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Sample records for brain beta tubulin

  1. Beta4 tubulin identifies a primitive cell source for oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain.

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    Wu, Chuanshen; Chang, Ansi; Smith, Maria C; Won, Roy; Yin, Xinghua; Staugaitis, Susan M; Agamanolis, Dimitri; Kidd, Grahame J; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2009-06-17

    We have identified a novel population of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain that expresses beta4 tubulin (betaT4) and has properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. betaT4 cells are scattered throughout the SVZ of the lateral ventricles in adult human brain and are significantly increased in the SVZs bordering demyelinated white matter in multiple sclerosis brains. In human fetal brain, betaT4 cell densities peak during the latter stages of gliogenesis, which occurs in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles. betaT4 cells represent 95% of cells in neurospheres treated with the anti-mitotic agent Ara C. betaT4 cells produce oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes in vitro. We compared the myelinating potential of betaT4-positive cells with A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells after transplantation (25,000 cells) into postnatal day 3 (P3) myelin-deficient rat brains. At P20, the progeny of betaT4 cells myelinated up to 4 mm of the external capsule, which significantly exceeded that of transplanted A2B5-positive progenitor cells. Such extensive and rapid mature CNS cell generation by a relatively small number of transplanted cells provides in vivo support for the therapeutic potential of betaT4 cells. We propose that betaT4 cells are an endogenous cell source that can be recruited to promote neural repair in the adult telencephalon.

  2. Biochemical studies of mouse brain tubulin: colchicine binding (DEAE-cellulose filter) assay and subunits (. cap alpha. and. beta. ) biosynthesis and degradation (in newborn brain)

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    Tse, Cek-Fyne

    1978-01-01

    A DEAE-cellulose filter assay, measuring (/sup 3/H)colchicine bound to colchicine binding protein (CBP) absorbed on filter discs, has been modified to include lM sucrose in the incubation medium for complexing colchicine to CBP in samples before applying the samples to filter discs (single point assay). Due to the much greater stability of colchicine binding capacity in the presence of lM sucrose, multiple time-point assays and least squares linear regression analysis were not necessary for accurate determination of CBP in hybrid mouse brain at different stages of development. The highest concentrations of CBP were observed in the 160,000g supernatant and pellet of newborn brain homogenate. Further studies of the modified filter assay documented that the assay has an overall counting efficiency of 27.3%, that DEAE-cellulose filters bind and retain all tubulin in the assay samples, and that one molecule of colchicine binds approximately one molecule of tubulin dimer. Therefore, millimoles of colchicine bound per milligram total protein can be used to calculate tubulin content. With this technique tubulin content of brain supernatant was found to be 11.9% for newborn, and 7.15% for 11 month old mice. Quantitative densitometry was also used to measure mouse brain supernatant actin content for these two stages. In vivo synthesis and degradation rates of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of two day mouse brain 100,000g supernatant were studied after intracerebral injection of (/sup 3/H)leucine. Quantitative changes of the ratio of tritium specific activities of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits with time were determined. The pattern of change was biphasic. During the first phase the ratio decreased; during the second phase the ratio increased continuously. An interpretation consistent with all the data in this study is that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is synthesized at a more rapid rate than the ..beta.. subunit. (ERB)

  3. Purification of tubulin from porcine brain.

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    Gell, Christopher; Friel, Claire T; Borgonovo, Barbara; Drechsel, David N; Hyman, Anthony A; Howard, Jonathon

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules, polymers of the heterodimeric protein αβ-tubulin, give shape to cells and are the tracks for vesicle transport and chromosome segregation. In vitro assays to study microtubule functions and their regulation by microtubule-associated proteins require the availability of purified αβ-tubulin. In this chapter, we describe the process of purification of heterodimeric αβ-tubulin from porcine brain.

  4. The impact of beta-elemene on beta-tubulin of human hepatoma hepg2 cells

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    Yuqiu Mao; Liying Ban; Jielin Zhang; Li Hou; Xiaonan Cui

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of beta-elemene injection on the growth and beta-tubulin of human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Methods:cellproliferation was assessed by MTT assay. cellcycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry (FCM). The mRNA expression of beta-tubulin was measured by RT-PCR. West-ern blot analysis was used to determine protein expression of beta-tubulin and the polymerization of beta-tubulin. Results:Beta-elemene injection inhibited HepG2 cells proliferation in a dose-and time-dependent manner;FCM analysis indicated beta-elemene injection induced cellcycle arrested at S phase. RT-PCR and western-blot analysis showed that beta-elemene injection down-regulated beta-tubulin expression at both mRNA and protein levels, presenting a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, beta-elemene injection reduced the polymerization of microtubules in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion:Beta-elemene injection can inhibit the proliferation of hepatoma HepG2 cells, the mechanism might be partly related to the down-regulation of beta-tubulin and inhibition of microtubular polymerization.

  5. GTP binding to the. beta. -subunit of tubulin is greatly reduced in Alzheimers disease

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    Khatoon, S.; Slevin, J.T.; Haley, B.E.

    1987-05-01

    A decrease occurs (80-100%) in the (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into a cytosolic protein (55K M/sub r/) of Alzheimer's (AD) brain, tentatively identified as the ..beta..-subunit of tubulin (co-migration with purified tubulin, concentration dependence of interaction with GTP, ATP and their 8-azido photoprobes, and similar effects of Ca/sup 2 +/ and EDTA on photoinsertion). This agrees with prior observations of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP interactions with brain tubulin and a recent report on faulty microtubular assembly in AD brain. The decrease in (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into the 55K M/sub r/ protein of AD brain was in contrast with other photolabeled proteins, which remained at equal levels in AD and age-matched normal brain tissues. The 55K and 45K M/sub r/ were the two major (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion species in non-AD brain. Of 5 AD brains, the photoinsertion of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP into the 55K M/sub r/ region was low or absent in 4 (55K/45K=0.1); one was 75% below normals (55K/45K=0.24). Total protein migrating at 55K M/sub r/ was similar in AD and controls. AD brain tubulin, while present, has its exchangeable GTP binding site on ..beta..-tubulin blocked/modified such that (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP cannot interact normally with this site.

  6. Taxol differentially modulates the dynamics of microtubules assembled from unfractionated and purified beta-tubulin isotypes.

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    Derry, W B; Wilson, L; Khan, I A; Luduena, R F; Jordan, M A

    1997-03-25

    Substoichiometric binding of taxol to tubulin in microtubules potently suppresses microtubule dynamics, which appears to be the most sensitive antiproliferative mechanism of taxol. To determine whether the beta-tubulin isotype composition of a microtubule can modulate sensitivity to taxol, we measured the effects of substoichiometric ratios of taxol bound to tubulin in microtubules on the dynamics of microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, or alphabeta(IV)-tubulin isotypes and compared the results with the effects of taxol on microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. Substoichiometric ratios of bound taxol in microtubules assembled from purified beta-tubulin isotypes or unfractionated tubulin potently suppressed the shortening rates and the lengths shortened per shortening event. Correlation of the suppression of the shortening rate with the stoichiometry of bound taxol revealed that microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, and alphabeta(IV)-tubulin were, respectively, 1.6-, 7.4-, and 7.2-fold less sensitive to the effects of bound taxol than microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. These results indicate that taxol differentially modulates microtubule dynamics depending upon the beta-tubulin isotype composition. The results are consistent with recent studies correlating taxol resistance in tumor cells with increased levels of beta(III0- and beta(IV)-tubulin expression and suggest that altered cellular expression of beta-tubulin isotypes can be an important mechanism by which tumor cells develop resistance to taxol.

  7. DSC Study on Brain Tubulin and the Effect of Cisplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The thermal property of the polymerization of brain tubulin was studied by a high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter. The phenomenon that heat flows increased and decreased consistently and obviously was observed. This phenomenon was called heat flow oscillation. It was probably correlated to the dynamic instability of microtubules. The effect of cisplatin on it was reported, too.

  8. Capzb2 interacts with beta-tubulin to regulate growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth.

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    David A Davis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Capping protein (CP is a heterodimer that regulates actin assembly by binding to the barbed end of F-actin. In cultured nonneuronal cells, each CP subunit plays a critical role in the organization and dynamics of lamellipodia and filopodia. Mutations in either alpha or beta CP subunit result in retinal degeneration in Drosophila. However, the function of CP subunits in mammalian neurons remains unclear. Here, we investigate the role of the beta CP subunit expressed in the brain, Capzb2, in growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. We found that silencing Capzb2 in hippocampal neurons resulted in short neurites and misshapen growth cones in which microtubules overgrew into the periphery and completely overlapped with F-actin. In searching for the mechanisms underlying these cytoskeletal abnormalities, we identified beta-tubulin as a novel binding partner of Capzb2 and demonstrated that Capzb2 decreases the rate and the extent of tubulin polymerization in vitro. We mapped the region of Capzb2 that was required for the subunit to interact with beta-tubulin and inhibit microtubule polymerization. A mutant Capzb2 lacking this region was able to bind F-actin and form a CP heterodimer with alpha2-subunit. However, this mutant was unable to rescue the growth cone and neurite outgrowth phenotypes caused by Capzb2 knockdown. Together, these data suggest that Capzb2 plays an important role in growth cone formation and neurite outgrowth and that the underlying mechanism may involve direct interaction between Capzb2 and microtubules.

  9. Maternal vitamin C deficiency does not reduce hippocampal volume and beta-tubulin III intensity in prenatal Guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Schjoldager, Janne Gram; Paidi, Maya Devi

    2016-01-01

    the observed deficits remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that vitC deficiency in utero may lead to a decreased neuronal maturation and increased cellular death giving rise to alterations of the hippocampal morphology in a guinea pig model. Brains from prenatal guinea pig pups (n = 9-10 in each group...... study found that hippocampal volume and beta-tubulin isotype III intensity in the prenatal guinea pig were influenced by gestational day but not by maternal vitC intake...

  10. Peloruside, laulimalide, and noscapine interactions with beta-tubulin.

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    Gajewski, Melissa M; Alisaraie, Laleh; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews the recent findings regarding the binding sites, binding modes and binding affinities of three novel antimitotic drugs peloruside, laulimalide and noscapine with respect to tubulin as the target of their action. These natural compounds are shown to bind to β-tubulin and stabilize microtubules for the cases of peloruside A and laulimalide, and prolong the time spent in pause for noscapine. Particular attention is focused on β-tubulin isotypes as targets for new cancer chemotherapy agents and the amino acid differences in the binding site for these compounds between isotypes. We propose a new strategy for antimitotic drug design that exploits differential distributions of tubulin isotypes between normal and cancer cells and corresponding differential affinities between various drug molecules and tubulin isotypes.

  11. Evolutionary relationships among "jakobid" flagellates as indicated by alpha- and beta-tubulin phylogenies.

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    Edgcomb, V P; Roger, A J; Simpson, A G; Kysela, D T; Sogin, M L

    2001-04-01

    Jakobids are free-living, heterotrophic flagellates that might represent early-diverging mitochondrial protists. They share ultrastructural similarities with eukaryotes that occupy basal positions in molecular phylogenies, and their mitochondrial genome architecture is eubacterial-like, suggesting a close affinity with the ancestral alpha-proteobacterial symbiont that gave rise to mitochondria and hydrogenosomes. To elucidate relationships among jakobids and other early-diverging eukaryotic lineages, we characterized alpha- and beta-tubulin genes from four jakobids: Jakoba libera, Jakoba incarcerata, Reclinomonas americana (the "core jakobids"), and Malawimonas jakobiformis. These are the first reports of nuclear genes from these organisms. Phylogenies based on alpha-, beta-, and combined alpha- plus beta-tubulin protein data sets do not support the monophyly of the jakobids. While beta-tubulin and combined alpha- plus beta-tubulin phylogenies showed a sister group relationship between J. libera and R. americana, the two other jakobids, M. jakobiformis and J. incarcerata, had unclear affinities. In all three analyses, J. libera, R. americana, and M. jakobiformis emerged from within a well-supported large "plant-protist" clade that included plants, green algae, cryptophytes, stramenopiles, alveolates, Euglenozoa, Heterolobosea, and several other protist groups, but not animals, fungi, microsporidia, parabasalids, or diplomonads. A preferred branching order within the plant-protist clade was not identified, but there was a tendency for the J. libera-R. americana lineage to group with a clade made up of the heteroloboseid amoeboflagellates and euglenozoan protists. Jakoba incarcerata branched within the plant-protist clade in the beta- and the combined alpha- plus beta-tubulin phylogenies. In alpha- tubulin trees, J. incarcerata occupied an unresolved position, weakly grouping with the animal/fungal/microsporidian group or with amitochondriate parabasalid and

  12. Detection of beta-tubulin in the cytoplasm of the interphasic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

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    Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Vargas-Mejía, Miguel Ángel; Díaz-Orea, María Alicia; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Cárdenas-Perea, María Elena; Guerrero-González, Tayde; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2016-08-01

    It is known that the microtubules (MT) of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites form an intranuclear mitotic spindle. However, electron microscopy studies and the employment of anti-beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) antibodies have not exhibited these cytoskeletal structures in the cytoplasm of these parasites. The purpose of this work was to detect β-tubulin in the cytoplasm of interphasic E. histolytica trophozoites. Activated or non-activated HMI-IMSS-strain E. histolytica trophozoites were used and cultured for 72 h at 37 °C in TYI-S-33 medium, and then these were incubated with the anti-β-tubulin antibody of E. histolytica. The anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with the intranuclear mitotic spindle of E. histolytica-activated trophozoites as control. In contrast, in non-activated interphasic parasites, anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with diverse puntiform structures in the cytoplasm and with ring-shaped structures localized in the cytoplasm, cellular membrane and endocytic stomas. In this work, for the first time, the presence of β-tubulin is shown in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica trophozoites.

  13. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

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    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  14. Prognostic Value of Beta-Tubulin-3 and c-Myc in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

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    Massari, Francesco; Bria, Emilio; Ciccarese, Chiara; Munari, Enrico; Modena, Alessandra; Zambonin, Valentina; Sperduti, Isabella; Artibani, Walter; Cheng, Liang; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo; Brunelli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, putative prognostic biomarkers have shown limited utility from the clinical perspective for bladder urothelial carcinoma. Herein, the expression of beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc was evaluated to determine their prognostic potential. Methods In formalin fixed-paraffin embedded blocks, immunohistochemical expression of c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 was evaluated. H score ranging from 0 to 300 was obtained by multiplying the percentage of positive cells by intensity (0–3); c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 expression was defined: 0: negative, 1: weakly positive, 2: strongly positive. Results beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc immunoexpression was available for 46 cases. At the univariate analysis, node-involvement, beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc overexpression discriminate shorter DFS (HR 2.19, p = 0.043; HR 3.10, p = 0.24 and HR 3.05, p = 0.011, respectively); 2-yrs DFS log-rank analysis according to low versus high level of immunoexpression were statistically significant; beta-tubulin-3, 53% low vs 12.7% high (p = value 0.02) and c-Myc 28 low vs 8 high (p-value 0.007). Patients displaying negative beta-tubulin-3/c-Myc had statistically significant better 2-yrs DFS than those with mixed expression or double positivity (54.5% versus 18.7% versus 0%, log-rank p = 0.006). Conclusions c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 show improvement for prognostic risk stratification in patients with muscle invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma. These molecular pathways may also be candidate to improve predictiveness to targeted therapies. PMID:26046361

  15. Prognostic Value of Beta-Tubulin-3 and c-Myc in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

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    Francesco Massari

    Full Text Available To date, putative prognostic biomarkers have shown limited utility from the clinical perspective for bladder urothelial carcinoma. Herein, the expression of beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc was evaluated to determine their prognostic potential.In formalin fixed-paraffin embedded blocks, immunohistochemical expression of c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 was evaluated. H score ranging from 0 to 300 was obtained by multiplying the percentage of positive cells by intensity (0-3; c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 expression was defined: 0: negative, 1: weakly positive, 2: strongly positive.beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc immunoexpression was available for 46 cases. At the univariate analysis, node-involvement, beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc overexpression discriminate shorter DFS (HR 2.19, p = 0.043; HR 3.10, p = 0.24 and HR 3.05, p = 0.011, respectively; 2-yrs DFS log-rank analysis according to low versus high level of immunoexpression were statistically significant; beta-tubulin-3, 53% low vs 12.7% high (p = value 0.02 and c-Myc 28 low vs 8 high (p-value 0.007. Patients displaying negative beta-tubulin-3/c-Myc had statistically significant better 2-yrs DFS than those with mixed expression or double positivity (54.5% versus 18.7% versus 0%, log-rank p = 0.006.c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 show improvement for prognostic risk stratification in patients with muscle invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma. These molecular pathways may also be candidate to improve predictiveness to targeted therapies.

  16. A photoaffinity analogue of discodermolide specifically labels a peptide in beta-tubulin.

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    Xia, Shujun; Kenesky, Craig S; Rucker, Paul V; Smith, Amos B; Orr, George A; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2006-10-01

    Discodermolide is a potentially important antitumor agent that stabilizes microtubules and blocks cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle in a manner similar to that of Taxol. Discodermolide also has unique properties that distinguish it from Taxol. In the present study, photoaffinity-labeled discodermolide analogues are used to investigate their binding site in tubulin. Three photoaffinity-labeled discodermolide analogues were synthesized, all of which promoted microtubule polymerization in the absence of GTP. The analogue, C19-[4-(4-(3)H-benzoyl-phenyl)-carbamate]-discodermolide (C19-[3H]BPC-discodermolide), was selected for photolabeling studies because it had the highest extent of photoincorporation, approximately 1%, of the three radiolabeled discodermolide analogues explored. Although compared to discodermolide, C19-BPC-discodermolide revealed no hypernucleation effect in the in vitro microtubule polymerization assay, it was more cytotoxic than discodermolide, and, like discodermolide, demonstrated synergism with Taxol. These results suggest that the hypernucleation effect of discodermolide is not involved in its cytotoxic activity. Similar to discodermolide, C19-BPC-discodermolide can effectively displace [3H]Taxol from microtubules, but Taxol cannot effectively displace C19-[3H]BPC-discodermolide binding. Discodermolide can effectively displace C19-[3H]BPC-discodermolide binding. Formic acid hydrolysis, immunoprecipitation experiments, and subtilisin digestion indicate that C19-BPC-discodermolide labels amino acid residues 305-433 in beta-tubulin. Further digestion with Asp-N and Arg-C enzymes suggested that C19-BPC-discodermolide binds to amino acid residues, 355-359, in beta-tubulin, which is in close proximity to the Taxol binding site. Molecular modeling guided by the above evidence led to a putative binding model for C19-BPC-discodermolide in tubulin.

  17. In vitro study on the alterations of brain tubulin structure and assembly affected by magnetite nanoparticles.

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    Dadras, Ali; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Afrasiabi, Ali; Naghshineh, Ali; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Mokhtari, Farzad

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, considerable efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of memory, cognition, and relevant neurodegenerative diseases in the human brain. Several studies have shown the importance of microtubule proteins in the memory mechanism and memory dysfunction. Microtubules possess dynamicity, which is essential for functions of neuronal networks. Microtubule-associated proteins, i.e., tau, play vital roles in microtubule stability. On the other hand, the ferromagnetic mineral magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) has been detected in the normal human brain, and elevated levels of magnetite are also observed in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Therefore, we propose that a relationship between microtubule organization in axons and brain magnetite nanoparticles is possible. In this study we found alterations of microtubule polymerization in the presence of increasing concentrations of magnetite through transmission electron microscopy images and a turbidimetry method. Structural changes of microtubule and tau protein, as an essential microtubule-associated protein for tubulin assembly, were detected via circular dichroism spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence, and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorometry. We predicted three possible binding sites on tau protein and one possible binding site on tubulin dimer for magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite also causes the morphology of PC12 cells to change abnormally and cell viability to decrease. Finally, we suggest that magnetite changes microtubule dynamics and polymerization through two paths: (1) changing the secondary and tertiary structure of tubulin and (2) binding to either tubulin dimer or tau protein and preventing tau-tubulin interaction.

  18. Fodrin in centrosomes: implication of a role of fodrin in the transport of gamma-tubulin complex in brain.

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    Sasidharan Shashikala

    Full Text Available Gamma-tubulin is the major protein involved in the nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes in eukaryotic cells. It is present in both cytoplasm and centrosome. However, before centrosome maturation prior to mitosis, gamma-tubulin concentration increases dramatically in the centrosome, the mechanism of which is not known. Earlier it was reported that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex isolated from goat brain contains non-erythroid spectrin/fodrin. The major role of erythroid spectrin is to help in the membrane organisation and integrity. However, fodrin or non-erythroid spectrin has a distinct pattern of localisation in brain cells and evidently some special functions over its erythroid counterpart. In this study, we show that fodrin and γ-tubulin are present together in both the cytoplasm and centrosomes in all brain cells except differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation studies in purified centrosomes from brain tissue and brain cell lines confirm that fodrin and γ-tubulin interact with each other in centrosomes. Fodrin dissociates from centrosome just after the onset of mitosis, when the concentration of γ-tubulin attains a maximum at centrosomes. Further it is observed that the interaction between fodrin and γ-tubulin in the centrosome is dependent on actin as depolymerisation of microfilaments stops fodrin localization. Image analysis revealed that γ-tubulin concentration also decreased drastically in the centrosome under this condition. This indicates towards a role of fodrin as a regulatory transporter of γ-tubulin to the centrosomes for normal progression of mitosis.

  19. Efficient gusA Transient Expression in Porphyra yezoensis Protoplasts Mediated by Endogenous Beta-tubulin Flanking Sequences

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    GONG Qianhong; YU Wengong; DAI Jixun; LIU Hongquan; XU Rifu; GUAN Huashi; PAN Kehou

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous tubulin promoter has been widely used for expressing foreign genes in green algae, but the efficiency and feasibility of endogenous tubulin promoter in the economically important Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta) are tmknown. In this study, the flanking sequences of beta-tubulin gene from P. yezoensis were amplified and two transient expression vectors were constructed to determine their transcription promoting feasibility for foreign gene gusA. The testing vector pATubGUS was constructed by inserting 5'- and 3'-flanking regions (Tub5'and Tub3') up- and down-stream of β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (gusA), respectively,into pA, a derivative of pCAT(R)3-enhancer vector. The control construct, pAGUSTub3, contains only gusA and Tub3 '. These constructs were electroporated into P. yezoensis protoplasts and the GUS activities were quantitatively analyzed by spectrometry. The results demonstrated that gusA gene was efficiently expressed in P. yezoensis protoplasts under the regulation of 5'-flanking sequence of the beta-tubulin gene. More interestingly, the pATubGUS produced stronger GUS activity in P. yezoensis protoplasts when compared to the result from pBI221, in which the gusA gene was directed by a constitutive CaMV 35 S promoter. The data suggest that the integration of P. yezoensis protoplast and its endogenous beta-tubulin flanking sequences is a potential novel system for foreign gene expression.

  20. A mutant beta-tubulin confers resistance to the action of benzimidazole-carbamate microtubule inhibitors both in vivo and in vitro.

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    Foster, K E; Burland, T G; Gull, K

    1987-03-16

    The mutant BEN210 of Physarum polycephalum is highly resistant to a number of benzimidazole carbamate agents, including methylbenzimidazole-2-yl-carbamate and parbendazole. The resistance is conferred by the benD210 mutation in a structural gene for beta-tubulin. This mutant allele encodes a beta-tubulin with novel electrophoretic mobility. We have used this strain to determine whether the mutant beta-tubulin is used in microtubules and whether this usage permits microtubule polymerisation in the presence of drugs both in vivo and in vitro. In vitro assembly studies of tubulin purified from the mutant strain have shown that microtubules are formed both in the absence of drugs and in all drug concentrations tested (up to 50 microM parbendazole). In contrast, the assembly of microtubules from wild-type tubulin in vitro is totally inhibited by 2-5 microM parbendazole. Thus the resistance of BEN210 to parbendazole observed in vivo has been reproduced in vitro using tubulin purified from the mutant strain. Electrophoretic analysis of the microtubules formed in vitro has shown that both the wild-type and the mutant beta-tubulin are incorporated into the microtubules and that the proportion of mutant to wild-type beta-tubulin appears to remain constant with increasing drug concentration. This is the first demonstration of a single mutation in a tubulin structural gene causing an altered function of the gene product in vitro.

  1. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain.

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    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-05-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10% to 30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is, therefore, critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII-tubulin, Nestin, and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII-tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2, and MDA-MB-468), which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells.

  2. Expression of recombinant alpha and beta tubulins from the yew Taxus cuspidata and analysis of the microtubule assembly in the presence of taxol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yuma; Abe, Akihiro; Ito, Kumiko; Cho, Yuko; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Konoki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Taxol was originally isolated from the yew Taxus brevifolia. Because taxol inhibits the depolymerization of microtubules, the presence of a self-resistance mechanism in Taxus spp. was hypothesized. The cloning of the cDNA for alpha and beta tubulins from Taxus cuspidata and those from the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T revealed that the (26)Asp, (359)Arg, and (361)Leu residues in the human beta tubulin, which are important for taxol binding, were replaced with Glu, Trp, and Met in the beta tubulin of T. cuspidata, respectively. The microtubule assembly of the recombinant alpha and beta tubulins was monitored turbidimetrically, and the results clearly demonstrated that the microtubule from T. cuspidata is less sensitive to taxol than that from HEK293T cells. The Taxus microtubule composed of the wild-type alpha tubulin and the beta tubulin with the E26D mutation restored the sensitivity to taxol. We thus postulated that the mutation identified in the beta tubulin of T. cuspidata plays a role in the self-resistance of this species against taxol.

  3. Light-microscopic observations of individual microtubules reconstituted from brain tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, R; Miki-Noumura, T

    1975-12-01

    The course of polymerization of individual brain microtubules could be observed with a light microscope employing dark-field illumination. Statistical analysis of the increase in microtubule length during the polymerization was in accordance with the time course of viscosity change of the tubulin solution. After a plateau level in viscosity was attained, there was no significant change in histograms showing length distribution. These observations were confirmed with fixed and stained microtubules, using a phase-contrast microscope. Observations with dark-field illumination revealed that reconstituted microtubules depolymerized and disappeared immediately upon exposure to buffer containing CaCl2 or sulphydryl reagents such as p-chloromercuriphenyl sulphonic acid (PCMPS) and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB). They were also cold-labile. The growth of heterogeneous microtubules which were assembled by mixing purified tubulin dimers with ciliary outer fibres could also be followed with these optical systems.

  4. In vitro porcine brain tubulin assembly inhibition by water extract from a Chinese medicinal herb, Tripterygium hypoglaucum Hutch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Qin Liang; Neng Cao; Zhong-Kui Song; Xu Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Tripterygium hyp-oglaucum Hutch (THH) on the assembly and disassembly process of tubulin and its possible mode of action.METHODS: In vitro porcine brain tubulin assembly assay was employed to analyze the inhibitory effects of THH at different concentrations (0.05 μg/L, 0.07 μg/L, 0.09μg/L). Colchicine (0.0025 mmol/L, 0.0050 mmol/L, 0.0075mmol/L) was used as a positive control.RESULTS: THH could significantly inhibit the assembly of isolated porcine brain tubulin at all tested concentrations.CONCLUSION: THH is capable of inducing aneuploidy in mammals via tubulin polymerization inhibition pathway and may pose a genetic risk to human beings.

  5. Sequence variation in the Trichuris trichiura beta-tubulin locus: implications for the development of benzimidazole resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A B; Anderson, T J C; Barker, G C; Michael, E; Bundy, D A P

    2002-11-01

    Benzimidazole resistance has evolved in a variety of organisms and typically results from mutations in the beta-tubulin locus at specific amino acid sites. Despite widespread treatment of human intestinal nematodes with benzimidazole drugs, there have been no unambiguous reports of resistance. However, since beta-tubulin mutations conferring resistance are generally recessive, frequencies of resistance alleles less than 30% would be difficult to detect on the basis of drug treatment failures. Here we investigate sequence variation in a 1079 bp segment of the beta-tubulin locus in the human whipworm Trichuris trichiura from 72 individual nematodes from seven countries. We did not observe any alleles with amino acid mutations indicative of resistance, and of 40 point mutations there were only four non-synonymous mutations all of which were singletons. Estimated effective population sizes are an order of magnitude lower than those from another nematode species in which benzimidazole resistance has developed (Haemonchus contortus). Both the lower diversity and reduced population sizes suggest that benzimidazole resistance is likely to evolve less rapidly in Trichuris than in trichostrongyle parasites of livestock. We observed moderate levels of population subdivision (Phi(ST)=0.26) comparable with that previously observed in Ascaris lumbricoides, and identical alleles were frequently found in parasites from different continents, suggestive of recent admixture. A particularly interesting feature of the data is the high nucleotide diversities observed in nematodes from the Caribbean. This genetic complexity may be a direct result of extensive admixture and complex history of human populations in this region of the world. These data should encourage (but not make complacent) those involved in large-scale benzimidazole treatment of human intestinal nematodes.

  6. Molecular characterization of beta-tubulin from Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talles Eduardo Ferreira Maciel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available β-tubulins are structural components of microtubules and the targets of benzimidazole fungicides used to control many diseases of agricultural importance. Intron polymorphisms in the intron-rich genes of these proteins have been used in phylogeographic investigations of phytopathogenic fungi. In this work, we sequenced 2764 nucleotides of the β-tubulin gene (Pp tubB in samples of Phakopsora pachyrhizi collected from seven soybean fields in Brazil. Pp tubB contained an open reading frame of 1341 nucleotides, including nine exons and eight introns. Exon length varied from 14 to 880 nucleotides, whereas intron length varied from 76 to 102 nucleotides. The presence of only four polymorphic sites limited the usefulness of Pp tubB for phylogeographic studies in P. pachyrhizi. The gene structures of Pp tubB and orthologous β-tubulin genes of Melampsora lini and Uromyces viciae-fabae were highly conserved. The amino acid substitutions in β-tubulin proteins associated with the onset of benzimidazole resistance in model organisms, especially at His6, Glu198 and Phe200, were absent from the predicted sequence of the P. pachyrhizi β-tubulin protein.

  7. Development a diagnostic pan-dermatophyte TaqMan probe real-time PCR assay based on beta tubulin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhendi, Hossein; Motamedi, Marjan; Makimura, Koichi; Satoh, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    Early differentiation of dermatophytosis from other cutaneous mycoses is essential to avoid inaccurate therapy. DNA-based techniques including real-time PCR have increasingly been considered for detection of fungal elements in clinical specimens. In this study, after partial sequence analysis of beta tubulin (BT2) gene in 13 common and rare pathogenic dermatophyte species, a pan-dermatophyte primer and probe set was designed in a TaqMan probe-based PCR format. The sensitivity and specificity of the system was tested with 22 reference strains of dermatophytes, 234 positive clinical specimens, 32 DNA samples extracted from normal nails, several fungi other than dermatophytes and human DNAs. Analytical detection limit of the designed PCR on serially diluted DNAs of prepared recombinant plasmid indicated that only five molecules per sample are the minimum number for reliable detection by the assay. A total of 226 out of 234 (96.5%) DNAs extracted from clinical samples, but none of the 32 nail samples, from healthy volunteers were positive in PCR. The real-time PCR targeted beta tubulin gene established in this study could be a sensitive diagnostic tool which is significantly faster than the conventional culture method and should be useful in the clinical settings, in large-scale epidemiological studies and in clinical trials of antifungal therapy.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury, Microglia, and Beta Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Mannix, Rebekah C.; Whalen, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TBI and AD share many pathologic features including chronic inflammation and the accumulation of beta amyloid (A\\(\\beta\\)). Data from both AD and TBI studies suggest that microglia play a central role in A\\(\\beta\\) accumulation after TBI. This paper focuses on the current research on the role of microglia response to A\\(\\beta\\) after TBI.

  9. Thiabendazole resistance and mutations in the beta-tubulin gene of Penicillium expansum strains isolated from apples and pears with blue mold decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabañas, Romualdo; Castellá, Gemma; Abarca, M Lourdes; Bragulat, M Rosa; Cabañes, F Javier

    2009-08-01

    Penicillium expansum is the causal agent of blue mold rot, a postharvest decay of stored fruits. This fungus also produces the mycotoxins patulin and citrinin. Control of P. expansum still relies mainly on the use of fungicides such as thiabendazole. Since its introduction, resistant strains have been reported. The aim of this work was to investigate the thiabendazole resistance and mutations in the beta-tubulin gene of P. expansum strains isolated from apples and pears with blue mold decay from Spain. A total of 71 strains of P. expansum were scored for resistance to thiabendazole and the beta-tubulin gene was sequenced. Out of 71 strains, 37 were sensitive and 34 were resistant to thiabendazole. Regarding the beta-tubulin gene sequence, 10 different genetic types were determined, with a 99.7-100% similarity. When the amino acid sequence was deduced, five different amino acid sequences were found. All except one of the sensitive strains lacked mutations in the region sequenced. Of the 34 resistant strains, only eight had mutations that involved the residues 198 and 240. All the strains with mutations at position 198 always corresponded to resistant isolates. However, a high percentage of resistant strains had no mutations in the region of the beta-tubulin gene sequenced, and so other mechanisms may be involved in thiabendazole resistance.

  10. Genetic variation in codons 167, 198 and 200 of the beta-tubulin gene in whipworms (Trichuris spp.) from a range of domestic animals and wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tina V A; Nejsum, Peter; Olsen, Annette; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2013-03-31

    A recurrent problem in the control of whipworm (Trichuris spp.) infections in many animal species and man is the relatively low efficacy of treatment with a single application of benzimidazoles (BZs). The presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in codons 167, 198 and 200 in the beta-tubulin gene has been associated with BZ anthelmintic resistance in intestinal nematodes of veterinary importance. We hypothesized that the low susceptibility to BZ could be related to a natural tolerance or induced resistance caused by BZ-resistant associated SNPs. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the presence of these SNPs in the beta-tubulin gene of Trichuris spp. obtained from a range of animals. DNA was extracted from a total of 121 Trichuris spp. adult whipworm specimens obtained from 6 different host species. The number of worms from each host was pig: 31, deer: 21, sheep: 18, mouse: 17, dog: 19 and Arabian camels: 14. A pooled sample of Trichuris eggs from 3 moose was also used. In order to amplify the beta-tubulin fragments which covered codons 167, 198 and 200 of the gene, degenerate primers were designed. The sequences obtained were used to design species specific primers and used to amplify a ~476 bp fragment of the beta-tubulin gene. The PCR products were sequenced, analysed and evaluated. We did not identify SNPs in codons 167, 198 or 200 that led to amino acid substitutions in any of the studied Trichuris spp., but genetic variation expected to be related to species differences was observed. The cluster analysis showed close evolutionary relationship between Trichuris spp. from ruminants and between mouse and dog whereas the pig-derived worms, T. suis, clustered with T. trichiura obtained from Genbank.

  11. Analysis of the beta-tubulin gene and morphological changes of the microsporidium Anncaliia algerae both suggest albendazole sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiana, Marianita; Pau, Cyrilla; Takvorian, Peter M; Cali, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The Microsporidium, Anncaliia algerae, an obligate intracellular parasite, has been identified as an opportunistic human pathogen, but treatment has not been evaluated for infections with this organism. Albendazole, an antitubulin polymerization drug used against parasitic worm infections, has been the medication of choice used to treat some microsporidial infections affecting humans, with varying results ranging from clearing infection (Encephalitozoon) to resistance (Enterocytozoon). This study illustrates the effect of albendazole treatment on A. algerae infection in Rabbit Kidney (RK13) cells and Human Fetal Lung (HFL-1) fibroblasts. Albendazole appears to have an attenuating effect on A. algerae infection and albendazole's IC50 in RK13 cells is 0.1 μg/ml. Long-term treatment inhibits up to 98% of spore production, but interrupting treatment reestablishes the infection without new exposure to the parasite as supported by microscopic observations. The parasite's beta-tubulin gene was purified, cloned, and sequenced. Five of the six specific amino acids, associated with benzimidazole sensitivity, are conserved in A. algerae. These findings suggest that A. algerae is sensitive to albendazole; however, the organism is not completely cleared from cultures.

  12. Preferential Expression of a Beta-tubulin Gene in Developing Cotton Fibers%棉花发育纤维中一个优势表达的β-Tubulin基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-li LI; Jie SUN; Chun-hong LI; Yong-qing ZHU; Gui-xian XIA

    2002-01-01

    @@ The developing cotton fiber is considered as a model system for studying the function of microtubules in plant cell elongation and cell wall biosynthesis. It has been shown that microtubules undergo active dynamic changes during fiber development. At the molecular level, Dixon et al demonstrated that two alphatubulin and two beta-tubulin isoforms accumulated preferentially in fibers, and Whittaker and Triplett showed that the accumulation of alpha-tubulin transcripts changed in a gene-specific manner in the developing cotton fibers.

  13. Activity of benzimidazoles against Dientamoeba fragilis (Trichomonadida, Monocercomonadidae in vitro and correlation of beta-tubulin sequences as an indicator of resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Damien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Dientamoeba fragilis has emerged as a significant and common enteropathogen. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints and chronic symptoms are common. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Despite this, there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism. Benzimidazoles are a class of antiparasitic drugs that are commonly used for the treatment of protozoan and helminthic infections. Susceptibility testing was undertaken on four D. fragilis clinical isolates against the following benzimidazoles: albendazole, flubendazole, mebendazole, nocodazole, triclabendazole and thiabendazole. The activities of the antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/mL to 500 μg/mL were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis grown in xenic culture. All tested drugs showed no efficacy. The beta-tubulin transcript was sequenced from two of the D. fragilis isolates and amino acid sequences predicted a susceptibility to benzimidazoles. This is the first study to report susceptibility profiles for benzimidazoles against D. fragilis, all of which were not active against the organism. This study also found that beta-tubulin sequences cannot be used as a reliable marker for resistance of benzimidazoles in D. fragilis.

  14. Inhibition of cytosolic Phospholipase A2 prevents prion peptide-induced neuronal damage and co-localisation with Beta III Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Victoria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and the subsequent metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA to prostaglandins have been shown to play an important role in neuronal death in neurodegenerative disease. Here we report the effects of the prion peptide fragment HuPrP106-126 on the PLA2 cascade in primary cortical neurons and translocation of cPLA2 to neurites. Results Exposure of primary cortical neurons to HuPrP106-126 increased the levels of phosphorylated cPLA2 and caused phosphorylated cPLA2 to relocate from the cell body to the cellular neurite in a PrP-dependent manner, a previously unreported observation. HuPrP106-126 also induced significant AA release, an indicator of cPLA2 activation; this preceded synapse damage and subsequent cellular death. The novel translocation of p-cPLA2 postulated the potential for exposure to HuPrP106-126 to result in a re-arrangement of the cellular cytoskeleton. However p-cPLA2 did not colocalise significantly with F-actin, intermediate filaments, or microtubule-associated proteins. Conversely, p-cPLA2 did significantly colocalise with the cytoskeletal protein beta III tubulin. Pre-treatment with the PLA2 inhibitor, palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3 reduced cPLA2 activation, AA release and damage to the neuronal synapse. Furthermore, PACOCF3 reduced expression of p-cPLA2 in neurites and inhibited colocalisation with beta III tubulin, resulting in protection against PrP-induced cell death. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest that cPLA2 plays a vital role in the action of HuPrP106-126 and that the colocalisation of p-cPLA2 with beta III tubulin could be central to the progress of neurodegeneration caused by prion peptides. Further work is needed to define exactly how PLA2 inhibitors protect neurons from peptide-induced toxicity and how this relates to intracellular structural changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  15. Introduction of silencing-inducing transgene against Fgf19 does not affect expression of Tbx5 and beta3-tubulin in the developing chicken retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Mayumi; Tomonari, Sayuri; Naito, Yuki; Saigo, Kaoru; Noji, Sumihare; Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Ohuchi, Hideyo

    2008-03-01

    Fgf19 is known to be expressed in the developing chicken eye but its functions during retinal development have remained elusive. Since Fgf19 is expressed in the dorsal portion of the optic cup, it is intriguing to know whether FGF19 is required for expression of dorso-ventral morphogenetic genes in the eye. To clarify this, expression patterns of Tbx5 and Vax were examined in the developing eye after in ovo RNA interference targeted against Fgf19. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that the short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeted against Fgf19 could reduce its expression in the eye to less than 50% of a relative amount of mRNA, compared with contralateral or untreated control eyes. However, no obvious alteration in expression domains of Tbx5 or Vax was observed. Misexpression of Tbx5 or Tbx5-RNAi did not alter the Fgf19 expression either. Furthermore, although Fgf19 is expressed in the central retina before neurogenesis occurs, beta3-tubulin, a marker for early retinal differentiation was still detected in the central retina after knockdown of Fgf19. Thus, knockdown of Fgf19 supports no obvious regulations between Fgf19 and Tbx5, or exhibits no phenotypes that perturb early retinal differentiation.

  16. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and mass spectrometry-based analysis of palmitoylation sites of in vitro palmitoylated rat brain tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Hou, Junjie; Xie, Zhensheng; Deng, Jianwei; Wang, Xiaoming; Chen, Danfang; Yang, Fuquan; Gong, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    Research has shown that the palmitoyl group of α-tubulin mediates the hydrophobic interaction between microtubules and intracellular membranes and that palmitoylated tubulin plays a role in signal transduction. There are 20 cysteine residues per α/β tubulin heterodimer. C376 of α-tubulin was reported to be predominantly palmitoylated and C20, C213 and C305 of α-tubulin were palmitoylated at lower levels. The previous method used for the analysis of the palmitoylation sites on α-tubulin was based on ³H-labeling, enzymolysis, purification and sequencing. This approach, although efficient, is laborious. Mass spectrometry (MS), especially tandem MS, has been shown to be a successful method for identification of various post-translational modifications of proteins. We report here a convenient MS-based method to comprehensively analyze the palmitoylation sites of the α/β tubulin heterodimer. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and streptavidin agarose affinity purification were applied to enrich palmitoylated peptides from tubulin. After nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, database searching and manual analysis of the spectra revealed that 11 cysteine residues of the α/β tubulin heterodimer were palmitoylated.

  17. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-08-17

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI.

  18. Tau-tubulin kinase 1 expression, phosphorylation and co-localization with phospho-Ser422 tau in the Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Harald; Cowburn, Richard F; Gustafsson, Elin; Strömberg, Kia; Svensson, Anne; Dahllund, Leif; Malinowsky, David; Sunnemark, Dan

    2013-07-01

    Recent reports have implicated tau-tubulin kinase 1 (TTBK1) in the pathological phosphorylation of tau that occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was undertaken to provide an extensive characterization of TTBK1 mRNA and protein expression in human brain from AD cases and non-demented controls so as to better understand the disease relevance of this novel kinase. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed abundant expression of TTBK1 in the somatodendritic compartment of cortical and hippocampal neurons of both AD cases and controls. TTBK1 immunoreactivity appeared to vary with the level of phospho-tau staining, and was strong in the somatodendritic compartment of apparently healthy hippocampal neurons as well as in pre-tangle neurons where it co-localized with diffuse phospho-Ser422 tau staining. Ser422 was confirmed as a TTBK1 substrate in vitro, and an antibody towards the site, in addition to labeling AT8-positive neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), neuritic plaques and neuropil threads, also labeled a small population of neurons that were unlabeled with AT8. These data suggest a role for TTBK1 in pre-tangle formation prior to the formation of fibrillar tau and strengthen the idea that tau is phosphorylated at Ser422 at an early/intermediate stage in NFT formation.

  19. A Unifying Hypothesis for the Conformational Change of Tubulin

    CERN Document Server

    Fygenson, D K

    2001-01-01

    Microtubule dynamic instability arises from the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the beta-monomer of the tubulin dimer. The conformational change induced by hydrolysis is unknown, but microtubules disassemble into protofilaments of GDP-bound tubulin that curve away from the microtubule axis. This paper presents the unfolding of a portion of the tubulin molecule into the microtubule interior as a plausible, unifying explanation for diverse structural and kinetic features of microtubules. This is the first specific structural hypothesis for the hydrolysis induced conformational change of tubulin that simultaneously explains weakening of lateral bonds, bending about longitudinal bonds, changes in protofilament supertwist associated with GTP hydrolysis, structural features of GDP-tubulin double rings, faster disassembly at higher temperatures and slower disassembly in the presence of glycerol and deuterium oxide. The hypothesis suggests further theoretical investigations and direct experimental tests.

  20. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-beta from the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Katharina Diem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-beta (A-beta in the brain indicates failure of elimination of A-beta from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease. There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of A-beta from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of A-beta into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of A-beta. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as A-beta, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of A-beta in the walls of human arteries with age and Alzheimer's disease as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Initially, A-beta diffuses through the extracellular spaces of grey matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterised, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of A-beta occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy.

  1. Water deficit modulates gene expression in growing zones of soybean seedlings. Analysis of differentially expressed cDNAs, a new beta-tubulin gene, and expression of genes encoding cell wall proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1991-10-01

    Transfer of soybean seedlings to low-water-potential vermiculite (psi w = -0.3 MPa) results in a reversible decrease in hypocotyl growth and modulation of several polysomal mRNAs (Plant Physiol 92: 205-214). We report here the isolation of two cDNA clones (pGE16 and pGE95) which correspond to genes whose mRNA levels are increased, and one cDNA clone (pGE23) which corresponds to a gene whose mRNA level is decreased in the hypocotyl zone of cell elongation by water deficit. In well-watered seedlings mRNAs hybridizing to pGE16 and pGE95 are most abundant in mature regions of the seedling, but in water-deficient seedlings mRNA levels are reduced in mature regions and enhanced in elongating regions. RNA corresponding to soybean proline-rich protein 1 (sbPRP1) shows a similar tissue distribution and response to water deficit. In contrast, in well-watered seedlings, the gene corresponding to pGE23 was highly expressed in the hypocotyl and root growing zones. Transfer of seedlings to low-water-potential vermiculite caused a rapid decrease in mRNA hybridizing to pGE23. Sequence analysis revealed that pGE23 has high homology with beta-tubulin. Water deficit also reduced the level of mRNA hybridizing to JCW1, an auxin-modulated gene, although with different kinetics. Furthermore, mRNA encoding actin, glycine-rich proteins (GRPs), and hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) were down-regulated in the hypocotyl zone of elongation of seedlings exposed to water deficit. No effect of water deficit was observed on the expression of chalcone synthase. Decreased expression of beta-tubulin, actin, JCW1, HRGP and GRP and increased expression of sbPRP1, pGE95 and pGE16 in the hypocotyl zone of cell elongation could participate in the reversible growth inhibition observed in water-deficient soybean seedlings.

  2. TUBA1A mutations cause wide spectrum lissencephaly (smooth brain) and suggest that multiple neuronal migration pathways converge on alpha tubulins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Kumar (Ravinesh); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); T.D. Babatz (Timothy); T.D. Cushion (Thomas); K. Harvey (Kirsten); M. Topf (Maya); L. Yates (Laura); S. Robb (Stephanie); G. Uyanik (Gökhan); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); M.I. Rees (Mark); R.J. Harvey (Robert); W.B. Dobyns (William)

    2010-01-01

    textabstracte previously showed that mutations in LIS1 and DCX account for ~85% of patients with the classic form of lissencephaly (LIS). Some rare forms of LIS are associated with a disproportionately small cerebellum, referred to as lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH). Tubulin alpha1A (

  3. Genetic variation in codons 167, 198 and 200 of the beta-tubulin gene in whipworms (Trichuris spp.) from a range of domestic animals and wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Nejsum, Peter; Olsen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    A recurrent problem in the control of whipworm (Trichuris spp.) infections in many animal species and man is the relatively low efficacy of treatment with a single application of benzimidazoles (BZs). The presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in codons 167, 198 and 200 in the beta-tu...

  4. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-02-13

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  5. Functional characterization of Kv channel beta-subunits from rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, S H; Rettig, J; Graack, H R; Pongs, O

    1996-06-15

    1. The potassium channel beta-subunit from rat brain, Kv beta 1.1, is known to induce inactivation of the delayed rectifier channel Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 delta 1-110. 2. Kv beta 1.1 was co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with various other potassium channel alpha-subunits. Kv beta 1.1 induced inactivation in members of the Kv1 subfamily with the exception of Kv 1.6; no inactivation of Kv 2.1, Kv 3.4 delta 2-28 and Kv4.1 channels could be observed. 3. The second member of the beta-subunit subfamily, Kv beta 2, had a shorter N-terminal end, accelerated inactivation of the A-type channel Kv 1.4, but did not induce inactivation when co-expressed with delayed rectifiers of the Kv1 channel family. 4. To test whether this subunit co-assembles with Kv alpha-subunits, the N-terminal inactivating domains of Kv beta 1.1 and Kv beta 3 were spliced to the N-terminus of Kv beta 2. The chimaeric beta-subunits (beta 1/ beta 2 and beta 3/ beta 2) induced fast inactivation of several Kv1 channels, indicating that Kv beta 2 associates with these alpha-subunits. No inactivation was induced in Kv 1.3, Kv 1.6, Kv2.1 and Kv3.4 delta 2-28 channels. 5. Kv beta 2 caused a voltage shift in the activation threshold of Kv1.5 of about -10 mV, indicating a putative physiological role. Kv beta 2 had a smaller effect on Kv 1.1 channels. 6. Kv beta 2 accelerated the activation time course of Kv1.5 but had no marked effect on channel deactivation.

  6. Tubulin evolution in insects: gene duplication and subfunctionalization provide specialized isoforms in a functionally constrained gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadagkar Sudhindra R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of 19 insect genome sequencing projects spanning six insect orders provides the opportunity to investigate the evolution of important gene families, here tubulins. Tubulins are a family of eukaryotic structural genes that form microtubules, fundamental components of the cytoskeleton that mediate cell division, shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. Previous in vivo studies in Drosophila find a stringent relationship between tubulin structure and function; small, biochemically similar changes in the major alpha 1 or testis-specific beta 2 tubulin protein render each unable to generate a motile spermtail axoneme. This has evolutionary implications, not a single non-synonymous substitution is found in beta 2 among 17 species of Drosophila and Hirtodrosophila flies spanning 60 Myr of evolution. This raises an important question, How do tubulins evolve while maintaining their function? To answer, we use molecular evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of insect tubulins. Results Sixty-six alpha tubulins and eighty-six beta tubulin gene copies were retrieved and subjected to molecular evolutionary analyses. Four ancient clades of alpha and beta tubulins are found in insects, a major isoform clade (alpha 1, beta 1 and three minor, tissue-specific clades (alpha 2-4, beta 2-4. Based on a Homarus americanus (lobster outgroup, these were generated through gene duplication events on major beta and alpha tubulin ancestors, followed by subfunctionalization in expression domain. Strong purifying selection acts on all tubulins, yet maximum pairwise amino acid distances between tubulin paralogs are large (0.464 substitutions/site beta tubulins, 0.707 alpha tubulins. Conversely orthologs, with the exception of reproductive tissue isoforms, show little sequence variation except in the last 15 carboxy terminus tail (CTT residues, which serve as sites for post-translational modifications (PTMs and interactions

  7. Tau and Beta-Amyloid Deposition, Microhemorrhage and Brain Function after Traumatic Brain Injury in War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0418 TITLE: Tau and Beta-Amyloid Deposition, Microhemorrhage and Brain Function after Traumatic Brain Injury in War...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour...completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information

  8. In Vitro Trypanocidal Activity of Antibodies to Bacterially Ex­pressed Trypanosoma brucei Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GW Lubega

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are only four drugs for treating African trypanosomiasis, a devastating disease in sub-Saharan Africa. With slow discovery of better drugs, vaccination is viewed as the best method of control. We previously showed that antibodies to native Trypanosoma brucei brucei tubulin inhibit the growth of trypanosomes in culture. Here, we aimed to determine the effect of antibodies to bacte­rially expressed trypanosome tubulin on T. brucei brucei growth. Methods: T. brucei brucei alpha and beta tubulin genes were individually expressed in Escherichia coli under the tryptophan promoter. Monoclonal tubulin antibodies reacted specifically with the ex­pressed tubulins with no cross-reaction with the opposite tubulin. Rabbits were immunized with 450μg each of the concentrated recombinant tubulin, and production of antibodies assessed by ELISA and Western blotting. The effect of polyclonal antibodies on trypanosome growth was deter­mined by culturing bloodstream T. brucei brucei in up to 25% of antisera. Results: Low antisera dilutions (25% from the immunized rabbits inhibited trypanosome growth. The most cytotoxic antisera were from one rabbit immunized with a mixture of both alpha and beta tubulins. However, the result was not reproduced in other rabbits and there was no apparent effect on growth at higher antisera dilutions. Conclusion: Antibodies to bacterially expressed trypanosome tubulin are not effective at killing cul­tured bloodstream trypanosomes.

  9. Evaluation of alpha-tubulin as an antigenic and molecular probe to detect Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Shin, Myeong Heon; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Park, Soon-Jung

    2009-09-01

    The alpha/beta-tubulin heterodimer is the basic subunit of microtubules in eukaryotes. Polyclonal antibodies specific to recombinant alpha-tubulin of Giardia lamblia were made, and found effective as a probe to specifically detect G. lamblia by immunofluorescence assays. Nucleotide sequences of alpha-tubulin genes were compared between G. lamblia WB and GS strains, prototypes of assemblage A and assemblage B, respectively. A set of primers was designed and used to amplify a portion of the alpha-tubulin gene from G. lamblia. PCR-RFLP analysis of this alpha-tubulin PCR product successfully differentiated G. lamblia into 2 distinct groups, assemblages A and B. The results indicate that alpha-tubulin can be used as a molecular probe to detect G. lamblia.

  10. Role of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, H; LeFeuvre, R A; Horai, R; Asano, M; Iwakura, Y; Rothwell, N J

    2001-08-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic brain damage. Evidence to date suggests that the major form of IL-1 contributing to ischemic injury is IL-1beta rather than IL-1alpha, but this has not been tested directly. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of transient cerebral ischemia [30 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)] on neuronal injury in wild-type (WT) mice and in IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, or both IL-1alpha and IL-1beta knock-out (KO) mice. Mice lacking both forms of IL-1 exhibited dramatically reduced ischemic infarct volumes compared with wild type (total volume, 70%; cortex, 87% reduction). Ischemic damage compared with WT mice was not significantly altered in mice lacking either IL-1alpha or IL-1beta alone. IL-1beta mRNA, but not IL-1alpha or the IL-1 type 1 receptor, was strongly induced by MCAO in WT and IL-1alpha KO mice. Administration (intracerebroventricularly) of recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced infarct volume in WT (-32%) and IL-1alpha KO (-48%) mice, but had no effect on injury in IL-1beta or IL-1alpha/beta KO mice. These data confirm that IL-1 plays a major role in ischemic brain injury. They also show that chronic deletion of IL-1alpha or IL-1beta fails to influence brain damage, probably because of compensatory changes in the IL-1 system in IL-1alpha KO mice and changes in IL-1-independent mediators of neuronal death in IL-1beta KO mice.

  11. The benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain and its interaction with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, I.L.; Doble, A.

    1983-06-01

    (3H)Ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate ((3H) beta-CCE) binds to a homogeneous population of recognition sites in rat whole brain membranes with high affinity. The (3H)beta-CCE binding is completely displaceable by low concentrations of a number of benzodiazepines with similar potencies found when using a 3H-benzodiazepine as the ligand. This suggests that the recognition sites for beta-CCE and the benzodiazepines are identical or that they are involved in a close interaction. The binding of (3H)beta-CCE does not obey simple mass-action kinetics. (3H)Flunitrazepam dissociation from its receptor population is biphasic, and different methods of initiation of this dissociation indicate that cooperative interactions take place within the receptor population. We conclude that the benzodiazepine receptor is a single entity that can exist in two conformations, the equilibrium between which may be controlled by some as yet unidentified factor.

  12. [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FE and [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FP are superior to [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT for dopamine transporter visualization: Autoradiographic evaluation in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Ilonka; Hall, Haakan; Halldin, Christer; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Sedvall, Goeran

    1997-10-01

    The binding of the three dopamine transporter radioligands ([{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT, [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FE, and [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FP) was studied using whole-hemisphere autoradiography on postmortem human brains. The autoradiograms revealed an intense and homogeneous labeling of the nucleus caudatus and putamen but also to varying extent to serotonergic and noradrenergic transporters of neocortex and thalamus. The order of specificity estimated (striatum over neocortex ratios) was {beta}-CIT-FP > {beta}-CIT-FE >> {beta}-CIT, suggesting that {beta}-CIT-FE and {beta}-CIT-FP should be preferred for in vivo studies of the dopamine transporter in the human brain.

  13. Tubulin tyrosine ligase and stathmin compete for tubulin binding in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin partition between soluble and polymeric forms is tightly regulated in cells. Stathmin and tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL)a each form stable complexes with tubulin and inhibit tubulin polymerization. Here we explore the mutual relationship between these proteins in vitro and demonstrate that full-length stathmin and TTL compete for binding to tubulin and fail to make a stable tubulin:stathmin:TTL triple complex in solution. Moreover, stathmin depresses TTL tubulin tyrosination activity i...

  14. Hypoxic induction of caspase-11/caspase-1/interleukin-1beta in brain microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Gon; Lee, Heasuk; Son, Eunyung; Kwon, Oh-Young; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Suk, Kyoungho

    2003-06-10

    Caspase-11 is an inducible protease that plays an important role in both inflammation and apoptosis. Inflammatory stimuli induce and activate caspase-11, which is required for the activation of caspase-1 or interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) converting enzyme (ICE). Caspase-1 in turn mediates the maturation of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, which is one of the crucial mediators of neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Here, we report that hypoxic exposure of cultured brain microglia (BV-2 mouse microglia cells and rat primary microglial cultures) induces expression and activation of caspase-11, which is accompanied by activation of caspase-1 and secretion of mature IL-1beta and IL-18. Hypoxic induction of caspase-11 was observed in both mRNA and protein levels, and was mediated through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Transient global ischemia in rats also induced caspase-11 expression and IL-1beta production in hippocampus supporting our in vitro findings. Caspase-11-expressing cells in hippocampus were morphologically identified as microglia. Taken together, our results indicate that hypoxia induces a sequential event-caspase-11 induction, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1beta release-in brain microglia, and point out the importance of initial caspase-11 induction in hypoxia-induced inflammatory activation of microglia.

