helped overcome these challenges by providing a scalable and renewable source of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). We have demonstrated that hPSC-derived BMECs exhibit robust structural and functional characteristics reminiscent of the in vivo BBB. Here, we provide a detailed description of the methods required to differentiate and functionally characterize hPSC-derived BMECs to facilitate their widespread use in downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biotin and biocytin uptake into cultured primary calf brain microvessel endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, B; Baumgartner, E R

    2000-03-10

    The uptake of biotin and the closely related biocytin was characterized in primary cultures of calf brain microvessel endothelial (CBME) cells. Biotin uptake was found to be Na(+)-gradient dependent and independent of changes in the membrane potential. Concentration dependence revealed a single saturation mechanism with a K(m) of 47 microM and a V(max) of 101 pmol/min/mg. Inhibition studies demonstrated dependence on metabolic energy and the necessity for a free carboxyl group for transport activity. The anticonvulsants primidone and carbamazepine had no inhibitory effect. Biotin uptake into CBME cells is a secondary active, electroneutral, saturable and specific process. Biocytin which accumulates in biotinidase deficiency, a human congenital disorder, did not inhibit biotin uptake and was not transported into these cells. The presence of human serum with normal biotinidase activity significantly reduced biotin uptake by about 50%. Further, added biocytin was hydrolyzed to biotin, which accumulated intracellularly but to a lesser extent than added free biotin. Biotin uptake after addition of plasma of biotinidase-deficient patients was not different from that in the presence of normal serum. These results indicate that the absence of biotinidase activity in serum does not reduce blood-brain barrier transport of biotin.

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in rat brain is downregulated by sub-chronic antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Nakata, Shunsuke; Iga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2017-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a neurotransmitter that may be related to major depressive disorder (MDD) because the selective neuronal NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, induces a dose-dependent antidepressant-like effect. NO modulates major neurotransmitters involved in the neurobiology of MDD, such as norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate. In this study, we investigated the effects of antidepressants as NO modulators in acute and sub-chronic treatments. Rats were injected with the SSRI paroxetine (PAR, 10 mg/kg), the SNRI milnacipran (MIL, 30 mg/kg), or the NaSSA mirtazapine (MIR, 10 mg/kg) for acute (1 h) or sub-chronic (3 weeks) treatment prior to analysis of nine brain regions (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, pons, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb). The mRNA expression levels of three NOS subtypes (neuronal: nNOS, inducible: iNOS, and endothelial: eNOS) were analyzed using real-time PCR with Taqman probes. Acute MIR treatment significantly increased nNOS mRNA expression in the hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and olfactory bulb, and iNOS mRNA expression in the frontal cortex and midbrain. Acute PAR and MIR treatments significantly increased eNOS mRNA expression in most brain regions. Conversely, sub-chronic treatment with all types of antidepressants resulted in significant decreases of eNOS mRNA expression in most brain regions. Sub-chronic treatment with the three types of antidepressants consistently decreased eNOS mRNA expression levels in the rat brain. These effects may be associated with the involvement of the NO system in the mechanism of action of antidepressants.

  4. Brain injury and cerebrovascular fibrin deposition correlate with reduced antithrombotic brain capillary functions in a hypertensive stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomia, T; Wang, L; Kumar, S R; Kim, A; Zlokovic, B V

    2000-06-01

    Hemostasis factors may influence the pathophysiology of stroke. The role of brain hemostasis in ischemic hypertensive brain injury is not known. We studied ischemic injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats in relation to cerebrovascular fibrin deposition and activity of different hemostasis factors in brain microcirculation. In spontaneously hypertensive rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion versus normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (W-K) rats, infarct and edema volumes were increased by 6.1-fold (P cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduced during middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by 55% (P hypertensive rats compared with Wistar-Kyoto rats by 11.8-fold (P hypertension reduces antithrombotic mechanisms in brain microcirculation, which may enhance cerebrovascular fibrin deposition and microvascular obstructions during transient focal cerebral ischemia, which results in greater neuronal injury.

  5. Oxytocin inhibits ox-LDL-induced adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Pan, Shengying; Tan, Jing; Zhao, Weina; Liu, Fengguo

    2017-12-15

    The attachment of monocytes to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is associated with an early event and the pathological progression of cerebrovascular diseases. Oxytocin (OT) is a human peptide hormone that is traditionally used as a medication to facilitate childbirth. However, little information is available regarding the physiological function of OT in brain endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, our results indicate that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) and was upregulated in response to ox-LDL in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, OT significantly suppressed ox-LDL-induced attachment of THP-1 monocytes to HBMVEs. Furthermore, we found that OT reduced the expression of adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1 and E-selectin. Interestingly, it was shown that OT could restore ox-LDL-induced reduction of KLF4 in HBMVEs. Importantly, knockdown of KLF4 abolished the inhibitory effects of OT on ox-LDL-induced expressions of VCAM-1 and E-selectin as well as the adhesion of human monocytic THP-1 cells to endothelial HBMVEs. Mechanistically, we found that the stimulatory effects of OT on KLF4 expression are mediated by the MEK5/MEF2A pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The anti-apoptotic effect of fluid mechanics preconditioning by cells membrane and mitochondria in rats brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shan; Zhu, Fengping; Hu, Ruiping; Tian, Song; Chen, Xingxing; Lou, Dan; Cao, Bing; Chen, Qiulei; Li, Bai; Li, Fang; Bai, Yulong; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian

    2018-01-01

    Exercise preconditioning is a simple and effective way to prevent ischemia. This paper further provided the mechanism in hemodynamic aspects at the cellular level. To study the anti-apoptotic effects of fluid mechanics preconditioning, Cultured rats brain microvascular endothelial cells were given fluid intervention in a parallel plate flow chamber before oxygen glucose deprivation. It showed that fluid mechanics preconditioning could inhibit the apoptosis of endothelial cells, and this process might be mediated by the shear stress activation of Tie-2 on cells membrane surface and Bcl-2 on the mitochondria surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microglial activation state exerts a biphasic influence on brain endothelial cell proliferation by regulating the balance of TNF and TGF-β1

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    Milner Richard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of cerebral ischemia and other neuroinflammatory states have demonstrated a strong association between new vessel formation and microglial recruitment and activation, raising the possibility that microglia may be involved in promoting angiogenesis. As endothelial cell proliferation is a fundamental early step in angiogenesis, the aim of this study was to test this hypothesis by examining the influence of microglial secreted factors on brain endothelial cell (BEC proliferation using BrdU incorporation. Methods Primary cultures of mouse BEC, microglia and astrocytes were used in this study. Proliferation of BEC was examined by BrdU incorporation. ELISA was used to quantify TNF and TGF-β1 levels within cell culture supernatants. Results Microglia regulated BEC proliferation in a biphasic manner; microglia conditioned medium (MG-CM from resting microglia inhibited, while that from activated microglia promoted BEC proliferation. A screen of microglial cytokines revealed that BEC proliferation was inhibited by TGF-β1, but promoted by TNF. ELISA showed that TNF and TGF-β1 were both present in MG-CM, and that while TGF-β1 dominated in resting MG-CM, TNF levels were massively increased in activated MG-CM, shifting the balance in favor of TNF. Antibody-blocking studies revealed that the influence of MG-CM to inhibit or promote BEC proliferation was largely attributable to the cytokines TGF-β1 and TNF, respectively. Conclusion This data suggests that microglial activation state might be an important determinant of cerebral angiogenesis; inhibiting BEC proliferation and neovascularization in the normal central nervous system (CNS, but stimulating the growth of new capillaries under neuroinflammatory conditions.

  8. Expression of an insulin-regulatable glucose carrier in muscle and fat endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaró, Senen; Palacín, Manuel; Pilch, Paul F.; Testar, Xavier; Zorzano, Antonio

    1989-12-01

    INSULIN rapidly stimulates glucose use in the major target tissues, muscle and fat, by modulating a tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform1-6. Access of glucose to the target tissue is restricted by endothelial cells which line the walls of nonfenestrated capillaries of fat and muscle7. Thus, we examined whether the capillary endothelial cells are actively involved in the modulation of glucose availability by these tissues. We report here the abundant expression of the muscle/fat glucose transporter isoform in endothelial cells, using an immunocytochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody specific for this isoform1. This expression is restricted to endothelial cells from the major insulin target tissues, and it is not detected in brain and liver where insulin does not activate glucose transport. The expression of the muscle/fat transporter isoform in endothelial cells is significantly greater than in the neighbouring muscle and fat cells. Following administration of insulin to animals in vivo, there occurs a rapid increase in the number of muscle/fat transporters present in the lumenal plasma membrane of the capillary endothelial cells. These results document that insulin promotes the translocation of the muscle/fat glucose transporter in endothelial cells. It is therefore likely that endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of glucose use by the major insulin target tissues in normal and diseased states.

  9. n-3 long-chain fatty acids and regulation of glucose transport in two models of rat brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Fabien; Jouin, Mélanie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Roux, Françoise; Perrière, Nicolas; Langelier, Bénédicte; Lavialle, Monique; Cunnane, Stephen; Guesnet, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Several in vivo studies suggest that docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3), the main n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) of brain membranes, could be an important regulator of brain energy metabolism by affecting glucose utilization and the density of the two isoforms of the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) (endothelial and astrocytic). This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that 22:6 n-3 in membranes may modulate glucose metabolism in brain endothelial cells. It compared the impact of 22:6 n-3 and the other two main LC-PUFA, arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3), on fatty acid composition of membrane phospholipids, glucose uptake and expression of 55-kDa GLUT1 isoform in two models of rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC), in primary culture and in the immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line RBE4. Without PUFA supplementation, both types of cerebral endothelial cells were depleted in 22:6 n-3, RBE4 being also particularly low in 20:4 n-6. After exposure to supplemental 20:4 n-6, 20:5 n-3 or 22:6 n-3 (15microM, i.e. a physiological dose), RBEC and RBE4 avidly incorporated these PUFA into their membrane phospholipids thereby resembling physiological conditions, i.e. the PUFA content of rat cerebral microvessels. However, RBE4 were unable to incorporate physiological level of 20:4 n-6. Basal glucose transport in RBEC (rate of [(3)H]-3-o-methylglucose uptake) was increased after 20:5 n-3 or 22:6 n-3 supplementation by 50% and 35%, respectively, whereas it was unchanged with 20:4 n-6. This increase of glucose transport was associated with an increased GLUT1 protein, while GLUT1 mRNA was not affected. The different PUFA did not impact on glucose uptake in RBE4. Due to alterations in n-6 PUFA metabolism and weak expression of GLUT1, RBE4 seems to be less adequate than RBEC to study PUFA metabolism and glucose transport in brain endothelial cells. Physiological doses of n-3 LC-PUFA have a direct and positive effect on glucose

  10. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Calcium antagonists decrease capillary wall damage in aging hypertensive rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, E.; de Jong, G.I.; Apro, E.; Keuker, J.I.H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hypertension during aging is a serious threat to the cerebral vasculature. The larger brain arteries can react to hypertension with an abnormal wall thickening, a loss of elasticity and a narrowed lumen. However, little is known about the hypertension-induced alterations of cerebral

  12. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Mediates the Uptake of Fatty Acids, but not Drugs, Into Human Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gordon S; Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-12-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the involvement of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), a lipid-binding protein expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in fatty acid and drug uptake into human brain endothelial cells. Following transfection with siRNA against hFABP5, human brain endothelial cell (hCMEC/D3) uptake of lipophilic ligands with varying affinity to FABP5 was assessed with intracellular concentrations quantified by liquid scintillation counting, HPLC, or LCMS/MS. The in situ BBB transport of [3H]-diazepam was also assessed in wild type and FABP5-deficient mice. hFABP5 siRNA reduced FABP5 expression in hCMEC/D3 cells by 39.9 ± 3.8% (mRNA) and 38.8 ± 6.6% (protein; mean ± SEM), leading to a reduction in uptake of [14C]-lauric acid, [3H]-oleic acid, and [14C]-stearic acid by 37.5 ± 8.8%, 41.7 ± 11.6%, and 50.7 ± 13.6%, respectively, over 1 min. No significant changes in [14C]-diazepam, pioglitazone, and troglitazone uptake were detected following FABP5 knockdown in hCMEC/D3 cells. Similarly, no difference in BBB transport of [3H]-diazepam was observed between wild type and FABP5-deficient mice. Therefore, although FABP5 facilitates brain endothelial cell uptake of fatty acids, it has limited effects on brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of drugs with lower affinity for FABP5. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acid Sphingomyelinase-Derived Ceramide Regulates ICAM-1 Function during T Cell Transmigration across Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kroon, Jeffrey; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Geerts, Dirk; van Het Hof, Bert; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Buul, Jaap D; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the CNS characterized by immune cell infiltration across the brain vasculature into the brain, a process not yet fully understood. We previously demonstrated that the sphingolipid metabolism is altered in MS lesions. In particular, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a critical enzyme in the production of the bioactive lipid ceramide, is involved in the pathogenesis of MS; however, its role in the brain vasculature remains unknown. Transmigration of T lymphocytes is highly dependent on adhesion molecules in the vasculature such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this article, we hypothesize that ASM controls T cell migration by regulating ICAM-1 function. To study the role of endothelial ASM in transmigration, we generated brain endothelial cells lacking ASM activity using a lentiviral shRNA approach. Interestingly, although ICAM-1 expression was increased in cells lacking ASM activity, we measured a significant decrease in T lymphocyte adhesion and consequently transmigration both in static and under flow conditions. As an underlying mechanism, we revealed that upon lack of endothelial ASM activity, the phosphorylation of ezrin was perturbed as well as the interaction between filamin and ICAM-1 upon ICAM-1 clustering. Functionally this resulted in reduced microvilli formation and impaired transendothelial migration of T cells. In conclusion, in this article, we show that ASM coordinates ICAM-1 function in brain endothelial cells by regulating its interaction with filamin and phosphorylation of ezrin. The understanding of these underlying mechanisms of T lymphocyte transmigration is of great value to develop new strategies against MS lesion formation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Radioprotection of mouse CNS endothelial cells in vivo

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    Lyubimova, N.; Coultas, P.; Martin, R. [Peter MacCallum Cancer institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-03-01

    After treatments with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and L-DOPA, the blood brain barrier causes a build-up of dopamine in brain capillary endothelial cells. Conversion of the dopamine to a fluorophore provides a marker which can be used to measure endothelial cell density by fluorescence microscopy. Earlier studies used this technique to monitor post-irradiation changes in endothelial cell density in rodent brain and showed loss within 24 hours of a sub-population of about 15 % of the endothelial cells. As a first step, rather than use the later endpoints of radionecrosis it was decided to examine directly whether Hoechst 33342 could protect against this rapid initial endothelial cell loss. Ten minutes after intravenous injection of Joechst 33342, in mouse brain the ligand was confined to endothelial cells and, for irradiation at this time, there was protection against endothelial cell loss over the first 24 hours after after exposure. Ablation of the sensitive subpopulation in unprotected mice took place over a dose range of 1 to 3 Gy {gamma}-rays but doses between 12 to 20 Gy were required in the presence of the ligand. This protection equated to a high dose modification factor of approximately 7 and may reflect suppression of apoptosis in this sensitive endothelial subpopulation. The extent to which there is enhanced survival in the endothelial population as a whole, and how the observed protection affects late CNS necrosis development, has yet to be determined. However these results suggest a potential use of DNA-binding radioprotectors with limited penetration in investigations of the relative significance of endothelial and parenchymal damage in normal tissue responses to ionising radiation. (authors)

  15. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  16. Capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence detection of rat brain catecholamines with microwave-assisted derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Fen; Liu, Yu-Wei; Singco, Brenda; Chen, Ssu-Wei; Huang, Hsi-Ya; Chin, Ting-Yu

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive method is described for the catecholamines detection in rat brain. CE with LIF detection for the determination of FITC derivatized catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine) was demonstrated. Conventional water bath and microwave-assisted derivatization methods were employed and a significant reduction in the derivatization time from 2 h for the conventional water bath at room temperature (ca. 25°C) to 2 min for the microwave-assisted derivatization was achieved. Online sample concentration of field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) method was employed to achieve higher sensitivities (the detection limits obtained in the normal injection mode ranged from 2.6 to 4.5 ng L⁻¹ and in the FASS mode ranged from 22 to 34 pg L⁻¹). Furthermore, this microwave-assisted derivatization CE-LIF method successfully determined catecholamines in rat brain with as low as 100 ng L⁻¹ (FASS mode) to 10 μg L⁻¹ (normal injection mode). This CE-LIF method provided better detection ability when compared to the best reports on catecholamines analyses. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  18. Co-culture model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazza, Marianne; Maubert, Monique E.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous systems exist to model the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the goal of understanding the regulation of passage into the central nervous system (CNS) and the potential impact of selected insults on BBB function. These models typically focus on the intrinsic cellular properties of the BBB, yet studies of peripheral cell migration are often excluded due to technical restraints. New Method This method allows for the study of in vitro cellular transmigration following exposure to any treatment of interest through optimization of co-culture conditions for the human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) cell line, hCMEC/D3, and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results hCMEC/D3 cells form functionally confluent monolayers on collagen coated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) transwell inserts, as assessed by microscopy and tracer molecule (FITC-dextran (FITC-D)) exclusion. Two components of complete hCMEC/D3 media, EBM-2 base-media and hydrocortisone (HC), were determined to be cytotoxic to PBMCs. By combining the remaining components of complete hCMEC/D3 media with complete PBMC media a resulting co-culture media was established for use in hCMEC/D3 – PBMC co-culture functional assays. Comparison with existing methods Through this method, issues of extensive differences in culture media conditions are resolved allowing for treatments and functional assays to be conducted on the two cell populations co-cultured simultaneously. Conclusion Described here is an in vitro co-culture model of the BBB, consisting of the hCMEC/D3 cell line and primary human PBMCs. The co-culture media will now allow for the study of exposure to potential insults to BBB function over prolonged time courses. PMID:27216631

  19. Fermented Chinese Formula Shuan-Tong-Ling Protects Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress Injury

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    Lingjing Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented Chinese formula Shuan-Tong-Ling (STL, composed of fourteen medicinal herbs, was an experiential formula by Dr. Zhigang Mei for treating vascular encephalopathy, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of fermented STL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- induced injury in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and the possible mechanisms. Cultured BMECs were treated with H2O2, STL, or nicotinamide (NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Then, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was employed to detect cell proliferation and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal was used to examine cell senescence. Cell nuclei were observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Additionally, changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione (GSH levels were measured. Expression of SIRT1, p21, and PGC-1α was determined by western blot. Cell proliferation significantly increased with STL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 treatment could intensify cell senescence and nuclei splitting or pyknosis. With STL treatment, the reduced ROS level was accompanied by increased SOD and GSH activity. Further assays showed upregulation of SIRT1 and PGC-1α and downregulation of p21 after STL treatment. The results revealed that STL could protect BMECs against oxidative stress injury at least partially through the SIRT1 pathway.

  20. Piperine Decreases Binding of Drugs to Human Plasma and Increases Uptake by Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Raghvendra K; Leeners, Brigitte; Imthurn, Bruno; Merki-Feld, Gabriele Susanne; Rosselli, Marinella

    2017-09-26

    We previously reported that piperine, an active alkaloidal principal of black and long peppers, enhances drug bioavailability by inhibiting drug metabolism. Another mechanism influencing drug availability/uptake is its free fraction. Since piperine is highly lipophilic, we hypothesize that it could also interact with drugs through binding displacement and influence their bioavailability. Accordingly, using equilibrium dialysis, we investigated whether piperine alters the binding of model drug ligands, that is flunitrazepam, diazepam, warfarin, salicylic acid, propranolol, lidocaine, and disopyramide to human plasma (n = 4). Since alterations in binding influence drug disposition, we also studied the effects of piperine on the uptake of plasma bound (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by cultured bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Piperine (1-1000 μM) increased the free fraction (fu) of both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein bound drugs in a concentration-dependent manner (p piperine (10 μM) increased the uptake of (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by BMECs (p piperine displaces plasma bound drugs from both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein and facilitates drug uptake across biological membranes (e.g. BMEC). Moreover, it is feasible that piperine may similarly facilitate the transport of drugs into tissues, in vivo, and alter both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Infectomic Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Infected with Cryptococcus neoformans

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    Ambrose Jong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to dissect the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis, a genomic survey of the changes in gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells infected by C. neoformans was carried out in a time-course study. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed sigificant fluctuations in the expression levels of different groups of genes during the pathogen-host interaction. Self-organizing map (SOM analysis revealed that most genes were up- or downregulated 2 folds or more at least at one time point during the pathogen-host engagement. The microarray data were validated by Western blot analysis of a group of genes, including β-actin, Bcl-x, CD47, Bax, Bad, and Bcl-2. Hierarchical cluster profile showed that 61 out of 66 listed interferon genes were changed at least at one time point. Similarly, the active responses in expression of MHC genes were detected at all stages of the interaction. Taken together, our infectomic approaches suggest that the host cells significantly change the gene profiles and also actively participate in immunoregulations of the central nervous system (CNS during C. neoformans infection.

  2. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Vestergaard, Mark B.; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    based on a gamma-variate model of the capillary transit time distribution. In addition, we wanted to investigate if a subtle increase of the blood–brain barrier permeability can be incorporated into the model, still allowing estimation of CTH. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects were...... scanned at 3.0T MRI system applying DCE-MRI and using a gamma-variate model to estimate CTH as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability of the blood–brain barrier, measured as the influx constant Ki. For proof of principle we also investigated three patients...

  3. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide and/or unconjugated bilirubin impair the integrity and function of brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Filipa L; Kittel, Agnes; Veszelka, Szilvia; Palmela, Inês; Tóth, Andrea; Brites, Dora; Deli, Mária A; Brito, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis and jaundice are common conditions in newborns that can lead to brain damage. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to alter the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), little is known on the effects of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and even less on the joint effects of UCB and LPS on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Monolayers of primary rat BMEC were treated with 1 µg/ml LPS and/or 50 µM UCB, in the presence of 100 µM human serum albumin, for 4 or 24 h. Co-cultures of BMEC with astroglial cells, a more complex BBB model, were used in selected experiments. LPS led to apoptosis and UCB induced both apoptotic and necrotic-like cell death. LPS and UCB led to inhibition of P-glycoprotein and activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 in mono-cultures. Transmission electron microscopy evidenced apoptotic bodies, as well as damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in BMEC by either insult. Shorter cell contacts and increased caveolae-like invaginations were noticeable in LPS-treated cells and loss of intercellular junctions was observed upon treatment with UCB. Both compounds triggered impairment of endothelial permeability and transendothelial electrical resistance both in mono- and co-cultures. The functional changes were confirmed by alterations in immunostaining for junctional proteins β-catenin, ZO-1 and claudin-5. Enlargement of intercellular spaces, and redistribution of junctional proteins were found in BMEC after exposure to LPS and UCB. LPS and/or UCB exert direct toxic effects on BMEC, with distinct temporal profiles and mechanisms of action. Therefore, the impairment of brain endothelial integrity upon exposure to these neurotoxins may favor their access to the brain, thus increasing the risk of injury and requiring adequate clinical management of sepsis and jaundice in the neonatal period.

  5. Circulating Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (cBMECs) as Potential Biomarkers of the Blood–Brain Barrier Disorders Caused by Microbial and Non-Microbial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Aimin; Jong, Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker)/S100B+ (brain marker) circulating BMECs (cBMECs) and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC) marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs), along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) (a new BBB marker) as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury. PMID:23637989

  6. Circulating brain microvascular endothelial cells (cBMECs) as potential biomarkers of the blood-brain barrier disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-He; Wang, Lin; Chi, Feng; Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Aimin; Jong, Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker)/S100B+ (brain marker) circulating BMECs (cBMECs) and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC) marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs), along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) (a new BBB marker) as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury.

  7. Circulating brain microvascular endothelial cells (cBMECs as potential biomarkers of the blood-brain barrier disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-He Huang

    Full Text Available Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs, which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker/S100B+ (brain marker circulating BMECs (cBMECs and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs, along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1 (a new BBB marker as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury.

  8. Inflammation stimulates thrombopoietin (Tpo) expression in rat brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells, but suppresses Tpo in astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Freyer, Dorette; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Hoffmann, Olaf; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo) and its receptor (c-Mpl; TpoR), which primary regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet production, are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased Tpo concentrations are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with bacterial or viral meningitis. Since previous data implicated a proapoptotic role of Tpo on newly generated neuronal cells, we herein elucidated the regulation of Tpo in primary rat neurons (e17), astrocytes, and microglia (p0-p3), as well as in brain-derived vascular endothelial cells of 3-week-old rats after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS inhibited Tpo gene expression in astrocytes and microglia, but not in neurons, most likely due to absence of Toll-like receptor 4 in neurons. While Tpo mRNA expression recovered in astrocytes after 24 h, it remained suppressed in microglia. Furthermore, we detected Tpo mRNA expression in primary brain-derived vascular endothelial cells, which also express the TpoR. In these cells, LPS significantly up-regulated Tpo mRNA expression. TpoR mRNA and protein expression remained constitutive in all cell types. Thus, our data provide evidence for a cell-type-specific modulation of Tpo mRNA expression by inflammation in brain-derived cells. Transient down-regulation of Tpo expression in astrocytes and microglia may limit Tpo-induced neuronal cell death in inflammatory brain disorders.

  9. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  10. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

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    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  11. Characterizing responses to gamma radiation by a highly clonogenic fish brain endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Sokeechand, Bibi S H; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-07-01

    The clonogenic property and radiobiological responses of a fish brain endothelial cell line, eelB, derived from the American eel were studied. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the plating efficiency of the eelB cells and to evaluate the clonogenic survival fractions after direct irradiation to low-dose low-LET gamma radiation or receiving irradiated cell conditioned medium in the bystander effect experiments. eelB had the second highest plating efficiency ever reported to date for fish cell lines. Large eelB macroscopic colonies could be formed in a short period of time and were easy to identify and count. Unlike with other fish clonogenic cell lines, which had a relatively slow proliferation profile, clonogenic assays with the eelB cells could be completed as early as 12 days in culture. After direct irradiation with gamma rays at low doses ranging from 0.1Gy to 5Gy, the dose-clonogenic survival curve of the eelB cell line showed a linear trend and did not develop a shoulder region. A classical radio-adaptive response was not induced with the clonogenic survival endpoint when the priming dose (0.1 or 0.5Gy) was delivered 6h before the challenge dose (3 or 5Gy). However, a radio-adaptive response was observed in progeny cells that survived 5Gy and developed lethal mutations. eelB appeared to lack the ability to produce damaging radiation-induced bystander signals on both eelB and HaCaT recipient cells. eelB cell line could be a very useful cell model in the study of radiation impacts on the aquatic health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor and neuropilins mRNAs during rat brain maturation by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adris, Soraya; Ojeda, Elizabeth; Genero, Mario; Argibay, Pablo

    2005-09-01

    1. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been related with several brain functions such as angiogenesis, neuroprotection, and neurogenesis. 2. We studied the mRNA expression of the two most important isoforms of VEGF (VEGF120 and VEGF164) as well as one type of VEGF receptors, neuropilins (NRP), during maturation in the rat brain using real-time PCR. 3. Today, real-time PCR is the method of choice for rapid and reliable quantification of mRNA transcription. 4. VEGF120 has little changes in its expression between P5 and P30. 5. However, VEGF164 increased its expression 2-folds at P15 in comparison to P5, remaining at this level in the adult brain (P30). 6. Both types of NRP, NRP-1 and NRP-2, which only bind VEGF164, increased their expression about 2-folds only at P30, at levels similar to those observed for VEGF164.

  13. Shear Stress Induces Differentiation of Endothelial Lineage Cells to Protect Neonatal Brain from Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through NRP1 and VEGFR2 Signaling

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    Chia-Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injuries disrupt the integrity of neurovascular structure and lead to lifelong neurological deficit. The devastating damage can be ameliorated by preserving the endothelial network, but the source for therapeutic cells is limited. We aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of mechanical shear stress in the differentiation of endothelial lineage cells (ELCs from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and the possible intracellular signals to protect HI injury using cell-based therapy in the neonatal rats. The ASCs expressed early endothelial markers after biochemical stimulation of endothelial growth medium. The ELCs with full endothelial characteristics were accomplished after a subsequential shear stress application for 24 hours. When comparing the therapeutic potential of ASCs and ELCs, the ELCs treatment significantly reduced the infarction area and preserved neurovascular architecture in HI injured brain. The transplanted ELCs can migrate and engraft into the brain tissue, especially in vessels, where they promoted the angiogenesis. The activation of Akt by neuropilin 1 (NRP1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 was important for ELC migration and following in vivo therapeutic outcomes. Therefore, the current study demonstrated importance of mechanical factor in stem cell differentiation and showed promising protection of brain from HI injury using ELCs treatment.

  14. Wnt activation of immortalized brain endothelial cells as a tool for generating a standardized model of the blood brain barrier in vitro.

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    Roberta Paolinelli

    Full Text Available Reproducing the characteristics and the functional responses of the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro represents an important task for the research community, and would be a critical biotechnological breakthrough. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries provide strong demand for inexpensive and easy-to-handle in vitro BBB models to screen novel drug candidates. Recently, it was shown that canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for the induction of the BBB properties in the neonatal brain microvasculature in vivo. In the present study, following on from earlier observations, we have developed a novel model of the BBB in vitro that may be suitable for large scale screening assays. This model is based on immortalized endothelial cell lines derived from murine and human brain, with no need for co-culture with astrocytes. To maintain the BBB endothelial cell properties, the cell lines are cultured in the presence of Wnt3a or drugs that stabilize β-catenin, or they are infected with a transcriptionally active form of β-catenin. Upon these treatments, the cell lines maintain expression of BBB-specific markers, which results in elevated transendothelial electrical resistance and reduced cell permeability. Importantly, these properties are retained for several passages in culture, and they can be reproduced and maintained in different laboratories over time. We conclude that the brain-derived endothelial cell lines that we have investigated gain their specialized characteristics upon activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. This model may be thus suitable to test the BBB permeability to chemicals or large molecular weight proteins, transmigration of inflammatory cells, treatments with cytokines, and genetic manipulation.

  15. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia

    2016-01-01

    receptor localization patterns in mono-cultures and co-cultures. The endothelial cells demonstrated an up-regulation of transferrin receptor mRNA after treatment with the iron chelator deferoxamine. The association of [125I]holo-transferrin and [59Fe]-transferrin to the endothelial cells was inhibited...... by an excess of unlabeled holo-transferrin, indicating receptor mediated association. However, over time the cell associated [59Fe]-label exceeded that of [125I]holo-transferrin, which could indicate release of iron in the endothelial cells and receptor recycling. Luminal-to-abluminal transport of [125I...

  16. Overexpression of pregnane X and glucocorticoid receptors and the regulation of cytochrome P450 in human epileptic brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Chaitali; Hossain, Mohammed; Solanki, Jesal; Najm, Imad M; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests a metabolic contribution of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) to the drug-resistant phenotype in human epilepsy. However, the upstream molecular regulators of CYP in the epileptic brain remain understudied. We therefore investigated the expression and function of pregnane xenobiotic (PXR) and glucocorticoid (GR) nuclear receptors in endothelial cells established from post-epilepsy surgery brain samples. PXR/GR localization was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in specimens from subjects who underwent temporal lobe resections to relieve drug-resistant seizures. We used primary cultures of endothelial cells obtained from epileptic brain tissues (EPI-ECs; n = 8), commercially available human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs; n = 8), and human hepatocytes (n = 3). PXR/GR messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in brain ECs was initially determined by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays. The expression of PXR/GR proteins was quantified by Western blot. PXR and GR silencing was performed in EPI-ECs (n = 4), and the impact on downstream CYP expression was determined. PXR/GR expression was detected by immunofluorescence in ECs and neurons in the human temporal lobe samples analyzed. Elevated mRNA and protein levels of PXR and GR were found in EPI-ECs versus control HBMECs. Hepatocytes, used as a positive control, displayed the highest levels of PXR/GR expression. We confirmed expression of PXR/GR in cytoplasmic-nuclear subcellular fractions, with a significant increase of PXR/GR in EPI-ECs versus controls. CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP2E1 were overexpressed in EPI-ECs versus control, whereas CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 were downregulated or absent in EPI-ECs. GR silencing in EPI-ECs led to decreased CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and PXR expression. PXR silencing in EPI-ECs resulted in the specific downregulation of CYP3A4 expression. Our results indicate increased PXR and GR in primary ECs derived from human epileptic brains. PXR or GR may be responsible for a local drug brain

  17. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coué, Grégory; Freese, Christian; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; Pickl, Karin E; Sinner, Frank M; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, surface charge, and loading efficiency, and were applied on human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (Huvec) cells. Cell-internalization and cytotoxicity experiments showed that the PAA-based nanocomplexes were essentially nontoxic, and the peptide was successfully internalized into cells. The results indicate that these PAAs have an excellent property as nontoxic carriers for intracellular protein and peptide delivery, and provide opportunities for novel applications in the delivery of peptides to endothelial cells of the brain.

  18. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J.; Tu, Hong; Abbott, N. Joan; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be upregulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb overex...

