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Sample records for brain arachidonic acid

  1. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  2. Maternal and fetal brain contents of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) at various essential fatty acid (EFA), DHA and AA dietary intakes during pregnancy in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Saskia A; Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Fokkema, M Rebecca; van der Iest, Theo Hans; Muskiet, Frits A J

    We investigated essential fatty acids (EFA) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCP) in maternal and fetal brain as a function of EFA/LCP availability to the feto-maternal unit in mice. Diets varying in parent EFA, arachidonic acid (AA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were administered from

  3. Arachidonic Acid Induces ARE/Nrf2-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Transcription in Rat Brain Astrocytes.

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    Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chien-Chung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2017-05-11

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a major product of phospholipid hydrolysis catalyzed by phospholipase A2 during neurodegenerative diseases. AA exerts as a second messenger to regulate various signaling components which may be involved in different pathophysiological processes. Astrocytes are the main types of CNS resident cells which maintain and support the physiological function of brain. AA has been shown to induce ROS generation through activation of NADPH oxidases (Noxs) which may play a key role in the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the mechanisms underlying AA-induced HO-1 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1). We found that AA induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity in RBA-1, which was mediated through the synthesis of 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin D2-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) receptors. This note was confirmed by transfection with PPARγ small interfering RNAs (siRNA) which attenuated the AA-mediated responses. AA-induced HO-1 expression was mediated through Nox/ROS generation, which was inhibited by Nox inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and ROS scavengers (N-acetyl cysteine). Moreover, AA-induced HO-1 expression was mediated through phosphorylation of Src, Pyk2, platelet-derived growth factor, PI3K/Akt, and ERK1/2 which were inhibited by the pharmacological inhibitors including PP1, PF431396, AG1296, LY294002, and U0126 or by transfection with respective siRNAs. AA-enhanced Nrf2 expression and HO-1 promoter activity was inhibited by transfection with Nrf2 siRNA or by these pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that Nrf2 and PPARγ were associated with the proximal antioxidant response element (ARE)-binding site on HO-1 promoter, suggesting that Nrf2/PPARγ are key transcription factors modulating HO-1 expression. AA-induced ARE promoter activity was also reduced by these

  4. Coordination of gene expression of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid cascade enzymes during human brain development and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica H Ryan

    Full Text Available The polyunsaturated arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids (AA and DHA participate in cell membrane synthesis during neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, and neurotransmission throughout life. Each is metabolized via coupled enzymatic reactions within separate but interacting metabolic cascades.AA and DHA pathway genes are coordinately expressed and underlie cascade interactions during human brain development and aging.The BrainCloud database for human non-pathological prefrontal cortex gene expression was used to quantify postnatal age changes in mRNA expression of 34 genes involved in AA and DHA metabolism.Expression patterns were split into Development (0 to 20 years and Aging (21 to 78 years intervals. Expression of genes for cytosolic phospholipases A2 (cPLA2, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and -2, and other AA cascade enzymes, correlated closely with age during Development, less so during Aging. Expression of DHA cascade enzymes was less inter-correlated in each period, but often changed in the opposite direction to expression of AA cascade genes. Except for the PLA2G4A (cPLA2 IVA and PTGS2 (COX-2 genes at 1q25, highly inter-correlated genes were at distant chromosomal loci.Coordinated age-related gene expression during the brain Development and Aging intervals likely underlies coupled changes in enzymes of the AA and DHA cascades and largely occur through distant transcriptional regulation. Healthy brain aging does not show upregulation of PLA2G4 or PTGS2 expression, which was found in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Coordination of Gene Expression of Arachidonic and Docosahexaenoic Acid Cascade Enzymes during Human Brain Development and Aging

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    Ryan, Veronica H.; Primiani, Christopher T.; Rao, Jagadeesh S.; Ahn, Kwangmi; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Blanchard, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background The polyunsaturated arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids (AA and DHA) participate in cell membrane synthesis during neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, and neurotransmission throughout life. Each is metabolized via coupled enzymatic reactions within separate but interacting metabolic cascades. Hypothesis AA and DHA pathway genes are coordinately expressed and underlie cascade interactions during human brain development and aging. Methods The BrainCloud database for human non-pathological prefrontal cortex gene expression was used to quantify postnatal age changes in mRNA expression of 34 genes involved in AA and DHA metabolism. Results Expression patterns were split into Development (0 to 20 years) and Aging (21 to 78 years) intervals. Expression of genes for cytosolic phospholipases A2 (cPLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-1 and -2, and other AA cascade enzymes, correlated closely with age during Development, less so during Aging. Expression of DHA cascade enzymes was less inter-correlated in each period, but often changed in the opposite direction to expression of AA cascade genes. Except for the PLA2G4A (cPLA2 IVA) and PTGS2 (COX-2) genes at 1q25, highly inter-correlated genes were at distant chromosomal loci. Conclusions Coordinated age-related gene expression during the brain Development and Aging intervals likely underlies coupled changes in enzymes of the AA and DHA cascades and largely occur through distant transcriptional regulation. Healthy brain aging does not show upregulation of PLA2G4 or PTGS2 expression, which was found in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24963629