  15. Abnormal Parietal Brain Function in ADHD: Replication and Extension of Previous EEG Beta Asymmetry Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sigi eHale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abundant work indicates ADHD abnormal posterior brain structure and function, including abnormal structural and functional asymmetries and reduced corpus callosum size. However, this literature has attracted considerably less research interest than fronto-striatal findings. Objective: To help address this imbalance, the current study replicates and extends our previous work showing abnormal parietal brain function in ADHD adults during the Conner’s continuous performance test (CPT. Method: Our previous study found that ADHD adults had increased rightward EEG beta (16-21 Hz asymmetry in inferior parietal brain regions during the CPT (p=.00001, and that this metric exhibited a lack of normal correlation (i.e., observed in controls with beta asymmetry at temporal-parietal regions. We re-tested these effects in a new ADHD sample, and with both new and old samples combined. We additionally examined: a EEG asymmetry in multiple frequency bands, b unilateral effects for all asymmetry findings, and c the association between EEG asymmetry and a battery of cognitive tests. Results: We replicated our original findings, again demonstrating abnormal rightward inferior parietal beta asymmetry in adults with ADHD during the CPT, and again this metric exhibited abnormal reduced correlation to temporal-parietal beta asymmetry. Novel analyses also demonstrated a broader pattern of rightward beta and theta asymmetry across inferior, superior, and temporal-parietal brain regions, and showed that rightward parietal asymmetry in ADHD was atypically associated with multiple cognitive tests. Conclusion: Abnormal increased rightward parietal EEG beta asymmetry is an important feature of ADHD. We speculate that this phenotype may occur with any form of impaired capacity for top-down task-directed control over sensory encoding functions, and that it may reflect associated increases of attentional shifting and compensatory sustained/selective attention.

  16. Tubulin tyrosine ligase and stathmin compete for tubulin binding in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2013-07-24

    Tubulin partition between soluble and polymeric forms is tightly regulated in cells. Stathmin and tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) each form stable complexes with tubulin and inhibit tubulin polymerization. Here we explore the mutual relationship between these proteins in vitro and demonstrate that full-length stathmin and TTL compete for binding to tubulin and fail to make a stable tubulin:stathmin:TTL triple complex in solution. Moreover, stathmin depresses TTL tubulin tyrosination activity in vitro. These results suggest either that TTL and stathmin have a partially overlapping footprint on the tubulin dimer or that stathmin induces a tubulin conformation incompatible with stable TTL binding.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces transforming growth factor-beta1 and transforming growth factor-beta receptor messenger RNAs and reduces complement C1qB messenger RNA in rat brain microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T E; Rozovsky, I; Sarkar, D K; Young-Chan, C S; Nichols, N R; Laping, N J; Finch, C E

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 is a multifunctional peptide with increased expression during Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions which involve inflammatory mechanisms. We examined the autoregulation of transforming growth factor-beta1 and transforming growth factor-beta receptors and the effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 on complement C1q in brains of adult Fischer 344 male rats and in primary glial cultures. Perforant path transection by entorhinal cortex lesioning was used as a model for the hippocampal deafferentation of Alzheimer's disease. In the hippocampus ipsilateral to the lesion, transforming growth factor-beta1 peptide was increased >100-fold; the messenger RNAs encoding transforming growth factor-beta1, transforming growth factor-beta type I and type II receptors were also increased, but to a smaller degree. In this acute lesion paradigm, microglia are the main cell type containing transforming growth factor-beta1, transforming growth factor-beta type I and II receptor messenger RNAs, shown by immunocytochemistry in combination with in situ hybridization. Autoregulation of the transforming growth factor-beta1 system was examined by intraventricular infusion of transforming growth factor-beta1 peptide, which increased hippocampal transforming growth factor-beta1 messenger RNA levels in a dose-dependent fashion. Similarly, transforming growth factor-beta1 increased levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 messenger RNA and transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor messenger RNA (IC(50), 5pM) and increased release of transforming growth factor-beta1 peptide from primary microglia cultures. Interactions of transforming growth factor-beta1 with complement system gene expression are also indicated, because transforming growth factor-beta1 decreased C1qB messenger RNA in the cortex and hippocampus, after intraventricular infusion, and in cultured glia. These indications of autocrine regulation of transforming growth

  18. GSK-3beta is required for memory reconsolidation in adult brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kimura

    Full Text Available Activation of GSK-3beta is presumed to be involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, which is characterized by memory disturbances during early stages of the disease. The normal function of GSK-3beta in adult brain is not well understood. Here, we analyzed the ability of heterozygote GSK-3beta knockout (GSK+/- mice to form memories. In the Morris water maze (MWM, learning and memory performance of GSK+/- mice was no different from that of wild-type (WT mice for the first 3 days of training. With continued learning on subsequent days, however, retrograde amnesia was induced in GSK+/- mice, suggesting that GSK+/- mice might be impaired in their ability to form long-term memories. In contextual fear conditioning (CFC, context memory was normally consolidated in GSK+/- mice, but once the original memory was reactivated, they showed reduced freezing, suggesting that GSK+/- mice had impaired memory reconsolidation. Biochemical analysis showed that GSK-3beta was activated after memory reactivation in WT mice. Intraperitoneal injection of a GSK-3 inhibitor before memory reactivation impaired memory reconsolidation in WT mice. These results suggest that memory reconsolidation requires activation of GSK-3beta in the adult brain.

  19. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  20. Postmortem proteomic analysis in human amygdala of drug addicts: possible impact of tubulin on drug-abusing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, P; Vielsmeier, V; Büttner, A; Eisenmenger, W; Siedler, F; Scheffer, B; Möller, H-J; Bondy, B

    2011-03-01

    Besides the ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens as the most investigated brain reward structures, several reports about the relation between volume and activity of the amygdala and drug-seeking behavior have emphasized the central role of the amygdala in the etiology of addiction. Considering its proposed important role and the limited number of human protein expression studies with amygdala in drug addiction, we performed a human postmortem proteomic analysis of amygdala tissue obtained from 8 opiate addicts and 7 control individuals. Results were validated by Western blot in an independent postmortem replication sample from 12 opiate addicts compared to 12 controls and 12 suicide victims, as a second "control sample". Applying 2D-electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, we detected alterations of beta-tubulin expression and decreased levels of the heat-shock protein HSP60 in drug addicts. Western blot analysis in the additional sample demonstrated significantly increased alpha- and beta-tubulin concentrations in the amygdala of drug abusers versus controls (P = 0.021, 0.029) and to suicide victims (P = 0.006, 0.002). Our results suggest that cytoskeletal alterations in the amygdala determined by tubulin seem to be involved in the pathophysiology of drug addiction, probably via a relation to neurotransmission and cellular signaling. Moreover, the loss of neuroprotection against stressors by chaperons as HSP60 might also contribute to structural alteration in the brain of drug addicts. Although further studies have to confirm our results, this might be a possible pathway that may increase our understanding of drug addiction.

  1. Enoxaparin treatment administered at both early and late stages of amyloid beta deposition improves cognition of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice with differential effects on brain A beta levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, N.M.; Dijk, L. van; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Kiliaan, A.J.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enoxaparin (Enox), a low molecular weight heparin, has been shown to lower brain amyloid beta (A beta) load in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease. However, the effect of Enox on cognition was not studied. Therefore, we examined the effect of peripheral Enox treatment on cognition and brain A beta

  2. Stathmin slows down guanosine diphosphate dissociation from tubulin in a phosphorylation-controlled fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amayed, P; Carlier, M F; Pantaloni, D

    2000-10-10

    Stathmin is an important protein that interacts with tubulin and regulates microtubule dynamics in a phosphorylation-controlled fashion. Here we show that the dissociation of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) from beta-tubulin is slowed 20-fold in the (tubulin)(2)-stathmin ternary complex (T(2)S). The kinetics of GDP or guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) dissociation from tubulin have been monitored by the change in tryptophan fluorescence of tubulin upon exchanging 2-amino-6-mercapto-9-beta-ribofuranosylpurine 5'-diphosphate (S6-GDP) for tubulin-bound guanine nucleotide. At molar ratios of stathmin to tubulin lower than 0.5, biphasic kinetics were observed, indicating that the dynamics of the complex is extremely slow, consistent with its high stability. The method was used to characterize the effects of phosphorylation of stathmin on its interaction with tubulin. The serine-to-glutamate substitution of all four phosphorylatable serines of stathmin (4E-stathmin) weakens the stability of the T(2)S complex by about 2 orders of magnitude. The phosphorylation of serines 16 and 63 in stathmin has a more severe effect and weakens the stability of T(2)S 10(4)-fold. The rate of GDP dissociation is lowered only 7-fold and 4-fold in the complexes of tubulin with 4E-stathmin and diphosphostathmin, respectively. Sedimentation velocity studies support the conclusions of nucleotide exchange data and show that the T(2)S complexes formed between tubulin and 4E-stathmin or diphosphostathmin are less compact than the highly stable T(2)S complex. The correlation between the effect of phosphorylation of stathmin on the stability of T(2)S complex measured in vitro and on the function of stathmin in vivo is discussed.

  3. Brain beta-adrenergic receptor binding in rats with obesity induced by a beef tallow diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that compared with safflower oil diet, feeding a beef tallow diet leads to a greater accumulation of body fat by reducing sympathetic activities. The present study examined the effects of dietary fats consisting of different fatty acids on alpha1- and beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were meal-fed isoenergetic diets based on safflower oil (rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids) or beef tallow (rich in saturated fatty acids) for 8 weeks. Binding affinities of the beta-adrenergic receptor in the hypothalamus and cortex were significantly lower in the beef tallow diet group, but those of the alpha1-receptor did not differ between the two groups. The polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid (P/S) ratio and fluidities of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cortex were lower in the beef tallow diet group than in the safflower oil diet group. These results suggest that the beef tallow diet decreases membrane fluidity by altering the fatty acid composition of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of rat. Consequently, beta-adrenergic receptor binding affinities in the brain were lower in rats fed the beef tallow diet than in rats fed the safflower oil diet. We recognized that there is possible link between the membrane fluidity and the changes in affinity of beta-adrenoceptors in rat brain.

  4. F-18 Polyethyleneglycol stilbenes as PET imaging agents targeting A{beta} aggregates in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung Meiping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Maier, Donna L. [Department of Neuroscience, AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE 19850 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States) and Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes a novel series of {sup 18}F-labeled polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-stilbene derivatives as potential {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaque-specific imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). In these series of compounds, {sup 18}F is linked to the stilbene through a PEG chain, of which the number of ethoxy groups ranges from 2 to 5. The purpose of adding PEG groups is to lower the lipophilicity and improve bioavailability. The syntheses of the 'cold' compounds and the {sup 18}F-labeled PEG stilbene derivatives are successfully achieved. All of the fluorinated stilbenes displayed high binding affinities in an assay using postmortem AD brain homogenates (K {sub i}=2.9-6.7 nM). Labeling was successfully performed by a substitution of the mesylate group of 10a-d by [{sup 18}F]fluoride giving the target compounds [{sup 18}F]12a-d (EOS, specific activity, 900-1500 Ci/mmol; radiochemical purity >99%). In vivo biodistribution of these novel {sup 18}F ligands in normal mice exhibited excellent brain penetrations and rapid washouts after an intravenous injection (6.6-8.1 and 1.2-2.6% dose/g at 2 and 60 min, respectively). Autoradiography of postmortem AD brain sections of [{sup 18}F]12a-d confirmed the specific binding related to the presence of A{beta} plaques. In addition, in vivo plaque labeling can be clearly demonstrated with these {sup 18}F-labeled agents in transgenic mice (Tg2576), a useful animal model for Alzheimer's disease. In conclusion, the preliminary results strongly suggest these fluorinated PEG stilbene derivatives are suitable candidates as A{beta} plaque imaging agents for studying patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  6. In vivo occupancy of female rat brain estrogen receptors by 17beta-estradiol and tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, D; Alvarado, M; Hanrahan, S M; Biegon, A

    2004-11-01

    Estrogens or antiestrogens are currently used by millions of women, but the interaction of these hormonal agents with brain estrogen receptors (ER) in vivo has not been characterized to date. Our goal was to assess, in vivo, the extent and regional distribution of brain ER occupancy in rats chronically exposed to 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) or tamoxifen (TAM). For that purpose, female ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with subcutaneous pellets containing either placebo (OVX), E(2), or TAM for 3 weeks. ER occupancy in grossly dissected regions was quantified with 16alpha-[(18)F]fluoroestradiol ([(18)F]FES). Both E(2) and TAM produced significant decreases in radioligand uptake in the brain although the effect of E(2) was larger and more widespread than the effect of TAM. Detailed regional analysis of the interaction was then undertaken using a radioiodinated ligand, 11beta-methoxy-16alpha-[(125)I]iodo-estradiol ([(125)I]MIE(2)), and quantitative ex vivo autoradiography. E(2) treatment resulted in near-complete (86.6 +/- 17.5%) inhibition of radioligand accumulation throughout the brain, while ER occupancy in the TAM group showed a marked regional distribution such that percentage inhibition ranged from 40.5 +/- 15.6 in the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus to 84.6 +/- 4.5 in the cortical amygdala. These results show that exposure to pharmacologically relevant levels of TAM produces a variable, region-specific pattern of brain ER occupancy, which may be influenced by the regional proportion of ER receptor subtypes. These findings may partially explain the highly variable and region-specific effects observed in neurochemical, metabolic, and functional studies of the effects of TAM in the brain of experimental animals as well as human subjects.

  7. The effect of beta-turn structure on the permeation of peptides across monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Steenberg, B; Knipp, G T;

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of the beta-turn structure of a peptide on its permeation via the paracellular and transcellular routes across cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell (BBMEC) monolayers, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). METHODS: The effective...

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of alpha- and beta- scorpion toxin receptors associated with rat brain sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, H; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Rochat, H

    1983-09-15

    Azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus, a beta-toxin, and azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus, an alpha-toxin, have been covalently linked after binding to their receptor sites that are related to the voltage sensitive sodium channel present in rat brain synaptosomes. Both derivatives labeled two polypeptides of 253000 +/- 20000 and 35000 +/- 2000 mol. wt. Labeling was blocked for each derivative by a large excess of the corresponding native toxin but no cross inhibition was obtained. These results suggest that both alpha - and beta - scorpion toxin receptors are located on or near the same two membrane polypeptides which may be part of the voltage dependent sodium channel.

  9. Caffeine suppresses amyloid-beta levels in plasma and brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chuanhai; Cirrito, John R; Lin, Xiaoyang; Wang, Li; Wang, Lilly; Verges, Deborah K; Dickson, Alexander; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Zhang, Chi; Mori, Takashi; Arendash, Gary W; Holtzman, David M; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies suggest that caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD). Supportive of this premise, our previous studies have shown that moderate caffeine administration protects/restores cognitive function and suppresses brain amyloid-beta (Abeta) production in AD transgenic mice. In the present study, we report that acute caffeine administration to both young adult and aged AD transgenic mice rapidly reduces Abeta levels in both brain interstitial fluid and plasma without affecting Abeta elimination. Long-term oral caffeine treatment to aged AD mice provided not only sustained reductions in plasma Abeta, but also decreases in both soluble and deposited Abeta in hippocampus and cortex. Irrespective of caffeine treatment, plasma Abeta levels did not correlate with brain Abeta levels or with cognitive performance in individual aged AD mice. Although higher plasma caffeine levels were strongly associated with lower plasma Abeta1-40 levels in aged AD mice, plasma caffeine levels were also not linked to cognitive performance. Plasma caffeine and theophylline levels were tightly correlated, both being associated with reduced inflammatory cytokine levels in hippocampus. Our conclusion is two-fold: first, that both plasma and brain Abeta levels are reduced by acute or chronic caffeine administration in several AD transgenic lines and ages, indicating a therapeutic value of caffeine against AD; and second, that plasma Abeta levels are not an accurate index of brain Abeta levels/deposition or cognitive performance in aged AD mice.

  10. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues....... Since these modifications may affect folding and turnover, they reduce protein functionality over time and may be linked to pathological conditions. The present mini-review describes evidence of AAR and AAI involvement in the misfolding and brain accumulation of Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide), a central...

  11. Individual Differences in Behavioural Despair Predict Brain GSK-3beta Expression in Mice: The Power of a Modified Swim Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Nataliia; Shevtsova, Elena; Bakhmet, Anastassia; Steinbusch, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    While deficient brain plasticity is a well-established pathophysiologic feature of depression, little is known about disorder-associated enhanced cognitive processing. Here, we studied a novel mouse paradigm that potentially models augmented learning of adverse memories during development of a depressive-like state. We used a modification of the classic two-day protocol of a mouse Porsolt test with an additional session occurring on Day 5 following the initial exposure. Unexpectedly, floating behaviour and brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3beta) mRNA levels, a factor of synaptic plasticity as well as a marker of distress and depression, were increased during the additional swimming session that was prevented by imipramine. Observed increases of GSK-3beta mRNA in prefrontal cortex during delayed testing session correlated with individual parameters of behavioural despair that was not found in the classic Porsolt test. Repeated swim exposure was accompanied by a lower pGSK-3beta/GSK-3beta ratio. A replacement of the second or the final swim sessions with exposure to the context of testing resulted in increased GSK-3beta mRNA level similar to the effects of swimming, while exclusion of the second testing prevented these changes. Together, our findings implicate the activation of brain GSK-3beta expression in enhanced contextual conditioning of adverse memories, which is associated with an individual susceptibility to a depressive syndrome. PMID:27478647

  12. Individual Differences in Behavioural Despair Predict Brain GSK-3beta Expression in Mice: The Power of a Modified Swim Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Strekalova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While deficient brain plasticity is a well-established pathophysiologic feature of depression, little is known about disorder-associated enhanced cognitive processing. Here, we studied a novel mouse paradigm that potentially models augmented learning of adverse memories during development of a depressive-like state. We used a modification of the classic two-day protocol of a mouse Porsolt test with an additional session occurring on Day 5 following the initial exposure. Unexpectedly, floating behaviour and brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3beta mRNA levels, a factor of synaptic plasticity as well as a marker of distress and depression, were increased during the additional swimming session that was prevented by imipramine. Observed increases of GSK-3beta mRNA in prefrontal cortex during delayed testing session correlated with individual parameters of behavioural despair that was not found in the classic Porsolt test. Repeated swim exposure was accompanied by a lower pGSK-3beta/GSK-3beta ratio. A replacement of the second or the final swim sessions with exposure to the context of testing resulted in increased GSK-3beta mRNA level similar to the effects of swimming, while exclusion of the second testing prevented these changes. Together, our findings implicate the activation of brain GSK-3beta expression in enhanced contextual conditioning of adverse memories, which is associated with an individual susceptibility to a depressive syndrome.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin eliminated in the urine of the infected host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertot, G M; Corral, R S; Fresno, M; Rodríguez, C; Katzin, A M; Grinstein, S

    1998-06-01

    In previous studies we have identified and characterized an 80-kDa Trypanosoma cruzi urinary antigen (UAg) eliminated during acute infection. Polyclonal antibodies raised against this antigen revealed by western blotting and immunoprecipitation analyses showed the existence of another antigenic component of 50-55 kDa in the UAg preparation. The antiserum was also used for screening of a T. cruzi expression library. Sequencing of inserts from selected cDNA clones showed high homology with the 3' end of the T.cruzi beta-tubulin gene sequence encoding for the C-terminus of the protein. The presence of T. cruzi tubulin in the UAg was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of a 50-55-kDa protein from 125I-labeled UAg with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human alpha/beta-tubulin. Interestingly, MAbs recognized radiolabeled T. cruzi tubulin eliminated in the urine of infected mice 24 hr postinoculation of [35S]methionine-labeled viable trypomastigotes. Tubulin found in the urine proved to be of T. cruzi origin because this protein could not be identified in urinary specimens from uninfected animals or mice acutely infected with Leishmania infantum or Toxoplasma gondii. We conclude that tubulin is one of the parasite antigens eliminated in the urine of T. cruzi-infected hosts. This finding may be used to develop a noninvasive procedure for early diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Single-isoform Recombinant Neuronal Human Tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemu, Annapurna; Atherton, Joseph; Spector, Jeffrey O; Szyk, Agnieszka; Moores, Carolyn A; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2016-06-17

    Microtubules are polymers that cycle stochastically between polymerization and depolymerization, i.e. they exhibit "dynamic instability." This behavior is crucial for cell division, motility, and differentiation. Although studies in the last decade have made fundamental breakthroughs in our understanding of how cellular effectors modulate microtubule dynamics, analysis of the relationship between tubulin sequence, structure, and dynamics has been held back by a lack of dynamics measurements with and structural characterization of homogeneous isotypically pure engineered tubulin. Here, we report for the first time the cryo-EM structure and in vitro dynamics parameters of recombinant isotypically pure human tubulin. α1A/βIII is a purely neuronal tubulin isoform. The 4.2-Å structure of post-translationally unmodified human α1A/βIII microtubules shows overall similarity to that of heterogeneous brain microtubules, but it is distinguished by subtle differences at polymerization interfaces, which are hot spots for sequence divergence between tubulin isoforms. In vitro dynamics assays show that, like mosaic brain microtubules, recombinant homogeneous microtubules undergo dynamic instability, but they polymerize slower and have fewer catastrophes. Interestingly, we find that epitaxial growth of α1A/βIII microtubules from heterogeneous brain seeds is inefficient but can be fully rescued by incorporating as little as 5% of brain tubulin into the homogeneous α1A/βIII lattice. Our study establishes a system to examine the structure and dynamics of mammalian microtubules with well defined tubulin species and is a first and necessary step toward uncovering how tubulin genetic and chemical diversity is exploited to modulate intrinsic microtubule dynamics.

  15. Brain beta-amyloid accumulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Atkin, Julie D; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both the deposition and pathogenesis of beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in neuronal cells and transgenic AD mice reduces Abeta toxicity and accumulation. In contrast, mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) confer enhanced pro-oxidative enzyme activities. We therefore examined whether ALS-linked mutant SOD1 overexpression in motor neuronal cells or transgenic ALS mice modulates Abeta toxicity or its accumulation in the brain. Aggregated, but not freshly solubilised, substrate-bound Abeta peptides induced degenerative morphology and cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Transfection of NSC-34 cells with human wild-type SOD1 attenuated Abeta-induced toxicity, however this neuroprotective effect was also observed for ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Analysis of the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum and olfactory bulb from transgenic SOD1G93A mice using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of acid-guanidine extracts revealed age-dependent elevations in Abeta levels, although not significantly different from wild-type mouse brain. In addition, brain amyloid protein precursor (APP) levels remained unaltered as a consequence of mutant SOD1 expression. We therefore conclude that mutant SOD1 overexpression promotes neither Abeta toxicity nor brain accumulation in these ALS models.

  16. Protein kinase CK2: evidence for a protein kinase CK2beta subunit fraction, devoid of the catalytic CK2alpha subunit, in mouse brain and testicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Siemer, S; Boldyreff, B;

    1999-01-01

    The highest CK2 activity was found in mouse testicles and brain, followed by spleen, liver, lung, kidney and heart. The activity values were directly correlated with the protein expression level of the CK2 subunits alpha (catalytic) and beta (regulatory). The alpha' subunit was only detected...... found for testicles and brain. The amount of CK2beta protein in brain in comparison to the other organs (except testicles) was estimated to be ca. 2-3-fold higher whereas the ratio of CK2beta between testicles and brain was estimated to be 3-4-fold. Results from the immunoprecipitation experiments...... support the notion for the existence of free CK2beta population and/or CK2beta in complex with other protein(s) present in brain and testicles. In all other mouse organs investigated, i.e. heart, lung, liver, kidney and spleen, no comparable amount of free CK2beta was observed. This is the first...

  17. Differential distribution of G-protein beta-subunits in brain: an immunocytochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunk, I; Pahner, I; Maier, U; Jenner, B; Veh, R W; Nürnberg, B; Ahnert-Hilger, G

    1999-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play central roles in signal transduction of neurons and other cells. The variety of their alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits allows numerous combinations thereby confering specificity to receptor-G-protein-effector interactions. Using antisera against individual G-protein beta-subunits we here present a regional and subcellular distribution of Gbeta1, Gbeta2, and Gbeta5 in rat brain. Immunocytochemical specificity of the subtype-specific antisera is revealed in Sf9 cells infected with various G-protein beta-subunits. Since Gbeta-subunits together with a G-protein gamma-subunit affect signal cascades we include a distribution of the neuron-specific Ggamma2- and Ggamma3-subunits in selected brain areas. Gbeta1, Gbeta2, and Gbeta5 are preferentially distributed in the neuropil of hippocampus, cerebellum and spinal cord. Gbeta2 is highly concentrated in the mossy fibres of dentate gyrus neurons ending in the stratum lucidum of hippocampal CA3-area. High amounts of Gbeta2 also occur in interneurons innervating spinal cord alpha-motoneurons. Gbeta5 is differentially distributed in all brain areas studied. It is found in the pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA1-CA3 as well as in the granule cell layer of dentate gyrus and in some interneurons. In the spinal cord Gbeta5 in contrast to Gbeta2 concentrates around alpha-motoneurons. In cultivated mouse hippocampal and hypothalamic neurons Gbeta2 and Gbeta5 are found in different subcellular compartments. Whereas Gbeta5 is restricted to the perikarya, Gbeta2 is also found in processes and synaptic contacts where it partially colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin. An antiserum recognizing Ggamma2 and Ggamma3 reveals that these subunits are less expressed in hippocampus and cerebellum. Presumably this antiserum specifically recognizes Ggamma2 and Ggamma3 in combinations with certain G alphas and/or Gbetas. The widespread but regionally and cellularly rather different distribution of

  18. Indices of brain beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in the learned helplessness animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurguis, G N; Kramer, G; Petty, F

    1996-01-01

    Both stress response and antidepressant drug action may be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta AR). Since learned helplessness is a stress-induced animal model of depression, beta AR are relevant to investigate in this model. To date, studies have measured changes in total receptor density (RT), but have not examined more detailed aspects of signal transduction mechanisms such as coupling of the receptor to GS protein. We have investigated brain beta AR coupling in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus of rats exposed to inescapable shock and then tested for learned helplessness, and in both tested and naive controls using [125I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as the ligand. Both antagonist-saturation and agonist-displacement experiments were conducted, and the specificity for the beta AR was optimized by excluding ICYP binding to 5HT1B receptors. The percentage receptor density in the high-conformational state (%RH) and the ratio of agonist (isoproterenol) dissociation constant from the receptor in the low-/high-conformational states (KL/KH) were used as indices of coupling to GS protein. No significant differences were found between rats developing learned helplessness and non-helpless rats after inescapable stress in any parameter measured in any brain region. In the frontal cortex, exposure to inescapable shock induced beta AR uncoupling from GS protein as suggested by a low KL/KH ratio both in helpless and non-helpless rats but not in either control group. In the hypothalamus, there were trends for higher RL, RT and KL/KH ratio in helpless rats and stressed controls compared to naive controls. These findings suggest that beta AR binding parameters in frontal cortex, hippocampus or hypothalamus did not differentiate between helpless and non-helpless rats. Changes in beta AR coupling observed in these brain regions may reflect effects of stress, which appeared to be region-specific, rather than stress-induced behavioral depression.

  19. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines and corresponding tryptamines: In vitro inhibition of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline uptake in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, H; Tuomisto, J; Airaksinen, M M; Kari, I; Peura, P; Pollari, L

    1980-04-01

    The structure activity relationships of tryptolines and some other beta-carbolines and tryptamines as inhibitors of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) uptake were studied in rat brain synaptosomes. All beta-carbolines inhibited to higher degree the uptake of 5-HT than that of DA or NA(IC50's 5-100 times lower). The most potent tryptoline derivative was 6-hydroxy-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (5-hydroxytryptoline, 6-OH-THBC) with an IC50 of 5.0 x 10(-7) M at a 5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. 6-Methoxy-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (5-methoxytryptoline) was slightly weaker; the inhibition of 5-HT uptake and DA uptake being competitive. Also tetrahydro-beta-carboline (tryptoline) was more potent than its 1-methylderivative, tetrahydroharmane (methtryptoline) or norharmane (beta-carboline). All of them were, however, weaker inhibitors of 5-HT uptake than the freely rotating indoleamines N-methyl-tryptamine (N-Me-T) or 5-HT itself. N-Me-T and 5-HT were also more potent inhibitors of DA and NA uptake than most of the beta-carbolines, DA uptake, however, was inhibited better by 6-OH-THBC than by 5-HT or N-ME-T. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may inhibit 5-HT uptake also in vivo but is unlikely that catecholamine uptake is affected.

  20. The beta-neurexin-neuroligin link is essential for quantum brain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, D D

    2002-01-01

    There are many blank areas in understanding the brain dynamics and especially how it gives rise to conscious experience. Quantum mechanics is believed to be capable of explaining the enigma of consciousness, however till now there is not good enough model considering both the data from clinical neurology and having some explanatory power! In this paper is presented a novel model in defense of macroscopic quantum events within and between neural cells. The beta-neurexin-neuroligin link is claimed to be not just the core of the central neural synapse, instead it is a device mediating entanglement between the cytoskeletons of the cortical neurons. The neurexin is also participating in the process of exocytosis through quantum tunneling. The gap junction tunneling supposed by Stuart Hameroff is shown to be incapable of sustaining quantum coherence between neurons for the needed 25 milliseconds. The possible role of DLBs, mitochondria and different types of glia in conscious experience is rationally criticized.

  1. Caffeine reverses cognitive impairment and decreases brain amyloid-beta levels in aged Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Cao, Chuanhai; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Runfeldt, Melissa; Dickson, Alexander; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Tane, Jun; Citron, Bruce A; Lin, Xiaoyang; Echeverria, Valentina; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) transgenic mice given a moderate level of caffeine intake (the human equivalent of 5 cups of coffee per day) are protected from development of otherwise certain cognitive impairment and have decreased hippocampal amyloid-beta (Abeta) levels due to suppression of both beta-secretase (BACE1) and presenilin 1 (PS1)/gamma-secretase expression. To determine if caffeine intake can have beneficial effects in "aged" APPsw mice already demonstrating cognitive impairment, we administered caffeine in the drinking water of 18-19 month old APPsw mice that were impaired in working memory. At 4-5 weeks into caffeine treatment, those impaired transgenic mice given caffeine (Tg/Caff) exhibited vastly superior working memory compared to the continuing impairment of control transgenic mice. In addition, Tg/Caff mice had substantially reduced Abeta deposition in hippocampus (decrease 40%) and entorhinal cortex (decrease 46%), as well as correlated decreases in brain soluble Abeta levels. Mechanistically, evidence is provided that caffeine suppression of BACE1 involves the cRaf-1/NFkappaB pathway. We also determined that caffeine concentrations within human physiological range effectively reduce active and total glycogen synthase kinase 3 levels in SweAPP N2a cells. Even with pre-existing and substantial Abeta burden, aged APPsw mice exhibited memory restoration and reversal of AD pathology, suggesting a treatment potential of caffeine in cases of established AD.

  2. Effect of visual experience on tubulin synthesis during a critical period of visual cortex development in the hooded rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronly-Dillon, J; Perry, G W

    1979-08-01

    1. In some species, restriction of visual experience in early life may affect normal functional development of visual cortical cells. The purpose of the present study was to determine if visual deprivation during post-natal development in the hooded rat also affects the production in brain cells of certain molecular components such as tubulin, that are needed for growth and maintenance of synapses and neurites. 2. Norwegian black hooded rats were reared under a variety of conditions of visual deprivation. At various stages of development the animals were killed and the rate of synthesis of tubulin in visual and motor cortex determined. Tritiated colchicine was used to assay tubulin and L-[14C]leucine injected into the brain ventricles 2 hr before death was used to measure rate of tubulin synthesis. 3. In rats reared in normal light there is a marked elevation in visual cortex tubulin synthesis that spans the period from eye-opening (13 days) until approximately 35 days. This elevation in tubulin synthesis is absent in animals reared in darkness from birth or deprived of pattern vision by eyelid suture. Also the effect of visual deprivation on tubulin synthesis was specifically confined to visual cortex and was not found for the motor cortex. Similarly, the incorporation of L-[14C]leucine into total protein in visual cortex was unaffected by dark rearing. Hence the stimulation of tubulin synthesis by visual experience in rat visual cortex is not attributable to a general non-specific stimulation of protein synthesis. 4. Rats that were dark-reared from birth and then exposed to a lighted environment for 24 hr during a certain critical period that extends from eye-opening (13 days) until approximately 35 days, displayed a significant increase in visual cortex tubulin rats that were brought into the light later than 35 days showed no significant increase in tubulin synthesis when compared with their continuously dark-rearer controls. 5. It is suggested that the number

  3. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal and cognitive function: an exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Yazigi Solis

    Full Text Available Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d(-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and vegetarians (Study 1 and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists (Study 2.In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men and seven age- and sex-matched omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine supplementation. In study 2, nineteen trained male cyclists completed four 20-Km cycling time trials (two pre supplementation and two post supplementation, with a battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, Rapid Visual Information Processing task being performed before and after exercise on each occasion.In Study 1, there were no within-group effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either vegetarians (p = 0.99 or omnivores (p = 0.27; nor was there any effect when data from both groups were pooled (p = 0.19. Similarly, there was no group by time interaction for brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal (p = 0.27. In study 2, exercise improved cognitive function across all tests (P 0.05 of beta-alanine supplementation on response times or accuracy for the Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm or RVIP task at rest or after exercise.28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d(-1 appeared not to influence brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either omnivores or vegetarians; nor did it influence cognitive function before or after exercise in trained cyclists.

  4. Theta, alpha and beta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation: brain modulation in tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some forms of tinnitus are considered to be auditory phantom phenomena related to reorganization and hyperactivity of the auditory central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive tool capable of modulating human brain activity, using single pulse or burst stimuli. Burst rTMS has only been performed in the theta range, and has not been used clinically. The authors analyze whether burst TMS at theta (5 Hz, alpha (10 Hz and beta (20 Hz frequencies can temporarily suppress narrow band noise/white noise tinnitus, which has been demonstrated to be intractable to tonic stimulation. Methods: rTMS is performed both in tonic and burst mode in 46 patients contralateral to the tinnitus side, at 5, 10 and 20 Hz. Fourteen placebo negative rTMS responders are further analyzed. Results: In 5 patients, maximal tinnitus suppression is obtained with theta, in 2 with alpha and in 7 with beta burst stimulation. Burst rTMS suppresses narrow band/white tinnitus much better than tonic rTMS t(13=6.4, p<.000. Women experience greater suppression of their tinnitus with burst stimulation than men, t(12=2.9, p<.05. Furthermore left sided tinnitus is perceived as more distressing on the TQ than right sided tinnitus, t(12=3.2, p<.01. The lower the tinnitus pitch the more effectively rTMS suppresses tinnitus(r=-0.65, p<0.05. Discussion: Burst rTMS can be used clinically, not only theta burst, but also alpha and beta burst. Burst rTMS is capable of suppressing narrow band/white noise tinnitus very much better than tonic rTMS. This could be due the simple fact that burst neuromodulation is more powerful than tonic neuromodulation or to a differential effect of burst and tonic stimulation on the lemniscal and extralemniscal auditory system. In some patients only alpha or beta burst rTMS is capable of suppressing tinnitus, and theta burst not. Therefore in future rTMS studies it could be worthwhile not to limit burst

  5. Inhibition of amyloid-beta-induced cell death in human brain pericytes in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein (A beta) deposition in the cerebral vascular walls is one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). A beta(1-40) carrying the 'Dutch' mutation (HCHWA-D A beta(1-40)) induces pronounced degeneration of cul

  6. Comparative study on glutathione transferases of rat brain and testis under the stress of phenobarbitol and beta-methylcholanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraju, K; Hemavathi, B; Vasundhara, K; Rao, A D; Devi, K N

    2005-08-01

    A comparative study was made on the tissue specific expression of glutathione transferases (GST) in brain and testis after exposure of rat to phenobarbitol (PB) and b-methylcholanthrene (MC). Glutathione transferases, a family of multifunctional proteins are involved in intracellular transport processes and in detoxication of electrophilic xenobiotics by catalyzing reactions such as conjugation, isomerization, reduction and thiolysis. On purification, the yield of GST proteins by affinity chromatography was 39% in testis and 32% in brain. The affinity purified testis GSTs were resolved by chromatofocusing into six anionic and four cationic isozymes, and in brain glutathione transferases were resolved into four anionic and three cationic isozymes, suggesting the presence of multiple isozymes with Yc, Yb, Ybeta and Ydelta in both of them. In testis and brain, these isozymes at identical pI values showed variable functions with a battery of substrates and the cationic isozymes of brain and testis showed identical properties in CHP (cumene hydroperoxide) at pH values of above 7.0. Substrate specificity studies and immunoblot analysis of testis and brain proteins revealed that they play a predominant role in the detoxication of phenobarbitol or beta-methylcholanthrene. Expression of the isozymes in testis and brain on exposure to PB and MC indicated elevated subunit variation. In both testis and brain, Ydelta of pi class was expressed on PB treatment and Yc of alpha class and Ybeta of mu class was expressed in MC treated testis and only Yc was predominantly expressed in MC treated brain. Thus these subunits expression is considered as markers for carcinogenesis and specific to chemical toxicity under phenobarbitol and beta-methylcholanthrene stress.

  7. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  8. P-glycoprotein efflux and other factors limit brain amyloid beta reduction by beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jere E; Thompson, Lorin A; Toyn, Jeremy H; Marcin, Lawrence; Barten, Donna M; Marcinkeviciene, Jovita; Kopcho, Lisa; Kim, Young; Lin, Alan; Guss, Valerie; Burton, Catherine; Iben, Lawrence; Polson, Craig; Cantone, Joe; Ford, Michael; Drexler, Dieter; Fiedler, Tracey; Lentz, Kimberley A; Grace, James E; Kolb, Janet; Corsa, Jason; Pierdomenico, Maria; Jones, Kelli; Olson, Richard E; Macor, John E; Albright, Charles F

    2008-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides are hypothesized to cause the initiation and progression of AD based on pathologic data from AD patients, genetic analysis of mutations that cause early onset forms of AD, and preclinical studies. Based on this hypothesis, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors are an attractive therapeutic approach for AD because cleavage of the APP by BACE1 is required to form Abeta. In this study, three potent BACE1 inhibitors are characterized. All three inhibitors decrease Abeta formation in cultured cells with IC(50) values less than 10 nM. Analysis of APP C-terminal fragments by immunoblotting and Abeta peptides by mass spectrometry showed that these inhibitors decreased Abeta by inhibiting BACE1. An assay for Abeta1-40 in mice was developed and used to show that these BACE1 inhibitors decreased plasma Abeta1-40, but not brain Abeta1-40, in wild-type mice. Because these BACE1 inhibitors were substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux transporters, these inhibitors were administered to P-gp knockout (KO) mice. These studies showed that all three BACE1 inhibitors decreased brain Abeta1-40 in P-gp KO mice, demonstrating that P-gp is a major limitation for development of BACE1 inhibitors to test the amyloid hypothesis. A comparison of plasma Abeta1-40 and brain Abeta1-40 dose responses for these three compounds revealed differences in relative ED(50) values, indicating that factors other than P-gp can also contribute to poor brain activity by BACE1 inhibitors.

  9. Heterogeneity of the alpha subunit of tubulin and the variability of tubulin within a single organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, T; Baxandall, J; Denslow, S; Walker, B

    1976-05-01

    When tubulins obtained from particular microtubules of the sea urchin (ciliary doublet A tubules, flagellar doublet microtubules, and mitotic microtubules) are analyzed by electrophoresis in a polyacrylamide gel system containing sodium dodecyl sulfate and urea, heterogeneity of the alpha subunit, and differences between the tubulins are revealed. The alpha subunit of tubulin from mitotic apparatus and from A microtubules of ciliary doublets is resolved into two bands, while the alpha subunit of flagellar doublet tubulin gives a single band. The mitotic and ciliary tubulins differ in the mobilities of their two alpha species, or in the relative amounts present, or both. The existence of differences between the tubulins has been confirmed by a preliminary analysis of their cyanogen bromide peptides.

  10. Developmental expression of estrogen receptor beta in the brain of prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploskonka, Stephanie D; Eaton, Jennifer L; Carr, Michael S; Schmidt, Jennifer V; Cushing, Bruce S

    2016-03-01

    Here, for the first time, the expression of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is characterized in the brains of the highly prosocial prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). ERβ immunoreactivity was compared in weanlings (postnatal Day 21) and adult males and females. The results indicate several major findings. First, unlike ERα, ERβ expression is not sexually dimorphic. Second, the adult pattern of ERβ-IR is established at the time of weaning, as there were no age-dependent effects on distribution. Finally, ERβ does not appear to be as widely distributed in voles compared with rats and mice. High levels of ERβ-IR were observed in several regions/nuclei within the medial pre-optic area, ventrolateral pre-optic nuclei, and in the hypothalamus, especially in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. The visualization of ERβ in prairie voles is important as the socially monogamous prairie vole functions as a human relevant model system for studying the expression of social behavior and social deficit disorders. Future studies will now be able to determine the effect of treatments on the expression and/or development of ERβ in this highly social species.

  11. Amyloid beta1–42 and the phoshorylated tau threonine 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Gjedde, Albert; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are the plaques of amyloid beta1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of this study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers...... angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of AD, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory...... and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of amyloid beta1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of AD. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human...

  12. The ADNP derived peptide, NAP modulates the tubulin pool: implication for neurotrophic and neuroprotective activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saar Oz

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MTs, key cytoskeletal elements in living cells, are critical for axonal transport, synaptic transmission, and maintenance of neuronal morphology. NAP (NAPVSIPQ is a neuroprotective peptide derived from the essential activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP. In Alzheimer's disease models, NAP protects against tauopathy and cognitive decline. Here, we show that NAP treatment significantly affected the alpha tubulin tyrosination cycle in the neuronal differentiation model, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 and in rat cortical astrocytes. The effect on tubulin tyrosination/detyrosination was coupled to increased MT network area (measured in PC12 cells, which is directly related to neurite outgrowth. Tubulin beta3, a marker for neurite outgrowth/neuronal differentiation significantly increased after NAP treatment. In rat cortical neurons, NAP doubled the area of dynamic MT invasion (Tyr-tubulin into the neuronal growth cone periphery. NAP was previously shown to protect against zinc-induced MT/neurite destruction and neuronal death, here, in PC12 cells, NAP treatment reversed zinc-decreased tau-tubulin-MT interaction and protected against death. NAP effects on the MT pool, coupled with increased tau engagement on compromised MTs imply an important role in neuronal plasticity, protecting against free tau accumulation leading to tauopathy. With tauopathy representing a major pathological hallmark in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders, the current findings provide a mechanistic basis for further development. NAP (davunetide is in phase 2/3 clinical trial in progressive supranuclear palsy, a disease presenting MT deficiency and tau pathology.

  13. Roles for two partially redundant alpha-tubulins during mitosis in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer B; Lyczak, Rebecca; Ellis, Gregory C; Bowerman, Bruce

    2004-06-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes multiple isotypes of alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin. Roles for a number of these tubulins in neuronal development have been described, but less is known about the isoforms that function during early embryonic development. Microtubules are required for multiple events after fertilization produces a one-cell zygote in C. elegans, including pronuclear migration, mitotic spindle assembly and function, and proper spindle positioning. Here we describe a conditional and dominant mis-sense mutation in the C. elegans alpha-tubulin gene tba-1 that disrupts pronuclear migration and positioning of the first mitotic spindle, and results in a highly penetrant embryonic lethality, at the restrictive temperature of 26 degrees C. Our analysis of the dominant tba-1 (or346ts) allele suggests that TBA-1 assembles into microtubules in early embryonic cells. However, we also show that reduction of tba-1 function using RNA interference results in defects much less severe than those caused by the dominant or346ts mutation, due to partial redundancy of TBA-1 and another alpha-tubulin called TBA-2. Reducing the function of both TBA-1 and TBA-2 results in severe defects in microtubule-dependent processes. We conclude that microtubules in the early C. elegans embryo are composed of both TBA-1 and TBA-2, and that the dominant tba-1(or346ts) mutation disrupts MT assembly or stability. Cell Motil.

  14. Tubulin dipole moment, dielectric constant and quantum behavior: computer simulations, experimental results and suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Schüssler, H A; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Mershin, Andreas; Kolomenski, Alexandre A.; Schuessler, Hans A.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2004-01-01

    We used computer simulation to calculate the electric dipole moments of the alpha and beta tubulin monomers and dimer and found those to be |palpha|=552D, |pbeta|=1193D and |palpha-beta|=1740D respectively. Independent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and refractometry measurements of the high-frequency dielectric constant and polarizability strongly corroborated our previous SPR-derived results giving delta-n/delta-c ~1.800x10^-3 ml/mg. The refractive index of tubulin was measured to be n_tub ~2.90 and the high frequency tubulin dielectric constant kappa_tub ~8.41 while the high-frequency polarizability was found to be alpha_tub ~ 2.1x10^-33 C m^2/V. Methods for the experimental determination of the low-frequency p are explored as well as ways to test the often conjectured quantum coherence and entanglement properties of tubulin. Biobits, bioqubits and other applications to bioelectronics are discussed.

  15. Tubulin binds to the cytoplasmic loop of TRESK background K⁺ channel in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Enyedi

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic loop between the second and third transmembrane segments is pivotal in the regulation of TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel, K2P18.1, KCNK18. Calcineurin binds to this region and activates the channel by dephosphorylation in response to the calcium signal. Phosphorylation-dependent anchorage of 14-3-3 adaptor protein also modulates TRESK at this location. In the present study, we identified molecular interacting partners of the intracellular loop. By an affinity chromatography approach using the cytoplasmic loop as bait, we have verified the specific association of calcineurin and 14-3-3 to the channel. In addition to these known interacting proteins, we observed substantial binding of tubulin to the intracellular loop. Successive truncation of the polypeptide and pull-down experiments from mouse brain cytosol narrowed down the region sufficient for the binding of tubulin to a 16 amino acid sequence: LVLGRLSYSIISNLDE. The first six residues of this sequence are similar to the previously reported tubulin-binding region of P2X2 purinergic receptor. The tubulin-binding site of TRESK is located close to the protein kinase A (PKA-dependent 14-3-3-docking motif of the channel. We provide experimental evidence suggesting that 14-3-3 competes with tubulin for the binding to the cytoplasmic loop of TRESK. It is intriguing that the 16 amino acid tubulin-binding sequence includes the serines, which were previously shown to be phosphorylated by microtubule-affinity regulating kinases (MARK kinases and contribute to channel inhibition. Although tubulin binds to TRESK in vitro, it remains to be established whether the two proteins also interact in the living cell.

  16. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-{beta}-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, K.A. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Kuopio University Hospital, Clinical Physiology, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Halldin, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Hall, H. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Lundkvist, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Ginovart, N. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Swahn, C.G. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Farde, L. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-10

    Radiolabelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-{beta}-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of {beta}-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC{sub 50}=0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than {beta}-CIT (IC{sub 50}=4.2 nM). Nor-{beta}-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-{beta}-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [{sup 125}I]nor-{beta}-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 {mu}M) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-{beta}-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide impairs amyloid beta efflux from brain: altered vascular sequestration, cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption, peripheral clearance and transporter function at the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and p-glycoprotein (Pgp clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ from brain are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We have recently shown that induction of systemic inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in impaired efflux of Aβ from the brain. The same treatment also impairs Pgp function. Here, our aim is to determine which physiological routes of Aβ clearance are affected following systemic inflammation, including those relying on LRP-1 and Pgp function at the blood–brain barrier. Methods CD-1 mice aged between 6 and 8 weeks were treated with 3 intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg LPS at 0, 6, and 24 hours and studied at 28 hours. 125I-Aβ1-42 or 125I-alpha-2-macroglobulin injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain (intracerebroventricular (ICV or into the jugular vein (intravenous (IV was used to quantify LRP-1-dependent partitioning between the brain vasculature and parenchyma and peripheral clearance, respectively. Disappearance of ICV-injected 14 C-inulin from brain was measured to quantify bulk flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain microvascular protein expression of LRP-1 and Pgp was measured by immunoblotting. Endothelial cell localization of LRP-1 was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Oxidative modifications to LRP-1 at the brain microvasculature were measured by immunoprecipitation of LRP-1 followed by immunoblotting for 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Results We found that LPS: caused an LRP-1-dependent redistribution of ICV-injected Aβ from brain parenchyma to brain vasculature and decreased entry into blood; impaired peripheral clearance of IV-injected Aβ; inhibited reabsorption of CSF; did not significantly alter brain microvascular protein levels of LRP-1 or Pgp, or oxidative modifications to LRP-1; and downregulated LRP-1 protein levels and caused LRP-1 mislocalization in cultured brain

  18. Brain MR finding of {beta}-fluoroethyl acetate rodenticide intoxication: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    {beta}-fluoroethyl acetate rodenticide intoxication can manifest as several different clinical abnormalities such as respiratory, neurologic, cardiologic and fluid-electrolyte problems. We report here on the MR findings of a case that showed symmetric cytotoxic edema in the while matter of the cerebral hemispheres after the ingestion of {beta} - fluoroethyl acetate rodenticide by a woman who was attempting suicide.

  19. Effects of thyroid status on presynaptic. cap alpha. 2-adrenoceptor and. beta. -adrenoceptor binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atterwill, C.K.; Bunn, S.J.; Atkinson, D.J. (Development Neurobiology Unit, London (UK). Inst. of Neurology); Smith, S.L.; Heal, D.J. (Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (UK))

    1984-01-01

    The effect of thyroid status on noradrenergic synaptic function in the mature brain was examined by measuring presynaptic ..cap alpha..2- and postsynaptic ..beta..-adrenoceptors. Repeated triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) administration to rats (100..mu..g/kg x 14 days hyperthyroid) caused an 18% increase in striatal ..beta..-adrenoceptors as shown by (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol binding with no change in membranes from cerebral cortex or hypothalamus. In contrast, hypothyroidism (propylthiouracil, PTU x 14 days) produced significant 12% and 30% reductions in striatal and hypothalamic ..beta..-adrenoceptors respectively with no change in the cerebral cortex. Presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function was measured in the two dysthyroid states using the clonidine-induced hypoactivity model. Experimental hyperthyroidism increased the degree of clonidine-induced hypoactivity, and suggests increased presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function compared with control rats, whereas hypothyroidism suppressed presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function. These results show firstly that changes of thyroid status in the mature rat may produce homeostatic alterations at central noradrenergic synapses as reflected by changes in pre- and postsynaptic adrenoceptor function. Secondly, there appear to be T/sub 3/-induced changes in ..beta..-adrenoceptors in the striatum where changes in dopaminergic neuronal activity have previously been demonstrated.

  20. DNA polymerase-beta is expressed early in neurons of Alzheimer's disease brain and is loaded into DNA replication forks in neurons challenged with beta-amyloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Copani; J.J.M. Hoozemans; F. Caraci; M. Calafiore; E.S. van Haastert; R. Veerhuis; A.J.M. Rozemuller; E. Aronica; M.A. Sortino; F. Nicoletti

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons exposed to synthetic beta-amyloid (A beta) fragments reenter the cell cycle and initiate a pathway of DNA replication that involves the repair enzyme DNA polymerase-beta (DNA pol-beta) before undergoing apoptotic death. In this study, by performing coimmunoprecipitation experiments

  1. Interleukin-1 beta impairs brain derived neurotrophic factor-induced signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liqi; Balazs, Robert; Soiampornkul, Rungtip; Thangnipon, Wipawan; Cotman, Carl W

    2008-09-01

    The expression of IL-1 is elevated in the CNS in diverse neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis was tested that IL-1 beta renders neurons vulnerable to degeneration by interfering with BDNF-induced neuroprotection. In trophic support-deprived neurons, IL-1 beta compromised the PI3-K/Akt pathway-mediated protection by BDNF and suppressed Akt activation. The effect was specific as in addition to Akt, the activation of MAPK/ERK, but not PLC gamma, was decreased. Activation of CREB, a target of these signaling pathways, was severely depressed by IL-1 beta. As the cytokine did not influence TrkB receptor and PLC gamma activation, IL-1 beta might have interfered with BDNF signaling at the docking step conveying activation to the PI3-K/Akt and Ras/MAPK pathways. Indeed, IL-1 beta suppressed the activation of the respective scaffolding proteins IRS-1 and Shc; this effect might involve ceramide generation. IL-1-induced interference with BDNF neuroprotection and signal transduction was corrected, in part, by ceramide production inhibitors and mimicked by the cell-permeable C2-ceramide. These results suggest that IL-1 beta places neurons at risk by interfering with BDNF signaling involving a ceramide-associated mechanism.

  2. Tubulin assembly is disordered in a hypogeomagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong Liang; Wang, Xing Sheng; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Ying; He, Rong Qiao

    2008-11-14

    Although the effect of a magnetic field on functions of many proteins has been reported, tubulin assembly in a hypogeomagnetic field (HGMF) has not yet been characterized. Here, we show disorder in tubulin self-assembly in an HGMF. Absorbance at 350 nm, commonly used to monitor tubulin self-assembly, was altered in the HGMF, providing evidence for the effects of HGMF on tubulin. Measurements of intrinsic fluorescence (335 nm) also revealed a disordered change in tubulin conformation during assembly in the HGMF. Under the same conditions, microtubule-like filaments were not observed by electron microscopy, with the exception of amorphous oligomers. Incubation of tubulin with tau in the natural geomagnetic field (GMF) yielded microtubule-like filaments, while only amorphous oligomers were observed following the incubation in the HGMF. This distinction suggests that tubulin assembly depends upon the GMF, and that elimination of the GMF induces disorder in tubulin organization.

  3. Tubulin assembly, taxoid site binding, and cellular effects of the microtubule-stabilizing agent dictyostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Charitha; Edler, Michael C; Hamel, Ernest; Raccor, Brianne S; Balachandran, Raghavan; Zhu, Guangyu; Giuliano, Kenneth A; Vogt, Andreas; Shin, Youseung; Fournier, Jean-Hugues; Fukui, Yoshikazu; Brückner, Arndt M; Curran, Dennis P; Day, Billy W

    2005-11-15

    (-)-Dictyostatin is a sponge-derived, 22-member macrolactone natural product shown to cause cells to accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, with changes in intracellular microtubules analogous to those observed with paclitaxel treatment. Dictyostatin also induces assembly of purified tubulin more rapidly than does paclitaxel, and nearly as vigorously as does dictyostatin's close structural congener, (+)-discodermolide (Isbrucker et al. (2003), Biochem. Pharmacol. 65, 75-82). We used synthetic (-)-dictyostatin to study its biochemical and cytological activities in greater detail. The antiproliferative activity of dictyostatin did not differ greatly from that of paclitaxel or discodermolide. Like discodermolide, dictyostatin retained antiproliferative activity against human ovarian carcinoma cells resistant to paclitaxel due to beta-tubulin mutations and caused conversion of cellular soluble tubulin pools to microtubules. Detailed comparison of the abilities of dictyostatin and discodermolide to induce tubulin assembly demonstrated that the compounds had similar potencies. Dictyostatin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled discodermolide to microtubules more potently than any other compound examined, and dictyostatin and discodermolide had equivalent activity as inhibitors of the binding of both radiolabeled epothilone B and paclitaxel to microtubules. These results are consistent with the idea that the macrocyclic structure of dictyostatin represents the template for the bioactive conformation of discodermolide.

  4. Beta-2 receptor antagonists for traumatic brain injury: a systematic review of controlled trials in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, K; Perel, P; Blackhall, K

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials was undertaken to assess the effects of beta-2 receptor antagonists in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Database and reference list searches were performed to identify eligible studies. Outcome data were extracted on functional status, as measured by the grip test or neurological severity score (NSS), and cerebral edema, as measured by brain water content (BWC). Data were pooled using the random-effects model. Seventeen controlled trials involving 817 animals were identified. Overall methodological quality was poor. Results from the grip test suggest that the treatment group maintained grip for a longer period than the control group; pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) = 8.28 (95% CI 5.78-10.78). The treatment group was found to have a lower NSS (i.e., better neurological function); pooled WMD =-3.28 (95% CI -4.72 to -1.85). Analysis of the cerebral edema data showed that the treatment group had a lower BWC than the control; pooled WMD =-0.42 (95% CI -0.59 to -0.26). There was evidence of statistical heterogeneity between comparisons for all outcomes. Evidence for small study effects was found for the grip test and BWC outcomes. The evidence from animal models of TBI suggests that beta-2 receptor antagonists can improve functional outcome and lessen cerebral edema. However, the poor methodological quality of the included studies and presence of small study effects may have influenced these findings.

  5. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S. [Unite de Neurobiologie Integrative du Systeme Cholinergique, URA CNRS 2182, Institut Pasteur, Departement de Neuroscience, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 place du general Leclerc, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiklund, A. [Section of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity {beta}2-containing nicotinic receptors ({beta}2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the {beta}2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and {beta}2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, {beta}2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via {alpha}7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on {beta}2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  6. Rationalization of paclitaxel insensitivity of yeast β-tubulin and human βIII-tubulin isotype using principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Lalita

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel arrests cell division by binding to the hetero-dimeric protein tubulin. Subtle differences in tubulin sequences, across eukaryotes and among β-tubulin isotypes, can have profound impact on paclitaxel-tubulin binding. To capture the experimentally observed paclitaxel-resistance of human βIII tubulin isotype and yeast β-tubulin, within a common theoretical framework, we have performed structural principal component analyses of β-tubulin sequences across eukaryotes. Results The paclitaxel-resistance of human βIII tubulin isotype and yeast β-tubulin uniquely mapped on to the lowest two principal components, defining the paclitaxel-binding site residues of β-tubulin. The molecular mechanisms behind paclitaxel-resistance, mediated through key residues, were identified from structural consequences of characteristic mutations that confer paclitaxel-resistance. Specifically, Ala277 in βIII isotype was shown to be crucial for paclitaxel-resistance. Conclusions The present analysis captures the origin of two apparently unrelated events, paclitaxel-insensitivity of yeast tubulin and human βIII tubulin isotype, through two common collective sequence vectors.

  7. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  8. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kafka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1, Dishevelled-3 (DVL3, E-cadherin (CDH1 and beta-catenin (CTNNB1. Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR/loss of heterozygosity (LOH. Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001. Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001. Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  9. Insulin inhibits amyloid beta-induced cell death in cultured human brain pericytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Boer, R.; Bosch, R.R.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the cerebral arterial and capillary walls is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type. In vitro, Abeta1-40, carrying the "Dutch" mutation (DAbeta1-40), induced reproducible degeneration of cult

  10. Differential gene expression in human brain pericytes induced by amyloid-beta protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this accumulation of fibrillar amyloid-beta (Alphabeta) in the vascular wall is accompanied by marked vascular damage. In vitro, Abeta1-40 carrying the 'Dutch' mutation (DAbeta1-40) induces degeneration of cult

  11. Inhibition of tau hyperphosphorylation and beta amyloid production in rat brain by oral administration of atorvastatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fen; LI Xu; SUO Ai-qin; ZHANG Jie-wen

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The two hallmark lesions in AD brain are deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs).Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors of AD. But its role in the pathogenesis of AD is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hypercholesteremia and tau phosphorylation or β-amyloid (Aβ),and evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on the level of tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brains of rats fed with high cholesterol diet.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into normal diet control group, high cholesterol diet group,and high cholesterol diet plus atorvastatin (Lipitor, 15 mg·kg-1·d-1) treated group. Blood from caudal vein was collected to measure total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at the end of the 3th and the 6th months by an enzymatic method. The animals were sacrificed 6 months later and brains were removed. All left brain hemispheres were fixed for immunohistochemistry. Hippocampus and cerebral cortex were separated from right hemispheres and homogenized separately. Tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brain tissue were determined by Western blotting (using antibodies PHF-1 and Tau-1) and anti-Aβ40/anti-Aβ42, respectively.Results We found that high cholesterol diet led to hypercholesteremia of rats as well as hyperphosphorylation of tau and increased Aβ level in the brains. Treatment of the high cholesterol diet fed rats with atorvastatin prevented the changes of both tau phosphorylation and Aβ level induced by high cholesterol diet.Conclusions Hypercholesteremia could induce tau hyperphosphorylation and Aβ production in rat brain. Atorvastatin could inhibit tau hyperphosphorylation and decrease Aβ generation. It may play a protective role in the patho-process of hypercholesteremia

  12. Phosphorylation and oligomerization states of native pig brain HSP90 studied by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnier, C.; Lafitte, D.; Jorgensen, T.J.;

    2001-01-01

    HSP90 purified from pig brain. The two protein isoforms were clearly distinguished by ESI-MS, the alpha isoform being approximately six times more abundant than the beta isoform. ESI-MS in combination with lambda phosphatase treatment provided direct evidence of the existence of four phosphorylated...... such as actin-microfilament, tubulin-microtubule and intermediate filaments, and also exhibits conventional chaperone functions. This protein exists in two isoforms alpha-HSP90 and beta-HSP90, and it forms dimers which are crucial species for its biological activity. PAGE, ESI-MS and MALDI-MS were used to study...... forms of native pig brain alpha-HSP90, with the diphosphorylated form being the most abundant. For the beta isoform, the di-phosphorylated was also the most abundant. MALDI mass spectra of HSP90 samples after chemical cross-linking showed a high percentage of alpha-alpha homodimers. In addition...