  19. Fucoidan Extracted from Hijiki Protects Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Against Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure-Induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Sook; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, In-Soo; Ali, Syed F; Kleinman, Michael T; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan against the decreased function of primary cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). BBMECs were extracted from bovine brains and cultured until confluent. To evaluate the function of BBMECs, we performed a permeability test using cell-by-cell equipment and by Western blot analysis for zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1), which is a tight junction protein of BMECs, and evaluated oxidative stress in BBMECs using the DCFH-DA assay and the CUPRAC-BCS assay. The increased oxidative stress in BBMECs following DEP exposure was suppressed by fucoidan. In addition, permeability of BBMECs induced by DEP exposure was decreased by fucoidan treatment. Our results showed that fucoidan protects against BBMEC disruption induced by DEP exposure. This study provides evidence that fucoidan might protect the central nervous system (CNS) against DEP exposure.

  20. Acclimatization to 4100 m does not change capillary density or mRNA expression of potential angiogenesis regulatory factors in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; Andersen, Jesper L.

    2004-01-01

    Increased skeletal muscle capillary density would be a logical adaptive mechanism to chronic hypoxic exposure. However, animal studies have yielded conflicting results, and human studies are sparse. Neoformation of capillaries is dependent on endothelial growth factors such as vascular endothelial...

  1. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  2. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases during Blood-Brain Barrier-Enhanced Permeability Caused by Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom

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    Monique C. P. Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phoneutria nigriventer spider accidental envenomation provokes neurotoxic manifestations, which when critical, results in epileptic-like episodes. In rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV causes blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb. The PNV-induced excitotoxicity results from disturbances on Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels and glutamate handling. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, beyond its angiogenic effect, also, interferes on synaptic physiology by affecting the same ion channels and protects neurons from excitotoxicity. However, it is unknown whether VEGF expression is altered following PNV envenomation. We found that adult and neonates rats injected with PNV showed immediate neurotoxic manifestations which paralleled with endothelial occludin, β-catenin, and laminin downregulation indicative of BBBb. In neonate rats, VEGF, VEGF mRNA, and Flt-1 receptors, glutamate decarboxylase, and calbindin-D28k increased in Purkinje neurons, while, in adult rats, the BBBb paralleled with VEGF mRNA, Flk-1, and calbindin-D28k increases and Flt-1 decreases. Statistically, the variable age had a role in such differences, which might be due to age-related unequal maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB and thus differential cross-signaling among components of the glial neurovascular unit. The concurrent increases in the VEGF/Flt-1/Flk-1 system in the cerebellar neuron cells and the BBBb following PNV exposure might imply a cytokine modulation of neuronal excitability consequent to homeostatic perturbations induced by ion channels-acting PNV neuropeptides. Whether such modulation represents neuroprotection needs further investigation.

  3. The Multifaceted Responses of Primary Human Astrocytes and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells to the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia Burgdorferi

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    Catherine A. Brissette

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The vector-borne pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes a multi-system disorder including neurological complications. These neurological disorders, collectively termed neuroborreliosis, can occur in up to 15% of untreated patients. The neurological symptoms are probably a result of a glial-driven, host inflammatory response to the bacterium. However, the specific contributions of individual glial and other support cell types to the pathogenesis of neuroborreliosis are relatively unexplored. The goal of this project was to characterize specific astrocyte and endothelial cell responses to B. burgdorferi. Primary human astrocytes and primary HBMEC (human brain microvascular endothelial cells were incubated with B. burgdorferi over a 72-h period and the transcriptional responses to the bacterium were analyzed by real-time PCR arrays. There was a robust increase in several surveyed chemokine and related genes, including IL (interleukin-8, for both primary astrocytes and HBMEC. Array results were confirmed with individual sets of PCR primers. The production of specific chemokines by both astrocytes and HBMEC in response to B. burgdorferi, including IL-8, CXCL-1, and CXCL-10, were confirmed by ELISA. These results demonstrate that primary astrocytes and HBMEC respond to virulent B. burgdorferi by producing a number of chemokines. These data suggest that infiltrating phagocytic cells, particularly neutrophils, attracted by chemokines expressed at the BBB (blood–brain barrier may be important contributors to the early inflammatory events associated with neuroborreliosis.

  4. Metformin induces up-regulation of blood-brain barrier functions by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Fuyuko; Dohgu, Shinya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Kaneshima, Shuji; Matsuo, Mai; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2013-04-19

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs frequently in CNS diseases and injuries. Few drugs have been developed as therapeutic candidates for facilitating BBB functions. Here, we examined whether metformin up-regulates BBB functions using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBECs). Metformin, concentration- and time-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance of RBEC monolayers, and decreased RBEC permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin. These effects of metformin were blocked by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK stimulation with an AMPK activator, AICAR, enhanced BBB functions. These findings indicate that metformin induces up-regulation of BBB functions via AMPK activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison between capillary, venous and arterial levels of protein S100B in patients with severe brain pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrand, Ramona; Romner, Bertil; Reinstrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein S100B is soon in clinical use as a sensitive marker after mild traumatic head injury in adults. Initial studies of S100B in pediatric head injury have shown promising results. Venous sampling can be challenging in children and capillary samples are often a preferred option. The aim of the...

  6. Cancer-associated fibroblast promote transmigration through endothelial brain cells in three-dimensional in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Lee, Joo Hyun; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Kim, Se Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Brain metastases are associated with high morbidity as well as with poor prognosis and survival in breast cancer patients. Despite its clinical importance, metastasis of breast cancer cells through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is poorly understood. The objective of our study was to investigate whether cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in breast cancer brain metastasis. Using a cell adhesion assays, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration assays and soft agar colony formation assays, we investigated the physical roles of CAFs in breast cancer brain metastasis. We also performed immunofluorescence, flow cytometric analysis, Droplet Digital PCR and Simon™ Simple Western System to confirm changes in expression levels. We established two novel three-dimensional (3D) culture systems using a perpendicular slide chamber and applying 3D embedded culture method to reflect brain metastasis conditions. With a newly developed device, CAFs was proven to promote cell adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CAFs enhanced the invasive migration of breast cancer cells in two kinds of 3D cultures. These 3D models also reliably recapitulate the initial steps of BBB transmigration, micro-metastasis and colonization. Expression of integrin α5β1 and αvβ3, c-MET and α2,6-siayltransferase was increased in breast cancer cells that migrated through the BBB. In conclusion, based on our in vitro BBB and co-culture models, our data suggest that CAFs may play a role in breast cancer brain metastasis. © 2014 UICC.

  7. An isogenic blood-brain barrier model comprising brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, and neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Scott G; Stebbins, Matthew J; Morales, Bethsymarie Soto; Asai, Shusaku W; Vatine, Gad D; Svendsen, Clive N; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical in maintaining a physical and metabolic barrier between the blood and the brain. The BBB consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) that line the brain vasculature and combine with astrocytes, neurons and pericytes to form the neurovascular unit. We hypothesized that astrocytes and neurons generated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could induce BBB phenotypes in iPSC-derived BMECs, creating a robust multicellular human BBB model. To this end, iPSCs were used to form neural progenitor-like EZ-spheres, which were in turn differentiated to neurons and astrocytes, enabling facile neural cell generation. The iPSC-derived astrocytes and neurons induced barrier tightening in primary rat BMECs indicating their BBB inductive capacity. When co-cultured with human iPSC-derived BMECs, the iPSC-derived neurons and astrocytes significantly elevated trans-endothelial electrical resistance, reduced passive permeability, and improved tight junction continuity in the BMEC cell population, while p-glycoprotein efflux transporter activity was unchanged. A physiologically relevant neural cell mixture of one neuron: three astrocytes yielded optimal BMEC induction properties. Finally, an isogenic multicellular BBB model was successfully demonstrated employing BMECs, astrocytes, and neurons from the same donor iPSC source. It is anticipated that such an isogenic facsimile of the human BBB could have applications in furthering understanding the cellular interplay of the neurovascular unit in both healthy and diseased humans. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 843. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined...

  9. Functional expression of choline transporter like-protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Beniko; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Kawai, Yuiko; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Inazu, Masato

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs). Choline uptake into hBMECs was a saturable process that was mediated by a Na(+)-independent, membrane potential and pH-dependent transport system. The cells have two different [(3)H]choline transport systems with Km values of 35.0 ± 4.9 μM and 54.1 ± 8.1 μM, respectively. Choline uptake was inhibited by choline, acetylcholine (ACh) and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3). Various organic cations also interacted with the choline transport system. Choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 mRNA were highly expressed, while mRNA for high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) were not expressed in hBMECs. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were localized to brain microvascular endothelial cells in human brain cortical sections. Both CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were expressed on the plasma membrane and mitochondria. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins are mainly expressed in plasma membrane and mitochondria, respectively. We conclude that choline is mainly transported via an intermediate-affinity choline transport system, CTL1 and CTL2, in hBMECs. These transporters are responsible for the uptake of extracellular choline and organic cations. CTL2 participate in choline transport mainly in mitochondria, and may be the major site for the control of choline oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of low-dose methylprednisolone on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells and its significance in rats after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of low-dose methylprednisolone(MP treatment after traumatic brain injury(TBI in rats on the number of peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs and injury area of the brain.Methods One hundred and fifty-four adult male Wistar rats were involved in the present study,and they were randomly divided into normal control group(n=18,TBI control group(n=38,MP control group(n=30,MP+TBI group(n=30 and TBI+MP group(n=38.The TBI model was reproduced by fluid percussion injury(FPI.MP(5mg/kg was intraperitoneally administered once a day for 4 days.Peripheral venous blood samples were taken on day 1,3,7 and 14,and the counts of EPCs were determined by flow cytometry.The rats were sacrificed on day 1 and 3,brain edema was estimated by dry-wet weight method,and the blood-brain barrier(BBB permeability was determined by Evans-blue extravasation.Results The counts of peripheral blood EPCs were significantly higher in MP control group,MP+TBI group and TBI+MP group on day 1,3 and 7 than that in normal control and TBI control group,and it returned to the level of normal control group on day 14.The BBB permeability was improved and brain edema alleviated in MP+TBI and TBI+MP group on day 3.Conclusion The administration of low-dose MP may increase the count of peripheral blood EPCs in rats,decrease BBB damage,and alleviate brain edema.

  11. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  12. β2 integrin-mediated crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Roser; Lyck, Ruth; Vestweber, Dietmar; Engelhardt, Britta

    2014-01-01

    In acute neuroinflammatory states such as meningitis, neutrophils cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and contribute to pathological alterations of cerebral function. The mechanisms that govern neutrophil migration across the BBB are ill defined. Using live-cell imaging, we show that LPS-stimulated BBB endothelium supports neutrophil arrest, crawling, and diapedesis under physiological flow in vitro. Investigating the interactions of neutrophils from wild-type, CD11a(-/-), CD11b(-/-), and CD18(null) mice with wild-type, junctional adhesion molecule-A(-/-), ICAM-1(null), ICAM-2(-/-), or ICAM-1(null)/ICAM-2(-/-) primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells, we demonstrate that neutrophil arrest, polarization, and crawling required G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent activation of β2 integrins and binding to endothelial ICAM-1. LFA-1 was the prevailing ligand for endothelial ICAM-1 in mediating neutrophil shear resistant arrest, whereas Mac-1 was dominant over LFA-1 in mediating neutrophil polarization on the BBB in vitro. Neutrophil crawling was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and neutrophil LFA-1 and Mac-1. In the absence of crawling, few neutrophils maintained adhesive interactions with the BBB endothelium by remaining either stationary on endothelial junctions or displaying transient adhesive interactions characterized by a fast displacement on the endothelium along the direction of flow. Diapedesis of stationary neutrophils was unchanged by the lack of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and occurred exclusively via the paracellular pathway. Crawling neutrophils, although preferentially crossing the BBB through the endothelial junctions, could additionally breach the BBB via the transcellular route. Thus, β2 integrin-mediated neutrophil crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed BBB.

  13. A three-dimensional neural spheroid model for capillary-like network formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Molly E; Kramer, Liana L; Livi, Liane L; Brown, Tyler; Moore, Christopher; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2017-01-29

    In vitro three-dimensional neural spheroid models have an in vivo-like cell density, and have the potential to reduce animal usage and increase experimental throughput. The aim of this study was to establish a spheroid model to study the formation of capillary-like networks in a three-dimensional environment that incorporates both neuronal and glial cell types, and does not require exogenous vasculogenic growth factors. We created self-assembled, scaffold-free cellular spheroids using primary-derived postnatal rodent cortex as a cell source. The interactions between relevant neural cell types, basement membrane proteins, and endothelial cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine if endothelial network structures had lumens. Endothelial cells within cortical spheroids assembled into capillary-like networks with lumens. Networks were surrounded by basement membrane proteins, including laminin, fibronectin and collagen IV, as well as key neurovascular cell types. Existing in vitro models of the cortical neurovascular environment study monolayers of endothelial cells, either on transwell inserts or coating cellular spheroids. These models are not well suited to study vasculogenesis, a process hallmarked by endothelial cell cord formation and subsequent lumenization. The neural spheroid is a new model to study the formation of endothelial cell capillary-like structures in vitro within a high cell density three-dimensional environment that contains both neuronal and glial populations. This model can be applied to investigate vascular assembly in healthy or disease states, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, or neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2009-03-15

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, the main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via 'Trojan horse' mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology.

  15. EGb761 provides a protective effect against Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell damage and blood-brain barrier disruption in an in vitro bEnd.3 endothelial model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bin Wan

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of senile dementia which is characterized by abnormal amyloid beta (Aβ accumulation and deposition in brain parenchyma and cerebral capillaries, and leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption. Despite great progress in understanding the etiology of AD, the underlying pathogenic mechanism of BBB damage is still unclear, and no effective treatment has been devised. The standard Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 has been widely used as a potential cognitive enhancer for the treatment of AD. However, the cellular mechanism underlying the effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we employed an immortalized endothelial cell line (bEnd.3 and incubation of Aβ(1-42 oligomer, to mimic a monolayer BBB model under conditions found in the AD brain. We investigated the effect of EGb761 on BBB and found that Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell injury, apoptosis, and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, were attenuated by treatment with EGb761. Moreover, treatment of the cells with EGb761 decreased BBB permeability and increased tight junction scaffold protein levels including ZO-1, Claudin-5 and Occludin. We also found that the Aβ(1-42 oligomer-induced upregulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE, which mediates Aβ cytotoxicity and plays an essential role in AD progression, was significantly decreased by treatment with EGb761. To our knowledge, we provide the first direct in vitro evidence of an effect of EGb761 on the brain endothelium exposed to Aβ(1-42 oligomer, and on the expression of tight junction (TJ scaffold proteins and RAGE. Our results provide a new insight into a possible mechanism of action of EGb761. This study provides a rational basis for the therapeutic application of EGb761 in the treatment of AD.

  16. Delivering minocycline into brain endothelial cells with liposome-based technology

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Changhong; Levchenko, Tatyana; Guo, Shuzhen; Stins, Monique; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Lo, Eng H.

    2012-01-01

    Minocycline has been proposed as a way to blunt neurovascular injury from matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) during stroke. However, recent clinical trials suggest that high levels of minocycline may have deleterious side-effects. Here, we showed that very high minocycline concentrations damage endothelial cells via calpain/caspase pathways. To alleviate this potential cytotoxicity, we encapsulated minocycline in liposomes. Low concentrations of minocycline could not reduce tumor necrosis facto...

  17. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is required for amyloid pathology in brain endothelial cells induced by Glycoprotein 120, methamphetamine and nicotine

    OpenAIRE

    Liqun Liu; Jingyi Yu; Li Li; Bao Zhang; Lingjuan Liu; Chun-Hua Wu; Ambrose Jong; Ding-An Mao; Sheng-He Huang

    2017-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) caused by HIV-1 virotoxins and drug abuse is the lack of understanding the underlying mechanisms that are commonly associated with disorders of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which mainly consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Here, we hypothesized that Glycoprotein 120 (gp120), methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine (NT) can enhance amyloid-beta (A?) accumulation in BMEC through Alpha7 nicoti...

  18. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coué, G.M.J.P.C.; Freese, C.; Unger, R.E.; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; Pickl, K.E.; Sinner, F.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles

  19. PDCD10 (CCM3) regulates brain endothelial barrier integrity in cerebral cavernous malformation type 3: role of CCM3-ERK1/2-cortactin cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Sladojevic, Nikola; Keep, Richard F; Andjelkovic, Anuska V

    2015-11-01

    Impairment of brain endothelial barrier integrity is critical for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) lesion development. The current study investigates changes in tight junction (TJ) complex organization when PDCD10 (CCM3) is mutated/depleted in human brain endothelial cells. Analysis of lesions with CCM3 mutation and brain endothelial cells transfected with CCM3 siRNA (CCM3-knockdown) showed little or no increase in TJ transmembrane and scaffolding proteins mRNA expression, but proteins levels were generally decreased. CCM3-knockdown cells had a redistribution of claudin-5 and occludin from the membrane to the cytosol with no alterations in protein turnover but with diminished protein-protein interactions with ZO-1 and ZO-1 interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. The most profound effect of CCM3 mutation/depletion was on an actin-binding protein, cortactin. CCM3 depletion caused cortactin Ser-phosphorylation, dissociation from ZO-1 and actin, redistribution to the cytosol and degradation. This affected cortical actin ring organization, TJ complex stability and consequently barrier integrity, with constant hyperpermeability to inulin. A potential link between CCM3 depletion and altered cortactin was tonic activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2. ERK1/2 inhibition increased cortactin expression and incorporation into the TJ complex and improved barrier integrity. This study highlights the potential role of CCM3 in regulating TJ complex organization and brain endothelial barrier permeability.

  20. Regulation of monocarboxylic acid transporter-1 by cAMP dependent vesicular trafficking in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhernik, Amy L; Li, Lun; LaVoy, Nathan; Velasquez, Micah J; Smith, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a detailed characterization of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter-1 (Mct1) in cytoplasmic vesicles of cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells shows them to be a diverse population of endosomes intrinsic to the regulation of the transporter by a brief 25 to 30 minute exposure to the membrane permeant cAMP analog, 8Br-cAMP. The vesicles are heterogeneous in size, mobility, internal pH, and co-localize with discreet markers of particular types of endosomes including early endosomes, clathrin coated vesicles, caveolar vesicles, trans-golgi, and lysosomes. The vesicular localization of Mct1 was not dependent on its N or C termini, however, the size and pH of Mct1 vesicles was increased by deletion of either terminus demonstrating a role for the termini in vesicular trafficking of Mct1. Using a novel BCECF-AM based assay developed in this study, 8Br-cAMP was shown to decrease the pH of Mct1 vesicles after 25 minutes. This result and method were confirmed in experiments with a ratiometric pH-sensitive EGFP-mCherry dual tagged Mct1 construct. Overall, the results indicate that cAMP signaling reduces the functionality of Mct1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by facilitating its entry into a highly dynamic vesicular trafficking pathway that appears to lead to the transporter's trafficking to autophagosomes and lysosomes.

  1. Endothelial Cells Derived from Non-malignant Tissues Are of Limited Value as Models for Brain Tumor Vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Jennifer; Mock, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2015-05-01

    Human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are commonly chosen over freshly isolated endothelial cells from glioblastomas (GECs) due to accessibility and costs. To test their suitability for in vitro studies, we comprehensively compared the transcriptomes and responses to major angiogenic cytokines of HUVECs (n=2) and GECs (n=5). Purity of GEC cultures was confirmed by uptake of acetylated low-density protein and immunostaining. Unsupervised analysis revealed a distinct grouping. We identified 854 differentially expressed genes. Pathway and gene ontology enrichment analyses pointed to clear differences in angiogenesis and leukocyte transmigration. Comparing the expression of cell adhesion molecules in five major angiogenic cytokines revealed that HUVECs in contrast to GECs did not exhibit a previously described down-regulation of cell adhesion molecules upon incubation with transforming growth factor betas, but rather with basic fibroblast growth factor. Given our findings, we strongly recommend the use of GECs as model cells for brain tumor endothelium for experiments investigating angiogenesis and immunobiology. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Approaches to transport therapeutic drugs across the blood-brain barrier to treat brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system is protected by barriers which control the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. The blood-brain barrier, formed by the endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells of blood-borne compounds and facilitates nutrients essential for normal metabolism to reach brain cells. This very tight regulation of the brain homeostasis results in the inability of some small and large therapeutic compounds to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, various strategies are being developed to enhance the amount and concentration of therapeutic compounds in the brain. In this review, we will address the different approaches used to increase the transport of therapeutics from blood into the brain parenchyma. We will mainly concentrate on the physiologic approach which takes advantage of specific receptors already expressed on the capillary endothelial cells forming the BBB and necessary for the survival of brain cells. Among all the approaches used for increasing brain delivery of therapeutics, the most accepted method is the use of the physiological approach which takes advantage of the transcytosis capacity of specific receptors expressed at the BBB. The low density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) is the most adapted for such use with the engineered peptide compound (EPiC) platform incorporating the Angiopep peptide in new therapeutics the most advanced with promising data in the clinic.

  3. Identification of CiaR Regulated Genes That Promote Group B Streptococcal Virulence and Interaction with Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Rong; Cutting, Andrew S; Del Rosario, Yvette; Villarino, Nicholas; Stewart, Lara; Weston, Thomas A; Patras, Kathryn A; Doran, Kelly S

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major causative agent of neonatal meningitis due to its ability to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the central nervous system (CNS). It has been demonstrated that GBS can invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC), a primary component of the BBB; however, the mechanism of intracellular survival and trafficking is unclear. We previously identified a two component regulatory system, CiaR/H, which promotes GBS intracellular survival in hBMEC. Here we show that a GBS strain deficient in the response regulator, CiaR, localized more frequently with Rab5, Rab7 and LAMP1 positive vesicles. Further, lysosomes isolated from hBMEC contained fewer viable bacteria following initial infection with the ΔciaR mutant compared to the WT strain. To characterize the contribution of CiaR-regulated genes, we constructed isogenic mutant strains lacking the two most down-regulated genes in the CiaR-deficient mutant, SAN_2180 and SAN_0039. These genes contributed to bacterial uptake and intracellular survival. Furthermore, competition experiments in mice showed that WT GBS had a significant survival advantage over the Δ2180 and Δ0039 mutants in the bloodstream and brain.

  4. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Sung Yong, E-mail: seum@miami.edu; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  5. Regulation of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter 1 Trafficking by the Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells Requires Cross-talk with Notch Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zejian; Sneve, Mary; Haroldson, Thomas A; Smith, Jeffrey P; Drewes, Lester R

    2016-04-08

    The transport of monocarboxylate fuels such as lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies across brain endothelial cells is mediated by monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1). Although the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for rodent blood-brain barrier development and for the expression of associated nutrient transporters, the role of this pathway in the regulation of brain endothelial MCT1 is unknown. Here we report expression of nine members of the frizzled receptor family by the RBE4 rat brain endothelial cell line. Furthermore, activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RBE4 cells via nuclear β-catenin signaling with LiCl does not alter brain endothelialMct1mRNA but increases the amount of MCT1 transporter protein. Plasma membrane biotinylation studies and confocal microscopic examination of mCherry-tagged MCT1 indicate that increased transporter results from reduced MCT1 trafficking from the plasma membrane via the endosomal/lysosomal pathway and is facilitated by decreased MCT1 ubiquitination following LiCl treatment. Inhibition of the Notch pathway by the γ-secretase inhibitorN-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester negated the up-regulation of MCT1 by LiCl, demonstrating a cross-talk between the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch pathways. Our results are important because they show, for the first time, the regulation of MCT1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by the multifunctional canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2017-01-01

    concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...... cells. The mechanisms underlying transendothelial L-glutamate transport are however still not well understood. The present chapter summarizes the current knowledge on blood-brain barrier L-glutamate transporters and the suggested pathways for the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux....

  7. Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Steven F; Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Mu, Dakai; Hudry, Eloise; Hyman, Bradley T; Maguire, Casey A; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-01-01

    Developing therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Notably, emerging technologies may provide promising new options for the treatment of CNS disorders. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to transduce cells in the CNS following intravascular administration in rodents, cats, pigs, and non-human primates. These results suggest that AAV9 is capable of crossing the BBB. However, mechanisms that govern AAV9 transendothelial trafficking at the BBB remain unknown. Furthermore, possibilities that AAV9 may transduce brain endothelial cells or affect BBB integrity still require investigation. Using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells as a model of the human BBB, we performed transduction and transendothelial trafficking assays comparing AAV9 to AAV2, a serotype that does not cross the BBB or transduce endothelial cells effectively in vivo. Results of our in vitro studies indicate that AAV9 penetrates brain microvascular endothelial cells barriers more effectively than AAV2, but has reduced transduction efficiency. In addition, our data suggest that (i) AAV9 penetrates endothelial barriers through an active, cell-mediated process, and (ii) AAV9 fails to disrupt indicators of BBB integrity such as transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction protein expression/localization, and inflammatory activation status. Overall, this report shows how human brain endothelial cells configured in BBB models can be utilized for evaluating transendothelial movement and transduction kinetics of various AAV capsids. Importantly, the use of a human in vitro BBB model can provide import insight into the possible effects that candidate AVV gene therapy vectors may have on the status of BBB integrity. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 192. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Protection of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor to Brain Edema Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Its Involved Mechanisms: Effect of Aquaporin-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heling Chu

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has protective effects on many neurological diseases. However, whether VEGF acts on brain edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is largely unknown. Our previous study has shown aquaporin-4 (AQP4 plays an important role in brain edema elimination following ICH. Meanwhile, there is close relationship between VEGF and AQP4. In this study, we aimed to test effects of VEGF on brain edema following ICH and examine whether they were AQP4 dependent. Recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165 was injected intracerebroventricularly 1 d after ICH induced by microinjecting autologous whole blood into striatum. We detected perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression, then examined the effects of rhVEGF165 on perihemotomal brain edema at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after injection in wild type (AQP4(+/+ and AQP4 knock-out (AQP4(-/- mice. Furthermore, we assessed the possible signal transduction pathways activated by VEGF to regulate AQP4 expression via astrocyte cultures. We found perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression was highly increased by rhVEGF165. RhVEGF165 alleviated perihemotomal brain edema in AQP4(+/+ mice at each time point, but had no effect on AQP4(-/- mice. Perihemotomal EB extravasation was increased by rhVEGF165 in AQP4(-/- mice, but not AQP4(+/+ mice. RhVEGF165 reduced neurological deficits and increased Nissl's staining cells surrounding hemotoma in both types of mice and these effects were related to AQP4. RhVEGF165 up-regulated phospharylation of C-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK and AQP4 protein in cultured astrocytes. The latter was inhibited by JNK and ERK inhibitors. In conclusion, VEGF reduces neurological deficits, brain edema, and neuronal death surrounding hemotoma but has no influence on BBB permeability. These effects are closely related to AQP4 up-regulation, possibly through activating JNK and ERK pathways. The current study may present new insights to

  9. miR-Let7A Controls the Cell Death and Tight Junction Density of Brain Endothelial Cells under High Glucose Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Yoon, So Ra; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced stress in the brain of patients with diabetes triggers the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), leading to diverse neurological diseases including stroke and dementia. Recently, the role of microRNA becomes an interest in the research for deciphering the mechanism of brain endothelial cell damage under hyperglycemia. Therefore, we investigated whether mircoRNA Let7A (miR-Let7A) controls the damage of brain endothelial (bEnd.3) cells against high glucose condition. Cell viability, cell death marker expressions (p-53, Bax, and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase), the loss of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and claudin-5), proinflammatory response (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, and nitrite production were confirmed using MTT, reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and Griess reagent assay. miR-Let7A overexpression significantly prevented cell death and loss of tight junction proteins and attenuated proinflammatory response and nitrite production in the bEnd.3 cells under high glucose condition. Taken together, we suggest that miR-Let7A may attenuate brain endothelial cell damage by controlling cell death signaling, loss of tight junction proteins, and proinflammatory response against high glucose stress. In the future, the manipulation of miR-Let7A may be a novel solution in controlling BBB disruption which leads to the central nervous system diseases.

  10. Live-cell imaging to detect phosphatidylserine externalization in brain endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation: implications for the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Johnson, Michael S; Chen, Biyi; Grace, Michael; Ukath, Jaysree; Lee, Vivienne S; McRobb, Lucinda S; Sedger, Lisa M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established intervention for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The processes of AVM vessel occlusion after SRS are poorly understood. To improve SRS efficacy, it is important to understand the cellular response of blood vessels to radiation. The molecular changes on the surface of AVM endothelial cells after irradiation may also be used for vascular targeting. This study investigates radiation-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on endothelial cells using live-cell imaging. METHODS An immortalized cell line generated from mouse brain endothelium, bEnd.3 cells, was cultured and irradiated at different radiation doses using a linear accelerator. PS externalization in the cells was subsequently visualized using polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis (pSIVA)-IANBD, a polarity-sensitive probe. Live-cell imaging was used to monitor PS externalization in real time. The effects of radiation on the cell cycle of bEnd.3 cells were also examined by flow cytometry. RESULTS Ionizing radiation effects are dose dependent. Reduction in the cell proliferation rate was observed after exposure to 5 Gy radiation, whereas higher radiation doses (15 Gy and 25 Gy) totally inhibited proliferation. In comparison with cells treated with sham radiation, the irradiated cells showed distinct pseudopodial elongation with little or no spreading of the cell body. The percentages of pSIVA-positive cells were significantly higher (p = 0.04) 24 hours after treatment in the cultures that received 25- and 15-Gy doses of radiation. This effect was sustained until the end of the experiment (3 days). Radiation at 5 Gy did not induce significant PS externalization compared with the sham-radiation controls at any time points (p > 0.15). Flow cytometric analysis data indicate that irradiation induced growth arrest of bEnd.3 cells, with cells accumulating in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS Ionizing radiation

  11. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of RARα, RARγ, or RXRα Increases Barrier Tightness in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Lippmann, Ethan S; Faubion, Madeline G; Daneman, Richard; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2017-09-28

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical to central nervous system (CNS) health. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are often used as in vitro BBB models for studying BBB dysfunction and therapeutic screening applications. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated to cells having key BMEC barrier and transporter properties, offering a renewable, scalable source of human BMECs. hPSC-derived BMECs have previously been shown to respond to all-trans retinoic acid (RA), and the goal of this study was to identify the stages at which differentiating human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) respond to activation of RA receptors (RARs) to impart BBB phenotypes. Here the authors identified that RA application to iPSC-derived BMECs at days 6-8 of differentiation led to a substantial elevation in transendothelial electrical resistance and induction of VE-cadherin expression. Specific RAR agonists identified RARα, RARγ, and RXRα as receptors capable of inducing barrier phenotypes. Moreover, RAR/RXRα costimulation elevated VE-cadherin expression and improved barrier fidelity to levels that recapitulated the effects of RA. This study elucidates the roles of RA signaling in iPSC-derived BMEC differentiation, and identifies directed agonist approaches that can improve BMEC fidelity for drug screening studies while also distinguishing potential nuclear receptor targets to explore in BBB dysfunction and therapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. eEF-2 Phosphorylation Down-Regulates P-Glycoprotein Over-Expression in Rat Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Hua Tang

    Full Text Available We investigated whether glutamate, NMDA receptors, and eukaryote elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF-2K/eEF-2 regulate P-glycoprotein expression, and the effects of the eEF-2K inhibitor NH125 on the expression of P-glycoprotein in rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (RBMECs.Cortex was obtained from newborn Wistar rat brains. After surface vessels and meninges were removed, the pellet containing microvessels was resuspended and incubated at 37°C in culture medium. Cell viability was assessed by the MTT assay. RBMECs were identified by immunohistochemistry with anti-vWF. P-glycoprotein, phospho-eEF-2, and eEF-2 expression were determined by western blot analysis. Mdr1a gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR.Mdr1a mRNA, P-glycoprotein and phospho-eEF-2 expression increased in L-glutamate stimulated RBMECs. P-glycoprotein and phospho-eEF-2 expression were down-regulated after NH125 treatment in L-glutamate stimulated RBMECs.eEF-2K/eEF-2 should have played an important role in the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in RBMECs. eEF-2K inhibitor NH125 could serve as an efficacious anti-multidrug resistant agent.

  14. Neisseria meningitidis induces brain microvascular endothelial cell detachment from the matrix and cleavage of occludin: a role for MMP-8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schubert-Unkmeir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is a hallmark event in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. Several inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, contribute to this disruption. Here we show that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC with Neisseria meningitidis induced an increase of permeability at prolonged time of infection. This was paralleled by an increase in MMP-8 activity in supernatants collected from infected cells. A detailed analysis revealed that MMP-8 was involved in the proteolytic cleavage of the tight junction protein occludin, resulting in its disappearance from the cell periphery and cleavage to a lower-sized 50-kDa protein in infected HBMEC. Abrogation of MMP-8 activity by specific inhibitors as well as transfection with MMP-8 siRNA abolished production of the cleavage fragment and occludin remained attached to the cell periphery. In addition, MMP-8 affected cell adherence to the underlying matrix. A similar temporal relationship was observed for MMP activity and cell detachment. Injury of the HBMEC monolayer suggested the requirement of direct cell contact because no detachment was observed when bacteria were placed above a transwell membrane or when bacterial supernatant was directly added to cells. Inhibition of MMP-8 partially prevented detachment of infected HBMEC and restored BBB permeability. Together, we established that MMP-8 activity plays a crucial role in disassembly of cell junction components and cell adhesion during meningococcal infection.