  6. Effects of chronic clozapine administration on markers of arachidonic acid cascade and synaptic integrity in rat brain

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    Cheon, Yewon; Modi, Hiren R.; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Rao, Jagadeesh S.

    2012-01-01

    The mode of action of clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic approved for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) mania, remains unclear. We tested for overlap with the actions of the mood stabilizers, lithium, carbamazepine and valproate, which downregulate arachidonic acid (AA) cascade markers in rat brain and upregulate BDNF. AA cascade markers are upregulated in the postmortem BD brain in association with neuroinflammation and synaptic loss, while BDNF is decreased. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with a therapeutically relevant dose of clozapine (10 mg/kg/day) or with saline for 30 days, and AA cascade and synaptic markers and BDNF were measured in the brain. Compared with saline-injected rats, chronic clozapine increased brain activity, mRNA and protein levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-selective calcium-independent phospholipase A2 type VIA (iPLA2), mRNA and protein levels of BDNF and of the postsynaptic marker, drebrin, while decreasing cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a proinflammatory AA metabolite. Activity and expression of AA-selective calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 type IVA and of secretory sPLA2 Type II were unchanged. These results show overlap with effects of mood stabilizers with regard to downregulation of COX activity and PGE2 and to increased BDNF, and suggest a common action against the reported neuropathology of BD. Additionally, the increased iPLA2 expression following clozapine suggests increased production of anti-inflammatory DHA metabolites, consistent with reports that dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation is beneficial in BD. PMID:22414961

  7. Traumatic brain injury causes platelet adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid receptor inhibition independent of hemorrhagic shock in humans and rats.

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    Castellino, Francis J; Chapman, Michael P; Donahue, Deborah L; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest E; Wohlauer, Max V; Fritz, Braxton; Yount, Robert; Ploplis, Victoria; Davis, Patrick; Evans, Edward; Walsh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is a well-established phenomenon, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Various studies implicate protein C activation related to the global insult of hemorrhagic shock or brain tissue factor release with resultant platelet dysfunction and depletion of coagulation factors. We hypothesized that the platelet dysfunction of CTBI is a distinct phenomenon from the coagulopathy following hemorrhagic shock. We used thrombelastography with platelet mapping as a measure of platelet function, assessing the degree of inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) receptor pathways. First, we studied the early effect of TBI on platelet inhibition by performing thrombelastography with platelet mapping on rats. We then conducted an analysis of admission blood samples from trauma patients with isolated head injury (n = 70). Patients in shock or on clopidogrel or aspirin were excluded. In rats, ADP receptor inhibition at 15 minutes after injury was 77.6% ± 6.7% versus 39.0% ± 5.3% for controls (p injury in patients with isolated head trauma. This phenomenon is observed in the absence of hemorrhagic shock or multisystem injury. Thus, TBI alone is shown to be sufficient to induce a profound platelet dysfunction.

  8. Arachidonic Acid and Prostaglandins Enhance Potassium-Stimulated Calcium InFlux into Rat Brain Synaptosomes

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    1990-03-02

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  9. Dietary arachidonic acid in perinatal nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Fewtrell, Mary; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is supplied together with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in infant formulas, but we have limited knowledge about the effects of supplementation with either of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on growth and developmental outcomes. AA is present in similar lev...

  10. Mechanism of arachidonic acid action on syntaxin-Munc18.

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    Connell, Emma; Darios, Frédéric; Broersen, Kerensa; Gatsby, Naomi; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Rickman, Colin; Davletov, Bazbek

    2007-04-01

    Syntaxin and Munc18 are, in tandem, essential for exocytosis in all eukaryotes. Recently, it was shown that Munc18 inhibition of neuronal syntaxin 1 can be overcome by arachidonic acid, indicating that this common second messenger acts to disrupt the syntaxin-Munc18 interaction. Here, we show that arachidonic acid can stimulate syntaxin 1 alone, indicating that it is syntaxin 1 that undergoes a structural change in the syntaxin 1-Munc18 complex. Arachidonic acid is incapable of dissociating Munc18 from syntaxin 1 and, crucially, Munc18 remains associated with syntaxin 1 after arachidonic-acid-induced syntaxin 1 binding to synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP25). We also show that the same principle operates in the case of the ubiquitous syntaxin 3 isoform, highlighting the conserved nature of the mechanism of arachidonic acid action. Neuronal soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) can be isolated from brain membranes in a complex with endogenous Munc18, consistent with a proposed function of Munc18 in vesicle docking and fusion.