  13. Molecular insight of isotypes specific β-tubulin interaction of tubulin heterodimer with noscapinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Naik, Pradeep K.

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine and its derivatives bind stoichiometrically to tubulin, alter its dynamic instability and thus effectively inhibit the cellular proliferation of a wide variety of cancer cells including many drug-resistant variants. The tubulin molecule is composed of α- and β-tubulin, which exist as various isotypes whose distribution and drug-binding properties are significantly different. Although the noscapinoids bind to a site overlapping with colchicine, their interaction is more biased towards β-tubulin. In fact, their precise interaction and binding affinity with specific isotypes of β-tubulin in the αβ-heterodimer has never been addressed. In this study, the binding affinity of a panel of noscapinoids with each type of tubulin was investigated computationally. We found that the binding score of a specific noscapinoid with each type of tubulin isotype is different. Specifically, amino-noscapine has the highest binding score of -6.4, -7.2, -7.4 and -7.3 kcal/mol with αβI, αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, respectively. Similarly 10 showed higher binding affinity of -6.8 kcal/mol with αβV, whereas 8 had the highest binding affinity of -7.2, -7.1 and -7.2 kcal/mol, respectively with αβVI, αβVII and αβVIII isotypes. More importantly, both amino-noscapine and its clinical derivative, bromo-noscapine have the highest binding affinity of -46.2 and -38.1 kcal/mol against αβIII (overexpression of αβIII has been associated with resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs for several human malignancies) as measured using MM-PBSA. Knowledge of the isotype specificity of the noscapinoids may allow for development of novel therapeutic agents based on this class of drugs.

  14. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. However, some individuals tolerate high brain amyloid-β loads without developing symptoms, while others progressively decline, suggesting that events in the brain downstream from amyloid-β deposition, such as regional brain atrophy rates, play an important role. The main purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the regional distributions of increased amyloid-β and the regional distribution of increased brain atrophy rates in patients with mild cognitive impairment. To simultaneously capture the spatial distributions of amyloid-β and brain atrophy rates, we employed the statistical concept of parallel independent component analysis, an effective method for joint analysis of multimodal imaging data. Parallel independent component analysis identified significant relationships between two patterns of amyloid-β deposition and atrophy rates: (i) increased amyloid-β burden in the left precuneus/cuneus and medial-temporal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the left medial-temporal and parietal regions; and (ii) in contrast, increased amyloid-β burden in bilateral precuneus/cuneus and parietal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the right medial temporal regions. The spatial distribution of increased amyloid-β and the associated spatial distribution of increased brain atrophy rates embrace a characteristic pattern of brain structures known for a high vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease pathology, encouraging for the use of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures as early indicators of

  15. Tubulin tyrosine ligase like 12 links to prostate cancer through tubulin posttranslational modification and chromosome ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylyk, Christine; Zambrano, Alberto; Zhao, Chunhua; Brants, Jan; Abecassis, Joseph; Schalken, Jack A; Rogatsch, Hermann; Schaefer, Georg; Pycha, Armin; Klocker, Helmut; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2010-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cause of death, and an important goal is to establish the pathways and functions of causative genes. We isolated RNAs that are differentially expressed in macrodissected prostate cancer samples. This study focused on 1 identified gene, TTLL12, which was predicted to modify tubulins, an established target for tumor therapy. TTLL12 is the most poorly characterized member of a recently discovered 14-member family of proteins that catalyze posttranslational modification of tubulins. We show that human TTLL12 is expressed in the proliferating layer of benign prostate. Expression increases during cancer progression to metastasis. It is highly expressed in many metastatic prostate cancer cell lines. It partially colocalizes with vimentin intermediate filaments and cellular structures containing tubulin, including midbodies, centrosomes, intercellular bridges and the mitotic spindle. Downregulation of TTLL12 affects several posttranslational modifications of tubulin (detyrosination and subsequent deglutamylation and polyglutamylation). Overexpression alters chromosomal ploidy. These results raise the possibility that TTLL12 could contribute to tumorigenesis through effects on the cytoskeleton, tubulin modification and chromosome number stability. This study contributes a step toward developing more selective agents targeting microtubules, an already successful target for tumor therapy.

  16. The tubulin-bound conformation of paclitaxel: T-taxol vs "PTX-NY".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Alcaraz, Ana A; Snyder, James P

    2009-03-27

    Nearly 35 years after its discovery and 11 years after FDA approval of paclitaxel (PTX) as a breakthrough anticancer drug, the 3-D structure of the agent bound to its beta-tubulin target was proposed to be T-Taxol. The latter bioactive form has recently been challenged by the Ojima group with a structure, "PTX-NY" ("REDOR Taxol"), in which the C-13 side chain is proposed to adopt a different conformation and an alternative hydrogen-bonding pattern in the tubulin binding site. Previously, the two conformers were compared to show that only T-Taxol fits the PTX-derived electron crystallographic density. That work has been extended by molecular mechanics and quantum chemical methods to reveal that the PTX-NY conformation is relatively less stable, on average, by 10-11 kcal/mol. In agreement with NMR studies, an 11 ns molecular dynamics treatment for PTX in an explicit water pool locates T-Taxol along the trajectory, but not PTX-NY. Docking of various PTX conformers into the electron crystallographic binding site of tubulin demonstrates that PTX-NY cannot be accommodated unless the pocket is reorganized in violation of the experimental constraints. Finally, analysis of the structures of T-Taxol and PTX-NY for their capacity to predict the existence of superpotent PTX analogues discloses that only the former forecasts such analogues, as now established by the T-Taxol-inspired synthesis of bridged taxanes. In sum, all empirical criteria support T-Taxol as the bound conformation of PTX on beta-tubulin in microtubules.

  17. Changes in expressions of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the brain of senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) P8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tha, K K; Okuma, Y; Miyazaki, H; Murayama, T; Uehara, T; Hatakeyama, R; Hayashi, Y; Nomura, Y

    2000-12-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is known to be a murine model for accelerated aging. The SAMP8 strain shows age-related deterioration of learning and memory at an earlier age than control mice (SAMR1). In the present study, we investigated the changes in expressions of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brain of SAMP8. In the hippocampus of 10 months old SAMP8, the expression of IL-1 mRNA was significantly elevated in comparison with that of SAMR1. In both strains of SAMs, increases in IL-1beta protein in the brain were observed at 10 months of age compared with 2 and 5 months. The only differences found between the strain in protein levels were at 10 months and were elevations in IL-1beta in the hippocampus and hypothalamus, and in TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus in SAMP8 as compared with SAMR1. However, lipopolysaccharide-induced increases in the expression of these cytokines in brain did not differ between SAMP8 and SAMR1. Increases in expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the brain may be involved in the age-related neural dysfunction and/or learning deficiency in SAMP8.

  18. Coupling between intrinsic prefrontal HbO2 and central EEG beta power oscillations in the resting brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Pfurtscheller

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the intrinsic activity in the resting brain, especially that of ultraslow and slow oscillations. Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, electroencephalography (EEG, blood pressure (BP, respiration and heart rate recordings during 5 minutes of rest, combined with cross spectral and sliding cross correlation calculations, we identified a short-lasting coupling (duration [Formula: see text] s between prefrontal oxyhemoglobin (HbO2 in the frequency band between 0.07 and 0.13 Hz and central EEG alpha and/or beta power oscillations in 8 of the 9 subjects investigated. The HbO2 peaks preceded the EEG band power peaks by 3.7 s in 6 subjects, with moderate or no coupling between BP and HbO2 oscillations. HbO2 and EEG band power oscillations were approximately in phase with BP oscillations in the 2 subjects with an extremely high coupling (squared coherence [Formula: see text] between BP and HbO2 oscillation. No coupling was identified in one subject. These results indicate that slow precentral (deoxyhemoglobin concentration oscillations during awake rest can be temporarily coupled with EEG fluctuations in sensorimotor areas and modulate the excitability level in the brains' motor areas, respectively. Therefore, this provides support for the idea that resting state networks fluctuate with frequencies of between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz (Mantini et.al. PNAS 2007.

  19. Coupling between intrinsic prefrontal HbO2 and central EEG beta power oscillations in the resting brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Gert; Daly, Ian; Bauernfeind, Günther; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the intrinsic activity in the resting brain, especially that of ultraslow and slow oscillations. Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalography (EEG), blood pressure (BP), respiration and heart rate recordings during 5 minutes of rest, combined with cross spectral and sliding cross correlation calculations, we identified a short-lasting coupling (duration [Formula: see text] s) between prefrontal oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in the frequency band between 0.07 and 0.13 Hz and central EEG alpha and/or beta power oscillations in 8 of the 9 subjects investigated. The HbO2 peaks preceded the EEG band power peaks by 3.7 s in 6 subjects, with moderate or no coupling between BP and HbO2 oscillations. HbO2 and EEG band power oscillations were approximately in phase with BP oscillations in the 2 subjects with an extremely high coupling (squared coherence [Formula: see text]) between BP and HbO2 oscillation. No coupling was identified in one subject. These results indicate that slow precentral (de)oxyhemoglobin concentration oscillations during awake rest can be temporarily coupled with EEG fluctuations in sensorimotor areas and modulate the excitability level in the brains' motor areas, respectively. Therefore, this provides support for the idea that resting state networks fluctuate with frequencies of between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz (Mantini et.al. PNAS 2007).

  20. Tubulin nucleotide status controls Sas-4-dependent pericentriolar material recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Jayachandran; Chim, Yiu-Cheung Frederick; Ha, Andrew; Basiri, Marcus L; Lerit, Dorothy A; Rusan, Nasser M; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2012-08-01

    Regulated centrosome biogenesis is required for accurate cell division and for maintaining genome integrity. Centrosomes consist of a centriole pair surrounded by a protein network known as pericentriolar material (PCM). PCM assembly is a tightly regulated, critical step that determines the size and capability of centrosomes. Here, we report a role for tubulin in regulating PCM recruitment through the conserved centrosomal protein Sas-4. Tubulin directly binds to Sas-4; together they are components of cytoplasmic complexes of centrosomal proteins. A Sas-4 mutant, which cannot bind tubulin, enhances centrosomal protein complex formation and has abnormally large centrosomes with excessive activity. These results suggest that tubulin negatively regulates PCM recruitment. Whereas tubulin-GTP prevents Sas-4 from forming protein complexes, tubulin-GDP promotes it. Thus, the regulation of PCM recruitment by tubulin depends on its GTP/GDP-bound state. These results identify a role for tubulin in regulating PCM recruitment independent of its well-known role as a building block of microtubules. On the basis of its guanine-bound state, tubulin can act as a molecular switch in PCM recruitment.

  1. Predictive timing functions of cortical beta oscillations are impaired in Parkinson's disease and influenced by L-DOPA and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gulberti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortex-basal ganglia circuits participate in motor timing and temporal perception, and are important for the dynamic configuration of sensorimotor networks in response to exogenous demands. In Parkinson's disease (PD patients, rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS induces motor performance benefits. Hitherto, little is known concerning contributions of the basal ganglia to sensory facilitation and cortical responses to RAS in PD. Therefore, we conducted an EEG study in 12 PD patients before and after surgery for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS and in 12 age-matched controls. Here we investigated the effects of levodopa and STN-DBS on resting-state EEG and on the cortical-response profile to slow and fast RAS in a passive-listening paradigm focusing on beta-band oscillations, which are important for auditory–motor coupling. The beta-modulation profile to RAS in healthy participants was characterized by local peaks preceding and following auditory stimuli. In PD patients RAS failed to induce pre-stimulus beta increases. The absence of pre-stimulus beta-band modulation may contribute to impaired rhythm perception in PD. Moreover, post-stimulus beta-band responses were highly abnormal during fast RAS in PD patients. Treatment with levodopa and STN-DBS reinstated a post-stimulus beta-modulation profile similar to controls, while STN-DBS reduced beta-band power in the resting-state. The treatment-sensitivity of beta oscillations suggests that STN-DBS may specifically improve timekeeping functions of cortical beta oscillations during fast auditory pacing.

  2. The Brain-Specific Beta4 Subunit Downregulates BK Channel Cell Surface Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Sonal Shruti; Joanna Urban-Ciecko; Fitzpatrick, James A.; Robert Brenner; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Alison L Barth

    2012-01-01

    The large-conductance K(+) channel (BK channel) can control neural excitability, and enhanced channel currents facilitate high firing rates in cortical neurons. The brain-specific auxiliary subunit β4 alters channel Ca(++)- and voltage-sensitivity, and β4 knock-out animals exhibit spontaneous seizures. Here we investigate β4's effect on BK channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using a novel genetic tag to track the cellular location of the pore-forming BKα subunit in living cells, we fi...

  3. The brain-specific Beta4 subunit downregulates BK channel cell surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shruti, Sonal; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Fitzpatrick, James A; Brenner, Robert; Bruchez, Marcel P; Barth, Alison L

    2012-01-01

    The large-conductance K(+) channel (BK channel) can control neural excitability, and enhanced channel currents facilitate high firing rates in cortical neurons. The brain-specific auxiliary subunit β4 alters channel Ca(++)- and voltage-sensitivity, and β4 knock-out animals exhibit spontaneous seizures. Here we investigate β4's effect on BK channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using a novel genetic tag to track the cellular location of the pore-forming BKα subunit in living cells, we find that β4 expression profoundly reduces surface localization of BK channels via a C-terminal ER retention sequence. In hippocampal CA3 neurons from C57BL/6 mice with endogenously high β4 expression, whole-cell BK channel currents display none of the characteristic properties of BKα+β4 channels observed in heterologous cells. Finally, β4 knock-out animals exhibit a 2.5-fold increase in whole-cell BK channel current, indicating that β4 also regulates current magnitude in vivo. Thus, we propose that a major function of the brain-specific β4 subunit in CA3 neurons is control of surface trafficking.

  4. The brain-specific Beta4 subunit downregulates BK channel cell surface expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Shruti

    Full Text Available The large-conductance K(+ channel (BK channel can control neural excitability, and enhanced channel currents facilitate high firing rates in cortical neurons. The brain-specific auxiliary subunit β4 alters channel Ca(++- and voltage-sensitivity, and β4 knock-out animals exhibit spontaneous seizures. Here we investigate β4's effect on BK channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using a novel genetic tag to track the cellular location of the pore-forming BKα subunit in living cells, we find that β4 expression profoundly reduces surface localization of BK channels via a C-terminal ER retention sequence. In hippocampal CA3 neurons from C57BL/6 mice with endogenously high β4 expression, whole-cell BK channel currents display none of the characteristic properties of BKα+β4 channels observed in heterologous cells. Finally, β4 knock-out animals exhibit a 2.5-fold increase in whole-cell BK channel current, indicating that β4 also regulates current magnitude in vivo. Thus, we propose that a major function of the brain-specific β4 subunit in CA3 neurons is control of surface trafficking.

  5. Effects of pituitary beta-endorphin secretagogues on the concentration of beta-endorphin in rat cerebrospinal fluid : evidence for a role of vasopressin in the regulation of brain beta-endorphin release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barna, I; Sweep, C G; Veldhuis, H D; Wiegant, V M; De Wied, D

    1990-01-01

    The concentration of beta-endorphin-immunoreactivity (beta E-IR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma of rats was determined following intracerebroventricular (ICV) treatment of conscious animals with substances known to stimulate the release of beta E and other pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derive

  6. The Diamagnetic Susceptibility of the Tubulin Dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Bras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An approximate value of the diamagnetic anisotropy of the tubulin dimer, Δχdimer, has been determined assuming axial symmetry and that only the α-helices and β-sheets contribute to the anisotropy. Two approaches have been utilized: (a using the value for the Δχα for an α-helical peptide bond given by Pauling (1979 and (b using the previously determined anisotropy of fibrinogen as a calibration standard. The Δχdimer≈4×10-27 JT−2 obtained from these measurements are similar to within 20%. Although Cotton-Mouton measurements alone cannot be used to estimate Δχ directly, the value we measured, CMdimer=1.41±0.03×10-8 T−2cm2mg−1, is consistent with the above estimate for Δχdimer. The method utilized for the determination of the tubulin dimer diamagnetic susceptibility is applicable to other proteins and macromolecular assemblies as well.

  7. Characterization of the pharmacokinetics of human recombinant erythropoietin in blood and brain when administered immediately after lateral fluid percussion brain injury and its pharmacodynamic effects on IL-1beta and MIP-2 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieutaud, Thomas; Andrews, Peter J D; Rhodes, Jonathan K J; Williamson, Robert

    2008-10-01

    This study sought to determine the bio-availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) in the brain and blood and its effects on the cerebral concentrations of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and macrophage-inflammation protein-2 (MIP-2) following lateral fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) in the rat. After induction of moderate FPI (1.6-1.8 atm), EPO was injected intraperitoneally (IP) or intravenously (IV) at doses of 1000-5000 U/kg in a randomized and blinded manner. Animals were then sacrificed at time points (4, 8, 12, 24 h) post-trauma, and the brain concentrations of EPO, IL-1beta, and MIP-2 were determined. EPO administration leads to a dose-dependent increase in the brain concentration of the drug; however, this could only be detected at doses of 3000 and 5000 U/kg. The cerebral concentration peaked in the first 4 h following trauma. EPO concentrations were significantly higher and decreased more slowly in the traumatized cortex compared to the contralateral side (p<0.0125). IV EPO (5000 U/kg) produced slightly higher concentrations of EPO than same doses injected IP; however, this was not significant. At a dose of 5000 U/kg, EPO significantly reduced the increase in IL-1beta at 8 and 12 h in both cortical sides. It also reduced the increase in MIP-2 but only after 8 h, on the contralateral side and after 12 h on the ipsilateral side. Our results suggest that EPO crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by 4 h after trauma and is localized primarily in the traumatized cortex. Further, it has biological efficacy at 8 h on several inflammatory proteins, yet must be employed at high doses to cross the BBB.

  8. Increase in α-tubulin modifications in the neuronal processes of hippocampal neurons in both kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure and Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hang Thi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ikegami, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration includes acute changes and slow-developing alterations, both of which partly involve common cellular machinery. During neurodegeneration, neuronal processes are impaired along with dysregulated post-translational modifications (PTMs) of cytoskeletal proteins. In neuronal processes, tubulin undergoes unique PTMs including a branched form of modification called glutamylation and loss of the C-terminal tyrosine residue and the penultimate glutamic acid residue forming Δ2-tubulin. Here, we investigated the state of two PTMs, glutamylation and Δ2 form, in both acute and slow-developing neurodegenerations, using a newly generated monoclonal antibody, DTE41, which had 2-fold higher affinity to glutamylated Δ2-tubulin, than to unmodified Δ2-tubulin. DTE41 recognised glutamylated Δ2-tubulin preferentially in immunostaining than in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting. In normal mouse brain, DTE41 stained molecular layer of the cerebellum as well as synapse-rich regions in pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex. In kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure, DTE41-labelled signals were increased in the hippocampal CA3 region, especially in the stratum lucidum. In the hippocampi of post-mortem patients with Alzheimer’s disease, intensities of DTE41 staining were increased in mossy fibres in the CA3 region as well as in apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons. Our findings indicate that glutamylation on Δ2-tubulin is increased in both acute and slow-developing neurodegeneration. PMID:28067280

  9. Induction of transforming growth factor beta receptors following focal ischemia in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Pál

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. TGF-βs bind to type I (TGF-βRI and II receptors (TGF-βRII, which are transmembrane kinase receptors, and an accessory type III receptor (TGF-βRIII. TGF-β may utilize another type I receptor, activin-like kinase receptor (Alk1. TGF-β is neuroprotective in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model of stroke. Recently, we reported the expression pattern of TGF-β1-3 after MCAO. To establish how TGF-βs exert their actions following MCAO, the present study describes the induction of TGF-βRI, RII, RIII and Alk1 at 24 h, 72 h and 1 mo after transient 1 h MCAO as well as following 24 h permanent MCAO using in situ hybridization histochemistry. In intact brain, only TGF-βRI had significant expression: neurons in cortical layer IV contained TGF-βRI. At 24 h after the occlusion, no TGF-β receptors showed induction. At 72 h following MCAO, all four types of TGF-β receptors were induced in the infarct area, while TGF-βRI and RII also appeared in the penumbra. Most cells with elevated TGF-βRI mRNA levels were microglia. TGF-βRII co-localized with both microglial and endothelial markers while TGF-βRIII and Alk1 were present predominantly in endothels. All four TGF-β receptors were induced within the lesion 1 mo after the occlusion. In particular, TGF-βRIII was further induced as compared to 72 h after MCAO. At this time point, TGF-βRIII signal was predominantly not associated with blood vessels suggesting its microglial location. These data suggest that TGF-β receptors are induced after MCAO in a timely and spatially regulated fashion. TGF-β receptor expression is preceded by increased TGF-β expression. TGF-βRI and RII are likely to be co-expressed in microglial cells while Alk1, TGF-βRII, and RIII in endothels within the infarct where TGF-β1 may be their ligand. At later time points, TGF-βRIII may also appear in glial cells

  10. Antibodies targeted to the brain with image-guided focused ultrasound reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Jordão

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD relies on antibodies directed against toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, which circulate in the bloodstream and remove Abeta from the brain. In mouse models of AD, the administration of anti-Abeta antibodies directly into the brain, in comparison to the bloodstream, was shown to be more efficient at reducing Abeta plaque pathology. Therefore, delivering anti-Abeta antibodies to the brain of AD patients may also improve treatment efficiency. Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is known to transiently-enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing intravenously administered therapeutics to enter the brain. Our goal was to establish that anti-Abeta antibodies delivered to the brain using magnetic resonance imaging-guided FUS (MRIgFUS can reduce plaque pathology. To test this, TgCRND8 mice received intravenous injections of MRI and FUS contrast agents, as well as anti-Abeta antibody, BAM-10. MRIgFUS was then applied transcranially. Within minutes, the MRI contrast agent entered the brain, and BAM-10 was later found bound to Abeta plaques in targeted cortical areas. Four days post-treatment, Abeta pathology was significantly reduced in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion, this is the first report to demonstrate that MRIgFUS delivery of anti-Abeta antibodies provides the combined advantages of using a low dose of antibody and rapidly reducing plaque pathology.

  11. Quantum Brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Skoulakis, E M C

    2000-01-01

    In order to create a novel model of memory and brain function, we focus our approach on the sub-molecular (electron), molecular (tubulin) and macromolecular (microtubule) components of the neural cytoskeleton. Due to their size and geometry, these systems may be approached using the principles of quantum physics. We identify quantum-physics derived mechanisms conceivably underlying the integrated yet differentiated aspects of memory encoding/recall as well as the molecular basis of the engram. We treat the tubulin molecule as the fundamental computation unit (qubit) in a quantum-computational network that consists of microtubules (MTs), networks of MTs and ultimately entire neurons and neural networks. We derive experimentally testable predictions of our quantum brain hypothesis and perform experiments on these.

  12. Dab2 attenuates brain injur y in APP/PS1 mice via targeting transforming growth factor-beta/SMAD signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Song; Yue Gu; Jing Jie; Xiaoxue Bai; Ying Yang; Chaoying Liu; Qun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) levels are extremely low in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. This receptor inhibits TGF-β1/SMAD signaling and thereby aggravates amyolid-beta deposition and neuronal injury. Dab2, a speciifc adapter protein, protects TβRII from degradation and ensures the effective conduction of TGF-β1/SMAD signaling. In this study, we used an adenoviral vector to overexpress the Dab2 gene in the mouse hippocampus and investigated the regulatory effect of Dab2 protein on TGF-β1/SMAD signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, and the potential neuroprotective effect. The results showed that the TβRII level was lower in APP/PS1 mouse hippocampus than in normal mouse hippocampus. After Dab2 expression, hippocampal TβRII and p-SMAD2/3 levels were signiif-cantly increased, while amyloid-beta deposition, microglia activation, tumor necrosis factor-βand interleulin-6 levels and neuronal loss were signiifcantly attenuated in APP/PS1 mouse brain tissue. These results suggest that Dab2 can exhibit neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer’s disease by regulating TGF-β1/SMAD signaling.

  13. Binding of (/sup 3/H)ethyl-. beta. -carboline-3-carboxylate to brain benzodiazepine receptors. Effect of drugs and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.F.; Paul, S.M.; Rice, K.C.; Skolnick, P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Cain, M. (Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-09-28

    It is reported that in contrast to the changes in affinity of (/sup 3/H)benzodiazepines elicited by halide ions, barbiturates, and pyrazolopyridines, the apparent affinity of ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE (ethyl-..beta..-carboline-3-carboxylate) is unaffected by these agents. Furthermore, Scatchard analysis of ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE binding to cerebral cortical and cerebellar membranes revealed a significantly greater number of binding sites than was observed with either (/sup 3/H)diazepam or (/sup 3/H)flunitazepam, suggesting that at low concentrations benzodiazepines selectively label a subpopulation of the receptors labelled with ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE. Alternatively, ..beta..-(/sup 3/H)CCE may bind to sites that are distinct from those labelled with (/sup 3/H)-benzodiazepines.

  14. alpha-Tubulin of Histriculus cavicola (Ciliophora; Hypotrichea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Romero, P; Villalobo, E; Díaz-Ramos, C; Calvo, P; Santos-Rosa, F; Torres, A

    1997-03-01

    An alpha-tubulin gene fragment amplified by PCR from the hypotrichous ciliate Histriculus cavicola has been sequenced. This fragment, 1,182 bp long, contains an in-frame "stop" codon (UAA), which in other hypotrichous species codes for a glutamine residue. The comparison of the alpha-tubulin genes from several ciliates classes have revealed amino acid positions which could serve to distinguish these taxonomic groups.

  15. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  16. Distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J M; Elfarissi, H; De Velasco, B; Ochoa, G H; Miller, A M; Clark, Y M; Matsumoto, B; Robles, L J

    2000-01-01

    Cephalopod retinas exhibit several responses to light and dark adaptation, including rhabdom size changes, photopigment movements, and pigment granule migration. Light- and dark-directed rearrangements of microfilament and microtubule cytoskeletal transport pathways could drive these changes. Recently, we localized actin-binding proteins in light-/dark-adapted octopus rhabdoms and suggested that actin cytoskeletal rearrangements bring about the formation and degradation of rhabdomere microvilli subsets. To determine if the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins control the other light/dark changes, we used immunoblotting and immunocytochemical procedures to map the distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in dorsal and ventral halves of light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. Immunoblots detected alpha- and beta-tubulin, dynein intermediate chain, and kinesin heavy chain in extracts of whole retinas. Epifluorescence and confocal microscopy showed that the tubulin proteins were distributed throughout the retina with more immunoreactivity in retinas exposed to light. Kinesin localization was heavy in the pigment layer of light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas but was less prominent in the dorsal region. Dynein distribution also varied in dorsal and ventral retinas with more immunoreactivity in light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas and confocal microscopy emphasized the granular nature of this labeling. We suggest that light may regulate the distribution of microtubule cytoskeletal proteins in the octopus retina and that position, dorsal versus ventral, also influences the distribution of motor proteins. The microtubule cytoskeleton is most likely involved in pigment granule migration in the light and dark and with the movement of transport vesicles from the photoreceptor inner segments to the rhabdoms.

  17. Effect of. cap alpha. -,. beta. -adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists of the efflux of /sup 22/Na and uptake of /sup 42/K by rat brain cortical slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillis, J.W.; Wu, P.H.; Thierry, D.L.

    1982-03-18

    The effects of norepinephrine on ion fluxes in rat brain cortical slices have now been ascertained. /sup 22/Na efflux and /sup 42/K influx are enhanced by norepinephrine. The increase in ion fluxes can be blocked by ouabain, phentolamine and propranolol, suggesting that the catecholamine activates a membrane sodium pump by a receptor-mediated step. The facilitation of /sup 22/Na efflux is stereospecific as demonstrated by the very weak action of D-norepinephrine at 10/sup -5/ M concentration. Various ..cap alpha..-adrenergic and ..beta..-adrenergic receptor agonists, including oxymetazoline, naphazoline, clonidine, tramazoline, methoxamine, phenylephrine, L-isoproterenol and methoxyphenamine are potent stimulants of the sodium pump as demonstrated by their enhancement of ion fluxes in rat brain cortical slices. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that norepinephrine hyperpolarizes central neurons by activating an ouabain-sensitive, receptor-mediated sodium pump.

  18. Motor neuron synapse and axon defects in a C. elegans alpha-tubulin mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Baran

    Full Text Available Regulation of microtubule dynamics underlies many fundamental cellular mechanisms including cell division, cell motility, and transport. In neurons, microtubules play key roles in cell migration, axon outgrowth, control of axon and synapse growth, and the regulated transport of vesicles and structural components of synapses. Loss of synapse and axon integrity and disruption of axon transport characterize many neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, mutations that specifically alter the assembly or stability of microtubules have been found to directly cause neurodevelopmental defects or neurodegeneration in vertebrates. We report here the characterization of a missense mutation in the C-terminal domain of C. elegans alpha-tubulin, tba-1(ju89, that disrupts motor neuron synapse and axon development. Mutant ju89 animals exhibit reduction in the number and size of neuromuscular synapses, altered locomotion, and defects in axon extension. Although null mutations of tba-1 show a nearly wild-type pattern, similar axon outgrowth defects were observed in animals lacking the beta-tubulin TBB-2. Genetic analysis reveals that tba-1(ju89 affects synapse development independent of its role in axon outgrowth. tba-1(ju89 is an altered function allele that most likely perturbs interactions between TBA-1 and specific microtubule-associated proteins that control microtubule dynamics and transport of components needed for synapse and axon growth.

  19. Method for measurement of the blood-brain barrier permeability in the perfused mouse brain: application to amyloid-beta peptide in wild type and Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Barbra; Hogg, Elizabeth; Sagare, Abhay; Jovanovic, Suzana; Maness, Lawrence; Maurer, Calvin; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2004-09-30

    The role of transport exchanges of neuroactive solutes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized. To take full advantage of genetically altered mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders for BBB transport studies, we adapted a brain perfusion technique to the mouse. During a carotid brain perfusion with a medium containing sheep red blood cells and mock plasma, the physiological parameters in the arterial inflow, regional cerebral blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography), ultrastructural integrity of the tissue, barrier to lanthanum, brain water content, energy metabolites and lactate levels remain unchanged. Amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) were iodinated by lactoperoxidase method. Non-oxidized mono-iodinated Abeta monomers were separated by HPLC (as confirmed by MALDI-TOF spectrometry) and used in transport measurements. Transport of intact 125I-Abeta40 across the BBB was time- and concentration-dependent in contrast to negligible 14C-inulin uptake. In 5-6 months old Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice, Abeta40 BBB transport was increased by >eight-fold compared to age-matched littermate controls, and was mediated via the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts. We conclude the present arterial brain perfusion method provides strictly controlled environment in cerebral microcirculation suitable for examining transport of rapidly and slowly penetrating molecules across the BBB in normal and transgenic mice.

  20. New benzimidazole-2-urea derivates as tubulin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenna; Kong, Dexin; Cheng, Huimin; Tan, Li; Zhang, Zhang; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Long, Huoyou; Zhou, Yang; Xu, Yong; Yang, Xiaohong; Ding, Ke

    2014-09-01

    Emerging drug resistance and other drawbacks limit tubulin inhibitors' therapeutic applications and developing novel tubulin inhibitors still attracts intensive efforts. We describe the discovery and structure-activity relationship study of a series of benzimidazole-2-urea derivatives as novel β tubulin inhibitors. The representative compound 6o potently suppressed the proliferation of a panel of human cancer cells (NCI-H460, Colo205, K562, A431, HepG2, Hela, MDA-MB-435S) with IC50 values of 0.040, 0.050, 0.006, 0.026, 1.774, 0.452 and 0.052 μM, respectively. Compound 6o obviously inhibited NCI-H460 spindles formation and induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase at 0.10 μM. Computational study suggested that 6o interacts with β tubulin in a novel binding mode. Our results suggested that benzimidazole-2-urea derivatives might be promising tubulin inhibitors with novel binding mode for further development.

  1. Differentiation of Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor on I-123 IPT(I-123-N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-cholorophenyl) tropane) Brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Moon Sun [Kwandong University College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Tae Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Min [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jai Yong; Ryu, Won Gee; Lee, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    The study was to assess I-123-N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2[beta]-carbomethoxy-3[beta]-(4-cholorophenyl) tropane (IPT) SPECT in differential diagnosis among early stage of Parkinson's disease(PD) and essential tremor(ET) and normal control(NL) groups quantitatively. I-123 IPT brain SPECT of 50 NL, 20 early PD, 30 advanced PD, and 20 ET were performed at 20 minutes and 2 hours. Specific/nonspecific binding of striatum was calculated by using right and left striatal specific to occipital non-specific uptake ratio (striatum-OCC/OCC). Mean value of specific/nonspecific binding ratio was significantly different between advanced PD group and NL group. However, significant overlap of striatal specific/nonspecific binding ratio was observed between PD group and ET group. Bilateral striatal specific/nonspecific binding ratios were decreased in advanced PD. Lateralized differences in the striatal uptake of I-123 IPT correlated with asymmetry in clinical findings in PD group. I-123 IPT SPECT may be a useful method for the diagnosis of PD and objective evaluation of progress of clinical stages. Care should be made in the differential diagnosis of early stage of PD and other motor disturbances mimicking PD such as ET in view of significant overlap in striatal I-123 specific/nonspecific binding ratio.

  2. Effects of glucose, insulin, and supernatant from pancreatic beta-cells on brain-pancreas relative protein in rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yan-Hua; Westenbroek, Christel; Tie, Lu; Liu, Ai-Hua; Yu, He-Ming; Ter Horst, Gert J.; Li, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiang-yi

    2006-01-01

    Brain-pancreas relative protein (BPRP) is a novel protein that mainly expresses in brain and pancreas. In our previous study, we found that various stressors significantly decreased the expression of BPRP in pancreas in vivo, accompanied by changes in insulin and glucose levels, and that expression

  3. Radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F] N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-2-{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3-{beta}-(4-Bromophenyl) Nortropane and the regional brain uptake in non human primate using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaly, Thomas E-mail: tchaly@nshs.edu; Baldwin, R.M.; Neumeyer, John L.; Hellman, Matthew J.; Dhawan, Vijay; Garg, Pradeep K.; Tamagnan, Gilles; Staley, Julie K.; Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S.; Hou, Yankun; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Gu Xiaohui; Zong, R.; Eidelberg, David

    2004-01-01

    A synthetic procedure for the preparation of [{sup 18}F]FPCBT, an imaging agent for the dopamine transporter (DAT), has been developed. The radiosynthesis was carried out in a two step procedure. Even though the yield was low, we were able to prepare 20 to 30mCi of the product, which was enough for two or three studies. The radiochemical purity was greater than 96%. The in vivo properties of this radiotracer were evaluated using baboon and it showed highest uptake in the striatum. The studies also revealed that the maximum uptake was reached within 7 to 10 minutes post injection. Plasma metabolite analysis indicated that there is only one metabolite and it is less lipophilic than the parent compound. [{sup 18}F]FPCBT displayed good brain uptake and its high target to non target ratio indicate that it is a potential candidate for DAT imaging.

  4. Impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with traumatic brain injury: a SPET study using {sup 123}I-{beta}-CIT and {sup 123}I-IBZM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnemiller, E.; Riccabona, G. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Brenneis, C.; Wissel, J.; Scherfler, C.; Poewe, W.; Wenning, G.K. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria)

    2000-09-01

    Structural imaging suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be associated with disruption of neuronal networks, including the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. However, to date deficits in pre- and/or postsynaptic dopaminergic neurotransmission have not been demonstrated in TBI using functional imaging. We therefore assessed dopaminergic function in ten TBI patients using [{sup 123}I]2-{beta}-carbomethoxy-3-{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Average Glasgow Coma Scale score ({+-}SD) at the time of head trauma was 5.8{+-}4.2. SPET was performed on average 141 days (SD {+-}92) after TBI. The SPET images were compared with structural images using cranial computerised tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SPET was performed with an ADAC Vertex dual-head camera. The activity ratios of striatal to cerebellar uptake were used as a semiquantitative parameter of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) and D2 receptor (D2R) binding. Compared with age-matched controls, patients with TBI had significantly lower striatal/cerebellar {beta}-CIT and IBZM binding ratios (P{<=}0.01). Overall, the DAT deficit was more marked than the D2R loss. CCT and MRI studies revealed varying cortical and subcortical lesions, with the frontal lobe being most frequently affected whereas the striatum appeared structurally normal in all but one patient. Our findings suggest that nigrostriatal dysfunction may be detected using SPET following TBI despite relative structural preservation of the striatum. Further investigations of possible clinical correlates and efficacy of dopaminergic therapy in patients with TBI seem justified. (orig.)

  5. The microtubule-stabilizing agent discodermolide competitively inhibits the binding of paclitaxel (Taxol) to tubulin polymers, enhances tubulin nucleation reactions more potently than paclitaxel, and inhibits the growth of paclitaxel-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, R J; Giannakakou, P; Gunasekera, S P; Longley, R E; Day, B W; Hamel, E

    1997-10-01

    The lactone-bearing polyhydroxylated alkatetraene (+)-discodermolide, which was isolated from the sponge Discodermia dissoluta, induces the polymerization of purified tubulin with and without microtubule-associated proteins or GTP, and the polymers formed are stable to cold and calcium. These effects are similar to those of paclitaxel (Taxol), but discodermolide is more potent. We confirmed that these properties represent hypernucleation phenomena; we obtained lower tubulin critical concentrations and shorter polymers with discodermolide than paclitaxel under a variety of reaction conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrated that discodermolide is a competitive inhibitor with [3H]paclitaxel in binding to tubulin polymer, with an apparent Ki value of 0.4 microM. Multidrug-resistant human colon and ovarian carcinoma cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein, which are 900- and 2800-fold resistant to paclitaxel, respectively, relative to the parental lines, retained significant sensitivity to discodermolide (25- and 89-fold more resistant relative to the parental lines). Ovarian carcinoma cells that are 20-30-fold more resistant to paclitaxel than the parental line on the basis of expression of altered beta-tubulin polypeptides retained nearly complete sensitivity to discodermolide. The effects of discodermolide on the reorganization of the microtubules of Potorous tridactylis kidney epithelial cells were examined at different times. Intracellular microtubules were reorganized into bundles in interphase cells much more rapidly after discodermolide treatment compared with paclitaxel treatment. A variety of spindle aberrations were observed after treatment with both drugs. The proportions of the different types of aberration were different for the two drugs and changed with the length of drug treatment.

  6. Combretastatin A-4 and Derivatives: Potential Fungicides Targeting Fungal Tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong-lin; Yan, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Jiu-jiu; Pang, Wan; Kai, Zhen-peng; Wu, Fan-hong

    2016-02-01

    Combretastatin A-4, first isolated from the African willow tree Combretum caffrum, is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor in medicine. It was first postulated as a potential fungicide targeting fungal tubulin for plant disease control in this study. Combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives were synthesized and tested against Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae. Several compounds have EC50 values similar to or better than that of isoprothiolane, which is widely used for rice disease control. Structure-activity relationship study indicated the the cis configuration and hydroxyl group in combretastatin A-4 are crucial to the antifungal effect. Molecular modeling indicated the binding sites of combretastatin A-4 and carbendazim on fungal tubulin are totally different. The bioactivity of combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives against carbendazim-resistant strains was demonstrated in this study. The results provide a new approach for fungicide discovery and fungicide resistance management.

  7. Acetylated tubulin is essential for touch sensation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Shane J; Qi, Yanmei; Iovino, Loredana; Andolfi, Laura; Guo, Da; Kalebic, Nereo; Castaldi, Laura; Tischer, Christian; Portulano, Carla; Bolasco, Giulia; Shirlekar, Kalyanee; Fusco, Claudia M; Asaro, Antonino; Fermani, Federica; Sundukova, Mayya; Matti, Ulf; Reymond, Luc; De Ninno, Adele; Businaro, Luca; Johnsson, Kai; Lazzarino, Marco; Ries, Jonas; Schwab, Yannick; Hu, Jing; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2016-12-13

    At its most fundamental level, touch sensation requires the translation of mechanical energy into mechanosensitive ion channel opening, thereby generating electro-chemical signals. Our understanding of this process, especially how the cytoskeleton influences it, remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the α-tubulin acetyltransferase Atat1 in sensory neurons display profound deficits in their ability to detect mechanical stimuli. We show that all cutaneous afferent subtypes, including nociceptors have strongly reduced mechanosensitivity upon Atat1 deletion, and that consequently, mice are largely insensitive to mechanical touch and pain. We establish that this broad loss of mechanosensitivity is dependent upon the acetyltransferase activity of Atat1, which when absent leads to a decrease in cellular elasticity. By mimicking α-tubulin acetylation genetically, we show both cellular rigidity and mechanosensitivity can be restored in Atat1 deficient sensory neurons. Hence, our results indicate that by influencing cellular stiffness, α-tubulin acetylation sets the force required for touch.

  8. Sodium Channel Voltage-Gated Beta 2 Plays a Vital Role in Brain Aging Associated with Synaptic Plasticity and Expression of COX5A and FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    XiYang, Yan-Bin; Wang, You-Cui; Zhao, Ya; Ru, Jin; Lu, Bing-Tuan; Zhang, Yue-Ning; Wang, Nai-Chao; Hu, Wei-Yan; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Hao, Chun-Guang; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dong, Wei; Quan, Xiong-Zhi; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The role of sodium channel voltage-gated beta 2 (SCN2B) in brain aging is largely unknown. The present study was therefore designed to determine the role of SCN2B in brain aging by using the senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8), a brain senescence-accelerated animal model, together with the SCN2B transgenic mice. The results showed that SAMP8 exhibited impaired learning and memory functions, assessed by the Morris water maze test, as early as 8 months of age. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of SCN2B were also upregulated in the prefrontal cortex at this age. Treatment with traditional Chinese anti-aging medicine Xueshuangtong (Panax notoginseng saponins, PNS) significantly reversed the SCN2B expressions in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in improved learning and memory. Moreover, SCN2B knockdown transgenic mice were generated and bred to determine the roles of SCN2B in brain senescence. A reduction in the SCN2B level by 60.68% resulted in improvement in the hippocampus-dependent spatial recognition memory and long-term potential (LTP) slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), followed by an upregulation of COX5A mRNA levels and downregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA expression. Together, the present findings indicated that SCN2B could play an important role in the aging-related cognitive deterioration, which is associated with the regulations of COX5A and FGF-2. These findings could provide the potential strategy of candidate target to develop antisenescence drugs for the treatment of brain aging.

  9. In vitro assembly of plant tubulin in the absence of microtubule-stabilizing reagents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The assembly of microtubules is essential for physiological functions of microtubules. Addition of microtubule-stabilizing reagents or microtubule "seeds" is usually necessary for plant tubulin assembly in vitro, which hinders the investigation of plant microtubule dynamics. In the present note, highly purified plant tubulins have been obtained from lily pollen, a non-microtubule-stabilizing reagent or microtubule "seed" system for plant tubulin assembly has been established and the analysis of plant tubulin assembly performed. Experiment results showed that purified tubulin polymerized in vitro, and a typical microtubule structure was observed with electron microscopy. The kinetics curve of tubulin assembly exhibited typical "parabola". The presence of taxol significantly altered the character of plant tubulin assembly, including that abnormal microtubules were assembled and the critical concentration for plant tubulin assembly was decreased exceedingly from 3 mg/mL in the absence of taxol to 0.043 mg/mL in the presence of taxol.

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) degrades soluble vasculotropic amyloid-beta E22Q and L34V mutants, delaying their toxicity for human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Guillamon, Mar; Mawhirt, Stephanie; Fossati, Silvia; Blais, Steven; Pares, Mireia; Penalba, Anna; Boada, Merce; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Neubert, Thomas A; Montaner, Joan; Ghiso, Jorge; Rostagno, Agueda

    2010-08-27

    Patients carrying mutations within the amyloid-beta (Abeta) sequence develop severe early-onset cerebral amyloid angiopathy with some of the related variants manifesting primarily with hemorrhagic phenotypes. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are typically associated with blood brain barrier disruption and hemorrhagic transformations after ischemic stroke. However, their contribution to cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related hemorrhage remains unclear. Human brain endothelial cells challenged with Abeta synthetic homologues containing mutations known to be associated in vivo with hemorrhagic manifestations (AbetaE22Q and AbetaL34V) showed enhanced production and activation of MMP-2, evaluated via Multiplex MMP antibody arrays, gel zymography, and Western blot, which in turn proteolytically cleaved in situ the Abeta peptides. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry analysis highlighted the generation of specific C-terminal proteolytic fragments, in particular the accumulation of Abeta-(1-16), a result validated in vitro with recombinant MMP-2 and quantitatively evaluated using deuterium-labeled internal standards. Silencing MMP-2 gene expression resulted in reduced Abeta degradation and enhanced apoptosis. Secretion and activation of MMP-2 as well as susceptibility of the Abeta peptides to MMP-2 degradation were dependent on the peptide conformation, with fibrillar elements of AbetaE22Q exhibiting negligible effects. Our results indicate that MMP-2 release and activation differentially degrades Abeta species, delaying their toxicity for endothelial cells. However, taking into consideration MMP ability to degrade basement membrane components, these protective effects might also undesirably compromise blood brain barrier integrity and precipitate a hemorrhagic phenotype.

  11. Synthesis of a [2-pyridinyl-18F]-labelled fluoro derivative of (-)-cytisine as a candidate radioligand for brain nicotinic alpha4beta2 receptor imaging with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Gaëlle; Lagnel, Béatrice; Rouden, Jacques; Besret, Laurent; Valette, Héric; Demphel, Stéphane; Gopisetti, JaganMohan; Coulon, Christine; Ottaviani, Michele; Wrenn, Lori A; Letchworth, Sharon R; Bohme, Georg A; Benavides, Jesus; Lasne, Marie-Claire; Bottlaender, Michel; Dollé, Frédéric

    2003-12-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable effort to design and synthesize radiotracers suitable for use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the alpha4beta2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype. A new fluoropyridinyl derivative of (-)-cytisine (1), namely (-)-9-(2-fluoropyridinyl)cytisine (3, K(i) values of 24 and 3462 nM for the alpha4beta2 and alpha7 nAChRs subtypes, respectively) has been synthesized in four chemical steps from (-)-cytisine and labelled with fluorine-18 (T(1/2): 119.8 min) using an efficient two-step radiochemical process [(a). nucleophilic heteroaromatic ortho-radiofluorination using the corresponding N-Boc-protected nitro-derivative, (b). TFA removal of the Boc protective group]. Typically, 20-45 mCi (0.74-1.67 GBq) of (-)-9-(2-[18F]fluoropyridinyl)cytisine ([18F]-3, 2-3 Ci/micromol or 74-111 GBq/micromol) were easily obtained in 70-75 min starting from a 100 mCi (3.7 GBq) aliquot of a cyclotron-produced [18F]fluoride production batch (20-45% non decay-corrected yield based on the starting [18F]fluoride). The in vivo pharmacological profile of (-)-9-(2-[18F]fluoropyridinyl)cytisine ([18F]-3) was evaluated in rats with biodistribution studies and brain radioactivity monitoring using intracerebral radiosensitive beta-microprobes. The observed in vivo distribution of the radiotracer in brain was rather uniform, and did not match with the known regional densities of nAChRs. It was also significantly different from that of the parent compound (-)-[3H]cytisine. Moreover, competition studies with (-)-nicotine (5 mg/kg, 5 min before the radiotracer injection) did not reduce brain uptake of the radiotracer. These experiments clearly indicate that (-)-9-(2-[18F]fluoropyridinyl)cytisine ([18F]-3) does not have the required properties for imaging nAChRs using PET.

  12. Anticancer Activity of Chamaejasmine: Effect on Tubulin Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingkun Nie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the anticancer activity of chamaejasmine was studied by evaluating its in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, SGC-7901, HCT-8, HO-4980, Hela, HepG2, PC-3, LNCap, Vero and MDCK using the MTT assay. Results indicated chamaejasmine showed more notable anticancer activity than taxol against PC-3 cells, with IC50 values of 2.28 and 3.98 µM, respectively. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that chamaejasmine was able to increase the expression of β-tubulin, but not α-tubulin. In silico simulations indicated that chamaejasmine specifically interacts with the active site which is located at the top of β-tubulin, thanks to the presence of strong hydrophobic effects between the core templates and the hydrophobic surface of the TB active site. The binding energy (Einter was calculated to be −164.77 kcal·mol−1. Results presented here suggest that chamaejasmine possesses anti-cancer properties relating to β-tubulin depolymerization inhibition, and therefore is a potential source of anticancer leads for the pharmaceutical industry.

  13. Brain oscillatory activity during motor preparation: Effect of directional uncertainty on beta, but not alpha, frequency band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charidimos eTzagarakis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In time-constraint activities, such as sports, it is advantageous to be prepared to act even before knowing precisely what action will be needed. Here, we studied the relation between neural oscillations during motor preparation and amount of uncertainty about the direction of the upcoming target. Ten right-handed volunteers participated in a cued center-out task. A brief visual cue identified the region of space in which the target would appear. Three cue sizes were used to vary the amount of information about the direction of the upcoming target. The target appeared at a random location within the region indicated by the cue, and the participants moved a joystick-controlled cursor towards it. Time-frequency analyses showed phasic increases of power in low (delta/theta: 30 Hz frequency-bands in relation to the onset of visual stimuli and of the motor response. More importantly in regard to motor preparation, there was a tonic reduction of power in the alpha (8-12 Hz and beta (14-30 Hz bands during the period between cue presentation and target onset. During motor preparation, the main source of change of power of the alpha band was localized over the contralateral sensorimotor region and both parietal cortices, whereas for the beta-band the main source was the contralateral sensorimotor region. During cue presentation, the reduction of power of the alpha-band in the occipital lobe showed a brief differentiation of condition: the wider the visual cue, the more the power of the alpha-band decreased. However during motor preparation, only the power of the beta-band was dependent on directional uncertainty: the less the directional uncertainty, the more the power of the beta-band decreased. In conclusion, the results indicate that the power in the alpha-band is associated briefly with cue size, but is otherwise an undifferentiated indication of neural activation, whereas the power of the beta-band reflects the level of motor preparation.

  14. In vitro studies on the effect of beta-carbolines on the activities of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase and on the muscarinic receptor binding of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skup, M; Oderfeld-Nowak, B; Rommelspacher, H

    1983-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) activity and muscarinic receptor binding of homogenates from several brain structures were inhibited by beta-carbolines. The inhibition was of the noncompetitive type in the case of the enzyme and of the mixed type in the case of the receptor binding. This effect was most strongly manifested by pyridoindoles(harmane, norharmane), i.e., carbolines containing an aromatic C ring than by the corresponding piperidoindoles (tetrahydroharmane, tetrahydronorharmane), i.e., those with a reduced C ring. The activity of choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6) was not altered. These data are further evidence of the interactions between indoleamine derivatives and the cholinergic system. The results are discussed in terms of their possible biological significance.

  15. The cycad neurotoxic amino acid, beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), elevates intracellular calcium levels in dissociated rat brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Delia M; Mabry, Tom J; Leslie, Steven W

    2002-10-01

    Seeds of the Guam cycad Cycas micronesica K.D. Hill (Cycadaceae), which contain ss-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), have been implicated in the etiology of the devastating neurodisease ALS-PDC that is found among the native Chamorros on Guam. The disease also occurs in the native populations on Irian Jaya and the Kii Peninsula of Japan, and in all three areas the cycad seeds are used either dietarily or medically. ALS-PDC is a complex of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism dementia complex with additional symptoms of Alzheimer's. It is well known that Ca(2+) elevations in brain cells can lead to cell death and neurodiseases. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of the cycad toxin BMAA to elevate the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in dissociated newborn rat brain cells loaded with fura-2 dye. BMAA produced an increase in intracellular calcium levels in a concentration-dependent manner. The increases were dependent not only on extracellular calcium concentrations, but also significantly on the presence of bicarbonate ion. Increasing concentrations of sodium bicarbonate resulted in a potentiation of the BMAA-induced [Ca(2+)](i) elevation. The bicarbonate dependence did not result from the increased sodium concentration or alkalinization of the buffer. Our results support the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity of BMAA is due to an excitotoxic mechanism, involving elevated intracellular calcium levels and bicarbonate. Furthermore, since BMAA alone produced no increase in Ca(2+) levels, these results suggest the involvement of a product of BMAA and CO(2), namely a beta-carbamate, which has a structure similar to other excitatory amino acids (EAA) such as glutamate; thus, the causative agent for ALS-PDC on Guam and elsewhere may be the beta-carbamate of BMAA. These findings support the theory that some forms of other neurodiseases may also involve environmental toxins.

  16. Tubulin acetylation promoting potency and absorption efficacy of deacetylase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas-Sanjuan, V; Oláh, J; Gonzalez-Alvarez, I; Lehotzky, A; Tőkési, N; Bermejo, M; Ovádi, J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and silent information regulator 2 (SIRT2) control the dynamics of the microtubule network via their deacetylase activities. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein (TPPP/p25) enhances microtubule acetylation by its direct binding to HDAC6. Our objective was to characterize the multiple interactions of the deacetylases and to establish the inhibitory potency and the pharmacokinetic features of the deacetylase inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and AGK2. Experimental Approach The interactions of deacetylases with tubulin and TPPP/p25 were quantified by elisa using human recombinant proteins. The effect of inhibitors on the tubulin acetylation was established in HeLa cells transfected with pTPPP and CG-4 cells expressing TPPP/p25 endogenously by celisa (elisa on cells), Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. The pharmacokinetic features of the inhibitors were evaluated by in situ kinetic modelling of their intestinal transport in rats. Key Results Deacetylases interact with both tubulin and TPPP/p25, notwithstanding piggy-back binding of HDAC6 or SIRT2 to the TPPP/p25-associated tubulin was established. Much higher inhibitory potency for TSA than for AGK2 was detected in both HeLa and CG-4 cells. Pioneer pharmacokinetic studies revealed passive diffusion and diffusion coupled with secretion for TSA and AGK2 respectively. Both inhibitors exhibited greater permeability than some other well-established drugs. Conclusions and Implications TPPP/p25-directed deacetylase inhibition provides mechanisms for the fine control of the dynamics and stability of the microtubule network. Deacetylase inhibitors with chemical structures similar to TSA and AGK2 appear to be excellent candidates for oral drug absorption. PMID:25257800

  17. Once-weekly 22microg subcutaneous IFN-beta-1a in secondary progressive MS: a 3-year follow-up study on brain MRI measurements and serum MMP-9 levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, X; Kuusisto, H; Dastidar, P;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of weekly injected subcutaneous interferon (IFN)-beta-1a 22 microg on the extent of brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the level of serum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). SUBJECTS...

  18. Long-term air pollution exposure is associated with neuroinflammation, an altered innate immune response, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, ultrafine particulate deposition, and accumulation of amyloid beta-42 and alpha-synuclein in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Solt, Anna C; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Nuse, Bryan; Herritt, Lou; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Stone, Ida; García, Raquel; Brooks, Diane M; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Reed, William

    2008-02-01

    Air pollution is a serious environmental problem. We investigated whether residency in cities with high air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation/neurodegeneration in healthy children and young adults who died suddenly. We measured mRNA cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in target brain regions from low (n = 12) or highly exposed residents (n = 35) aged 25.1 +/- 1.5 years. Upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, substantia nigrae and vagus nerves; disruption of the blood-brain barrier; endothelial activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell trafficking were seen in highly exposed subjects. Amyloid beta42 (Abeta42) immunoreactivity was observed in 58.8% of apolipoprotein E (APOE) 3/3 Parkinson's diseases, and carriers of the APOE 4 allele could have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease if they reside in a polluted environment.

  19. Characterization of an inducible expression system in Aspergillus nidulans using alcA and tubulin-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, R B; May, G S; Morris, N R

    1989-06-30

    Plasmids have been constructed in which expression of a gene can be placed under the control of the inducible promoter of the alcA gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I in Aspergillus nidulans. Simplified shuttle vectors carrying pyr4 which complements pyrG89 mutations have also been constructed. These are based on pUC19 and retain alpha-peptide expression. The beta-tubulin genes, tubC and benA, have been placed under the control of alcA and their expression studied. Levels of expression can be assayed phenotypically because increased synthesis of beta-tubulin inhibits vegetative growth. Sensitivity of asexual spore formation to the anti-microtubule drug benomyl provides a means of detecting very low levels of expression of the chimeric genes. Glucose almost completely represses the chimeric genes. Induction is rapid and is maximal within an hour. When a strain carrying seven copies of an alcA::tubC gene fusion was grown under inducing conditions, 6.5% of total sulfate labelled protein consisted of tubC product. Cyclopentanone was the most potent inducer of the chimeric genes on solid media but it also partially inhibited growth. Chimeric alcA::tubC and alcA::benA genes were expressed to very similar levels despite the fact that tubC utilizes many rare codons.

  20. PCR-RFLP on β-tubulin gene for rapid identification of the most clinically important species of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Tuba; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Abastabar, Mahdi; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C; Armaki, Mojtaba Taghizadeh; Hoseinnejad, Akbar; Nabili, Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus species are important agents of life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. Proper speciation in the Aspergilli has been justified based on varied fungal virulence, clinical presentations, and antifungal resistance. Accurate identification of Aspergillus species usually relies on fungal DNA sequencing but this requires expensive equipment that is not available in most clinical laboratories. We developed and validated a discriminative low-cost PCR-based test to discriminate Aspergillus isolates at the species level. The Beta tubulin gene of various reference strains of Aspergillus species was amplified using the universal fungal primers Bt2a and Bt2b. The PCR products were subjected to digestion with a single restriction enzyme AlwI. All Aspergillus isolates were subjected to DNA sequencing for final species characterization. The PCR-RFLP test generated unique patterns for six clinically important Aspergillus species, including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus clavatus and Aspergillus nidulans. The one-enzyme PCR-RFLP on Beta tubulin gene designed in this study is a low-cost tool for the reliable and rapid differentiation of the clinically important Aspergillus species.