  15. Impact of commercial cigarette smoke condensate on brain tissue co-cultured with astrocytes and blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Bong; Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choe, Eun-Sang; Kim, Kwang-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of two commercial cigarette smoke condensates (CCSC) on oxidative stress and cell cytotoxicity in human brain (T98G) or astrocytes (U-373 MG) in the presence of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Cell viability of mono-culture of T98G or U-373 MG was markedly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner, and T98G was more susceptible than U-373 MG to CCSC exposure. Cytotoxicity was less prominent when T98G was co-cultured with HBMEC than when T98G was co-cultured with U-373 MG. Significant reduction in trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER), a biomarker of cellular integrity was noted in HBMEC co-cultured with T98G (HBMEC-T98G co-culture) and U-373 MG co-cultured with T98G (U-373 MG-T98G co-culture) after 24 or 48 hr CCSC exposure, respectively. TEER value of U-373 MG co-cultured with T98G (79-84%) was higher than HBMEC co-cultured with T98G (62-63%) within 120-hr incubation with CCSC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by CCSC in mono-culture of T98G and U-373 MG reached highest levels at 4 and 16 mg/ml, respectively. ROS production by T98G fell when co-cultured with HBMEC or U-373MG. These findings suggest that adverse consequences of CCSC treatment on brain cells may be protected by blood-brain barrier or astrocytes, but with chronic exposure toxicity may be worsened due to destruction of cellular integrity.

  16. Capillary origami

    OpenAIRE

    Py, Charlotte; Reverdy, Paul; Doppler, L.; Bico, J.; Roman, B.; Baroud, Charles,

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The hairs of a wet dog rushing out from a pond assemble into bundles; this is a common example of the effect of capillary forces on flexible structures. From a practical point of the deformation and adhesion of compliant structures induced by interfacial forces may lead to disastrous effects in mechanical microsystems.

  17. The Physiochemistry of Capped Nanosilver Predicts Its Biological Activity in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (REBEC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The “capping” or coating of nanosilver (nanoAg) extends its potency by limiting its oxidation and aggregation and stabilizing its size and shape. The ability of such coated nanoAg to alter the permeability and activate oxidative stress pathways in rat brain endothelia...

  18. Sphingosine 1 Phosphate at the Blood Brain Barrier: Can the Modulation of S1P Receptor 1 Influence the Response of Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes to Inflammatory Stimuli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona F Spampinato

    Full Text Available The ability of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB to maintain proper barrier functions, keeping an optimal environment for central nervous system (CNS activity and regulating leukocytes' access, can be affected in CNS diseases. Endothelial cells and astrocytes are the principal BBB cellular constituents and their interaction is essential to maintain its function. Both endothelial cells and astrocytes express the receptors for the bioactive sphingolipid S1P. Fingolimod, an immune modulatory drug whose structure is similar to S1P, has been approved for treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS: fingolimod reduces the rate of MS relapses by preventing leukocyte egress from the lymph nodes. Here, we examined the ability of S1P and fingolimod to act on the BBB, using an in vitro co-culture model that allowed us to investigate the effects of S1P on endothelial cells, astrocytes, and interactions between the two. Acting selectively on endothelial cells, S1P receptor signaling reduced cell death induced by inflammatory cytokines. When acting on astrocytes, fingolimod treatment induced the release of a factor, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF that reduced the effects of cytokines on endothelium. In an in vitro BBB model incorporating shear stress, S1P receptor modulation reduced leukocyte migration across the endothelial barrier, indicating a novel mechanism that might contribute to fingolimod efficacy in MS treatment.

  19. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide is a useful prognostic marker in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension and renal insufficiency.

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    Lars Harbaum

    Full Text Available N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is a routinely used prognostic parameter in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH. As it accumulates in the presence of impaired renal function, the clinical utility of NT-proBNP in PH patients with concomitant renal insufficiency remains unclear. In a retrospective approach, patients with pre-capillary PH (group I or IV and concomitant renal insufficiency at time of right heart catheterization (glomerular filtration rate (GFR ≤60 ml/min/1.73 m2 were identified out of all prevalent pre-capillary PH patients treated at a single center. Forty patients with renal insufficiency (25.8% were identified and matched regarding hemodynamic parameters with a control group of 56 PH patients with normal renal function (GFR >60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Correlations of NT-proBNP levels with hemodynamic and prognostic parameters (time to clinical worsening and overall survival were assessed. Overall, GFR correlated inversely with NT-proBNP and had the strongest influence on NT-proBNP levels in a stepwise multiple linear regression model including hemodynamic parameters and age (r2 = 0.167. PH patients with renal insufficiency had significant higher levels of NT-proBNP (median: 1935 ng/l vs. 573 ng/l, p = 0.001. Nevertheless, NT-proBNP correlated with invasive hemodynamic parameters in these patients. Using higher cut-off values than in patients with preserved renal function, NT-proBNP levels were significantly associated with time to clinical worsening (>1660 ng/l, p = 0.001 and survival (>2212 ng/l, p = 0.047 in patients with renal insufficiency. Multivariate Cox's proportional hazards analysis including established prognostic parameters, age and GFR confirmed NT-proBNP as an independent risk factor for clinical worsening in PH patients with renal insufficiency (hazard ratio 4.8, p = 0.007. Thus, in a retrospective analysis we showed that NT-proBNP levels correlated with

  20. Exogenous arachidonic acid mediates permeability of human brain microvessel endothelial cells through prostaglandin E2 activation of EP3 and EP4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Siddhartha; Nguyen, Hieu H; On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan W; Aukema, Harold M; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Arachidonic acid (ARA; 5,8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) is a conditionally essential polyunsaturated fatty acid [20:4(n-6)] and is a major constituent of brain lipids. The current study examined the transport processes for ARA in confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Addition of radioactive ARA to the apical compartment of HBMEC cultured on Transwell(®) inserts resulted in rapid incorporation of radioactivity into the basolateral medium. Knock down of fatty acid transport proteins did not alter ARA passage into the basolateral medium as a result of the rapid generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an eicosanoid known to facilitate opening of the blood-brain barrier. Permeability following ARA or PGE2 exposure was confirmed by an increased movement of fluorescein-labeled dextran from apical to basolateral medium. ARA-mediated permeability was attenuated by specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. EP3 and EP4 receptor antagonists attenuated the ARA-mediated permeability of HBMEC. The results indicate that ARA increases permeability of HBMEC monolayers likely via increased production of PGE2 which acts upon EP3 and EP4 receptors to mediate permeability. These observations may explain the rapid influx of ARA into the brain previously observed upon plasma infusion with ARA. The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is a restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Radiolabeled arachidonic acid (ARA) movement across, and monolayer permeability in the presence of ARA, was examined in confluent monolayers of primary human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) cultured on Transwell(®) plates. Incubation of HBMECs with ARA resulted in a rapid increase in HBMEC monolayer permeability. The mechanism was mediated, in part

  1. Pericytes: brain-immune interface modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela eHurtado-Alvarado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The premise that the central nervous system is immune-privileged arose from the fact that direct contact between immune and nervous cells is hindered by the blood-brain barrier. However, the blood-brain barrier also comprises the interface between the immune and nervous systems by secreting chemo-attractant molecules and by modulating immune cell entry into the brain. The majority of published studies on the blood-brain barrier focus on endothelial cells, which are a critical component, but not the only one; other cellular components include astroglia, microglia, and pericytes. Pericytes are poorly studied in comparison with astrocytes or endothelial cells; they are mesenchymal cells that can modify their ultrastructure and gene expression in response to changes in the central nervous system microenvironment. Pericytes have a unique synergistic relationship with brain endothelial cells in the regulation of capillary permeability through secretion of cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide, matrix metallo-proteinases, and by means of capillary contraction. Those pericyte manifestations are related to changes in blood-brain barrier permeability by an increase in endocytosis-mediated transport and by tight junction disruption. In addition, recent reports demonstrate that pericytes control the migration of leukocytes in response to inflammatory mediators by up-regulating the expression of adhesion molecules and releasing chemo-attractants; however, under physiological conditions they appear to be immune-suppressors. Better understanding of the immune properties of pericytes and their participation in the effects of brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and sleep loss will be achieved by analyzing pericyte ultrastructure, capillary coverage, and protein expression. That knowledge may provide a mechanism by which pericytes participate in the maintenance of the proper function of the brain-immune interface.

  2. Dexamethasone suppresses JMJD3 gene activation via a putative negative glucocorticoid response element and maintains integrity of tight junctions in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Na, Wonho; Shin, Jee Y; Lee, Jee Y; Jeong, Sangyun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yune, Tae Y; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2017-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) exhibits a highly selective permeability to support the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). The tight junctions in the BBB microvascular endothelial cells seal the paracellular space to prevent diffusion. Thus, disruption of tight junctions results in harmful effects in CNS diseases and injuries. It has recently been demonstrated that glucocorticoids have beneficial effects on maintaining tight junctions in both in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. In the present study, we found that dexamethasone suppresses the expression of JMJD3, a histone H3K27 demethylase, via the recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) and nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) to the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in the upstream region of JMJD3 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. The decreased JMJD3 gene expression resulted in the suppression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 gene activation. Dexamethasone also activated the expression of the claudin 5 and occludin genes. Collectively, dexamethasone attenuated the disruption of the tight junctions in the brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. Therefore, glucocorticoids may help to preserve the integrity of the tight junctions in the BBB via transcriptional and post-translational regulation following CNS diseases and injuries.

  3. Ultrastructure of skeletal muscle capillaries under conditions of space mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodina, A V; Pozdnyakov, O M

    2006-06-01

    Capillaries of the rat forepaw skeletal muscles were examined on day 14 of space mission and on days 1 and 14 after landing. Ultrastructural studies revealed apoptosis caused by muscle fiber atrophy and necrobiotic changes eventuating in coagulation or monocellular necrosis of endothelial cells. Formation of capillaries was detected, which can be regarded as an adaptive reaction to injuries caused by space mission factors.

  4. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J; Tu, Hong; Joan Abbott, N; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-12-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be up-regulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb over-expression in C6 cells increased leptin permeation whereas ObRa over-expression showed no effect when compared with the control group of pcDNA-transfected C6 cells. By contrast, the paracellular permeability to the sodium fluorescein control was unchanged by over-expression of ObR subtypes. Leptin remained intact after crossing the monolayer as shown by HPLC and acid precipitation, and this was not affected by C6 cell co-culture or the over-expression of different ObR subtypes. Thus, increased expression of ObRb (and to a lesser extent ObRe) in C6 cells specifically increased the permeation of leptin across the hCMEC monolayer. Consistent with the evidence that the most apparent regulatory changes of ObR during obesity and inflammation occur in astrocytes, the results indicate that astrocytes actively regulate leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier, a mechanism independent of reduction of paracellular permeability. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2010 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibits Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in Interleukin-1β-Treated Endothelial Cells.

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    Takeda, Katsuhiro; Obinata, Yusuke; Konishi, Akihiro; Kajiya, Mikihito; Matsuda, Shinji; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Sasaki, Shinya; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2016-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances periodontal tissue regeneration. Tissue regeneration is characterized by inflammation, which directs the quality of tissue repair. The objective of this study is to propose the relevance of BDNF to inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of BDNF on intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is an inflammatory marker, expressed in interleukin (IL)-1β-treated human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). In addition, we studied the effect of BDNF on the adhesion of neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells to HMVECs in a cell adhesion assay. We demonstrated that BDNF attenuates the IL-1β-induced ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. Treatment of HMVECs with IL-1β led to an increase in the number of adherent neutrophil-like HL-60 cells. BDNF significantly decreased the number of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells attached to HMVECs. In conclusion, BDNF may reduce excess inflammation through reduced neutrophil recruitment by regulating ICAM-1 expression.

  6. Protective Effects of Inducible HO-1 on Oxygen Toxicity in Rat Brain Endothelial Microvessel Cells

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    Seung-Jun Yoo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundReperfusion in ischemia is believed to generate cytotoxic oxidative stress, which mediates reperfusion injury. These stress conditions can initiate lipid peroxidation and damage to proteins, as well as promote DNA strand breaks. As biliverdin and bilirubin produced by heme oxygenase isoform 1 (HO-1 have antioxidant properties, the production of both antioxidants by HO-1 may help increase the resistance of the ischemic brain to oxidative stress. In the present study, the survival effect of HO-1 was confirmed using hemin.MethodsTo confirm the roles of HO-1, carbon monoxide, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate further in the antioxidant effect of HO-1 and bilirubin, cells were treated with cycloheximide, desferoxamine, and zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis glycol, respectively.ResultsHO-1 itself acted as an antioxidant. Furthermore, iron, rather than carbon monoxide, was involved in the HO-1-mediated survival effect. HO-1 activity was also important in providing bilirubin as an antioxidant.ConclusionOur results suggested that HO-1 helped to increase the resistance of the ischemic brain to oxidative stress.

  7. Endotoxin-activated microglia injure brain derived endothelial cells via NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK stress kinase pathways

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    Yenari Midori A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that microglia damage blood brain barrier (BBB components following ischemic brain insults, but the underlying mechanism(s is/are not well known. Recent work has established the contribution of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 activation to several brain pathologies including ischemia, neurodegeneration and sepsis. The present study established the requirement of microglia for lipopolysaccharide (LPS mediated endothelial cell death, and explored pathways involved in this toxicity. LPS is a classic TLR4 agonist, and is used here to model aspects of brain conditions where TLR4 stimulation occurs. Methods/Results In monocultures, LPS induced death in microglia, but not brain derived endothelial cells (EC. However, LPS increased EC death when cocultured with microglia. LPS led to nitric oxide (NO and inducible NO synthase (iNOS induction in microglia, but not in EC. Inhibiting microglial activation by blocking iNOS and other generators of NO or blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS also prevented injury in these cocultures. To assess the signaling pathway(s involved, inhibitors of several downstream TLR-4 activated pathways were studied. Inhibitors of NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK/SAPK decreased microglial activation and prevented cell death, although the effect of blocking JNK/SAPK was rather modest. Inhibitors of PI3K, ERK, and p38 MAPK had no effect. Conclusions We show that LPS-activated microglia promote BBB disruption through injury to endothelial cells, and the specific blockade of JAK-STAT, NF-κB may prove to be especially useful anti-inflammatory strategies to confer cerebrovascular protection.

  8. Endotoxin-activated microglia injure brain derived endothelial cells via NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK stress kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacimi, Rachid; Giffard, Rona G; Yenari, Midori A

    2011-03-07

    We previously showed that microglia damage blood brain barrier (BBB) components following ischemic brain insults, but the underlying mechanism(s) is/are not well known. Recent work has established the contribution of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation to several brain pathologies including ischemia, neurodegeneration and sepsis. The present study established the requirement of microglia for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endothelial cell death, and explored pathways involved in this toxicity. LPS is a classic TLR4 agonist, and is used here to model aspects of brain conditions where TLR4 stimulation occurs. In monocultures, LPS induced death in microglia, but not brain derived endothelial cells (EC). However, LPS increased EC death when cocultured with microglia. LPS led to nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induction in microglia, but not in EC. Inhibiting microglial activation by blocking iNOS and other generators of NO or blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS) also prevented injury in these cocultures. To assess the signaling pathway(s) involved, inhibitors of several downstream TLR-4 activated pathways were studied. Inhibitors of NF-κB, JAK-STAT and JNK/SAPK decreased microglial activation and prevented cell death, although the effect of blocking JNK/SAPK was rather modest. Inhibitors of PI3K, ERK, and p38 MAPK had no effect. We show that LPS-activated microglia promote BBB disruption through injury to endothelial cells, and the specific blockade of JAK-STAT, NF-κB may prove to be especially useful anti-inflammatory strategies to confer cerebrovascular protection.

  9. PJ-34 inhibits PARP-1 expression and ERK phosphorylation in glioma-conditioned brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Motta, Carla; D'Angeli, Floriana; Scalia, Marina; Satriano, Cristina; Barbagallo, Davide; Naletova, Irina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella; Spina-Purrello, Vittoria

    2015-08-15

    Inhibitors of PARP-1(Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) act by competing with NAD(+), the enzyme physiological substrate, which play a protective role in many pathological conditions characterized by PARP-1 overactivation. It has been shown that PARP-1 also promotes tumor growth and progression through its DNA repair activity. Since angiogenesis is an essential requirement for these activities, we sought to determine whether PARP inhibition might affect rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (GP8.3) migration, stimulated by C6-glioma conditioned medium (CM). Through wound-healing experiments and MTT analysis, we demonstrated that PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 [N-(6-Oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide] abolishes the migratory response of GP8.3 cells and reduces their viability. PARP-1 also acts in a DNA independent way within the Extracellular-Regulated-Kinase (ERK) signaling cascade, which regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. By western analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM), we analyzed the effects of PJ-34 on PARP-1 expression, phospho-ERK and phospho-Elk-1 activation. The effect of MEK (mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-kinase) inhibitor PD98059 (2-(2-Amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4 H-1-benzopyran-4-one) on PARP-1 expression in unstimulated and in CM-stimulated GP8.3 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR. PARP-1 expression and phospho-ERK activation were significantly reduced by treatment of GP8.3 cells with PJ-34 or PD98059. By LSM, we further demonstrated that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK are coexpressed and share the same subcellular localization in GP8.3 cells, in the cytoplasm as well as in nucleoplasm. Based on these data, we propose that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK interact in the cytosol and then translocate to the nucleus, where they trigger a proliferative response. We also propose that PARP-1 inhibition blocks CM-induced endothelial migration by interfering with ERK signal-transduction pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Intercellular Interactomics of Human Brain Endothelial Cells and Th17 Lymphocytes: A Novel Strategy for Identifying Therapeutic Targets of CNS Inflammation

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    Arsalan S. Haqqani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte infiltration across an activated brain endothelium contributes to the neuroinflammation seen in many neurological disorders. Recent evidence shows that IL-17-producing T-lymphocytes (e.g., Th17 cells possess brain-homing capability and contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and cerebral ischemia. The leukocyte transmigration across the endothelium is a highly regulated, multistep process involving intercellular communications and interactions between the leukocytes and endothelial cells. The molecules involved in the process are attractive therapeutic targets for inhibiting leukocyte brain migration. We hypothesized and have been successful in demonstrating that molecules of potential therapeutic significance involved in Th17-brain endothelial cell (BEC communications and interactions can be discovered through the combination of advanced membrane/submembrane proteomic and interactomic methods. We describe elements of this strategy and preliminary results obtained in method and approach development. The Th17-BEC interaction network provides new insights into the complexity of the transmigration process mediated by well-organized, subcellularly localized molecular interactions. These molecules and interactions are potential diagnostic, therapeutic, or theranostic targets for treatment of neurological conditions accompanied or caused by leukocyte infiltration.

  11. Characterisation of extracellular vesicle-subsets derived from brain endothelial cells and analysis of their protein cargo modulation after TNF exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozio, Vito; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the composition and functional differences between extracellular vesicle (EV) subsets, such as microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes (EXOs), nor to what extent their cargo reflects the phenotypic state of the cell of origin. Brain endothelial cells are the constitutive part of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a selective barrier that maintains brain homeostasis. BBB impairment is associated with several neuroinflammatory diseases with the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) often playing a key role. In the present study, shotgun proteomics and parallel reaction monitoring (PRM)-based targeted mass spectrometry were used to characterise brain endothelial cell-released EVs, and to study how TNF exposure modulated EV protein cargoes. MVs were found to be enriched in mitochondrial and cytoskeletal proteins, whereas EXOs were enriched in adhesion, histone and ribosomal proteins. After stimulation with TNF, several proteins involved in TNF and NF-κB signalling pathways, that were found to be differentially expressed in cells, were also differentially expressed in both MVs and EXOs. Thus, our results revealed some novel proteins as potentially useful candidates for discriminating between MVs and EXOs, together with additional evidence that cells "package" proteins in EVs systematically and according to their phenotypic state.

  12. Reduction in cardiolipin decreases mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and increases glucose transport into and across human brain cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Nguyen, Hieu M; Mejia, Edgard M; Chang, Wenguang; Wang, Ying; Watson, Emily; On, Ngoc; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-10-01

    Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid required for function of the electron transport chain and ATP generation. We examined the role of cardiolipin in maintaining mitochondrial function necessary to support barrier properties of brain microvessel endothelial cells. Knockdown of the terminal enzyme of cardiolipin synthesis, cardiolipin synthase, in hCMEC/D3 cells resulted in decreased cellular cardiolipin levels compared to controls. The reduction in cardiolipin resulted in decreased mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, increased pyruvate kinase activity, and increased 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose uptake and glucose transporter-1 expression and localization to membranes in hCMEC/D3 cells compared to controls. The mechanism for the increase in glucose uptake was an increase in adenosine-5'-monophosphate kinase and protein kinase B activity and decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activity. Knockdown of cardiolipin synthase did not affect permeability of fluorescent dextran across confluent hCMEC/D3 monolayers grown on Transwell(®) inserts. In contrast, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase resulted in an increase in 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose transport across these monolayers compared to controls. The data indicate that in hCMEC/D3 cells, spare respiratory capacity is dependent on cardiolipin. In addition, reduction in cardiolipin in these cells alters their cellular energy status and this results in increased glucose transport into and across hCMEC/D3 monolayers. Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. In human adult brain endothelial cell hCMEC/D3 monolayers cultured on Transwell(®) plates, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase results in decrease in mitochondrial

  13. Generation of Brain Microvascular Endothelial-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Co-Culture with C6 Glioma Cells.

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    Haruka Minami

    Full Text Available The blood brain barrier (BBB is formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and tightly regulates the transport of molecules from blood to neural tissues. In vitro BBB models from human pluripotent stem cell (PSCs-derived BMECs would be useful not only for the research on the BBB development and function but also for drug-screening for neurological diseases. However, little is known about the differentiation of human PSCs to BMECs. In the present study, human induced PSCs (iPSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs, and further maturated to BMECs. Interestingly, C6 rat glioma cell-conditioned medium (C6CM, in addition to C6 co-culture, induced the differentiation of human iPSC-derived ECs (iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells, increase in the trans-endothelial electrical resistance, decreased in the dextran transport and up-regulation of gene expression of tight junction molecules in human iPS-ECs. Moreover, Wnt inhibitors attenuated the effects of C6CM. In summary, we have established a simple protocol of the generation of BMEC-like cells from human iPSCs, and have demonstrated that differentiation of iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells is induced by C6CM-derived signals, including canonical Wnt signals.

  14. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of ICAM-1 through modulation of toll-like receptor-4 signaling in brain endothelial cells.

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    Seok, Sun Mi; Park, Tae Yeop; Park, Hye-Si; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) is a glycolytic intermediate with salutary effects in various brain injury models, but its neuroprotective mechanism is incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the effects of FBP on the expression of adhesion molecules in cerebrovascular endothelial cells and explored the possible mechanisms therein involved. FBP significantly down-regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to brain endothelial cells and inhibited NF-κB activity, which is implicated in the expression of adhesion molecules. FBP abrogated ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activation induced by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2-kDa (MALP-2) or overexpression of MyD88 or TRAF6. FBP suppressed TRAF6-induced phosphorylation of TAK1, IKKβ and IκBα, but fail to affect NF-κB activity induced by ectopic expression of IKKβ. In addition, LPS-induced IRAK-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by FBP, suggesting the presence of multiple molecular targets of FBP in MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. FBP significantly attenuated ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activity induced by poly[I:C] or overexpression of TRIF or TBK1. FBP significantly repressed the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β) and the activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) induced by LPS, poly[I:C] or overexpression of TRIF or TBK1, but fail to affect IRF3 activity induced by ectopic expression of constitutively active IRF3. Overall, our results demonstrate that FBP modulates both MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways of TLR4 and subsequent inflammatory responses in brain endothelial cells, providing insight into its neuroprotective mechanism in brain injury associated with inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

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    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Edaravone protected human brain microvascular endothelial cells from methylglyoxal-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

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    Wenlu Li

    Full Text Available Subjects with diabetes experience an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease and stroke compared with nondiabetic age-matched individuals. Increased formation of reactive physiological dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO seems to be implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complication due to its protein glycation and oxidative stress effect. Edaravone, a novel radical scavenger, has been reported to display the advantageous effects on ischemic stroke both in animals and clinical trials; however, little is known about whether edaravone has protective effects on diabetic cerebrovascular injury. Using cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC, protective effects of edaravone on MGO and MGO enhancing oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD induced injury were investigated. Cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT formation, cell account, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and Rhodamine 123 staining. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs formation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE expression were measured by western blotting. Cellular oxidative stress was measured by reactive oxygen species (ROS release. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly induced HBMEC injury, which was inhibited by pretreatment of edaravone from 10-100 µmol/l. What's more, treatment of MGO enhanced AGEs accumulation, RAGE expression and ROS release in the cultured HBMEC, which were inhibited by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Finally, treatment of MGO for 24 h and then followed by 3 h OGD insult significantly enhanced cell injury when compared with OGD insult only, which was also protected by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Thus, edaravone protected HBMEC from MGO and MGO enhancing OGD-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

  17. Human brain arteriovenous malformations express lymphatic-associated genes

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D.; Fuentes, Laurel F; Santiago, Shauna M; Allen, Breanna M; Cook, Douglas J.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Chang, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are devastating, hemorrhage-prone, cerebrovascular lesions characterized by well-defined feeding arteries, draining vein(s) and the absence of a capillary bed. The endothelial cells (ECs) that comprise AVMs exhibit a loss of arterial and venous specification. Given the role of the transcription factor COUP-TFII in vascular development, EC specification, and pathological angiogenesis, we examined human AVM tissue to determine if COUP-FTII may ...

  18. Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Paradigm Established Effects of Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokine on Neurodegeneration-Linked Depressive States in Hamsters with Brain Endothelial Damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Ennio; Fazzari, Gilda; Mele, Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Zizza, Merylin; Jiao, Wei; Di Vito, Anna; Barni, Tullio; Mandalà, Maurizio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms by which inflammation affects the different emotional moods are only partially known. Previous works have pointed to stress hormones like glucocorticoids plus the vascular factor endothelin-1 as key factors evoking stressful states especially in relation to endothelial dysfunctions. With this work, it was our intention to establish the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression variations towards depression-like behaviors and consequently the development of neurodegeneration events caused by endothelial damages in the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Such a rodent, which is considered a valuable animal model to test depression and anxiety states, exhibited a variety of depression-like behaviors including reduction in sucrose consumption, locomotion, and exploration (p < 0.01) following exposure to unpredictable chronic mild stress. Contextually, a tight correlation between unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced depressive states and expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines was detected as shown by marked expression levels (p < 0.01) of IL-1β and NF-kB in the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex. Even the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 supplied notably significant (p < 0.001) expression levels in the same areas of resilient hamsters. Application of hemodynamic and endothelial functional studies pointed to altered arterial endothelial activities in depressed with respect to resilient animals. Moreover, evident damaged neuronal fields in the above areas of depressed hamsters allowed us to correlate such a behavioral phenomenon to the upregulation of IL-1β and NF-κB. Overall, the differing roles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on depressive states, especially in view of brain endothelial damages, may provide novel therapeutic measures against mood disorders linked to neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Modelling the endothelial blood-CNS barriers: a method for the production of robust in vitro models of the rat blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier.

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    Watson, P Marc D; Paterson, Judy C; Thom, George; Ginman, Ulrika; Lundquist, Stefan; Webster, Carl I

    2013-06-18

    Modelling the blood-CNS barriers of the brain and spinal cord in vitro continues to provide a considerable challenge for research studying the passage of large and small molecules in and out of the central nervous system, both within the context of basic biology and for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Although there has been considerable success over the previous two decades in establishing useful in vitro primary endothelial cell cultures from the blood-CNS barriers, no model fully mimics the high electrical resistance, low paracellular permeability and selective influx/efflux characteristics of the in vivo situation. Furthermore, such primary-derived cultures are typically labour-intensive and generate low yields of cells, limiting scope for experimental work. We thus aimed to establish protocols for the high yield isolation and culture of endothelial cells from both rat brain and spinal cord. Our aim was to optimise in vitro conditions for inducing phenotypic characteristics in these cells that were reminiscent of the in vivo situation, such that they developed into tight endothelial barriers suitable for performing investigative biology and permeability studies. Brain and spinal cord tissue was taken from the same rats and used to specifically isolate endothelial cells to reconstitute as in vitro blood-CNS barrier models. Isolated endothelial cells were cultured to expand the cellular yield and then passaged onto cell culture inserts for further investigation. Cell culture conditions were optimised using commercially available reagents and the resulting barrier-forming endothelial monolayers were characterised by functional permeability experiments and in vitro phenotyping by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Using a combination of modified handling techniques and cell culture conditions, we have established and optimised a protocol for the in vitro culture of brain and, for the first time in rat, spinal cord endothelial cells. High yields of both CNS

  20. Reprogramming of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression profiles in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, M; Witek, B; Bereta, J; Bereta, M; Edwards, D R; Kordula, T

    1999-04-01

    Cytokine-dependent regulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression provides an important mechanism for controlling the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We present data indicating that during inflammatory processes TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 may be involved in the proteolytic remodeling of subendothelial basement membrane of the brain microvascular system, a key step during leukocyte migration into the brain perivascular tissue. In brain endothelial cells the expression of TIMP-1 is dramatically up-regulated by major proinflammatory cytokines, with the combination of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) exhibiting the strongest synergistic stimulation. Simultaneously, IL-1beta/TNF alpha almost completely blocks TIMP-3 expression. Both synergistic effects are dose-dependent within the concentration range 0.05-5 ng/ml of both cytokines and correlate with the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an endothelial cell activation marker. Down-regulation of TIMP-3 expression is also detected in astrocytes treated with TNF alpha or IFN-gamma whereas oncostatin M as well as TNF alpha up-regulate TIMP-1 mRNA level. We propose that the cytokine-modified balance between TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression provides a potential mechanism involved in the regulation of microvascular basement membrane proteolysis.

  1. Methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) induce differential cytotoxic effects in bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Rice, Kenner C; Gannon, Brenda M; Fantegrossi, William E; Gonzalez, Carmen; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F

    2016-08-26

    Designer drugs such as synthetic psychostimulants are indicative of a worldwide problem of drug abuse and addiction. In addition to methamphetamine (METH), these drugs include 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) and commercial preparations of synthetic cathinones including 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), typically referred to as "bath salts." These psychostimulants exert neurotoxic effects by altering monoamine systems in the brain. Additionally, METH and MDMA adversely affect the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB): there are no current reports on the effects of MDPV on the BBB. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of METH, MDMA and MDPV on bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (bBMVECs), an accepted in vitro model of the BBB. Confluent bBMVEC monolayers were treated with METH, MDMA and MDPV (0.5mM-2.5mM) for 24h. METH and MDMA increased lactate dehydrogenase release only at the highest concentration (2.5mM), whereas MDPV induced cytotoxicity at all concentrations. MDMA and METH decreased cellular proliferation only at 2.5mM, with similar effects observed after MDPV exposures starting at 1mM. Only MDPV increased reactive oxygen species production at all concentrations tested whereas all 3 drugs increased nitric oxide production. Morphological analysis revealed different patterns of compound-induced cell damage. METH induced vacuole formation at 1mM and disruption of the monolayer at 2.5mM. MDMA induced disruption of the endothelial monolayer from 1mM without vacuolization. On the other hand, MDPV induced monolayer disruption at doses ≥0.5mM without vacuole formation; at 2.5mM, the few remaining cells lacked endothelial morphology. These data suggest that even though these synthetic psychostimulants alter monoaminergic systems, they each induce BBB toxicity by different mechanisms with MDPV being the most toxic. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Flavonoids targeting of IκB phosphorylation abrogates carcinogen-induced MMP-9 and COX-2 expression in human brain endothelial cells

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    Tahanian E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Tahanian¹, Luis Arguello Sanchez¹, Tze Chieh Shiao², René Roy², Borhane Annabi¹¹Centre de Recherche BioMED, ²Centre de Recherche PharmaQAM, Département de chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, QC, CanadaAbstract: Brain endothelial cells play an essential role as structural and functional components of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increased BBB breakdown and brain injury are associated with neuroinflammation and are thought to trigger mechanisms involving matrix metalloproteinase upregulation. Emerging evidence also indicates that cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition limits BBB disruption, but the mechanisms linking metalloproteinase to COX remain unknown. In this study, we sought to investigate the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway, a common pathway in both the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and COX-2 expression, and the inhibitory properties of several chemopreventive flavonoids. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells were treated with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a carcinogen documented to increase MMP-9 and COX-2 through NF-κB, and several naturally occurring flavonoids. Among the molecules tested, we found that fisetin, apigenin, and luteolin specifically and dose-dependently antagonized PMA-induced COX-2 and MMP-9 gene and protein expressions as assessed by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting, and zymography respectively. We further demonstrate that flavonoids impact on IκK-mediated phosphorylation activity as demonstrated by the inhibition of PMA-induced IκB phosphorylation levels. Our results suggest that BBB disruption during neuroinflammation could be pharmacologically reduced by a specific class of flavonoids acting as NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, flavonoids, neuroinflammation, NF-κB signal transduction inhibitors

  3. Capillary Rarefaction Associates with Albuminuria: The Maastricht Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Remy J H; Henry, Ronald M A; Houben, Alfons J H M; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Kroon, Abraham A; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Schram, Miranda T; Sep, Simone J S; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Muris, Dennis M J; Gronenschild, Ed H B M; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L; Kooman, Jeroen P; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2016-12-01

    Albuminuria may be a biomarker of generalized (i.e., microvascular and macrovascular) endothelial dysfunction. According to this concept, endothelial dysfunction of the renal microcirculation causes albuminuria by increasing glomerular capillary wall permeability and intraglomerular pressure, the latter eventually leading to glomerular capillary dropout (rarefaction) and further increases in intraglomerular pressure. However, direct evidence for an association between capillary rarefaction and albuminuria is lacking. Therefore, we examined the cross-sectional association between the recruitment of capillaries after arterial occlusion (capillary density during postocclusive peak reactive hyperemia) and during venous occlusion (venous congestion), as assessed with skin capillaroscopy, and albuminuria in 741 participants of the Maastricht Study, including 211 participants with type 2 diabetes. Overall, 57 participants had albuminuria, which was defined as a urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/24 h. After adjustment for potential confounders, participants in the lowest tertile of skin capillary recruitment during postocclusive peak reactive hyperemia had an odds ratio for albuminuria of 2.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 4.80) compared with those in the highest tertile. Similarly, a comparison between the lowest and the highest tertiles of capillary recruitment during venous congestion yielded an odds ratio of 2.89 (95% confidence interval, 1.27 to 6.61) for participants in the lowest tertile. In conclusion, lower capillary density of the skin microcirculation independently associated with albuminuria, providing direct support for a role of capillary rarefaction in the pathogenesis of albuminuria. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury through histamine H₁ and H₂ receptors in vitro.