  11. Mechanism of arachidonic acid action on syntaxin–Munc18

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    Connell, Emma; Darios, Frédéric; Broersen, Kerensa; Gatsby, Naomi; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Rickman, Colin; Davletov, Bazbek

    2007-01-01

    Syntaxin and Munc18 are, in tandem, essential for exocytosis in all eukaryotes. Recently, it was shown that Munc18 inhibition of neuronal syntaxin 1 can be overcome by arachidonic acid, indicating that this common second messenger acts to disrupt the syntaxin–Munc18 interaction. Here, we show that arachidonic acid can stimulate syntaxin 1 alone, indicating that it is syntaxin 1 that undergoes a structural change in the syntaxin 1–Munc18 complex. Arachidonic acid is incapable of dissociating Munc18 from syntaxin 1 and, crucially, Munc18 remains associated with syntaxin 1 after arachidonic-acid-induced syntaxin 1 binding to synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP25). We also show that the same principle operates in the case of the ubiquitous syntaxin 3 isoform, highlighting the conserved nature of the mechanism of arachidonic acid action. Neuronal soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) can be isolated from brain membranes in a complex with endogenous Munc18, consistent with a proposed function of Munc18 in vesicle docking and fusion. PMID:17363971

  12. Exogenous arachidonic acid mediates permeability of human brain microvessel endothelial cells through prostaglandin E2 activation of EP3 and EP4 receptors.

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    Dalvi, Siddhartha; Nguyen, Hieu H; On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan W; Aukema, Harold M; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Arachidonic acid (ARA; 5,8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) is a conditionally essential polyunsaturated fatty acid [20:4(n-6)] and is a major constituent of brain lipids. The current study examined the transport processes for ARA in confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Addition of radioactive ARA to the apical compartment of HBMEC cultured on Transwell(®) inserts resulted in rapid incorporation of radioactivity into the basolateral medium. Knock down of fatty acid transport proteins did not alter ARA passage into the basolateral medium as a result of the rapid generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an eicosanoid known to facilitate opening of the blood-brain barrier. Permeability following ARA or PGE2 exposure was confirmed by an increased movement of fluorescein-labeled dextran from apical to basolateral medium. ARA-mediated permeability was attenuated by specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. EP3 and EP4 receptor antagonists attenuated the ARA-mediated permeability of HBMEC. The results indicate that ARA increases permeability of HBMEC monolayers likely via increased production of PGE2 which acts upon EP3 and EP4 receptors to mediate permeability. These observations may explain the rapid influx of ARA into the brain previously observed upon plasma infusion with ARA. The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is a restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Radiolabeled arachidonic acid (ARA) movement across, and monolayer permeability in the presence of ARA, was examined in confluent monolayers of primary human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) cultured on Transwell(®) plates. Incubation of HBMECs with ARA resulted in a rapid increase in HBMEC monolayer permeability. The mechanism was mediated, in part

  13. Transient postnatal fluoxetine decreases brain concentrations of 20-HETE and 15-epi-LXA4, arachidonic acid metabolites in adult mice.

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    Yuan, Zhi-Xin; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-10-01

    Transient postnatal exposure of rodents to the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine alters behavior and brain 5-HT neurotransmission during adulthood, and also reduces brain arachidonic (ARA) metabolic consumption and protein level of the ARA metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P4504A (CYP4A). Brain 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), converted by CYP4A from ARA, will be reduced in adult mice treated transiently and postnatally with fluoxetine. Male mice pups were injected i.p. daily with fluoxetine (10mg/kg) or saline during P4-P21. At P90 their brain was high-energy microwaved and analyzed for 20-HETE and six other ARA metabolites by enzyme immunoassay. Postnatal fluoxetine vs. saline significantly decreased brain concentrations of 20-HETE (-70.3%) and 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (-60%) in adult mice, but did not change other eicosanoid concentrations. Behavioral changes in adult mice treated postnatally with fluoxetine may be related to reduced brain ARA metabolism involving CYP4A and 20-HETE formation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Arachidonic acid metabolites in pathogenic yeasts