  1. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, F.; Dhenain, M.; Gurden, H.; Routier, A. L.; Lefebvre, F.; Mastrippolito, R.; Lanièce, P.

    2008-10-01

    The β-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using 18F, 11C and 15O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous β-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with 18F-FDG and H2O15 blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed β-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is

  2. 音乐治疗对慢性应激大鼠脑内5-羟色胺及微管蛋白的影响%Effects of the music therapy on the serotonin and tubulin in brain tissue of chronic unpredictable mild stress rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴涵; 牟晓洁

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨音乐治疗对慢性轻度不可预测性应激(CUMS)大鼠脑内前额叶、海马、下丘脑等脑区5-羟色胺及微管蛋白的水平及可能作用机制.方法 随机将24只SD雄性大鼠分为音乐治疗应激组(n=8)、应激组(n=8)和正常对照组(n=8).采用慢性轻度不可预测性应激(CUMS)模型连续刺激大鼠21 d,音乐治疗应激组在应激的同时给予音乐治疗.实验结束后对每组大鼠进行行为学观察,然后处死大鼠,检测下丘脑、海马和前额叶皮质中5-羟色胺(5-HT)及其代谢产物5-羟吲哚乙酸(5-HIAA)的含量和微管蛋白的表达.结果 旷场试验的中央格停留时间比较,应激组大鼠显著低于对照组(P<0.01),而音乐治疗应激组与对照组相比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).与应激组相比,对照组和音乐治疗应激组的海马、前额叶中5-HT及5-HIAA含量均显著升高(P<0.01);但三组下丘脑中5-HT及5-HIAA含量差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).与应激组相比,对照组和音乐治疗应激组的海马中乙酰化微管蛋白表达均显著降低(P<0.01),酪氨酸化微管蛋白表达均显著升高(P<0.01);但三组的前额叶和下丘脑中乙酰化微管蛋白、酪氨酸化微管蛋白表达差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 音乐治疗能改善应激所致的前额叶、海马5-羟色胺水平的低下和海马微管蛋白的降低.%Objective To study the effect of the music therapy on the serotonin and tubulin in frontal cortex,hippocampus and hypothalamus of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats,and to explore the neurobiology of the music therapy on stress disorders.Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided equally to music therapy stress group(n=8),stress group(n=8) and normal control group(n=8).Mild chronic unpredictable stress was used for 21 days in a continuous stimulation pattern to establish the CUMS model.The 5-HT,5-HIAA and tubulin levels in the the frontal cortex

  3. Expression of alpha tubulin during the dimorphic transition of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W P; Soares, R B; Jesuino, R S; Izacc, S M; Felipe, M S; Soares, C M

    2001-10-01

    In this study we analyzed the expression of (alpha-tubulin during the dimorphic transition of the human-pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The alpha-tubulin from P. brasiliensis was recognized by a commercially available anti-tubulin antibody and was developmentally regulated during the dimorphic form transition. We detected at least two alpha-tubulin isoforms in the mycelial state and only one isoform in the yeast forms. This finding suggests specific roles for the alpha-tubulin isoforms in P. brasiliensis's yeast and mycelial forms.

  4. Increased expression of class III β-tubulin in castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, S; Ploussard, G.; Allory, Y; Nicolaiew, N; Boissière-Michot, F; Maillé, P; Kheuang, L; Coppolani, E; Ali, A.; Bibeau, F; Culine, S; Buttyan, R; de la Taille, A; Vacherot, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) is expressed in tissues of neuronal lineage and also in several human malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma, breast and ovarian cancer. Overexpression of βIII-tubulin in these tumours is associated with an unfavourable outcome and resistance to taxane-based therapies. At present, βIII-tubulin expression remains largely uncharacterised in prostate cancer. Methods: In this report, we evaluated the expression of βIII-tubulin in 138 d...

  5. Beta-Amyloid Downregulates MDR1-P-Glycoprotein (Abcb1 Expression at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Brenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular dysfunction is an important component of Alzheimer's disease, leading to reduced clearance across the blood-brain barrier and accumulation of neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in the brain. It has been shown that the ABC transport protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1 is involved in the export of Aβ from the brain into the blood. To determine whether Aβ influences the expression of key Aβ transporters, we studied the effects of 1-day subcutaneous Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 administration via Alzet mini-osmotic pumps on P-gp, BCRP, LRP1, and RAGE expression in the brain of 90-day-old male FVB mice. Our results demonstrate significantly reduced P-gp, LRP1, and RAGE mRNA expression in mice treated with Aβ1-42 compared to controls, while BCRP expression was not affected. The expression of the four proteins was unchanged in mice treated with Aβ1-40 or reverse-sequence peptides. These findings indicate that, in addition to the age-related decrease of P-gp expression, Aβ1-42 itself downregulates the expression of P-gp and other Aβ-transporters, which could exacerbate the intracerebral accumulation of Aβ and thereby accelerate neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral β-amyloid angiopathy.

  6. A Direct Interaction between Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 and Specific β-Tubulin Isoforms Regulates Tubulin Acetylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Bernard M. H.; Spain, Victoria A.; Leinster, Veronica H. L.; Chia, Ruth; Beilina, Alexandra; Cho, Hyun J.; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Urban, Mary K.; Sancho, Rosa M.; Ramírez, Marian Blanca; Biskup, Saskia; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cai, Huaibin; Cookson, Mark R.; Berwick, Daniel C.; Harvey, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2, encoding the multifunctional protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), are a common cause of Parkinson disease. LRRK2 has been suggested to influence the cytoskeleton as LRRK2 mutants reduce neurite outgrowth and cause an accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau. This might cause alterations in the dynamic instability of microtubules suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Here, we describe a direct interaction between LRRK2 and β-tubulin. This interaction is conferred by the LRRK2 Roc domain and is disrupted by the familial R1441G mutation and artificial Roc domain mutations that mimic autophosphorylation. LRRK2 selectively interacts with three β-tubulin isoforms: TUBB, TUBB4, and TUBB6, one of which (TUBB4) is mutated in the movement disorder dystonia type 4 (DYT4). Binding specificity is determined by lysine 362 and alanine 364 of β-tubulin. Molecular modeling was used to map the interaction surface to the luminal face of microtubule protofibrils in close proximity to the lysine 40 acetylation site in α-tubulin. This location is predicted to be poorly accessible within mature stabilized microtubules, but exposed in dynamic microtubule populations. Consistent with this finding, endogenous LRRK2 displays a preferential localization to dynamic microtubules within growth cones, rather than adjacent axonal microtubule bundles. This interaction is functionally relevant to microtubule dynamics, as mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from LRRK2 knock-out mice display increased microtubule acetylation. Taken together, our data shed light on the nature of the LRRK2-tubulin interaction, and indicate that alterations in microtubule stability caused by changes in LRRK2 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:24275654

  7. Effects of thyroid status on the characteristics of alpha sub 1 -, alpha sub 2 -, beta, imipramine and GABA receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrini, M.; Marrama, D.; Vergoni, A.V.; Bertolini, A. (Univ. of Modena (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a chronic treatment with L-triiodothyronine or with propylthiouracil on the characteristics of alpha{sub 1}, alpha{sub 2}, beta, imipramine and GABA binding sites in different brain areas of the adult rat have been studied. T{sub 3}-treatment caused an increase in the number of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalprenolol and a decrease in the number of ({sup 3}H)muscimol binding sites in the cerebral cortex. PTU-treatment caused a decrease in the number of ({sup 3}H)prazosin, ({sup 3}H)yohimbine and ({sup 3}H)dihydroalprenolol binding sites in the cerebral cortex, while the number of ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding sites was reduced in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus, and increased in the hippocampus. Affinity constants were never modified. Concurrent experiments showed that the in vitro addition of T{sub 3} and PTU did not influence the binding of any of the ligands employed to control rat brain membranes. The present data further support the view that neurotransmission in the CNS is influenced by the thyroid status.

  8. Curcumin inhibits beta-amyloid protein 40/42 expression in the brain in a concentration-and time-dependent manner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhang; Lu Si; Xiaodong Shi; Wenke Yin; Yu Li

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the amount of beta-amyloid(Aβ)protein in the brain can be lowered by down-regulating Aβ production,promoting Aβ degradation,reducing Aβ oligomerization or deposition,thereby alleviating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.Curcumin has been known to be a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma(PPARy)agonist and can obviously inhibit Aβ production and oligomerization.This study investigated the effects of curcumin on the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1(BACE1)activity and PPARy expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells,and validated the inhibitory effects of curcumin on Aβ40/42 expression in the brain.Results revealed that PPARy mRNA and protein expression in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells significantly increased with increasing curcumin concentration and time course(P < 0.05);BACE1 mRNA and protein expression and Aβ40/42 production significantly decreased with increasing curcumin concentration and time course(P < 0.05).The changes in PPARY and BACE1expression during Aβ production could be reversed by the PPARy antagonist GW9662.These findings indicate that curcumin reduced Aβ production by activating PPARy expression and inhibiting BACE1 expression in a concentration-and time-dependent manner.

  9. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  10. The NMDAR subunit NR3A interacts with microtubule-associated protein 1S in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Samuelsson, Helena; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt;

    2007-01-01

    -proximal part of the NR3A C-terminus. MAP1S belongs to the same family as MAP1A and MAP1B, and was found to be abundant in both postnatal and adult rat brain. In hippocampal neurons the distribution-pattern of MAP1S resembled that of beta-tubulin III, but a fraction of the protein colocalized with synaptic......When screening a brain cDNA library, we found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR3A binds to microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 1S/chromosome 19 open reading frame 5 (C19ORF5). The interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and binding of MAP1S was localized to the membrane...

  11. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  12. The solution structure of the N-terminal domain of human tubulin binding cofactor C reveals a platform for tubulin interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Flor Garcia-Mayoral

    Full Text Available Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C (TBCC is a post-chaperonin involved in the folding and assembly of α- and β-tubulin monomers leading to the release of productive tubulin heterodimers ready to polymerize into microtubules. In this process it collaborates with other cofactors (TBC's A, B, D, and E and forms a supercomplex with TBCD, β-tubulin, TBCE and α-tubulin. Here, we demonstrate that TBCC depletion results in multipolar spindles and mitotic failure. Accordingly, TBCC is found at the centrosome and is implicated in bipolar spindle formation. We also determine by NMR the structure of the N-terminal domain of TBCC. The TBCC N-terminal domain adopts a spectrin-like fold topology composed of a left-handed 3-stranded α-helix bundle. Remarkably, the 30-residue N-terminal segment of the TBCC N-terminal domain is flexible and disordered in solution. This unstructured region is involved in the interaction with tubulin. Our data lead us to propose a testable model for TBCC N-terminal domain/tubulin recognition in which the highly charged N-terminus as well as residues from the three helices and the loops interact with the acidic hypervariable regions of tubulin monomers.

  13. The Solution Structure of the N-Terminal Domain of Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C Reveals a Platform for Tubulin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mayoral, Mª Flor; Castaño, Raquel; Fanarraga, Monica L.; Zabala, Juan Carlos; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C (TBCC) is a post-chaperonin involved in the folding and assembly of α- and β-tubulin monomers leading to the release of productive tubulin heterodimers ready to polymerize into microtubules. In this process it collaborates with other cofactors (TBC's A, B, D, and E) and forms a supercomplex with TBCD, β-tubulin, TBCE and α-tubulin. Here, we demonstrate that TBCC depletion results in multipolar spindles and mitotic failure. Accordingly, TBCC is found at the centrosome and is implicated in bipolar spindle formation. We also determine by NMR the structure of the N-terminal domain of TBCC. The TBCC N-terminal domain adopts a spectrin-like fold topology composed of a left-handed 3-stranded α-helix bundle. Remarkably, the 30-residue N-terminal segment of the TBCC N-terminal domain is flexible and disordered in solution. This unstructured region is involved in the interaction with tubulin. Our data lead us to propose a testable model for TBCC N-terminal domain/tubulin recognition in which the highly charged N-terminus as well as residues from the three helices and the loops interact with the acidic hypervariable regions of tubulin monomers. PMID:22028797

  14. Interaction of an Overexpressed gamma-Tubulin with Microtubules In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofron, M; Nadezdina, E; Vassilev, A; Matuliene, J; Essner, R; Kato, J; Kuriyama, R

    1998-08-01

    gamma-Tubulin is an ubiquitous MTOC (microtubule-organizing center) component essential for the regulation of microtubule functions. A 1.8 kb cDNA coding for gamma-tubulin was isolated from CHO cells. Analysis of nucleotide sequence predicts a protein of 451 amino acids, which is over 97% identical to human and Xenopus gamma-tubulin. When CHO cells were transiently transfected with the gamma-tubulin clone, epitope-tagged full-length, as well as truncated polypeptides (amino acids 1-398 and 1-340), resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic foci of various sizes. Although one of the foci was identified as the centrosome, the rest of the dots were not associated with any other centrosomal components tested so far. The pattern of microtubule organization was not affected by induction of such gamma-tubulin-containing dots in transfected cells. In addition, the cytoplasmic foci were unable to serve as the site for microtubule regrowth in nocodazole-treated cells upon removal of the drug, suggesting that gamma-tubulin-containing foci were not involved in the activity for microtubule formation and organization. Using the monomeric form of Chlamydomonas gamma-tubulin purified from insect Sf9 cells (), interaction between gamma-tubulin and microtubules was further investigated by immunoelectron microscopy. Microtubules incubated with gamma-tubulin monomers in vitro were associated with more gold particles conjugated with gamma-tubulin than in controls where no exogenous gamma-tubulin was added. However, binding of gamma-tubulin to microtubules was not extensive and was easily lost during sample preparation. Although gamma-tubulin was detected at the minus end of microtubules several times more frequently than the plus end, the majority of gold particles were seen along the microtubule length. These results contradict the previous reports (; ), which might be ascribed to the difference in the level of protein expression in transfected cells.

  15. Stathmin and interfacial microtubule inhibitors recognize a naturally curved conformation of tubulin dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Pascale; Dorléans, Audrey; Devred, Francois; Sanz, Laura; Allegro, Diane; Alfonso, Carlos; Knossow, Marcel; Peyrot, Vincent; Andreu, Jose M

    2010-10-08

    Tubulin is able to switch between a straight microtubule-like structure and a curved structure in complex with the stathmin-like domain of the RB3 protein (T(2)RB3). GTP hydrolysis following microtubule assembly induces protofilament curvature and disassembly. The conformation of the labile tubulin heterodimers is unknown. One important question is whether free GDP-tubulin dimers are straightened by GTP binding or if GTP-tubulin is also curved and switches into a straight conformation upon assembly. We have obtained insight into the bending flexibility of tubulin by analyzing the interplay of tubulin-stathmin association with the binding of several small molecule inhibitors to the colchicine domain at the tubulin intradimer interface, combining structural and biochemical approaches. The crystal structures of T(2)RB3 complexes with the chiral R and S isomers of ethyl-5-amino-2-methyl-1,2-dihydro-3-phenylpyrido[3,4-b]pyrazin-7-yl-carbamate, show that their binding site overlaps with colchicine ring A and that both complexes have the same curvature as unliganded T(2)RB3. The binding of these ligands is incompatible with a straight tubulin structure in microtubules. Analytical ultracentrifugation and binding measurements show that tubulin-stathmin associations (T(2)RB3, T(2)Stath) and binding of ligands (R, S, TN-16, or the colchicine analogue MTC) are thermodynamically independent from one another, irrespective of tubulin being bound to GTP or GDP. The fact that the interfacial ligands bind equally well to tubulin dimers or stathmin complexes supports a bent conformation of the free tubulin dimers. It is tempting to speculate that stathmin evolved to recognize curved structures in unassembled and disassembling tubulin, thus regulating microtubule assembly.

  16. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta thalassemia is found in people of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, African, South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin genes found on chromosomes ...

  17. Hypocotyl expression and light downregulation of the soybean tubulin gene, tubB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoike, H; Han, I S; Jongewaard, I; Doyle, M; Guiltinan, M; Fosket, D E

    1994-03-01

    The tubB1 beta-tubulin gene of Glycine max (previously named s beta 1) is highly expressed only in rapidly elongating regions of etiolated seedling hypocotyls and this expression is strongly downregulated when the seedlings are exposed to light. Primer extension demonstrated that the gene was transcribed in these tissues and contained two sites of transcriptional initiation. To determine the mechanism regulating tubB1 expression, a chimeric reporter gene was constructed by fusing 5' upstream regions of tubB1 to a promoterless beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene and these constructs were introduced into protoplasts by electroporation. Strong transient expression of the reporter gene was obtained after electroporation of chimeric constructs containing 1 kb of tubB1 5' upstream sequence into tobacco protoplasts. Deletion of the distal most 300 bp from the 5' sequence of tubB1 enhanced expression, suggesting the possibility of a negative transcriptional regulator in this region. Additional deletions of the 5' sequence reduced expression substantially. Constructs containing a tubB1 3' terminus were expressed at much lower levels than those containing a nopaline synthase (NOS) 3' terminus. The tubB1-GUS chimeric gene also was introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated Ti plasmid transformation and the organ-specific expression pattern of the chimeric gene was determined in seedlings of the transgenic plants. Hypocotyls exhibited strong GUS activity when the seedlings were germinated in darkness, but lacked the GUS enzyme when the seedlings were germinated in the light.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Pironetin reacts covalently with cysteine-316 of α-tubulin to destabilize microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Yuxi; Wang, Taijing; Jiang, Jian; Botting, Catherine H.; Liu, Huanting; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Jinliang; Naismith, James H.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Lijuan

    2016-06-01

    Molecules that alter the normal dynamics of microtubule assembly and disassembly include many anticancer drugs in clinical use. So far all such therapeutics target β-tubulin, and structural biology has explained the basis of their action and permitted design of new drugs. However, by shifting the profile of β-tubulin isoforms, cancer cells become resistant to treatment. Compounds that bind to α-tubulin are less well characterized and unexploited. The natural product pironetin is known to bind to α-tubulin and is a potent inhibitor of microtubule polymerization. Previous reports had identified that pironetin reacts with lysine-352 residue however analogues designed on this model had much lower potency, which was difficult to explain, hindering further development. We report crystallographic and mass spectrometric data that reveal that pironetin forms a covalent bond to cysteine-316 in α-tubulin via a Michael addition reaction. These data provide a basis for the rational design of α-tubulin targeting chemotherapeutics.

  19. Tubulin dynamics during the cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycle in artificially activated sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, G; Foucault, G; Raymond, M N; Pudles, J

    1983-12-01

    Sedimentation studies and [3H]colchicine-binding assays have demonstrated a relationship between the cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycles and the changes in tubulin organization in Paracentrotus lividus eggs activated by 2.5 mM procaine. The same amount of tubulin (20-25% of the total egg tubulin) is involved in these cyclic process and appears to undergo polymerization and depolymerization cycles. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the microtubules formed during these cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycles are under a particulate form which is sedimentable at low speed. Activation experiments carried out in the presence of cytochalasin B (CB) show that the increase in the cytoplasmic cohesiveness is highly reduced while tubulin polymerization and depolymerization cycles and pronuclear centration are not affected. Although tubulin or actin polymerization can be independently triggered in procaine-activated eggs, the increase in cytoplasmic cohesiveness requires the polymerization of both proteins. However, the cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycles appear to be regulated by tubulin polymerization and depolymerization cycles.

  20. Hyperresponsive febrile reactions to interleukin (IL) 1alpha and IL-1beta, and altered brain cytokine mRNA and serum cytokine levels, in IL-1beta-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alheim, K; Chai, Z; Fantuzzi, G; Hasanvan, H; Malinowsky, D; Di Santo, E; Ghezzi, P; Dinarello, C A; Bartfai, T

    1997-03-18

    IL-1beta is an endogenous pyrogen that is induced during systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or IL-1-induced fever. We have examined the fever and cytokine responses following i.p. injection of IL-1 agonists, IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, and compared these with response to LPS (i.p.) in wild-type and IL-1beta-deficient mice. The IL-1beta deficient mice appear to have elevated body temperature but exhibit a normal circadian temperature cycle. Exogenously injected IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, or LPS induced hyperresponsive fevers in the IL-1beta-deficient mice. We also observed phenotypic differences between wild-type and IL-1beta-deficient mice in hypothalamic basal mRNA levels for IL-1alpha and IL-6, but not for IL-1beta-converting enzyme or IL-1 receptor type I or type II. The IL-1alpha mRNA levels were down-regulated, whereas the IL-6 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of IL-1beta-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. The IL-1beta-deficient mice also responded to LPS challenge with significantly higher serum corticosterone and with lower serum tumor necrosis factor type alpha levels than the wild-type mice. The data suggest that, in the redundant cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta plays an important but not obligatory role in fever induction by LPS or IL-1alpha, as well as in the induction of serum tumor necrosis factor type alpha and corticosterone responses either by LPS or by IL-1alpha or IL-1beta.

  1. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; MacGibbon, Alastair; Fong, Bertram; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Karen; Rowan, Angela; McJarrow, Paul

    2015-06-05

    We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16) or blank gels (n = 16) from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark-light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

  2. S-adenosylmethionine Administration Attenuates Low Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression Induced by Chronic Cerebrovascular Hypoperfusion or Beta Amyloid Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Cui, Jing; Fang, Chen; Zhang, Xiaowen; Li, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Chronic cerebrovascular hypoperfusion is a high-risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it is conducive to beta amyloid (Aβ) over-production. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family widely expressed in the central nervous system. The structure of the rat BDNF gene is complex, consisting of eight non-coding exons (I-VIII) and one coding exon (IX). The BDNF gene is transcribed from multiple promoters located upstream of different 5' non-coding exons to produce a heterogeneous population of BDNF mRNAs. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) produced in the methionine cycle is the primary methyl donor and the precursor of glutathione. In this study, a cerebrovascular hypoperfusion rat model and an Aβ intrahippocampal injection rat model were used to explore the expression profiles of all BDNF transcripts in the hippocampus with chronic cerebrovascular hypoperfusion or Aβ injection as well as with SAM treatment. We found that the BDNF mRNAs and protein were down-regulated in the hippocampus undergoing chronic cerebrovascular hypoperfusion as well as Aβ treatment, and BDNF exons IV and VI played key roles. SAM improved the low BDNF expression following these insults mainly through exons IV and VI. These results suggest that SAM plays a neuroprotective role by increasing the expression of endogenous BDNF and could be a potential target for AD therapy.

  3. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC, a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Guan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16 or blank gels (n = 16 from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark–light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

  4. Brain death provokes very acute alteration in myocardial morphology detected by echocardiography: preventive effect of beta-blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, René; Hadour, Guylaine; Tamion, Fabienne; Henry, Jean-Paul; Mulder, Paul; Richard, Vincent; Thuillez, Christian; Ovize, Michel; Derumeaux, Geneviève

    2011-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate immediate acute changes in myocardial function during the autonomic storm of brain death (BD). Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 8/group): controls without any treatment, β-blocker (Esmolol®, 10 mg/kg), calcium channel blocker (Diltiazem®, 10 mg/kg), or alpha-blocker (Prazosin®, 0.3 mg/kg). Treatments were administered intravenously 5 min before BD induction. Echocardiography (ATL-5000, 8 MHz) was performed to measure left ventricular (LV) dimensions and fractional shortening at baseline, during BD induction and 5 min and 15 min after BD. In controls, BD was immediately associated with an increase in wall thickness and a decrease in LV cavity dimension. This myocardial wall hypertrophy was completely prevented by β-blockers, but not with calcium- and alpha-blockers. Extensive myocardial interstitial edema was found in all groups, except in the β-blocker group. Myocardial wall hypertrophy was also prevented during a longer follow-up of 180 min after BD in β-blocker group as opposed to controls. In conclusion, BD is associated with an immediate and severe myocardial damage related to an important interstitial edema which is prevented by β-blockers.

  5. MEC-17 deficiency leads to reduced α-tubulin acetylation and impaired migration of cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wei, Dan; Wang, Qiong; Pan, Jing; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2012-09-12

    Neuronal migration is a fundamental process during the development of the cerebral cortex and is regulated by cytoskeletal components. Microtubule dynamics can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to tubulin subunits. Acetylation of α-tubulin at lysine 40 is important in regulating microtubule properties, and this process is controlled by acetyltransferase and deacetylase. MEC-17 is a newly discovered α-tubulin acetyltransferase that has been found to play a major role in the acetylation of α-tubulin in different species in vivo. However, the physiological function of MEC-17 during neural development is largely unknown. Here, we report that MEC-17 is critical for the migration of cortical neurons in the rat. MEC-17 was strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex during development. MEC-17 deficiency caused migratory defects in the cortical projection neurons and interneurons, and perturbed the transition of projection neurons from the multipolar stage to the unipolar/bipolar stage in the intermediate zone of the cortex. Furthermore, knockdown of α-tubulin deacetylase HDAC6 or overexpression of tubulin(K40Q) to mimic acetylated α-tubulin could reduce the migratory and morphological defects caused by MEC-17 deficiency in cortical projection neurons. Thus, MEC-17, which regulates the acetylation of α-tubulin, appears to control the migration and morphological transition of cortical neurons. This finding reveals the importance of MEC-17 and α-tubulin acetylation in cortical development.

  6. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  7. HDAC6 deacetylates alpha tubulin in sperm and modulates sperm motility in Holtzman rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Sweta; Shetty, Omshree; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, Nafisa; Khole, Vrinda; Parte, Priyanka

    2015-02-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an alpha (α)-tubulin deacetylase and its over-expression has been demonstrated to promote chemotactic cell movement. Motility in sperm is driven by the flagella, the cytoskeletal structure comprising the microtubules, which are heterodimers of α- and β-tubulins. We have hypothesized that HDAC6, by virtue of being an α-tubulin deacetylase, might modulate sperm motility. However, the presence of HDAC6 on sperm has hitherto not been reported. In this study, we have demonstrated, for the first time, the presence of HDAC6 transcript and protein in the testicular and caudal sperm of rat. We have observed a significantly overlapping expression of HDAC6 with acetyl α-tubulin (Ac α-tubulin) in the mid-piece and principal piece of sperm flagella, and the co-precipitation of α-tubulin and Ac α-tubulin together with HDAC6 and vice versa in sperm lysates. This indicates that HDAC6 interacts with α-tubulin. The HDAC6 activity of sperm, sperm motility and status of Ac α-tubulin investigated in the presence of HDAC inhibitors Trichostatin A, Tubastatin A and sodium butyrate demonstrate that HDAC6 in sperm is catalytically active and that inhibitors of HDAC6 increase acetylation and restrict sperm motility. Thus, we show that (1) active HDAC6 enzyme is present in sperm, (2) HDAC6 in sperm is able to deacetylate α-tubulin, (3) inhibition of HDAC6 results in increased Ac α-tubulin expression and (4) HDAC6 inhibition affects sperm motility. This evidence suggests that HDAC6 is involved in modulating sperm movement.

  8. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Is Feasible for Plant Tubulin Assembly In vitro: A Comprehensive Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hua XU; Shan-Jin HUANG; Ming YUAN

    2005-01-01

    It is much more difficult for tubulin from plant sources to polymerize in vitro than tubulin from animal sources. Taxol, a most widely used reagent in microtubule studies, enhances plant microtubule assembly, but hinders microtubule dynamics. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a widely used reagent in animal microtubule studies, is a good candidate for the investigation of plant microtubule assembly in vitro.However, proper investigation is lacking about the effects of DMSO on plant microtubule assembly in vitro.In the present study, DMSO was used to establish optimal conditions for the polymerization of plant tubulin. Tubulin, purified from lily pollen, polymerizes into microtubules at a critical concentration of 1.2mg/mL in the presence of 10% DMSO. The polymers appear to have a normal microtubule structure, as revealed by electron microscopy. In the presence of 10% DMSO, microtubule polymerization decreases when the pH of the medium is increased from 6.5 to 7.4. Both the polymerization rate and the mass of the polymers increase as temperature increases from 25 to 40 ℃. Tubulin polymerizes and depolymerizes along with cycling of temperature, from 37 to 4 ℃, or following the addition to or the removal of Ca2+ from the medium. When incubated with nuclei isolated from tobacco BY-2 suspension cells, tubulin assembles onto the nuclear surface in the presence of 10% DMSO. Labeling lily pollen tubulin with 5- (and 6-)carboxytetramethyl-rhodamine succinimidyl ester (NHS-rhodamine) was performed successfully in the presence of 10% DMSO. Labeled tubulin assembles into a radial structure on the surface of BY-2 nuclei. The polymerization of lily pollen tubulin is also enhanced by microtubule-associated proteins from animal sources in the presence of 10% DMSO. All the experimental results indicate that plant tubulin functions normally in the presence of DMSO. Therefore, DMSO is an appropriate reagent for plant tubulin polymerization and investigation of plant microtubules in

  9. A novel mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis induced by lupeol via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibition and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingli; Tu, Yi; He, Wen; Peng, Yan; Qiu, Zhenpeng

    2015-09-05

    Lupeol is a naturally available triterpenoid with selective anticancerous potential on various human cancer cells. The present study shows that lupeol can inhibit cell proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HCCLM3 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, through caspase-3 dependent activation and Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Lupeol-induced cell death is associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and ser-9-phosphoryltion of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Beta (GSK-3β), with concomitant suppression of Akt1, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), β-catenin, c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA expression. Suppressing overexpression of BDNF by lupeol results in decreased protein expression of p-Akt and PI3K (p110α), as well as reactivation of GSK-3β function in HepG2 cells. Lupeol treatment also inhibits LiCl-induced activation of Wnt signaling pathway and exerts the in vitro anti-invasive activity in Huh-7 cells. LiCl-triggered high expression of β-catenin, c-Myc and Cyclin D1 protein is reduced followed by lupeol exposure. The findings suggest a mechanistic link between caspase dependent pathway, BDNF secretion and Akt/PI3K/GSK-3β in HCC cells. These results indicate that lupeol can suppress HCC cell proliferation by inhibiting BDNF secretion and phosphorylation of GSK-3β(Ser-9), cooperated with blockade of Akt/PI3K and Wnt signaling pathway.

  10. JWA protein binds to α-tubulin in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hairong; LI Aiqun; LI Aiping; ZHOU Jianwei

    2004-01-01

    Our previous study elucidated that JWA protein was a newly identified microtubule-associated protein (MAP), which combined to and co-localized with β-tubulin.In the present study, we designed a series of experiments to explore if any interactions between JWA protein and α-tubulin existed and how JWA protein would functionally link to α-tubulin, especially in cell mitosis. Results of coimmunoprecipitation, gene transfection and immunofluorescence microscopy from PC12 and HEK293 cells provided strong evidence for a linkage between JWA protein and α-tubulin. Our data showed that JWA protein bound to α-tubulin stably no matter whether α-tubulin was polymerized or not. In addition, by using antisense oligonucleotides, cell cycle blocking agents and hypothermia disposal techniques,we also found the interaction between JWA protein and α-tubulin. The further analysis using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that both proteins co-existed in PC12 cells and were independent on the cell cycle. In conclusion, JWA protein is a newly identified microtubuleassociated protein, binds to α-tubulin, and probably plays an important role in regulation of microtubular stability.

  11. Comparative modelling of human β tubulin isotypes and implications for drug binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torin Huzil, J.; Ludueña, Richard F.; Tuszynski, Jack

    2006-02-01

    The protein tubulin is a target for several anti-mitotic drugs, which affect microtubule dynamics, ultimately leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Many of these drugs, including the taxanes and Vinca alkaloids, are currently used clinically in the treatment of several types of cancer. Another tubulin binding drug, colchicine, although too toxic to be used as a chemotherapeutic agent, is commonly used for the treatment of gout. The main disadvantage that all of these drugs share is that they bind tubulin indiscriminately, leading to the death of both cancerous and healthy cells. However, the broad cellular distribution of several tubulin isotypes provides a platform upon which to construct novel chemotherapeutic drugs that could differentiate between different cell types, reducing the undesirable side effects associated with current chemotherapeutic treatments. Here, we report an analysis of ten human β tubulin isotypes and discuss differences within each of the previously characterized paclitaxel, colchicine and vinblastine binding sites.

  12. Upregulation of Na+,Cl--Coupled Betaine/ γ-Amino-Butyric Acid Transporter BGT1 by Tau Tubulin Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Almilaji

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The serine/threonine kinase Tau-tubulin-kinase 2 (TTBK2 is expressed in various tissues including kidney, liver and brain. Loss of function mutations of TTBK2 lead to autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 11 (SCA11. Cell survival is fostered by cellular accumulation of organic osmolytes. Carriers accomplishing cellular accumulation of organic osmolytes include the Na+, Cl--coupled betaine/γ-amino-butyric acid transporter BGT1. The present study explored whether TTBK2 participates in the regulation of BGT1 activity. Methods: Electrogenic transport of GABA was determined in Xenopus oocytes expressing BGT1 with or without wild-type TTBK2, truncated TTBK2[1-450] or kinase inactive mutants TTBK2- KD and TTBK2[1-450]-KD. Results: Coexpression of wild-type TTBK2, but not of TTBK2[1-450], TTBK2-KD or TTBK2[1-450]-KD, increased electrogenic GABA transport. Wildtype TTBK2 increased the maximal transport rate without significantly modifying affinity of the carrier. Coexpression of wild-type TTBK2 significantly delayed the decline of transport following inhibition of carrier insertion with brefeldin A, indicating that wild-type TTBK2 increased carrier stability in the cell membrane. Conclusion: Tau-tubulin-kinase 2 TTBK2 is a powerful stimulator of the osmolyte and GABA transporter BGT1.

  13. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the TCP-1 Tubulin Chaperone Complex [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J; Rogala, Kacper B; Deane, Charlotte M; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G

    2015-06-29

    Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies, but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs.

  14. Evolutionary relationships in Aspergillus section Fumigati inferred from partial beta-tubulin and hydrophobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiser, D.M.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Taylor, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Members of Aspergillus section Fumigati are important animal pathogens and food contaminants. There is considerable variation among the 16 currently recognized species in this section, particularly in their mating systems: five are known to be strictly mitosporic, nine are homothallic, and two ar...

  15. Increase in expression level of alpha-tubulin gene in Arabidopsis seedlings under hypergravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuka; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-10-01

    Under hypergravity conditions, elongation growth of plant shoots is suppressed. The analysis of the changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method showed that a gene encoding alpha-tubulin, which is a component of microtubules, was up-regulated by hypergravity. In Arabidopsis six genes encoding alpha-tubulin (TUA1-TUA6) have been identified. In the present study, we examined the dose-response and the time course relations of the changes in the expression of all six alpha-tubulin genes in Arabidopsis hypocotyls grown under hypergravity conditions. The expression levels of all six alpha-tubulin genes, TUA1-TUA6, were increased by increasing gravity, although the extent was variable among genes. The increase in expression of all alpha-tubulin genes was detected within a few hours, when the seedlings grown at 1 g were transferred to 300 g condition. These results suggest that Arabidopsis hypocotyls regulate the expression level of six alpha-tubulin genes promptly in response to gravity stimuli. The increase in the amount of microtubules due to the activation of tubulin gene expression may be involved in the regulation by gravity signal of shoot growth.

  16. beta-Estradiol induces synaptogenesis in the hippocampus by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor release from dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Akaishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuki, Norio; Ohno, Yasuo; Nakazawa, Ken

    2007-05-30

    We investigated the effect of beta-estradiol (E2) on synaptogenesis in the hippocampus using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and subregional hippocampal neuron cultures. E2 increased the expression of PSD95, a postsynaptic marker, specifically in stratum lucidum of Cornu Ammonis 3 (CA3SL) in cultured hippocampal slices. E2 also increased the spine density at the proximal site of CA3 apical dendrites in CA3SL and PSD95 was clustered on these spine heads. The effects of E2 on the expression of PSD95 and the spine density disappeared when the dentate gyrus (DG) had been excised at 1 day in vitro (DIV). FM1-43 analysis of subregional hippocampal neuron cultures which were comprised of Ammon's horn neurons, DG neurons, or a mixture of these neurons, revealed that E2 increased the number of presynaptic sites in the cultures that contained DG neurons. K252a, a potent inhibitor of the high affinity receptor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and function-blocking antibody to BDNF (BDNFAB) completely inhibited the effects of E2 in hippocampal slice cultures and subregional neuron cultures, whereas ICI182,780 (ICI), a strong antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptors (nERs), did not. Expression of BDNF in DG neurons was markedly higher than that in Ammon's horn neurons and E2 did not affect these expression levels. E2 significantly increased the BDNF release from DG neurons. KT5720, a specific inhibitor of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and Rp-adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate triethylammonium salt (Rp-cAMP), a non-hydrolyzable diastereoisomer and a potent inhibitor of PKA, completely suppressed the E2-induced increase in BDNF release, whereas ICI and U0126, a potent inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), did not. These results suggest that E2 induces synaptogenesis between mossy fibers and CA3 neurons by enhancing BDNF release from DG granule cells in a nER-independent and PKA-dependent manner.

  17. PET imaging of brain with the {beta}-amyloid probe, [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1, in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan); National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ye, Daniel; Cohen, Robert M. [National Institutes of Health, Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Cai, Lisheng; Musachio, John L.; Hong, Jinsoo; Crescenzo, Mathew; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Zoghbi, Sami; Vines, Douglass C.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Jacobowitz, David [USUHS, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V. [National Institutes of Health, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Katada, Kazuhiro [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 and positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET imaging was performed with the NIH ATLAS small animal scanner in six elderly transgenic mice (Tg2576; age 22.0{+-}1.8 months; 23.6{+-}2.6 g) overexpressing a mutated form of human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) known to result in the production of A{beta} plaques, and in six elderly wild-type litter mates (age 21.8{+-}1.6 months; 29.5{+-}4.7 g). Dynamic PET scans were performed for 30 min in each mouse under 1% isoflurane inhalation anesthesia after a bolus injection of 13-46 MBq of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1. PET data were reconstructed with 3D OSEM. On the coronal PET image, irregular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on frontal cortex (FR), parietal cortex (PA), striatum (ST), thalamus (TH), pons (PO), and cerebellum (CE), guided by a mouse stereotaxic atlas. Time-activity curves (TACs) (expressed as percent injected dose per gram normalized to body weight: % ID-kg/g) were obtained for FR, PA, ST, TH, PO, and CE. ROI-to-CE radioactivity ratios were also calculated. Following PET scans, sections of mouse brain prepared from anesthetized and fixative-perfused mice were stained with thioflavin-S. TACs for [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 in all ROIs peaked early (at 30-55 s), with radioactivity washing out quickly thereafter in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Peak uptake in all regions was significantly lower in transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. During the later part of the washout phase (12-30 min), the mean FR/CE and PA/CE ratios were higher in transgenic than in wild-type mice (1.06{+-}0.04 vs 0.98{+-}0.07, p=0.04; 1.06{+-}0.09 vs 0.93{+-}0.08 p=0.02) while ST/CE, TH/CE, and PO/CE ratios were not. Ex vivo staining revealed widespread A{beta} plaques in cortex, but not in cerebellum of transgenic mice or in any brain regions of wild

  18. Neuron-specific expression of p48 Ebp1 during murine brain development and its contribution to CNS axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyo Rim; Hwang, Inwoo; Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2017-03-01

    P48 Ebp1 is expressed in rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells and accelerates cell growth and survival. However, its expression pattern and role in central nervous system development have not been studied. Here, we demonstrated the spatiotemporal expression pattern of p48 Ebp1 during embryonic development and the postnatal period. During embryonic development, p48 Ebp1 was highly expressed in the brain. Expression gradually decreased after birth but was still more abundant than p42 expression after birth. Strikingly, we found that p48 Ebp1 was expressed in a cell type specific manner in neurons but not astrocytes. Moreover, p48 Ebp1 physically interacted with beta tubulin but not alpha tubulin. This fits with its accumulation in distal microtubule growth cone regions. Furthermore, in injured hippocampal slices, p48 Ebp1 introduction promoted axon regeneration. Thus, we speculate that p48 Ebp1 might contribute to microtubule dynamics acting as an MAP and promotes CNS axon regeneration. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 126-131].

  19. High-affinity accumulation of a maytansinoid in cells via weak tubulin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmacher, Victor S; Audette, Charlene A; Guan, Yinghua; Sidhom, Eriene-Heidi; Shah, Jagesh V; Whiteman, Kathleen R; Kovtun, Yelena V

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-targeting maytansinoids accumulate in cells and induce mitotic arrest at 250- to 1000-fold lower concentrations than those required for their association with tubulin or microtubules. To identify the mechanisms of this intracellular accumulation and exceptional cytotoxicity of maytansinoids we studied interaction of a highly cytotoxic maytansinoid, S-methyl DM1 and several other maytansinoids with cells. S-methyl DM1 accumulated inside the cells with a markedly higher apparent affinity than to tubulin or microtubules. The apparent affinities of maytansinoids correlated with their cytotoxicities. The number of intracellular binding sites for S-methyl DM1 in MCF7 cells was comparable to the number of tubulin molecules per cell (~ 4-6 × 10(7) copies). Efflux of 3[H]-S-methyl DM1 from cells was enhanced in the presence of an excess of non-labeled S-methyl DM1, indicating that re-binding of 3 [H]-S-methyl DM1 to intracellular binding sites contributed to its intracellular retention. Liposomes loaded with non-polymerized tubulin recapitulated the apparent high-affinity association of S-methyl DM1 to cells. We propose a model for the intracellular accumulation of maytansinoids in which molecules of the compounds diffuse into a cell and associate with tubulin. Affinities of maytansinoids for individual tubulin molecules are weak, but the high intracellular concentration of tubulin favors, after dissociation of a compound-tubulin complex, their re-binding to a tubulin molecule, or to a tip of a microtubule in the same cell, over their efflux. As a result, a significant fraction of microtubule tips is occupied with a maytansinoid when added to cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, inducing mitotic arrest and cell death.

  20. The interplay between tubulins and P450 cytochromes during Plasmodium berghei invasion of Anopheles gambiae midgut.

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    Rute C Félix

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium infection increases the oxidative stress inside the mosquito, leading to a significant alteration on transcription of Anopheles gambiae detoxification genes. Among these detoxification genes several P450 cytochromes and tubulins were differently expressed, suggesting their involvement in the mosquito's response to parasite invasion. P450 cytochromes are usually involved in the metabolism and detoxification of several compounds, but are also regulated by several pathogens, including malaria parasite. Tubulins are extremely important as components of the cytoskeleton, which rearrangement functions as a response to malaria parasite invasion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene silencing methods were used to uncover the effects of cytochrome P450 reductase, tubulinA and tubulinB silencing on the A. gambiae response to Plasmodium berghei invasion. The role of tubulins in counter infection processes was also investigated by inhibiting their effect. Colchicine, vinblastine and paclitaxel, three different tubulin inhibitors were injected into A. gambiae mosquitoes. Twenty-four hours post injection these mosquitoes were infected with P. berghei through a blood meal from infected CD1 mice. Cytochrome P450 gene expression was measured using RT-qPCR to detect differences in cytochrome expression between silenced, inhibited and control mosquitoes. Results showed that cytochrome P450 reductase silencing, as well as tubulin (A and B silencing and inhibition affected the efficiency of Plasmodium infection. Silencing and inhibition also affected the expression levels of cytochromes P450. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest the existence of a relationship between tubulins and P450 cytochromes during A. gambiae immune response to P. berghei invasion. One of the P450 cytochromes in this study, CYP6Z2, stands out as the potential link in this association. Further work is needed to fully understand the role of tubulin genes in the response to

  1. Tubulin posttranslational modifications induced by cadmium in the sponge Clathrina clathrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledda, F.D., E-mail: f.ledda@hotmail.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell’Ambiente e della Vita (DISTAV), Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, I-16132 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze della Natura e del Territorio (DIPNET), Università di Sassari, Via Muroni 25, I-07100 Sassari (Italy); Ramoino, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell’Ambiente e della Vita (DISTAV), Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, I-16132 Genova (Italy); Ravera, S. [Dipartimento di Farmacia (DIFAR), Viale Cembrano 4, I-16147 Genova (Italy); Perino, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell’Ambiente e della Vita (DISTAV), Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, I-16132 Genova (Italy); Bianchini, P. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Dipartimento di Nanofisica, Via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Diaspro, A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Dipartimento di Nanofisica, Via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica (DIFI), Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Gallus, L.; Pronzato, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell’Ambiente e della Vita (DISTAV), Università di Genova, Corso Europa 26, I-16132 Genova (Italy); Manconi, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Natura e del Territorio (DIPNET), Università di Sassari, Via Muroni 25, I-07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •The effect of Cd{sup 2+} on Clathrina clathrus microtubule network was studied. •Cd{sup 2+} exposure increases acetylated and detyrosinated α-tubulin levels. •Microtubules enriched in acetylated/detyrosinated α-tubulin were resistant to cold. •Clathrina clathrus exposed to Cd{sup 2+} showed cytoplasmic microtubules with an enhanced stability. -- Abstract: As sessile filter feeders, sponges are exposed to environmental stress due to pollutants of both anthropogenic and natural origins and are able to accumulate harmful substances. Thus, sponges are considered a good tool for the biomonitoring of coastal areas. In this study, we used biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses to provide new data on the cadmium-related changes in sponge cells. In particular, we analyzed the effects of different concentrations of cadmium on the microtubule network in the calcisponge Clathrina clathrus. Quantitative densitometry of the immunoblots showed that, while the levels of α- and β-tubulin remained relatively constant in C. clathrus when exposed to 1 and 5 μM CdCl{sub 2}, there were progressive shifts in the levels of some tubulin isoforms. Exposure for 24 h to sublethal concentrations of cadmium reduced the level of tyrosinated α-tubulin and enhanced the levels of acetylated and detyrosinated α-tubulin relative to the levels in controls. Confocal microscopy analysis of immunolabeled tissue sections showed that the inhibitory effect of cadmium was associated with a decrease in the labeling of the cells with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes tyrosinated α-tubulin. By contrast, the reactivity with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes acetylated α-tubulin and with a polyclonal antibody specific for detyrosinated α-tubulin was enhanced at the same time points. Because the acetylation and detyrosination of α-tubulin occur on stable microtubules, the marked enhancement of α-tubulin acetylation and detyrosination in Cd{sup 2+}-treated cells

  2. Recognition and characterization of Erythropoietin binding-proteins in the brain of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kowsari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Erythropoietin (EPO, is a 34KDa glycoprotein hormone, which belongs to type 1 cytokine superfamily. EPO involves in erythrocyte maturation through inhibition of apoptosis in erythroid cells. Besides its main function, protective effects of EPO in heart and brain tissues have been reported. EPO has a critical role in development, growth, and homeostasis of brain. Furthermore EPO has great potential in the recovery of different brain diseases which are still under studying. In this research, EPO binding pattern to brain proteins in animal model was studied. Materials and Methods:EPO antibody was covalently crosslinked to protein A/G agarose. in order to interact between EPO  and its target in brain,  about 5µg EPO added to brain homogenates(500ul of 1 mg/ml and incubate at 4ο C for 30 min. brain tissue lysate were added to agarose beads, After isolation of target proteins(EPO - protein both one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis were performed. Proteins were identified utilizing MALDI-TOF/TOF and MASCOT software. Results: This research showed that EPO could physically interact with eightproteins including  Tubulin beta, Actin cytoplasmic 2, T-complex protein 1, TPR and ankyrin repeat-containing protein 1, Centromere-associated protein E, Kinesin-like protein KIF7, Growth arrest-specific protein 2 and  Pleckstrin homology-like domain family B member 2. Conclusion: Since EPO is a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of neurological diseases, identified proteins may help us to have a better understanding about the mechanism of protective effects of EPO in the brain. Our data needs to be validated by complementary bioassays.

  3. Recognition and characterization of Erythropoietin binding-proteins in the brain of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowsari, Reza; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Pourtaji, Atena; Ghorbani, Maryam; Moghadam-Omranipour, Hediye; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Lari, Parisa; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Erythropoietin (EPO), is a 34KDa glycoprotein hormone, which belongs to type 1 cytokine superfamily. EPO involves in erythrocyte maturation through inhibition of apoptosis in erythroid cells. Besides its main function, protective effects of EPO in heart and brain tissues have been reported. EPO has a critical role in development, growth, and homeostasis of brain. Furthermore EPO has great potential in the recovery of different brain diseases which are still under studying. In this research, EPO binding pattern to brain proteins in animal model was studied. Materials and Methods: EPO antibody was covalently crosslinked to protein A/G agarose. in order to interact between EPO and its target in brain, about 5µg EPO added to brain homogenates(500ul of 1 mg/ml) and incubate at 4ο C for 30 min. brain tissue lysate were added to agarose beads, After isolation of target proteins(EPO - protein) both one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis were performed. Proteins were identified utilizing MALDI-TOF/TOF and MASCOT software. Results: This research showed that EPO could physically interact with eightproteins including Tubulin beta, Actin cytoplasmic 2, T-complex protein 1, TPR and ankyrin repeat-containing protein 1, Centromere-associated protein E, Kinesin-like protein KIF7, Growth arrest-specific protein 2 and Pleckstrin homology-like domain family B member 2. Conclusion: Since EPO is a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of neurological diseases, identified proteins may help us to have a better understanding about the mechanism of protective effects of EPO in the brain. Our data needs to be validated by complementary bioassays. PMID:27803781

  4. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood-brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein-dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals.

  5. Obesity in Aging Exacerbates Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption, Neuroinflammation, and Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Hippocampus: Effects on Expression of Genes Involved in Beta-Amyloid Generation and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E.; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet–fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood–brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood–brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein–dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood–brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals. PMID:24269929

  6. Role of delta-tubulin and the C-tubule in assembly of Paramecium basal bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisson Janine

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A breakthrough in the understanding of centriole assembly was provided by the characterization of the UNI3 gene in Chlamydomonas. Deletion of this gene, found to encode a novel member of the tubulin superfamily, delta-tubulin, results in the loss of the C-tubule, in the nine microtubule triplets which are the hallmark of centrioles and basal bodies. Delta-tubulin homologs have been identified in the genomes of mammals and protozoa, but their phylogenetic relationships are unclear and their function is not yet known. Results Using the method of gene-specific silencing, we have inactivated the Paramecium delta-tubulin gene, which was recently identified. This inactivation leads to loss of the C-tubule in all basal bodies, without any effect on ciliogenesis. This deficiency does not directly affect basal body duplication, but perturbs the cortical cytoskeleton, progressively leading to mislocalization and loss of basal bodies and to altered cell size and shape. Furthermore, additional loss of B- and even A-tubules at one or more triplet sites are observed: around these incomplete cylinders, the remaining doublets are nevertheless positioned according to the native ninefold symmetry. Conclusions The fact that in two distinct phyla, delta-tubulin plays a similar role provides a new basis for interpreting phylogenetic relationships among delta-tubulins. The role of delta-tubulin in C-tubule assembly reveals that tubulins contribute subtle specificities at microtubule nucleation sites. Our observations also demonstrate the existence of a prepattern for the ninefold symmetry of the organelle which is maintained even if less than 9 triplets develop.

  7. Anion-induced increases in the affinity of colcemid binding to tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, K; Bhattacharyya, B; Biswas, B B

    1984-08-01

    Colcemid binds tubulin rapidly and reversibly in contrast to colchicine which binds tubulin relatively slowly and essentially irreversibly. At 37 degrees C the association rate constant for colcemid binding is 1.88 X 10(6) M-1 h-1, about 10 times higher than that for colchicine; this is reflected in the activation energies for binding which are 51.4 kJ/mol for colcemid and 84.8 kJ/mol for colchicine. Scatchard analysis indicates two binding sites on tubulin having different affinities for colcemid. The high-affinity site (Ka = 0.7 X 10(5) M-1 at 37 degrees C) is sensitive to temperature and binds both colchicine and colcemid and hence they are mutually competitive inhibitors. The low-affinity site (Kb = 1.2 X 10(4) M-1) is rather insensitive to temperature and binds only colcemid. Like colchicine, 0.6 mol of colcemid are bound/mol of tubulin dimer (at the high-affinity site) and the reaction is entropy driven (163 J K-1 mol-1). Similar to colchicine, colcemid binding to tubulin is stimulated by certain anions (viz. sulfate and tartrate) but by a different mechanism. Colcemid binding affinity at the lower-affinity site of tubulin is increased in the presence of ammonium sulfate. Interestingly, the lower-affinity site on tubulin for colcemid, even when converted to higher affinity in presence of ammonium sulfate, is not recognized by colchicine. We conclude that tubulin possesses two binding sites, one of which specifically recognized the groups present on the B-ring of colchicine molecule and is effected by the ammonium sulfate, whereas the higher-affinity site, which could accommodate both colchicine and colcemid, possibly recognized the A and C ring of colchicine.

  8. Kinetics of the neuroinflammation-oxidative stress correlation in rat brain following the injection of fibrillar amyloid-beta onto the hippocampus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Valdivia-Velázquez, Miguel; Acosta-Martínez, J Pablo; Ortiz, Genaro G

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe-following the injection of a single intracerebral dose of fibrillar amyloid-beta(1-40) in vivo-some correlations between proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress indicators in function of time, as well as how these variables fit in a regression model. We found a positive, significant correlation between interleukin (IL)-1beta or IL-6 and the activity of the glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px), but IL-1beta or IL-6 maintained a strong, negative correlation with the lipid peroxidation (LPO). The first 12 h marked a positive correlation between IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), but starting from the 36 h, this relationship became negative. We found also particular patterns of behavior through the time for IL-1beta, nitrites and IL-6, with parallel or sequential interrelationships. Results shows clearly that, in vivo, the fibrillar amyloid-beta (Abeta) disrupts the oxidative balance and initiate a proinflammatory response, which in turn feeds the oxidative imbalance in a coordinated, sequential way. This work contributes to our understanding of the positive feedbacks, focusing the "cytokine cycle" along with the oxidative stress mediators in a complex, multicellular, and interactive environment.

  9. Polyamine sharing between tubulin dimers favours microtubule nucleation and elongation via facilitated diffusion.

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    Alain Mechulam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest for the first time that the action of multivalent cations on microtubule dynamics can result from facilitated diffusion of GTP-tubulin to the microtubule ends. Facilitated diffusion can promote microtubule assembly, because, upon encountering a growing nucleus or the microtubule wall, random GTP-tubulin sliding on their surfaces will increase the probability of association to the target sites (nucleation sites or MT ends. This is an original explanation for understanding the apparent discrepancy between the high rate of microtubule elongation and the low rate of tubulin association at the microtubule ends in the viscous cytoplasm. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion requires an attraction force between two tubulins, which can result from the sharing of multivalent counterions. Natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are present in all living cells and are potent agents to trigger tubulin self-attraction. By using an analytical model, we analyze the implication of facilitated diffusion mediated by polyamines on nucleation and elongation of microtubules. In vitro experiments using pure tubulin indicate that the promotion of microtubule assembly by polyamines is typical of facilitated diffusion. The results presented here show that polyamines can be of particular importance for the regulation of the microtubule network in vivo and provide the basis for further investigations into the effects of facilitated diffusion on cytoskeleton dynamics.

  10. Microtubule-associated proteins and tubulin interaction by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, P O; Barbier, P; Breuzard, G; Peyrot, V; Devred, F

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules play an important role in a number of vital cell processes such as cell division, intracellular transport, and cell architecture. The highly dynamic structure of microtubules is tightly regulated by a number of stabilizing and destabilizing microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), such as tau and stathmin. Because of their importance, tubulin-MAPs interactions have been extensively studied using various methods that provide researchers with complementary but sometimes contradictory thermodynamic data. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only direct thermodynamic method that enables a full thermodynamic characterization (stoichiometry, enthalpy, entropy of binding, and association constant) of the interaction after a single titration experiment. This method has been recently applied to study tubulin-MAPs interactions in order to bring new insights into molecular mechanisms of tubulin regulation. In this chapter, we review the technical specificity of this method and then focus on the use of ITC in the investigation of tubulin-MAPs binding. We describe technical issues which could arise during planning and carrying out the ITC experiments, in particular with fragile proteins such as tubulin. Using examples of stathmin and tau, we demonstrate how ITC can be used to gain major insights into tubulin-MAP interaction.

  11. Pironetin reacts covalently with cysteine-316 of α-tubulin to destabilize microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Yuxi; Wang, Taijing; Jiang, Jian; Botting, Catherine H.; Liu, Huanting; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Jinliang; Naismith, James H.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Molecules that alter the normal dynamics of microtubule assembly and disassembly include many anticancer drugs in clinical use. So far all such therapeutics target β-tubulin, and structural biology has explained the basis of their action and permitted design of new drugs. However, by shifting the profile of β-tubulin isoforms, cancer cells become resistant to treatment. Compounds that bind to α-tubulin are less well characterized and unexploited. The natural product pironetin is known to bind to α-tubulin and is a potent inhibitor of microtubule polymerization. Previous reports had identified that pironetin reacts with lysine-352 residue however analogues designed on this model had much lower potency, which was difficult to explain, hindering further development. We report crystallographic and mass spectrometric data that reveal that pironetin forms a covalent bond to cysteine-316 in α-tubulin via a Michael addition reaction. These data provide a basis for the rational design of α-tubulin targeting chemotherapeutics. PMID:27357539

  12. Efficient simulations of tubulin-driven axonal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Stefan; Henningsson, Erik; Heyden, Anders

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns efficient and reliable numerical simulations of the dynamic behaviour of a moving-boundary model for tubulin-driven axonal growth. The model is nonlinear and consists of a coupled set of a partial differential equation (PDE) and two ordinary differential equations. The PDE is defined on a computational domain with a moving boundary, which is part of the solution. Numerical simulations based on standard explicit time-stepping methods are too time consuming due to the small time steps required for numerical stability. On the other hand standard implicit schemes are too complex due to the nonlinear equations that needs to be solved in each step. Instead, we propose to use the Peaceman-Rachford splitting scheme combined with temporal and spatial scalings of the model. Simulations based on this scheme have shown to be efficient, accurate, and reliable which makes it possible to evaluate the model, e.g. its dependency on biological and physical model parameters. These evaluations show among other things that the initial axon growth is very fast, that the active transport is the dominant reason over diffusion for the growth velocity, and that the polymerization rate in the growth cone does not affect the final axon length.

  13. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-08-11

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techniques can detect specific structures at an increased resolution, but the narrow spacing between neuronal microtubules poses challenges because most existing labelling strategies increase the effective microtubule diameter by 20-40 nm and will thereby blend neighbouring microtubules into one structure. Here we develop single-chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) against tubulin to achieve super-resolution imaging of microtubules with a decreased apparent diameter. To test the resolving power of these novel probes, we generate microtubule bundles with a known spacing of 50-70 nm and successfully resolve individual microtubules. Individual bundled microtubules can also be resolved in different mammalian cells, including hippocampal neurons, allowing novel insights into fundamental mechanisms of microtubule organization in cell- and neurobiology.