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    Zhang, Luyi; Yao, Ke; Fan, Yanying; He, Ping; Wang, Xiaofen; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2012-12-01

    Although it is believed that carnosine has protective effects on various cell types, its effect on microvascular endothelial cells has not been well defined. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of carnosine in microvascular endothelial cells using an in vitro rotenone-induced oxidative stress model. Mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to 1 μmol/L rotenone for 18 h. In some experiments, carnosine (100 nmol/L-1 mmol/L) was added 30 min prior to rotenone exposure. When used, histamine receptor antagonists (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) were added 15 min before carnosine treatment. After rotenone exposure, apoptosis of microvascular cells was analysed by Hoechst 33342 staining, whereas mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed by JC-1 staining. Intracellular carnosine and histamine levels were determined using HPLC or ultra-HPLC. Over the range 1 μmol/L-1 mmol/L, carnosine concentration-dependently decreased the number of apoptotic cells after 18 h exposure to rotenone. This effect was reversed by the histamine H1 receptor antagonists pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (1 and 10 μmol/L) and the H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) and zolatidine (10 μmol/L). α-Fluoromethylhistidine (100 μmol/L), a selective and irreversible inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, also significantly inhibited the protective effects of carnosine. At 0.1 mmol/L, carnosine restored the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential after 6 h exposure to 1 μmol/L rotenone and this effect was also reversed by the H1 and H2 receptor antagonists. Moreover, intracellular carnosine levels increased as early as 1 h after carnosine treatment, whereas intracellular histamine levels increased 18 h after carnosine treatment. The results of the present study indicate that carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury via histamine H1 and H2 receptors. The

  5. Endothelial cells derived from the blood-brain barrier and islets of Langerhans differ in their response to the effects of bilirubin on oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime eKapitulnik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. High glucose levels (hyperglycemia generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 M induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langherans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 M did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ('physiological' UCB concentrations (0.1-5 M attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 M increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  6. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

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    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with WNV (NY99 strain significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1 did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101 strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  7. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Orillo, Beverly; Verma, Saguna

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV) causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE). Infection with WNV (NY99 strain) significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1) did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101) strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  8. Cryopreservation of Brain Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Enhanced by Rho-Associated Coiled Coil-Containing Kinase Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hannah K; Faubion, Madeline G; Hjortness, Michael K; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) maintains brain homeostasis but also presents a major obstacle to brain drug delivery. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) form the principal barrier and therefore represent the major cellular component of in vitro BBB models. Such models are often used for mechanistic studies of the BBB in health and disease and for drug screening. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have emerged as a new source for generating BMEC-like cells for use in in vitro human BBB studies. However, the inability to cryopreserve iPSC-BMECs has impeded implementation of this model by requiring a fresh differentiation to generate cells for each experiment. Cryopreservation of differentiated iPSC-BMECs would have a number of distinct advantages, including enabling production of larger scale lots, decreasing lead time to generate purified iPSC-BMEC cultures, and facilitating use of iPSC-BMECs in large-scale screening. In this study, we demonstrate that iPSC-BMECs can be successfully cryopreserved at multiple differentiation stages. Cryopreserved iPSC-BMECs retain high viability, express standard endothelial and BBB markers, and reach a high transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of ∼3000 Ω·cm2, equivalent to nonfrozen controls. Rho-associated coiled coil-containing kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 substantially increased survival and attachment of cryopreserved iPSC-BMECs, as well as stabilized TEER above 800 Ω·cm2 out to 7 days post-thaw. Overall, cryopreservation will ease handling and storage of high-quality iPSC-BMECs, reducing a key barrier to greater implementation of these cells in modeling the human BBB.

  9. Let-7i attenuates human brain microvascular endothelial cell damage in oxygen glucose deprivation model by decreasing toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Tian, Canhui; Peng, Shunli; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue; Deng, Zhen

    2017-11-04

    The let-7 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays an important role on endothelial cell function. However, there have been few studies on their role under ischemic conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that let-7i, belonging to the let-7 family, rescues human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in an oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model. Our data show that the expression of let-7 family miRNAs was downregulated after OGD. Overexpression of let-7i significantly alleviated cell death and improved survival of OGD-treated HBMECs. Let-7i also protected permeability in an in vitro blood brain barrier (BBB) model. Further, let-7i downregulated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an inflammation trigger. Moreover, overexpression of let-7i decreased matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression under OGD. Upon silencing TLR4 expression in HBMECs, the anti-inflammatory effect of let-7i was abolished. Our research suggests that let-7i promotes OGD-induced inflammation via downregulating TLR4 expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The blood-brain barrier and glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Richard A

    2009-09-01

    Glutamate concentrations in plasma are 50-100 micromol/L; in whole brain, they are 10,000-12,000 micromol/L but only 0.5-2 micromol/L in extracellular fluids (ECFs). The low ECF concentrations, which are essential for optimal brain function, are maintained by neurons, astrocytes, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Cerebral capillary endothelial cells form the BBB that surrounds the entire central nervous system. Tight junctions connect endothelial cells and separate the BBB into luminal and abluminal domains. Molecules entering or leaving the brain thus must pass 2 membranes, and each membrane has distinct properties. Facilitative carriers exist only in luminal membranes, and Na(+)-dependent glutamate cotransporters (excitatory amino acid transporters; EAATs) exist exclusively in abluminal membranes. The EAATs are secondary transporters that couple the Na(+) gradient between the ECF and the endothelial cell to move glutamate against the existing electrochemical gradient. Thus, the EAATs in the abluminal membrane shift glutamate from the ECF to the endothelial cell where glutamate is free to diffuse into blood on facilitative carriers. This organization does not allow net glutamate entry to the brain; rather, it promotes the removal of glutamate and the maintenance of low glutamate concentrations in the ECF. This explains studies that show that the BBB is impermeable to glutamate, even at high concentrations, except in a few small areas that have fenestrated capillaries (circumventricular organs). Recently, the question of whether the BBB becomes permeable in diabetes has arisen. This issue was tested in rats with diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance or with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Neither condition produced any detectable effect on BBB glutamate transport.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor blockade alters magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of vascular function and decreases barrier permeability in a rat model of lung cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishko, Gregory L; Muldoon, Leslie L; Pagel, Michael A; Schwartz, Daniel L; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-02-17

    Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote vascular normalization and inhibit angiogenesis has been proposed for the treatment of brain metastases; however, vascular normalization has not been well-characterized in this disease. We investigated the effect of treatment with bevacizumab anti-VEGF antibody on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of brain tumor vascular characteristics in comparison to small molecule delivery in a rat model of human lung cancer brain metastasis. Athymic rats with A549 human lung adenocarcinoma intracerebral xenografts underwent MRI at 11.75 T before and one day after treatment with bevacizumab (n = 8) or saline control (n = 8) to evaluate tumor volume, free water content (edema), blood volume and vascular permeability (Ktrans). One day later, permeability to 14C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was measured in tumor and brain to assess the penetration of a small drug-like molecule. In saline control animals, tumor volume, edema and permeability increased over the two day assessment period. Compared to controls, bevacizumab treatment slowed the rate of tumor growth (P = 0.003) and blocked the increase in edema (P = 0.033), but did not alter tumor blood volume. Bevacizumab also significantly reduced Ktrans (P = 0.033) and AIB passive permeability in tumor (P = 0.04), but not to peritumoral tissue or normal brain. Post-treatment Ktrans correlated with AIB levels in the bevacizumab-treated rats but not in the saline controls. The correlation of an MRI biomarker for decreased vascular permeability with decreased AIB concentration in tumor after antiangiogenic treatment suggests that bevacizumab partially restored the normal low permeability characteristics of the blood-brain barrier in a model of human lung cancer brain metastasis.

  12. CD105 expression in oral capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Tsuchiya, Motomi; Nomoto, Shouta; Matsue, Yasuyoshi; Nishikawa, Yohichi; Takamura, Tsuyoshi; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Capillary hemangioma (capillary lobular hemangioma) and cavernous hemangioma (venous malformation) are relatively common oral tumors/malformations and are characterized by increased numbers of normal and abnormal blood vessels. However, the causes of these lesions are not well understood. CD105 (endoglin) is predominantly expressed in proliferating blood endothelial cells (ECs). We analyzed expressions of CD105, CD34, von Willebrand factor, Ki-67, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in 31 capillary hemangiomas and 34 cavernous hemangiomas. Staining scores were calculated as the product of the proportion score and intensity score. Morphologically normal oral mucosa specimens (n = 10) were simultaneously evaluated as normal controls. As compared with cavernous hemangiomas and normal controls, capillary hemangiomas had higher staining scores for CD105, VEGF-A, and COX-2. The Ki-67 labeling index was significantly higher in capillary hemangiomas than in cavernous hemangiomas and normal controls (P characteristics of capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are quite different. The ECs of capillary hemangiomas actively proliferated and were generally regulated by VEGF-A. In contrast, the ECs of cavernous hemangiomas lacked proliferative activity. These results suggest that angiogenesis and vasodilatation of pre-existing blood vessels are important in the development of capillary hemangioma and cavernous hemangioma, respectively.

  13. Manganese distribution across the blood-brain barrier III. The divalent metal transporter-1 is not the major mechanism mediating brain manganese uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossgrove, Janelle S; Yokel, Robert A

    2004-03-01

    Manganese (Mn) is essential for and toxic to the brain. Brain Mn uptake utilizes both diffusion and transporter-mediated pathways. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) has been suggested to mediate brain Mn uptake. The b/b Belgrade rat does not express significant amounts of functional DMT-1. In the present work, brain influx transfer coefficients of (54) Mn ion and (54) Mn transferrin (Mn Tf) were determined in b/b and +/b Belgrade and Wistar rats using the in situ brain perfusion technique. Brain Mn uptake was not significantly different among the three rat strains for either Mn species. We hypothesized that Mn may enter brain endothelial cells by a DMT-1-independent process but not be able to distribute across those cells into brain tissue due to the absence of DMT-1 activity. To test this hypothesis the brain capillary endothelial cells were isolated from b/b and +/b Belgrade rats and Wistar rats after in situ brain perfusion. Some animals received cerebrovascular washout after in situ brain perfusion to ascertain any affect of genotype on (54) Mn adsorption to the endothelial cell luminal surface. Less than 30% of the brain (54) Mn after (54) Mn ion or (54) Mn Tf perfusion remained associated with endothelial cells, suggesting the majority had distributed into brain extracellular fluid (ECF) and/or brain cells. Mn appears to distribute across the rat blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain by one or more carrier-mediated processes other than the DMT-1.

  14. Blood-brain barrier transport machineries and targeted therapy of brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Desired clinical outcome of pharmacotherapy of brain diseases largely depends upon the safe drug delivery into the brain parenchyma. However, due to the robust blockade function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, drug transport into the brain is selectively controlled by the BBB formed by brain capillary endothelial cells and supported by astrocytes and pericytes. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed the most recent literature on the subject to provide an insight upon the role and impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results: All drugs, either small molecules or macromolecules, designated to treat brain diseases must adequately cross the BBB to provide their therapeutic properties on biological targets within the central nervous system (CNS. However, most of these pharmaceuticals do not sufficiently penetrate into CNS, failing to meet the intended therapeutic outcomes. Most lipophilic drugs capable of penetrating BBB are prone to the efflux functionality of BBB. In contrast, all hydrophilic drugs are facing severe infiltration blockage imposed by the tight cellular junctions of the BBB. Hence, a number of strategies have been devised to improve the efficiency of brain drug delivery and targeted therapy of CNS disorders using multimodal nanosystems (NSs. Conclusion: In order to improve the therapeutic outcomes of CNS drug transfer and targeted delivery, the discriminatory permeability of BBB needs to be taken under control. The carrier-mediated transport machineries of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs can be exploited for the discovery, development and delivery of small molecules into the brain. Further, the receptor-mediated transport systems can be recruited for the delivery of macromolecular biologics and multimodal NSs into the brain.

  15. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor and adeno-associated virus mediated brain derived neurotrophic factor on neurogenic and vasculogenic erectile dysfunction induced by hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Shahram S; Rogers, Rodman; Chang, Johnny; Ho, Hoa-Chung; Grazziottin, Tulio; Lin, Ching-Schwun; Lue, Tom F

    2003-04-01

    We examined neurogenic and vasculogenic erectile dysfunction associated with hypercholesterolemia and evaluated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for potential treatment. A total of 21, 2-month-old male rats were fed a 2% cholesterol diet and another seven were fed a normal diet. Two months later serum cholesterol levels were measured and test agents were given intracavernously. Those on normal diet (controls) received phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Those on cholesterol diet were randomly divided into 3 groups receiving PBS, VEGF (4 microg.) or AAV-BDNF (10 viral particles). Four months later erectile function was evaluated and cavernous tissues were collected for erectile dysfunction and immunohistochemical staining. Serum cholesterol levels were higher in rats fed the high fat diet than in controls. Intracavernous pressure was lower in cholesterol plus PBS treated rats than in rats of the other 3 groups. All hypercholesterolemic rats had less nerve content, fewer endothelial cells and higher smooth muscle content than rats with normal cholesterol levels. In cholesterol plus PBS treated rats electron microscopy showed hypermyelination and severe atrophy of axons, a remarkable decrease in the number and size of nonmyelinated axons, disarray of the smooth muscle cells with scant myofilaments and foamy cytoplasm, and denuded endothelial lining of the sinusoids covered by numerous platelets. VEGF and AAV-BDNF appeared to alleviate partially these changes. A high fat diet caused erectile dysfunction with accompanying neurological and vascular changes. VEGF and AAV-BDNF seemed to alleviate these problems.

  16. Patients with and without Posttransplant Capillary Leak Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Reikvam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is commonly used in the treatment of younger patients with severe hematological diseases, and endothelial cells seem to be important for the development of several posttransplant complications. Capillary leak syndrome is a common early posttransplant complication where endothelial cell dysfunction probably contributes to the pathogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether the pretreatment serum metabolic profile reflects a risk of posttransplant capillary leak syndrome. We investigated the pretransplant serum levels of 766 metabolites for 80 consecutive allotransplant recipients. Patients with later capillary leak syndrome showed increased pretherapy levels of metabolites associated with endothelial dysfunction (homocitrulline, adenosine altered renal regulation of fluid and/or electrolyte balance (betaine, methoxytyramine, and taurine and altered vascular function (cytidine, adenosine, and methoxytyramine. Additional bioinformatical analyses showed that capillary leak syndrome was also associated with altered purine/pyrimidine metabolism (i.e., metabolites involved in vascular regulation and endothelial functions, aminoglycosylation (possibly important for endothelial cell functions, and eicosanoid metabolism (also involved in vascular regulation. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the pretransplant metabolic status can be a marker for posttransplant abnormal fluid and/or electrolyte balance.

  17. Pretreatment with light-emitting diode therapy reduces ischemic brain injury in mice through endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, So Young; Kim, Nam Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2017-05-13

    Photostimulation with low-level light emitting diode therapy (LED-T) modulates neurological and psychological functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of LED-T pretreatment on the mouse brain after ischemia/reperfusion and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Ischemia/reperfusion brain injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. The mice received LED-T twice a day for 2 days prior to cerebral ischemia. After reperfusion, the LED-T group showed significantly smaller infarct and edema volumes, fewer behavioral deficits compared to injured mice that did not receive LED-T and significantly higher cerebral blood flow compared to the vehicle group. We observed lower levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in the injured mouse brains, but significantly higher eNOS phosphorylation in LED-T-pretreated mice. The enhanced phospho-eNOS was inhibited by LY294002, indicating that the effects of LED-T on the ischemic brain could be attributed to the upregulation of eNOS phosphorylation through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Moreover, no reductions in infarct or edema volume were observed in LED-T-pretreated eNOS-deficient (eNOS-/-) mice. Collectively, we found that pretreatment with LED-T reduced the amount of ischemia-induced brain damage. Importantly, we revealed that these effects were mediated by the stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation via the PI3K/Akt pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative study of expression and activity of glucose transporters between stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells and hCMEC/D3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Abraham J

    2017-10-01

    Glucose constitutes a major source of energy of mammalian brains. Glucose uptake at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occurs through a facilitated glucose transport, through glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), although other isoforms have been described at the BBB. Mutations in GLUT1 are associated with the GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, yet none of the current in vitro models of the human BBB maybe suited for modeling such a disorder. In this study, we investigated the expression of glucose transporters and glucose diffusion across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) derived from healthy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We investigated the expression of different glucose transporters at the BBB using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry and measured glucose uptake and diffusion across BMEC monolayers obtained from two iPSC lines and from hCMEC/D3 cells. BMEC monolayers showed expression of several glucose transporters, in particular GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Diffusion of glucose across the monolayers was mediated via a saturable transcellular mechanism and partially inhibited by pharmacological inhibitors. Taken together, our study suggests the presence of several glucose transporters isoforms at the human BBB and demonstrates the feasibility of modeling glucose across the BBB using patient-derived stem cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Injury via Rho/Rho-kinase Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Qian, Chen; Wang, Ning; Lin, Chenyu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guangyun; Piao, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, also known as Ligustrazine), which is isolated from Chinese Herb Medicine Ligustium wollichii Franchat (Chuan Xiong), has been widely used in China for the treatment of ischemic stroke by Chinese herbalists. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are the integral parts of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting BMECs against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) which is important for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the protective mechanisms of TMP, focusing on OGD-injured BMECs and the Rho/Rho-kinase (Rho-associated kinases, ROCK) signaling pathway. The model of OGD-injured BMECs was established in this study. BMECs were identified by von Willebrand factor III staining and exposed to fasudil, or TMP at different concentrations (14.3, 28.6, 57.3 µM) for 2 h before 24 h of OGD injury. The effect of each treatment was examined by cell viability assays, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and transendothelial electric resistance and western blot analysis (caspase-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), RhoA, Rac1). Our results show that TMP significantly attenuated apoptosis and the permeability of BMECs induced by OGD. In addition, TMP could notably down-regulate the characteristic proteins in Rho/ROCK signaling pathway such as RhoA and Rac1, which triggered abnormal changes of eNOS and ROS, respectively. Altogether, our results show that TMP has a strong protective effect against OGD-induced BMECs injury and suggest that the mechanism might be related to the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway.

  1. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-βI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beili Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-α, PKC-β or PKC-βI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•− by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-βI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-βI and NADPH oxidase.

  2. Intracerebral Capillary Hemangioma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Young; Kim, Jae Kyun; Byun, Jun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eon Sub [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Intracerebral capillary hemangiomas are very rare benign vascular tumors that mostly occur during infancy. We described a 69-year-old man with generalized tonic-clonic seizures who was diagnosed with an intracranial mass. Multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography studies were performed for evaluation of brain, and there was a well-enhancing mass found in the right temporal lobe without a definite feeding vessel. The patient underwent surgery and the pathologic examination demonstrated marked proliferation of small vessels with a lobular pattern in the brain parenchyma, which was confirmed to be capillary hemangioma.

  3. Astrocyte-mediated regulation of multidrug resistance p-glycoprotein in fetal and neonatal brain endothelial cells: age-dependent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baello, Stephanie; Iqbal, Majid; Gibb, William; Matthews, Stephen G

    2016-08-01

    Brain endothelial cells (BECs) form a major component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In late gestation, these cells express high levels of the multidrug transporter p-glycoprotein (P-gp; encoded by Abcb1), which prevents the passage of an array of endogenous factors and xenobiotics into the fetal brain. P-gp levels in the BECs increase dramatically in late gestation, coincident with astrocyte differentiation. However, the role of astrocytes in modulating P-gp in the developing BBB is unknown. We hypothesized that factors produced by astrocytes positively regulate P-gp in BECs. Astrocytes and BECs were isolated from fetal and postnatal guinea pigs. Levels of Abcb1 mRNA and P-gp were increased in BECs co-cultured with astrocytes compared to BECs in monoculture. Moreover, postnatal astrocytes enhanced P-gp function in fetal BECs but fetal astrocytes had no effect on postnatal BECs. These effects were dependent on secreted proteins with a molecular weight in the range of 3-100 kDa. LC/MS-MS revealed significant differences in proteins secreted by fetal and postnatal astrocytes. We propose that astrocytes are critical modulators of P-gp at the developing BBB. As such, aberrations in astrocyte maturation, observed in neurodevelopmental disorders, will likely decrease P-gp at the BBB. This would allow increased transfer of P-gp endogenous and exogenous substrates into the brain, many of which have neurodevelopmental consequences. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  4. In vitro characterization of pralidoxime transport and acetylcholinesterase reactivation across MDCK cells and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Minn, Il; Chambers, Janice E; Searson, Peter C

    2016-07-11

    Current therapies for organophosphate poisoning involve administration of oximes, such as pralidoxime (2-PAM), that reactivate the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Studies in animal models have shown a low concentration in the brain following systemic injection. To assess 2-PAM transport, we studied transwell permeability in three Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cell lines and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs). To determine whether 2-PAM is a substrate for common brain efflux pumps, experiments were performed in the MDCKII-MDR1 cell line, transfected to overexpress the P-gp efflux pump, and the MDCKII-FLuc-ABCG2 cell line, transfected to overexpress the BCRP efflux pump. To determine how transcellular transport influences enzyme reactivation, we developed a modified transwell assay where the inhibited acetylcholinesterase enzyme, substrate, and reporter are introduced into the basolateral chamber. Enzymatic activity was inhibited using paraoxon and parathion. The permeability of 2-PAM is about 2 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in MDCK cells and about 1 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in BC1-hBMECs. Permeability is not influenced by pre-treatment with atropine. In addition, 2-PAM is not a substrate for the P-gp or BCRP efflux pumps. The low permeability explains poor brain penetration of 2-PAM and therefore the slow enzyme reactivation. This elucidates one of the reasons for the necessity of sustained intravascular (IV) infusion in response to organophosphate poisoning.

  5. New aspects of fenestrated vasculature and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji eMiyata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The blood–brain barrier (BBB generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs, which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT, subfornical organ (SFO, and area postrema (AP, have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and

  6. Neuroprotective effect of allicin against traumatic brain injury via Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qi, Jun; Feng, Feng; Wang, Mao-de; Bao, Gang; Wang, Tuo; Xiang, Mu; Xie, Wan-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Allicin, one of the main biologically active compounds derived from garlic, has been shown to exert various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in in vitro and in vivo studies. Here, we sought to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of allicin against traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. We found that allicin treatment (10 and 50mg/kg, not 1mg/kg) significantly reduced brain edema and motor functional deficits, as well as apoptotic neuronal cell death in injured cortex. These protective effects could be observed even if the administration was delayed to 4h after injury. Moreover, allicin treatment decreased the expression levels of MDA and protein carbonyl, preserved the endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities, and suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines. The results of Western blot analysis showed that allicin increased the phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Blocking Akt/eNOS pathway activation by specific inhibitor LY294002 (10μL, 10mmol/L) or L-NIO (0.5mg/kg) partly reversed the protective effects of allicin and its anti-inflammatory activities. The allicin induced anti-oxidative activity was partly prevented by LY294002, but not L-NIO. In summary, our data strongly suggested that allicin treatment at an appropriate dose can exert protective effect against TBI through Akt/eNOS pathway-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-23

    Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative stress has never been addressed. This is of crucial importance since smokers have a much higher risk for cerebrovascular stroke and tobacco smoke exposure has been clearly shown to enhance BBB damage following an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, the goal of our study was to investigate the defense pathways activated at the BBB endothelial level by TS exposure. Specifically we focused on Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B signaling response (NF-κβ) as the central protective mechanisms related to oxidative insult. With the exception of Nicotine, both full flavor (3R4F) and decotinized (ULN) cigarettes activated Nrf2 and NFκβ pathways in hCMEC/D3 endothelial cells. Several detoxification and anti-oxidant genes including downstream products were also activated including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1), catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), solute carrier-SLC7A11). Gene expression levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2S1 and CYP51A1) and efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multi-drug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) were also enhanced. Increase of P-gp functional activity and depletion of GSH were also observed. Strikingly, toxicity of denicotinized ("reduced exposure") cigarettes was equivalent to 3R4F (or worse). This study provides a detailed analysis of Nrf2-related cytoprotective mechanisms activated in response to 3R4F and ULN-derived TS exposure correlating the results with their

  8. Meox2/Tcf15 heterodimers program the heart capillary endothelium for cardiac fatty acid uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppiello, Giulia; Collantes, Maria; Sirerol-Piquer, María Salomé; Vandenwijngaert, Sara; Schoors, Sandra; Swinnen, Melissa; Vandersmissen, Ine; Herijgers, Paul; Topal, Baki; van Loon, Johannes; Goffin, Jan; Prósper, Felipe; Carmeliet, Peter; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Janssens, Stefan; Peñuelas, Iván; Aranguren, Xabier L; Luttun, Aernout

    2015-03-03

    Microvascular endothelium in different organs is specialized to fulfill the particular needs of parenchymal cells. However, specific information about heart capillary endothelial cells (ECs) is lacking. Using microarray profiling on freshly isolated ECs from heart, brain, and liver, we revealed a genetic signature for microvascular heart ECs and identified Meox2/Tcf15 heterodimers as novel transcriptional determinants. This signature was largely shared with skeletal muscle and adipose tissue endothelium and was enriched in genes encoding fatty acid (FA) transport-related proteins. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we showed that Meox2/Tcf15 mediate FA uptake in heart ECs, in part, by driving endothelial CD36 and lipoprotein lipase expression and facilitate FA transport across heart ECs. Combined Meox2 and Tcf15 haplodeficiency impaired FA uptake in heart ECs and reduced FA transfer to cardiomyocytes. In the long term, this combined haplodeficiency resulted in impaired cardiac contractility. Our findings highlight a regulatory role for ECs in FA transfer to the heart parenchyma and unveil 2 of its intrinsic regulators. Our insights could be used to develop new strategies based on endothelial Meox2/Tcf15 targeting to modulate FA transfer to the heart and remedy cardiac dysfunction resulting from altered energy substrate usage. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Wnt Activation of Immortalized Brain Endothelial Cells as a Tool for Generating a Standardized Model of the Blood Brain Barrier In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Paolinelli; Monica Corada; Luca Ferrarini; Kavi Devraj; Cédric Artus; Czupalla, Cathrin J.; Noemi Rudini; Luigi Maddaluno; Eleanna Papa; Britta Engelhardt; Pierre Olivier Couraud; Stefan Liebner; Elisabetta Dejana

    2013-01-01

    Reproducing the characteristics and the functional responses of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro represents an important task for the research community, and would be a critical biotechnological breakthrough. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries provide strong demand for inexpensive and easy-to-handle in vitro BBB models to screen novel drug candidates. Recently, it was shown that canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for the induction of the BBB properties in the neonatal brain...

  10. Cellular edema regulates tissue capillary perfusion after hemorrhage resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Li, Na; Matheson, Paul J; Garrison, Richard N

    2007-10-01

    Hemorrhage-induced activation of endothelial cell Na+/H+ -exchanger results in cellular swelling, which physically impedes capillary filling and compromises gut perfusion. We hypothesized that correction of the vascular volume deficit by conventional resuscitation does not improve capillary filling unless cellular swelling is prevented. Also, we hypothesized that adjunctive direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR) with topical peritoneal dialysis solution (Delflex; Fresenius USA, Inc., Ogden, Ut) enhances capillary filling and gut perfusion by mechanisms that are independent of the Na+/H+ function. In vivo intravital videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimeter were used by us to measure microvascular diameter and flow, capillary filling (index of functional capillary density, FCD), and endothelial cell function in the terminal ileum of anesthetized rats. Rats were bled to 50% mean arterial pressure for 60 min and resuscitated with the shed blood plus 2 volumes of saline (conventional resuscitation). Prevention of endothelial cell swelling was achieved with topical amiloride (specific Na+/H+ inhibitor) in the tissue bath before hemorrhage or simultaneously with conventional resuscitation. DPR was simulated by instillation of Delflex in the tissue bath as adjunctive to conventional resuscitation. Sham no hemorrhage group and a simulated DPR group that received topical amiloride treatment served as controls. Conventional resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock restored and maintained central hemodynamics but caused progressive and persistent intestinal vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion associated with low FCD and endothelial cell dysfunction. Prevention of endothelial cell swelling when combined with conventional resuscitation, preserved endothelial cell function, and restored local intestinal microvascular variables to near-prehemorrhage levels. Simulated adjunctive DPR produced rapid, sustained, and generalized vasodilation associated with restoration of endothelial cell

  11. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding......Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain...

  12. HCdc14A is involved in cell cycle regulation of human brain vascular endothelial cells following injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingjing; Zhou, Houguang; Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Hu, Renming; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle processes play a vital role in vascular endothelial proliferation and dysfunction. Cell division cycle protein 14 (Cdc14) is an important cell cycle regulatory phosphatase. Previous studies in budding yeast demonstrated that Cdc14 could trigger the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), which are required for mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, the exact function of human Cdc14 (hCdc14) in cell cycle regulation during vascular diseases is yet to be elucidated. There are two HCdc14 homologs: hCdc14A and hCdc14B. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of hCdc14A in high glucose-, free fatty acids (FFAs)-, and hypoxia-induced injury in cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs). Data revealed that high glucose, FFA, and hypoxia down-regulated hCdc14A expression remarkably, and also affected the expression of other cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclin B, cyclin D, cyclin E, and p53. Furthermore, the combined addition of the three stimuli largely blocked cell cycle progression, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. We also determined that hCdc14A was localized mainly to centrosomes during interphase and spindles during mitosis using confocal microscopy, and that it could affect the expression of other cycle-related proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of hCdc14A accelerated cell cycle progression, enhanced cell proliferation, and promoted neoplastic transformation, whereas the knockdown of hCdc14A using small interfering RNA produced the opposite effects. Therefore, these findings provide novel evidence that hCdc14A might be involved in cell cycle regulation in cultured HBVECs during high glucose-, FFA-, and hypoxia-induced injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MicroRNA-155 Regulates ROS Production, NO Generation, Apoptosis and Multiple Functions of Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajing; Pan, Qunwen; Zhao, Yuhui; He, Caixia; Bi, Kexia; Chen, Yusen; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang; Ma, Xiaotang

    2015-12-01

    The microRNA-155 (miR155) regulates various functions of cells. Dysfunction or injury of endothelial cells (ECs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the role and potential mechanisms of miR155 in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) under physiological and pathological conditions. We detected the effects of miR155 silencing on ROS production, NO generation, apoptosis and functions of HBMECs at basal and in response to oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Western blot and q-PCR were used for analyzing the gene expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase(Akt), activated caspase-3, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Results showed that under both basal and challenge situations: (1) Silencing of miR155 decreased apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of HBMECs, whereas, promoted nitric oxide (NO) generation. (2) Silencing of miR155 increased the proliferation, migration, and tube formation ability of HBMECs, while decreased cell adhesion ability. (3) Gene expression analyses showed that EGFR/ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt were increased and that activated caspase-3 and ICAM-1 mRNA were decreased after knockdown of miR155. In conclusion, knockdown of miR155 could modulate ROS production, NO generation, apoptosis and function of HBMECs via regulating diverse gene expression, such as caspase-3, ICAM-1 and EGFR/ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Multimodal investigations of trans-endothelial cell trafficking under condition of disrupted blood-brain barrier integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaryk Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells or immune cells targeting the central nervous system (CNS bear significant promises for patients affected by CNS disorders. Brain or spinal cord delivery of therapeutic cells is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB which remains one of the recognized rate-limiting steps. Osmotic BBB disruption (BBBD has been shown to improve small molecule chemotherapy for brain tumors, but successful delivery of cells in conjunction with BBBD has never been reported. We have used a clinically relevant model (pig of BBBD to attempt brain delivery of TALL-104, a human leukemic T cell line. TALL-104 cells are potent tumor killers and have demonstrated potential for systemic tumor therapy. The pig model used is analogous to the clinical BBBD procedure. Cells were injected in the carotid artery after labeling with the MRI T1 contrast agent GdHPDO3A. Contrast CT scans were used to quantify BBBD and MRI was used to detect Gd++-loaded cells in the brain. Transcranial Doppler was used to monitor cerebral blood flow. EEG recordings were used to detect seizures. Immunocytochemical detection (Cresyl Violet, anti-human CD8 for TALL-104, Evans Blue for BBB damage, GFAP and NEUN was performed. Results At the concentration used TALL-104 cells were tolerated. Incomplete BBBD did not allow cell entry into the brain. MRI scans at 24 and 48 hours post-injection allowed visualization of topographically segregated cells in the hemisphere that underwent successful BBBD. Perivascular location of TALL-104 was confirmed in the BBBD hemisphere by Cresyl violet and CD8 immunocytochemistry. No significant alteration in CBF or EEG activity was recorded during cell injections. Conclusions Our data show that targeted CNS cell therapy requires blood-brain barrier disruption. MRI-detectable cytotoxic anti-neoplastic cells can be forced to transverse the BBB and accumulate in the perivascular space. The virtual absence of toxicity, the high anti-tumor activity

  15. Inflammation Modulates RLIP76/RALBP1 Electrophile-Glutathione Conjugate Transporter and Housekeeping Genes in Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bennani-Baiti

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are often present at inflammation sites. This is the case of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB of patients afflicted with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or multiple sclerosis, as well as in cases of bacterial meningitis, trauma, or tumor-associated ischemia. Inflammation is a known modulator of gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, mostly NF-κB. RLIP76 (a.k.a. RALBP1, an ATP-dependent transporter of electrophile-glutathione conjugates, modulates BBB permeability through the regulation of tight junction function, cell adhesion, and exocytosis. Genes and pathways regulated by RLIP76 are transcriptional targets of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α pro-inflammatory molecule, suggesting that RLIP76 may also be an inflammation target. To assess the effects of TNF-α on RLIP76, we faced the problem of choosing reference genes impervious to TNF-α. Since such genes were not known in human BBB endothelial cells, we subjected these to TNF-α, and measured by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of housekeeping genes commonly used as reference genes. We find most to be modulated, and analysis of several inflammation datasets as well as a metaanalysis of more than 5000 human tissue samples encompassing more than 300 cell types and diseases show that no single housekeeping gene may be used as a reference gene. Using three different algorithms, however, we uncovered a reference geneset impervious to TNF-α, and show for the first time that RLIP76 expression is induced by TNF-α and follows the induction kinetics of inflammation markers, suggesting that inflammation can influence RLIP76 expression at the BBB. We also show that MRP1 (a.k.a. ABCC1, another electrophile-glutathione transporter, is not modulated in the same cells and conditions, indicating that RLIP76 regulation by TNF-α is not a general property of glutathione transporters. The reference geneset

  16. Intramedullary capillary haemangioma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, T

    2012-02-03

    Intramedullary capillary haemangioma is extremely rare and only four cases have been previously reported. We describe a further case, outlining the clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological features.