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    Ells Ruan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although most of what is known about the biology and function of arachidonic acid metabolites comes from the study of mammalian biology, these compounds can also be produced by lower eukaryotes, including yeasts and other fungi. It is also in this group of organisms that the least is known about the metabolic pathways leading to the production of these compounds as well as the functions of these compounds in the biology of fungi and yeasts. This review will deal with the discovery of oxylipins from polyunsaturated fatty acids, and more specifically the arachidonic acid derived eicosanoids, such as 3-hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid, prostaglandin F2α and prostaglandin E2, in yeasts starting in the early 1990s. This review will also focus on what is known about the metabolic pathways and/or proteins involved in the production of these compounds in pathogenic yeasts. The possible roles of these compounds in the biology, including the pathology, of these organisms will be discussed.

  15. New uses of bioglycerin: production of arachidonic acid

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    Filamentous fungi of the genus Mortierella are known to produce arachidonic acid from glucose and M. alpina is currently used in industrial scale production of arachidonic acid in Japan. In anticipation of a large excess of co-product bioglycerin from the national biodiesel program, we would like ...

  16. Cytochalasins inhibit arachidonic acid metabolism in thrombin-stimulated platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Siess, W; Lapetina, E G; Cuatrecasas, P

    1982-01-01

    Low concentrations (0.5-1 microM) of cytochalasins inhibit the thrombin-stimulated polymerization of monomeric actin to filamentous actin in platelets. Similar concentrations of cytochalasin B inhibit the formation and metabolism of arachidonic acid in horse platelets stimulated by low concentrations of thrombin (0.1-0.5 unit/ml). However, the release of serotonin is not inhibited by cytochalasin B. Cytochalasins B and D (0.5-1 microM) markedly reduce, in thrombin-stimulated human or horse pl...

  17. Study of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Human Bladder Tumor

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    Masahide Matsuyama

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies and animal experiments have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX is the principal target of NSAIDs. COX is the first oxidase in the process of prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid. COX enzyme may be involved in the initiation and/or the promotion of tumorigenesis due to NSAIDs inhibition of COX. Lipoxygenase (LOX is also an initial enzyme in the pathway for producing leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. Similar to COX, LOX enzyme may also be involved in the initiation and/or promotion of tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator activator-receptor (PPAR-γ is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily. PPAR-γ plays a role in both adipocyte differentiation and tumorigenesis. PPAR-γ is one target for cell growth modulation of NSAIDs. In this review, we report the expression of COX-2, LOX and PPAR-γ in human bladder tumor tissues as well as the effects of COX-2 and LOX inhibitors and PPAR-γ ligand.

  18. Study of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Human Bladder Tumor

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    Masahide Matsuyama

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies and animal experiments have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX is the principal target of NSAIDs. COX is the first oxidase in the process of prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid. COX enzyme may be involved in the initiation and/or the promotion of tumorigenesis due to NSAIDs inhibition of COX. Lipoxygenase (LOX is also an initial enzyme in the pathway for producing leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. Similar to COX, LOX enzyme may also be involved in the initiation and/or promotion of tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator activator-receptor (PPAR-γ is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily. PPAR-γ plays a role in both adipocyte differentiation and tumorigenesis. PPAR-γ is one target for cell growth modulation of NSAIDs. In this review, we report the expression of COX-2, LOX and PPAR-γ in human bladder tumor tissues as well as the effects of COX-2 and LOX inhibitors and PPAR-γ ligand.

  19. Flavonolignans inhibit the arachidonic acid pathway in blood platelets.

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    Bijak, Michal; Saluk-Bijak, Joanna

    2017-08-10

    Arachidonic acid metabolism by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a major pathway for blood platelets' activation, which is associated with pro-thrombotic platelet activity and the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Inhibition of COX activity is one of the major means of anti-platelet pharmacotherapy preventing arterial thrombosis and reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events. Recent studies have presented that a silymarin (standardized extract of Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)) can inhibit the COX pathway. Accordingly, the aim of our study was to determine the effects of three major flavonolignans (silybin, silychristin and silydianin) on COX pathway activity in blood platelets. We determined the effect of flavonolignans on arachidonic acid induced blood platelet aggregation, COX pathway metabolites formation, as well as COX activity in platelets. Additionally, we analysed the potential mechanism of this interaction using the bioinformatic ligand docking method. We observed that tested compounds decrease the platelet aggregation level, both thromboxane A2 and malondialdehyde formation, as well as inhibit the COX activity. The strongest effect was observed for silychristin and silybin. In our in silico study we showed that silychristin and silybin have conformations which interact with the active COX site as competitive inhibitors, blocking the possibility of substrate binding. The results obtained from this study clearly present the potential of flavonolignans as novel antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory agents.