  14. Effect of propofol on beta-Eodorphin in the brain after thermal stress in rats%异丙酚对热应激大鼠脑组织β-内啡肽表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兴维; 王端玉; 王志刚; 赵鑫; 金延武

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and significances of propofol on beta-Endorphin in brain tissues after thermal stress in rats. Methods 72 male Wister rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Rats that received neither anesthesia nor WBH treatment served as the control group (group C, n = 8), rats which were anesthetized with intraperitoneal injection of chloral hydrate followed with thermal stress served as the model group (group M, n = 32), and other rats which were anesthetized with intraperitoneal injection of propofol followed with whole body hyperthermia keeping at 42 ℃ for 30 min served as the hyper-thermia group (group HP, n = 32). The mechanical withdrawal threshold to von Frey hair stimulation was checked at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after hyperthermia intervention. The rat hypothalamus was then rapidly removed to detect beta-Endorphin with the radio-immunoassay method and neuron apoptosis with TUNEL. Result Beta-Endorphin in the hypothalamus of groups M and HP were greatly increased compared with that of the control group, and the mechanical withdrawal threshold to von Frey hair stimulation changed as well (P < 0.05). Beta-Endorphin of group HP was increased compared with that of group M at 6 and 12 h. The amount of apoptotic neurons increased as follows: group C < group HP < group M( P < 0.05). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that hyperthermia was able to increase beta-Endorphin in brain tissues and improve the mechanical withdrawal threshold to von Frey hair stimulation in rats, and propofol could protect the brain from thermal stress via increasing expression of beta-Endorphin.%目的 观察异丙酚对热应激模型大鼠脑组织β-内啡肽含量的影响.方法 随机将72只雄性Wister大鼠分为对照组(C组,n=8)、热应激模型组(M组,n=32)和异丙酚麻醉高温组(HP组,n=32);高温组分别于红外线辐射加热后2、6、12、24 h测定大鼠机械痛阈,然后快速取脑,采用放射免疫法测定丘脑β-内啡肽含

  15. Tubulin binding, protein-bound conformation in solution, and antimitotic cellular profiling of noscapine and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennani, Youssef L; Gu, Wenxin; Canales, Angeles; Díaz, Fernando J; Eustace, Brenda K; Hoover, Russell R; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus; Nezami, Azin; Wang, Tiansheng

    2012-03-08

    Noscapine and its 7-hydroxy and 7-amino derivatives were characterized for their binding to tubulin. A solution NMR structure of these compounds bound to tubulin shows that noscapine and its 7-aniline derivative do not compete for the same binding site nor does its small molecule crystal structure match its tubulin-bound conformation. These compounds were also tested for their antiproliferative effects on a panel hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

  16. Kinetics of 16-{alpha}-[{sup 18}]fluoroestradiol-3,17-{beta}-disulphatemate ([{sup 18}F]FESDS) in piglet blood and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brust, P.; Roemer, J.; Fuechtner, F.; Kasch, H. [Hans-Knoell Inst. fuer Naturstoff-Forschung, Jena (Germany); Steinbach, J. [Inst. fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, Leipzig (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    The suitability of [{sup 18}F]FESDS as PET tracer was investigated. After i.v. injection [{sup 18}F]FESDS was immediately trapped by the erythrocytes. The PET images did not allow the differentiation of brain regions because of the very high amounts retained in the blood. [{sup 18}F]FESDS is therefore not recommended for brain imaging with PET. (orig.)

  17. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    GUAN, JIAN; MacGibbon, Alastair; Fong, Bertram; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Karen; Rowan, Angela; McJarrow, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n...

  18. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  19. Regulation of tubulin expression by micro-RNAs: implications for drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, Sharon; Graichen, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of methods for studying micro-RNA regulation of tubulin isotypes. In clinical studies, β-tubulin isotypes were found to be biomarkers for tumor formation. In addition, because changes in the levels of specific β-tubulin isotypes alter the stability of microtubules in mitotic spindles in vitro, it has been hypothesized that changes in microtubule protein levels could contribute to chemotherapy resistance. Over the past 15 years, micro-RNAs have been shown to target mRNAs in signaling pathways involved in tumor suppression, as well as tumorigenesis. Investigating micro-RNA regulation of tubulin isotypes will shed light on the mechanisms underlying the processes that implicate tubulin isotypes as biomarkers for aggressive tumors or chemotherapy resistance. The methods discussed in this chapter include the use of micro-RNA superarrays, next-generation sequencing, real-time PCR experiments, upregulation of micro-RNAs, and immunoprecipitation of RNA-induced silencing complex. We will show examples of data collected using these methods and how these data contribute to understanding paclitaxel resistance.

  20. Interaction of benzimidazole anthelmintics with Haemonchus contortus tubulin: binding affinity and anthelmintic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega, G W; Prichard, R K

    1991-08-01

    The ability of various benzimidazoles (BZs) to bind tubulin under different conditions was assessed by determining their IC50 values (the concentration of unlabeled drug required to inhibit 50% of the labeled drug binding), Ka (the apparent equilibrium association constant) and Bmax (the maximum binding at infinite [BZ] = [drug-receptor]). The ability of unlabeled benzimidazoles--fenbendazole, mebendazole (MBZ), oxibendazole (OBZ), albendazole (ABZ), rycobendazole (albendazole sulfoxide, ABZSO), albendazole sulfone, oxfendazole (OFZ), and thiabendazole--to bind tubulin was determined from their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]MBZ or [3H]OBZ to tubulin in supernatants derived from unembryonated eggs or adult worms of Haemonchus contortus. The binding constants (IC50, Ka, and Bmax) correlated with the known anthelmintic potency (recommended therapeutic doses) of the BZ compounds except for OFZ and ABZSO whose Ka values were lower than could be expected from anthelmintic potency. The binding of [3H]ABZ or [3H]OFZ to tubulin in supernatants derived from BZ-susceptible and BZ-resistant H. contortus was compared. [3H]ABZ demonstrated saturable high-affinity binding but [3H]OFZ bound with low affinity. The high-affinity binding of [3H]ABZ was reduced for the R strain. Tubulin bound BZ drugs at 4 degrees C with lower apparent Ka than at 37 degrees C.

  1. Novel Suicide Ligands of Tubulin Arrest Cancer Cells in S-Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Davis

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available It is presently accepted that the mechanism of action for all anti-tumor tubulin ligands involves the perturbation of microtubule dynamics during the G2/M phase of cell division and subsequent entry into apoptosis 1]. In this report, we challenge the established dogma by describing a unique mechanism of action caused by a novel series of tubulin ligands, halogenated derivatives of acetamido benzoyl ethyl ester. We have developed a suicide ligand for tubulin, which covalently attaches to the target and shows potent cancericidal activity in tissue culture assays and in animal tumor models. These compounds target early S-phase at the G1/S transition rather than the G2/M phase and mitotic arrest. Bcl-2 phosphorylation, a marker of mitotic microtubule inhibition by other tubulin ligands was dramatically altered, phosphorylation was rapid and biphasic rather than a slow linear event. The halogenated ethyl ester series of derivatives thus constitute a unique set of tubulin ligands which induce a novel mechanism of apoptosis.

  2. Binding of dihydroxynaphthyl aryl ketones to tubulin colchicine site inhibits microtubule assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Eunices; Benites, Julio; Valderrama, Jaime A; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Verrax, Julien; Nova, Esteban; Villanelo, Felipe; Maturana, Daniel; Escobar, Cristian; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2015-10-23

    Dihydroxynaphthyl aryl ketones 1-5 have been evaluated for their abilities to inhibit microtubule assembly and the binding to tubulin. Compounds 3, 4 and 5 displayed competitive inhibition against colchicine binding, and docking analysis showed that they bind to the tubulin colchicine-binding pocket inducing sheets instead of microtubules. Remarkable differences in biological activity observed among the assayed compounds seem to be related to the structure and position of the aryl substituent bonded to the carbonyl group. Compounds 2, 3 and 4, which contain a heterocyclic ring, presented higher affinity for tubulin compared to the carbocyclic analogue 5. Compound 4 showed the best affinity of the series, with an IC50 value of 2.1 μM for microtubule polymerization inhibition and a tubulin dissociation constant of 1.0 ± 0.2 μM, as determined by thermophoresis. Compound 4 was more efficacious in disrupting microtubule assembly in vitro than compound 5 although it contains the trimethoxyphenyl ring present in colchicine. Hydrogen bonds with Asn101 of α-tubulin seem to be responsible for the higher affinity of compound 4 respects to the others.

  3. High dietary consumption of trans fatty acids decreases brain docosahexaenoic acid but does not alter amyloid-beta and tau pathologies in the 3xTg-AD model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phivilay, A; Julien, C; Tremblay, C; Berthiaume, L; Julien, P; Giguère, Y; Calon, F

    2009-03-03

    Dietary consumption of trans fatty acids (TFA) has increased during the 20th century and is a suspected risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. More recently, high TFA intake has been associated with a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the impact of TFA on an animal model genetically programmed to express amyloid-beta (Abeta) and tau pathological markers of AD, we have fed 3xTg-AD mice with either control (0% TFA/total fatty acid), high TFA (16% TFA) or very high TFA (43% TFA) isocaloric diets from 2 to 16 months of age. Effects of TFA on plasma hepatic enzymes, glucose and lipid profile were minimal but very high TFA intake decreased visceral fat of non-transgenic mice. Importantly, dietary TFA increased brain TFA concentrations in a dose-related manner. Very high TFA consumption substantially modified the brain fatty acid profile by increasing mono-unsaturated fatty acids and decreasing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Very high TFA intake induced a shift from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) toward n-6 docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6) without altering the n-3:n-6 PUFA ratio in the cortex of both control and 3xTg-AD mice. Changes in levels of Abeta(40), Abeta(42), tau protein, phosphorylated tau protein and synaptic markers were not statistically significant in the three groups of 3xTg-AD mice, despite a trend toward decreased insoluble tau in very high TFA-fed 3xTg-AD animals. In summary, TFA intake modulated brain fatty acid profiles but had no significant effect on major brain neuropathological hallmarks of AD in an animal model.

  4. DIFFERENTIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PROTEIN-KINASE-C (PKC-ALPHA-BETA AND PKC-GAMMA) ISOENZYME IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN THE CHICK BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; BOLHUIS, JJ; SOLOMONIA, RO; HORN, G; LUITEN, PGM

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in neural plasticity. The phosphorylation of the myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS) in the left intermediate and medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) of the chick brain has been shown previously to correlate significantly with the streng

  5. Significance of β-tubulin Expression in Breast Premalignant Lesions and Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxia Gao; Yun Niu; Xiumin Ding; Yong Yu

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the expression of β-tubulin in premalignant lesions and carcinomas of the breast, and to observe the relationship of its expression with breast cancer pathological features.METHODS The expression of β-tubulin was detected immunohistochemically in 50 specimens of premalignant lesions of the breast (ADH and Peri-PM with ADH), 50 specimens of breast in situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS), and 50 specimens of invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC). Thirty specimens of normal breast tissues served as a control group.RESULTS Immunohistochemical analysis showed that: the differences among the 4 groups (normal breast tissues, breast premalignant lesions, DCIS and IDC, P < 0.05) were significant,and there were also statistically significant differences between any 2 groups (P < 0.05) except for the β-tubulin positive expression comparing DCIS versus IDC (P > 0.05). In addition, β-tubulin was expressed at a higher level in Peri-PM with ADH compared to ADH (P < 0.05). Following the degree of breast epithelial hyperplasia involved, and its development into carcinoma, the β-tubulin positive expression displayed an elevating tendency.We also found a significant positive relationship of β-tubulin expression with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05), but no significant correlation with histological grading and nuclear grade.CONCLUSION Centrosome defects may be an early event in the development of breast cancer and they can also promote tumor progression. Studies of aberrations of centrosomal proteins provide a new way to explore the mechanism of breast tumorigenesis.

  6. Atorvastatin prevents age-related and amyloid-beta-induced microglial activation by blocking interferon-gamma release from natural killer cells in the brain

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Anthony

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Microglial function is modulated by several factors reflecting the numerous receptors expressed on the cell surface, however endogenous factors which contribute to the age-related increase in microglial activation remain largely unknown. One possible factor which may contribute is interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ has been shown to increase in the aged brain and potently activates microglia, although its endogenous cell source in the brain remains unidentified. Methods Male Wistar rats were used to assess the effect of age and amyloid-β (Aβ) on NK cell infiltration into the brain. The effect of the anti-inflammatory compound, atorvastatin was also assessed under these conditions. We measured cytokine and chemokine (IFNγ, IL-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IFNγ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10)), expression in the brain by appropriate methods. We also looked at NK cell markers, CD161, NKp30 and NKp46 using flow cytometry and western blot. Results Natural killer (NK) cells are a major source of IFNγ in the periphery and here we report the presence of CD161+ NKp30+ cells and expression of CD161 and NKp46 in the brain of aged and Aβ-treated rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that isolated CD161+ cells respond to interleukin-2 (IL-2) by releasing IFNγ. Atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, attenuates the increase in CD161 and NKp46 observed in hippocampus of aged and Aβ-treated rats. This was paralleled by a decrease in IFNγ, markers of microglial activation and the chemokines, MCP-1 and IP-10 which are chemotactic for NK cells. Conclusions We propose that NK cells contribute to the age-related and Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory changes and demonstrate that these changes can be modulated by atorvastatin treatment.

  7. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurier Jean-Fabien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC, a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. Methods We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. Results TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to

  8. Gravity-Induced Modifications to Development in Hypocotyls of Arabidopsis Tubulin Mutants1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the roles of cortical microtubules in gravity-induced modifications to the development of stem organs by analyzing morphology and orientation of cortical microtubule arrays in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) tubulin mutants, tua3(D205N), tua4(S178Δ), and tua6(A281T), cultivated under 1g and hypergravity (300g) conditions. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants were shorter and thicker than the wild type even at 1g, and hypergravity further suppressed elongation and stimulated expansion. The degree of such changes was clearly smaller in tubulin mutants, in particular in tua6. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants also showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1g, and the degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions, especially in tua6. Hypergravity induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells of wild-type hypocotyls. In tubulin mutants, especially in tua6, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. The twisting phenotype was most obvious at cells 10 to 12 from the top, where reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions occurred. Moreover, the left-handed helical growth mutants (tua3 and tua4) had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant (tua6) had left-handed arrays. There was a close correlation between the alignment angle of epidermal cell files and the alignment of cortical microtubules. Gadolinium ions, blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels (mechanoreceptors), suppressed the twisting phenotype in tubulin mutants under both 1g and 300g conditions. Microtubule arrays in tubulin mutants were oriented more transversely by gadolinium treatment, irrespective of gravity conditions. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an essential role in maintenance of normal growth

  9. Gravity-induced modifications to development in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis tubulin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the roles of cortical microtubules in gravity-induced modifications to the development of stem organs by analyzing morphology and orientation of cortical microtubule arrays in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) tubulin mutants, tua3(D205N), tua4(S178Delta), and tua6(A281T), cultivated under 1g and hypergravity (300g) conditions. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants were shorter and thicker than the wild type even at 1g, and hypergravity further suppressed elongation and stimulated expansion. The degree of such changes was clearly smaller in tubulin mutants, in particular in tua6. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants also showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1g, and the degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions, especially in tua6. Hypergravity induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells of wild-type hypocotyls. In tubulin mutants, especially in tua6, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. The twisting phenotype was most obvious at cells 10 to 12 from the top, where reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions occurred. Moreover, the left-handed helical growth mutants (tua3 and tua4) had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant (tua6) had left-handed arrays. There was a close correlation between the alignment angle of epidermal cell files and the alignment of cortical microtubules. Gadolinium ions, blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels (mechanoreceptors), suppressed the twisting phenotype in tubulin mutants under both 1g and 300 g conditions. Microtubule arrays in tubulin mutants were oriented more transversely by gadolinium treatment, irrespective of gravity conditions. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an essential role in maintenance of normal

  10. Probing FtsZ and tubulin with C8-substituted GTP analogs reveals differences in their nucleotide binding sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Läppchen, T.; Pinas, V.A.; Hartog, A.F.; Koomen, G.J.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Andreu, J.M.; Trambaiolo, D.; Löwe, J.; Juhem, A.; Popov, A.V.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2008-01-01

    The cytoskeletal proteins, FtsZ and tubulin, play a pivotal role in prokaryotic cell division and eukaryotic chromosome segregation, respectively. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ could constitute a new class of antibiotics, while several inhibitors of tubulin are wid

  11. (-)-Rhazinilam and the diphenylpyridazinone NSC 613241: Two compounds inducing the formation of morphologically similar tubulin spirals but binding apparently to two distinct sites on tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruoli; Hamel, Ernest

    2016-08-15

    The most potent microtubule assembly inhibitor of newer diphenylpyridazinone derivatives examined was NSC 613241. Because NSC 613241 and (-)-rhazinilam also induce the formation of similar 2-filament spirals, these aberrant reactions were compared. Spiral formation with both compounds was enhanced by GTP and inhibited by GDP and by 15 other inhibitors of microtubule assembly. Similarly, microtubule assembly induced by paclitaxel or laulimalide is enhanced by GTP and inhibited by GDP and assembly inhibitors, but neither [(3)H]NSC 613241 nor [(3)H](-)-rhazinilam bound to microtubules or inhibited the binding of [(3)H]paclitaxel or [(3)H]peloruside A to microtubules. Differences in the pitch of aberrant polymers were found: NSC 613241-induced and (-)-rhazinilam-induced spirals had average repeats of 85 and 79-80 nm, respectively. We found no binding of [(3)H]NSC 613241 or [(3)H](-)-rhazinilam to αβ-tubulin dimer, but both compounds were incorporated into the polymers they induced in substoichiometric reactions, with as little as 0.1-0.2 mol compound/mol of tubulin, and no cross-inhibition by NSC 613241 or (-)-rhazinilam into spirals occurred. Under reaction conditions where neither compound induced spiral formation, both compounds together synergistically induced substantial spiral formation. We conclude that (-)-rhazinilam and NSC 613241 bind to different sites on tubulin that differ from binding sites for other antitubulin agents.

  12. Oblongifolin C inhibits metastasis by up-regulating keratin 18 and tubulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Lao, Yuanzhi; Xu, Naihan; Xi, Zhichao; Wu, Man; Wang, Hua; Li, Xiyi; Tan, Hongsheng; Sun, Menghong; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-05-14

    Tumor metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related patient death. In this study, we performed a wound healing migration screen to search for a metastatic inhibitor within our library of natural compounds. We found that oblongifolin C (OC), a natural compound extracted from Garcinia yunnanensis Hu, is an effective inhibitor of metastasis in human esophageal squamous carcinoma Eca109 cells. The transwell migration and matrigel invasion assay results also showed that OC inhibits the migration of Eca109 cells and HepG2 cells. OC can increase the expression of tubulin, indicating that OC inhibits metastasis via tubulin aggregation. In addition, the Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunostaining results indicated that OC increases the expression of keratin18. Furthermore, the knockdown of keratin 18 by small interfering RNAs inhibited the expression of tubulin and increased the metastasis of cancer cells, suggesting that keratin 18 is the upstream signal of tubulin and plays a vital role in metastasis. A subsequent study in a tail vein injection metastasis model showed that OC can significantly inhibit pulmonary metastasis, as revealed by immunohistochemistry staining. Taken together, our results suggest that OC inhibits metastasis through the induction of the expression of keratin 18 and may be useful in cancer therapy.

  13. Stereoselective synthesis of 3,3-diarylacrylonitriles as tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhenglai; Song, Yunlong; Sarkar, Taradas; Hamel, Ernest; Fogler, William E; Agoston, Gregory E; Fanwick, Phillip E; Cushman, Mark

    2008-06-06

    A series of 3,3-diarylacrylonitriles were synthesized stereoselectively as tubulin polymerization inhibitors for potential use in cancer chemotherapy. This synthetic route features stannylcupration and palladium-catalyzed Stille cross-coupling chemistry, allowing both E and Z isomers of 3,3-diarylacrylonitriles to be prepared in a very short sequence of reactions.

  14. Imidazoles and benzimidazoles as tubulin-modulators for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Fernando C; García-Rubiño, M Eugenia; Lozano-López, César; Kawano, Daniel F; Eifler-Lima, Vera L; von Poser, Gilsane L; Campos, Joaquín M

    2015-01-01

    Imidazoles and benzimidazoles are privileged heterocyclic bioactive compounds used with success in the clinical practice of innumerous diseases. Although there are many advancements in cancer therapy, microtubules remain as one of the few macromolecular targets validated for planning active anti-cancer compounds, and the design of drugs that modulate microtubule dynamics in unknown sites of tubulin is one of the goals of the medicinal chemistry. The discussion of the role of new and commercially available imidazole and benzimidazole derivatives as tubulin modulators is scattered throughout scientific literature, and indicates that these compounds have a tubulin modulation mechanism different from that of tubulin modulators clinically available, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel, vincristine and vinblastine. In fact, recent literature indicates that these derivatives inhibit microtubule formation binding to the colchicine site, present good pharmacokinetic properties and are capable of overcoming multidrug resistance in many cell lines. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the imidazoles/benzimidazoles modulation of microtubule dynamics is very important to develop new strategies to overcome the resistance to anti-cancer drugs and to discover new biomarkers and targets for cancer chemotherapy.

  15. HDAC6 regulates mutant SOD1 aggregation through two SMIR motifs and tubulin acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Barnett, Kelly R; Yang, Liuqing; Brumley, Erin; Zhu, Haining

    2013-05-24

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin deacetylase that regulates protein aggregation and turnover. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) make the mutant protein prone to aggregation. However, the role of HDAC6 in mutant SOD1 aggregation and the ALS etiology is unclear. Here we report that HDAC6 knockdown increased mutant SOD1 aggregation in cultured cells. Different from its known role in mediating the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, HDAC6 selectively interacted with mutant SOD1 via two motifs similar to the SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR) that we identified previously in p62/sequestosome 1. Expression of the aggregation-prone mutant SOD1 increased α-tubulin acetylation, and the acetylation-mimicking K40Q α-tubulin mutant promoted mutant SOD1 aggregation. Our results suggest that ALS-linked mutant SOD1 can modulate HDAC6 activity and increase tubulin acetylation, which, in turn, facilitates the microtubule- and retrograde transport-dependent mutant SOD1 aggregation. HDAC6 impairment might be a common feature in various subtypes of ALS.

  16. HDAC6 Regulates Mutant SOD1 Aggregation through Two SMIR Motifs and Tubulin Acetylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Barnett, Kelly R.; Yang, Liuqing; Brumley, Erin; Zhu, Haining

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin deacetylase that regulates protein aggregation and turnover. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) make the mutant protein prone to aggregation. However, the role of HDAC6 in mutant SOD1 aggregation and the ALS etiology is unclear. Here we report that HDAC6 knockdown increased mutant SOD1 aggregation in cultured cells. Different from its known role in mediating the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, HDAC6 selectively interacted with mutant SOD1 via two motifs similar to the SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR) that we identified previously in p62/sequestosome 1. Expression of the aggregation-prone mutant SOD1 increased α-tubulin acetylation, and the acetylation-mimicking K40Q α-tubulin mutant promoted mutant SOD1 aggregation. Our results suggest that ALS-linked mutant SOD1 can modulate HDAC6 activity and increase tubulin acetylation, which, in turn, facilitates the microtubule- and retrograde transport-dependent mutant SOD1 aggregation. HDAC6 impairment might be a common feature in various subtypes of ALS. PMID:23580651

  17. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies sugges...

  18. Defective tubulin organization and proplatelet formation in murine megakaryocytes lacking Rac1 and Cdc42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Dütting, Sebastian; Cherpokova, Deya;

    2013-01-01

    normally in vivo but displayed highly abnormal morphology and uncontrolled fragmentation. Consistently, a lack of Rac1/Cdc42 virtually abrogated proplatelet formation in vitro. Strikingly, this phenotype was associated with severely defective tubulin organization, whereas actin assembly and structure were...

  19. Relationship between aged-rat brain fatty acid composition and fatty acid beta-oxidation%老年大鼠脑脂肪酸含量与脂肪酸β-氧化的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨磊; 石如玲; 张煜; 赵春澎; 付云; 黄艳梅

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较老年及青年大鼠脑脂肪酸含量、肝脏脂肪酸β-氧化关键酶表达水平的不同,探讨衰老时脂肪酸含量的变化与脂肪酸β-氧化功能的关系.方法 老年组和青年组大鼠各10只,用气相色谱法分析脑皮质脂肪酸含量,用反转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)方法测定过氧化物酶体β-氧化关键酶脂酰辅酶A氧化酶(AOX1)、线粒体β-氧化关键酶肉碱脂酰转移酶1( CPT1)及过氧化物酶体增殖剂激活受体α(PPARα) mRNA的表达水平,用游离脂肪酸试剂盒测定血清游离脂肪酸(FFA)含量.结果 与青年组相比,老年组大鼠脑内C18∶0、C20∶4、C22∶6含量降低(P<0.05或P<0.01),脑内C16∶1、C18∶1、C20∶0、C20∶1、C22∶1、C24∶0、C24∶1含量升高(P<0.05或P<0.01),肝脏AOX1、CPT1、PPARα mRNA水平降低(P<0.05),血清总FFA含量降低(P<0.05).结论 衰老时大鼠脑脂肪酸含量变化的原因可能由线粒体和过氧化物酶体β-氧化功能降低所致.%Objective To analyze the differences of brain fatty acid content and liver fatty acid beta-oxidation enzyme expression between aged and young rats, and to explore the relationship between aged brain fatty acid composition and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Methods Old (22 months) and young (3 months) male rats were used in this experiment. Every ten mice in old group and young group. Fatty acid composition and contents of cerebral cortex were detected by gas chromatography analysis. The mRNA levels of acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (AOX1) ,camitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) and peroxisome proliferator-ac-tivated receptor-a (PPARa) in liver were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum free fatty acid (FFA) level was measured by the assay kit. Results Compared with the young group, C18 : 0.C20 : 4 and C22 : 6 levels decreased( P<0.05 or P<0.01), while C16 : 1.C18 : l,C20 :0,C20 : 1,C22 : 1,C24 : 0 and C24 : 1 levels increased (P< 0.05 orP<0

  20. Orally Active and Selective Tubulin Inhibitors as Anti-Trypanosome Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Nanavaty

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop a safe, effective, orally active, and inexpensive therapy for African trypanosomiasis due to the drawbacks of current drugs. Selective tubulin inhibitors have the potential to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of this disease, which is based on the tubulin protein structural difference between mammalian and trypanosome cells. We propose to identify novel tubulin inhibitors from a compound library developed based on the lead compounds that selectively target trypanosomiasis.We used Trypanosoma brucei brucei as the parasite model, and human normal kidney cells and mouse microphage cells as the host model. Growth rates of both trypanosomes and mammalian cells were determined as a means to screen compounds that selectively inhibit the proliferation of parasites. Furthermore, we examined the cell cycle profile of the parasite and compared tubulin polymerization dynamics before and after the treatment using identified compounds. Last, in vivo anti-parasite activities of these compounds were determined in T. brucei-infected mice.Three compounds were selected that are 100 fold more effective against the growth of T. brucei cells than mammalian cells. These compounds caused cell cycle progression defects in T. brucei cells. Western analyses indicated that these compounds decreased tubulin polymerization in T. brucei cells. The in vivo investigation revealed that these compounds, when admitted orally, inhibited T. brucei cell proliferation in mouse blood. However, they were not potent enough to clear up the infection completely.These compounds are promising lead compounds as orally active agents for drug development of anti-trypanosome agents. A more detail structure activity relationship (SAR was summarized that will be used to guide future lead optimization to improve the selectivity and potency of the current compounds.

  1. Ansamitocin P3 depolymerizes microtubules and induces apoptosis by binding to tubulin at the vinblastine site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venghateri, Jubina B; Gupta, Tilak Kumar; Verma, Paul J; Kunwar, Ambarish; Panda, Dulal

    2013-01-01

    Maytansinoid conjugates are currently under different phases of clinical trials and have been showing promising activity for various types of cancers. In this study, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3, a structural analogue of maytansine for its anticancer activity. Ansamitocin P3 potently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, HeLa, EMT-6/AR1 and MDA-MB-231 cells in culture with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 20±3, 50±0.5, 140±17, and 150±1.1 pM, respectively. Ansamitocin P3 strongly depolymerized both interphase and mitotic microtubules and perturbed chromosome segregation at its proliferation inhibitory concentration range. Treatment of ansamitocin P3 activated spindle checkpoint surveillance proteins, Mad2 and BubR1 and blocked the cells in mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Subsequently, cells underwent apoptosis via p53 mediated apoptotic pathway. Further, ansamitocin P3 was found to bind to purified tubulin in vitro with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.3±0.7 µM. The binding of ansamitocin P3 induced conformational changes in tubulin. A docking analysis suggested that ansamitocin P3 may bind partially to vinblastine binding site on tubulin in two different positions. The analysis indicated that the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin is stabilized by hydrogen bonds. In addition, weak interactions such as halogen-oxygen interactions may also contribute to the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin. The study provided a significant insight in understanding the antiproliferative mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3.

  2. VDAC–Tubulin, an Anti-Warburg Pro-Oxidant Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Eduardo N.

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic enhanced glycolysis characterizes the Warburg phenotype. In cancer cells, suppression of mitochondrial metabolism contributes to maintain a low ATP/ADP ratio that favors glycolysis. We propose that the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) located in the mitochondrial outer membrane is a metabolic link between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in the Warburg phenotype. Most metabolites including respiratory substrates, ADP, and Pi enter mitochondria only through VDAC. Oxidation of respiratory substrates in the Krebs cycle generates NADH that enters the electron transport chain (ETC) to generate a proton motive force utilized to generate ATP and to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ). The ETC is also the major source of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Dimeric α-β tubulin decreases conductance of VDAC inserted in lipid bilayers, and high free tubulin in cancer cells by closing VDAC, limits the ingress of respiratory substrates and ATP decreasing mitochondrial ΔΨ. VDAC opening regulated by free tubulin operates as a “master key” that “seal–unseal” mitochondria to modulate mitochondrial metabolism, ROS formation, and the intracellular flow of energy. Erastin, a small molecule that binds to VDAC and kills cancer cells, and erastin-like compounds antagonize the inhibitory effect of tubulin on VDAC. Blockage of the VDAC–tubulin switch increases mitochondrial metabolism leading to decreased glycolysis and oxidative stress that promotes mitochondrial dysfunction, bioenergetic failure, and cell death. In summary, VDAC opening-dependent cell death follows a “metabolic double-hit model” characterized by oxidative stress and reversion of the pro-proliferative Warburg phenotype. PMID:28168164

  3. Ansamitocin P3 depolymerizes microtubules and induces apoptosis by binding to tubulin at the vinblastine site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jubina B Venghateri

    Full Text Available Maytansinoid conjugates are currently under different phases of clinical trials and have been showing promising activity for various types of cancers. In this study, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3, a structural analogue of maytansine for its anticancer activity. Ansamitocin P3 potently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, HeLa, EMT-6/AR1 and MDA-MB-231 cells in culture with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 20±3, 50±0.5, 140±17, and 150±1.1 pM, respectively. Ansamitocin P3 strongly depolymerized both interphase and mitotic microtubules and perturbed chromosome segregation at its proliferation inhibitory concentration range. Treatment of ansamitocin P3 activated spindle checkpoint surveillance proteins, Mad2 and BubR1 and blocked the cells in mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Subsequently, cells underwent apoptosis via p53 mediated apoptotic pathway. Further, ansamitocin P3 was found to bind to purified tubulin in vitro with a dissociation constant (Kd of 1.3±0.7 µM. The binding of ansamitocin P3 induced conformational changes in tubulin. A docking analysis suggested that ansamitocin P3 may bind partially to vinblastine binding site on tubulin in two different positions. The analysis indicated that the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin is stabilized by hydrogen bonds. In addition, weak interactions such as halogen-oxygen interactions may also contribute to the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin. The study provided a significant insight in understanding the antiproliferative mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3.

  4. Molecular and biomolecular-based nanomaterials: Tubulin and taxol as molecular constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Carmona, Javier Servando

    The new field of protein-based nano-technology takes advantage of the complex interactions between proteins to form unique structures with properties that cannot be achieved with traditional components. Microtubules (MTs), self assembled proteinaceous hollow filaments, offer promise in the development of MT-based nano-systems. The compelling need for the controlled assembly of 3D MT arrays is the fundamental motivation for the first part of this research. We report on the morphology of MTs grown in a crowded environment in the form of high viscosity fluids containing agarose and a novel process that enables the assembly of MTs supported by gel-based 3D scaffolds. Our research on MTs and their interaction with other molecules lead us to discover extraordinary spherulitic structures that changed the course of the project. The novel subject situate us into a complicated dilemma that question the nature of MT asters reported in experiments carried out in cells. The second part of this research is focused in the crystallization of Taxol, a MT stabilizing molecule used as anti-cancer drug. It was confirmed via fluorescent and differential interference contrast microscopy that Taxol crystals can be decorated with fluorescent proteins and fluorochromes without perturbing their morphology. We used theoretical calculations to further investigate Taxol-fluorescent agent interactions. Furthermore, the crystallization of Taxol was studied in pure water, aqueous solutions containing tubulin proteins and tubulin-containing agarose gels. We demonstrated that tubulin is able to heterogeneously nucleate Taxol spherulites. To explain the formation of tubulin-Taxol nuclei a new, secondary Taxol-binding site within the tubulin heterodimer is suggested. Results presented in this work are important for in vivo and in vitro microtubule studies due to the possibility of mistaking these Taxol spherulites for microtubule asters. Thus, we are confirming the need for careful interpretation of

  5. Anion-induced increases in the rate of colchicine binding to tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, B; Wolff, J

    1976-06-01

    The rate of binding of colchicine to tubulin to tubulin is enhanced by certain anions. Among the inorganic anions tested, only sulfate was effective. The organic anions include mostly dicarboxylic acids, among which tartrate was the most effective. This effect occurs onlt at low concentrations of colchicine (less than 0.6 X 10(-5) M). The rate increase dor sulfate and L-(+)-tartrate is ca. 2.5-fold at 1.0 mM and plateaus at a limiting value of ca. 4-fold at 100mM. The overall dissociation rate of the colchicine from the complex, which includes both the true rate of dissociation and the rate of irreversible denaturation of tubulin, is not influenced by 1.0 mM tartrate. The affinity constants for colchicine determined from the rate constants are 8.7 X 10(6) and 2.1 X 10(7) M-1 in the absence and the presence of 1.0 mM L-(+)-tartrate. The limiting value is 3.2 X 10(7) M-1. The affinity constant calculated from steady-state measurements is 3.2 X 10(6) M-1 with or without anions. The binding of other ligands like podophyllotoxin, vinblastine, and 1 -anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate to tubulin is not affected by tartrate. No major conformational changes resulting from anion treatment could be detected by circular dichroism or intrinsic fluorescence. However, the ability of tubulin to polymerize is inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate at concentrations that increase the rate of colchicine binding. We conclude that anions must have a local effect at or near the binding site which enhances the binding rate of colchicine and which may be related to inhibition of polymerization.

  6. Antitumor Activity of IMC-038525, a Novel Oral Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Maria Carolina; Malikzay, Asra; Ouyang, Xiaohu; Surguladze, David; Fleming, James; Mitelman, Stan; Camara, Margarita; Finnerty, Bridget; Doody, Jacqueline; Chekler, Eugene L P; Kussie, Paul; Tonra, James R

    2010-10-01

    Microtubules are a well-validated target for anticancer therapy. Molecules that bind tubulin affect dynamic instability of microtubules causing mitotic arrest of proliferating cells, leading to cell death and tumor growth inhibition. Natural antitubulin agents such as taxanes and Vinca alkaloids have been successful in the treatment of cancer; however, several limitations have encouraged the development of synthetic small molecule inhibitors of tubulin function. We have previously reported the discovery of two novel chemical series of tubulin polymerization inhibitors, triazoles (Ouyang et al. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1,2,4-triazoles as a novel class of potent tubulin polymerization inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2005; 15:5154-5159) and oxadiazole derivatives (Ouyang et al. Oxadiazole derivatives as a novel class of antimitotic agents: synthesis, inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and activity in tumor cell lines. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2006; 16:1191-1196). Here, we report on the anticancer effects of a lead oxadiazole derivative in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, IMC-038525 caused mitotic arrest at nanomolar concentrations in epidermoid carcinoma and breast tumor cells, including multidrug-resistant cells. In vivo, IMC-038525 had a desirable pharmacokinetic profile with sustained plasma levels after oral dosing. IMC-038525 reduced subcutaneous xenograft tumor growth with significantly greater efficacy than the taxane paclitaxel. At efficacious doses, IMC-038525 did not cause substantial myelosuppression or peripheral neurotoxicity, as evaluated by neutrophil counts and changes in myelination of the sciatic nerve, respectively. These data indicate that IMC-038525 is a promising candidate for further development as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  8. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  9. Study on Molecular Recognition between Euphorbia Factor L713283 and β-Tubulin via Molecular Simulation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Euphorbia factor L713283 is a new lathyrane diterpene isolated from Euphorbia lathyris and shows strong anticancer activity. By using molecular similarity analysis, β-tubulin was identified as one of the possible targets of L713283. We further investigated the binding modes of L713283 with β-tubulin using molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD simulation methods. The results indicated that the binding site between β-tubulin and L713283 was composed of the four regions, that is, residues Phe20~Glu27, Leu225~Thr232, Phe270~Gly277, and Ile356~Met363. MM/GBSA method was used to calculate the binding free energy and determine the key residues for the association of L713283 with β-tubulin. It was found that nonpolar interactions made the major contributions for the binding. In addition, we compared the binding pocket and motion modes of L713283-free and L713283-bound β-tubulin systems. It is proposed that L713283 may bind to β-tubulin and favor the formation of αβ-tubulin dimmer. This work provides possible explanation for molecular mechanism of the anticancer agent L713283, and the strategy used here could benefit the investigation of possible target profile for those bioactive agents with unknown mechanisms.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and molecular modeling studies on 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexes with tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbildua, José J; Brunet, Juan E; Jameson, David M; López, Maribel; Nova, Esteban; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2006-03-01

    The goal of this work was to determine the binding properties and location of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexed with tubulin. Using fluorescence anisotropy, a dissociation constant of 5.2+/-0.4 microM for the DAPI-tubulin complex was determined, slightly lower than that for the tubulin S complex. The influence of the C-terminal region on the binding of DAPI to tubulin was also characterized. Using FRET experiments, and assuming a kappa2 value of 2/3, distances between Co2+ bound to its high-affinity binding site and the DAPI-binding site and 2',3'-O-(trinitrophenyl)guanosine 5'-triphosphate bound to the exchangeable nucleotide and the DAPI-binding site were found to be 20+/-2 A and 43+/-2 A, respectively. To locate potential DAPI-binding sites on tubulin, a molecular modeling study was carried out using the tubulin crystal structure and energy minimization calculations. The results from the FRET measurements were used to limit the possible location of DAPI in the tubulin structure. Several candidate binding sites were found and these are discussed in the context of the various properties of bound DAPI.

  11. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and molecular modeling studies on 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexes with tubulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbildua, José J.; Brunet, Juan E.; Jameson, David M.; López, Maribel; Nova, Esteban; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work was to determine the binding properties and location of 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexed with tubulin. Using fluorescence anisotropy, a dissociation constant of 5.2 ± 0.4 μM for the DAPI–tubulin complex was determined, slightly lower than that for the tubulin S complex. The influence of the C-terminal region on the binding of DAPI to tubulin was also characterized. Using FRET experiments, and assuming a κ2 value of 2/3, distances between Co2+ bound to its high-affinity binding site and the DAPI-binding site and 2′,3′-O-(trinitrophenyl)guanosine 5′-triphosphate bound to the exchangeable nucleotide and the DAPI-binding site were found to be 20 ± 2 Å and 43 ± 2 Å, respectively. To locate potential DAPI-binding sites on tubulin, a molecular modeling study was carried out using the tubulin crystal structure and energy minimization calculations. The results from the FRET measurements were used to limit the possible location of DAPI in the tubulin structure. Several candidate binding sites were found and these are discussed in the context of the various properties of bound DAPI. PMID:16452620

  12. Establishing a High-content Analysis Method for Tubulin Polymerization to Evaluate Both the Stabilizing and Destabilizing Activities of Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Chi Shing; Nickischer, Debra; Lei, Ming; Weston, Andrea; Zhang, Litao; Schweizer, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are important components of the cellular cytoskeleton that play roles in various cellular processes such as vesicular transport and spindle formation during mitosis. They are formed by an ordered organization of α-tubulin and β-tubulin hetero-polymers. Altering microtubule polymerization has been known to be the mechanism of action for a number of therapeutically important drugs including taxanes and epothilones. Traditional cell-based assays for tubulin-interacting compounds rely on their indirect effects on cell cycle and/or cell proliferation. Direct monitoring of compound effects on microtubules is required to dissect detailed mechanisms of action in a cellular setting. Here we report a high-content assay platform to monitor tubulin polymerization status by directly measuring the acute effects of drug candidates on the cellular tubulin network with the capability to dissect the mechanisms of action. This high-content analysis distinguishes in a quantitative manner between compounds that act as tubulin stabilizers versus those that are tubulin destabilizers. In addition, using a multiplex approach, we expanded this analysis to simultaneously monitor physiological cellular responses and associated cellular phenotypes.

  13. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 1,4-Disubstituted-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline Compounds as New Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1,4-disubstituted-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline derivatives designed as tubulin polymerization inhibitors were synthesized. Their cytotoxic activities against the CEM leukemia cell line were evaluated. Most of them displayed moderate cytotoxic activities, and compounds 21 and 32 showed good activities with IC50 of 4.10 and 0.64 μM, respectively. The most potent compound 32 was further confirmed to be able to inhibit tubulin polymerization, and its hypothetical binding mode with tubulin was obtained by molecular docking.

  14. A population of human brain cells expressing phenotypic markers of more than one lineage can be induced in vitro to differentiate into mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieske, Piotr; Augelli, Brian J; Stawski, Robert; Gaughan, John; Azizi, S Ausim; Krynska, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    Proliferating astrocytic cells from germinal, as well as mature areas of brain parenchyma, have the characteristics of neural stem/progenitor cells and are capable of generating both neurons and glia. We previously reported that primary fetal human brain cells, designated as Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA), expressed, in addition to GFAP, Vimentin and Nestin, low levels of betaIII-Tubulin, an early neuronal marker, and differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in vitro. Here, we showed that primary NHA cells co-express low levels of mesenchymal markers Fibronectin and Collagen-1 in culture. These cells transitioned into mesenchymal-like cells when cultured in adherent conditions in serum containing media. The mesenchymal-like derivatives of these cells were characterized based on their morphological changes, high expression of Vimentin and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, Collagen-1 and Fibronectin, and decline of neural markers. When incubated in osteogenic and adipogenic induction media, the mesenchymal-like cells differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Furthermore, NHA cells express markers of neural crest cells, SOX-10 and p75. These data support the idea of ectoderm-derived mesenchymal lineages. These findings suggest that a population of primitive fetal brain cells with neural/neural crest/mesenchymal phenotype, resembles the remarkable phenotypic plasticity of neural crest cells, and differentiates into adipocytes and osteocytes under the influence of environmental factors.

  15. Brain beta-amyloid measures and magnetic resonance imaging atrophy both predict time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R; Wiste, Heather J; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Weigand, Stephen D; Senjem, Matthew L; Zeng, Guang; Bernstein, Matt A; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Pankratz, Vernon S; Aisen, Paul S; Weiner, Michael W; Petersen, Ronald C; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Knopman, David S

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers of brain Aβ amyloid deposition can be measured either by cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 or Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of Aβ load and neurodegenerative atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging to predict shorter time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's dementia and to characterize the effect of these biomarkers on the risk of progression as they become increasingly abnormal. A total of 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were identified from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The primary outcome was time-to-progression to Alzheimer's dementia. Hippocampal volumes were measured and adjusted for intracranial volume. We used a new method of pooling cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures to produce equivalent measures of brain Aβ load from either source and analysed the results using multiple imputation methods. We performed our analyses in two phases. First, we grouped our subjects into those who were 'amyloid positive' (n = 165, with the assumption that Alzheimer's pathology is dominant in this group) and those who were 'amyloid negative' (n = 53). In the second phase, we included all 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment to evaluate the biomarkers in a sample that we assumed to contain a full spectrum of expected pathologies. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment were much more likely to progress to dementia within 2 years than amyloid negative subjects with mild cognitive impairment (50 versus 19%). Among amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment only, hippocampal atrophy predicted shorter time-to-progression (P mild cognitive impairment were combined (amyloid positive and negative), hippocampal atrophy and Aβ load predicted shorter time-to-progression with comparable power (hazard ratio for an inter

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB expression in the "oldest-old," the 90+ Study: correlation with cognitive status and levels of soluble amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Bernadeta; Corrada, Maria M; Kawas, Claudia H; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Factors associated with maintaining good cognition into old age are unclear. Decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to memory loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and soluble assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau contribute to neurodegeneration. However, it is unknown whether AD-type neuropathology, soluble Aβ and tau, or levels of BDNF and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) correlate with dementia in the oldest-old. We examined these targets in postmortem Brodmann's areas 7 and 9 (BA7 and BA9) in 4 groups of subjects >90 years old: (1) no dementia/no AD pathology, (2) no dementia/AD pathology, (3) dementia/no AD pathology, (4) dementia/AD pathology. In BA7, BDNF messenger RNA correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores and was decreased in demented versus nondemented subjects, regardless of pathology. Soluble Aβ42 was increased in both groups with AD pathology, demented or not, compared to no dementia/no AD pathology subjects. Groups did not differ in TrkB isoform levels or in levels of total soluble tau, individual tau isoforms, threonine-181 tau phosphorylation, or ratio of phosphorylated 3R-4R isoforms. In BA9, soluble Aβ42 correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores and with BDNF messenger RNA expression. Thus, soluble Aβ42 and BDNF, but not TrkB or soluble tau, correlate with dementia in the oldest-old.

  17. Microglia-derived proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta induce Purkinje neuronal apoptosis via their receptors in hypoxic neonatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Charanjit; Sivakumar, Viswanathan; Zou, Zhirong; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2014-01-01

    The developing cerebellum is extremely vulnerable to hypoxia which can damage the Purkinje neurons. We hypothesized that this might be mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) derived from activated microglia as in other brain areas. One-day-old rats were subjected to hypoxia following, which the expression changes of various proteins in the cerebellum including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, TNF-α, IL-1β, TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 were analyzed. Following hypoxic exposure, TNF-α and IL-1β immunoexpression in microglia was enhanced coupled by that of TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 in the Purkinje neurons. Along with this, hypoxic microglia in vitro showed enhanced release of TNF-α and IL-1β whose receptor expression was concomitantly increased in the Purkinje neurons. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) level was significantly increased in the cerebellum and cultured microglia subjected to hypoxic exposure. Moreover, cultured Purkinje neurons treated with conditioned medium derived from hypoxic microglia underwent apoptosis but the incidence was significantly reduced when the cells were treated with the same medium that was neutralized with TNF-α/IL-1β antibody. We conclude that hypoxic microglia in the neonatal cerebellum produce increased amounts of NO, TNF-α and IL-1β which when acting via their respective receptors could induce Purkinje neuron death.

  18. Surgical outcome of deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus with beta oscillation in PD patients%丘脑底核电刺激治疗以beta振荡为特征的帕金森病的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张弨; 王垚; 王慧敏; 张凯; 张建国; 孟凡刚

    2013-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study is to observe therapeutic effect of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS)for parkinsonian patients with beta neural oscillation pattern in subthalamic nucleus.Methods Clinical data of 6 parkinsonian patients underwent STN-DBS were analyzed retrospectively.The UPDRS-Ⅲ and levodopa equivalent doses (LEDD) were recorded preoperatively and 1,6,12 months postoperatively.Results As compared with base line,the patients' UPDRS-

  19. Proteomics indicates modulation of tubulin polymerization by L-menthol inhibiting human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridi, Uzma; Sisodia, Brijesh S; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shukla, Rakesh K; Darokar, Mahendra P; Dwivedi, Upendra N; Shasany, Ajit K

    2011-05-01

    Menthol is a naturally occurring cyclic monoterpene used in oral hygiene products, confectionary, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, pesticides, and as a flavoring agent. In the present study, we analyzed the differentially expressing proteome in L-menthol-treated Caco-2 cell line as it was found to inhibit cell proliferation. Interestingly, free tubulin proteins were observed to be limited after menthol treatment. Semiquantitative RT-PCR with α-tubulin primers showed no change in the level of RNA expression in menthol-treated cell line. However, tubulin polymerization assay with menthol indicated a trend similar to taxol in promoting microtubule assembly. Further, physical counting of apoptotic nuclei and active caspase-3 assays confirmed onset of apoptosis though the rate was slower as compared with that of taxol treatment. This study is the first report of a monoterpene L-menthol modulating tubulin polymerization and apoptosis to inhibit cancer cell proliferation.

  20. Down-regulated βIII-tubulin Expression Can Reverse Paclitaxel Resistance in A549/Taxol Cells Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinling ZHUO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Chemotherapy drug resistance is the primary causes of death in patients with pulmonary carcinoma which make tumor recurrence or metastasis. β-tubulin is the main cell targets of anti-microtubule drug. Increased expression of βIII-tubulin has been implicated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines. To explore the relationship among the expression level of βIII-tubulin and the sensitivity of A549/Taxolcell lines to Taxol and cell cycles and cell apoptosis by RNA interference-mediated inhibition of βIII-tubulin in A549/Taxol cells. Methods Three pairs of siRNA targetd βIII-tubulin were designed and prepared, which were transfected into A549/Taxol cells using LipofectamineTM 2000. We detected the expression of βIII-tubulin mRNA using Real-time fluorescence qRT-PCR. Tedhen we selected the most efficient siRNA by the expression of βIII-tubulin mRNA in transfected group. βIII-tubulin protein level were mesured by Western blot. The taxol sensitivity in transfected group were evaluated by MTT assay. And the cell apoptosis and cell cycles were determined by flow cytometry. Results βIII-tubulin mRNA levels in A549/Taxol cells were significantly decreased in transfected grop by Real-time qRT-PCR than control groups. And βIII-tubulin siRNA-1 sequence showed the highest transfection efficiency, which was (87.73±4.87% (P<0.01; Western blot results showed that the expressional level of BIII tublin protein was significantly down-reulated in the transfectant cells than thant in the control cells. By MTT assay, we showed that the inhibition ratio of Taxol to A549/Taxol cells transfeced was higher than that of control group (51.77±4.60% (P<0.01. The early apoptosis rate of A549/Taxol cells in transfected group were significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.01; G2-M content in taxol group obviously increased than untreated samples by the cell cycle (P<0.05. Conclusion βIII-tubulin down-regulated significantly

  1. Neuron-like differentiation of adult rat bone marrow stromal cells induced by transforming growth factor-beta and brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Xifan Mei; Gang Lü; Yansong Wang; Quanshuang Li; Zhanpeng Guo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can induce stem cell differentiation into neuron-like cells.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of TGF-β and BDNF at inducing the differentiation of adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into neuron-like cells, both in combination or alone.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A comparative observation experiment was performed at the Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University between October 2007 and January 2008.MATERIALS: TGF-βand BDNF were purchased from Sigma, USA; mouse anti-rat neuron specific enolase, neurofilament and glial fibrillary acidic protein were purchased from Beijing HMHL Biochem Ltd., China.METHODS: BMSCs were isolated from rats aged 4 weeks and incubated with TGF-β(1μg/L) and/or BDNF (50μg/mL).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression of neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament and glial fibrillary acidic protein were determined by immunocytochemistry.RESULTS: BMSCs differentiated into neuron-like cells following induction of TGF-β and BDNF, and expressed both neuron-specific enolase and neurofilament. The percent of positive cells was significantly greater in the combination group than those induced with TGF-β or BDNF alone (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Treatment of BMSCs with a combination of TGF-β and BDNF induced differentiation into neuron-like cells, with the induction being significantly greater than with TGF-β or BDNF alone.

  2. Oligomeric amyloid-{beta} inhibits the proteolytic conversion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), AMPA receptor trafficking, and classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoqing; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Keifer, Joyce

    2010-11-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is thought to have a significant role in the progressive memory loss observed in patients with Alzheimer disease and inhibits synaptic plasticity in animal models of learning. We previously demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical for synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in an in vitro model of eyeblink classical conditioning. Here, we report that acquisition of conditioned responses was significantly attenuated by bath application of oligomeric (200 nm), but not fibrillar, Aβ peptide. Western blotting revealed that BDNF protein expression during conditioning is significantly reduced by treatment with oligomeric Aβ, as were phosphorylation levels of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), and ERK. However, levels of PKA and PKCζ/λ were unaffected, as was PDK-1. Protein localization studies using confocal imaging indicate that oligomeric Aβ, but not fibrillar or scrambled forms, suppresses colocalization of GluR1 and GluR4 AMPA receptor subunits with synaptophysin, indicating that trafficking of these subunits to synapses during the conditioning procedure is blocked. In contrast, coapplication of BDNF with oligomeric Aβ significantly reversed these findings. Interestingly, a tolloid-like metalloproteinase in turtle, tTLLs (turtle tolloid-like protein), which normally processes the precursor proBDNF into mature BDNF, was found to degrade oligomeric Aβ into small fragments. These data suggest that an Aβ-induced reduction in BDNF, perhaps due to interference in the proteolytic conversion of proBDNF to BDNF, results in inhibition of synaptic AMPA receptor delivery and suppression of the acquisition of conditioning.

  3. On the Nature and Shape of Tubulin Trails: Implications on Microtubule Self-Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Glade, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules, major elements of the cell skeleton are, most of the time, well organized in vivo, but they can also show self-organizing behaviors in time and/or space in purified solutions in vitro. Theoretical studies and models based on the concepts of collective dynamics in complex systems, reaction-diffusion processes and emergent phenomena were proposed to explain some of these behaviors. In the particular case of microtubule spatial self-organization, it has been advanced that microtubules could behave like ants, self-organizing by 'talking to each other' by way of hypothetic (because never observed) concentrated chemical trails of tubulin that are expected to be released by their disassembling ends. Deterministic models based on this idea yielded indeed like-looking spatio-temporal self-organizing behaviors. Nevertheless the question remains of whether microscopic tubulin trails produced by individual or bundles of several microtubules are intense enough to allow microtubule self-organization at a macr...

  4. Interaction of hepatitis C virus F protein with prefoldin 2 perturbs tubulin cytoskeleton organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Mei-Ling; Chao, Chung-Hao; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2006-09-15

    By use of the yeast two-hybrid system, hepatitis C virus (HCV) F protein was found to interact with a cellular protein named prefoldin 2. The interaction was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy as well as coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Prefoldin 2 is a subunit of a hexameric molecular chaperone complex, named prefoldin, which delivers nascent actin and tubulin proteins to the eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin for facilitated folding. Functional prefoldin spontaneously assembles from its six subunits (prefoldin 1-6). In the yeast three-hybrid system, it was found that expression of HCV F protein impeded the interaction between prefoldin 1 and 2. By performing immunofluorescence experiment and non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, it was shown that expression of HCV F protein resulted in aberrant organization of tubulin cytoskeleton. Since HCV replication requires intact microtubule and actin polymerization, HCV F protein may serve as a modulator to prevent high level of HCV replication and thus contributes to viral persistence in chronic HCV infection.

  5. Imaging of self-assembled tubulin polymorphs used as metallization templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, W.; Behrens, S.; Böhm, Kj; Dinjus, E.

    2007-03-01

    Tubulin, a protein isolated from eukaryotic cells, is able to self-assemble in vitro under well-defined chemical conditions into highly ordered polymorphic suprastructures such as tubules, rings or sheets. Here we report about the imaging and the morphological appearance of such tubulin assemblies utilized as templates for the deposition of metal nanoparticles or continuous metallization. The structural imaging and analyzing tools like field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with respect to different electron detectors (Inlens-SE, BSE, TE) are addressed. An EDX-unit is applied for the verification of the deposited metals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in tapping-mode (TM) is adopted for 3D-rendering and morphological measurements (height). Tip-surface interactions, the influence of fixation and cantilever-types are considered. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is applied to visualize deposited nanoparticles.

  6. Design and synthesis of pyrazole-oxindole conjugates targeting tubulin polymerization as new anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed; Shaik, Anver Basha; Jain, Nishant; Kishor, Chandan; Nagabhushana, Ananthamurthy; Supriya, Bhukya; Bharath Kumar, G; Chourasiya, Sumit S; Suresh, Yerramsetty; Mishra, Rakesh K; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-03-06

    A series of twenty one compounds with pyrazole and oxindole conjugates were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation and investigated for their antiproliferative activity on different human cancer cell lines. The conjugates are comprised of a four ring scaffold; the structural isomers 12b and 12c possess chloro-substitution in the D ring. Among the congeners 12b, 12c, and 12d manifested significant cytotoxicity and inhibited tubulin assembly. Treatments with 12b, 12c and 12d resulted in accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, disruption of microtubule network, and increase in cyclin B1 protein. Zebrafish screening revealed that 12b, and 12d caused developmental defects. Docking analysis demonstrated that the congeners occupy the colchicine binding pocket of tubulin.

  7. Molecular modeling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provides insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: 1) In silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; 2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA)...