  17. Imaging MALDI mass spectrometry using an oscillating capillary nebulizer matrix coating system and its application to analysis of lipids in brain from a mouse model of Tay-Sachs/Sandhoff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfeng; Allegood, Jeremy; Liu, Ying; Wang, Elaine; Cachón-Gonzalez, Begoña; Cox, Timothy M; Merrill, Alfred H; Sullards, M Cameron

    2008-04-15

    The quality of tissue imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) depends on the effectiveness of the matrix deposition, especially for lipids that may dissolve in the solvent used for the matrix application. This article describes the use of an oscillating capillary nebulizer (OCN) to spray small droplets of matrix aerosol onto the sample surface for improved matrix homogeneity, reduced crystal size, and controlled solvent effects. This system was then applied to the analysis of histological slices of brains from mice with homozygous disruption of the hexb gene (hexb-/-), a model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease, versus the functionally normal heterozygote (hexb+/-) by imaging MALDI-MS. This allowed profiling and localization of many different lipid species, and of particular interest, ganglioside GM2, asialo-GM2 (GA2), and sulfatides (ST). The presence of these compounds was confirmed by analysis of brain extracts using electrospray ionization in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The major fatty acid of the ceramide backbone of both GM2 and GA2 was identified as stearic acid (18:0) versus nervonic acid (24:1) for ST by both tissue-imaging MS and ESI-MS/MS. GM2 and GA2 were highly elevated in hexb-/- and were both localized in the granular cell region of the cerebellum. ST, however, was localized mainly in myelinated fiber (white matter) region of the cerebellum as well as in the brain stem with a relatively uniform distribution and had similar relative signal intensity for both hexb+/- and hexb-/- brain. It was also observed that there were distinct localizations for numerous other lipid subclasses; hence, imaging MALDI-MS could be used for "lipidomic" studies. These results illustrate the usefulness of tissue-imaging MALDI-MS with matrix deposition by OCN for histologic comparison of lipids in tissues such as brains from this mouse model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease.

  18. Assessment of coagulopathy, endothelial injury, and inflammation after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhage in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Rasmussen, Lars S; Jin, Guang

    2014-01-01

    and complement systems. METHODS: A total of 33 swine were allocated to either TBI + HS (n = 27, TBI and volume-controlled 40% blood loss) or controls (n = 6, anesthesia and instrumentation). TBI + HS animals were left hypotensive (mean arterial pressure, 30-35 mm Hg) for 2 hours. Blood samples were drawn...... at baseline, 3 minutes and 15 minutes after injury, as well as following 2 hours of hypotension. Markers of coagulation, anticoagulation, endothelial activation/glycocalyx shedding, inflammation, complement, and sympathoadrenal function were measured. RESULTS: The TBI + HS group demonstrated an immediate (3...... inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], 81.1 pg/mL vs. 50.8 pg/mL, p = 0.03) and activation of the protein C system (activated protein C, 56.7 ng/mL vs. 26.1 ng/mL, p = 0.01) were evident following the 2-hour hypotension phase. CONCLUSION: The combination of TBI and shock results in an immediate...

  19. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles for delivery across the blood–brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Mayank; Molino, Yves; Sreedhar, Bojja; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to develop poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for delivery of a protein – tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1) – across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to inhibit deleterious matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Materials and methods The NPs were formulated by multiple-emulsion solvent-evaporation, and for enhancing BBB penetration, they were coated with polysorbate 80 (Ps80). We compared Ps80-coated and uncoated NPs for their toxicity, binding, and BBB penetration on primary rat brain capillary endothelial cell cultures and the rat brain endothelial 4 cell line. These studies were followed by in vivo studies for brain delivery of these NPs. Results Results showed that neither Ps80-coated nor uncoated NPs caused significant opening of the BBB, and essentially they were nontoxic. NPs without Ps80 coating had more binding to endothelial cells compared to Ps80-coated NPs. Penetration studies showed that TIMP-1 NPs + Ps80 had 11.21%±1.35% penetration, whereas TIMP-1 alone and TIMP-1 NPs without Ps80 coating did not cross the endothelial monolayer. In vivo studies indicated BBB penetration of intravenously injected TIMP-1 NPs + Ps80. Conclusion The study demonstrated that Ps80 coating of NPs does not cause significant toxic effects to endothelial cells and that it can be used to enhance the delivery of protein across endothelial cell barriers, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24531257

  20. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles for delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Mayank; Molino, Yves; Sreedhar, Bojja; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for delivery of a protein - tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1) - across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to inhibit deleterious matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The NPs were formulated by multiple-emulsion solvent-evaporation, and for enhancing BBB penetration, they were coated with polysorbate 80 (Ps80). We compared Ps80-coated and uncoated NPs for their toxicity, binding, and BBB penetration on primary rat brain capillary endothelial cell cultures and the rat brain endothelial 4 cell line. These studies were followed by in vivo studies for brain delivery of these NPs. Results showed that neither Ps80-coated nor uncoated NPs caused significant opening of the BBB, and essentially they were nontoxic. NPs without Ps80 coating had more binding to endothelial cells compared to Ps80-coated NPs. Penetration studies showed that TIMP-1 NPs + Ps80 had 11.21%± 1.35% penetration, whereas TIMP-1 alone and TIMP-1 NPs without Ps80 coating did not cross the endothelial monolayer. In vivo studies indicated BBB penetration of intravenously injected TIMP-1 NPs + Ps80. The study demonstrated that Ps80 coating of NPs does not cause significant toxic effects to endothelial cells and that it can be used to enhance the delivery of protein across endothelial cell barriers, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Whole-transcriptome brain expression and exon-usage profiling in major depression and suicide: evidence for altered glial, endothelial and ATPase activity.

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    Pantazatos, S P; Huang, Y-Y; Rosoklija, G B; Dwork, A J; Arango, V; Mann, J J

    2017-05-01

    Brain gene expression profiling studies of suicide and depression using oligonucleotide microarrays have often failed to distinguish these two phenotypes. Moreover, next generation sequencing approaches are more accurate in quantifying gene expression and can detect alternative splicing. Using RNA-seq, we examined whole-exome gene and exon expression in non-psychiatric controls (CON, N=29), DSM-IV major depressive disorder suicides (MDD-S, N=21) and MDD non-suicides (MDD, N=9) in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 9) of sudden death medication-free individuals post mortem. Using small RNA-seq, we also examined miRNA expression (nine samples per group). DeSeq2 identified 35 genes differentially expressed between groups and surviving adjustment for false discovery rate (adjusted Pdepression, altered genes include humanin-like-8 (MTRNRL8), interleukin-8 (IL8), and serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade H (SERPINH1) and chemokine ligand 4 (CCL4), while exploratory gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed lower expression of immune-related pathways such as chemokine receptor activity, chemotaxis and cytokine biosynthesis, and angiogenesis and vascular development in (adjusted Psuicide and depression, and provisional evidence for altered DNA-dependent ATPase expression in suicide only. DEXSEq analysis identified differential exon usage in ATPase, class II, type 9B (adjusted Pdepression. Differences in miRNA expression or structural gene variants were not detected. Results lend further support for models in which deficits in microglial, endothelial (blood-brain barrier), ATPase activity and astrocytic cell functions contribute to MDD and suicide, and identify putative pathways and mechanisms for further study in these disorders.

  2. Contribution of pannexin 1 and connexin 43 hemichannels to extracellular calcium-dependent transport dynamics in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akaogi, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Megumi; Uchida, Yasuo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-04-01

    Dysregulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport function is thought to exacerbate neuronal damage in acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of pannexin (Px) and/or connexin (Cx) hemichannel(s)-mediated transport of organic anions and cations in human BBB endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and to identify inhibitors of hemichannel opening in hCMEC/D3 cells in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), a condition mimicking acute ischemic stroke. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), the cells showed increased uptake and efflux transport of organic ionic fluorescent dyes. Classic hemichannel inhibitors markedly inhibited the enhanced uptake and efflux. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics confirmed Px1 and Cx43 protein expression in plasma membrane of hCMEC/D3 cells. Knockdown of Px1 and Cx43 with the small interfering RNAs significantly inhibited the enhanced uptake and efflux of organic anionic and cationic fluorescent dyes. Clinically used cilnidipine and progesterone, which have neuroprotective effects in animal ischemia models, were identified as inhibitors of hemichannel opening. These findings suggest that altered transport dynamics at the human BBB in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) is at least partly attributable to opening of Px1 and Cx43 hemichannels. Therefore, we speculate that Px1 and Cx43 may be potential drug targets to ameliorate BBB transport dysregulation during acute ischemia. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Engler, Tatjana; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad) vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf) was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i) covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii) the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii) combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting.

  4. A fatal case of acute progression of generalized edema and simultaneous flash pulmonary edema in a patient with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosaki, Yuri; Hayashidani, Shunji; Ouchi, Sayako; Ohshima, Tukasa; Nakano, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2015-04-28

    Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome is a rare and fatal disease due to the unexplained episodic attacks of capillary leakage of plasma from the intravascular into the interstitial space. The attack consists of three phases, a prodromal phase, peripheral leak phase and recruitment phase. During the peripheral leak phase, generalized edema, mainly in the trunk and extremities, with hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia occurs, while usually the visceral organs like lungs, brain, heart and kidneys seem not to be involved. Treatment of the acute phase is supportive, focusing on adequate but not overzealous fluid resuscitation, because pulmonary edema usually occurs in the recruitment phase. A 65-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of severe hypovolemic shock with metabolic acidosis and hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia. Although she was considered to be in the peripheral leak phase of idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome, which could not be diagnosed during the treatment, the generalized edema worsened further, severe flash pulmonary edema progressed rapidly after fluid resuscitation and she died. The autopsy showed generalized edema, especially alveolar pulmonary edema without endothelial apoptosis. Because hypovolemic shock and fatal pulmonary edema may progress rapidly together even in the peripheral leak phase of idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome, we should keep in mind this rare and fatal disease and recognize the pathophysiology to treat it effectively when the patient has hypovolemia with metabolic acidosis.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) -TrKB signaling modulates cancer-endothelial cells interaction and affects the outcomes of triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Hsu, Chih-Yi; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    There is good evidence that the tumor microenvironment plays an important role in cancer metastasis and progression. Our previous studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the process of metastasis and in the migration of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BDNF on the tumor cell microenvironment, namely, the cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction of TNBC cells. We conducted oligoneucleotide microarray analysis of potential biomarkers that are able to differentiate recurrent TNBC from non-recurrent TNBC. The MDA-MB-231 and human endothelial HUVEC lines were used for this study and our approaches included functional studies, such as migration assay, as well as Western blot and real-time PCR analysis of migration and angiogenic signaling. In addition, we analyzed the survival outcome of TNBC breast cancer patients according to their expression level of BDNF using clinical samples. The results demonstrated that BDNF was able to bring about autocrinal (MDA-MB-231) and paracrinal (HUVECs) regulation of BDNF-TrkB gene expression and this affected cell migratory activity. The BDNF-induced migratory activity was blocked by inhibitors of ERK, PI3K and TrkB when MDA-MB-231 cells were examined, but only an inhibitor of ERK blocked this activity when HUVEC cells were used. Furthermore, decreased migratory activity was found for △BDNF and △TrkB cell lines. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) of MDA-MB-231 cells showed that BDNF is a key factor that is able to regulate a network made up of metalloproteases and calmodulin. Protein expression levels in a tissue array of tumor slices were found to be correlated with patient prognosis and the results showed that there was significant correlation of TrkB expression, but not of BDNF. expressionwith patient DFS and OS. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of the BDNF signaling pathway seems tobe involved in the mechanism associated with early recurrence in

  6. G-CSF protects human brain vascular endothelial cells injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia through MAPK and Akt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Su

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke by mobilizing bone marrow (BM-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, promoting angiogenesis, and inhibiting apoptosis. Impairments in mobilization and function of the BM-derived EPCs have previously been reported in animal and human studies of diabetes where there is both reduction in the levels of the BM-derived EPCs and its ability to promote angiogenesis. This is hypothesized to account for the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications such as stroke. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of G-CSF on diabetes-associated cerebral vascular defect. We observed that pretreatment of the cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs with G-CSF largely prevented cell death induced by the combination stimulus with high glucose, free fatty acids (FFA and hypoxia by increasing cell viability, decreasing apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Cell ultrastructure measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM revealed that G-CSF treatment nicely reduced combination stimulus-induced cell apoptosis. The results from fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM showed that G-CSF greatly suppressed the levels of intracellular calcium ions under combination stimulus. We also found that G-CSF enhanced the expression of cell cycle proteins such as human cell division cycle protein 14A (hCdc14A, cyclinB and cyclinE, inhibited p53 activity, and facilitated cell cycle progression following combination stimulus. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2 and Akt, and deactivation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK and p38 were proved to be required for the pro-survival effects of G-CSF on HBVECs exposed to combination stimulus. Overall, G-CSF is capable of alleviating HBVECs injury triggered by the combination administration with high glucose, FFA and hypoxia involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and Akt

  7. Neisseria meningitidis Opc invasin binds to the sulphated tyrosines of activated vitronectin to attach to and invade human brain endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sa E Cunha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The host vasculature is believed to constitute the principal route of dissemination of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm throughout the body, resulting in septicaemia and meningitis in susceptible humans. In vitro, the Nm outer membrane protein Opc can enhance cellular entry and exit, utilising serum factors to anchor to endothelial integrins; but the mechanisms of binding to serum factors are poorly characterised. This study demonstrates that Nm Opc expressed in acapsulate as well as capsulate bacteria can increase human brain endothelial cell line (HBMEC adhesion and entry by first binding to serum vitronectin and, to a lesser extent, fibronectin. This study also demonstrates that Opc binds preferentially to the activated form of human vitronectin, but not to native vitronectin unless the latter is treated to relax its closed conformation. The direct binding of vitronectin occurs at its Connecting Region (CR requiring sulphated tyrosines Y(56 and Y(59. Accordingly, Opc/vitronectin interaction could be inhibited with a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody 8E6 that targets the sulphotyrosines, and with synthetic sulphated (but not phosphorylated or unmodified peptides spanning the vitronectin residues 43-68. Most importantly, the 26-mer sulphated peptide bearing the cell-binding domain (45RGD(47 was sufficient for efficient meningococcal invasion of HBMECs. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the binding of a bacterial adhesin to sulphated tyrosines of the host receptor. Our data also show that a single region of Opc is likely to interact with the sulphated regions of both vitronectin and of heparin. As such, in the absence of heparin, Opc-expressing Nm interact directly at the CR but when precoated with heparin, they bind via heparin to the heparin-binding domain of the activated vitronectin, although with a lower affinity than at the CR. Such redundancy suggests the importance of Opc/vitronectin interaction in meningococcal

  8. Confocal imaging of xenobiotic transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David S

    2003-11-01

    The brain capillary endothelium is a formidable barrier to entry of foreign chemicals into the central nervous system (CNS). For the most part it poorly distinguishes between therapeutics and neurotoxins and thus the blood-brain barrier both protects the brain from toxic chemicals and limits our ability to treat a variety of CNS disorders. Two elements underlie the barrier function of the brain capillary endothelium: 1). a physical barrier comprised of tight junctions, which form an effective seal to intercellular diffusion, and the cells themselves, which exhibit a low rate of endocytosis, and 2). a metabolic/active barrier, comprised of specific membrane transporters expressed by the endothelial cells. We have recently developed an experimental system based on confocal microscopy to study mechanisms of transport in freshly isolated brain capillaries. Here I review studies demonstrating a major role for the ATP-driven, xenobiotic export pump, p-glycoprotein, in barrier function and recent experiments showing that transient inhibition of pump function can have substantial benefit for chemotherapy in an animal model of brain cancer. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A computational model of hemodynamic parameters in cortical capillary networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeian, Navid; Sellier, Mathieu; David, Tim

    2011-02-21

    The analysis of hemodynamic parameters and functional reactivity of cerebral capillaries is still controversial. To assess the hemodynamic parameters in the cortical capillary network, a generic model was created using 2D voronoi tessellation in which each edge represents a capillary segment. This method is capable of creating an appropriate generic model of cerebral capillary network relating to each part of the brain cortex because the geometric model is able to vary the capillary density. The modeling presented here is based on morphometric parameters extracted from physiological data of the human cortex. The pertinent hemodynamic parameters were obtained by numerical simulation based on effective blood viscosity as a function of hematocrit and microvessel diameter, phase separation and plasma skimming effects. The hemodynamic parameters of capillary networks with two different densities (consistent with the variation of the morphometric data in the human cortical capillary network) were analyzed. The results show pertinent hemodynamic parameters for each model. The heterogeneity (coefficient variation) and the mean value of hematocrits, flow rates and velocities of the both network models were specified. The distributions of blood flow throughout the both models seem to confirm the hypothesis in which all capillaries in a cortical network are recruited at rest (normal condition). The results also demonstrate a discrepancy of the network resistance between two models, which are derived from the difference in the number density of capillary segments between the models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spreading endothelial cell dysfunction in response to necrotic trophoblasts. Soluble factors released from endothelial cells that have phagocytosed necrotic shed trophoblasts reduce the proliferation of additional endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Ding, J X; Liu, B; Stone, P; Feng, Y J; Chamley, L

    2010-11-01

    The pathogenesis of preeclampsia is not clear but the disease is characterised by systemic endothelial cell dysfunction that is considered to be triggered by a placental factor. Necrotic trophoblastic debris that is deported in the maternal blood is one possible placental trigger for preeclampsia. Syncytial knots were first associated with preeclampsia over 100 years ago. However, syncytial knots are very large and most are trapped in the pulmonary capillaries making it difficult to envisage how they could lead to widespread systemic endothelial cell dysfunction. This study was undertaken to examine whether conditioned medium from endothelial cells that have phagocytosed necrotic trophoblastic debris could adversely affect the proliferation or survival of fresh endothelial cells. Trophoblastic cellular debris, harvested from placental explants was added to endothelial cell monolayers directly or after induction of necrosis by freeze-thawing. Conditioned medium from the endothelial cell cultures was exposed to fresh endothelial cells and their proliferation measured by Alamar Blue, and CyQUANTNF cell proliferation assays. Endothelial cell death was examined by a fluorogenic caspase-3 activity assay and LDH release. Conditioned medium from endothelial cells that had phagocytosed necrotic but not apoptotic trophoblastic debris significantly inhibited the proliferation of fresh endothelial cells but did not induce their death. The conditioned medium also reduced cell-surface endoglin expression by fresh endothelial cells. These results confirm that phagocytosis of necrotic trophoblastic debris by endothelial cells results in the secretion of soluble factors that might explain how necrotic trophoblastic debris trapped in the pulmonary capillaries could induce systemic endothelial cell dysfunction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Candesartan improves ischemia-induced impairment of the blood-brain barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Gohei; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Morofuji, Yoichi; Hiu, Takeshi; Hayashi, Kentaro; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Deli, Maria A; Nagata, Izumi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Niwa, Masami

    2015-05-01

    Candesartan has been reported to have a protective effect on cerebral ischemia in vivo and in human ischemic stroke. We studied the direct effects of candesartan on blood-brain barrier (BBB) function with our in vitro monolayer model generated using rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBECs). The in vitro BBB model was subjected to normoxia or 6-h oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/24-h reoxygenation, with or without candesartan. 6-h OGD/24-h reoxygenation decreased transendothelial electrical resistance and increased the endothelial permeability for sodium fluorescein in RBEC monolayers. Candesartan (10 nM) improved RBEC barrier dysfunction induced by 6-h OGD/24-h reoxygenation. Immunostaining and immunoblotting analysis indicated that the effect of candesartan on barrier function under 6-h OGD/24-h reoxygenation was not related to the expression levels of tight junction proteins. However, candesartan affected RBEC morphological changes induced by 6-h OGD/24-h reoxygenation. We analyzed oxidative stress and cell viability using chemical reagents. Candesartan improved cell viability following 6-h OGD/24-h reoxygenation, whereas candesartan had no effect on oxidative stress. These results show that candesartan directly improves cell function and viability of brain capillary endothelial cells under OGD/reoxygenation, suggesting that the protective effects of candesartan on ischemic stroke are related to protection of the BBB.

  12. Lactoferrin-modified procationic liposomes as a novel drug carrier for brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huali; Tang, Lei; Qin, Yao; Yin, Yujia; Tang, Jie; Tang, Wenwei; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Zhirong; Liu, Ji; He, Qin

    2010-05-12

    In this study, a new drug carrier for brain delivery, lactoferrin-modified procationic liposome, was developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The procationic liposomes (PCLs) were neutral or negatively charged at physiological pH, and when they touched brain capillary endothelial cells with the help of a brain-targeting ligand, lactoferrin (Lf), they were changed into cationic liposomes (CL). The PCLs and lactoferrin-modified procationic liposomes (Lf-PCLs) with different CHETA/Lf ratio were prepared and characterized. The primary brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) were cultured to investigate the potential cytotoxicity and uptake of liposomes in vitro. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), developed by the co-culture of BCECs and astrocytes (ACs), was employed to evaluate the ability and mechanisms of liposomes to cross endothelial cells. The liposome uptake by the mouse brain in vivo was detected by HPLC-fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that compared with the conventional liposomes and CLs, PCL and Lf-PCLs showed an improved performance in the uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity. Besides the uptake mediated by clathrin-dependent endocytosis of PCL, Lf-PCL crossed the BCECs through lipid raft/caveloae-mediated endocytosis. The endocytosis involved in the transport of Lf-PCL crossing BBB was mediated by both receptor- and absorption-mediated transcytosis. Compared with the conventional liposomes, PCL and Lf-PCL-8 (CHETA/Lf ratio=1:8, w/w) were observed to show much improved characteristics of the localization in the brain. This study suggested that Lf-PCL was an available brain drug delivery carrier with potential future application.

  13. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Axel; Nehen, Mathias; Deiß, Annika; Buttmann, Mathias

    2015-08-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  14. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Haarmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  15. In vivo and ex vivo regulation of breast cancer resistant protein (Bcrp) by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Pparα) at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Md Tozammel; Shah, Arpit; More, Vijay; Miller, David S; Bendayan, Reina

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2) localized at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits permeability into the brain of many xenobiotics, including pharmacological agents. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα), a ligand-activated transcription factor, primarily involved in lipid metabolism, has been shown to regulate the functional expression of Bcrp in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). The aim of this study was to investigate ex vivo and in vivo, the regulation of Bcrp by Pparα in an intact BBB. Ex vivo quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses showed significant up-regulation of Abcg2/Bcrp mRNA and protein levels in CD-1 mouse brain capillaries incubated with clofibrate, a Pparα ligand. Fluorescence-based transport assays in CD-1 and C57BL/6 brain capillaries showed that exposure to clofibrate significantly increased Bcrp transport activity. This increase was not observed in capillaries isolated from Pparα knockout mice. In vivo, we found: i) significant Bcrp protein up-regulation in clofibrate-dosed CD-1 and C57BL/6 capillary lysates, but no effect in Pparα knockout capillary lysates, and ii) significantly increased Bcrp transport activity in capillaries isolated from clofibrate-treated mice. These results demonstrate an increase in Bcrp functional expression by Pparα in brain capillaries, and suggest that Pparα is another nuclear receptor that can contribute to the regulation of membrane efflux transporters and drug permeability at the BBB. We propose the involvement of the following pathways in clofibrate-mediated induction of the drug transporter Abcg2/Bcrp mRNA, protein expression and function by the nuclear receptor Pparα, in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells. Upon activation with clofibrate (Pparα, ligand), Pparα complex translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus and further recruits coactivators and transcription machinery which induce the transcription of Abcg2 gene and

  16. The additive erectile recovery effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor combined with vascular endothelial growth factor in a rat model of neurogenic impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Chiang; Minor, Thomas X; Rahman, Nadeem U; Ho, Hao-Chung; Nunes, Lora; Lue, Tom F

    2005-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that combined intracavernosal injection with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with adeno-associated virus-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (AAV-BDNF) synergistically facilitates the neural regeneration and erectile function after cavernosal nerve injury. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into five equal groups: eight had a sham operation while 32 had bilateral cavernosal nerve freezing followed by an immediate intracavernosal injection with either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), VEGF, AAV-BDNF, or AAV-BDNF + VEGF. Erectile function was assessed by cavernosal nerve electrostimulation at 3 months, and samples of the major pelvic ganglia and penile tissue were evaluated histologically. In this animal model of impotence from nerve injury, the recovery of erectile function was greatest in those receiving AAV-BDNF + VEGF; the mean (sd) maximal intracavernosal pressure in this group was 87.2 (20.78) cmH2O, compared with 37.3 (11.39) for VEGF alone and 49.8 (29.58) for AAV-BDNF alone. No erectile dysfunction was identified in the sham group, with a pressure of 100.7 (22.70) cmH2O, while all treatment groups significantly outperformed the PBS (control) group, at 29.3 (13.52) cmH2O. Furthermore, all animals receiving monotherapy or combined treatment had more NADPH-diaphorase-positive nerve fibres than controls but less than in the sham group. Bilateral cavernosal nerve freezing causes erectile dysfunction with accompanying neurological changes. Intracavernosal injection with either VEGF or AAV-BDNF alone enhances nerve regeneration, with combined therapy (VEGF and AAV-BDNF) promoting neural and erectile recovery additively.

  17. Effects of Chinese medicinal herbs on expression of brain-derived Neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its interaction with human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and endothelial HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Chen, Fang-Pey; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Lin, Man-Ting; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2017-08-12

    Our previous study demonstrated that an up-regulation of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling pathway is involved the mechanism causing the recurrence of triple negative breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of commonly used Chinese medicinal herbs on MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells and how they interact with BDNF. Human TNBC MDA-MB-231 cells and human endothelial HUVEC cells were used to explore the effect of commonly used Chinese herbal medicines on cancer cells alone, on endothelial cells alone and on cancer cell/endothelial cell interactions; this was done via functional studies, including migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, Western blot analysis and real-time PCR investigations were also used to investigate migration signal transduction, invasion signal transduction, and angiogenic signal transduction in these systems. Finally, the effect of the Chinese medicinal herbs on cancer cell/endothelial cell interactions was assessed using co-culture and ELISA. In terms of autoregulation, BDNF up-regulated TrkB gene expression in both MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells. Furthermore, BDNF enhanced migration by MDA-MB-231 cells via Rac, Cdc42 and MMP, while also increasing the migration of HUVEC cells via MMP and COX-2 expression. As measured by ELISA, the Chinese herbal medicinal herbs A. membranaceus, P. lactiflora, L. chuanxiong, P. suffruticosa and L. lucidum increased BDNF secretion by MDA-MB-231 cells. Similarly, using a co-culture system with MDA-MB-231 cells, A. membranaceus and L. lucidum modulated BDNF-TrkB signaling by HUVEC cells. We conclude that BDNF plays an important role in the metastatic interaction between MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells. Some Chinese medicinal herbs are able to enhance the BDNF-related metastatic potential of the interaction between cancer cells and endothelial cells. These findings provide important information that should help with the development of integrated medical therapies for breast

  18. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Catherine N; Reynell, Clare; Gesslein, Bodil

    2014-01-01

    Increases in brain blood flow, evoked by neuronal activity, power neural computation and form the basis of BOLD (blood-oxygen-level-dependent) functional imaging. Whether blood flow is controlled solely by arteriole smooth muscle, or also by capillary pericytes, is controversial. We demonstrate...... blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the blood......-brain barrier. Thus, pericytes are major regulators of cerebral blood flow and initiators of functional imaging signals. Prevention of pericyte constriction and death may reduce the long-lasting blood flow decrease that damages neurons after stroke....

  19. Solute Carriers in the Blood-Brain Barier: Safety in Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nałęcz, Katarzyna A

    2017-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, being in contact with astrocytes endfeet and pericytes, separates extracellular fluid from plasma. Supply of necessary nutrients and removal of certain metabolites takes place due to the activity of transporting proteins from ABC (ATP binding cassette) and SLC (solute carrier) superfamilies. This review is focused on the SLC families involved in transport though the blood-brain barrier of energetic substrates (glucose, monocarboxylates, creatine), amino acids, neurotransmitters and their precursors, as well as organic ions. Members of SLC1, SLC2, SLC3/SLC7, SLC5, SLC6, SLC16, SLC22, SLC38, SLC44, SLC47 and SLCO (SLC21), whose presence in the blood-brain barriers has been demonstrated are characterized with a special emphasis put on polarity of transporters localization in a luminal (blood side) versus an abluminal (brain side) membrane.

  20. Developmental changes of l-arginine transport at the blood-brain barrier in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Hirose, Shirou; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Matsuyama, Ryo; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2017-12-14

    l-Arginine is required for regulating synapse formation/patterning and angiogenesis in the developing brain. We hypothesized that this requirement would be met by increased transporter-mediated supply across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the purpose of this work was to test the idea that elevation of blood-to-brain l-arginine transport across the BBB in the postnatal period coincides with up-regulation of cationic acid transporter 1 (CAT1) expression in developing brain capillaries. We found that the apparent brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (Kp, app) of l-arginine after intravenous administration during the first and second postnatal weeks was 2-fold greater than that at the adult stage. Kp, app of l-serine was also increased at the first postnatal week. In contrast, Kp, app of d-mannitol, a passively BBB-permeable molecule, did not change, indicating that increased transport of l-arginine and l-serine is not due to BBB immaturity. Double immunohistochemical staining of CAT1 and a marker protein, glucose transporter 1, revealed that CAT1 was localized on both luminal and abluminal membranes of brain capillary endothelial cells during the developmental and adult stages. A dramatic increase in CAT1 expression in the brain was seen at postnatal day 7 (P7) and day 14 (P14) and the expression subsequently decreased as the brain matured. In accordance with this, intense immunostaining of CAT1 was observed in brain capillaries at P7 and P14. These findings strongly support our hypothesis and suggest that the supply of blood-born l-arginine to the brain via CAT1 at the BBB plays a key role in meeting the elevated demand for l-arginine in postnatal brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Glutamate Is Managed by the Blood–Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Hawkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A facilitative transport system exists on the blood–brain barrier (BBB that has been tacitly assumed to be a path for glutamate entry to the brain. However, glutamate is a non-essential amino acid whose brain content is much greater than plasma, and studies in vivo show that glutamate does not enter the brain in appreciable quantities except in those small regions with fenestrated capillaries (circumventricular organs. The situation became understandable when luminal (blood facing and abluminal (brain facing membranes were isolated and studied separately. Facilitative transport of glutamate and glutamine exists only on the luminal membranes, whereas Na+-dependent transport systems for glutamate, glutamine, and some other amino acids are present only on the abluminal membrane. The Na+-dependent cotransporters of the abluminal membrane are in a position to actively transport amino acids from the extracellular fluid (ECF into the endothelial cells of the BBB. These powerful secondary active transporters couple with the energy of the Na+-gradient to move glutamate and glutamine into endothelial cells, whereupon glutamate can exit to the blood on the luminal facilitative glutamate transporter. Glutamine may also exit the brain via separate facilitative transport system that exists on the luminal membranes, or glutamine can be hydrolyzed to glutamate within the BBB, thereby releasing ammonia that is freely diffusible. The γ-glutamyl cycle participates indirectly by producing oxoproline (pyroglutamate, which stimulates almost all secondary active transporters yet discovered in the abluminal membranes of the BBB.

  2. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  3. Chiral separation by capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gübitz, G; Schmid, M G

    2000-01-01

    The state of art in chiral capillary electrochromatography is reviewed. Chiral separations by capillary electrochromatography were carried out using capillaries packed with chiral stationary phases or achiral stationary phases in combination with a chiral selector added to the mobile phase. Furthermore, the use of open tubular capillaries containing the chiral selector coated to the capillary wall was also reported. Among other separation principles moleculary imprinted polymers represent a challenging approach for chiral capillary electrochromatography. A recent trend is the use of polymeric continuous beds with a chiral selector incorporated.

  4. Biomimetic Unidirectional Capillary Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Eric; Moran, Patrick; Dahl, Jason

    2017-11-01

    In arid environments animals require specialized adaptations to collect adequate water. The Texas horned lizard (P. cornutum) has superhydrophylic skin which draws water out of moist soil or directly from water sources. The water then makes its way into the lizard's unidirectional capillary system, made of overlapping scales, which serves to channel water to its mouth. Testing different channel geometries, repeated ``D'' shaped chambers as in Commans et al. (2015) and truncated isosceles triangle chambers, as found in P. cornutum, we show the ability to have passive, unidirectional, fluid transport. Tests were carried out with the capillaries in a horizontal configuration. While both capillary geometries produced the desired traits, the triangular chambers showed superior unidirectionality, with no observed back flow, while ``D'' chambers showed back flow under testing conditions. The chambers provided similar flow rates. These types of channel systems will find use in microfluidics, notably in medical, printing, and lab-on-chip applications.

  5. How Capillary Rafts Sink

    CERN Document Server

    Protiere, S; Aristoff, J; Stone, H

    2010-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing how capillary rafts sink. Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. Thanks to Archimedes principle we can easily predict whether an object sinks or floats. But what happens when several small particles are placed at an interface between two fluids. In this case surface tension also plays an important role. These particles self-assemble by capillarity and thus form what we call a "capillary raft". We show how such capillary rafts sink for varying sizes of particles and define how this parameter affects the sinking process.

  6. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively controlled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB, whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods: Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics. Conclusion: The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent.

  7. Endothelial Cell Implantation and Survival within Experimental Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Bachchu; Indurti, Ravi R.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Goldstein, Gary W.; Laterra, John

    1994-10-01

    The delivery of therapeutic genes to primary brain neoplasms opens new opportunities for treating these frequently fatal tumors. Efficient gene delivery to tissues remains an important obstacle to therapy, and this problem has unique characteristics in brain tumors due to the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers. The presence of endothelial mitogens and vessel proliferation within solid tumors suggests that genetically modified endothelial cells might efficiently transplant to brain tumors. Rat brain endothelial cells immortalized with the adenovirus E1A gene and further modified to express the β-galactosidase reporter were examined for their ability to survive implantation to experimental rat gliomas. Rats received 9L, F98, or C6 glioma cells in combination with endothelial cells intracranially to caudate/putamen or subcutaneously to flank. Implanted endothelial cells were identified by β-galactosidase histochemistry or by polymerase chain reaction in all tumors up to 35 days postimplantation, the latest time examined. Implanted endothelial cells appeared to cooperate in tumor vessel formation and expressed the brain-specific endothelial glucose transporter type 1 as identified by immunohistochemistry. The proliferation of implanted endothelial cells was supported by their increased number within tumors between postimplantation days 14 and 21 (P = 0.015) and by their expression of the proliferation antigen Ki67. These findings establish that genetically modified endothelial cells can be stably engrafted to growing gliomas and suggest that endothelial cell implantation may provide a means of delivering therapeutic genes to brain neoplasms and other solid tumors. In addition, endothelial implantation to brain may be useful for defining mechanisms of brain-specific endothelial differentiation.

  8. Capillary electrophoresis of diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekkola, M L; Jumppanen, J H

    1996-05-31

    The review surveys the application of capillary electrophoresis to the screening, identification and determination of diuretics and probenecid. The number of publications is still limited, but the studies already published clearly show that capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography are excellent alternatives for the investigation of diuretics. High accuracy identifications of diuretics and probenecid, even in urine samples, can be obtained when CZE is used with the marker techniques. This review paper has been written from the viewpoint of practical use and some hints are given for future CE studies on diuretics.

  9. Capillary regeneration in scleroderma: stem cell therapy reverses phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo N Fleming

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease with a characteristic vascular pathology. The vasculopathy associated with scleroderma is one of the major contributors to the clinical manifestations of the disease.We used immunohistochemical and mRNA in situ hybridization techniques to characterize this vasculopathy and showed with morphometry that scleroderma has true capillary rarefaction. We compared skin biopsies from 23 scleroderma patients and 24 normal controls and 7 scleroderma patients who had undergone high dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplant. Along with the loss of capillaries there was a dramatic change in endothelial phenotype in the residual vessels. The molecules defining this phenotype are: vascular endothelial cadherin, a supposedly universal endothelial marker required for tube formation (lost in the scleroderma tissue, antiangiogenic interferon alpha (overexpressed in the scleroderma dermis and RGS5, a signaling molecule whose expression coincides with the end of branching morphogenesis during development and tumor angiogenesis (also overexpressed in scleroderma skin. Following high dose immunosuppressive therapy, patients experienced clinical improvement and 5 of the 7 patients with scleroderma had increased capillary counts. It was also observed in the same 5 patients, that the interferon alpha and vascular endothelial cadherin had returned to normal as other clinical signs in the skin regressed, and in all 7 patients, RGS5 had returned to normal.These data provide the first objective evidence for loss of vessels in scleroderma and show that this phenomenon is reversible. Coordinate changes in expression of three molecules already implicated in angiogenesis or anti-angiogenesis suggest that control of expression of these three molecules may be the underlying mechanism for at least the vascular component of this disease. Since rarefaction has been little studied, these data may have

  10. The complementary membranes forming the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Richard A; Peterson, Darryl R; Viña, Juan R

    2002-09-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells form the blood-brain barrier. They are connected by extensive tight junctions, and are polarized into luminal (blood-facing) and abluminal (brain-facing) plasma membrane domains. The polar distribution of transport proteins allows for active regulation of brain extracellular fluid. Experiments on isolated membrane vesicles from capillary endothelial cells of bovine brain demonstrated the polar arrangement of amino acid and glucose transporters, and the utility of such arrangements have been proposed. For instance, passive carriers for glutamine and glutamate have been found only in the luminal membrane of blood-brain barrier cells, while Na-dependent secondary active transporters are at the abluminal membrane. This organization could promote the net removal of nitrogen-rich amino acids from brain, and account for the low level of glutamate penetration into the central nervous system. Furthermore, the presence of a gamma-glutamyl cycle at the luminal membrane and Na-dependent amino acid transporters at the abluminal membrane may serve to modulate movement of amino acids from blood-to-brain. Passive carriers facilitate amino acid transport into brain. However, activation of the gamma-glutamyl cycle by increased plasma amino acids is expected to generate oxoproline within the blood-brain barrier. Oxoproline stimulates secondary active amino acid transporters (Systems A and B(o)+) at the abluminal membrane, thereby reducing net influx of amino acids to brain. Finally, passive glucose transporters are present in both the luminal and abluminal membranes of the blood-brain barrier. Interestingly, a high affinity Na-dependent glucose carrier has been described only in the abluminal membrane. This raises the question whether glucose entry may be regulated to some extent. Immunoblotting studies suggest more than one type of passive glucose transporter exist in the blood-brain barrier, each with an asymmetrical distribution. In conclusion, it

  11. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  12. Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: Is Methylene Blue the Silver Bullet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Umbrello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS is a rare disorder characterized by unexplained, recurrent episodes of transient, abrupt increase in endothelial permeability, leading to severe hypotension, generalized edema, and hemoconcentration. Case Report. We report the case of a patient suffering from systemic capillary leak syndrome and present a possible interpretation of the pathophysiology of this condition. Besides the classical triad of hypotension, edema, and hemoconcentration, we recorded increased levels of methemoglobin, an index of NO overproduction. We present a possible interpretation of the pathophysiology of this condition based on the fast and complete reversal of symptoms after methylene blue administration (which opposes NO-induced effects and speculate that increased NO levels could be implicated in the pathophysiology of the capillary leak phase. Why should an emergency physician be aware of this? The safety of this treatment and its fluid- and cathecolamine-sparing effect deserve consideration and further research.

  13. Griffonia simplicifolia lectins bind specifically to endothelial cells and some epithelial cells in mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L

    1987-04-01

    The binding of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I (GSA-I) and the isolectins GSA-I-AB3 and GSA-I-B4, having affinity for some alpha-D-galactosyl and N-acetyl galactosaminyl residues was studied in different mouse tissues. In brain, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle, the GSA-I-lectin conjugates showed prominent binding only to blood vessel endothelia. Similarly, in the liver and kidney cortex the GSA-I-conjugates selectively reacted with endothelial cells of the sinusoids and with intertubular and glomerular capillaries, respectively. However, a strong reactivity with the GSA-I-conjugates was additionally seen in the acinar cells of the pancreas, in the stratified squamous epithelia of skin and tongue, and in transitional epithelium. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis combined with the lectin-blotting technique indicated that a similar set of glycoproteins are responsible for the GSA-I binding, even in different tissues. Another lectin with specificity for alpha-D-galactose, the Maclura pomifera agglutinin, displayed a distinctly different distribution of binding sites, mainly in the basement membranes, of all mouse tissues studied. The results suggest that some alpha-D-galactosyl residues, recognized by the binding of GSA-I lectins, are preferentially expressed in endothelial cells of mouse tissues, and also provide further evidence that endothelial cells can present a highly specific surface glycosylation pattern.

  14. Effects of patulin on thymus capillary of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Nursel; Ozsoy, Nesrin; Osmanagaoglu, Ozlem; Selmanoğlu, Güldeniz; Koçkaya, E Arzu

    2006-01-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin that is produced by species of Penicillum, Aspergillus, and Byssochylamys molds that may grow on a variety of foods including fruit, grains and cheese. Patulin, at a dose of 0.1 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) was administered orally to growing male rats aged 5-6 weeks for a period of 60 or 90 days. The dose of patulin used in the present study was based on estimated human exposure levels. At the end of these periods, the thymus glands of patulin-treated and control Wistar rats were removed and ultrastructural changes in capillary cells of the thymus of patulin-treated Wistar rats were determined by electron microscopy. The walls of thymus capillaries of the 60-day patulin-treated rat groups (P-60) exhibited degeneration observable in electron microscopic sections. For example, loss of cytoplasm and mitochondrial cristae of cells, swollen endothelial cells, increased thickness of the basement membrane, closed lumen of capillaries, accumulation of fibrous material at the periphery of the capillaries and nuclear anomalies were seen in these sections. Such degeneration and changes were also observed in sections of capillaries of the 90-day patulin-treated rat groups (P-90). The levels of degeneration of endothelial cell nucleus of P-90 were greater than those of P-60. This study demonstrated the ultrastructural degeneration of thymus capillary cells of patulin-treated rats. The results obtained from this study may provide a guide to research dealing with the toxic effects of patulin on tissue and organ ultrastructure. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates cerebral edema formation by protecting the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Reiner; Urrutia, Andrés; Hoffmann, Angelika; Liu, Hui; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Reischl, Stefan; Korff, Thomas; Marti, Hugo H

    2015-04-01

    Brain edema is a hallmark of various neuropathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to characterize how tissue hypoxia, together with oxidative stress and inflammation, leads to capillary dysfunction and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In a mouse stroke model we show that systemic treatment with dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an antioxidant drug clinically used for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, significantly prevented edema formation in vivo. Indeed, DMF stabilized the BBB by preventing disruption of interendothelial tight junctions and gap formation, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain tissue. In vitro, DMF directly sustained endothelial tight junctions, inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, and attenuated leukocyte transmigration. We also demonstrate that these effects are mediated via activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). DMF activated the Nrf2 pathway as shown by up-regulation of several Nrf2 target genes in the brain in vivo, as well as in cerebral endothelial cells and astrocytes in vitro, where DMF also increased protein abundance of nuclear Nrf2. Finally, Nrf2 knockdown in endothelial cells aggravated subcellular delocalization of tight junction proteins during ischemic conditions, and attenuated the protective effect exerted by DMF. Overall, our data suggest that DMF protects from cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke by targeting interendothelial junctions in an Nrf2-dependent manner, and provide the basis for a completely new approach to treat brain edema. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ImmunoPEGliposome-mediated reduction of blood and brain amyloid levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease is restricted to aged animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Posado-Fernández, Adrián; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (hyper-phosphorylated Tau) in the brain are two major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Active and passive immunotherapy may limit cerebral Aβ deposition and/or accelerate its...... clearance. With the aid of a newly characterized monoclonal anti-Aβ antibody we constructed immunoPEGliposomes with high avidity for capturing Aβ in the periphery. The functionality of these vesicles in modulating Aβ uptake by both human brain capillary endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells (suppressing uptake...

  17. Non-thermal activation of the hsp27/p38MAPK stress pathway by mobile phone radiation in human endothelial cells: molecular mechanism for cancer- and blood-brain barrier-related effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynski, Dariusz; Joenväärä, Sakari; Reivinen, Jukka; Kuokka, Reetta

    2002-05-01

    We have examined whether non-thermal exposures of cultures of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926 to 900 MHz GSM mobile phone microwave radiation could activate stress response. Results obtained demonstrate that 1-hour non-thermal exposure of EA.hy926 cells changes the phosphorylation status of numerous, yet largely unidentified, proteins. One of the affected proteins was identified as heat shock protein-27 (hsp27). Mobile phone exposure caused a transient increase in phosphorylation of hsp27, an effect which was prevented by SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK). Also, mobile phone exposure caused transient changes in the protein expression levels of hsp27 and p38MAPK. All these changes were non-thermal effects because, as determined using temperature probes, irradiation did not alter the temperature of cell cultures, which remained throughout the irradiation period at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Changes in the overall pattern of protein phosphorylation suggest that mobile phone radiation activates a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways, among them the hsp27/p38MAPK stress response pathway. Based on the known functions of hsp27, we put forward the hypothesis that mobile phone radiation-induced activation of hsp27 may (i) facilitate the development of brain cancer by inhibiting the cytochrome c/caspase-3 apoptotic pathway and (ii) cause an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability through stabilization of endothelial cell stress fibers. We postulate that these events, when occurring repeatedly over a long period of time, might become a health hazard because of the possible accumulation of brain tissue damage. Furthermore, our hypothesis suggests that other brain damaging factors may co-participate in mobile phone radiation-induced effects.

  18. Modulation of p-glycoprotein transport function at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Björn; Hartz, Anika M S; Fricker, Gert; Miller, David S

    2005-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of many therapeutic drugs are blunted because of restricted entry into the brain. The basis for this poor permeability is the brain capillary endothelium, which comprises the blood-brain barrier. This tissue exhibits very low paracellular (tight-junctional) permeability and expresses potent, multispecific, drug export pumps. Together, these combine to limit use of pharmacotherapy to treat CNS disorders such as brain cancer and bacterial or viral infections. Of all the xenobiotic efflux pumps highly expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells, p-glycoprotein handles the largest fraction of commonly prescribed drugs and thus is an obvious target for manipulation. Here we review recent studies focused on understanding the mechanisms by which p-glycoprotein activity in the blood-brain barrier can be modulated. These include (i) direct inhibition by specific competitors, (ii) functional modulation, and (iii) transcriptional modulation. Each has the potential to specifically reduce p-glycoprotein function and thus selectively increase brain permeability of p-glycoprotein substrates.

  19. Mixed oligomers and monomeric amyloid-β disrupts endothelial cells integrity and reduces monomeric amyloid-β transport across hCMEC/D3 cell line as an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qosa, Hisham; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-09-01

    Senile amyloid plaques are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the severity of clinical symptoms of AD is weakly correlated with the plaque load. AD symptoms severity is reported to be more strongly correlated with the level of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) assemblies. Formation of soluble Aβ assemblies is stimulated by monomeric Aβ accumulation in the brain, which has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Studies tend to focus on the neurotoxicity of specific Aβ species. There are relatively few studies investigating toxic effects of Aβ on the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We hypothesized that a soluble Aβ pool more closely resembling the in vivo situation composed of a mixture of Aβ40 monomer and Aβ42 oligomer would exert higher toxicity against hCMEC/D3 cells as an in vitro BBB model than either component alone. We observed that, in addition to a disruptive effect on the endothelial cells integrity due to enhancement of the paracellular permeability of the hCMEC/D3 monolayer, the Aβ mixture significantly decreased monomeric Aβ transport across the cell culture model. Consistent with its effect on Aβ transport, Aβ mixture treatment for 24h resulted in LRP1 down-regulation and RAGE up-regulation in hCMEC/D3 cells. The individual Aβ species separately failed to alter Aβ clearance or the cell-based BBB model integrity. Our study offers, for the first time, evidence that a mixture of soluble Aβ species, at nanomolar concentrations, disrupts endothelial cells integrity and its own transport across an in vitro model of the BBB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Practical capillary electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberger, Robert

    2000-01-01

    In the 1980s, capillary electrophoresis (CE) joined high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as the most powerful separation technique available to analytical chemists and biochemists. Published research using CE grew from 48 papers in the year of commercial introduction (1988) to 1200 in 1997. While only a dozen major pharmaceutical and biotech companies have reduced CE to routine practice, the applications market is showing real or potential growth in key areas, particularly in the DNA marketplace for genomic mapping and forensic identification. For drug development involving small molecules (including chiral separations), one CE instrument can replace 10 liquid chromatographs in terms of speed of analysis. CE also uses aqueous rather than organic solvents and is thus environmentally friendlier than HPLC. The second edition of Practical Capillary Electrophoresis has been extensively reorganized and rewritten to reflect modern usage in the field, with an emphasis on commercially available apparatus and ...

  1. MiR-7-5p is frequently downregulated in glioblastoma microvasculature and inhibits vascular endothelial cell proliferation by targeting RAF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Yuguang; Li, Lianling; Xu, Zhenkuan; Bi, Baibin; Wang, Yunyan; Li, Jian Yi

    2014-10-01

    The aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is always associated with tumor development and progression. Microvascular proliferation is one of the unique pathologic features of glioblastoma (GBM) . In this study, the microvasculature from GBM or normal brain tissue derived from neurosurgeries was purified and total RNA was isolated from purified microvasculature. The difference of miRNA expression profiles between glioblastoma microvasculature and normal brain capillaries was investigated. It was found that miR-7-5p in GBM microvessels was significantly reduced compared with that in normal brain capillaries. In the in vitro experiments, overexpression of miR-7-5p significantly inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation. Forced expression of miR-7-5p in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro significantly reduced the protein level of RAF1 and repressed the activity of the luciferase, a reporter vector carrying the 3'-untranslated region of RAF1. These findings indicate that RAF1 is one of the miR-7-5p target genes. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between miR-7-5p expression and RAF1 protein level in GBM microvasculature was found. These data suggest that miR-7-5p functions as a tumor suppressor gene to regulate GBM microvascular endothelial cell proliferation potentially by targeting the RAF1 oncogene, implicating an important role for miR-7-5p in the pathogenesis of GBM. It may serve as a guide for the antitumor angiogenesis drug development.

  2. Enhanced gene expression in the brain following intravenous administration of lactoferrin-bearing polypropylenimine dendriplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Sukrut; Robb, Gillian; Pickard, Benjamin S; Dufès, Christine

    2015-11-10

    The possibility of using gene therapy for the treatment of brain diseases such as brain cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, is currently hampered by the lack of gene delivery systems able to cross the blood-brain barrier and deliver DNA to the brain following intravenous administration. On the basis that lactoferrin can effectively reach the brain by using specific receptors for crossing the blood-brain barrier, we propose to investigate if a lactoferrin-bearing generation 3-diaminobutyric polypropylenimine (DAB) dendrimer would allow the transport of plasmid DNA to the brain after intravenous administration. In this work, we demonstrated that the conjugation of lactoferrin to the dendrimer led to an enhanced DNA uptake by 2.1-fold in bEnd.3 murine brain capillary endothelial cells compared to the unmodified dendriplex in vitro. In vivo, the intravenous administration of lactoferrin-bearing DAB dendriplex resulted in a significantly increased gene expression in the brain, by more than 6.4-fold compared to that of DAB dendriplex, while decreasing gene expression in the lung and the kidneys. Gene expression in the brain was significantly higher than in any other major organs of the body. Lactoferrin-bearing generation 3 polypropylenimine dendrimer is therefore a highly promising delivery system for systemic gene delivery to the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  4. Ion guiding in alumina capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhász, Z.; Sulik, B.; Biri, S.

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of a few keV impact energy Ne ions through capillaries in anodic alumina membranes has been studied with different ion counting methods using an energy dispersive electrostatic spectrometer, a multichannel plate (MCP) array and sensitive current-measurement. In the present work, we...... focus our attention to the measurements with the MCP array. The alumina capillaries were prepared by electro-chemical oxidation of aluminium foils. For the present experiments guiding of 3-6 keV Ne ions has been studied in two samples with capillary diameter of about 140 nm and 260 nm and with capillary...

  5. Capillary growth in human skeletal muscle: physiological factors and the balance between pro-angiogenic and angiostatic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Hoier, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    In human skeletal muscle, the capillary net readily adapts according to the level of muscular activity to allow for optimal diffusion conditions for oxygen from the blood to the muscle. Animal studies have demonstrated that stimulation of capillary growth in skeletal muscle can occur either by me...... addresses physiological signals and angiogenic factors in skeletal muscle with a focus on human data.......In human skeletal muscle, the capillary net readily adapts according to the level of muscular activity to allow for optimal diffusion conditions for oxygen from the blood to the muscle. Animal studies have demonstrated that stimulation of capillary growth in skeletal muscle can occur either...... angiogenesis. A number of such regulatory proteins have been described in skeletal muscle in animal and cell models but also in human skeletal muscle. Important pro-angiogenic factors in skeletal muscle are vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and angiopoietin 2, whereas...

  6. Alcohols and wide-bore capillaries in nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, S P; Jussila, M; Sinervo, K; Riekkola, M L

    1999-09-01

    The feasibility of using C1-C5 alcohols as electrolyte solutions in nonaqueous capillary zone electrophoresis was investigated. The separation of basic narcotic analgesics and acidic diuretics was modified by changing the alcohol in an electrolyte solution containing alcohol-acetonitrile-acetic acid (50:49:1, v/v) and 20 mM ammonium acetate while other experimental conditions were kept constant. The alcohols studied were methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and 1-pentanol. The results indicate that even longer-chain alcohols can be used in nonaqueous capillary zone electrophoresis and, because of the lower currents they allow, they are especially advantageous in wider capillaries. Basic analytes were separated in 200 microm and 320 microm ID capillaries with 1-butanol-acetonitrile-acetic acid (50:49:1, v/v) containing 20 mM ammonium acetate as electrolyte solution. Problems related to the use of wide-bore capillaries are discussed.

  7. Vacuum scanning capillary photoemission microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aseyev, S.A.; Cherkun, A P; Mironov, B N

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a conical capillary in a scanning probe microscopy for surface analysis. The probe can measure photoemission from a substrate by transmitting photoelectrons along the capillary as a function of probe position. The technique is demonstrated on a model substrate consisting...

  8. Elucidation of mechanism of blood-brain barrier damage for prevention and treatment of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki

    2017-03-28

    It is well-known that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays significant roles in transporting intravascular substances into the brain. The BBB in cerebral capillaries essentially impedes the influx of intravascular compounds from the blood to the brain, while nutritive substances, such as glucose, can be selectively transported through several types of influx transporters in endothelial cells. In the choroid plexus, intravascular substances can invade the parenchyma as fenestrations exist in endothelial cells of capillaries. However, the substances cannot invade the ventricles easily as there are tight junctions between epithelial cells in the choroid plexus. This restricted movement of the substances across the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells constitutes a blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In the brain, there are circumventricular organs, in which the barrier function is imperfect in capillaries. Accordingly, it is reasonable to consider that intravascular substances can move in and around the parenchyma of the organs. Actually, it was reported in mice that intravascular substances moved in the corpus callosum, medial portions of the hippocampus, and periventricular areas via the subfornical organs or the choroid plexus. Regarding pathways of intracerebral interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids to the outside of the brain, two representative drainage pathways, or perivascular drainage and glymphatic pathways, are being established. The first is the pathway in a retrograde direction to the blood flow through the basement membrane in walls of cerebral capillaries, the tunica media of arteries, and the vessels walls of the internal carotid artery. The second is in an anterograde direction to blood flow through the para-arterial routes, aquaporin 4-dependent transport through the astroglial cytoplasm, and para-venous routes, and then the fluids drain into the subarachnoid CSF. These fluids are finally considered to drain into the cervical lymph nodes or veins

  9. Protein kinase C-α signals P115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiaolu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is capable of activating the small GTPase RhoA, which in turn contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC isozymes in the mechanism of RhoA activation and in signaling TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC barrier dysfunction. Methods Bend.3 cells, an immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, were exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/mL. RhoA activity was assessed by pull down assay. PKC-α activity was measured using enzyme assasy. BMEC barrier function was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. p115RhoGEF phosphorylation was detected by autoradiography followed by western blotting. F-actin organization was observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both pharmacological inhibitors and knockdown approaches were employed to investigate the role of PKC and p115RhoGEF in TNF-α-induced RhoA activation and BMEC permeability. Results We observed that TNF-α induces a rapid phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF, activation of PKC and RhoA in BMECs. Inhibition of conventional PKC by Gö6976 mitigated the TNF-α-induced p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation. Subsequently, we found that these events are regulated by PKC-α rather than PKC-β by using shRNA. In addition, P115-shRNA and n19RhoA (dominant negative mutant of RhoA transfections had no effect on mediating TNF-α-induced PKC-α activation. These data suggest that PKC-α but not PKC-β acts as an upstream regulator of p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in response to TNF-α. Moreover, depletion of PKC-α, of p115RhoGEF, and inhibition of RhoA activation also prevented TNF-α-induced stress fiber formation and a decrease in TER. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that PKC-α phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF mediates TNF

  10. On hydraulics of capillary tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Aloyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the laws of motion of water in the capillary tubes, taken as a model for flowing well, on the analogical net count device. For capillary tube the lower limit value of flow rate is empirically determined above which the total hydraulic resistance of the capillary is practically constant. The specificity of the phenomenon is that the regime of motion, by a Reynolds number, for a given flow rate still remains laminar. This circumstance can perplex the specialists, so the author invites them to the scientific debate on the subject of study. Obviously, to identify the resulting puzzle it is necessary to conduct a series of experiments using capillaries of different lengths and diameters and with different values of overpressure. The article states that in tubes with very small diameter the preliminary magnitude of capillary rise of water in the presence of flow plays no role and can be neglected.

  11. Blood Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Delayed Neurological Deficits in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Induced by Blast Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Shetty

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred.

  12. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ashok K; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred.

  13. CD15s/CD62E Interaction Mediates the Adhesion of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells on Brain Endothelial Cells: Implications for Cerebral Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassam, Samah A.; Maherally, Zaynah; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Roncaroli, Federico; Fillmore, Helen L.; Pilkington, Geoffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Expression of the cell adhesion molecule (CAM), Sialyl Lewis X (CD15s) correlates with cancer metastasis, while expression of E-selectin (CD62E) is stimulated by TNF-α. CD15s/CD62E interaction plays a key role in the homing process of circulating leukocytes. We investigated the heterophilic interaction of CD15s and CD62E in brain metastasis-related cancer cell adhesion. CD15s and CD62E were characterised in human brain endothelium (hCMEC/D3), primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (COR-L105 and A549) and metastatic NSCLC (SEBTA-001 and NCI-H1299) using immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in human brain tissue sections. TNF-α (25 pg/mL) stimulated extracellular expression of CD62E while adhesion assays, under both static and physiological flow live-cell conditions, explored the effect of CD15s-mAb immunoblocking on adhesion of cancer cell–brain endothelium. CD15s was faintly expressed on hCMEC/D3, while high levels were observed on primary NSCLC cells with expression highest on metastatic NSCLC cells (p cells activated with TNF-α, with lower levels on primary and metastatic NSCLC cells. CD15s and CD62E were expressed on lung metastatic brain biopsies. CD15s/CD62E interaction was localised at adhesion sites of cancer cell–brain endothelium. CD15s immunoblocking significantly decreased cancer cell adhesion to brain endothelium under static and shear stress conditions (p brain metastasis. PMID:28698503

  14. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia?reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative...

  15. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschek, C; Kolb, H; Kolb-Bachofen, V

    1997-12-01

    1. Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants. 2. In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25-1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects. 3. iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT-PCR.

  16. Overcoming the blood-brain barrier for delivering drugs into the brain by using adenosine receptor nanoagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zheng, Shuyan; Changyi, Yinzhi; Zhang, Jianping; Ju, Shenghong; Zhu, Jianhua; Li, Cong

    2014-04-22

    The extremely low permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) poses the greatest impediment in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Recent work indicated that BBB permeability can be up-regulated by activating A2A adenosine receptor (AR), which temporarily increases intercellular spaces between the brain capillary endothelial cells. However, due to transient circulation lifetime of adenosine-based agonists, their capability to enhance brain delivery of drugs, especially macromolecular drugs, is limited. In this work, a series of nanoagonists (NAs) were developed by labeling different copies of A2A AR activating ligands on dendrimers. In vitro transendothelial electrical resistance measurements demonstrated that the NAs increased permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer by compromising the tightness of tight junctions, the key structure that restricts the entry of blood-borne molecules into the brain. In vivo imaging studies indicated the remarkably up-regulated brain uptake of a macromolecular model drug (45 kDa) after intravenous injection of NAs. Autoradiographic imaging showed that the BBB opening time-window can be tuned in a range of 0.5-2.0 h by the NAs labeled with different numbers of AR-activating ligands. By choosing a suitable NA, it is possible to maximize brain drug delivery and minimize the uncontrollable BBB leakage by matching the BBB opening time-window with the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic agent. The NA-mediated brain drug delivery strategy holds promise for the treatment of CNS diseases with improved therapeutic efficiency and reduced side-effects.

  17. In Vitro Construction of Scaffold-Free Bilayered Tissue-Engineered Skin Containing Capillary Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many types of skin substitutes have been constructed using exogenous materials. Angiogenesis is an important factor for tissue-engineered skin constructs. In this study, we constructed a scaffold-free bilayered tissue-engineered skin containing a capillary network. First, we cocultured dermal fibroblasts with dermal microvascular endothelial cells at a ratio of 2 : 1. A fibrous sheet was formed by the interactions between the fibroblasts and the endothelial cells, and capillary-like structures were observed after 20 days of coculture. Epithelial cells were then seeded on the fibrous sheet to assemble the bilayered tissue. HE staining showed that tissue-engineered skin exhibited a stratified epidermis after 7 days. Immunostaining showed that the epithelium promoted the formation of capillary-like structures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis showed that the capillary-like structures were typical microblood vessels. ELISA demonstrated that vascularization was promoted by significant upregulation of vascularization associated growth factors due to interactions among the 3 types of cells in the bilayer, as compared to cocultures of fibroblast and endothelial cells and monocultures.

  18. Effect of valproic acid and injury on lesion size and endothelial glycocalyx shedding in a rodent model of isolated traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Cecilie Heerdegen; deMoya, Marc A; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    were analyzed for sSDC-1, and lesion size was determined on Nissl-stained cryosections. RESULTS: sSDC-1 was significantly elevated in injured compared with uninjured animals at 3 hours (p = 0.0009) and 6 hours (p = 0.0007) after injury. This effect was significantly more pronounced in the animals...... hypothesized that severe isolated TBI would cause shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, as measured by serum syndecan-1 (sSDC-1) levels. We further hypothesized that VPA treatment would reduce this response and reduce lesion size volume. METHODS: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to TBI + VPA (n = 8......), TBI + saline vehicle control infusion (n = 8), sham + saline vehicle control infusion (n = 6), or sham + VPA (n = 8). TBI animals were subjected to severe controlled cortical impact and killed 6 hours after injury. VPA 300 mg/kg was given as an intravenous bolus 30 minutes after injury. Serum samples...