  8. Phylogenetic Characterization of β-Tubulins and Development of Pyrosequencing Assays for Benzimidazole Resistance in Cattle Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeler, Janina; Krüger, Nina; Krücken, Jürgen; von der Heyden, Vera C.; Ramünke, Sabrina; Küttler, Ursula; Miltsch, Sandra; López Cepeda, Michael; Knox, Malcolm; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter; Harder, Achim; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Control of helminth infections is a major task in livestock production to prevent health constraints and economic losses. However, resistance to established anthelmintic substances already impedes effective anthelmintic treatment in many regions worldwide. Thus, there is an obvious need for sensitive and reliable methods to assess the resistance status of at least the most important nematode populations. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene of various nematodes correlate with resistance to benzimidazoles (BZ), a major anthelmintic class. Here we describe the full-length β-tubulin isotype 1 and 2 and α-tubulin coding sequences of the cattle nematode Ostertagia ostertagi. Additionally, the Cooperia oncophora α-tubulin coding sequence was identified. Phylogenetic maximum-likelihood analysis revealed that both isotype 1 and 2 are orthologs to the Caenorhabditis elegans ben-1 gene which is also associated with BZ resistance upon mutation. In contrast, a Trichuris trichiura cDNA, postulated to be β-tubulin isotype 1 involved in BZ resistance in this human parasite, turned out to be closely related to C. elegans β-tubulins tbb-4 and mec-7 and would therefore represent the first non-ben-1-like β-tubulin to be under selection through treatment with BZs. A pyrosequencing assay was established to detect BZ resistance associated SNPs in β-tubulin isotype 1 codons 167, 198 and 200 of C. oncophora and O. ostertagi. PCR-fragments representing either of the two alleles were combined in defined ratios to evaluate the pyrosequencing assay. The correlation between the given and the measured allele frequencies of the respective SNPs was very high. Subsequently laboratory isolates and field populations with known resistance status were analyzed. With the exception of codon 167 in Cooperia, increases of resistance associated alleles were detected for all codons in at least one of the phenotypically resistant population. Pyrosequencing

  9. Synthesis of phenstatin/isocombretastatin-chalcone conjugates as potent tubulin polymerization inhibitors and mitochondrial apoptotic inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed; Kumar, G Bharath; Vishnuvardhan, M V P S; Shaik, Anver Basha; Reddy, Vangala Santhosh; Mahesh, Rasala; Sayeeda, Ibrahim Bin; Kapure, Jeevak Sopanrao

    2015-04-07

    A series of phenstatin/isocombretastatin–chalcones were synthesized and screened for their cytotoxic activity against various human cancer cell lines. Some representative compounds exhibited significant antiproliferative activity against a panel of sixty human cancer cell lines of the NCI, with GI50 values in the range of 0.11 to 19.0 μM. Three compounds (3b, 3c and 3e) showed a broad spectrum of antiproliferative efficacy on most of the cell lines in the sub-micromolar range. In addition, all the synthesized compounds (3a–l and 4a–l) displayed moderate to excellent cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells such as MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with IC50 values in the range of 0.5 to 19.9 μM. Moreover, the tubulin polymerization assay and immunofluorescence analysis results suggest that some of these compounds like 3c and 3e exhibited significant inhibitory effect on the tubulin assembly with an IC50 value of 0.8 μM and 0.6 μM respectively. A competitive binding assay suggested that these compounds bind at the colchicine-binding site of tubulin. A cell cycle assay revealed that these compounds arrest at the G2/M phase and lead to apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, this was confirmed by Hoechst 33258 staining, activation of caspase 9, DNA fragmentation, Annexin V-FITC and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Molecular docking studies indicated that compounds like 3e occupy the colchicine binding site of tubulin.

  10. Stathmin Regulates Centrosomal Nucleation of Microtubules and Tubulin Dimer/Polymer Partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Ringhoff, Danielle N.; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Stathmin is a microtubule-destabilizing protein ubiquitously expressed in vertebrates and highly expressed in many cancers. In several cell types, stathmin regulates the partitioning of tubulin between unassembled and polymer forms, but the mechanism responsible for partitioning has not been determined. We examined stathmin function in two cell systems: mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from embryos +/+, +/−, and −/− for the stathmin gene and porcine kidney epithelial (LLCPK) cells ...

  11. Phosphorylated LIM kinases colocalize with gamma-tubulin in centrosomes during early stages of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Jones, Jennifer L; Oelschlager, Denise K; Tapia, Tenekua; Tousson, Albert; Grizzle, William E

    2007-12-01

    LIM kinases (LIMK1 and LIMK2) are LIM domain containing serine/threonine kinases that modulate reorganization of actin cytoskeleton through inactivating phosphorylation of cofilin. The Rho family of small GTPases regulates the catalytic activity of LIMK1 and LIMK2 through activating phosphorylation by ROCK or by p21 kinase. Recent studies have suggested that LIMK1 could play a role in modulation of cellular growth by alteration of the cell cycle in breast and prostate tumor cells; however, the direct mitogenic effects of LIMK1 in these tumor cells is yet to be elucidated. Via immunofluorescence, in this study, we show that phosphorylated LIM kinases (pLIMK1/2) are colocalized with gamma-tubulin in the centrosomes during the early mitotic phases of human breast and prostate cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and DU145); apparent colocalization begins in the centrosomes in prophase. As shown by both bright field (MDA-MB-231) and fluorescent immunohistochemistry (MDA-MB-231 and DU145), pLIMK1/2 does not localize to centrosomes during interphase. By bright field immunohistochemistry, the largest area of the centrosome that is stained with pLIMK1/2 occurs at anaphase. In early telophase, reduced staining of pLIMK1/2 at the spindle poles and concomitant accumulation of pLIMK1/2 at the cleavage furrow begins to occur. In late telophase, loss of staining of pLIMK1/2 and of colocalization with gamma-tubulin occurs at the poles and pLIMK1/2 became further concentrated at the junction between the two daughter cells. Co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that gamma-tubulin associates with phosphorylated LIMK1 and LIMK2 but not with dephosphorylated LIMK1 or LIMK2. The results suggest that activated LIMK1/2 may associate with gamma-tubulin and play a role in mitotic spindle assembly.

  12. Review: tubulin function, action of antitubulin drugs, and new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Federico; Budman, Daniel R

    2005-01-01

    Anticancer agents that interfere with microtubulin function are in widespread use in man and have a broad spectrum of activity against both hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The mechanisms of actions of these agents have been better defined during the past decade, indicating that there are distinct binding sites for these agents and that they interfere with microtubulin dynamics (growth and shortening of tubules) at low concentrations and only evoke microtubulin aggregation or dissociation at high concentrations. Tubulin has been recently described in the nucleus of cells and in mitochondria. Downstream events from tubulin binding are believed to be critical events for the generation of apoptosis in the malignant cell. The effects of vinca alkaloids and taxanes are distinct, suggesting that the interference with the tubulin cap by high-affinity binding of effective agents is not the only mechanism of cytotoxic effect, and the low-affinity binding of drug, which distorts microtubulin function, may also be important. The epothilones share some of the binding characteristics of the taxanes and are in clinical trials because of cytoxic activity in taxane resistant cells. Tubulin has additional target sites for anticancer drugs including interference with the binding and function of microtubule associated proteins and interference with motor proteins which are essential for the transport of substances within the cell. Because many of these microtubule associated proteins have an ATP binding site, both computer-aided design and combinatorial chemistry techniques can be used to make agents to interfere with their function analogous to imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). Agents that interfere with the motor protein kinesin are entering clinical trials.

  13. Molecular modelling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provide insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-06-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: (1) in silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; (2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) scoring results ΔΔG(bind-cald) for both noscapine and Br-noscapine (3.915 and 3.025 kcal/mol) are in reasonably good agreement with our experimentally determined binding affinity (ΔΔG(bind-Expt) of 3.570 and 2.988 kcal/mol, derived from K(d) values); and (3) Br-noscapine competes with colchicine binding to tubulin. The simplest interpretation of these collective data is that Br-noscapine binds tubulin at a site overlapping with, or very close to colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Although we cannot rule out a formal possibility that Br-noscapine might bind to a site distinct and distant from the colchicine-binding site that might negatively influence the colchicine binding to tubulin.

  14. The tubulin repertoire of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons and its context‑dependent role in process outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhead, Dean; Schwarz, Erich M.; O’Hagan, Robert; Bellotti, Sebastian; Krieg, Michael; Barr, Maureen M.; Dunn, Alexander R.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules contribute to many cellular processes, including transport, signaling, and chromosome separation during cell division. They comprise αβ‑tubulin heterodimers arranged into linear protofilaments and assembled into tubes. Eukaryotes express multiple tubulin isoforms, and there has been a longstanding debate as to whether the isoforms are redundant or perform specialized roles as part of a tubulin code. Here we use the well‑characterized touch receptor neurons (TRNs) of Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate this question through genetic dissection of process outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro. With single‑cell RNA-seq, we compare transcription profiles for TRNs with those of two other sensory neurons and present evidence that each sensory neuron expresses a distinct palette of tubulin genes. In the TRNs, we analyze process outgrowth and show that four tubulins (tba‑1, tba‑2, tbb‑1, and tbb‑2) function partially or fully redundantly, whereas two others (mec‑7 and mec‑12) perform specialized, context‑dependent roles. Our findings support a model in which sensory neurons express overlapping subsets of tubulin genes whose functional redundancy varies among cell types and in vivo and in vitro contexts. PMID:27654945

  15. Anti-tubulin drugs conjugated to anti-ErbB antibodies selectively radiosensitize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen R.; Yang, Howard C.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Aguilera, Joe; Crisp, Jessica L.; Jones, Karra A.; Whitney, Michael A.; Lippman, Scott M.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Advani, Sunil J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour resistance to radiotherapy remains a barrier to improving cancer patient outcomes. To overcome radioresistance, certain drugs have been found to sensitize cells to ionizing radiation (IR). In theory, more potent radiosensitizing drugs should increase tumour kill and improve patient outcomes. In practice, clinical utility of potent radiosensitizing drugs is curtailed by off-target side effects. Here we report potent anti-tubulin drugs conjugated to anti-ErbB antibodies selectively radiosensitize to tumours based on surface receptor expression. While two classes of potent anti-tubulins, auristatins and maytansinoids, indiscriminately radiosensitize tumour cells, conjugating these potent anti-tubulins to anti-ErbB antibodies restrict their radiosensitizing capacity. Of translational significance, we report that a clinically used maytansinoid ADC, ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), with IR prolongs tumour control in target expressing HER2+ tumours but not target negative tumours. In contrast to ErbB signal inhibition, our findings establish an alternative therapeutic paradigm for ErbB-based radiosensitization using antibodies to restrict radiosensitizer delivery. PMID:27698471

  16. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-10-28

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies suggested that fisetin binds to β-tubulin with superior affinity compared to paclitaxel. Fisetin treatment of human prostate cancer cells resulted in robust up-regulation of microtubule associated proteins (MAP)-2 and -4. In addition, fisetin treated cells were enriched in α-tubulin acetylation, an indication of stabilization of microtubules. Fisetin significantly inhibited PCa cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Nudc, a protein associated with microtubule motor dynein/dynactin complex that regulates microtubule dynamics, was inhibited with fisetin treatment. Further, fisetin treatment of a P-glycoprotein overexpressing multidrug-resistant cancer cell line NCI/ADR-RES inhibited the viability and colony formation. Our results offer in vitro proof-of-concept for fisetin as a microtubule targeting agent. We suggest that fisetin could be developed as an adjuvant for treatment of prostate and other cancer types.

  17. A second tubulin binding site on the kinesin-13 motor head domain is important during mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhang

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13s are microtubule (MT depolymerases different from most other kinesins that move along MTs. Like other kinesins, they have a motor or head domain (HD containing a tubulin and an ATP binding site. Interestingly, kinesin-13s have an additional binding site (Kin-Tub-2 on the opposite side of the HD that contains several family conserved positively charged residues. The role of this site in kinesin-13 function is not clear. To address this issue, we investigated the in-vitro and in-vivo effects of mutating Kin-Tub-2 family conserved residues on the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-13, KLP10A. We show that the Kin-Tub-2 site enhances tubulin cross-linking and MT bundling properties of KLP10A in-vitro. Disruption of the Kin-Tub-2 site, despite not having a deleterious effect on MT depolymerization, results in abnormal mitotic spindles and lagging chromosomes during mitosis in Drosophila S2 cells. The results suggest that the additional Kin-Tub-2 tubulin biding site plays a direct MT attachment role in-vivo.

  18. Time course, distribution and cell types of induction of transforming growth factor betas following middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Pál

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-β1-3 are cytokines that regulate the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of various cell types. The present study describes the induction of TGF-β1-3 in the rat after focal ischemia at 3 h, 24 h, 72 h and 1 month after transient (1 h or permanent (24 h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO using in situ hybridization histochemistry and quantitative analysis. Double labeling with different markers was used to identify the localization of TGF-β mRNA relative to the penumbra and glial scar, and the types of cells expressing TGF-βs. TGF-β1 expression increased 3 h after MCAO in the penumbra and was further elevated 24 h after MCAO. TGF-β1 was present mostly in microglial cells but also in some astrocytes. By 72 h and 1 month after the occlusion, TGF-β1 mRNA-expressing cells also appeared in microglia within the ischemic core and in the glial scar. In contrast, TGF-β2 mRNA level was increased in neurons but not in astrocytes or microglial cells in layers II, III, and V of the ipsilateral cerebral cortex 24 h after MCAO. TGF-β3 was not induced in cells around the penumbra. Its expression increased in only a few cells in layer II of the cerebral cortex 24 h after MCAO. The levels of TGF-β2 and -β3 decreased at subsequent time points. Permanent MCAO further elevated the levels of all 3 subtypes of TGF-βs suggesting that reperfusion is not a major factor in their induction. TGF-β1 did not co-localize with either Fos or ATF-3, while the co-localization of TGF-β2 with Fos but not with ATF-3 suggests that cortical spreading depolarization, but not damage to neural processes, might be the mechanism of induction for TGF-β2. The results imply that endogenous TGF-βs are induced by different mechanisms following an ischemic attack in the brain suggesting that they are involved in distinct spatially and temporally regulated inflammatory and neuroprotective processes.

  19. Experimental beta-alaninuria induced by (aminooxyacetate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurozumi Y

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental beta-alaninuria was induced in rats by injection of (aminooxyacetate (AOA, a potent inhibitor of aminotransferases, in order to elucidate the pathogenesis of hyper-beta-alaninemia. A 27-fold increase of beta-alanine (BALA excretion was induced by subcutaneous injection of 1 5 mg of AOA per kg of body weight. A 13-fold and a 9-fold increase of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, respectively, were also induced simultaneously by the AOA injection. Identification of BALA and BAIBA isolated from the rat urine was performed by chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses. The effects of AOA injection on the tissue levels of these amino acids were also studied. Contents of BALA in the liver and kidney and GABA in the brain increased significantly in response to AOA injection. The present study indicates that BALA transaminase is involved in hyper-beta-alaninemia.

  20. Effects and Mechanisms of Beta-cypermethrin on the Activity of Glutamine Synthetase in Mice Brain%乙体氯氰菊酯对小鼠脑组织GS活力的影响及其机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安丽; 鲍清; 孙静; 赵越; 刘莉; 于飞; 任亚浩; 杨军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects and mechanisms of pyrethroids on excitatory neurotoxicity in mammal. Methods According to their body weights, healthy adult mice were randomly divided into five groups with 10 in each (5 males and 5 females). Four groups of mice were administrated by gastro-gavage with 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg of beta-cypermethrin, diluted with salad oil respectively. Another group of mice was immediately given 300 mg/kg of reduced glutathione(GSH)by intraperitoneal injection after administration with 80 mg/kg of beta-cypermethrin- Three hours after administration, the activity and the mRNA expression of glutamine synthetase(GS) in brains were determined by colorimetric assay and RT-PCR, respectively. Results Two hours after administration, some excitotoxic symptoms were observed in the group of 40 and 80 mg/kg with or without GSH intervention, and the toxic symptoms were alleviated in mice by GSH intervention. There were no obvious symptoms in the group of 20 mg/kg. With the increasing of administrated dosage, the activity of GS in mice brain decreased. Statistical treatment showed that the GS activity of mice brain in groups of 40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg were remarkably different with the control group (P0. 05). In addition, GS mRNA levels had no remarkable difference (P > 0. 05 ) among each group. Conclnsions The suppression of GS activity in mice brain induced by beta-cypermethrin was not mediated by GS gene transcriptional regulation. Toxic symptoms were alleviated obviously in mice, but the GS activity was not significantly improved by exogenetic GSH treatment.%目的 初步探讨拟除虫菊酯类农药致哺乳动物兴奋性神经毒作用机制.方法 将健康成年小鼠按体重随机分成1个对照组、3个染毒组和1个干预组,每组10只,雌雄各半.染毒组小鼠以灌胃方式分别给予20、40、80 mg/kg剂量的乙体氯氰菊酯,食用色拉油稀释受试物质;对照组小鼠给予等量色拉油;干预组小鼠以80 mg/kg

  1. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    We have strategically designed a series of noscapine derivatives by inserting biaryl pharmacophore (a major structural constituent of many of the microtubule-targeting natural anticancer compounds) onto the scaffold structure of noscapine. Molecular interaction of these derivatives with α,β-tubulin heterodimer was investigated by molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation. The predictive binding affinity indicates that the newly designed noscapinoids bind to tubulin with a greater affinity. The predictive binding free energy (ΔGbind, pred) of these derivatives (ranging from -5.568 to -5.970 kcal/mol) based on linear interaction energy (LIE) method with a surface generalized Born (SGB) continuum solvation model showed improved binding affinity with tubulin compared to the lead compound, natural α-noscapine (-5.505 kcal/mol). Guided by the computational findings, these new biaryl type α-noscapine congeners were synthesized from 9-bromo-α-noscapine using optimized Suzuki reaction conditions for further experimental evaluation. The derivatives showed improved inhibition of the proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549), compared to natural noscapine. The cell cycle analysis in MCF-7 further revealed that these compounds alter the cell cycle profile and cause mitotic arrest at G2/M phase more strongly than noscapine. Tubulin binding assay revealed higher binding affinity to tubulin, as suggested by dissociation constant (Kd) of 126 ± 5.0 µM for 5a, 107 ± 5.0 µM for 5c, 70 ± 4.0 µM for 5d, and 68 ± 6.0 µM for 5e compared to noscapine (Kd of 152 ± 1.0 µM). In fact, the experimentally determined value of ΔGbind, expt (calculated from the Kd value) are consistent with the predicted value of ΔGbind, pred calculated based on LIE-SGB. Based on these results, one of the derivative 5e of this series was used for further toxicological

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid A beta(1-40) Improves Differential Dementia Diagnosis in Patients with Intermediate P-tau(181P) Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaets, Sylvie; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed that the concentration of amyloid-beta(1-40) (A beta(1-40)) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflects the total amount of A beta protein in the brain and thus allows a better interpretation of inter-individual differences in A beta quantity than the A beta(1-42) concentration. In this stud

  3. Lithium and neuropsychiatric therapeutics: neuroplasticity via glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, beta-catenin, and neurotrophin cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Akihiko

    2009-05-01

    Mood disorders are not merely attributed to the functional defect of neurotransmission, but also are due to the structural impairment of neuroplasticity. Chronic stress decreases neurotrophin levels, precipitating or exacerbating depression; conversely, antidepressants increase expression of various neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor), thereby blocking or reversing structural and functional pathologies via promoting neurogenesis. Since the worldwide approval of lithium therapy in 1970, lithium has been used for its anti-manic, antidepressant, and anti-suicidal effects, yet the therapeutic mechanisms at the cellular level remain not-fully defined. During the last five years, multiple lines of evidence have shown that the mood stabilization and neurogenesis by lithium are due to the lithium-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), allowing accumulation of beta-catenin and beta-catenin-dependent gene transcriptional events. Altered levels of GSK-3beta and beta-catenin are associated with various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, while various classical neuropsychiatric drugs inhibit GSK-3beta and up-regulate beta-catenin expression. In addition, evidence has emerged that insulin-like growth factor-I enhances antidepression, anti-anxiety, memory, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis; antidepressants up-regulate expression of insulin-like growth factor-I, while insulin-like growth factor-I up-regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and its receptor TrkB level, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced synaptic protein levels. More importantly, physical exercise and healthy diet raise transport of peripheral circulating insulin-like growth factor I into the brain, reinforcing the expression of neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and the strength of cell survival signalings (e.g., phosphoinositide 3-kinase / Akt / GSK-3beta pathway

  4. Proteins in human brain cortex are modified by oxidation, glycoxidation, and lipoxidation. Effects of Alzheimer disease and identification of lipoxidation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Dalfó, Esther; Ayala, Victòria; Bellmunt, Maria Josep; Prat, Joan; Ferrer, Isidre; Portero-Otín, Manuel

    2005-06-03

    Diverse oxidative pathways, such as direct oxidation of amino acids, glycoxidation, and lipoxidation could contribute to Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. A global survey for the amount of structurally characterized probes for these reactions is lacking and could overcome the lack of specificity derived from measurement of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine reactive carbonyls. Consequently we analyzed (i) the presence and concentrations of glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes, N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine, N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)-lysine, and N(epsilon)-(malondialdehyde)-lysine by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, (ii) the biological response through expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, (iii) the fatty acid composition in brain samples from Alzheimer disease patients and age-matched controls, and (iv) the targets of N(epsilon)-(malondialdehyde)-lysine formation in brain cortex by proteomic techniques. Alzheimer disease was associated with significant, although heterogeneous, increases in the concentrations of all evaluated markers. Alzheimer disease samples presented increases in expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products with high molecular heterogeneity. Samples from Alzheimer disease patients also showed content of docosahexaenoic acid, which increased lipid peroxidizability. In accordance, N(epsilon)-(malondialdehyde)-lysine formation targeted important proteins for both glial and neuronal homeostasis such as neurofilament L, alpha-tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase complex protein I, and the beta chain of ATP synthase. These data support an important role for lipid peroxidation-derived protein modifications in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

  5. CXI-benzo-84 reversibly binds to tubulin at colchicine site and induces apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ankit; Gupta, Tilak Kumar; Kini, Sudarshan; Kunwar, Ambarish; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2013-08-01

    Here, we have discovered CXI-benzo-84 as a potential anticancer agent from a library of benzimidazole derivatives using cell based screening strategy. CXI-benzo-84 inhibited cell cycle progression in metaphase stage of mitosis and accumulated spindle assembly checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1 on kinetochores, which subsequently activated apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. CXI-benzo-84 depolymerized both interphase and mitotic microtubules, perturbed EB1 binding to microtubules and inhibited the assembly and GTPase activity of tubulin in vitro. CXI-benzo-84 bound to tubulin at a single binding site with a dissociation constant of 1.2±0.2μM. Competition experiments and molecular docking suggested that CXI-benzo-84 binds to tubulin at the colchicine-site. Further, computational analysis provided a significant insight on the binding site of CXI-benzo-84 on tubulin. In addition to its potential use in cancer chemotherapy, CXI-benzo-84 may also be useful to screen colchicine-site agents and to understand the colchicine binding site on tubulin.

  6. Voltage-dependent anion channels modulate mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells: regulation by free tubulin and erastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Eduardo N; Sheldon, Kely L; DeHart, David N; Patnaik, Jyoti; Manevich, Yefim; Townsend, Danyelle M; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Lemasters, John J

    2013-04-26

    Respiratory substrates and adenine nucleotides cross the mitochondrial outer membrane through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), comprising three isoforms--VDAC1, 2, and 3. We characterized the role of individual isoforms in mitochondrial metabolism by HepG2 human hepatoma cells using siRNA. With VDAC3 to the greatest extent, all VDAC isoforms contributed to the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, but only VDAC3 knockdown decreased ATP, ADP, NAD(P)H, and mitochondrial redox state. Cells expressing predominantly VDAC3 were least sensitive to depolarization induced by increased free tubulin. In planar lipid bilayers, free tubulin inhibited VDAC1 and VDAC2 but not VDAC3. Erastin, a compound that interacts with VDAC, blocked and reversed mitochondrial depolarization after microtubule destabilizers in intact cells and antagonized tubulin-induced VDAC blockage in planar bilayers. In conclusion, free tubulin inhibits VDAC1/2 and limits mitochondrial metabolism in HepG2 cells, contributing to the Warburg phenomenon. Reversal of tubulin-VDAC interaction by erastin antagonizes Warburg metabolism and restores oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

  7. Conservation of tubulin-binding sequences in TRPV1 throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspendu Sardar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid sub type 1 (TRPV1, commonly known as capsaicin receptor can detect multiple stimuli ranging from noxious compounds, low pH, temperature as well as electromagnetic wave at different ranges. In addition, this receptor is involved in multiple physiological and sensory processes. Therefore, functions of TRPV1 have direct influences on adaptation and further evolution also. Availability of various eukaryotic genomic sequences in public domain facilitates us in studying the molecular evolution of TRPV1 protein and the respective conservation of certain domains, motifs and interacting regions that are functionally important. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using statistical and bioinformatics tools, our analysis reveals that TRPV1 has evolved about ∼420 million years ago (MYA. Our analysis reveals that specific regions, domains and motifs of TRPV1 has gone through different selection pressure and thus have different levels of conservation. We found that among all, TRP box is the most conserved and thus have functional significance. Our results also indicate that the tubulin binding sequences (TBS have evolutionary significance as these stretch sequences are more conserved than many other essential regions of TRPV1. The overall distribution of positively charged residues within the TBS motifs is conserved throughout evolution. In silico analysis reveals that the TBS-1 and TBS-2 of TRPV1 can form helical structures and may play important role in TRPV1 function. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis identifies the regions of TRPV1, which are important for structure-function relationship. This analysis indicates that tubulin binding sequence-1 (TBS-1 near the TRP-box forms a potential helix and the tubulin interactions with TRPV1 via TBS-1 have evolutionary significance. This interaction may be required for the proper channel function and regulation and may also have significance in the context

  8. Rapid Genotyping of β-tubulin Polymorphisms in Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashwan, Nour; Scott, Marilyn; Prichard, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background The benzimidazole (BZ) anthelmintics, albendazole (ABZ) and mebendazole (MBZ) are the most common drugs used for treatment of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs). Their intensive use increases the possibility that BZ resistance may develop. In veterinary nematodes, BZ resistance is caused by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene at codon position 200, 167 or 198, and these SNPs have also been correlated with poor response of human Trichuris trichiura to BZ treatment. It is important to be able to investigate the presence of resistance-associated SNPs in STHs before resistance becomes clinically established. Methods The objective of this study was to develop new genotyping assays to screen for the presence of β-tubulin SNPs in T. trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides. Rapid, simple and accurate genotyping assays were developed based on the SmartAmp2 method. Primer sets were optimized and selected to distinguish the SNP-variant genotypes. After initial optimization on control plasmids, the feasibility of the assay was assessed in field samples from Haiti and Panama. Finally, spiked fecal samples were assessed to determine the tolerance of Aac polymerase to fecal inhibitors. Findings Rapid SNP genotyping assays were developed to target β-tubulin polymorphisms in T. trichiura and A. lumbricoides. The assays showed high sensitivity and specificity in field samples and also demonstrated high tolerance to PCR inhibitors in fecal samples. Conclusion These assays proved to be robust and efficient with the potential to be used as field tools for monitoring SNPs that could be associated with BZ resistance. However, further work is needed to validate the assays on large numbers of field samples before and after treatment. PMID:28081124

  9. A Cell-Based Pharmacokinetics Assay for Evaluating Tubulin-Binding Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Jihua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Chan, Jonathon; Wang, Hai; Jin, Yi; Yu, Lei; Grainger, David W.; Ying, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence reveals that traditional pharmacokinetics parameters based on plasma drug concentrations are insufficient to reliably demonstrate accurate pharmacological effects of drugs in target organs or cells in vivo. This underscores the increasing need to improve the types and qualities of cellular pharmacokinetic information for drug preclinical screening and clinical efficacy assessments. Here we report a whole cell-based method to assess drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics to better understand different formulation-mediated intracellular drug release profiles. As proof of concept for this approach, we compared the well-known taxane class of anti-microtubule drugs based on paclitaxel (PTX), including clinically familiar albumin nanoparticle-based Abraxane™, and a polymer nanoparticle-based degradable paclitaxel carrier, poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX, also known as CT-2103) versus control PTX. This in vitro cell-based evaluation of PTX efficacy includes determining the cellular kinetics of tubulin polymerization, relative populations of cells under G2 mitotic arrest, cell proliferation and total cell viability. For these taxane tubulin-binding compounds, the kinetics of cell microtubule stabilization directly correlate with G2 arrest and cell proliferation, reflecting the kinetics and amounts of intracellular PTX release. Each individual cell-based dose-response experiment correlates with published, key therapeutic parameters and taken together, provide a comprehensive understanding of drug intracellular pharmacokinetics at both cellular and molecular levels. This whole cell-based evaluating method is convenient, quantitative and cost-effective for evaluating new formulations designed to optimize cellular pharmacokinetics for drugs perturbing tubulin polymerization as well as assisting in explaining drug mechanisms of action at cellular levels. PMID:24688312

  10. A cell-based pharmacokinetics assay for evaluating tubulin-binding drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Jihua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Chan, Jonathon; Wang, Hai; Jin, Yi; Yu, Lei; Grainger, David W; Ying, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence reveals that traditional pharmacokinetics parameters based on plasma drug concentrations are insufficient to reliably demonstrate accurate pharmacological effects of drugs in target organs or cells in vivo. This underscores the increasing need to improve the types and qualities of cellular pharmacokinetic information for drug preclinical screening and clinical efficacy assessments. Here we report a whole cell-based method to assess drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics to better understand different formulation-mediated intracellular drug release profiles. As proof of concept for this approach, we compared the well-known taxane class of anti-microtubule drugs based on paclitaxel (PTX), including clinically familiar albumin nanoparticle-based Abraxane™, and a polymer nanoparticle-based degradable paclitaxel carrier, poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX, also known as CT-2103) versus control PTX. This in vitro cell-based evaluation of PTX efficacy includes determining the cellular kinetics of tubulin polymerization, relative populations of cells under G2 mitotic arrest, cell proliferation and total cell viability. For these taxane tubulin-binding compounds, the kinetics of cell microtubule stabilization directly correlate with G2 arrest and cell proliferation, reflecting the kinetics and amounts of intracellular PTX release. Each individual cell-based dose-response experiment correlates with published, key therapeutic parameters and taken together, provide a comprehensive understanding of drug intracellular pharmacokinetics at both cellular and molecular levels. This whole cell-based evaluating method is convenient, quantitative and cost-effective for evaluating new formulations designed to optimize cellular pharmacokinetics for drugs perturbing tubulin polymerization as well as assisting in explaining drug mechanisms of action at cellular levels.

  11. Novel hybrid nocodazole analogues as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and their antiproliferative activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sangram S.; Jedhe, Ganesh S.; Meshram, Sachin N.; Santra, Manas K.; Hamel, Ernest; Sanjayan, Gangadhar J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and SAR profiling of a series of novel combretastatin–nocodazole conjugates as potential anticancer agents. The thiophene ring in the nocodazole moiety was replaced by a substituted phenyl ring from the combretastatin moiety to design novel hybrid analogues. The hydroxyl group at the ortho position in compounds 2, 3 and 4 was used as the conformationally locking tool by anticipated six-membered hydrogen bonding. The bioactivity profiles of all compounds as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and as antiproliferative agents against the A-549 human lung cancer cell line were investigated Compounds 1 and 4 showed μM IC50 values in both assays. PMID:25817588

  12. Divalent cation and ionic strength effects on Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin self-association.

    OpenAIRE

    Lobert, S; Boyd, C A; Correia, J J

    1997-01-01

    We present here a systematic study of ionic strength and divalent cation effects on Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin spiral formation. We used sedimentation velocity experiments and quantitative fitting of weight-average sedimentation coefficients versus free drug concentrations to obtain thermodynamic parameters under various solution conditions. The addition of 50-150 mM NaCl to our standard buffer (10 mM piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid), 1 mM Mg, 50 microM GDP or GTP, pH 6.9) enhan...

  13. High LET Radiation Amplifies Centrosome Overduplication Through a Pathway of γ-Tubulin Monoubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Mikio [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hirayama, Ryoichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Komatsu, Kenshi, E-mail: komatsu@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation induces centrosome overduplication, leading to mitotic catastrophe and tumorigenesis. Because mitotic catastrophe is one of the major tumor cell killing factors in high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation therapy and long-term survivors from such treatment have a potential risk of secondary tumors, we investigated LET dependence of radiation-induced centrosome overduplication and the underlying mechanism. Methods and Materials: Carbon and iron ion beams (13-200 keV/μm) and γ-rays (0.5 keV/μm) were used as radiation sources. To count centrosomes after IR exposure, human U2OS and mouse NIH3T3 cells were immunostained with antibodies of γ-tubulin and centrin 2. Similarly, Nbs1-, Brca1-, Ku70-, and DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cells and their counterpart wild-type cells were used for measurement of centrosome overduplication. Results: The number of excess centrosome-containing cells at interphase and the resulting multipolar spindle at mitosis were amplified with increased LET, reaching a maximum level of 100 keV/μm, followed by sharp decrease in frequency. Interestingly, Ku70 and DNA-PKcs deficiencies marginally affected the induction of centrosome overduplication, whereas the cell killings were significantly enhanced. This was in contrast to observation that high LET radiation significantly enhanced frequencies of centrosome overduplication in Nbs1- and Brca1-deficient cells. Because NBS1/BRCA1 is implicated in monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin, we subsequently tested whether it is affected by high LET radiation. As a result, monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin was abolished in 48 to 72 hours after exposure to high LET radiation, although γ-ray exposure slightly decreased it 48 hours postirradiation and was restored to a normal level at 72 hours. Conclusions: High LET radiation significantly reduces NBS1/BRCA1-mediated monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin and amplifies centrosome overduplication with a peak at 100 keV/μm. In contrast, Ku70 and DNA

  14. Insecticidal heterolignans--tubuline polymerization inhibitors with activity against chewing pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackenpohl, Jens; Adelt, Isabelle; Antonicek, Horst; Arnold, Christian; Behrmann, Patricia; Blaha, Nicole; Böhmer, Jutta; Gutbrod, Oliver; Hanke, Roman; Hohmann, Sabine; van Houtdreve, Marc; Lösel, Peter; Malsam, Olga; Melchers, Martin; Neufert, Valentina; Peschel, Elisabeth; Reckmann, Udo; Schenke, Thomas; Thiesen, Hans-Peter; Velten, Robert; Vogelsang, Kathrin; Weiss, Hans-Christoph

    2009-06-15

    Starting from natural product podophyllotoxin 1 substituted heterolignans were identified with promising insecticidal in vivo activity. The impact of substitution in each segment of the core structure was investigated in a detailed SAR study, and variation of substituents in both aromatic moieties afforded derivatives 5 and 43 with broad insecticidal activity against lepidopteran and coleopteran species. In vitro measurements supported by modeling studies indicate that heterolignans 3-134 act as tubuline polymerization inhibitors interacting with the colchicine-binding site. Insect specific structure-activity effects were observed showing that the insecticidal SAR described herein differs from reported cytotoxicity studies.

  15. New imidazoquinoxaline derivatives: Synthesis, biological evaluation on melanoma, effect on tubulin polymerization and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zghaib, Zahraa; Guichou, Jean-François; Vappiani, Johanna; Bec, Nicole; Hadj-Kaddour, Kamel; Vincent, Laure-Anaïs; Paniagua-Gayraud, Stéphanie; Larroque, Christian; Moarbess, Georges; Cuq, Pierre; Kassab, Issam; Deleuze-Masquéfa, Carine; Diab-Assaf, Mona; Bonnet, Pierre-Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are considered as important targets of anticancer therapy. EAPB0503 and its structural imidazo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives are major microtubule-interfering agents with potent anticancer activity. In this study, the synthesis of several new derivatives of EAPB0503 is described, and the anticancer efficacy of 13 novel derivatives on A375 human melanoma cell line is reported. All new compounds show significant antiproliferative activity with IC50 in the range of 0.077-122μM against human melanoma cell line (A375). Direct inhibition of tubulin polymerization assay in vitro is also assessed. Results show that compounds 6b, 6e, 6g, and EAPB0503 highly inhibit tubulin polymerization with percentages of inhibition of 99%, 98%, 90%, and 84% respectively. Structure-activity relationship studies within the series are also discussed in line with molecular docking studies into the colchicine-binding site of tubulin.

  16. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of tubulin inhibitors with non-small cell lung cancer pre-clinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic small molecule tubulin inhibitors have many advantages as novel anti-cancer agents compared to the current tubulin inhibitors generated from natural products. Our previous studies led to the design and synthesis of a series of novel tubulin inhibitors. Some of these compounds also inhibited heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27, and showed promising in vitro anti-cancer activities in several breast cancer cell lines at sub nano-molar concentrations. However, whether these compounds could suppress tumor growth in animals was not investigated yet. In the current study, to identify the best drug candidates, therapeutic efficacy of the representative compounds from previous analyses was evaluated using non-small cell lung cancer preclinical models. These agents dose-dependently inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells in both monolayer cultures and three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. Several compounds also showed promising tumor growth suppressive activity in nude mice xenograft model

  17. Probing FtsZ and tubulin with C8-substituted GTP analogs reveals differences in their nucleotide binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läppchen, Tilman; Pinas, Victorine A; Hartog, Aloysius F; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; Schaffner-Barbero, Claudia; Andreu, José Manuel; Trambaiolo, Daniel; Löwe, Jan; Juhem, Aurélie; Popov, Andrei V; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2008-02-01

    The cytoskeletal proteins, FtsZ and tubulin, play a pivotal role in prokaryotic cell division and eukaryotic chromosome segregation, respectively. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ could constitute a new class of antibiotics, while several inhibitors of tubulin are widely used in antiproliferative therapy. In this work, we set out to identify selective inhibitors of FtsZ based on the structure of its natural ligand, GTP. We found that GTP analogs with small hydrophobic substituents at C8 of the nucleobase efficiently inhibit FtsZ polymerization, whereas they have an opposite effect on the polymerization of tubulin. The inhibitory activity of the GTP analogs on FtsZ polymerization allowed us to crystallize FtsZ in complex with C8-morpholino-GTP, revealing the binding mode of a GTP derivative containing a nonmodified triphosphate chain.

  18. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Relevance to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Sasvari, M.; Konya, C.; Penke, B; Luiten, P.G.M.; Nyakas, C.

    1999-01-01

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition arid processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are producedin a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor prot

  19. Low dose tubulin-binding drugs rescue peroxisome trafficking deficit in patient-derived stem cells in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Fan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, diagnosed by progressive gait disturbances with muscle weakness and spasticity, for which there are no treatments targeted at the underlying pathophysiology. Mutations in spastin are a common cause of HSP. Spastin is a microtubule-severing protein whose mutation in mouse causes defective axonal transport. In human patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS cells, spastin mutations lead to lower levels of acetylated α-tubulin, a marker of stabilised microtubules, and to slower speed of peroxisome trafficking. Here we screened multiple concentrations of four tubulin-binding drugs for their ability to rescue levels of acetylated α-tubulin in patient-derived ONS cells. Drug doses that restored acetylated α-tubulin to levels in control-derived ONS cells were then selected for their ability to rescue peroxisome trafficking deficits. Automated microscopic screening identified very low doses of the four drugs (0.5 nM taxol, 0.5 nM vinblastine, 2 nM epothilone D, 10 µM noscapine that rescued acetylated α-tubulin in patient-derived ONS cells. These same doses rescued peroxisome trafficking deficits, restoring peroxisome speeds to untreated control cell levels. These results demonstrate a novel approach for drug screening based on high throughput automated microscopy for acetylated α-tubulin followed by functional validation of microtubule-based peroxisome transport. From a clinical perspective, all the drugs tested are used clinically, but at much higher doses. Importantly, epothilone D and noscapine can enter the central nervous system, making them potential candidates for future clinical trials.

  20. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 mediates amyloid-beta-mediated cell death of cerebrovascular cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Triel, J.J. van; Veerhuis, R.; Maat-Schieman, M.L.; Bu, G.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Inefficient clearance of A beta, caused by impaired blood-brain barrier crossing into the circulation, seems to be a major cause of A beta accumulation in the brain of late-onset Alzheimer's disease patients and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis Dutch type. We observed association of r

  1. Astrocytic expression of the Alzheimer's disease beta-secretase (BACE1) is stimulus-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Apelt, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    The beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a prerequisite for the generation of beta-amyloid peptides, which give rise to cerebrovascular and parenchymal beta-amyloid deposits in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. BACE1 is neuronally expressed in the brains of humans and experimental...... paradigms studied. In contrast, BACE1 expression by reactive astrocytes was evident in chronic but not in acute models of gliosis. Additionally, we observed BACE1-immunoreactive astrocytes in proximity to beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of aged Tg2576 mice and Alzheimer's disease patients....

  2. Exploring the Contribution of Collective Motions to the Dynamics of Forced-Unfolding in Tubulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Momin, Farhana; Haines, Kelly E.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Decomposition of the intrinsic dynamics of proteins into collective motions among distant regions of the protein structure provides a physically appealing approach that couples the dynamics of the system with its functional role. The cellular functions of microtubules (an essential component of the cytoskeleton in all eukaryotic cells) depend on their dynamic instability, which is altered by various factors among which applied forces are central. To shed light on the coupling between forces and the dynamic instability of microtubules, we focus on the investigation of the response of the microtubule subunits (tubulin) to applied forces. We address this point by adapting an approach designed to survey correlations for the equilibrium dynamics of proteins to the case of correlations for proteins forced-dynamics. The resulting collective motions in tubulin have a number of functional implications, such as the identification of long-range couplings with a role in blocking the dynamic instability of microtubules. A fundamental implication of our study for the life of a cell is that, to increase the likelihood of unraveling of large cytoskeletal filaments under physiological forces, molecular motors must use a combination of pulling and torsion rather than just pulling. PMID:20159162

  3. Phosphorylation of the yeast γ-tubulin Tub4 regulates microtubule function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Tien-chen; Gombos, Linda; Neuner, Annett;

    2011-01-01

    The yeast ¿-tubulin Tub4 is assembled with Spc97 and Spc98 into the small Tub4 complex. The Tub4 complex binds via the receptor proteins Spc72 and Spc110 to the spindle pole body (SPB), the functional equivalent of the mammalian centrosome, where the Tub4 complex organizes cytoplasmic and nuclear...... microtubules. Little is known about the regulation of the Tub4 complex. Here, we isolated the Tub4 complex with the bound receptors from yeast cells. Analysis of the purified Tub4 complex by mass spectrometry identified more than 50 phosphorylation sites in Spc72, Spc97, Spc98, Spc110 and Tub4. To examine...... the functional relevance of the phosphorylation sites, phospho-mimicking and non-phosphorylatable mutations in Tub4, Spc97 and Spc98 were analyzed. Three phosphorylation sites in Tub4 were found to be critical for Tub4 stability and microtubule organization. One of the sites is highly conserved in ¿-tubulins...

  4. Specific expression of a β-tubulin gene (GhTub1) in developing cotton fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Yuanli; (李园莉); SUN; Jie; (孙杰); LI; Chunhong; (李春红); ZHU; Yongqing; (朱勇清); XIA; Guixian; (夏桂先)

    2003-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed using poly (A)+ RNA isolated from -1-15 DPA fibers of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The cDNA encoding a β-tubulin isoform (designated as GhTub1) was identified through EST search. Northern blot analysis using 3′-UTR of the cDNA as a gene-specific probe was performed to investigate the expression levels of GhTub1 in various organs and in the developing fibers. The results showed that GhTub1 gene was specifically expressed in cotton fiber cells. During fiber development, GhTub1 transcripts accumulated highlyat the stage of cell rapid elongation with the highest expression appearing at the time when fiber expansion reaches the peak rate. To probe the in vivo function of GhTub1, its cDNA was cloned in the yeast expression vector pREP1 and transformed into the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Overexpression of GhTub1 in yeast cells caused severe changes in the cell morphology. These results suggest that GhTub1 may play a role in the polar elongation of cotton fibers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the fiber-specific transcript accumulation of a cotton β-tubulin gene.

  5. Divalent cation and ionic strength effects on Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, S; Boyd, C A; Correia, J J

    1997-01-01

    We present here a systematic study of ionic strength and divalent cation effects on Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin spiral formation. We used sedimentation velocity experiments and quantitative fitting of weight-average sedimentation coefficients versus free drug concentrations to obtain thermodynamic parameters under various solution conditions. The addition of 50-150 mM NaCl to our standard buffer (10 mM piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid), 1 mM Mg, 50 microM GDP or GTP, pH 6.9) enhances overall vinblastine- or vincristine-induced tubulin self-association. As demonstrated in previous studies, GDP enhances overall self-association more than GTP, although in the presence of salt, GDP enhancement is reduced. For example, in 150 mM NaCl, GDP enhancement is 0.24 kcal/mol for vinblastine and 0.36 kcal/mol for vincristine versus an average enhancement of 0.87 (+/- 0.34) kcal/mol for the same drugs in the absence of salt. Wyman linkage analysis of experiments with vinblastine or vincristine over a range of NaCl concentrations showed a twofold increase in the change in NaCl bound to drug-induced spirals in the presence of GTP compared to GDP. These data indicate that GDP enhancement of Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin self-association is due in part to electrostatic inhibition in the GTP state. In the absence of NaCl, we found that vinblastine and 1 mM Mn2+ or Ca2+ causes immediate condensation of tubulin. The predominant aggregates observed by electron microscopy are large sheets. This effect was not found with 1 mM Mg2+. At 100 microM cation concentrations (Mn2+, Mg2+, or Ca2+), GDP enhances vinblastine-induced spiral formation by 0.55 (+/- 0.26) kcal/mol. This effect is found only in K2, the association of liganded heterodimers at the ends of growing spirals. There is no GDP enhancement of K1, the binding of drug to heterodimer, although K1 is dependent upon the divalent cation concentration. NaCl diminishes tubulin condensation, probably by inhibiting lateral

  6. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju [Department of Surgery, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Weber, Joseph [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mohanakumar, T., E-mail: kumart@wustl.edu [Department of Surgery, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  7. Beta-carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patches on the tongue and mouth called oral leukoplakia. Taking beta-carotene by mouth for up to 12 months seems to decrease symptoms of oral leukoplakia. Osteoarthritis. Beta-carotene taken by mouth may prevent ...

  8. Class III β-tubulin overexpression within the tumor microenvironment is a prognostic biomarker for poor overall survival in ovarian cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant carboplatin/paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Dana M; Buza, Natalia; Glasgow, Michelle; Bellone, Stefania; Bortolomai, Ileana; Gasparrini, Sara; Cocco, Emiliano; Ratner, Elena; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas J; Schwartz, Peter E; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Critics have suggested that neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking may select for resistant clones or cancer stem cells when compared to primary cytoreduction. β-tubulins are chemotherapeutic targets of taxanes and epothilones. Class III β-tubulin overexpression has been linked to chemoresistance and hypoxia. Herein, we describe changes in class III β-tubulin in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma in response to NACT, in relationship to clinical outcome, and between patients who underwent NACT versus primary debulking; we characterize in vitro chemosensitivity to paclitaxel/patupilone of cell lines established from this patient population, and class III β-tubulin expression following repeated exposure to paclitaxel. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed among 22 paired specimens obtained before/after NACT decreased expression of class III β-tubulin following therapy within stroma (p=0.07), but not tumor (p=0.63). Poor median overall survival was predicted by high levels of class III β-tubulin in both tumor (HR 3.66 [1.11,12.05], p=0.03) and stroma (HR 4.53 [1.28,16.1], p=0.02). Class III β-tubulin expression by quantitative-real-time-polymerase-chain-reaction was higher among patients who received NACT (n=12) compared to primary cytoreduction (n=14) (mean±SD fold-change: 491.2±115.9 vs. 224.1±55.66, p=0.037). In vitro subculture with paclitaxel resulted in class III β-tubulin upregulation, however, cell lines that overexpressed class III β-tubulin remained sensitive to patupilone. Overexpression of class III β-tubulin in patients dispositioned to NACT may thus identify an intrinsically aggressive phenotype, and predict poor overall survival and paclitaxel resistance. Decreases in stromal expression may represent normalization of the tumor microenvironment following therapy. Epothilones warrant study for patients who have received neoadjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel.

  9. Oxalone and lactone moieties of podophyllotoxin exhibit properties of both the B and C rings of colchicine in its binding with tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suvroma; Das, Lalita; Datta, Ajit B; Poddar, Asim; Janik, Mark E; Bhattacharyya, Bhabatarak

    2006-05-23

    Thermodynamics of podophyllotoxin binding to tubulin and its multiple points of attachment with tubulin has been studied in detail using isothermal titration calorimetry. The calorimetric enthalpy of the association of podophyllotoxin with tubulin is negative and occurs with a negative heat capacity change (DeltaC(p) = -2.47 kJ mol(-)(1) K(-)(1)). The binding is unique with a simultaneous participation of both hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding forces with unfavorable negative entropic contribution at higher temperature, favored with an enthalpy-entropy compensation. Interestingly, the binding of 2-methoxy-5-(2',3',4'-trimethoxyphenyl)tropone (AC, a colchicine analogue without the B ring) with tubulin is enthalpy-favored. However, the podophyllotoxin-tubulin association depending upon the temperature of the reaction has a favorable entropic and enthalpic component, which resembles both B- and C-ring properties of colchicine. On the basis of the crystal structure of the podophyllotoxin-tubulin complex, distance calculations have indicated a possible interaction between threonine 179 of alpha-tubulin and the hydroxy group on the D ring of podophyllotoxin. To confirm the involvement of the oxalone moiety as well as the lactone ring of podophyllotoxin in tubulin binding, analogues of podophyllotoxin are synthesized with methoxy substitution at the 4' position of ring D along with its isomer and another analogue epimerized at ring E. From these results, involvement of oxalone as well as the lactone ring of the drug in a specific orientation inclusive of ring A is indicated for podophyllotoxin-tubulin binding. Therefore, podophyllotoxin, like colchicine, behaves as a bifunctional ligand having properties of both the B and C rings of colchicine by making more than one point of attachment with the protein tubulin.

  10. Protein synthesis in postischemic rat brain: a two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, M; Dienel, G A; Jacewicz, M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1986-12-01

    This study examined the pattern of protein synthesis in the neocortex, caudate-putamen, and the hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia in rats. The animal model of temporary ischemia used in this study causes permanent damage to vulnerable neurons with a time course of injury that varies from hours (caudate nucleus) to days (hippocampus). To examine the spectrum of proteins synthesized in these regions at 3 and 18 h after recirculation, cerebral proteins were pulse-labeled in vivo by an intravenous injection of [35S]methionine. Newly synthesized (35S-labeled) and constitutive (unlabeled) proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In all three brain regions, specific proteins underwent preferential synthesis (Mr approximately 27,000, approximately 65,000, approximately 70,000, approximately 110,000), while others showed decreased synthesis (neuron-specific enolase, alpha- and beta-tubulin). There was an early (3 h post ischemia) induction of the Mr approximately 70,000 mammalian "stress" protein; at 18 h post ischemia, its synthesis remained high in the hippocampus but was diminished in the neocortex and had largely subsided in the caudate-putamen. All regions at 18 h showed increased synthesis of an Mr approximately 50,000 protein, tentatively identified as glial fibrillary acidic protein. The results show that temporary forebrain ischemia induces changes in protein synthesis that include features similar to those observed in other eukaryotic cells subjected to injurious stress. These postischemic changes in protein synthesis are qualitatively similar in all brain regions examined despite regional differences in the severity of subsequent neuronal damage. The persistent synthesis of the Mr approximately 70,000 stress protein in the hippocampus, however, may reflect continued metabolic injury long after the ischemic episode has passed.

  11. Forward-Looking Betas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Vainberg, Gregory

    Few issues are more important for finance practice than the computation of market betas. Existing approaches compute market betas using historical data. While these approaches differ in terms of statistical sophistication and the modeling of the time-variation in the betas, they are all backward......-looking. This paper introduces a radically different approach to estimating market betas. Using the tools in Bakshi and Madan (2000) and Bakshi, Kapadia and Madan (2003) we employ the information embedded in the prices of individual stock options and index options to compute our forward-looking market beta...

  12. γ-tubulin is differentially expressed in mitotic and non-mitotic cardiomyocytes in the regenerating zebrafish heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Sallin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains complementary figures related to the research article entitled, “ A dual epimorphic and compensatory mode of heart regeneration” ([10], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2014.12.002, which presents a spatial and temporal characterization of cardiomyocyte proliferation and dedifferentiation after cryoinjury-induced myocardial infarction. This study demonstrated that mitotic divisions occur in cardiac cells at distinct differentiation status, namely in dedifferentiated cells at the injury border as well as in mature cardiac cells within the remaining intact myocardium. One of the important aspects supporting our conclusions is a characterization of proteins that are upregulated during mitosis in the regenerating hearts. The data presented here reveal a dynamic change in the expression level and in the subcellular distribution of γ-tubulin between mitotic and non-mitotic cardiac cells. We report that in the non-mitotic cells, γ-tubulin expression is restricted to the centrosome. By contrast, during the mitosis, γ-tubulin strongly expands its localization within the spindle apparatus that interacts with the condensed chromosomes. We demonstrated that the differential distribution of γ-tubulin in non-mitotic and mitotic cells requires adjusted image processing for the appropriate visualization of both expression patterns in the same histological specimens.

  13. Class III β-tubulin in advanced NSCLC of adenocarcinoma subtype predicts superior outcome in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Platinum-based doublets are the cornerstone of treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and often include vinorelbine or taxanes. A predictive biomarker is greatly needed to select chemotherapy-sensitive patients for these microtubule-interfering agents. Class III ß-tubulin (TUBB3...

  14. GTP analogue inhibits polymerization and GTPase activity of the bacterial protein FtsZ without affecting its eukaryotic homologue tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läppchen, Tilman; Hartog, Aloysius F; Pinas, Victorine A; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2005-05-31

    The prokaryotic tubulin homologue FtsZ plays a key role in bacterial cell division. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ are expected to result in a new class of antibacterial agents. One of the challenges is to identify compounds which do not affect the function of tubulin and various other GTPases in eukaryotic cells. We have designed a novel inhibitor of FtsZ polymerization based on the structure of the natural substrate GTP. The inhibitory activity of 8-bromoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BrGTP) was characterized by a coupled assay, which allows simultaneous detection of the extent of polymerization (via light scattering) and GTPase activity (via release of inorganic phosphate). We found that BrGTP acts as a competitive inhibitor of both FtsZ polymerization and GTPase activity with a Ki for GTPase activity of 31.8 +/- 4.1 microM. The observation that BrGTP seems not to inhibit tubulin assembly suggests a structural difference of the GTP-binding pockets of FtsZ and tubulin.

  15. GTP analogue inhibits polymerization and GTPase activity of the bacterial protein FtsZ without affecting its eukaryotic homologue tubulin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Läppchen, T.; Hartog, A.F.; Pinas, V.; Koomen, G.J.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2005-01-01

    The prokaryotic tubulin homologue FtsZ plays a key role in bacterial cell division. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ are expected to result in a new class of antibacterial agents. One of the challenges is to identify compounds which do not affect the function of tubul

  16. Tubulin bond energies and microtubule biomechanics determined from nanoindentation in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Theisen, Kelly E; Marx, Kenneth A; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral non-covalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physico-chemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force-deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversib...

  17. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  18. ESTs library from embryonic stages reveals tubulin and reflectin diversity in Sepia officinalis (Mollusca — Cephalopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaglia, Yann; Bekel, Thomas; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Andouche, Aude; Navet, Sandra; Bonnaud, Laure

    2012-05-01

    New molecular resources regarding the so-called “non-standard models” in biology extend the present knowledge and are essential for molecular evolution and diversity studies (especially during the development) and evolutionary inferences about these zoological groups, or more practically for their fruitful management. Sepia officinalis, an economically important cephalopod species, is emerging as a new lophotrochozoan developmental model. We developed a large set of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from embryonic stages of S. officinalis, yielding 19,780 non-redundant sequences (NRS). Around 75% of these sequences have no homologs in existing available databases. This set is the first developmental ESTs library in cephalopods. By exploring these NRS for tubulin, a generic protein family, and reflectin, a cephalopod specific protein family,we point out for both families a striking molecular diversity in S. officinalis.

  19. [1,2]Oxazolo[5,4-e]isoindoles as promising tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Virginia; Pennati, Marzia; Parrino, Barbara; Carbone, Anna; Montalbano, Alessandra; Lopergolo, Alessia; Zuco, Valentina; Cominetti, Denis; Diana, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Barraja, Paola

    2016-11-29

    A series of [1,2]Oxazolo [5,4-e]isoindoles has been synthesized through a versatile and high yielding sequence. All the new structures showed in the (1)HNMR spectra, the typical signal in the 8.34-8.47 ppm attributable to the H-3 of the [1,2]oxazole moiety. Among all derivatives, methoxy benzyl substituents at positions 3 and 4 or/and 5 were very effective in reducing the growth of different tumor cell lines, including diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (DMPM), an uncommon and rapidly malignancy poorly responsive to available therapeutic options. The most active compound 6j was found to impair tubulin polymerization, cause cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and induce apoptosis in DMPM cells, making it as a new lead for the discovery of new potent antimitotic drugs.

  20. PAX3 inhibits β-Tubulin-III expression and neuronal differentiation of neural stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Sixian; Du, Jinfeng; Lv, Yan; Lin, Hengrong; Mao, Zuming; Xu, Man; Liu, Mei; Liu, Yan

    2017-02-20

    PAX3 functions at the nodal point in neural stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Using bioinformatics methods, we identified PAX3 as a potential regulator of β-Tubulin-III (TUBB3) gene transcription, and the results indicated that PAX3 might be involved in neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation by orchestrating the expression of cytoskeletal proteins. In the present study, we reported that PAX3 could inhibit the differentiation of NSCs and the expression of TUBB3. Further, using luciferase and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that PAX3 could bind to the promoter region of TUBB3 and inhibit TUBB3 transcription. Finally, we confirmed that PAX3 could bind to the promoter region of endogenous TUBB3 in the native chromatin of NSCs. These findings indicated that PAX3 is a pivotal factor targeting various molecules during differentiation of NSCs in vitro.

  1. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and Antigen-presenting cell interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa B Martín-Cófreces

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The cross-talk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the IS by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the APC, thus favoring the transport of components towards the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of the TCR signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off.

  2. In silico inspired design and synthesis of a novel tubulin-binding anti-cancer drug: folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Lopus, Manu; Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N.; Joshi, Harish C.

    2012-02-01

    Our screen for tubulin-binding small molecules that do not depolymerize bulk cellular microtubules, but based upon structural features of well known microtubule-depolymerizing colchicine and podophyllotoxin, revealed tubulin binding anti-cancer property of noscapine (Ye et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95:2280-2286, 1998). Guided by molecular modelling calculations and structure-activity relationships we conjugated at C9 of noscapine, a folate group—a ligand for cellular folate receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is over-expressed on some solid tumours such as ovarian epithelial cancers. Molecular docking experiments predicted that a folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin) accommodated well inside the binding cavity (docking score -11.295 kcal/mol) at the interface between α- and β-tubulin. The bulky folate moiety of Targetin is extended toward lumen of microtubules. The binding free energy (Δ G bind) computed based on molecular mechanics energy minimization was -221.01 kcal/mol that revealed favourable interaction of Targetin with the receptor. Chemical synthesis, tubulin-binding experiments, and anti-cancer activity in vitro corroborate fully well with the molecular modelling experiments. Targetin binds tubulin with a dissociation constant ( K d value) of 149 ± 3.0 μM and decreases the transition frequencies between growth and shortening phases of microtubule assembly dynamics at concentrations that do not alter the total polymer mass. Cancer cells in general were more sensitive to Targetin compared with the founding compound noscapine (IC50 in the range of 15-40 μM). Quite strikingly, ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3 and A2780), known to overexpress FRα, were much more sensitive to targetin (IC50 in the range of 0.3-1.5 μM).