  19. Radioprotection of mouse CNS endothelial cells in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubimova, N.; Coultas, P.; Martin, R. [Peter McCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Full text: Radioprotection using the minor groove binding DNA ligand Hoechst 33342 has been demonstrated in vitro, and more recently in vivo, in mouse lung. Intravenous administration was used for the lung studies, and both endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells-showed good up-take. Radiation damage to the endothelial cell population has also been postulated as important in late developing radionecrosis of spinal cord and brain. Endothelial cell density in brain can be readily determined by a fluorescent-histochemical technique. Treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and subsequent injection with L-DOPA results in an accumulation of dopamine (DA) in CNS endothelial cells. DA is converted to a fluorophore by exposure to paraformaldehyde, and cell numbers assayed by fluorescence microscopy. Earlier studies used this technique to monitor post-irradiation changes in endothelial cell density in rodent brain and showed the loss, within 24 hours, of a sensitive subpopulation comprising about 15% of the endothelial cells. Ten minutes after intravenous injection of Hoechst 33342 (80mg/kg) the ligand is confined by its limited penetration to the endothelial cells in mouse brain. When we irradiated at this time, there was protection against early endothelial cell loss. Ablation of the sensitive subpopulation in unprotected mice takes place over a dose range of 1 to 3 Gy {gamma}-rays, but doses between 12 to 20 Gy are required in the presence of ligand. This protection equates to a very high dose modification factor of about 7 and possibly reflects a suppression of apoptosis in the sensitive endothelial subpopulation. The extent to which there is enhanced survival in the endothelial population as a whole and how the observed protection affects late CNS necrosis development has yet to be determined. However present results clearly show potential for the use of DNA-binding radioprotectors with limited penetration for investigations into the relative significance of

  20. Dll4-containing exosomes induce capillary sprout retraction in a 3D microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharghi-Namini, Soheila; Tan, Evan; Ong, Lee-Ling Sharon; Ge, Ruowen; Asada, H. Harry

    2014-01-01

    Delta-like 4 (Dll4), a membrane-bound Notch ligand, plays a fundamental role in vascular development and angiogenesis. Dll4 is highly expressed in capillary endothelial tip cells and is involved in suppressing neighboring stalk cells to become tip cells during angiogenesis. Dll4-Notch signaling is mediated either by direct cell-cell contact or by Dll4-containing exosomes from a distance. However, whether Dll4-containing exosomes influence tip cells of existing capillaries is unknown. Using a 3D microfluidic device and time-lapse confocal microscopy, we show here for the first time that Dll4-containing exosomes causes tip cells to lose their filopodia and trigger capillary sprout retraction in collagen matrix. We demonstrate that Dll4 exosomes can freely travel through 3D collagen matrix and transfer Dll4 protein to distant tip cells. Upon reaching endothelial sprout, it causes filopodia and tip cell retraction. Continuous application of Dll4 exosomes from a distance lead to significant reduction of sprout formation. This effect correlates with Notch signaling activation upon Dll4-containing exosome interaction with recipient endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that Dll4-containing exosomes increase endothelial cell motility while suppressing their proliferation. These data revealed novel functions of Dll4 in angiogenesis through exosomes. PMID:24504253

  1. Blood-brain barrier: a definition of normal and altered function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollay, M; Roberts, P A

    1980-06-01

    The anatomical component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been shown to be the cerebral capillary. These capillary endothelial cells are connected by continuous tight intercellular junctions and under normal conditions do not demonstrate transendothelial channels or pinocytotic vesicles. The rate that substances penetrate the BBB is related to molecular size, lipid solubility, and the presence of a specific carrier-mediated transport system. This latter mechanism for transendothelial passage is utilized for the movement of a wide variety of biologically important compounds such as sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. In certain pathological conditions, the permeability of the BBB is altered so that normally excluded plasma proteins and fluid enter the brain extracellular space, with the subsequent development of cerebral edema. In other abnormal conditions, alterations in the specialized transport systems operating across the cerebral capillary result in adverse changes in cerebral and neurotransmitter metabolism. An understanding of the unique properties of the BBB and of the changes that occur in pathological conditions has allowed the development of rational therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases of the central nervous system.

  2. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  3. Selectivity in capillary electrokinetic separations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, R.A; de Jong, G.J.; Ensing, K

    1999-01-01

    This review gives a survey of selectivity modes in capillary electrophoresis separations in pharmaceutical analysis and bioanalysis. Despite the high efficiencies of these separation techniques, good selectivity is required to allow quantitation or identification of a Chemistry and Toxicology,

  4. Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, a Putative Receptor for the Adhesion of Streptococcus pneumoniae to the Vascular Endothelium of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iovino, Federico; Molema, Grietje; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main causative agent of bacterial meningitis. S. pneumoniae is thought to invade the central nervous system via the bloodstream by crossing the vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier. The exact mechanism by which pneumococci cross

  5. Transfection of rat brain endothelium in a primary culture model of the blood-brain barrier at different states of barrier maturity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Lichota, Jacek

    approaches have been developed. Gene therapy could be a promising and novel approach to overcome the restricting properties of the BBB to polypeptides and proteins. Gene therapy is based on the delivery of genetic material into brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), which, theoretically, will result...... in expression and secretion of the recombinant protein from the BCECs and into the brain, thus turning BCECs into small recombinant protein factories. In this study, the possibility of using BCECs as small factories for recombinant protein production was investigated. To mimic the in-vivo situation as closely...... transfection is positively correlated with cell division, with dividing cells being more sensitive to gene transfection. Therefore, by using this model, the transfection efficiency of the rat endothelium was investigated in an immature state and mature state of the BBB. During the transfection period...

  6. Non-canonical Wnt signalling modulates the endothelial shear stress flow sensor in vascular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Claudio A; Jones, Martin L; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Vion, Anne-Clemence; Barbacena, Pedro; Fan, Jieqing; Mathivet, Thomas; Fonseca, Catarina G; Ragab, Anan; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Coveney, Peter V; Lang, Richard A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-02-04

    Endothelial cells respond to molecular and physical forces in development and vascular homeostasis. Deregulation of endothelial responses to flow-induced shear is believed to contribute to many aspects of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. However, how molecular signals and shear-mediated physical forces integrate to regulate vascular patterning is poorly understood. Here we show that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/Wnt11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarization and migration against flow at lower shear levels. Integration of flow modelling and polarity analysis in entire vascular networks demonstrates that polarization against flow is achieved differentially in artery, vein, capillaries and the primitive sprouting front. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus.

  7. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  8. CURRENT METHODS OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION ASSESSMENT AND THEIR POSSIBLE USE IN THE PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Shabrov; A. G. Apresyan; A. L. Dobkes; S. U. Ermolov; T. V. Ermolova; S. G. Manasyan; S. V. Serdyukov

    2016-01-01

    A review contains a description of the most common methods of evaluation and monitoring of "endothelial dysfunction" that are assessed in terms of their information content and applicability in the practice of medicine. The term "endothelial function" is interpreted primarily as a function of the regulation of capillary blood flow, carried out by the expense of the dynamic change of the phase of vasoconstriction and vasodilatation in vessels of resistive type (in accordance with the changing ...

  9. Capillary tone: cyclooxygenase, shear stress, luminal glycocalyx, and hydraulic conductivity (Lp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H

    2015-04-01

    Control of capillary hydraulic conductivity (Lp) is the physiological mechanism that underpins systemic hydration. Capillaries form the largest surface of endothelial cells in any species with a cardiovascular system and all capillaries are exposed to the flow-induced force, shear stress (τ). Vasoactive molecules such as prostacyclin (cyclooxygenase product, COX) are released from endothelial cells in response to τ. Little is known about how COX activity impacts capillary Lp. The purpose here was to assess Lp in situ following an acute Δτ stimulus and during COX1/COX2 inhibition. Mesenteric true capillaries (TC) of Rana pipiens (pithed) were cannulated for Lp assessment using the modified Landis technique. Rana were randomized into Control and Test groups. Two capillaries per animal were used (perfusate, 10 mg·mL(-1) BSA/frog Ringer's; superfusate, frog Ringer's or indomethacin (10(-5) mol·L(-1)) mixed in frog Ringer's solution). Three distinct responses of Lp to indomethacin (TC2) were demonstrated (TC1 and TC2 medians: Test Subgroup 1, 3.0 vs. 1.8; Test Subgroup 2, 18.2 vs. 2.2; Test Subgroup 3, 4.2 vs. 10.2 × 10(-7) cm·sec(-1)·cm H2O(-1)). Multiple regression analysis revealed a relationship between capillary Lp and systemic red blood cell concentration or hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, and Δτ (Test Subgroup 1, R(2) = 0.59, P healthy state. Recovering barrier function may be an unrecognized benefit of transfusions during blood loss or edema formation. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  10. In vitro analysis of human periodontal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokawa, Mizuki; Sato, Soh

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) participate in key aspects of vascular biology, such as maintenance of capillary permeability, initiation of coagulation, and regulation of inflammation. According to previous reports, ECs have revealed highly specific characteristics depending on the organs and tissues. However, some reports have described the characteristics of the capillaries formed by human periodontal ECs. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the functional characteristics of the periodontal microvascular ECs in vitro. Human periodontal ligament-endothelial cells (HPDL-ECs) and human gingiva-endothelial cells (HG-ECs) were isolated by immunoprecipitation with magnetic beads conjugated to a monoclonal anti-CD31 antibody. The isolated HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were characterized to definitively demonstrate that these cell cultures represented pure ECs. Human umbilical-vein ECs and human dermal microvascular ECs were used for comparison. These cells were compared according to the proliferation potential, the formation of capillary-like tubes, the transendothelial electric resistance (TEER), and the expression of tight junction proteins. HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs with characteristic cobblestone monolayer morphology were obtained, as determined by light microscopy at confluence. Furthermore, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs expressed the EC markers platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (also known as CD31), von Willebrand factor, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1, and the cells stained strongly positive for CD31 and CD309. In addition, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were observed to form capillary-like tubes, and they demonstrated uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Functional analyses of the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs showed that, compared to the control cells, tube formation persisted for only a brief period of time, and TEER was substantially reduced at confluence. Furthermore, the cells exhibited delocalization of zonula occludens-1 and occludin at cell-cell contact sites

  11. Molecular biology of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient processing of information by the central nervous system (CNS represents an important evolutionary advantage. Thus, homeostatic mechanisms have developed that provide appropriate circumstances for neuronal signaling, including a highly controlled and stable microenvironment. To provide such a milieu for neurons, extracellular fluids of the CNS are separated from the changeable environment of blood at three major interfaces: at the brain capillaries by the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which is localized at the level of the endothelial cells and separates brain interstitial fluid (ISF from blood; at the epithelial layer of four choroid plexuses, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB, which separates CSF from the CP ISF, and at the arachnoid barrier. The two barriers that represent the largest interface between blood and brain extracellular fluids, the BBB and the BCSFB, prevent the free paracellular diffusion of polar molecules by complex morphological features, including tight junctions (TJs that interconnect the endothelial and epithelial cells, respectively. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of TJs and adherens junctions in the brain capillary endothelial cells and in the CP epithelial cells. However, normal function of the CNS depends on a constant supply of essential molecules, like glucose and amino acids from the blood, exchange of electrolytes between brain extracellular fluids and blood, as well as on efficient removal of metabolic waste products and excess neurotransmitters from the brain ISF. Therefore, a number of specific transport proteins are expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells and CP epithelial cells that provide transport of nutrients and ions into the CNS and removal of waste products and ions from the CSF. The second part of this review concentrates on the molecular biology of various solute carrier (SLC transport proteins at those two barriers and underlines

  12. Simultaneous two-photon imaging of cerebral oxygenation and capillary blood flow in atherosclerotic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuecong; Li, Baoqiang; Moeini, Mohammad; Lesage, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Gradual changes in brain microvasculature and cerebral capillary blood flow occurring with atherosclerosis may significantly contribute to cognition decline due to their role in brain tissue oxygenation. However, previous stud- ies of the relationship between cerebral capillary blood flow and brain tissue oxygenation are limited. This study aimed to investigate vascular and concomitant changes in brain tissue pO2 with atherosclerosis. Experiments in young healthy C57B1/6 mice (n=6 , WT), young atherosclerotic mice (n=6 , ATX Y) and old atherosclerotic mice (n=6 , ATX O) were performed imaging on the left sensory-motor cortex at resting state under urethane (1.5 g/kg) anesthesia using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that pO2 around capillaries, correlated with red blood cell (RBC) flux, increased with atherosclerosis.

  13. Capillary-oxygenation-level-dependent near-infrared spectrometry in frontal lobe of humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Dawson, Ellen A.; Nybo, Lars; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Secher, Niels H.; Gjedde, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Brain function requires oxygen and maintenance of brain capillary oxygenation is important. We evaluated how faithfully frontal lobe near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) follows haemoglobin saturation (SCap) and how calculated mitochondrial oxygen tension (PMitoO2) influences motor performance. Twelve

  14. Pharmacokinetics, Brain Delivery, and Efficacy in Brain Tumor-Bearing Mice of Glutathione Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (2B3-101)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Pieter J.; Appeldoorn, Chantal C. M.; Dorland, Rick; van Kregten, Joan; Manca, Francesca; Vugts, Danielle J.; Windhorst, Bert; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.; de Vries, Helga E.; Maussang, David; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Brain cancer is a devastating disease affecting many people worldwide. Effective treatment with chemotherapeutics is limited due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that tightly regulates the diffusion of endogenous molecules but also xenobiotics. Glutathione pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (2B3-101) is being developed as a new treatment option for patients with brain cancer. It is based on already marketed pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil®/Caelyx®), with an additional glutathione coating that safely enhances drug delivery across the BBB. Uptake of 2B3-101 by human brain capillary endothelial cells in vitro was time-, concentration- and temperature-dependent, while pegylated liposomal doxorubicin mainly remained bound to the cells. In vivo, 2B3-101 and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin had a comparable plasma exposure in mice, yet brain retention 4 days after administration was higher for 2B3-101. 2B3-101 was overall well tolerated by athymic FVB mice with experimental human glioblastoma (luciferase transfected U87MG). In 2 independent experiments a strong inhibition of brain tumor growth was observed for 2B3-101 as measured by bioluminescence intensity. The effect of weekly administration of 5 mg/kg 2B3-101 was more pronounced compared to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (pbrain tumor growth (pbrain tumors and could become a promising new therapeutic option for the treatment of brain malignancies. PMID:24416140

  15. Vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and the molecular organisation of endothelial junctions in the early human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Lopa; Babawale, Michael O; Anderson, Mark; Lammiman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by the capacity of endothelial cells to adhere to each other and form new tubes. The presence and role of junctional adhesion molecules during physiological vasculogenesis is unknown. Using ultrastructural and immunocytochemical approaches, we compared the junctional phenotype of developing vessels of the first-trimester human placenta with vessels in the last trimester; the latter include newly formed terminal capillaries and the quiescent vascular bed. First-trimester placental vessels contained the adherens junctional molecules, vascular endothelial cadherin and alpha- and beta-catenin but lacked plakoglobin, the component of fully differentiated adherens junctions. Furthermore, these vessels did not contain the transmembrane tight junctional molecules occludin and claudin-1 and -2. This profile reflects the phenotype of terminal capillaries but differs from large vessels of the full-term placenta. Electron microscopic studies revealed that endothelial tight junctions are present in the first-trimester placenta. Thus, occludin and claudin-1 appear to play no part in the formation of endothelial tight junctions, but are a later requirement. In the early placenta, the predominant growth factor appears to be vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), whilst at term, angiopoietin-1 was present in large vessels, with intense angiopoietin-2 immunofluorescence (and VEGF) located in terminal villous capillaries. Thus, endothelial junctions in the human placenta possess two distinct molecular phenotypes, i.e. stable or dynamic, dependent on maturity and plasticity. These distinct phenotypes may be influenced by the angiopoietins/VEGF present in the placenta. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqing Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed.

  17. Astrocyte functions in the copper homeostasis of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Dringen, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Copper is an essential element that is required for a variety of important cellular functions. Since not only copper deficiency but also excess of copper can seriously affect cellular functions, the cellular copper metabolism is tightly regulated. In brain, astrocytes appear to play a pivotal role in the copper metabolism. With their strategically important localization between capillary endothelial cells and neuronal structures they are ideally positioned to transport copper from the blood-brain barrier to parenchymal brain cells. Accordingly, astrocytes have the capacity to efficiently take up, store and to export copper. Cultured astrocytes appear to be remarkably resistant against copper-induced toxicity. However, copper exposure can lead to profound alterations in the metabolism of these cells. This article will summarize the current knowledge on the copper metabolism of astrocytes, will describe copper-induced alterations in the glucose and glutathione metabolism of astrocytes and will address the potential role of astrocytes in the copper metabolism of the brain in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurotrophin p75 receptor (p75NTR) promotes endothelial cell apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis: implications for diabetes-induced impaired neovascularization in ischemic limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caporali, Andrea; Pani, Elisabetta; Horrevoets, Anton J. G.; Kraenkel, Nicolle; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Sala-Newby, Graciela B.; Meloni, Marco; Cristofaro, Brunella; Graiani, Gallia; Leroyer, Aurelie S.; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Spinetti, Gaia; Yoon, Sung Ok; Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes impairs endothelial function and reparative neovascularization. The p75 receptor of neurotrophins (p75(NTR)), which is scarcely present in healthy endothelial cells (ECs), becomes strongly expressed by capillary ECs after induction of peripheral ischemia in type-1 diabetic mice. Here, we

  19. Exercise Training Could Improve Age-Related Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow and Capillary Vascularity through the Upregulation of VEGF and eNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheepsumon Viboolvorakul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of exercise training on age-induced microvascular alterations in the brain. Additionally, the association with the protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was also assessed. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary-young (SE-Young, n=5, sedentary aged (SE-Aged, n=8, immersed-aged (IM-Aged, n=5, and exercise trained-aged (ET-Aged, 60 minutes/day and 5 days/week for 8 weeks, n=8 rats. The MAPs of all aged groups, SE-Aged, IM-Aged, and ET-Aged, were significantly higher than that of the SE-Young group. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in the SE-Aged and IM-Aged was significantly decreased as compared to SE-Young groups. However, rCBF of ET-Aged group was significantly higher than that in the IM-Aged group (P<0.05. Moreover, the percentage of capillary vascularity (%CV and the levels of VEGF and eNOS in the ET-Aged group were significantly increased compared to the IM-Aged group (P<0.05. These results imply that exercise training could improve age-induced microvascular changes and hypoperfusion closely associated with the upregulation of VEGF and eNOS.

  20. Development and Validation of an In-Cell Western for Quantifying P-Glycoprotein Expression in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial (hCMEC/D3) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Mitchell P; Pan, Yijun; Short, Jennifer L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    An in-cell western (ICW) protocol detecting the relative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human cerebro-microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) was developed and optimized, with the intention of improving throughput relative to western blotting (WB). For validation of the ICW protocol, hCMEC/D3 cells were incubated with known P-gp upregulators (10 μM rifampicin and 5 μM SR12813) and treated with siRNA targeted against MDR1, before measuring changes in P-gp expression, using both ICW and WB in parallel. To confirm a relationship between the detected P-gp expression and function, the uptake of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 was assessed following SR12813 treatment. Rifampicin and SR12813 significantly upregulated P-gp expression (1.5-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively) compared to control, as assessed by the ICW protocol. WB analysis of the same treatments revealed 1.4-fold and 1.5-fold upregulations. MDR1 siRNA reduced P-gp abundance by 20% and 35% when assessed by ICW and WB, respectively. SR12813 treatment reduced rhodamine-123 uptake by 18%, indicating that the observed changes in P-gp expression by ICW were associated with comparable functional changes. The correlation of P-gp upregulation by WB, rhodamine-123 uptake, and the ICW protocol provide validation of a new ICW method as an alternative method for quantification of P-gp in hCMEC/D3 cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  2. A three-dimensional model of the human blood-brain barrier to analyse the transport of nanoparticles and astrocyte/endothelial interactions [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddagangannagari Sreekanthreddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D model of the human blood-brain barrier in vitro, which mimics the cellular architecture of the CNS and could be used to analyse the delivery of nanoparticles to cells of the CNS. The model includes human astrocytes set in a collagen gel, which is overlaid by a monolayer of human brain endothelium (hCMEC/D3 cell line. The model was characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. A collagenase digestion method could recover the two cell types separately at 92-96% purity.  Astrocytes grown in the gel matrix do not divide and they have reduced expression of aquaporin-4 and the endothelin receptor, type B compared to two-dimensional cultures, but maintain their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. The effects of conditioned media from these astrocytes on the barrier phenotype of the endothelium was compared with media from astrocytes grown conventionally on a two-dimensional (2D substratum. Both induce the expression of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-5 in hCMEC/D3 cells, but there was no difference between the induced expression levels by the two media. The model has been used to assess the transport of glucose-coated 4nm gold nanoparticles and for leukocyte migration. TEM was used to trace and quantitate the movement of the nanoparticles across the endothelium and into the astrocytes. This blood-brain barrier model is very suitable for assessing delivery of nanoparticles and larger biomolecules to cells of the CNS, following transport across the endothelium.

  3. Impacts on oil recovery from capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bognoe, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The main conclusions drawn from this thesis are; 7 scientific papers are published on a broad variety of subjects, and describes in detail the experiments and research treated in this thesis. Scientific research has been performed, investigating the subjects of capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities from different angles. This thesis discusses the findings in this study and aims to illustrate the benefits of the results obtained for further development of other experiments, and/or even the industrial benefits in field development. The methods for wettability alteration have developed throughout the work. From producing heterogeneous wettability alterations, the methods have improved to giving both radial and lateral uniform wettability alterations, which also remains unaltered throughout the duration of the experimental work. The alteration of wettability is dependent on initial water saturation, flow rate, aging time and crude oil composition. Capillary pressure and relative permeability curves have been measured for core plugs at different wettabilities using conventional centrifuge methods. The trends observed are mostly consistent with theory. The production mechanisms of strongly and moderately water wet chalk has been investigated. At strongly water wet conditions in fractured chalk; the flow is governed by capillary forces, showing strong impact from the fractures. At moderately water wet conditions, the impact of the fractures are absent, and a dispersed water front is observed during the displacement. The oil recovery is about the same, at the two wettabilities. Fracture crossing mechanisms at the same wettability conditions have been mapped. And the observations are consistent with those of the water floods. During strongly water wet displacement, the fracture crossing is occurring once the inlet core has reached endpoint of spontaneous imbibition. At moderately water wet conditions the fracture crossing is less abrupt, and creation of wetting

  4. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett. 10, 826-832 (2010)]. An individual valve is burst by focusing the laser in its vicinity. We demonstrate the capture of single polystyrene 7 μm beads in the constriction triggered by the bursting of the valve.

  5. Extreme ultraviolet capillary discharge lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah; West, Andrew; Tallents, Greg

    2017-10-01

    An extreme ultraviolet capillary discharge laser has recently been installed at the University of York. The laser produces EUV radiation of wavelength 46.9nm, with pulse durations of approximately 1.2ns and energies of up to 50 μJ. A population inversion is produced by a high voltage electrical discharge passing through an argon filled capillary tube. Within the capillary, radial pinching of the argon plasma through JxB force causes the pressure and temperature of the plasma to increase which causes amplification between 3p -3s (J = 0-1) transitions producing EUV radiation. Laser optimisation, calibration of detectors and designs for initial experiments to produce warm dense matter by focusing onto solid targets are presented. The plasmas formed by the EUV laser irradiation of solid targets can be shown to produce warm dense matter in a regime where the ionization equilibrium is dominated by radiative ionization.

  6. Genetic variability of Artemisia capillaris (Wormwood capillary) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic variability among individuals of Artemisia capillaris from state of Terengganu, Malaysia was examined by using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The samples were collected from differences regional in Terengganu State. The genomic DNA was extracted from the samples leaves.

  7. CXC chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7 regulates CXCR4 protein expression and capillary tuft development in mouse kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Haege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is involved in kidney development by regulating formation of the glomerular tuft. Recently, a second CXCL12 receptor was identified and designated CXCR7. Although it is established that CXCR7 regulates heart and brain development in conjunction with CXCL12 and CXCR4, little is known about the influence of CXCR7 on CXCL12 dependent kidney development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We provided analysis of CXCR7 expression and function in the developing mouse kidney. Using in situ hybridization, we identified CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial cells including podocytes at all nephron stages up to the mature glomerulus. CXCL12 mRNA showed a striking overlap with CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial structures. In addition, CXCL12 was detected in stromal cells and the glomerular tuft. Expression of CXCR4 was complementary to that of CXCR7 as it occurred in mesenchymal cells, outgrowing ureteric buds and glomerular endothelial cells but not in podocytes. Kidney examination in CXCR7 null mice revealed ballooning of glomerular capillaries as described earlier for CXCR4 null mice. Moreover, we detected a severe reduction of CXCR4 protein but not CXCR4 mRNA within the glomerular tuft and in the condensed mesenchyme. Malformation of the glomerular tuft in CXCR7 null mice was associated with mesangial cell clumping. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We established that there is a similar glomerular pathology in CXCR7 and CXCR4 null embryos. Based on the phenotype and the anatomical organization of the CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 system in the forming glomerulus, we propose that CXCR7 fine-tunes CXCL12/CXCR4 mediated signalling between podocytes and glomerular capillaries.

  8. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  9. A subset of group A-like var genes encodes the malaria parasite ligands for binding to human brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claessens, Antoine; Adams, Yvonne; Ghumra, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most deadly manifestation of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathology of cerebral malaria is characterized by the accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the microvasculature of the brain caused by parasite adhesins on the surface of IEs binding to human...... of these variants. The clinical in vivo relevance of the HBEC-selected parasites was supported by significantly higher surface recognition of HBEC-selected parasites compared with unselected parasites by antibodies from young African children suffering cerebral malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.......029) but not by antibodies from controls with uncomplicated malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.58). This work describes a binding phenotype for virulence-associated group A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants and identifies targets for interventions to treat or prevent cerebral malaria....

  10. The biflavonoid amentoflavone inhibits neovascularization preventing the activity of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarallo, Valeria; Lepore, Laura; Marcellini, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    of VEGF receptor 1 and 2 (VEGFR-1,VEGFR-2) and to inhibit endothelial cell migration and capillary-like tube formation induced by VEGF-A or placental growth factor 1 (PlGF-1) at low μm concentration. In vivo, amentoflavone is able to inhibit VEGF-A-induced chorioallantoic membrane neovascularization...

  11. Measuring endothelial glycocalyx dimensions in humans: a potential novel tool to monitor vascular vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwdorp, Max; Meuwese, Marijn C.; Mooij, Hans L.; Ince, Can; Broekhuizen, Lysette N.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Vink, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is increasingly considered as an intravascular compartment that protects the vessel wall against pathogenic insults. The purpose of this study was to translate an established experimental method of estimating capillary glycocalyx dimension into a clinically useful tool and

  12. Capillary density and capillary-to-fibre ratio in vastus lateralis muscle of untrained and trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, J A; Semik, D; Zawadowska, B; Majerczak, J; Karasinski, J; Kolodziejski, L; Duda, K; Kilarski, W M

    2005-01-01

    Muscle fibre profile area (Af), volume density (Vv), capillary-to-fibre ratio (CF) and number of capillaries per fibre square millimetre (CD) were determined from needle biopsies of vastus lateralis of twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg) of different training background. Seven subjects were untrained students (group A), nine were national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B) with the background of 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training, and eight subjects were sprint-power athletes (group C) with 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training. Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase. Capillaries were visualized and counted using CD31 antibodies against endothelial cells. There were significant differences in the Vv of type I and type II muscle fibres in both trained groups, B (51.8%; 25.6%) and C (50.5%; 26.4%). However, in untrained group A that was treated as a reference group, the difference between Vv of type I and type II fibres was less prominent, nevertheless statistically significant (42.1%; 35.1%). There was also a significant difference in CF: 1.9 in group A and 2.1 in groups B and C. The number of capillaries per mm2 (CD) was 245 (group A), 308 (group B) and 325 (group C). Significant differences (Pvolleyball, soccer and modern dance.

  13. Obesity and neuroinflammatory phenotype in mice lacking endothelial megalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Fernando; Antequera, Desiree; Tavares, Eva; Pascual, Consuelo; Maldonado, Rosario; Camins, Antoni; Carro, Eva

    2017-01-31

    The multiligand receptor megalin controls the brain uptake of a number of ligands, including insulin and leptin. Despite the role of megalin in the transport of these metabolically relevant hormones, the role of megalin at the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) has not yet been explored in the context of metabolic regulation. Here we investigate the role of brain endothelial megalin in energy metabolism and leptin signaling using an endothelial cell-specific megalin deficient (EMD) mouse model. We found megalin is important to protect mice from developing obesity and metabolic syndrome when mice are fed a normal chow diet. EMD mice developed neuroinflammation, by triggering several pro-inflammatory cytokines, displayed reduced neurogenesis and mitochondrial deregulation. These results implicate brain endothelial megalin expression in obesity-related metabolic changes through the leptin signaling pathway proposing a potential link between obesity and neurodegeneration.

  14. Inflammation- and tumor-induced anorexia and weight loss require MyD88 in hematopoietic/myeloid cells but not in brain endothelial or neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Johan; Wilhelms, Daniel Björk; Nilsson, Anna; Eskilsson, Anna; Tang, Yan-Juan; Ströhle, Peter; Caesar, Robert; Schwaninger, Markus; Wunderlich, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2013-05-01

    Loss of appetite is a hallmark of inflammatory diseases. The underlying mechanisms remain undefined, but it is known that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), an adaptor protein critical for Toll-like and IL-1 receptor family signaling, is involved. Here we addressed the question of determining in which cells the MyD88 signaling that results in anorexia development occurs by using chimeric mice and animals with cell-specific deletions. We found that MyD88-knockout mice, which are resistant to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anorexia, displayed anorexia when transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. Furthermore, mice with a targeted deletion of MyD88 in hematopoietic or myeloid cells were largely protected against LPS-induced anorexia and displayed attenuated weight loss, whereas mice with MyD88 deletion in hepatocytes or in neural cells or the cerebrovascular endothelium developed anorexia and weight loss of similar magnitude as wild-type mice. Furthermore, in a model for cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia, deletion of MyD88 in hematopoietic cells attenuated the anorexia and protected against body weight loss. These findings demonstrate that MyD88-dependent signaling within the brain is not required for eliciting inflammation-induced anorexia. Instead, we identify MyD88 signaling in hematopoietic/myeloid cells as a critical component for acute inflammatory-driven anorexia, as well as for chronic anorexia and weight loss associated with malignant disease.

  15. Activation of the blood-brain barrier by SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) requires cell-associated virus and is not restricted to endothelial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, A G; Rasmussen, T A; Bieniemy, D; Lackner, A A

    2004-11-01

    The primary cell infected during acute HIV neuropathogenesis is the monocyte-derived macrophage. We have demonstrated that there is activation of the BBB (blood-brain barrier) during acute viral infection and at terminal AIDS. However, it has never been determined if there is a requirement for the virus to be carried through the BBB or how these Trojan horses would be induced to cross the BBB. We added SIVmac251-infected (SIV is simian immunodeficiency virus) mononuclear cells (and their supernatants) to the luminal or abluminal compartment of our BBB model. There was activation of both sides of the BBB model, only if viral-infected cells were added to the luminal compartment, as opposed to the addition of cell-free supernatants. This suggests that cell-associated virus is essential for the activation of the BBB. This, in turn, would be expected to lead to further infiltration of cells capable of viral infection. VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1) staining revealed, for the first time, that there is an absolute requirement for virally infected cells, and not just the presence of virus for the activation of the BBB.

  16. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  17. Brain pericytes from stress-susceptible pigs increase blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenhaute Elodie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function of pericytes remains questionable but with improved cultured technique and the use of genetically modified animals, it has become increasingly clear that pericytes are an integral part of blood–brain barrier (BBB function, and the involvement of pericyte dysfunction in certain cerebrovascular diseases is now emerging. The porcine stress syndrome (PSS is the only confirmed, homologous model of malignant hyperthermia (MH in veterinary medicine. Affected animals can experience upon slaughter a range of symptoms, including skeletal muscle rigidity, metabolic acidosis, tachycardia and fever, similar to the human syndrome. Symptoms are due to an enhanced calcium release from intracellular stores. These conditions are associated with a point mutation in ryr1/hal gene, encoding the ryanodine receptor, a calcium channel. Important blood vessel wall muscle modifications have been described in PSS, but potential brain vessel changes have never been documented in this syndrome. Methods In the present work, histological and ultrastructural analyses of brain capillaries from wild type and ryr1 mutated pigs were conducted to investigate the potential impairment of pericytes, in this pathology. In addition, brain pericytes were isolated from the three porcine genotypes (wild-type NN pigs; Nn and nn pigs, bearing one or two (n mutant ryr1/hal alleles, respectively, and tested in vitro for their influence on the permeability of BBB endothelial monolayers. Results Enlarged perivascular spaces were observed in ryr1-mutant samples, corresponding to a partial or total detachment of the astrocytic endfeet. These spaces were electron lucent and sometimes filled with lipid deposits and swollen astrocytic feet. At the ultrastructural level, brain pericytes did not seem to be affected because they showed regular morphology and characteristics, so we aimed to check their ability to maintain BBB properties in vitro. Our results indicated

  18. Blood-Brain Barrier Effects of the Fusarium Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol, 3 Acetyldeoxynivalenol, and Moniliformin and Their Transfer to the Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Behrens

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium fungi frequently contaminate food and feed and have adverse effects on human and animal health. Fusarium mycotoxins exhibit a wide structural and biosynthetic diversity leading to different toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. Several studies investigated the toxicity of mycotoxins, focusing on very specific targets, like the brain. However, it still remains unclear how fast mycotoxins reach the brain and if they impair the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. This study investigated and compared the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and moniliformin on the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, the transfer properties to the brain were analyzed, which are required for risk assessment, including potential neurotoxic effects.Primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells were cultivated to study the effects of the examined mycotoxins on the blood-brain barrier in vitro. The barrier integrity was monitored by cellular impedance spectroscopy and 14C radiolabeled sucrose permeability measurements. The distribution of the applied toxins between blood and brain compartments of the cell monolayer was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to calculate transfer rates and permeability coefficients.Deoxynivalenol reduced the barrier integrity and caused cytotoxic effects at 10 μM concentrations. Slight alterations of the barrier integrity were also detected for 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol. The latter was transferred very quickly across the barrier and additionally cleaved to deoxynivalenol. The transfer of deoxynivalenol and moniliformin was slower, but clearly exceeded the permeability of the negative control. None of the compounds was enriched in one of the compartments, indicating that no efflux transport protein is involved in their transport.