  3. In silico inspired design and synthesis of a novel tubulin-binding anti-cancer drug: folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K; Lopus, Manu; Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N; Joshi, Harish C

    2012-02-01

    Our screen for tubulin-binding small molecules that do not depolymerize bulk cellular microtubules, but based upon structural features of well known microtubule-depolymerizing colchicine and podophyllotoxin, revealed tubulin binding anti-cancer property of noscapine (Ye et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95:2280-2286, 1998). Guided by molecular modelling calculations and structure-activity relationships we conjugated at C9 of noscapine, a folate group-a ligand for cellular folate receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is over-expressed on some solid tumours such as ovarian epithelial cancers. Molecular docking experiments predicted that a folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin) accommodated well inside the binding cavity (docking score -11.295 kcal/mol) at the interface between α- and β-tubulin. The bulky folate moiety of Targetin is extended toward lumen of microtubules. The binding free energy (ΔG (bind)) computed based on molecular mechanics energy minimization was -221.01 kcal/mol that revealed favourable interaction of Targetin with the receptor. Chemical synthesis, tubulin-binding experiments, and anti-cancer activity in vitro corroborate fully well with the molecular modelling experiments. Targetin binds tubulin with a dissociation constant (K (d) value) of 149 ± 3.0 μM and decreases the transition frequencies between growth and shortening phases of microtubule assembly dynamics at concentrations that do not alter the total polymer mass. Cancer cells in general were more sensitive to Targetin compared with the founding compound noscapine (IC(50) in the range of 15-40 μM). Quite strikingly, ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3 and A2780), known to overexpress FRα, were much more sensitive to targetin (IC(50) in the range of 0.3-1.5 μM).

  4. Ausência de associação entre polimorfismo do gene da interleucina-1 beta e o prognóstico de pacientes com traumatismo crânio-encefálico grave Lack of association between interleukin-1 gene polymorphism and prognosis in severe traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Frederes Krämer Alcalde

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O traumatismo crânio-encefálico é a principal causa de óbito em indivíduos com idade entre 1 a 45 anos. O desfecho do traumatismo crânio-encefálico pode estar relacionado, além de fatores pré-morbidade e gravidade do dano, com fatores genéticos. Genes que podem ter relação com o resultado pós-trauma vêm sendo estudados, porém, ainda existem poucas informações sobre a associação entre polimorfismos genéticos e o desfecho do traumatismo crânio-encefálico. O gene da interleucina-1 beta (IL-1B é um dos genes estudados, pois esta citocina encontra-se em níveis elevados após o traumatismo crânio-encefálico e pode afetar de forma negativa seu desfecho. O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar o polimorfismo -31C/T, localizado na região promotora do gene IL-1B, em pacientes com traumatismo crânio-encefálico grave visando correlacioná-lo com o desfecho primário precoce (alta do centro de terapia intensiva ou morte. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 69 pacientes internados por traumatismo crânio-encefálico grave em três hospitais de Porto Alegre e região metropolitana. O polimorfismo foi analisado através da reação em cadeia da polimerase, seguida da digestão com enzima de restrição. RESULTADOS: O traumatismo crânio-encefálico grave foi associado a uma mortalidade de 45%. Não foram observadas diferenças significativas nas frequências alélicas e genotípicas entre os grupos de pacientes divididos pelo desfecho do traumatismo crânio-encefálico. CONCLUSÃO: Nossos resultados sugerem que o polimorfismo -31C/T do gene IL-1B não tem impacto significativo no desfecho fatal dos pacientes com traumatismo crânio-encefálico grave.OBJECTIVE: Traumatic brain injury is the major cause of death among individuals between 1-45 years-old. The outcome of traumatic brain injury may be related to brain susceptibility to the injury and genetic factors. Genes that may affect traumatic brain injury outcome are being

  5. Intracellular ascorbate tightens the endothelial permeability barrier through Epac1 and the tubulin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William H; Rhea, Elizabeth Meredith; Qu, Zhi-Chao; Hecker, Morgan R; May, James M

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, both tightens the endothelial permeability barrier in basal cells and also prevents barrier leak induced by inflammatory agents. Barrier tightening by ascorbate in basal endothelial cells requires nitric oxide derived from activation of nitric oxide synthase. Although ascorbate did not affect cyclic AMP levels in our previous study, there remains a question of whether it might activate downstream cyclic AMP-dependent pathways. In this work, we found in both primary and immortalized cultured endothelial cells that ascorbate tightened the endothelial permeability barrier by ∼30%. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, this occurred at what are likely physiologic intracellular ascorbate concentrations. In so doing, ascorbate decreased measures of oxidative stress and also flattened the cells to increase cell-to-cell contact. Inhibition of downstream cyclic AMP-dependent proteins via protein kinase A did not prevent ascorbate from tightening the endothelial permeability barrier, whereas inhibition of Epac1 did block the ascorbate effect. Although Epac1 was required, its mediator Rap1 was not activated. Furthermore, ascorbate acutely stabilized microtubules during depolymerization induced by colchicine and nocodazole. Over several days in culture, ascorbate also increased the amount of stable acetylated α-tubulin. Microtubule stabilization was further suggested by the finding that ascorbate increased the amount of Epac1 bound to α-tubulin. These results suggest that physiologic ascorbate concentrations tighten the endothelial permeability barrier in unstimulated cells by stabilizing microtubules in a manner downstream of cyclic AMP that might be due both to increasing nitric oxide availability and to scavenging of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species.

  6. Structural complexity of filaments formed from the actin and tubulin folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shimin; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT From yeast to man, an evolutionary distance of 1.3 billion years, the F-actin filament structure has been conserved largely in line with the 94% sequence identity. The situation is entirely different in bacteria. In comparison to eukaryotic actins, the bacterial actin-like proteins (ALPs) show medium to low levels of sequence identity. This is extreme in the case of the ParM family of proteins, which often display less than 20% identity. ParMs are plasmid segregation proteins that form the polymerizing motors that propel pairs of plasmids to the extremities of a cell prior to cell division, ensuring faithful inheritance of the plasmid. Recently, exotic ParM filament structures have been elucidated that show ParM filament geometries are not limited to the standard polar pair of strands typified by actin. Four-stranded non-polar ParM filaments existing as open or closed nanotubules are found in Clostridium tetani and Bacillus thuringiensis, respectively. These diverse architectures indicate that the actin fold is capable of forming a large variety of filament morphologies, and that the conception of the “actin” filament has been heavily influenced by its conservation in eukaryotes. Here, we review the history of the structure determination of the eukaryotic actin filament to give a sense of context for the discovery of the new ParM filament structures. We describe the novel ParM geometries and predict that even more complex actin-like filaments may exist in bacteria. Finally, we compare the architectures of filaments arising from the actin and tubulin folds and conclude that the basic units possess similar properties that can each form a range of structures. Thus, the use of the actin fold in microfilaments and the tubulin fold for microtubules likely arose from a wider range of filament possibilities, but became entrenched as those architectures in early eukaryotes. PMID:28042378

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  9. [{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP is superior to [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT-FP for quantitation of the dopamine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, Camilla; Halldin, Christer; Ginovart, Nathalie; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars

    1997-10-01

    {beta}-CIT-FP [N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane] is a cocaine analogue with high affinity for the dopamine transporter. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies with [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT-FP ([{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT-FP) has shown that equilibrium conditions were approached but, however, not reached at the end of measurement. Moreover, metabolite studies of [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT-FP in monkey plasma demonstrated a lipophilic-labelled metabolite that may enter the brain. We therefore labelled {beta}-CIT-FP with fluorine-18 in a position that may avoid the formation of labelled lipophilic metabolites. The more long-lived radionuclide ({sup 18}F) was used to allow for measurements over longer time. [N-fluoropropyl-{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP ([{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP) was prepared by N-alkylation of nor-{beta}-CIT with [{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl bromide. PET studies were performed in cynomolgus monkeys. [{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP entered the brain rapidly. There was a high concentration of radioactivity in the striatum and much lower in the thalamus, neocortex, and cerebellum. The striatum-to-cerebellum ratio was about 5 at time of transient equilibrium, which occurred after 60 to 100 min. After pretreatment with GBR 12909, radioactivity in the striatum was markedly reduced, thus indicating specific [{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP binding to the dopamine transporter. The fraction of unchanged [{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP determined by HPLC was 10-15% after 140 min. No lipophilic labelled metabolites were detected. The absence of measurable lipophilic labelled metabolites and the occurrence of transient equilibrium within the time of the PET measurement indicate that [{sup 18}F]{beta}-CIT-FP is superior to [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT-FP as a PET radioligand for quantification of the dopamine transporter in the human brain.

  10. Water-stress-induced inhibition of α-tubulin gene expression during growth, and its implications for reproductive success in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Inder S; Koonjul, Priyum; Attieh, Jihad; Saini, Hargurdeep S

    2014-07-01

    A drought-suppressed cDNA (RiP-3), encoding a putative α-tubulin protein was isolated from rice panicle at pollen-mother-cell meiosis stage. Analysis of its deduced amino acid sequence showed all the typical structural motifs for plant α-tubulins. The expression of α-tubulin transcripts was observed in all the reproductive organs of rice panicle, and in 5- or 15-day old seedlings, but not in mature leaves. Expression levels were positively correlated with the regions and periods of high growth, and the transcript level declined in parallel with drought-induced reduction in growth rates in all tissues examined. Immunoblot analysis of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE with anti-α-tubulin monoclonal antibody showed that the level of protein paralleled the changes in the transcript abundance in these organs. In situ immunolocalization of the α-tubulin protein in sections of the basal part of 5-day old seedlings showed that the highest levels of the protein were associated with the fastest growing leaf whorls, and the protein level declined upon a brief episode of water stress. Given the known critical role of tubulin in cell division and elongation, the results indicate that the expression of α-tubulin gene may be part of the events that suppress panicle elongation during water deficit, which is in turn a suspected cause of male reproductive failure and yield reduction in rice.

  11. Dependency of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) for tubulin stability and assembly; use of estramustine phosphate in the study of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridén, B; Wallin, M

    1991-07-10

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were separated from tubulin with several different methods. The ability of the isolated MAPs to reinduce assembly of phosphocellulose purified tubulin differed markedly between the different methods. MAPs isolated by addition of 0.35 M NaCl to taxol-stabilized microtubules stimulated tubulin assembly most effectively, while addition of 0.6 M NaCl produced MAPs with a substantially lower ability to stimulate tubulin assembly. The second best preparation was achieved with phosphocellulose chromatographic separation of MAPs with 0.6 M NaCl elution. The addition of estramustine phosphate to microtubules reconstituted of MAPs prepared by 0.35 M NaCl or phosphocellulose chromatography, induced less disassembly than for microtubules assembled from unseparated proteins, and was almost without effect on microtubules reconstituted from MAPs prepared by taxol and 0.6 M NaCl. Estramustine phosphate binds to the tubulin binding part of the MAPs, and the results do therefore indicate that the MAPs are altered by the separation methods. Since the MAPs are regarded as highly stable molecules, one probable alteration could be aggregation of the MAPs, as also indicated by the results. The purified tubulin itself seemed not to be affected by the phosphocellulose purification, since the microtubule proteins were unchanged by the low buffer strenght used during the cromatography. However, the assembly competence after a prolonged incubation of the microtubule proteins at 4 degrees C was dependent on intact bindings between the tubulin and MAPs.

  12. Cell type- and isotype-specific expression and regulation of β-tubulins in primary olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mohamed; Hansmann, Florian; Kreutzer, Robert; Kreutzer, Mihaela; Brandes, Gudrun; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2013-05-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells (SCs) are closely-related cell types with regeneration-promoting properties. Comparative gene expression analysis is particularly relevant since it may explain cell type-specific effects and guide the use of each cell type into special clinical applications. In the present study, we focused on β-tubulin isotype expression in primary adult canine glia as a translational large animal model. β-tubulins so far have been studied mainly in non-neuronal tumors and implied in tumorigenic growth. We show here that primary OECs and SCs expressed βII-V isotype mRNA. Interestingly, βIII-tubulin mRNA and protein expression was high in OECs and low in SCs, while fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) induced its down-regulation in both cell types to the same extent. This was in contrast to βV-tubulin mRNA which was similarly expressed in both cell types and unaltered by FGF-2. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that OEC cultures contained a higher percentage of βIII-tubulin-positive cells compared to SC cultures. Addition of FGF-2 reduced the number of βIII-tubulin-positive cells in both cultures and significantly increased the percentage of cells with a multipolar morphology. Taken together, we demonstrate cell type-specific expression (βIII) and isotype-specific regulation (βIII, βV) of β-tubulin isotypes in OECs and SCs. While differential expression of βIII-tubulin in primary glial cell types with identical proliferative behaviour argues for novel functions unrelated to tumorigenic growth, strong βIII-tubulin expression in OECs may help to explain the specific properties of this glial cell type.

  13. G protein betagamma subunits interact with alphabeta- and gamma-tubulin and play a role in microtubule assembly in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Valentina; Gutierrez, Christina; Najera, Omar; Leony, Denisse; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Popova, Juliana; Rasenick, Mark M; Das, Siddhartha; Roychowdhury, Sukla

    2007-12-01

    The betagamma subunit of G proteins (Gbetagamma) is known to transfer signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effector molecules. Recent results suggest that Gbetagamma also interacts with microtubules and is involved in the regulation of the mitotic spindle. In the current study, the anti-microtubular drug nocodazole was employed to investigate the mechanism by which Gbetagamma interacts with tubulin and its possible implications in microtubule assembly in cultured PC12 cells. Nocodazole-induced depolymerization of microtubules drastically inhibited the interaction between Gbetagamma and tubulin. Gbetagamma was preferentially bound to microtubules and treatment with nocodazole suggested that the dissociation of Gbetagamma from microtubules is an early step in the depolymerization process. When microtubules were allowed to recover after removal of nocodazole, the tubulin-Gbetagamma interaction was restored. Unlike Gbetagamma, however, the interaction between tubulin and the alpha subunit of the Gs protein (Gsalpha) was not inhibited by nocodazole, indicating that the inhibition of tubulin-Gbetagamma interactions during microtubule depolymerization is selective. We found that Gbetagamma also interacts with gamma-tubulin, colocalizes with gamma-tubulin in centrosomes, and co-sediments in centrosomal fractions. The interaction between Gbetagamma and gamma-tubulin was unaffected by nocodazole, suggesting that the Gbetagamma-gamma-tubulin interaction is not dependent on assembled microtubules. Taken together, our results suggest that Gbetagamma may play an important and definitive role in microtubule assembly and/or stability. We propose that betagamma-microtubule interaction is an important step for G protein-mediated cell activation. These results may also provide new insights into the mechanism of action of anti-microtubule drugs.

  14. Acetylcholinesterase, a senile plaque component, affects the fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A; Bronfman, F; Pérez, C A; Vicente, M; Garrido, J; Inestrosa, N C

    1995-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits present in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. Recent studies showed that A beta 1-40 can adopt two different conformational states in solution (an amyloidogenic conformer, A beta ac, and a non-amyloidogenic conformer, A beta nac) which have distinct abilities to form amyloid fibrils. We report here that AChE binds A beta nac and accelerates amyloid formation by the same peptide. No such effect was observed with A beta ac, the amyloidogenic conformer, suggesting that AChE acts as a 'pathological chaperone' inducing a conformational transition from A beta nac into A beta ac in vitro.

  15. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a simplified fluorescently labeled discodermolide as a molecular probe to study the binding of discodermolide to tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jun; Blanden, Adam R; Bane, Susan; Kingston, David G I

    2011-09-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a simplified fluorescently labeled discodermolide analogue possessing a dimethylaminobenzoyl fluorophore has been achieved. Stereoselective Suzuki coupling and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction comprised the key tactics for its construction. The analogue exhibited qualitatively similar activity to paclitaxel in a tubulin assembly assay, and it can thus be used as a fluorescent molecular probe to explore the local environment of the discodermolide binding site on tubulin. The results of fluorescence measurements on the tubulin-bound analogue are reported.

  16. Integrating docking and molecular dynamics approaches for a series of proline-based 2,5-diketopiperazines as novel αβ-tubulin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, Najmeh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Ghayeb, Yousef; Sepehri, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, docking tools were utilized in order to study the binding properties of more than five hundred of proline-based 2,5-diketopiperazine in the binding site of αβ-tubulin. Results revealed that 20 compounds among them showed lower binding energies in comparison with Tryprostatin-A, a well known tubulin inhibitor and therefore could be potential inhibitors of tubulin. However, the precise evaluation of binding poses represents the similar binding modes for all of these compounds and Tryprostatin-A. Finally, the best docked complex was subjected to a 25 ns molecular dynamics simulation to further validate the proposed binding mode of this compound.

  17. Betting against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model's five central predictions: (1) Because constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for......, the return of the BAB factor is low. (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one. (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets....... for US equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures. (2) A betting against beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low-beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns. (3) When funding constraints tighten...

  18. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets........S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...

  19. Lactate fuels the human brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quistorff, Bjørn; Secher, Niels H; Van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2008-01-01

    )] from a resting value of 6 to exercise, cerebral activation associated with mental activity, or exposure to a stressful situation. The CMR decrease is prevented with combined beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptor......The human brain releases a small amount of lactate at rest, and even an increase in arterial blood lactate during anesthesia does not provoke a net cerebral lactate uptake. However, during cerebral activation associated with exercise involving a marked increase in plasma lactate, the brain takes up...

  20. Imperfect World of $\\beta\\beta$-decay Nuclear Data Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, B

    2015-01-01

    The precision of double-beta ($\\beta\\beta$) decay experimental half lives and their uncertainties is reanalyzed. The method of Benford's distributions has been applied to nuclear reaction, structure and decay data sets. First-digit distribution trend for $\\beta\\beta$-decay T$_{1/2}^{2\

  1. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  2. Negative Beta Encoder

    CERN Document Server

    Kohda, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A new class of analog-digital (A/D), digital-analog (D/A) converters as an alternative to conventional ones, called $\\beta$-encoder, has been shown to have exponential accuracy in the bit rates while possessing self-correction property for fluctuations of amplifier factor $\\beta$ and quantizer threshold $\

  3. Double beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2011-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  4. Evidence for the association of the S100beta gene with low cognitive performance and dementia in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, J-C; Ferreira, S; Gussekloo, J

    2007-01-01

    Variations in the S100beta gene may be instrumental in producing a continuum from mild cognitive decline to overt dementia. After screening 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in S100beta, we observed association of the rs2300403 intron 2 SNP with poorer cognitive function in three...... corresponding mRNA isoform was called S100beta2). S100beta2 expression was increased in AD brain compared with controls, and the rs2300403 SNP was associated with elevated levels of S100beta2 mRNA in AD brains, especially in women. Therefore, this genetic variant in S100beta increases the risk of low cognitive...... performance and dementia, possibly by favouring a splicing event increasing S100beta2 isoform expression in the brain....

  5. A canonical FtsZ protein in Verrucomicrobium spinosum, a member of the Bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia that also includes tubulin-producing Prosthecobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staley James T

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin and evolution of the homologous GTP-binding cytoskeletal proteins FtsZ typical of Bacteria and tubulin characteristic of eukaryotes is a major question in molecular evolutionary biology. Both FtsZ and tubulin are central to key cell biology processes – bacterial septation and cell division in the case of FtsZ and in the case of tubulins the function of microtubules necessary for mitosis and other key cytoskeleton-dependent processes in eukaryotes. The origin of tubulin in particular is of significance to models for eukaryote origins. Most members of domain Bacteria possess FtsZ, but bacteria in genus Prosthecobacter of the phylum Verrucomicrobia form a key exception, possessing tubulin homologs BtubA and BtubB. It is therefore of interest to know whether other members of phylum Verrucomicrobia possess FtsZ or tubulin as their FtsZ-tubulin gene family representative. Results Verrucomicrobium spinosum, a member of Phylum Verrucomicrobia of domain Bacteria, has been found to possess a gene for a protein homologous to the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ. The deduced amino acid sequence has sequence signatures and predicted secondary structure characteristic for FtsZ rather than tubulin, but phylogenetic trees and sequence analysis indicate that it is divergent from all other known FtsZ sequences in members of domain Bacteria. The FtsZ gene of V. spinosum is located within a dcw gene cluster exhibiting gene order conservation known to contribute to the divisome in other Bacteria and comparable to these clusters in other Bacteria, suggesting a similar functional role. Conclusion Verrucomicrobium spinosum has been found to possess a gene for a protein homologous to the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ. The results suggest the functional as well as structural homology of the V. spinosum FtsZ to the FtsZs of other Bacteria implying its involvement in cell septum formation during division. Thus, both bacteria-like FtsZ and eukaryote

  6. Use of substitute Nonidet P-40 nonionic detergents in intracellular tubulin polymerization assays for screening of microtubule targeting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Saptarshi; Field, Jessica J; Miller, John H

    2017-01-10

    Shell Chemical Company Nonidet P-40 has been used for decades in many biochemical assays as a nonionic, nondenaturing detergent; however, Shell no longer produces this product. Four commercially available substitutes were investigated and their activities titrated in an intracellular tubulin polymerization assay. Although claimed by the supply companies to be identical to the Shell Nonidet P-40, all four substitutes were about 10-fold more potent and needed to be diluted accordingly. As microtubule targeting drugs are a major class of anticancer agent, and many researchers use the intracellular tubulin polymerization assay, this information is important to help troubleshoot assay development with the new substitutes. As the Shell Nonidet P-40 has been used in many biochemical buffers, these results will be of general interest to the biochemical, cell, and molecular research community.

  7. Quantum chemistry calculation-aided structural optimization of combretastatin A-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors: improved stability and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junhang; Zheng, Canhui; Zhu, Kongkai; Liu, Jia; Sun, Nannan; Wang, Chongqing; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Ju; Luo, Cheng; Zhou, Youjun

    2015-03-12

    A potent combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) like tubulin polymerization inhibitor 22b was found with strong antitumor activity previously. However, it easily undergoes cis-trans isomerization under natural light, and the resulting decrease in activity limits its further applications. In this study, we used quantum chemistry calculations to explore the molecular basis of its instability. Aided by the calculations, two rounds of structural optimization of 22b were conducted. Accelerated quantitative light stability testing confirmed that the stability of these designed compounds was significantly improved as predicted. Among them, compounds 1 and 3b displayed more potent inhibitory activity on tumor cell growth than 22b. In addition, the potent in vivo antitumor activity of compound 1 was confirmed. Quantum chemistry calculations were used in the optimization of stilbene-like molecules, providing new insight into stilbenoid optimization and important implications for the future development of novel CA-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

  8. Rational design, synthesis and biological evaluations of amino-noscapine: a high affinity tubulin-binding noscapinoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Chatterji, Biswa Prasun; Vangapandu, Surya N.; Aneja, Ritu; Chandra, Ramesh; Kanteveri, Srinivas; Joshi, Harish C.

    2011-05-01

    Noscapine and its derivatives are important microtubule-interfering agents shown to have potent anti-tumor activity. The binding free energies (Δ G bind) of noscapinoids computed using linear interaction energy (LIE) method with a surface generalized Born (SGB) continuum solvation model were in agreement with the experimental Δ G bind with average root mean square error of 0.082 kcal/mol. This LIE-SGB model guided us in designing a novel derivative of noscapine, amino-noscapine [(S)-3-((R)-9-amino-4-methoxy-6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro [1, 3] dioxolo[4,5- g]isoquinolin-5-yl)-6,7-dimethoxy isobenzo-furan-1(3 H)-one] that has higher tubulin binding activity (predicted Δ G bind = -6.438 kcal/mol and experimental Δ G bind = -6.628 kcal/mol) than noscapine, but does not significantly change the total extent of the tubulin subunit/polymer ratio. The modes of interaction of amino-noscapine with the binding pocket of tubulin involved three hydrogen bonds and are distinct compared to noscapine which involved only one hydrogen bond. Also the patterns of non-bonded interactions are albeit different between both the lignads. The `blind docking' approach (docking of ligand with different binding sites of a protein and their evaluations) as well as the reasonable accuracy of calculating Δ G bind using LIE-SGB model constitutes the first evidence that this class of compounds binds to tubulin at a site overlapping with colchicine-binding site or close to it. Our results revealed that amino-noscapine has better anti-tumor activity than noscapine.

  9. Class III β-tubulin in advanced NSCLC of adenocarcinoma subtype predicts superior outcome in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Platinum-based doublets are the cornerstone of treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and often include vinorelbine or taxanes. A predictive biomarker is greatly needed to select chemotherapy-sensitive patients for these microtubule-interfering agents. Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3......) has been shown of value in NSCLC, but evidence is not uniform. Accordingly, we explored the predictive role of TUBB3 in advanced NSCLC....

  10. Analysis of the Strength of Interfacial Hydrogen Bonds between Tubulin Dimers Using Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoub, Ahmed T.; Craddock, Travis J.A.; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are key structural elements that, among numerous biological functions, maintain the cytoskeleton of the cell and have a major role in cell division, which makes them important cancer chemotherapy targets. Understanding the energy balance that brings tubulin dimers, the building blocks of microtubules, together to form a microtubule is especially important for revealing the mechanism of their dynamic instability. Several studies have been conducted to estimate various contribution...

  11. Photoinduced Partial Unfolding of Tubulin Bound to Meso-tetrakis(sulfonatophenyl) Porphyrin Leads to Inhibition of Microtubule Formation In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information...morphogen- esis, mitosis and meiosis [15, 16]. Because tubulin het- erodimers and MTs are vital for cellular processes, they have become a prime target in

  12. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions beta thalassemia beta thalassemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Beta thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  13. Cellular distribution of ferric iron, ferritin, transferrin and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in substantia nigra and basal ganglia of normal and β2-microglobulin deficient mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Trinder, D.; Morgan, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus......beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus...

  14. Direct measurement of tubulin and bulk message distributions on polysomes of growing, starved and deciliated Tetrahymena using RNA gel blots of sucrose gradients containing acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzone, F J; Callahan, R; Gorovsky, M A

    1988-10-25

    A method was developed using sucrose gradients containing acrylamide which greatly simplifies the measurement of the polysomal distribution of messages. After centrifugation, the acrylamide was polymerized, forming a "polysome gel". RNA gel blots of polysome gels were used to determine the polysomal distributions of alpha-tubulin and total polyadenylated mRNA in growing, starved (nongrowing) and starved-deciliated Tetrahymena and the number of messages loaded onto polysomes was calculated. These measurements indicated that the translational efficiencies of alpha-tubulin mRNA and total polyadenylated mRNA are largely unaffected when the rates of tubulin and total protein synthesis vary dramatically. Thus, differential regulation of alpha-tubulin mRNA translation initiation does not contribute to the greater than 100-fold induction of tubulin synthesis observed during cilia regeneration and in growing cells. The major translation-level process regulating tubulin synthesis in Tetrahymena appears to be a change in message loading mediated by a non-specific message recruitment or unmasking factor.

  15. Luminal localization of α-tubulin K40 acetylation by cryo-EM analysis of fab-labeled microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virupakshi Soppina

    Full Text Available The αβ-tubulin subunits of microtubules can undergo a variety of evolutionarily-conserved post-translational modifications (PTMs that provide functional specialization to subsets of cellular microtubules. Acetylation of α-tubulin residue Lysine-40 (K40 has been correlated with increased microtubule stability, intracellular transport, and ciliary assembly, yet a mechanistic understanding of how acetylation influences these events is lacking. Using the anti-acetylated tubulin antibody 6-11B-1 and electron cryo-microscopy, we demonstrate that the K40 acetylation site is located inside the microtubule lumen and thus cannot directly influence events on the microtubule surface, including kinesin-1 binding. Surprisingly, the monoclonal 6-11B-1 antibody recognizes both acetylated and deacetylated microtubules. These results suggest that acetylation induces structural changes in the K40-containing loop that could have important functional consequences on microtubule stability, bending, and subunit interactions. This work has important implications for acetylation and deacetylation reaction mechanisms as well as for interpreting experiments based on 6-11B-1 labeling.

  16. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  17. In vitro anti-tubulin effects of mebendazole and fenbendazole on canine glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S R; Castello, S A; Robinson, A C; Koehler, J W

    2017-01-12

    Benzimidazole anthelmintics have reported anti-neoplastic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro chemosensitivity of three canine glioma cell lines to mebendazole and fenbendazole. The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) (±SD) obtained from performing the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay after treating J3T, G06-A, and SDT-3G cells for 72 h with mebendazole were 0.030 ± 0.003, 0.080 ± 0.015 and 0.030 ± 0.006 μM respectively, while those for fenbendazole were 0.550  ± 0.015, 1.530 ± 0.159 and 0.690 ± 0.095 μM; treatment of primary canine fibroblasts for 72 h at IC50 showed no significant effect. Immunofluorescence studies showed disruption of tubulin after treatment. Mebendazole and fenbendazole are cytotoxic in canine glioma cell lines in vitro and may be good candidates for treatment of canine gliomas. Further in vivo studies are required.

  18. Growth stimulation in inflorescences of an Arabidopsis tubulin mutant under microgravity conditions in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T; Soga, K; Wakabayashi, K; Hashimoto, T; Karahara, I; Yano, S; Tanigaki, F; Shimazu, T; Kasahara, H; Masuda, D; Kamisaka, S

    2014-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are involved in plant resistance to hypergravity, but their roles in resistance to 1 g gravity are still uncertain. To clarify this point, we cultivated an Arabidopsis α-tubulin 6 mutant (tua6) in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the Kibo Module of the International Space Station, and analyzed growth and cell wall mechanical properties of inflorescences. Growth of inflorescence stems was stimulated under microgravity conditions, as compared with ground and on-orbit 1 g conditions. The stems were 10-45% longer and their growth rate 15-55% higher under microgravity conditions than those under both 1 g conditions. The degree of growth stimulation tended to be higher in the tua6 mutant than the wild-type Columbia. Under microgravity conditions, the cell wall extensibility in elongating regions of inflorescences was significantly higher than the controls, suggesting that growth stimulation was caused by cell wall modifications. No clear differences were detected in any growth or cell wall property between ground and on-orbit 1 g controls. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules generally play an important role in plant resistance to the gravitational force.

  19. A novel dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in rat brain membranes. Its isolation, purification, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, K S

    1988-05-15

    A new type of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, which releases basic aminoacyl dipeptides from the NH2-terminal end of oligopeptides, was purified about 2100-fold with 6.8% recovery from rat brain membranes by column chromatography on Cellex D, Arg-Tyr-AH-Sepharose 4B, hydroxylapatite, and Sephadex G-75, after the membranes were solubilized with Nonidet P-40. Activity was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using Arg0-Met5-enkephalin (Arg0-enk)* as substrate in the presence of bestatin, thiorphan, and captopril. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified enzyme is apparently homogeneous with a mass of 64,000 daltons. This thiol enzyme is optimally active at pH 7 and is selectively activated by Mn(II). It loses 94% of its activity after EDTA treatment and can be reactivated by Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II). It splits Arg0-enk into equimolar amounts of Arg-Tyr and Gly-Gly-Phe-Met with a Km of 100 microM, and Vmax of 3.8 mumol/mg of protein/min. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase does not hydrolyze model substrates for dipeptidyl aminopeptidases I, II, III, and IV, aminoacyl beta-naphthylamides, actin, desmin, tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins. The enzyme is insensitive to puromycin, but is inhibited by several neuropeptides. Angiotensin III is the most potent with a Ki of 0.3 microM. Substrate specificity, pH optimum, molecular weight, activators, and catalytic site demonstrate that this enzyme is distinct from dipeptidyl aminopeptidases previously described.

  20. Molecular composition of staufen2-containing ribonucleoproteins in embryonic rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolaine Maher-Laporte

    Full Text Available Messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs are used to transport mRNAs along neuronal dendrites to their site of translation. Numerous mRNA-binding and regulatory proteins within mRNPs finely regulate the fate of bound-mRNAs. Their specific combination defines different types of mRNPs that in turn are related to specific synaptic functions. One of these mRNA-binding proteins, Staufen2 (Stau2, was shown to transport dendritic mRNAs along microtubules. Its knockdown expression in neurons was shown to change spine morphology and synaptic functions. To further understand the molecular mechanisms by which Stau2 modulates synaptic function in neurons, it is important to identify and characterize protein co-factors that regulate the fate of Stau2-containing mRNPs. To this end, a proteomic approach was used to identify co-immunoprecipitated proteins in Staufen2-containing mRNPs isolated from embryonic rat brains. The proteomic approach identified mRNA-binding proteins (PABPC1, hnRNP H1, YB1 and hsc70, proteins of the cytoskeleton (alpha- and beta-tubulin and RUFY3 a poorly characterized protein. While PABPC1 and YB1 associate with Stau2-containing mRNPs through RNAs, hsc70 is directly bound to Stau2 and this interaction is regulated by ATP. PABPC1 and YB1 proteins formed puncta in dendrites of embryonic rat hippocampal neurons. However, they poorly co-localized with Stau2 in the large dendritic complexes suggesting that they are rather components of Stau2-containing mRNA particles. All together, these results represent a further step in the characterization of Stau2-containing mRNPs in neurons and provide new tools to study and understand how Stau2-containing mRNPs are transported, translationally silenced during transport and/or locally expressed according to cell needs.

  1. The iA{beta}5p {beta}-breaker peptide regulates the A{beta}(25-35) interaction with lipid bilayers through a cholesterol-mediated mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitiello, Giuseppe [Department of Chemistry, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); CSGI (Consorzio per lo Sviluppo dei Sistemi a Grande Interfase), Florence (Italy); Grimaldi, Manuela; D' Ursi, Anna Maria [Department of Pharmaceutical Science, University of Salerno, Fisciano (Italy); D' Errico, Gerardino, E-mail: gerardino.derrico@unina.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); CSGI (Consorzio per lo Sviluppo dei Sistemi a Grande Interfase), Florence (Italy)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p shows a significant tendency to deeply penetrates the hydrophobic core of lipid membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}(25-35) locates in the external region of the membrane causing a re-positioning of CHOL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p withholds cholesterol in the inner hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p prevents the A{beta}(25-35) release from the lipid membrane. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the deposition of aggregates of the {beta}-amyloid peptide (A{beta}) in the brain. A potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease is the use of synthetic {beta}-sheet breaker peptides, which are capable of binding A{beta} but unable to become part of a {beta}-sheet structure, thus inhibiting the peptide aggregation. Many studies suggest that membranes play a key role in the A{beta} aggregation; consequently, it is strategic to investigate the interplay between {beta}-sheet breaker peptides and A{beta} in the presence of lipid bilayers. In this work, we focused on the effect of the {beta}-sheet breaker peptide acetyl-LPFFD-amide, iA{beta}5p, on the interaction of the A{beta}(25-35) fragment with lipid membranes, studied by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy, using spin-labeled membrane components (either phospholipids or cholesterol). The ESR results show that iA{beta}5p influences the A{beta}(25-35) interaction with the bilayer through a cholesterol-mediated mechanism: iA{beta}5p withholds cholesterol in the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayer, making the interfacial region more fluid and capable to accommodate A{beta}(25-35). As a consequence, iA{beta}5p prevents the A{beta}(25-35) release from the lipid membrane, which is the first step of the {beta}-amyloid aggregation process.

  2. Alcohol-related brain damage in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia M Erdozain

    Full Text Available Chronic excessive alcohol intoxications evoke cumulative damage to tissues and organs. We examined prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area (BA 9 from 20 human alcoholics and 20 age, gender, and postmortem delay matched control subjects. H & E staining and light microscopy of prefrontal cortex tissue revealed a reduction in the levels of cytoskeleton surrounding the nuclei of cortical and subcortical neurons, and a disruption of subcortical neuron patterning in alcoholic subjects. BA 9 tissue homogenisation and one dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE proteomics of cytosolic proteins identified dramatic reductions in the protein levels of spectrin β II, and α- and β-tubulins in alcoholics, and these were validated and quantitated by Western blotting. We detected a significant increase in α-tubulin acetylation in alcoholics, a non-significant increase in isoaspartate protein damage, but a significant increase in protein isoaspartyl methyltransferase protein levels, the enzyme that triggers isoaspartate damage repair in vivo. There was also a significant reduction in proteasome activity in alcoholics. One dimensional PAGE of membrane-enriched fractions detected a reduction in β-spectrin protein levels, and a significant increase in transmembranous α3 (catalytic subunit of the Na+,K+-ATPase in alcoholic subjects. However, control subjects retained stable oligomeric forms of α-subunit that were diminished in alcoholics. In alcoholics, significant loss of cytosolic α- and β-tubulins were also seen in caudate nucleus, hippocampus and cerebellum, but to different levels, indicative of brain regional susceptibility to alcohol-related damage. Collectively, these protein changes provide a molecular basis for some of the neuronal and behavioural abnormalities attributed to alcoholics.

  3. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  4. Alpha and Beta Determinations

    CERN Document Server

    Dunietz, Isard

    1999-01-01

    Because the Bd -> J/psi Ks asymmetry determines only sin(2 beta), a discrete ambiguity in the true value of beta remains. This note reviews how the ambiguity can be removed. Extractions of the CKM angle alpha are discussed next. Some of the methods require very large data samples and will not be feasible in the near future. In the near future, semi-inclusive CP-violating searches could be undertaken, which are reviewed last.

  5. Beta cell dynamics: beta cell replenishment, beta cell compensation and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, arises mostly from beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance and remains a highly complex metabolic disease due to various stages in its pathogenesis. Glucose homeostasis is primarily regulated by insulin secretion from the beta cells in response to prevailing glycemia. Beta cell populations are dynamic as they respond to fluctuating insulin demand. Beta cell replenishment and death primarily regulate beta cell populations. Beta cells, pancreatic cells, and extra-pancreatic cells represent the three tiers for replenishing beta cells. In rodents, beta cell self-replenishment appears to be the dominant source for new beta cells supported by pancreatic cells (non-beta islet cells, acinar cells, and duct cells) and extra-pancreatic cells (liver, neural, and stem/progenitor cells). In humans, beta cell neogenesis from non-beta cells appears to be the dominant source of beta cell replenishment as limited beta cell self-replenishment occurs particularly in adulthood. Metabolic states of increased insulin demand trigger increased insulin synthesis and secretion from beta cells. Beta cells, therefore, adapt to support their physiology. Maintaining physiological beta cell populations is a strategy for targeting metabolic states of persistently increased insulin demand as in diabetes.

  6. A Single Amino-Acid Substitution at Lysine 40 of an Arabidopsis thaliana α-tubulin Causes Extensive Cell Proliferation and Expansion Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xiong; Deyang Xu; Zhongnan Yang; HaiHuang; Xiaofeng Cui

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules are highly dynamic cytoskeletal polymers of α/β-tubulin heterodimers that undergo multiple post-translational modifications essential for various cellular functions in eukaryotes.The lysine 40 (K40) is largely conserved in α-tubulins in many eukaryote species,and the post-translational modification by acetylation at K40 is critical for neuronal development in vertebrates.However,the biological function of K40 of α-tubulins in plants remains unexplored.In this study,we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that constitutive expression of mutated forms of α-tubulin6 (TUA6) at K40 (TUA6κ40A or TUA6κ40Q),in which K40 is replaced by alanine or glutamine,result in severely reduced plant size.Phenotypic characterization of the 35S:TUA6κ40A transgenic plants revealed that both cell proliferation and cell expansion were affected.Cytological and biochemical analyses showed that the accumulation ofα-and β-tubulin proteins was significantly reduced in the transgenic plants,and the cortical microtubule arrays were severely disrupted,indicating that K40 of the plant α-tubulin is critical in maintaining microtubule stability.We also constructed 35S:TUA6κ40R transgenic plants in which K40 of the engineered TUA6 protein is replaced by an arginine,and found that the 35S:TUA6K40R plants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild-type.Since lysine and arginine are similar in biochemical nature but arginine cannot be acetylated,these results suggest a structural importance for K40 of α-tubulins in cell division and expansion.

  7. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1/MOZART 1 is an integral component of the γ-tubulin-containing microtubule nucleating complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayoshi; Yagi, Noriyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Fujita, Satoshi; Kawashima, Noriyuki; Ehrhardt, David W; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Microtubules in eukaryotic cells are nucleated from ring-shaped complexes that contain γ-tubulin and a family of homologous γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs), but the subunit composition of the complexes can vary among fungi, animals and plants. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1 (GIP1), a small protein with no homology to the GCP family, interacts with GCP3 in vitro, and is a plant homolog of vertebrate mitotic-spindle organizing protein associated with a ring of γ-tubulin 1 (MOZART1), a recently identified component of the γ-tubulin complex in human cell lines. In this study, we characterized two closely related Arabidopsis GIP1s: GIP1a and GIP1b. Single mutants of gip1a and gip1b were indistinguishable from wild-type plants, but their double mutant was embryonic lethal, and showed impaired development of male gametophytes. Functional fusions of GIP1a with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to purify GIP1a-containing complexes from Arabidopsis plants, which contained all the subunits (except NEDD1) previously identified in the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes. GIP1a and GIP1b interacted specifically with Arabidopsis GCP3 in yeast. GFP-GIP1a labeled mitotic microtubule arrays in a pattern largely consistent with, but partly distinct from, the localization of the γ-tubulin complex containing GCP2 or GCP3 in planta. In interphase cortical arrays, the labeled complexes were preferentially recruited to existing microtubules, from which new microtubules were efficiently nucleated. However, in contrast to complexes labeled with tagged GCP2 or GCP3, their recruitment to cortical areas with no microtubules was rarely observed. These results indicate that GIP1/MOZART1 is an integral component of a subset of the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes.

  8. Tau Tubulin Kinase TTBK2 Sensitivity of Glutamate Receptor GluK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Nieding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inherited, autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 11 (SCA11 is caused by loss of function mutations of TTBK2 (tau tubulin kinase 2. Mutations observed in patients with SCA11 include truncated TTBK2(450. The present study explored the possibility that TTBK2 influences the function of the glutamate receptor GluK2. Methods: GluK2 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes without and with additional expression of wild type TTBK2, the truncated mutant TTBK2(450, or the kinase dead mutants TTBK2(KD and TTBK2(450/KD. GluK2 current was determined by dual electrode voltage clamp and GluK2 protein abundance in the cell membrane utilizing confocal microscopy. Results: Glutamate exposure of GluK2 expressing oocytes generated a current, which was significantly lower in oocytes expressing GluK2 together with TTBK2 wt or TTBK2(KD than in oocytes expressing GluK2 alone or together with either TTBK2(450 or TTBK2(450/KD. According to confocal microscopy of EGFP-tagged GluK2, TTBK2 wt decreased the GluK2 protein abundance in the cell membrane. Overexpression of an inactive RAB5(N133I mutant but not RAB5wt could reverse the TTBK2 effect on GluK2 suggesting that RAB5 function is required for the effect. Conclusions: TTBK2 down-regulates GluK2 activity by decreasing the receptor protein abundance in the cell membrane via RAB5-dependent endocytosis, an effect that may protect against neuroexcitotoxicity.

  9. Occurrence of “beta bursts” in human frontal cortex related to psychological parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, A.; Schrijer, C.F.M.; Storm van Leeuwen, W.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. In a psychiatric patient with electrodes implanted in various brain structures the occurrence of paroxysmal 16–26 c/sec activity — “beta bursts” — in the inferior frontal cortex is described. 2. 2. The beta bursts occurred during “free” behavioural situations but could be provoked also by var

  10. INDUCTION OF INTERLEUKIN-1-BETA MESSENGER-RNA AFTER FOCAL CEREBRAL-ISCHEMIA IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUTTINI, M; SAUTER, A; BODDEKE, HWGM

    1994-01-01

    The expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA in the brain in response to cerebral ischaemia in rats was examined using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Focal cerebral ischaemia was induced in spontaneously hypertensive rats by permanent occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO)

  11. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  12. Hereditary and sporadic beta-amyloidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral amyloidoses are chronic, progressive neurodegenerative diseases that are caused by the aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins in the central nervous system, and lead to cognitive deficits, stroke, and focal neurological dysfunction including cerebellar and extrapyramidal signs. Among them, beta-amyloidoses are a heterogenous set of conditions characterised by the deposition of beta-amyloid protein in brain parenchyma and/or vessel walls that lead to the development of two main clinico-pathological entities: Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which may be sporadic or familial, and may also co-exist in the same patient. The aim of this review is to describe the most important differences in the pathways leading to parenchymal and cerebrovascular beta-amyloidoses, and the main clinical, neuropathological and biochemical characteristics of the two conditions. It also discusses the phenotypes associated with a series of familial and sporadic beta-amyloidoses in more detail in order to highlight the clinical and neuropathological features that may help to distinguish the different forms of disease.

  13. [BETA-ADRENERGIC REGULATION OF THE ADENYLYL CYCLASE SIGNALING SYSTEM IN MYOCARDIUM AND BRAIN OF RATS WITH OBESITY AND TYPES 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND THE EFFECT OF LONG-TERM INTRANASAL INSULIN TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L A; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    The stimulating effect of norepinephrine, isoproterenol and selective β-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists BRL 37344 and CL 316.243 on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the brain and myocardium of young and mature rats (disease induction at 2 and 4 months, respectively) with experimental obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and the influence of long-term treatment of animals with intranasal insulin (I-I) were studied. The AC stimulatory effects of β-agonist isoproterenol in animals with obesity and DM2 was shown to be practically unchanged. The respective effects of norepinephrine on the AC activity were attenuated in the brain of young and mature rats and in the myocardium if mature rats, and the I-I treatment led to their partial recovery. In the brain and myocardium of mature rats with obesity and DM2, the enhancement of the AC stimulatory effects of β3-AR agonists was observed, white in young rats the influence of the same pathological conditions was lacking. The I-I treatment decreased the AC stimulatory effects of β3-agonists to their levels in the control. Since functional disruption of the adrenergic agonist-sensitive ACSS can lead to metabolic syndrome and DM2, the recovery of this system by the I-I treatment offers one of the ways to correct these diseases and their complications in the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  15. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  16. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  17. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  18. Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inestrosa, N C; Alvarez, A; Pérez, C A; Moreno, R D; Vicente, M; Linker, C; Casanueva, O I; Soto, C; Garrido, J

    1996-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

  19. Brain components

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make complex movements without thinking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord and is composed of ... structures: the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brain stem provides us with automatic functions that are necessary ...

  20. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  1. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of cis-restricted triazole/tetrazole mimics of combretastatin-benzothiazole hybrids as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and apoptosis inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba Rao, A V; Swapna, Konderu; Shaik, Siddiq Pasha; Lakshma Nayak, V; Srinivasa Reddy, T; Sunkari, Satish; Shaik, Thokhir Basha; Bagul, Chandrakant; Kamal, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    A series of colchicine site binding tubulin inhibitors were synthesized by the modification of the combretastatin pharmacophore. The ring B was replaced by the pharmacologically relevant benzothiazole scaffolds, and the cis configuration of the olefinic bond was restricted by the incorporation of a triazole and tetrazole rings which is envisaged by the structural resemblance to a tubulin inhibitor like combretastatin (CA-4). These compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity on selected cancer cell lines and an insight in the structure activity relationship was developed. The most potent compounds (9a and 9b) demonstrated an antiproliferative effect comparable to that of CA-4. Mitotic cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase revealed the disruption of microtubule dynamics that was confirmed by tubulin polymerization assays and immunocytochemistry studies at the cellular level. Western blot analysis revealed that these compounds accumulate more tubulin in the soluble fraction. The colchicine competitive binding assay and the molecular docking studies suggested that the binding of these mimics at the colchicine site of the tubulin is similar to that of CA-4. Moreover, the triggering of apoptotic cell death after mitotic arrest was investigated by studying their effect by Hoechst staining, Annexin-V-FITC assay, mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation and caspase-3 activation.

  5. The elongation of primary cilia via the acetylation of α-tubulin by the treatment with lithium chloride in human fibroblast KD cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakakura, Takashi; Asano-Hoshino, Anshin; Suzuki, Takeshi; Arisawa, Kenjiro; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Sekino, Yoshihisa; Kiuchi, Yoshiko; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Hagiwara, Haruo

    2015-03-01

    Primary cilium, an organelle found on nearly every cell in the human body, typically serves as the mechanical sensor of the cell. Lithium ion is known to promote the elongation of primary cilia in a variety of cell types, but it is unknown whether lithium is involved in the acetylation of α-tubulin which is essential for the assembly of primary cilia. In order to reveal the relationship between the elongation of primary cilia with lithium and the acetylation of α-tubulin, we first observed the formation and structure of primary cilia in KD cells, a cell line deriving fibroblasts in human labium. Subsequently, by immunohistochemical and western blot analysis we elucidated that the length of primary cilia and acetylation of α-tubulin are regulated by lithium chloride (LiCl) in the medium in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. We next performed the RT-PCR, RNAi-based experiments and biochemical study using an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3βGSK-3β). We found that LiCl mobilizes the α-tubulin N-acetyltransferase 1 (αTAT1) in the signaling pathway mediating GSK-3β and adenylate cyclase III. In conclusion, our results suggested that LiCl treatments activate αTAT1 by the inhibition of GSK-3β and promote the α-tubulin acetylation, and then elongate the primary cilia.

  6. Transient increase in the levels of γ-tubulin complex and katanin are responsible for reorientation by ethylene and hypergravity of cortical microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Aya; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2010-11-01

    The body shape of a plant is primarily regulated by orientation of cortical microtubules. γ-Tubulin complex and katanin are required for the nucleation and the severing of microtubules, respectively. Here we discuss the role of γ-tubulin complex and katanin during reorientation of cortical microtubules. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the immediate precursor of ethylene, modifies growth anisotropy of azuki bean epicotyls; it inhibits elongation growth and promotes lateral growth. The ACC-induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions preceded the modification of growth anisotropy. The transcript level of γ-tubulin complex (VaTUG and VaGCP3) and katanin (VaKTN1) was increased transiently by ACC treatment. During reorientation of cortical microtubules by hypergravity, which also modifies growth anisotropy of shoots, the expression levels of both γ-tubulin complex and katanin genes were increased transiently. The increase in the number of the nucleated microtubule branch as well as the microtubule-severing activity via upregulation of γ-tubulin complex genes and katanin genes may be involved in the reorientation of cortical microtubules, and contribute to the regulation of the shape of plant body.

  7. Increased plasma amyloid beta protein 1-42 levels in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, P D; Dalton, A J; Mehta, S P; Kim, K S; Sersen, E A; Wisniewski, H M

    1998-01-23

    Amyloid beta protein 1-40 (A beta40) and A beta42 levels were quantitated in plasma from 43 persons with Down syndrome (DS; 26-68 years of age), 43 age-matched normal controls, and 19 non-DS mentally retarded (MR) persons (26-91 years of age) by using a sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. A beta40 levels were higher in DS and MR than controls, but were similar between DS and MR groups. A beta42 levels were higher in DS than controls or MR persons. The ratios of A beta42/A beta40 were higher in DS than controls or MR persons. The findings are consistent with those seen in DS brains.

  8. Boosted beta regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schmid

    Full Text Available Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1. Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures.

  9. Nano-ZnO leads to tubulin macrotube assembly and actin bundling, triggering cytoskeletal catastrophe and cell necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hevia, Lorena; Valiente, Rafael; Martín-Rodríguez, Rosa; Renero-Lecuna, Carlos; González, Jesús; Rodríguez-Fernández, Lidia; Aguado, Fernando; Villegas, Juan C.; Fanarraga, Mónica L.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc is a crucial element in biology that plays chief catalytic, structural and protein regulatory roles. Excess cytoplasmic zinc is toxic to cells so there are cell-entry and intracellular buffering mechanisms that control intracellular zinc availability. Tubulin and actin are two zinc-scavenging proteins that are essential components of the cellular cytoskeleton implicated in cell division, migration and cellular architecture maintenance. Here we demonstrate how exposure to different ZnO nanostructures, namely ZnO commercial nanoparticles and custom-made ZnO nanowires, produce acute cytotoxic effects in human keratinocytes (HaCat) and epithelial cells (HeLa) triggering a dose-dependent cell retraction and collapse. We show how engulfed ZnO nanoparticles dissolve intracellularly, triggering actin filament bundling and structural changes in microtubules, transforming these highly dynamic 25 nm diameter polymers into rigid macrotubes of tubulin, severely affecting cell proliferation and survival. Our results demonstrate that nano-ZnO causes acute cytoskeletal collapse that triggers necrosis, followed by a late reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptotic process.Zinc is a crucial element in biology that plays chief catalytic, structural and protein regulatory roles. Excess cytoplasmic zinc is toxic to cells so there are cell-entry and intracellular buffering mechanisms that control intracellular zinc availability. Tubulin and actin are two zinc-scavenging proteins that are essential components of the cellular cytoskeleton implicated in cell division, migration and cellular architecture maintenance. Here we demonstrate how exposure to different ZnO nanostructures, namely ZnO commercial nanoparticles and custom-made ZnO nanowires, produce acute cytotoxic effects in human keratinocytes (HaCat) and epithelial cells (HeLa) triggering a dose-dependent cell retraction and collapse. We show how engulfed ZnO nanoparticles dissolve intracellularly, triggering actin

  10. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.;

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions...... of differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears...

  11. Exploring natural product chemistry and biology with multicomponent reactions. 5. Discovery of a novel tubulin-targeting scaffold derived from the rigidin family of marine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, Liliya V; Magedov, Igor V; Romero, Anntherese E; Karki, Menuka; Otero, Isaiah; Hayden, Kathryn; Evdokimov, Nikolai M; Banuls, Laetitia Moreno Y; Rastogi, Shiva K; Smith, W Ross; Lu, Shi-Long; Kiss, Robert; Shuster, Charles B; Hamel, Ernest; Betancourt, Tania; Rogelj, Snezna; Kornienko, Alexander

    2013-09-12

    We developed synthetic chemistry to access the marine alkaloid rigidins and over 40 synthetic analogues based on the 7-deazaxanthine, 7-deazaadenine, 7-deazapurine, and 7-deazahypoxanthine skeletons. Analogues based on the 7-deazahypoxanthine skeleton exhibited nanomolar potencies against cell lines representing cancers with dismal prognoses, tumor metastases, and multidrug resistant cells. Studies aimed at elucidating the mode(s) of action of the 7-deazahypoxanthines in cancer cells revealed that they inhibited in vitro tubulin polymerization and disorganized microtubules in live HeLa cells. Experiments evaluating the effects of the 7-deazahypoxanthines on the binding of [(3)H]colchicine to tubulin identified the colchicine site on tubulin as the most likely target for these compounds in cancer cells. Because many microtubule-targeting compounds are successfully used to fight cancer in the clinic, we believe the new chemical class of antitubulin agents represented by the 7-deazahypoxanthine rigidin analogues have significant potential as new anticancer agents.

  12. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular docking studies of novel 1-benzene acyl-2-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-benzimidazole derivatives as potential tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ting; Qin, Ya-Juan; Yang, Na; Zhang, Ya-Liang; Liu, Chang-Hong; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2015-06-24

    A series of 1-benzene acyl-2-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-benzimidazole derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as potential tubulin polymerization inhibitors and for the cytotoxicity against anthropic cancer cell lines. Among the novel compounds, compound 11f was demonstrated the most potent tubulin polymerization inhibitory activity (IC50 = 1.5 μM) and antiproliferative activity against A549, HepG2 and MCF-7 (GI50 = 2.4, 3.8 and 5.1 μM, respectively), which was compared with the positive control colchicine and CA-4. We also evaluated that compound 11f could effectively induce apoptosis of A549 associated with G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Docking simulation and 3D-QSAR model in these studies provided more information that could be applied to design new molecules with more potent tubulin inhibitory activity.

  13. SAS-4 is recruited to a dynamic structure in newly forming centrioles that is stabilized by the gamma-tubulin-mediated addition of centriolar microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammermann, Alexander; Maddox, Paul S; Desai, Arshad; Oegema, Karen

    2008-02-25

    Centrioles are surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM), which is proposed to promote new centriole assembly by concentrating gamma-tubulin. Here, we quantitatively monitor new centriole assembly in living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, focusing on the conserved components SAS-4 and SAS-6. We show that SAS-4 and SAS-6 are coordinately recruited to the site of new centriole assembly and reach their maximum levels during S phase. Centriolar SAS-6 is subsequently reduced by a mechanism intrinsic to the early assembly pathway that does not require progression into mitosis. Centriolar SAS-4 remains in dynamic equilibrium with the cytoplasmic pool until late prophase, when it is stably incorporated in a step that requires gamma-tubulin and microtubule assembly. These results indicate that gamma-tubulin in the PCM stabilizes the nascent daughter centriole by promoting microtubule addition to its outer wall. Such a mechanism may help restrict new centriole assembly to the vicinity of preexisting parent centrioles that recruit PCM.

  14. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Express Neural Phenotypes in vitro and Migrate in Brain After Transplantation in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI-YE YANG; TIAN-HUA HUANG; LIAN MA

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) into neuron-like cells and to explore their potential use for neural transplantation. Methods BMSC from rats and adult humans were cultured in serum-containing media. Salvia miltiorrhiza was used to induce human BMSC (hBMSC) to differentiate. BMSC were identified with immunocytochemistry. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine mRNA expression of neurofilamentl (NF1), nestin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in rat BMSC (rBMSC). Rat BMSC labelled by Hoschst33258 were transplanted into striatum of rats to trace migration and distribution. Results BMSC expressed NSE, NF1 and nestin mRNA, and NF1 mRNA and expression was increased with induction of Salvia miltiorrhiza. A small number of hBMSC were stained by anti-nestin, anti-GFAP and anti-S100. Salvia miltiorrhiza could induce hBMSC to differentiate into neuron-like cells.Some differentiated neuron-like cells, that expressed NSE, beta-tubulin and NF-200, showed typical neuron morphology, but some neuron-like cells also expressed alpha smooth muscle protein, making their neuron identification complicated. rBMSC could migrate and adapted in the host brains after being transplanted. Conclusion Bone marrow stromal cells could express phenotypes of neurons, and Salvia miltiorrhiza could induce hBMSC to differentiate into neuron-like cells. If BMSC could be converted into neurons instead of mesenchymal derivatives, they would be an abundant and accessible cellular source to treat a variety of neurological diseases.

  15. Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin/Cyclophosphamide Followed by Ixabepilone or Paclitaxel in Early Stage Breast Cancer and Evaluation of βIII-Tubulin Expression as a Predictive Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chan, Stephen; Chacko, Raju T.; Campone, Mario; Manikhas, Alexy; Nag, Shona M.; Leichman, Cynthia G.; Dasappa, Lokanatha; Fasching, Peter A.; Hurtado de Mendoza, Fernando; Symmans, W. Fraser; Liu, David; Mukhopadhyay, Pralay; Horak, Christine; Xing, Guan; Pusztai, Lajos

    2013-01-01

    Background. This randomized phase II trial was designed to compare the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) induced by neoadjuvant cyclophosphamide plus doxorubicin (AC) followed by ixabepilone or paclitaxel in women with early stage breast cancer (BC). Expression of βIII-tubulin as a predictive marker was also evaluated. Patients and Methods. Women with untreated, histologically confirmed primary invasive breast adenocarcinoma received four cycles of AC followed by 1:1 randomization to either ixabepilone 40 mg/m2 (3-hour infusion) every 3 weeks for four cycles (n = 148) or weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 (1-hour infusion) for 12 weeks (n = 147). All patients underwent a core needle biopsy of the primary cancer for molecular marker analysis prior to chemotherapy. βIII-Tubulin expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results. There was no significant difference in the rate of pCR in the ixabepilone treatment arm (24.3%; 90% confidence interval [CI], 18.6–30.8) and the paclitaxel treatment arm (25.2%; 90% CI, 19.4–31.7). βIII-Tubulin-positive patients obtained higher pCR rates compared with βIII-tubulin-negative patients in both treatment arms; however, βIII-tubulin expression was not significantly associated with a differential response to ixabepilone or paclitaxel. The safety profiles of both regimens were generally similar, although neutropenia occurred more frequently in the ixabepilone arm (grade 3/4: 41.3% vs. 8.4%). The most common nonhematologic toxicity was peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions. Neoadjuvant treatment of early stage BC with AC followed by ixabepilone every 3 weeks or weekly paclitaxel was well tolerated with no significant difference in efficacy. Higher response rates were observed among βIII-tubulin-positive patients. PMID:23853246

  16. Synthesis of 2-aryl-1,2,4-oxadiazolo-benzimidazoles: Tubulin polymerization inhibitors and apoptosis inducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed; Reddy, T Srinivasa; Vishnuvardhan, M V P S; Nimbarte, Vijaykumar D; Subba Rao, A V; Srinivasulu, Vunnam; Shankaraiah, Nagula

    2015-08-01

    A new series of 2-aryl 1,2,4-oxadiazolo-benzimidazole conjugates have been synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity in the sixty cancer cell line panel of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Compounds 5l (NSC: 761109/1) and 5x (NSC: 761814/1) exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activity against most of the cancer cell lines in the one dose assay and were further screened at five dose concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM) which showed GI50 values in the range of 0.79-28.2 μM. Flow cytometric data of these compounds showed increased cells in G2/M phase, which is suggestive of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Further, compounds 5l and 5x showed inhibition of tubulin polymerization and disruption of the formation of microtubules. These compounds induce apoptosis by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation as well as by mitochondrial membrane depolarization. In addition, structure activity relationship studies within the series are also discussed. Molecular docking studies of compounds 5l and 5x into the colchicine-binding site of the tubulin, revealed the possible mode of interaction by these compounds.

  17. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  18. Genetic analysis of a novel tubulin mutation that redirects synaptic vesicle targeting and causes neurite degeneration in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Min Hsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress.

  19. Design and synthesis of pyrazole/isoxazole linked arylcinnamides as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and potential antiproliferative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed; Shaik, Anver Basha; Rao, Bala Bhaskara; Khan, Irfan; Bharath Kumar, G; Jain, Nishant

    2015-10-28

    As pyrazole and isoxazole based derivatives are well-known for displaying a considerable biological profile, an attempt has been made to unravel their cytotoxic potential. In this context, a number of pyrazole/isoxazole linked arylcinnamide conjugates (15a-o and 21a-n) have been synthesized by employing a straight forward route. The basic structure comprised three ring scaffolds (A, B and C): methoxyphenyl rings as A and C rings and a five membered heterocyclic ring (pyrazole or isoxazole) as the B-ring. To achieve clear understanding, these derivatives are categorized as pyrazole-phenylcinnamides (PP) and isoxazole-phenylcinnamides (IP). These compounds have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of various human cancer cell lines such as HeLa, DU-145, A549 and MDA-MB231 and most of them exhibit considerable cytotoxic effects. Some of them like 15a, 15b, 15e, 15i and 15l exhibit promising cytotoxicity in HeLa cells (IC50 = 0.4, 1.8, 1.2, 2.7 and 1.7 μM). Amongst them 15a, 15b and 15e were taken up for detailed biological studies, they were found to arrest the cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, they were investigated for their effect on the microtubular cytoskeletal system by using a tubulin polymerization assay, immunofluroscence and molecular docking studies; interestingly they demonstrate a significant inhibition of tubulin polymerization.

  20. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ... form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ...

  1. Applied Beta Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of beta and/or nonpenetrating exposure results is complicated and past techniques and capabilities have resulted in significant inaccuracies in recorded results. Current developments have resulted in increased capabilities which make the results more accurate and should result in less total exposure to the work force. Continued development of works in progress should provide equivalent future improvements.

  2. Beta Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... had their spleens removed. Slower growth rates. The anemia resulting from beta thalassemia can cause children to grow more slowly and also can lead ... boost production of new red blood cells. Some children with moderate anemia may require an occasional blood transfusion , particularly after ...

  3. Trichoderma .beta.-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-01-03

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross-section...

  5. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta is expressed in the form of proteoglycan and binds to the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnea, G; Grumet, M; Milev, P;

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular domain of receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTP beta) exhibits striking sequence similarity with a soluble, rat brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (3F8 PG). Immunoprecipitation experiments of cells transfected with RPTP beta expression vector and metabolically...... labeled with [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine indicate that the transmembrane form of RPTP beta is indeed a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The 3F8 PG is therefore a variant form composed of the entire extracellular domain of RPTP beta probably generated by alternative RNA splicing. Previous...

  6. TGF-beta and osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaney Davidson, E.N.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage damage is a major problem in osteoarthritis (OA). Growth factors like transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) have great potential in cartilage repair. In this review, we will focus on the potential therapeutic intervention in OA with TGF-beta, application of the growth facto

  7. Genetic variations in the beta-tubulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 region of Trichuris species from man and baboons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Olsen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The whipworm Trichuris trichiura has been estimated to infect 604 -- 795 million people worldwide. The current control strategy against trichuriasis using the benzimidazoles (BZs) albendazole (400 mg) or mebendazole (500 mg) as single-dose treatment is not satisfactory. The occurrence of single n...

  8. Discrimination of Trichophyton tonsurans and Trichophyton equinum by PCR-RFLP and by beta-tubulin and Translation Elongation Factor 1-alpha sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei-Matehkolaei, A.; Makimura, K.; de Hoog, G.S.; Shidfar, M.R.; Satoh, K.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Mirhendi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans and T. equinum are two closely related sister species of dermatophytes, but differ in their preferred hosts, i.e., humans or horses, respectively. Routine procedures for their identification depend on studies of their pheno-typic, physiological and biochemical characteristics,

  9. Differential regulation of chemoattractant-stimulated beta 2, beta 3, and beta 7 integrin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, C; Masinovsky, B; Staunton, D E

    1998-06-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to endothelium and extravasation are dynamic processes that require activation of integrins. Chemoattractants such as IL-8 and FMLP are potent activators of leukocyte integrins. To compare the chemoattractant-stimulated activation of three integrins, alpha 4 beta 7, alpha L beta 2, and alpha V beta 3, in the same cellular context, we expressed an IL-8 receptor (IL-8RA) and FMLP receptor (FPR) in the lymphoid cell line JY. Chemoattractants induced a rapid increase in alpha L beta 2- and alpha V beta 3-dependent JY adhesion within 5 min, and it was sustained for 30 min. In contrast, stimulation of alpha 4 beta 7-dependent adhesion was transient, returning to basal levels by 30 min. The activation profiles of the integrins were similar regardless of whether IL-8 or FMLP was used for induction. We also demonstrate that alpha 4 beta 7-dependent adhesion was uniquely responsive to the F actin-disrupting agent cytochalasin D and the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrin. While alpha V beta 3- and alpha L beta 2-mediated cell adhesion was significantly reduced by cytochalasin D, alpha 4 beta 7-mediated adhesion was enhanced. Chelerythrin inhibited both the IL-8 and PMA activation of alpha L beta 2 and alpha V beta 3. In contrast, inducible alpha 4 beta 7 activity was unaffected, and basal activity was increased. These findings demonstrate that the mechanism of alpha 4 beta 7 regulation by chemoattractants is different from that of alpha L beta 2 and alpha V beta 3 and that it appears to involve distinct cytoskeletal and PKC dependencies. In addition, PKC activity may be a positive or negative regulator of integrin-dependent adhesion.

  10. Cytokines and perinatal brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, F S; Barks, J D; Hagan, P; Liu, X H; Ivacko, J; Szaflarski, J

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly expanding body of data provides support for the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are expressed acutely in injured brain and contribute to progressive neuronal damage. Little is known about the pathogenetic role of these cytokines in perinatal brain injury. Recent experimental studies have incorporated two closely related in vivo perinatal rodent brain injury models to evaluate the role(s) of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the progression of neuronal injury: a perinatal stroke model, elicited by unilateral carotid artery ligation and subsequent timed exposure to 8% oxygen in 7-day-old rats, and a model of excitotoxic injury, elicited by stereotactic intra-cerebral injection of the selective excitatory amino acid agonist NMDA. Each of these lesioning methods results in reproducible, quantifiable focal forebrain injury at this developmental stage. Acute brain injury, evoked by cerebral hypoxia-ischemia or excitotoxin lesioning, results in transient marked increases in expression of IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha mRNA in brain regions susceptible to irreversible injury, and there is evidence that pharmacological antagonism of IL-1 receptors can attenuate injury in both models. Recent studies also suggest that complementary strategies, based on pharmacological antagonism of platelet activating factor and on neutrophil depletion can also limit the extent of irreversible injury. In summary, current data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the progression of perinatal brain injury, and that these mediators are important targets for neuroprotective interventions in the acute post-injury period.

  11. Beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Origa Raffaella

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands, dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes, gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely

  12. Beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanello, Renzo; Origa, Raffaella

    2010-05-21

    Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands), dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis). Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes), gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely, deletions in the beta

  13. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  14. Realized Beta GARCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger; Voev, Valeri Radkov

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model that incorporates realized measures of variances and covariances. Realized measures extract information about the current levels of volatilities and correlations from high-frequency data, which...... is particularly useful for modeling financial returns during periods of rapid changes in the underlying covariance structure. When applied to market returns in conjunction with returns on an individual asset, the model yields a dynamic model specification of the conditional regression coefficient that is known...... as the beta. We apply the model to a large set of assets and find the conditional betas to be far more variable than usually found with rolling-window regressions based exclusively on daily returns. In the empirical part of the paper, we examine the cross-sectional as well as the time variation...

  15. Coroutine Sequencing in BETA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger;

    In object-oriented programming, a program execution is viewed as a physical model of some real or imaginary part of the world. A language supporting object-oriented programming must therefore contain comprehensive facilities for modeling phenomena and concepts form the application domain. Many ap...... applications in the real world consist of objects carrying out sequential processes. Coroutines may be used for modeling objects that alternate between a number of sequential processes. The authors describe coroutines in BETA...

  16. Magic Baseline Beta Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2007-01-01

    We study the physics reach of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The CERN-INO distance is close to the so-called "magic" baseline which helps evade some of the parameter degeneracies and allows for a better measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy and $\\theta_{13}$.

  17. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades......, but the mechanisms involved are still not clarified. In this review the information obtained in previous studies is recapitulated together with some of the current attempts to resolve the controversy in the field: identification of the putative progenitor cells, identification of the factors involved...

  18. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  19. Triazole linked mono carbonyl curcumin-isatin bifunctional hybrids as novel anti tubulin agents: Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sahil; Gupta, Manish K; Saxena, Ajit K; Bedi, Preet Mohinder S

    2015-11-15

    Keeping in view the limitations associated with currently available anticancer drugs, molecular hybrids of mono carbonyl curcumin and isatin tethered by triazole ring have been synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116, A549, HeLa, CAKI-I, PC-3, MiaPaca-2 human cancer cell lines. The results revealed that the compounds SA-1 to SA-9, SB-2, SB-3, SB-4, SB-7 and SC-2 showed a good range of IC50 values against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116 and PC-3 cell lines, while the other four cell lines among these were found to be almost resistant. Structure activity relationship revealed that the nature of Ring X and substitution at position R influences the activity. Methoxy substituted phenyl ring as Ring X and H as R were found to be the ideal structural features. The most potent compounds (SA-2, SA-3, SA-4, SA-7) were further tested for tubulin inhibition. Compound SA-2 was found to significantly inhibit the tubulin polymerization (IC50=1.2 μM against HCT-116). Compound SA-2, moreover, lead to the disruption of microtubules as confirmed by immunofluorescence technique. The significant cytotoxicity and tubulin inhibition by SA-2 was streamlined by molecular modeling studies where it was docked at the curcumin binding site of tubulin.

  20. The alpha-tubulin gene AmTuba1: a marker for rapid mycelial growth in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkka, Mika T; Schrey, Silvia; Nehls, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The apical extension of hyphae is of central importance for extensive spread of fungal mycelium in forest soils and for effective ectomycorrhiza development. Since the tubulin cytoskeleton is known to be important for fungal tip growth, we have investigated the expression of an alpha-tubulin gene from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Amanita muscaria (AmTuba1). The phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences revealed the existence of two subgroups of alpha-tubulins in homobasidiomycetes, clearly distinguishable by defined amino acids. AmTuba1 belongs to subgroup1. The AmTuba1 transcript level is related to mycelial growth rate. Growth induction of carbohydrate starved (non-growing) hyphae resulted in an enhanced AmTuba1 expression as soon as hyphal growth started, reaching a maximum at highest mycelial growth rate. Bacterium-induced hyphal elongation also leads to increased AmTuba1 transcript levels. In mature A. muscaria/P. abies ectomycorrhizas, where fungal hyphae are highly branched, and slowly growing, AmTuba1 expression were even lower than in carbohydrate-starved mycelium, indicating a further down-regulation of gene expression in symbiosis. In conclusion, our analyses show that the AmTuba1 gene can be used as a marker for active apical extension in fly agaric, and that alpha-tubulin proteins are promising tools for the classification of fungi.

  1. Synthesis, molecular docking and biological evaluation of 1-phenylsulphonyl-2-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-benzimidazole derivatives as novel potential tubulin assembling inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ting; Cai, Xun-Chao; Shi, Tian-Qi; Zhang, Ya-Liang; Wang, Zhong-Chang; Liu, Chang-Hong; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-12-29

    A series of new 1-phenylsulphonyl-2-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-benzimidazole derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of tubulin polymerization and anthropic cancer cell lines. Among them, compound 33 displayed the most potent tubulin polymerization inhibitory activity in vitro (IC50  = 1.41 μM) and strong antiproliferative activities against A549, Hela, HepG2 and MCF-7 cell lines in vitro with GI50 value of 1.6, 2.7, 2.9 and 4.3 μM, respectively, comparable with the positive control colchicine (GI50 value of 4.1, 7.2, 9.5 and 14.5 μM, respectively) and CA-4 (GI50 value of 2.2, 4.3, 6.4 and 11.4 μM, respectively). Simultaneously, we evaluated that compound 33 could effectively induce apoptosis of A549 associated with G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Immunofluorescence microscopy also clearly indicated compound 33 a potent antimicrotubule agent. Docking simulation showed that compound 33 could bind tightly with the colchicine-binding site and act as a tubulin inhibitor. Three-dimensional-QSAR model was also built to provide more pharmacophore understanding that could be used to design new agents with more potent tubulin assembling inhibitory activity in the future.

  2. N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)colcemid, a probe for different classes of colchicine-binding site on tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S; Puri, K D; Surolia, A; Roy, S; Bhattacharyya, B

    1993-03-01

    The nature of binding of 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-colcemid (NBD-colcemid), an environment-sensitive fluorescent analogue of colchicine, to tubulin was tested. This article reports the first fluorometric study where two types of binding site of a colchicine analogue on tubulin were detected. Binding of NBD-colcemid to one of these sites equilibrates slowly. NBD-colcemid competes with colchicine for this site. Binding of NBD-colcemid to this site also causes inhibition of tubulin self-assembly. In contrast, NBD-colcemid binding to the other site is characterised by rapid equilibration and lack of competition with colchicine. Nevertheless, binding to this site is highly specific for the colchicine nucleus, as alkyl-NBD analogues have no significant binding activity. Fast-reaction-kinetic studies gave 1.76 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 for the association and 0.79 s-1 for the dissociation rate constants for the binding of NBD-colcemid to the fast site of tubulin. The association rate constants for the two phases of the slow site are 444.4 M-1 s-1 and 11.67 M-1 s-1 [corrected], respectively. These two sites may be related to the two sites of colchicine reported earlier, with binding characteristics altered by the increased hydrophobic nature of NBD-colcemid.

  3. Fission yeast MOZART1/Mzt1 is an essential γ-tubulin complex component required for complex recruitment to the microtubule organizing center, but not its assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Mori, Risa; Yukawa, Masashi; Toda, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    γ-Tubulin plays a universal role in microtubule nucleation from microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) such as the animal centrosome and fungal spindle pole body (SPB). γ-Tubulin functions as a multiprotein complex called the γ-tubulin complex (γ-TuC), consisting of GCP1-6 (GCP1 is γ-tubulin). In fungi and flies, it has been shown that GCP1-3 are core components, as they are indispensable for γ-TuC complex assembly and cell division, whereas the other three GCPs are not. Recently a novel conserved component, MOZART1, was identified in humans and plants, but its precise functions remain to be determined. In this paper, we characterize the fission yeast homologue Mzt1, showing that it is essential for cell viability. Mzt1 is present in approximately equal stoichiometry with Alp4/GCP2 and localizes to all the MTOCs, including the SPB and interphase and equatorial MTOCs. Temperature-sensitive mzt1 mutants display varying degrees of compromised microtubule organization, exhibiting multiple defects during both interphase and mitosis. Mzt1 is required for γ-TuC recruitment, but not sufficient to localize to the SPB, which depends on γ-TuC integrity. Intriguingly, the core γ-TuC assembles in the absence of Mzt1. Mzt1 therefore plays a unique role within the γ-TuC components in attachment of this complex to the major MTOC site.

  4. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  5. Identification of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Danto, S I; Borok, Z; Eber, J T; Martín-Vasallo, P; Lubman, R L

    1997-01-01

    The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase is a heterodimeric plasma membrane protein that consists of a catalytic alpha-subunit and a smaller glycosylated beta-subunit that has not been fully characterized in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) to date. In this study, we identified the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit protein in rat AEC and lung membranes using immunochemical techniques. Rat AEC grown in primary culture and rat lung, brain, and kidney membranes were solubilized in either 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sample buffer for SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or in 1% Nonidet P-40 lysis buffer for immunoprecipitation studies. Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit was not detected in either AEC or lung membranes on Western blots when probed with a panel of antibodies (Ab) against beta-subunit isoforms, whereas brain and kidney beta-subunit were recognized as broad approximately 50-kDa bands. AEC, lung, and kidney membranes were immunoprecipitated with anti-beta Ab IEC 1/48, a monoclonal Ab that recognizes beta-subunit protein only in its undenatured state. The beta-subunit was detected in the immunoprecipitate (IP) from kidney membranes by several different anti-beta-subunit Ab. The beta-subunit was faintly detectable from AEC and lung IP as a broad approximately 50-kDa band when blotted with the polyclonal anti-beta 1-subunit Ab SpET but could not be detected by blotting with other anti-beta Ab. Treatment of the IP from kidney, lung, and AEC with N-glycosidase F for 2 h at 37 degrees C resulted in immunodetection of identical approximately 35 kDa bands when probed with all anti-beta 1 Ab on Western blots. From these results, we conclude that rat lung and AEC possess immunoreactive beta-subunit protein that is only readily detectable after deglycosylation. Because anti-beta Ab fail to detect the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta-subunit in rat lung or AEC by standard Western blotting techniques under the conditions of these experiments, our results suggest that lung beta-subunit may be

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  11. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  15. [Down-regulated βIII-tubulin expression can reverse paclitaxel resistance in A549/taxol cells lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yinling; Guo, Qisen

    2014-08-20

    背景与目的 化疗耐药导致肿瘤很快复发和/或转移,是目前肺癌死亡的主要原因之一。β-tubulin是抗微管药物的主要细胞靶点。已有的研究证明:βIII-tubulin高表达与非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)耐药有关。利用RNA干扰技术沉默耐紫杉醇A549细胞(A549/Taxol)中βIII-tubulin基因表达,探讨靶基因下调后对化疗药物紫杉醇的敏感性的变化以及细胞周期和细胞凋亡情况。方法 构建靶向βIII-tubulin的siRNA,以脂质体为载体介导βIII-tubulin siRNA转染A549/Taxol细胞,利用qRT-PCR检测细胞内βIII-tubulin mRNA的变化情况,并筛选出最佳干扰序列;Western blot法检测A549/Taxol细胞内βIII-tubulin蛋白表达的变化;MTT法检测转染后细胞株对紫杉醇敏感性的变化;流式细胞仪检测细胞周期和细胞凋亡的变化。结果 实时荧光qRT-PCR法显示转染后细胞株靶基因水平较对照组降低,其中βIII-tubulin siRNA-1序列抑制率最高为(87.73±4.87)%(P<0.01);Western blot显示转染后靶蛋白水平较对照组明显降低;MTT法表明紫杉醇处理转染后细胞株的细胞抑制率较对照组明显增加(51.77±4.60)%(P<0.01);细胞凋亡显示βIII-tubulin siRNA+Taxol组细胞早期凋亡率较对照组明显增加(P<0.01),两者的差异有统计学意义;细胞周期检测结果显示紫杉醇处理组的G2/M期细胞百分率高于对照组,且转染后紫杉醇处理组的细胞晚期凋亡率较对照组增加。结论 βIII-tubulin表达下调明显提高A549/Taxol细胞株对Taxol的敏感性。

  16. Brain injury-associated biomarkers of TGF-beta1, S100B, GFAP, NF-L, tTG, AbetaPP, and tau were concomitantly enhanced and the UPS was impaired during acute brain injury caused by Toxocara canis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Dar-Der

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the outcomes and sequelae after different types of brain injury (BI are variable and difficult to predict, investigations on whether enhanced expressions of BI-associated biomarkers (BIABs, including transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, S100B, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, neurofilament light chain (NF-L, tissue transglutaminases (tTGs, β-amyloid precursor proteins (AβPP, and tau are present as well as whether impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is present have been widely used to help delineate pathophysiological mechanisms in various BIs. Larvae of Toxocara canis can invade the brain and cause BI in humans and mice, leading to cerebral toxocariasis (CT. Because the parasitic burden is light in CT, it may be too cryptic to be detected in humans, making it difficult to clearly understand the pathogenesis of subtle BI in CT. Since the pathogenesis of murine toxocariasis is very similar to that in humans, it appears appropriate to use a murine model to investigate the pathogenesis of CT. Methods BIAB expressions and UPS function in the brains of mice inoculated with a single dose of 250 T. canis embryonated eggs was investigated from 3 days (dpi to 8 weeks post-infection (wpi by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Results Results revealed that at 4 and 8 wpi, T. canis larvae were found to have invaded areas around the choroid plexus but without eliciting leukocyte infiltration in brains of infected mice; nevertheless, astrogliosis, an indicator of BI, with 78.9~142.0-fold increases in GFAP expression was present. Meanwhile, markedly increased levels of other BIAB proteins including TGF-β1, S100B, NF-L, tTG, AβPP, and tau, with increases ranging 2.0~12.0-fold were found, although their corresponding mRNA expressions were not found to be present at 8 wpi. Concomitantly, UPS impairment was evidenced by the overexpression of conjugated ubiquitin and ubiquitin in the brain. Conclusion Further studies

  17. Association between response to albendazole treatment and β-tubulin genotype frequencies in soil-transmitted helminths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïssatou Diawara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Albendazole (ABZ, a benzimidazole (BZ anthelmintic (AH, is commonly used for treatment of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs. Its regular use increases the possibility that BZ resistance may develop, which, in veterinary nematodes is caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the β-tubulin gene at positions 200, 167 or 198. The relative importance of these SNPs varies among the different parasitic nematodes of animals studied to date, and it is currently unknown whether any of these are influencing BZ efficacy against STHs in humans. We assessed ABZ efficacy and SNP frequencies before and after treatment of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm infections. METHODS: Studies were performed in Haiti, Kenya, and Panama. Stool samples were examined prior to ABZ treatment and two weeks (Haiti, one week (Kenya and three weeks (Panama after treatment to determine egg reduction rate (ERR. Eggs were genotyped and frequencies of each SNP assessed. FINDINGS: In T. trichiura, polymorphism was detected at codon 200. Following treatment, there was a significant increase, from 3.1% to 55.3%, of homozygous resistance-type in Haiti, and from 51.3% to 67.8% in Kenya (ERRs were 49.7% and 10.1%, respectively. In A. lumbricoides, a SNP at position 167 was identified at high frequency, both before and after treatment, but ABZ efficacy remained high. In hookworms from Kenya we identified the resistance-associated SNP at position 200 at low frequency before and after treatment while ERR values indicated good drug efficacy. CONCLUSION: Albendazole was effective for A. lumbricoides and hookworms. However, ABZ exerts a selection pressure on the β-tubulin gene at position 200 in T. trichiura, possibly explaining only moderate ABZ efficacy against this parasite. In A. lumbricoides, the codon 167 polymorphism seemed not to affect drug efficacy whilst the polymorphism at codon 200 in hookworms was at such low frequency that conclusions

  18. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit ... final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other ...

  20. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  1. The Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  2. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour.

  3. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  4. Beta blockers, norepinephrine, and cancer: an epidemiological viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: There is growing evidence that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) and its sister molecule epinephrine (EPI) (adrenaline) affect some types of cancer. Several recent epidemiological studies have shown that chronic use of beta blocking drugs (which antagonize NE/EPI receptors) results in lower recurrence, progression, or mortality of ...

  5. Beta section Beta: biogeographical patterns of variation and taxonomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letschert, J.P.W.

    1993-01-01

    In Chapter 1 an account is given of the historical subdivision of the genus Beta and its sections, and the relations of the sections are discussed. Emphasis is given to the taxonomic treatment of wild section Beta by various authors. The Linnaean names B. vulgaris L. and B. maritima L. are lectotypi

  6. Depressed adrenomedullin in the embryonic transforming growth factor-beta1 null mouse becomes elevated postnatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegas, Elena; Martínez, Alfredo; Ozbun, Laurent L; Garayoa, Mercedes; Letterio, John J; Montuenga, Luis M; Jakowlew, Sonia B

    2004-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and adrenomedullin are multifunctional regulatory proteins which are expressed in developing embryonic and adult tissues. Because of their colocalization, TGF-beta1 and adrenomedullin may be able to coordinately act to influence development and differentiation. In order to learn more about the biology of adrenomedullin in the absence of the effects of TGF-beta1 in vivo, we examined adrenomedullin in the TGF-beta1 null mouse. A generally lower amount of adrenomedullin was detected by immunohistochemical staining analysis in multiple tissues from embryonic TGF-beta1 null mice compared to wildtype animals, including the heart, lung, brain, liver, and kidney, among others. In contrast, immunohistochemical staining for adrenomedullin was more intense in tissues of the postnatal TGF-beta1 null mouse compared to the wildtype mouse. These observations were confirmed by quantitative real time RT-PCR for adrenomedullin in both embryos and postnatal animals, as well as in cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts from TGF-beta1 null and wildtype mice. In addition, when cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts were treated with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta1, the levels of adrenomedullin expression were statistically reduced compared to untreated cells. Our data show that expression of adrenomedullin is reduced in tissues of the developing embryonic TGF-beta1 null mouse compared to the wildtype mouse, but increases during postnatal development in TGF-beta1 null mice. The elevated expression of adrenomedullin which occurs postnatally in the TGF-beta1 null mouse may be a cause or a consequence of the multifocal wasting syndrome which is characteristic of postnatal TGF-beta1 null mice.

  7. Cyclic modular beta-sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R Jeremy; Brower, Justin O; Castellanos, Elena; Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Khakshoor, Omid; Russu, Wade A; Nowick, James S

    2007-03-07

    The development of peptide beta-hairpins is problematic, because folding depends on the amino acid sequence and changes to the sequence can significantly decrease folding. Robust beta-hairpins that can tolerate such changes are attractive tools for studying interactions involving protein beta-sheets and developing inhibitors of these interactions. This paper introduces a new class of peptide models of protein beta-sheets that addresses the problem of separating folding from the sequence. These model beta-sheets are macrocyclic peptides that fold in water to present a pentapeptide beta-strand along one edge; the other edge contains the tripeptide beta-strand mimic Hao [JACS 2000, 122, 7654] and two additional amino acids. The pentapeptide and Hao-containing peptide strands are connected by two delta-linked ornithine (deltaOrn) turns [JACS 2003, 125, 876]. Each deltaOrn turn contains a free alpha-amino group that permits the linking of individual modules to form divalent beta-sheets. These "cyclic modular beta-sheets" are synthesized by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis of a linear precursor followed by solution-phase cyclization. Eight cyclic modular beta-sheets 1a-1h containing sequences based on beta-amyloid and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR. Linked cyclic modular beta-sheet 2, which contains two modules of 1b, was also synthesized and characterized. 1H NMR studies show downfield alpha-proton chemical shifts, deltaOrn delta-proton magnetic anisotropy, and NOE cross-peaks that establish all compounds but 1c and 1g to be moderately or well folded into a conformation that resembles a beta-sheet. Pulsed-field gradient NMR diffusion experiments show little or no self-association at low (

  8. Effects of tertiary amine local anesthetics on the assembly and disassembly of brain microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genna, J M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1980-09-01

    From kinetic and electron microscopy studies on the effects of procaine, tetracaine and dibucaine on the polymerization and depolymerization of the microtubules isolated from pig and rat brains the following results were obtained. 1. Procaine or tetracaine, at the concentration range of 0.5--20 mM and of 0.5--5 mM respectively, increases the rate of tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and of microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) as a linear function of the concentration of the anesthetics, while identical amounts of microtubules are formed. In the absence of microtubule-associated proteins the polymerization of tubulin is not induced by 10 mM procaine, furthermore, the critical concentration of microtubule proteins necessary for assembly into microtubules is not affected at this concentration level of the anesthetic. This suggests that procaine affects not the nucleation, but rather the elongation process. 2. Dibucaine, from 0.5 mM to 3 mM increases the lag time of the polymerization reaction, while from 0.5 mM to 2 mM it linearly decreases both tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C) and microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) rates. Dibucaine, up to mM concentration, does not affect the extent of tubulin polymerization; however, above this concentration it induces the formation of amorphous aggregates. 3. Procaine or tetracaine enhances the depolymerizing effect of calcium on microtubules. The half-maximal values for the depolymerizing effect of calcium were 0.96, 0.71 and 0.51 mM for the control, in the presence of 10 mM procaine and 5 mM tetracaine respectively.

  9. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Integration of BETA with Eclipse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Enevoldsen, Mads Brøgger

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents language interoperability issues appearing in order to implement support for the BETA language in the Java-based Eclipse integrated development environment. One of the challenges is to implement plug-ins in BETA and be able to load them in Eclipse. In order to do this, some form...

  11. Measurements of sin 2 $\\beta$

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, A

    2000-01-01

    A review of the most recent measurements of the CP violating parameter sin 2 beta from LEP and CDF is reported. These yield an average value of sin 2 beta =0.91+or-0.35, giving a confidence level that CP violation in the B system has been observed of almost 99%. (10 refs).

  12. Beta decay of Cu-56

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borcea, R; Aysto, J; Caurier, E; Dendooven, P; Doring, J; Gierlik, M; Gorska, M; Grawe, H; Hellstrom, M; Janas, Z; Jokinen, A; Karny, M; Kirchner, R; La Commara, M; Langanke, K; Martinez-Pinedo, G; Mayet, P; Nieminen, A; Nowacki, F; Penttila, H; Plochocki, A; Rejmund, M; Roeckl, E; Schlegel, C; Schmidt, K; Schwengner, R; Sawicka, M

    2001-01-01

    The proton-rich isotope Cu-56 was produced at the GSI On-Line Mass Separator by means of the Si-28(S-32, p3n) fusion-evaporation reaction. Its beta -decay properties were studied by detecting beta -delayed gamma rays and protons. A half-Life of 93 +/- 3 ms was determined for Cu-56. Compared to the p

  13. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalou...

  14. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  15. Effect of saturated fat diet on learning and memory, brain beta-amyloid and oxidative stress of guinea pigs%饱和脂肪饮食对豚鼠学习记忆、脑β-淀粉样蛋白及氧化应激的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟伟科; 王小引; 樊振琦; 王朋; 张天; 闫金库; 马驰; 冯汉; 王冰

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察饱和脂肪饮食对豚鼠学习记忆、脑β-淀粉样蛋白(Aβ)、总超氧化物歧化酶(T-SOD)及丙二醛(MDA)的影响.方法 24只雄性豚鼠随机分为对照组和饱和脂肪组,每组12只.对照组给予正常饲料,饱和脂肪组饲料中添加质量分数15%牛油,喂养16周.用Morris水迷宫测定豚鼠空间学习记忆能力,用酶联免疫吸附分析法测定海马Aβ水平,用黄嘌呤氧化酶法测定脑组织T-SOD,用硫代巴比妥酸法测定脑组织MDA水平.结果 与对照组比较,饱和脂肪组豚鼠的平均逃避潜伏期显著延长(P<0.05),穿越原平台位置的次数显著减少(P<0.05),海马Aβ水平显著升高(P<0.05),脑T-SOD活性显著降低(P<0.05).结论 饱和脂肪饮食引起学习记忆受损及Aβ增多,其机制可能与脑抗氧化能力降低有关.%Objective To investigate the effect of saturated fat diet on learning and memory,brain beta-amyloid(Aβ),total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD)and malondialdehyde (MDA)levels in guinea pigs.Methods Twenty-four males guinea pigs were randomly divided into control group and saturated fat group,12 guinea pigs in each group.The control group was given a normal diet,and saturated fat group was given saturated fat diet containing 15% butter for 16 weeks.The spatial learning and memory abilities were examined by Morris water maze test.Aβ content in hippocampus was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.T-SOD activity was measured by using xanthine oxidase method.MDA content was determined by thiobarbiturate method.Results Compared with control group,the mean escape latency was prolonged and the frequency of crossing the original platform was reduced in saturated fat group(P < 0.05) ;hippocampal Aβ content was increased significantly in saturated fat group(P < 0.05) ; the brain T-SOD activity was decreased in saturated fat group (P < 0.05).Conclusion Saturated fat induces learning and memory impairment and Aβ increase,and its

  16. The cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/40 ratio in the differentiation of Alzheimer's disease from non-Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, P E; Slats, D; Sjögren, J M C; Kremer, B P H; Verhey, F R J; Rikkert, M G M Olde; Verbeek, M M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid beta(40) (Abeta(40)) is the most abundant Abeta peptide in the brain. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of Abeta(40) might therefore be considered to most closely reflect the total Abeta load in the brain. Both in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in normal aging the Abeta load in t

  17. [Serum beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2M) following renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Silva, A; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Ramos, O L; Azjen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    Although there was an important improvement in graft and patient survival the last 10 years, graft rejection continues to be a major barrier to the success of renal transplantation. Identification of a laboratory test that could help to diagnose graft rejection would facilitate the management of renal transplanted patients. PURPOSE--To evaluate the utility of monitoring serum beta 2M in recently transplanted patients. METHODS--We daily determined serum beta 2M levels in 20 receptors of renal grafts (10 from living related and 10 from cadaveric donors) and compared them to their clinical and laboratory evolution. RESULTS--Eight patients who presented immediate good renal function following grafting and did not have rejection had a mean serum beta 2M of 3.7 mg/L on the 4th day post transplant. The sensitivity of the test for the diagnosis of acute rejection was 87.5%, but the specificity was only 46%. Patients who presented acute tubular necrosis (ATN) without rejection had a progressive decrease in their serum levels of beta 2M, while their serum creatinine changed as they were dialyzed. In contrast, patients with ATN and concomitance of acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity presented elevated beta 2M and creatinine serum levels. CONCLUSION--Daily monitoring of serum beta 2M does not improve the ability to diagnose acute rejection in patients with good renal function. However, serum beta 2M levels seemed to be useful in diagnosing acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity in patients with ATN.

  18. Transient increase in the transcript levels of gamma-tubulin complex genes during reorientation of cortical microtubules by gravity in azuki bean (Vigna angularis) epicotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2008-09-01

    By hypergravity treatment, the percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased in azuki bean (Vigna angularis) epicotyls. The expression of genes encoding gamma-tubulin complex (VaTUG and VaGCP3) was increased transiently in response to changes in the gravitational conditions. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified reorientation of microtubules as well as up-regulation of expression of VaTUG and VaGCP3 by hypergravity. These results suggest that mechanoreceptors may perceive the gravity signal, which leads to a transient increase in the transcript levels of gamma-tubulin complex genes and reorientation of cortical microtubules.

  19. Transient increase in the levels of gamma-tubulin complex in reorientation of cortical microtubules by gravity in azuki bean epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Kotake, Toshihisa; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    Azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) seedlings were exposed to centrifugal hypergravity, and the changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules and the expression of genes cording γ-tubulin complex (VaTUBG and VaSpc98p) were examined. By 300 g treatment, the percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased in epicotyls. Hypergravity increased the expression of VaTUBG and VaSpc98p transiently. Also, the expression of both genes was increased transiently by removal of hypergravity stimulus. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified reorientation of microtubules as well as up-regulation of expression of VaTUBG and VaSpc98p by hypergravity. These results suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane may perceive the gravity signal, which leads to reorientation of cortical microtubules by transiently stimulating the formation of γ-tubulin complex.

  20. Synthesis of Peptides from α- and β-Tubulin Containing Glutamic Acid Side-Chain Linked Oligo-Glu with Defined Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Tegge

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Side-chain oligo- and polyglutamylation represents an important posttranslational modification in tubulin physiology. The particular number of glutamate units is related to specific regulatory functions. In this work, we present a method for the synthesis of building blocks for the Fmoc synthesis of peptides containing main chain glutamic acid residues that carry side-chain branching with oligo-glutamic acid. The two model peptide sequences CYEEVGVDSVEGEG-E(E-EEGEEY and CQDATADEQG-E(E-FEEEEGEDEA from the C-termini of mammalian α1- and β1-tubulin, respectively, containing oligo-glutamic acid side-chain branching with lengths of 1 to 5 amino acids were assembled in good yield and purity. The products may lead to the generation of specific antibodies which should be important tools for a more detailed investigation of polyglutamylation processes.

  1. Biparental Inheritance of γ-Tubulin during Human Fertilization: Molecular Reconstitution of Functional Zygotic Centrosomes in Inseminated Human Oocytes and in Cell-free Extracts Nucleated by Human Sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Simerly, Calvin; Zoran, Sara S.; Payne, Chris; Dominko, Tanja; Sutovsky, Peter; Christopher S. Navara; Salisbury, Jeffery L.; Schatten, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    Human sperm centrosome reconstitution and the parental contributions to the zygotic centrosome are examined in mammalian zygotes and after exposure of spermatozoa to Xenopus laevis cell-free extracts. The presence and inheritance of the conserved centrosomal constituents γ-tubulin, centrin, and MPM-2 (which detects phosphorylated epitopes) are traced, as is the sperm microtubule-nucleating capability on reconstituted centrosomes. γ-Tubulin is biparentally inherited in humans (maternal >> than...

  2. Motor preparation attenuates neural variability and beta-band LFP in parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Wei, Linyu; Liu, Yu

    2014-10-28

    Accumulative evidence shows that neural variability is meaningful and powerful during brain information processing, but how cognitive state influences neural variability is still unclear. We studied neural variability during motor preparation in lateral intraparietal area (LIP), a brain area closely involved in saccade generation. During motor preparation, we observed significant variability decline, and the decline highly correlated with beta-band local field potential (LFP) fluctuations. Furthermore, we found similar variance-LFP correlations in both the memory-guided saccade task and the visually-guided saccade task. These results indicate a possible linkage between beta-band LFP and trial-to-trial neural variability.

  3. Two benzimidazole resistance-associated SNPs in the isotype-1 β-tubulin gene predominate in Haemonchus contortus populations from eight regions in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus is one of the most important parasitic nematodes of small ruminants around the world, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. The control of haemonchosis relies mainly on anthelmintics, but the excessive and prolonged use of anthelmintics is causing serious drug resistance issues in many countries. As benzimidazole (BZ anthelmintics have been broadly used in China, we hypothesized that resistance is widespread. Given the link between three known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, designated F167Y, E198A and F200Y in the isotype-1 β-tubulin gene and BZ resistance, our goal here was to explore the presence of these mutations in H. contortus from small ruminants (sheep and goats from eight provinces in China using PCR-coupled sequencing. In addition, the genetic diversity and genetic relationship of isotype-1 β-tubulin sequence haplotypes were also investigated. Among 192 H. contortus adult individuals representing the eight populations, we identified six distinct sequence types, five of which had SNP E198A (GCA and/or F200Y (TAC. Sequence analysis showed that the frequencies of SNPs E198A and F200Y were 0–70% and 0–31%, respectively. SNP F167Y (TAC was not detected in any population. In addition, high haplotype diversities (0.455–0.939 and nucleotide diversities (0.018–0.039 were calculated. A network analysis of the isotype-1 β-tubulin gene sequences showed that SNPs E198A and F200Y occurred in multiple distinct groupings, suggesting multiple independent origins of these SNPs. The findings of this first study of SNPs in the isotype-1 β-tubulin gene of H. contortus populations suggest that BZ resistance is prevalent in some regions of China, and that any control strategy might focus on monitoring BZ resistance in this country.

  4. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Simplified Fluorescently Labeled Discodermolide as a Molecular Probe to Study the Binding of Discodermolide to Tubulin

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Jun; Blanden, Adam R.; Bane, Susan; Kingston, David G. I.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a simplified fluorescently labeled discodermolide analogue possessing a dimethylaminobenzoyl fluorophore has been achieved. Stereoselective Suzuki coupling, Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons reaction or the Wittig reaction comprised the key tactics for its construction. The analogue exhibited qualitatively similar activity to paclitaxel in a tubulin assembly assay, and it can thus be used as a fluorescent molecular probe to explore the local environme...

  5. 靶向微管抗肿瘤药物研究进展%The Antitumor Research Advances on Tubulin Targeted Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭小宁; 金芳; 李志超; 罗志勇

    2013-01-01

    微管由微管蛋白组成,在细胞分裂、细胞内物质运输、信号传递、维持细胞形态等过程中起着重要作用.一些干扰微管功能的化合物可使细胞停滞在有丝分裂期而抑制细胞增殖.相对于正常细胞,肿瘤细胞有丝分裂异常频繁,以微管作为抗肿瘤的靶点已成为研究热点.作用于微管的微管蛋白抑制剂通过抑制微管蛋白的聚合促进微管解聚或者抑制微管解聚促进微管蛋白聚合来破坏微管动态平衡、干扰肿瘤细胞纺锤体形成、阻断细胞分裂、抑制肿瘤增殖,现就微管蛋白抑制剂的研究进展作一综述.%Microtubule which consists of tubulin plays an important role in cell mitosis, intracellular transportation, maintenance of cell shape and the process of signal transduction. Some kind of compounds can block cell proliferation at mitotic phase by interfering microtubule function. Tumor cell proliferate much more frequently relative to normal cell so that it has been a novel strategy to take tubulin as anticarcinogen targets. Tubulin inhibitors which interfere the polymerization and depolymerization destroy microtubules dynamic balance and inhibit tumor cells division. The latest tubulin inhibitors are introduced.

  6. Brain Autopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... why a family should consider arranging for a brain autopsy upon the death of their loved one. To get a definitive ... study of tissue removed from the body after death. Examination of the whole brain is important in understanding FTD because the patterns ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  9. Role of human GABA(A) receptor beta3 subunit in insecticide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratra, G S; Kamita, S G; Casida, J E

    2001-05-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor is the target for the major insecticides alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil and for many analogs. Their action as chloride channel blockers is directly measured by binding studies with [(3)H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB). This study tests the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptor subunit composition determines the sensitivity and selectivity of insecticide toxicity. Human receptor subtypes were expressed individually (alpha1, alpha6, beta1, beta3, and gamma2) and in combination in insect Sf9 cells. Binding parameters were similar for [(3)H]EBOB in the beta3 homooligomer, alpha1beta3gamma2 heterooligomer, and native brain membranes, but toxicological profiles were very different. Surprisingly, alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil were all remarkably potent on the recombinant beta3 homooligomeric receptor (IC50 values of 0.5-2.4 nM), whereas they were similar in potency on the alpha1beta3gamma2 subtype (IC50 values of 16-33 nM) and highly selective on the native receptor (IC50 values of 7.3, 306, and 2470 nM, respectively). The selectivity order for 29 insecticides and convulsants as IC50 ratios for native/beta3 or alpha1beta3gamma2/beta3 was as follows: fipronil > lindane > 19 other insecticides including alpha-endosulfan and picrotoxinin > 4 trioxabicyclooctanes and dithianes (almost nonselective) > tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, 4-chlorophenylsilatrane, or alpha-thujone. Specificity between mammals and insects at the target site (fipronil > lindane > alpha-endosulfan) paralleled that for toxicity. Potency at the native receptor is more predictive for inhibition of GABA-stimulated chloride uptake than that at the beta3 or alpha1beta3gamma2 receptors. Therefore, the beta3 subunit contains the insecticide target and other subunits differentially modulate the binding to confer compound-dependent specificity and selective toxicity.

  10. Beta-blockers and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, John M

    2010-01-01

    , mainly, with beta-2 blockade and alpha-blockade. Thus non-selective (e.g. propranolol) or modestly beta-1 selective (e.g. metoprolol, atenolol) are associated with metabolic disturbance, bronchospasm, epinephrine/hypertensive interaction (with cigarette-smoking or insulin-induced hypoglycaemia), while the possession of alpha-blocking activity (e.g. carvedilol) is associated with dizziness and postural hypotension. The possession of beta-2 blockade, particularly if combined with alpha-blockade, is associated with an increased occurrence of sexual dysfunction. Lipophilic BB like propranolol and metoprolol appear in high concentrations in human brain tissue and are associated with side-effects such as insomnia, dreams and nightmares.

  11. (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G{sub 2}/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhães, Hemerson I.F. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Wilke, Diego V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Bezerra, Daniel P., E-mail: danielpbezerra@gmail.com [Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Cavalcanti, Bruno C. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas (Laboratório LP4), Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Pessoa, Claudia, E-mail: c_pessoa@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis.

  12. Live visualizations of single isolated tubulin protein self-assembly via tunneling current: effect of electromagnetic pumping during spontaneous growth of microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2014-12-01

    As we bring tubulin protein molecules one by one into the vicinity, they self-assemble and entire event we capture live via quantum tunneling. We observe how these molecules form a linear chain and then chains self-assemble into 2D sheet, an essential for microtubule, --fundamental nano-tube in a cellular life form. Even without using GTP, or any chemical reaction, but applying particular ac signal using specially designed antenna around atomic sharp tip we could carry out the self-assembly, however, if there is no electromagnetic pumping, no self-assembly is observed. In order to verify this atomic scale observation, we have built an artificial cell-like environment with nano-scale engineering and repeated spontaneous growth of tubulin protein to its complex with and without electromagnetic signal. We used 64 combinations of plant, animal and fungi tubulins and several doping molecules used as drug, and repeatedly observed that the long reported common frequency region where protein folds mechanically and its structures vibrate electromagnetically. Under pumping, the growth process exhibits a unique organized behavior unprecedented otherwise. Thus, ``common frequency point'' is proposed as a tool to regulate protein complex related diseases in the future.

  13. Mixed heterolobosean and novel gregarine lineage genes from culture ATCC 50646: Long-branch artefacts, not lateral gene transfer, distort α-tubulin phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Contradictory and confusing results can arise if sequenced 'monoprotist' samples really contain DNA of very different species. Eukaryote-wide phylogenetic analyses using five genes from the amoeboflagellate culture ATCC 50646 previously implied it was an undescribed percolozoan related to percolatean flagellates (Stephanopogon, Percolomonas). Contrastingly, three phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA alone, did not place it within Percolozoa, but as an isolated deep-branching excavate. I resolve that contradiction by sequence phylogenies for all five genes individually, using up to 652 taxa. Its 18S rRNA sequence (GQ377652) is near-identical to one from stained-glass windows, somewhat more distant from one from cooling-tower water, all three related to terrestrial actinocephalid gregarines Hoplorhynchus and Pyxinia. All four protein-gene sequences (Hsp90; α-tubulin; β-tubulin; actin) are from an amoeboflagellate heterolobosean percolozoan, not especially deeply branching. Contrary to previous conclusions from trees combining protein and rRNA sequences or rDNA trees including Eozoa only, this culture does not represent a major novel deep-branching eukaryote lineage distinct from Heterolobosea, and thus lacks special significance for deep eukaryote phylogeny, though the rDNA sequence is important for gregarine phylogeny. α-Tubulin trees for over 250 eukaryotes refute earlier suggestions of lateral gene transfer within eukaryotes, being largely congruent with morphology and other gene trees.

  14. Comparative Analyses of the β-Tubulin Gene and Molecular Modeling Reveal Molecular Insight into the Colchicine Resistance in Kinetoplastids Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Luis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential susceptibility to microtubule agents has been demonstrated between mammalian cells and kinetoplastid organisms such as Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma spp. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize the architecture of the putative colchicine binding site of Leishmania spp. and investigate the molecular basis of colchicine resistance. We cloned and sequenced the β-tubulin gene of Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis and established the theoretical 3D model of the protein, using the crystallographic structure of the bovine protein as template. We identified mutations on the Leishmania  β-tubulin gene sequences on regions related to the putative colchicine-binding pocket, which generate amino acid substitutions and changes in the topology of this region, blocking the access of colchicine. The same mutations were found in the β-tubulin sequence of kinetoplastid organisms such as Trypanosoma cruzi, T. brucei, and T. evansi. Using molecular modelling approaches, we demonstrated that conformational changes include an elongation and torsion of an α-helix structure and displacement to the inside of the pocket of one β-sheet that hinders access of colchicine. We propose that kinetoplastid organisms show resistance to colchicine due to amino acids substitutions that generate structural changes in the putative colchicine-binding domain, which prevent colchicine access.

  15. Brain peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  16. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolta, Malak G.; Williams, Byron B.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta-E), and immunoreactive insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) three days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for three days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolel acetic acid, while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta-E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta-E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta-E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  17. Estimating direction in brain-behavior interactions: Proactive and reactive brain states in driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier O; Brooks, Justin; Kerick, Scott; Johnson, Tony; Mullen, Tim R; Vettel, Jean M

    2017-02-22

    Conventional neuroimaging analyses have ascribed function to particular brain regions, exploiting the power of the subtraction technique in fMRI and event-related potential analyses in EEG. Moving beyond this convention, many researchers have begun exploring network-based neurodynamics and coordination between brain regions as a function of behavioral parameters or environmental statistics; however, most approaches average evoked activity across the experimental session to study task-dependent networks. Here, we examined on-going oscillatory activity as measured with EEG and use a methodology to estimate directionality in brain-behavior interactions. After source reconstruction, activity within specific frequency bands (delta: 2-3Hz; theta: 4-7Hz; alpha: 8-12Hz; beta: 13-25Hz) in a priori regions of interest was linked to continuous behavioral measurements, and we used a predictive filtering scheme to estimate the asymmetry between brain-to-behavior and behavior-to-brain prediction using a variant of Granger causality. We applied this approach to a simulated driving task and examined directed relationships between brain activity and continuous driving performance (steering behavior or vehicle heading error). Our results indicated that two neuro-behavioral states may be explored with this methodology: a Proactive brain state that actively plans the response to the sensory information and is characterized by delta-beta activity, and a Reactive brain state that processes incoming information and reacts to environmental statistics primarily within the alpha band.

  18. α1-Tubulin FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and conidiation in Fusarium asiaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiqun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Zheng, Jingwu; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-04-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Fusarium asiaticum contains two homologous genes FaTUA1 and FaTUA2 encoding α-tubulins. In this study, we found that FaTUA2 was dispensable for vegetative growth and sporulation in F. asiaticum. The deletion of FaTUA1 however led to dramatically reduced mycelial growth, twisted hyphae and abnormal nuclei in apical cells of hyphae. The FaTUA1 deletion mutant (ΔFaTuA1-5) also showed a significant decrease in conidiation, and produced abnormal conidia. Pathogenicity assays showed that ΔFaTuA1-5 exhibited decreased virulence on wheat head. Unexpectedly, the deletion of FaTUA1 led to resistance to high temperatures. In addition, ΔFaTuA2 showed increased sensitivity to carbendazim. Furthermore, increased FaTUA2 expression in ΔFaTuA1-5 partially restored the defects of the mutant in mycelial growth, conidial production and virulence, vice versa, increased FaTUA1 expression in the FaTUA2 deletion mutant also partially relieved the defect of the mutant in the delay of conidial germination. Taken together, these results indicate that FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and development, and the functions of FaTuA1 and FaTuA2 are partially interchangeable in F. asiaticum.

  19. Nephridial and gonoduct distribution patterns in Nerillidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) examined by tubulin staining and cLSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Müller, Monika C M

    2004-09-01

    The distribution and configuration of nephridia and gonoducts are described for seven species from seven genera of the interstitial polychaete family Nerillidae. The ciliated nephridia and gonoducts were identified by tubulin staining and examined with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The following species of the seven to nine-segmented nerillids were examined: Leptonerilla prospera, Nerilla antennata (nine segments); Nerillidium mediterraneum, Trochonerilla mobilis, Gen. sp. A (eight segments); and Aristonerilla brevis, Paranerilla limicola (seven segments). Two of the examined species are hermaphroditic (N. mediterraneum and Gen. sp. A). Segmented nephridia can be found from the first to the last segment, with a total of two to five pairs. One to three pairs of segmented spermioducts are present in all species. One pair of gonoducts is found in all species, except for P. limicola, where they are absent. Nephridia vary in length from half to almost twice the length of a segment and may be curled up in loops. In A. brevis and P. limicola the nephridia are discontinuously ciliated. The distribution and configuration of spermioducts and gonoducts are also variable, although to a lesser extent. The spermioduct distribution is generally consistent within genera and therefore of systematic significance. Nephridia and gonoducts are never found together in the same segments, and the results indicate that gonoducts and nephridia have developed from the same anlagen. The distribution patterns of nephridia and gonoducts are discussed with respect to segmentation, systematics, and development.

  20. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J. [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  1. Dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources; Dosimetria de fuentes {beta} extensas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Lallena R, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of {beta} extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  2. Evolution of outer membrane beta-barrels from an ancestral beta beta hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, M; Biegert, A; Linke, D; Lupas, A N; Söding, J

    2010-06-01

    Outer membrane beta-barrels (OMBBs) are the major class of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and plastids. Their transmembrane domains consist of 8-24 beta-strands forming a closed, barrel-shaped beta-sheet around a central pore. Despite their obvious structural regularity, evidence for an origin by duplication or for a common ancestry has not been found. We use three complementary approaches to show that all OMBBs from Gram-negative bacteria evolved from a single, ancestral beta beta hairpin. First, we link almost all families of known single-chain bacterial OMBBs with each other through transitive profile searches. Second, we identify a clear repeat signature in the sequences of many OMBBs in which the repeating sequence unit coincides with the structural beta beta hairpin repeat. Third, we show that the observed sequence similarity between OMBB hairpins cannot be explained by structural or membrane constraints on their sequences. The third approach addresses a longstanding problem in protein evolution: how to distinguish between a very remotely homologous relationship and the opposing scenario of "sequence convergence." The origin of a diverse group of proteins from a single hairpin module supports the hypothesis that, around the time of transition from the RNA to the protein world, proteins arose by amplification and recombination of short peptide modules that had previously evolved as cofactors of RNAs.

  3. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  4. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  5. Beta amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau deposits in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy, J.; Miller, L.; Qing, H.; Radenovic, A.; Kis, A.; Vileno, B.; Laszlo, F.; Martins, R.N.; Waeber, G.; Mooser, V.; Bosman, F.; Khalili, K.; Darbinian, N.; McGeer, P.L.

    2008-08-25

    Strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes. To determine if amyloid beta (A{beta}) and hyperphosphorylated tau occurs in type 2 diabetes, pancreas tissues from 21 autopsy cases (10 type 2 diabetes and 11 controls) were analyzed. APP and tau mRNAs were identified in human pancreas and in cultured insulinoma beta cells (INS-1) by RT-PCR. Prominent APP and tau bands were detected by Western blotting in pancreatic extracts. Aggregated A{beta}, hyperphosphorylated tau, ubiquitin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein(a), IB1/JIP-1 and JNK1 were detected in Langerhans islets in type 2 diabetic patients. A{beta} was co-localized with amylin in islet amyloid deposits. In situ beta sheet formation of islet amyloid deposits was shown by infrared microspectroscopy (SIRMS). LPS increased APP in non-neuronal cells as well. We conclude that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau are also associated with type 2 diabetes, highlighting common pathogenetic features in neurodegenerative disorders, including AD and type 2 diabetes and suggesting that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau may also occur in other organs than the brain.

  6. MALDI, AP/MALDI and ESI techniques for the MS detection of amyloid [beta]-peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Mineo, Placido; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Amyloid [beta]-peptides (A[beta]s) are involved in several neuropathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and considerable experimental evidences have emerged indicating that different proteases play a major role in regulating the accumulation of A[beta]s in the brain. Particularly, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been shown to degrade A[beta]s at different cleavage sites, but the experimental results reported in the literature and obtained by mass spectrometry methods are somehow fragmentary. The detection of A[beta]s is often complicated by solubility issues, oxidation artifacts and spontaneous aggregation/cleavage and, in order to rationalize the different reported results, we analyzed A[beta]s solutions by three different MS approaches: matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI ion trap and electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap. Differences in the obtained results are discussed and ESI is chosen as the most suitable MS method for A[beta]s detection. Finally, cleavage sites produced by interaction of A[beta]s with IDE are identified, two of which had never been reported in the literature.

  7. Late effects of enriched environment (EE) plus multimodal early onset stimulation (MEOS) after traumatic brain injury in rats: Ongoing improvement of neuromotor function despite sustained volume of the CNS lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert-Gruener, Marcela; Maegele, Marc; Garbe, Janika; Angelov, Doychin N

    2007-01-01

    Recently we showed that the combination between MEOS and EE applied to rats for 7-15 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was associated with reduced CNS lesion volume and enhanced reversal of neuromotor dysfunction. In a continuation of this work, we tested whether these effects persisted for longer post-operative periods, e.g. 30 days post-injury (dpi). Rats were subjected to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) or to sham injury. After LFP, one third of the animals (injured and sham) was placed under conditions of standard housing (SH), one third was kept in EE-only, and one third received EE+MEOS. Standardized composite neuroscore (NS) for neurological functions and computerized analysis of the vibrissal motor performance were used to assess post-traumatic neuromotor deficits. These were followed by evaluation of the cortical lesion volume (CLV) after immunostaining for neuron-specific enolase, caspase 3 active, and GFAP. Finally, the volume of cortical lesion containing regeneration-associated proteins (CLV-RAP) was determined in sections stained for GAP-43, MAP2, and neuronal class III beta-tubulin. We found (i) no differences in the vibrissal motor performance; (ii) EE+MEOS rats performed significantly better than SH rats in NS; (iii) EE-only and EE+MEOS animals, but not SH rats, showed better recovery at 30 dpi than at 15 dpi; (iv) no differences among all groups in CLV (larger than that at 15 dpi) and CLV-RAP, despite a clear tendency to reduction in the EE-only and EE+MEOS rats. We conclude that EE+MEOS retards, but cannot prevent the increase of lesion volume. This retardation is sufficient for a continuous restoration of neurological functions.