  19. The Glycoprofile Patterns of Endothelial Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Barkhordari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED FOR DUPLICATE PUBLICATION] Background: The pathological classification of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis has been a matter of debate and controversy for histopathologists. Objective: To identify and specify the glycotypes of capillary endothelial cells in usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP compared to those found in normal tissue. Methods: Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 16 cases of UIP were studied by lectin histochemistry with a panel of 27 biotinylated lectins and an avidin-peroxidase revealing system. Results: High expression of several classes of glycan was seen de novo in capillary endothelial cells from patients with UIP including small complex and bi/tri-antennary bisected complex N-linked sequences bolund by Concanavalin A and erythro-phytohemagglutinin, respectively, GalNAca1 residues bound by Helix pomatia and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and L-fucosylated derivatives of type II glycan chains recognized by Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I. Glycans bound by agglutinins from Lycopersicon esculentum (β1,4GlcNAc and Wisteria floribunda (GalNAc as well as GlcNAc oligomers bound by Phytolacca americana and succinylated Wheat Germ agglutinin were also seen in the capillary endothelial cells of UIP. In contrast, L-fucosylated derivatives of type I glycan chains were absent in cells from cases of UIP when Anguilla anguilla agglutinin was applied, unlike the situation in normal tissue. Conclusion: These results may indicate existence of two distinct populations of endothelial cell in UIP with markedly different patterns of glycosylation, reflecting a pattern of differentiation and angiogenesis, which is not detectable morphologically.

  20. Capillary growth in human skeletal muscle: physiological factors and the balance between pro-angiogenic and angiostatic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Hoier, Birgitte

    2014-12-01

    In human skeletal muscle, the capillary net readily adapts according to the level of muscular activity to allow for optimal diffusion conditions for oxygen from the blood to the muscle. Animal studies have demonstrated that stimulation of capillary growth in skeletal muscle can occur either by mechanical or by chemical signalling. Mechanical signals originate from shear stress forces on the endothelial cell layer induced by the blood flowing through the vessel, but include also mechanical stretch and compression of the vascular structures and the surrounding tissue, as the muscle contracts. Depending on the mechanical signal provided, capillary growth may occur either by longitudinal splitting (shear stress) or by sprouting (passive stretch). The mechanical signals initiate angiogenic processes by up-regulation or release of angioregulatory proteins that either promote, modulate or inhibit angiogenesis. A number of such regulatory proteins have been described in skeletal muscle in animal and cell models but also in human skeletal muscle. Important pro-angiogenic factors in skeletal muscle are vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and angiopoietin 2, whereas angiostatic factors include thrombospondin-1 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase. Which of these angiogenic factors are up-regulated in the muscle tissue depends on the mechanical and chemical stimulus provided and, consequently, the process by which capillary growth occurs. The present review addresses physiological signals and angiogenic factors in skeletal muscle with a focus on human data.

  1. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R.; Albini, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  2. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R; Esposito, Alessia I; Ruggiero, Luca; Orecchioni, Stefania; Calleri, Angelica; Bertolini, Francesco; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  3. Optical coherence tomography angiography-based capillary velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Zhang, Qinqin; Li, Yuandong; Song, Shaozhen

    2017-06-01

    Challenge persists in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) when it is required to quantify capillary blood flow within tissue beds in vivo. We propose a useful approach to statistically estimate the mean capillary flow velocity using a model-based statistical method of eigendecomposition (ED) analysis of the complex OCT signals obtained with the OCT angiography (OCTA) scanning protocol. ED-based analysis is achieved by the covariance matrix of the ensemble complex OCT signals, upon which the eigenvalues and eigenvectors that represent the subsets of the signal makeup are calculated. From this analysis, the signals due to moving particles can be isolated by employing an adaptive regression filter to remove the eigencomponents that represent static tissue signals. The mean frequency (MF) of moving particles can be estimated by the first lag-one autocorrelation of the corresponding eigenvectors. Three important parameters are introduced, including the blood flow signal power representing the presence of blood flow (i.e., OCTA signals), the MF indicating the mean velocity of blood flow, and the frequency bandwidth describing the temporal flow heterogeneity within a scanned tissue volume. The proposed approach is tested using scattering phantoms, in which microfluidic channels are used to simulate the functional capillary vessels that are perfused with the scattering intralipid solution. The results indicate a linear relationship between the MF and mean flow velocity. In vivo animal experiments are also conducted by imaging mouse brain with distal middle cerebral artery ligation to test the capability of the method to image the changes in capillary flows in response to an ischemic insult, demonstrating the practical usefulness of the proposed method for providing important quantifiable information about capillary tissue beds in the investigations of neurological conditions in vivo.

  4. Side by side comparison between dynamic versus static models of blood-brain barrier in vitro: a permeability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Janigro, Damir; Hossain, Mohammed; Oby, Emily; Rapp, Edward; Cucullo, Luca

    2006-09-13

    Endothelial cells in vivo are continuously exposed to shear stress, a tangential force generated by the flow of blood across their apical surfaces that affects endothelial cell structure and function. By contrast, the Transwell apparatus cannot reproduce the presence of intraluminal blood flow that is essential for the formation and differentiation of the BBB. In contrast, the dynamic in vitro model of the BBB (DIV-BBB) mimics both functionally and anatomically the brain microvasculature, creating quasi-physiological conditions for co-culturing human and non-human endothelial cells and astrocytes in a capillary-like structure. We used intraluminal bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) co-cultured with extraluminal glial cells (C6) to obtain elevated trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and selective permeability to sucrose and phenytoin. The experiments were performed in parallel using Transwell systems DIV-BBB models and data were then cross compared. By contrast with Transwell, C6 and BAEC co-cultured in the DIV-BBB demonstrated predominantly aerobic metabolism evidenced by a robust increase in glucose consumption that was paralleled by a similar change in lactate production. BAEC exposed to glia under dynamic conditions grow in a monolayer fashion and developed a more stringent barrier as demonstrated by high TEER values and a selective permeability to [14C] phenytoin and the well-known paracellular marker [3H] sucrose. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the exposure to intraluminal flow plays an essential role in promoting endothelial cell differentiation and increasing BBB tightness, thus making the use of the DIV-BBB well suited for pharmacological studies.

  5. Bioengineering dermo-epidermal skin grafts with blood and lymphatic capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Daniela; Luginbühl, Joachim; Scola, Simonetta; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2014-01-29

    The first bioengineered, autologous, dermo-epidermal skin grafts are presently undergoing clinical trials; hence, it is reasonable to envisage the next clinical step at the forefront of plastic and burn surgery, which is the generation of autologous skin grafts that contain vascular plexuses, preformed in vitro. As the importance of the blood, and particularly the lymphatic vascular system, is increasingly recognized, it is attractive to engineer both human blood and lymphatic vessels in one tissue or organ graft. We show here that functional lymphatic capillaries can be generated using three-dimensional hydrogels. Like normal lymphatics, these capillaries branch, form lumen, and take up fluid in vitro and in vivo after transplantation onto immunocompromised rodents. Formation of lymphatic capillaries could be modulated by both lymphangiogenic and anti-lymphangiogenic stimuli, demonstrating the potential usefulness of this system for in vitro testing. Blood and lymphatic endothelial cells never intermixed during vessel development, nor did blood and lymphatic capillaries anastomose under the described circumstances. After transplantation of the engineered grafts, the human lymphatic capillaries anastomosed to the nude rat's lymphatic plexus and supported fluid drainage. Successful preclinical results suggest that these skin grafts could be applied on patients suffering from severe skin defects.

  6. Capillary waves with surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Denner, Fabian; Morgan, Neal; van Wachem, Berend; Dini, Daniele

    2017-11-01

    Experiments over the last 50 years have suggested a correlation between the surface (shear) viscosity and the stability of a foam or emulsion. With recent techniques allowing more accurate measurements of the elusive surface viscosity, we examine this link theoretically using small-amplitude capillary waves in the presence of the Marangoni effect and surface viscosity modelled via the Boussinesq-Scriven model. The surface viscosity effect is found to contribute a damping effect on the amplitude of the capillary wave with subtle differences to the effect of the convective-diffusive Marangoni transport. The general wave dispersion is augmented to take into account the Marangoni and surface viscosity effects, and a first-order correction to the critical damping wavelength is derived. The authors acknowledge the financial support of the Shell University Technology Centre for fuels and lubricants.

  7. Centrifuge modelling of capillary rise

    OpenAIRE

    Depountis, N.; DAVIES, MCR; Harris, C; Burkhart, S; THOREL, L; A. Rezzoug; Konig, D; Merrifield, C; CRAIG, WH

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports results from centrifuge tests designed to investigate capillary rise in soils subjected to different gravitational fields. The experimental programme is part of the EU-funded NECER project (Network of European Centrifuges for Environmental Geotechnic Research), whose objective is to investigate the appropriateness of geotechnical centrifuge modelling for the investigation of geoenvironmental problems, particularly with reference to partially saturated soils. The tests were ...

  8. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ming-Chung [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Ling [Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsing, Chung-Hsi [Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chiou-Feng, E-mail: cflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  9. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  10. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  11. Bilateral ovarian capillary hemangioma with stromal luteinization and hyperandrogenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Richard Sheng Poe; Covinsky, Michael; Zhang, Songlin

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old female presented to the outpatient clinic with a six-month history of left lower quadrant abdominal fullness and pressure. Serum levels included free testosterone 3.8 pg/mL (normal 0-1.8 pg/mL) and testosterone 259 ng/dL (normal 3-41 ng/dL). Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed bilateral small ovarian cystic masses with marked, progressive enhancement, and restriction of diffusion. Laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and showed left and right ovarian hemorrhagic masses measuring 2.1 cm and 0.6 cm respectively. The histology showed benign vascular lesions composed of small capillary vessels with a rim of luteinized stromal cells. The luteinized cells were strongly positive for inhibin A. The endothelial cells were negative for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral ovarian hemangioma with stromal luteinization and hyperandrogenism.

  12. Listeriolysin O mediates cytotoxicity against human brain microvascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penetration of the brain microvascular endothelial layer is one of the routes L. monocytogenes use to breach the blood-brain barrier. Because host factors in the blood severely limit direct invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by L. monocytogenes, alternative mechanisms m...

  13. High lung volume increases stress failure in pulmonary capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z.; Costello, M. L.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Elliott, A. R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to test whether stress failure occurred more frequently at high than at low lung volumes for the same Ptm. Lungs of anesthetized rabbits were inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 20 cmH2O, perfused with autologous blood at 32.5 or 2.5 cmH2O Ptm, and fixed by intravascular perfusion. Samples were examined by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with those of a previous study in which the lung was inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O. There was a large increase in the frequency of stress failure of the capillary walls at the higher lung volume. For example, at 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter cell lining was 7.1 +/- 2.2 at the high lung volume compared with 0.7 +/- 0.4 at the low lung volume. The corresponding values for epithelium were 8.5 +/- 1.6 and 0.9 +/- 0.6. Both differences were significant (P less than 0.05). At 52.5 cmH2O Ptm, the results for endothelium were 20.7 +/- 7.6 (high volume) and 7.1 +/- 2.1 (low volume), and the corresponding results for epithelium were 32.8 +/- 11.9 and 11.4 +/- 3.7. At 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the thickness of the blood-gas barrier was greater at the higher lung volume, consistent with the development of more interstitial edema. Ballooning of the epithelium caused by accumulation of edema fluid between the epithelial cell and its basement membrane was seen at 32.5 and 52.5 cmH2O Ptm. At high lung volume, the breaks tended to be narrower and fewer were oriented perpendicular to the axis of the pulmonary capillaries than at low lung volumes. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy measurements agreed well. Our findings provide a physiological

  14. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions.

  15. Conditional deletion of Ccm2 causes hemorrhage in the adult brain: a mouse model of human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kirk; Uchida, Yutaka; O'Donnell, Erin; Claudio, Estefania; Li, Wenling; Soneji, Kosha; Wang, Hongshan; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2011-08-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are irregularly shaped and enlarged capillaries in the brain that are prone to hemorrhage, resulting in headaches, seizures, strokes and even death in patients. The disease affects up to 0.5% of the population and the inherited form has been linked to mutations in one of three genetic loci, CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. To understand the pathophysiology underlying the vascular lesions in CCM, it is critical to develop a reproducible mouse genetic model of this disease. Here, we report that limited conditional ablation of Ccm2 in young adult mice induces observable neurological dysfunction and reproducibly results in brain hemorrhages whose appearance is highly reminiscent of the lesions observed in human CCM patients. We first demonstrate that conventional or endothelial-specific deletion of Ccm2 leads to fatal cardiovascular defects during embryogenesis, including insufficient vascular lumen formation as well as defective arteriogenesis and heart malformation. These findings confirm and extend prior studies. We then demonstrate that the inducible deletion of Ccm2 in adult mice recapitulates the CCM-like brain lesions in humans; the lesions display disrupted vascular lumens, enlarged capillary cavities, loss of proper neuro-vascular associations and an inflammatory reaction. The CCM lesions also exhibit damaged neuronal architecture, the likely cause of neurologic defects, such as ataxia and seizure. These mice represent the first CCM2 animal model for CCM and should provide the means to elucidate disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic strategies for human CCM.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  17. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  18. In inflammatory reactive astrocytes co-cultured with brain endothelial cells nicotine-evoked Ca(2+) transients are attenuated due to interleukin-1beta release and rearrangement of actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbro, D; Westerlund, A; Björklund, U; Hansson, E

    2009-03-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in a more pronounced way in astrocytes co-cultured with microvascular endothelial cells from adult rat brain, compared with monocultured astrocytes, as a sign of a more developed signal transduction system. Also investigated was whether nicotine plays a role in the control of neuroinflammatory reactivity in astrocytes. Ca(2+) imaging experiments were performed using cells loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2/AM. Co-cultured astrocytes responded to lower concentrations of nicotine than did monocultured astrocytes, indicating that they are more sensitive to nicotine. Co-cultured astrocytes also expressed a higher selectivity for alpha7nAChR and alpha4/beta2 subunits and evoked higher Ca(2+) transients compared with monocultured astrocytes. The Ca(2+) transients referred to are activators of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, both IP(3) and ryanodine, triggered by influx through receptor channels. The nicotine-induced Ca(2+) transients were attenuated after incubation with the inflammatory mediator lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but were not attenuated after incubation with the pain-transmitting peptides substance P and calcitonin-gene-related peptide, nor with the infection and inflammation stress mediator, leptin. Furthermore, LPS-induced release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was more pronounced in co-cultured versus monocultured astrocytes. Incubation with both LPS and IL-1beta further attenuated nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response. We also found that LPS and IL-1beta induced rearrangement of the F-actin filaments, as measured with an Alexa488-conjugated phalloidin probe. The rearrangements consisted of increases in ring formations and a more dispersed appearance of the filaments. These results indicate that there is a connection between a dysfunction of nicotine Ca(2+) signaling in

  19. Polydopamine coated capillaries for CE separations

    OpenAIRE

    Partyka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We have tested CE separation of selected samples in capillaries with polydopamine modified surface. The capillaries were modified by polydopamine or polydopamine with an additive. The polydopamine coating with additive represents a simple and effective procedure for capillary alteration by another modificator such as hydroxyethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose etc. In this work, we represent separation data from PrinCE system with UV detection for peptides, proteins and oligosaccha...

  20. Immune System in the Brain: A Modulatory Role on Dendritic Spine Morphophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Kurt Bitzer-Quintero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is closely linked to the immune system at several levels. The brain parenchyma is separated from the periphery by the blood brain barrier, which under normal conditions prevents the entry of mediators such as activated leukocytes, antibodies, complement factors, and cytokines. The myeloid cell lineage plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses at the central level, and it comprises two main subtypes: (1 resident microglia, distributed throughout the brain parenchyma; (2 perivascular macrophages located in the brain capillaries of the basal lamina and the choroid plexus. In addition, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, endothelial cells, and, to a lesser extent, neurons are implicated in the immune response in the central nervous system. By modulating synaptogenesis, microglia are most specifically involved in restoring neuronal connectivity following injury. These cells release immune mediators, such as cytokines, that modulate synaptic transmission and that alter the morphology of dendritic spines during the inflammatory process following injury. Thus, the expression and release of immune mediators in the brain parenchyma are closely linked to plastic morphophysiological changes in neuronal dendritic spines. Based on these observations, it has been proposed that these immune mediators are also implicated in learning and memory processes.

  1. Oxygen exchange in silicone rubber capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineken, F G; Predecki, P K; Filley, G F

    1978-06-01

    Capillaries of 7 and 12.5 mu diameter have been fabricated in silicone rubber. Whole blood treated with heparin has been perfused through these capillaries. Under flowing conditions, no clotting or other clumping effects have been observed and red cells appear to maintain a constant velocity. Oxygen transfer data to and from saline perfusing the 12.5 mu diameter capillaries have been obtained in order to determine how rapidly O2 will permeate the silicone rubber film. The data indicate that the capillaries simulate lung tissue oxygen exchange and will allow for the first time the experimental determination of oxygen exchange kinetics in flowing whole blood.

  2. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Paul D

    1992-01-01

    This book is designed to be a practical guide, used by wide audience, including those new to CE, those more experienced, routine users, those interested in technology development, and those involved with applications research. References have been emphasized to allow the reader to explore the detailed specifics and theoretical foundations.This book draws together the rapidly evolving, diverse, and multidisciplinary subject of capillary electrophoresis (CE). It is designed as a practical guide to be used by a wide audience, including those new to CE as well as more experienced users. T

  4. Apigenin Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Elsholtzia rugulosa Prevents β-Amyloid 25–35-Induces Toxicity in Rat Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshan Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells of cerebral capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β peptides are key pathological elements in the development of this disease. Apigenin (4’,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that can be isolated from several plant species. In the present study, effects of apigenin obtained from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa (Labiatae on primary cultured rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs mediated by amyloid-β peptide 25–35 (Aβ25–35 were examined. Aβ25–35 showed toxic effects on CMECs, involving reduction of cell viability, release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, increase of nuclear condensation, over-production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and breakage of the barrier integrity and function. Based on this model, we demonstrated that apigenin from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa protected cultured rat CMECs by increasing cell viability, reducing LDH release, relieving nuclear condensation, alleviating intracellular ROS generation, increasing SOD activity, and strengthening the barrier integrity through the preservation of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability property and characteristic enzymatic activity after being exposed to Aβ25–35. In conclusion, apigenin isolated from Elsholtzia rugulosa has the ability to protect rat CMECs against Aβ25–35-induced toxicity.

  5. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-01-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids...

  6. Delivery of a peptide-drug conjugate targeting the blood brain barrier improved the efficacy of paclitaxel against glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Zheng, Xuemin; Gong, Min; Zhang, Jianning

    2016-11-29

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to the brain has created an entire field of active research devoted to overcoming the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently delivering drugs to the brain. Angiopep-2 can trigger transcytosis and traverse the BBB by recognizing low-density lipoprotein related protein-1 (LRP-1) expressed on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Here, we designed a novel strategy for the delivery of drugs to the brain. The novel drug delivery system was a combination of a receptor-targeting ligand, such as low-density lipoprotein related protein 1, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was hypothesized that this conjugate will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB and increase the permeability of a solid tumor. Our findings indicate that the combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle significantly improved translocation of small molecules (paclitaxel) into the brain compared to the vehicle treatment, which contained only receptor-targeting ligand. The application of this strategy could potentially expand the horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders.

  7. Evaluating the involvement of cerebral microvascular endothelial Na+/K+-ATPase and Na+-K+-2Cl- co-transporter in electrolyte fluxes in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model of dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Kasper; Assentoft, Mette; Hørlyck, Sofie

    2018-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is involved in brain water and salt homeostasis. Blood osmolarity increases during dehydration and water is osmotically extracted from the brain. The loss of water is less than expected from pure osmotic forces, due to brain electrolyte accumulation. Although...

  8. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  9. Mixed Fluid Conditions: Capillary Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos

    2017-07-06

    Mixed fluid phenomena in porous media have profound implications on soil-atmosphere interaction, energy geotechnology, environmental engineering and infrastructure design. Surface tension varies with pressure, temperature, solute concentration, and surfactant concentration; on the other hand, the contact angle responds to interfacial tensions, surface topography, invasion velocity, and chemical interactions. Interfaces are not isolated but interact through the fluid pressure and respond to external fields. Jumps, snap-offs and percolating wetting liquids along edges and crevices are ubiquitous in real, non-cylindrical porous networks. Pore- and macroscale instabilities together with pore structure variability-and-correlation favor fluid trapping and hinder recovery efficiency. The saturation-pressure characteristic curve is affected by the saturation-history, flow-rate, the mechanical response of the porous medium, and time-dependent reactive and diffusive processes; in addition, there are salient differences between unsaturation by internal gas nucleation and gas invasion. Capillary forces add to other skeletal forces in the porous medium and can generate open-mode discontinuities when the capillary entry pressure is high relative to the effective stress. Time emerges as an important variable in mixed-fluid conditions and common quasi-static analyses may fail to capture the system response.

  10. Impact of capillary flow hydrodynamics on carrier-mediated transport of opioid derivatives at the blood-brain barrier, based on pH-dependent Michaelis-Menten and Crone-Renkin analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Siti R; Abbott, N Joan; Avdeef, Alex

    2017-08-30

    Most studies of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and transport are conducted at a single pH, but more detailed information can be revealed by using multiple pH values. A pH-dependent biophysical model was applied to the mechanistic analysis of published pH-dependent BBB luminal uptake data from three opioid derivatives in rat: pentazocine (Suzuki et al., 2002a, 2002b), naloxone (Suzuki et al., 2010a), and oxycodone (Okura et al., 2008). Two types of data were processed: in situ brain perfusion (ISBP) and brain uptake index (BUI). The published perfusion data were converted to apparent luminal permeability values, Papp, and analyzed by the pCEL-X program (Yusof et al., 2014), using the pH-dependent Crone-Renkin equation (pH-CRE) to determine the impact of cerebrovascular flow on the Michaelis-Menten transport parameters (Avdeef and Sun, 2011). For oxycodone, the ISBP data had been measured at pH7.4 and 8.4. The present analysis indicates a 7-fold lower value of the cerebrovascular flow velocity, Fpf, than that expected in the original study. From the pyrilamine-inhibited data, the flow-corrected passive intrinsic permeability value was determined to be P0=398×10-6cm·s-1. The uptake data indicate that the neutral form of oxycodone is affected by a transporter at pH8.4. The extent of the cation uptake was less certain from the available data. For pentazocine, the brain uptake by the BUI method had been measured at pH5.5, 6.5, and 7.4, in a concentration range 0.1-40mM. Under similar conditions, ISBP data were also available. The pH-CRE determined values of Fpf from both methods were nearly the same, and were smaller than the expected value in the original publication. The transport of the cationic pentazocine was not fully saturated at pH5.5 at 40mM. The transport of the neutral species at pH7.4 appeared to reach saturation at 40mM pentazocine concentration, but not at 12mM. In the case of naloxone, a pH-dependent Michaelis-Menten equation (pH-MME) analysis of

  11. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J; Caldwell, Robert W; Romero, Maritza J

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G(-) and G(+) bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  12. Pericytes as Inducers of Rapid, Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-Dependent Capillary Damage during Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underly, Robert G; Levy, Manuel; Hartmann, David A; Grant, Roger I; Watson, Ashley N; Shih, Andy Y

    2017-01-04

    Blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB) and release of toxic blood molecules into the brain contributes to neuronal injury during stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases. While pericytes are builders and custodians of the BBB in the normal brain, their impact on BBB integrity during ischemia remains unclear. We imaged pericyte-labeled transgenic mice with in vivo two-photon microscopy to examine the relationship between pericytes and blood plasma leakage during photothrombotic occlusion of cortical capillaries. Upon cessation of capillary flow, we observed that plasma leakage occurred with three times greater frequency in regions where pericyte somata adjoined the endothelium. Pericyte somata covered only 7% of the total capillary length in cortex, indicating that a disproportionate amount of leakage occurred from a small fraction of the capillary bed. Plasma leakage was preceded by rapid activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) at pericyte somata, which was visualized at high resolution in vivo using a fluorescent probe for matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 activity, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-gelatin. Coinjection of an MMP-9 inhibitor, but not an MMP-2 inhibitor, reduced pericyte-associated FITC-gelatin fluorescence and plasma leakage. These results suggest that pericytes contribute to rapid and localized proteolytic degradation of the BBB during cerebral ischemia. Pericytes are a key component of the neurovascular unit and are essential for normal BBB function. However, during acute ischemia, we find that pericytes are involved in creating rapid and heterogeneous BBB disruption in the capillary bed. The mechanism by which pericytes contribute to BBB damage warrants further investigation, as it may yield new therapeutic targets for acute stroke injury and other neurological diseases involving capillary flow impairment. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/370129-12$15.00/0.

  13. Cannabinoids Regulate the Diameter of Pericyte-Containing Retinal Capillaries in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cannabinoids are vasoactive substances that act as key regulators of arterial tone in the blood vessels supplying peripheral tissues and the central nervous system. We therefore investigated the effect of cannabinoids on retinal capillaries and pericytes. Methods: The effects of cannabinoids on capillary diameters were determined using an ex vivo whole-mount rat retinal model. Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry were performed to explore the underlying mechanism. Results: Endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide and exogenous cannabinoid (R-(+-WIN55212-2 dilated the noradrenaline-precontracted capillaries in a concentration-dependent manner (1 µM to 0.1 mM. The extent of vasorelaxation was positively correlated with changes in pericyte width. The effects of R-(+-WIN55212-2 on vasorelaxation and pericyte width were inhibited by a cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1 antagonist, AM251 or rimonabant (SR141716A, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME, and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. They were also abolished by the removal of the endothelium, but not by the cannabinoid receptor-2 antagonist SR144528, the endothelial cannabinoid receptor antagonist O-1918, or the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Conclusion: The exogenous cannabinoid R-(+-WIN55212-2 promotes the vasorelaxation of pericyte-containing rat retinal capillaries. This effect of R-(+-WIN55212-2 is dependent on CB1 and the nitric oxide–cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway, and requires an intact endothelium.

  14. Inner capillary diameter of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of female rat increases during lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés-Sol Albertina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the endothelial cell (EC in blood flow regulation within the central nervous system has been little studied. Here, we explored EC participation in morphological changes of the anterior hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN microvasculature of female rats at two reproductive stages with different metabolic demand (virginity and lactation. We measured the inner capillary diameter (ICD of 800 capillaries from either the magnocellular or parvocellular regions. The space occupied by neural (somas, dendrites and axons and glial, but excluding vascular elements of the neurovascular compartment was also measured in 100-μm2 sample fields of both PVN subdivisions. Results The PVN of both groups of animals showed ICDs that ranged from 3 to 10 microns. The virgin group presented mostly capillaries with small ICD, whereas the lactating females exhibited a significant increment in the percentage of capillaries with larger ICD. The space occupied by the neural and glial elements of the neurovascular compartment did not show changes with lactation. Conclusions Our findings suggest that during lactation the microvasculature of the PVN of female rats undergoes dynamic, transitory changes in blood flow as represented by an increment in the ICD through a self-cytoplasmic volume modification reflected by EC changes. A model of this process is proposed.

  15. The endothelial border to health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Nina Wærling; Hansen, Anker Jon; Sams, Anette

    2017-01-01

    by hyperglycemic events because the endothelium transduces “high glucose” signaling into significant pathophysiological phenomena leading to reduced endothelial barrier function, compromised vascular tone regulation and inflammation (e.g., cytokine secretion and RAGE activation). In addition, endothelial...

  16. The use of adipose mesenchymal stem cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells on a fibrin matrix for endothelialized skin substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Isabel; Granados, Rosario; Holguín Holgado, Purificación; García-Vela, José Antonio; Casares, Celia; Casares, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the reconstruction of human skin by tissue engineering represents a clinical challenge and has offered a therapeutic alternative. Avascular engineered skin equivalents have been available for several years and used to treat wounds due to burns, nonhealing ulcers, and surgical excisions. They are constituted by different types of cultured cells included in a three-dimensional structure that permits cellular proliferation to create tissue substitutes. The major drawback of these artificial skin substitutes is their lack of blood supply, since the endurance and cell proliferation of the substitute depend on an adequate oxygen and nutrient supply and on toxin removal. These functions are served by the vascular system. We have produced a new model of endothelialized skin substitute that promotes the formation of capillary-like structures by seeding human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with dermal fibroblasts and human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) in a fibrin matrix. Dermal fibroblasts and hADMSCs produce extracellular matrix that stimulates cellular growth and proliferation. hADMSCs secrete significant quantities of angiogenic and antiapoptotic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor), which induce in vitro differentiation of these cells into endothelial cells promoting angiogenesis and participating in tissue repair and skin regeneration processes. We obtained the artificial skin substitute with similar structure to native skin, including dermis and epidermis. We demonstrated that endothelial cells (CD31 and von Willebrand factor positive) proliferated and organized themselves into capillary-like structures within the fibrin matrix. The epidermis showed a complete epithelization by squamous cells (AE1/AE3 cytokeratin positive) with intracytoplasmic keratohyalin granules, hyperkeratosis, and parakeratosis. We have established a novel artificial skin substitute that facilitates the formation

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 as a marker for malignant vascular tumors and mesothelioma: an immunohistochemical study of 262 vascular endothelial and 1640 nonvascular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Markku; Rikala, Maarit-Sarlomo; Rys, Janusz; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zeng-Feng

    2012-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a primary responder to vascular endothelial growth factor signal and thereby regulates endothelial migration and proliferation. This receptor is expressed in endothelial cells and in some vascular tumors, but many reports also detail its expression in carcinomas and lymphomas. VEGFR2 is a potential cell-type marker, and data on VEGFR2 expression may also have therapeutic significance in view of recent availability of VEGFR2 inhibitors. In this study, we immunohistochemically examined 262 vascular endothelial and 1640 nonvascular tumors and selected non-neoplastic tissues with a VEGFR2-specific rabbit monoclonal antibody 55B11. In early human embryo, VEFGR2 was expressed in endothelia of developing capillaries and in the thoracic duct, great vessels, hepatic sinusoids, epidermis, and mesothelia. In late first trimester fetus peripheral soft tissues, VEGFR2 was restricted to capillary endothelia, chondrocytes, and superficial portion of the epidermis. In normal adult tissues, it was restricted to endothelia and mesothelia. VEGFR2 was consistently expressed in angiosarcomas, Kaposi sarcomas, and retiform hemangioendotheliomas. It was detected in only half of epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas (15/27), usually focally. VEGFR2 was strongly expressed in most capillary hemangiomas and weakly or focally in cavernous, venous, and spindle cell hemangiomas and in lymphangiomas. Malignant epithelial mesothelioma was found to be a unique epithelial neoplasm with a strong and nearly consistent VEGFR2 expression, including membrane staining (35/38). Approximately 10% of squamous cell carcinomas and 23% of pulmonary adenocarcinomas contained focal positivity. The only nonendothelial mesenchymal tumors found to be VEGFR2 positive were biphasic synovial sarcoma (focal epithelial expression) and chordoma. All melanomas and lymphomas were negative. VEGFR2 is a promising marker for malignant vascular tumors and malignant

  18. Spinal cord compression injury in guinea pigs: structural changes of endothelium and its perivascular cell associations after blood-brain barrier breakdown and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, C B; Blight, A R

    1997-04-01

    This study examines morphological changes of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after spinal cord compression. The lowest thoracic segment (T13) of female guinea pigs was injured and the BBB was tested from 7 days to 5.5 months postinjury using intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer. Tracer leakage in the injured segment was verified with the light microscope and the fine structure of capillaries was examined. Diffuse tissue staining was observed at T13 up to 2 weeks following injury. A leaky BBB correlated with expected changes in the fine structure of endothelial cell junctions. These were predominantly nonoverlapping cell junctions which, in many instances, were separated by clefts between adjacent cells. At early survival times, numerous capillary profiles with juxtaposed astrocyte foot processes were noted in addition to altered cell associations. Complete sealing of the BBB against interstitial HRP leakage was not observed until 17 days postinjury. After the first week, some of the endothelial cells were contacted by macrophages, processes of perivascular microglia, and processes of swollen and degenerating astrocytes. Perivascular spaces varied in extent and contained amorphous deposits of extracellular materials in addition to supernumerary layers of basal lamina. The early changes were followe