  20. Arachidonic acid enhances reproduction in Daphnia magna and mitigates changes in sex ratios induced by pyriproxyfen.

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    Ginjupalli, Gautam K; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2015-03-01

    Arachidonic acid is 1 of only 2 unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. The authors hypothesized that, as a key fatty acid, arachidonic acid may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with arachidonic acid indicate that it alters female:male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata diet. Next, the authors tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (Chlorella vulgaris) with arachidonic acid enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. Arachidonic acid enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 µM and 4.0 µM by 30% to 40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that arachidonic acid is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, the data indicate that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of arachidonic acid needed for reproduction. Diet-switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some, but not all, of arachidonic acid's effects when compared with a C. vulgaris-only diet, suggesting that some arachidonic acid provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, arachidonic acid supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in arachidonic acid may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist pyriproxyfen. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:527-535. © 2014 SETAC. © 2014 SETAC.

  1. Ferrous iron mediated oxidation of arachidonic acid: studies employing nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

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    Peterson, D A; Gerrard, J M; Rao, G H; Krick, T P; White, J G

    1978-10-01

    The oxidation of arachidonic acid by ferrous sulfate provides a useful model to study the role of iron in lipid oxidation reactions. We have employed nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) in the present investigation to evaluate the mechanism of this reaction. In the presence of arachidonic acid, Fe +++, and O2, the yellow dye NBT was rapidly reduced to the blue form, NBTH2. The molar ratio of arachidonic acid to Fe++ in this rapid reaction was 1:1, showing an interaction of one fatty acid molecule per iron molecule. Approximately one molecule of NBT was reduced per four molecules of arachidonic acid and Fe++. Reduction of NBT was accompanied by oxidation of Fe++ to Fe+++, suggesting the transfer of four electrons from the Fe++ to NBT to reduce the dye. Arachidonic acid was found to be unchanged when extracted at the end of the reaction, indicating formation of a complex that could dissociate leaving intact arachidonic acid. Evidence for the presence of such a complex which slowly dissociates during the reaction was obtained after longer incubations with small amounts of arachidonic acid. NBT reduction was not inhibited by agents which hydrolyze superoxide, by catalase or by agents which trap hydroxy radicals. We, therefore, propose a model in which NBT traps a radical generated on the arachidonic acid molecule. The proposed model suggests mechanisms for other fatty acid oxidation reactions such as prostaglandin and hydroperoxy fatty acid synthesis.

  2. Human milk arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents increase following supplementation during pregnancy and lactation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Saskia A.; Dijick-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Doornbos, Bennard; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Schaafsma, Anne; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; Djick-Brouwer, D.A.J.

    Introduction: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are important for neurodevelopment. Maternal diet influences milk DHA, whereas milk AA seems rather constant. We investigated milk AA, DHA and DHA/AA after supplementation of AA plus DHA, or DHA alone during pregnancy and lactation.

  3. Intrauterine, postpartum and adult relationships between arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Remko S.; Luxwolda, Martine F.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) fatty acid compositions from populations with stable dietary habits but large variations in RBC-arachidonic (AA) and RBC-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) provided us with insight into relationships between DHA and AA. It also enabled us to estimate the maternal RBC-DHA (mRBC-DHA) status

  4. Niacin Sensitivity and the Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Schizophrenia

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    Messamore, Erik; Hoffman, William F.; Yao, Jeffrey K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Schizophrenia is associated with a blunted flush response to niacin. Since niacin-induced skin flushing is mediated by vasodilators derived from arachidonic acid (AA), we tested whether the blunted flush response to niacin is a marker of AA deficiency. Methods Eight concentrations of methylnicotinate were applied to the forearms of 20 adults with schizophrenia and 20 controls. Laser Doppler measurement of blood flow responses was used to derive values for niacin sensitivity (defined as the concentration eliciting half-maximal response, i.e., EC50 value) and efficacy (defined as the maximal evoked blood flow response). RBC membrane fatty acids were analyzed by gas chromatography. Results Niacin sensitivity and efficacy were reduced in schizophrenia. In the control group, there was significant correlation between AA levels and niacin sensitivity as well as a trend toward correlation between AA levels and niacin efficacy. In contrast, neither sensitivity nor efficacy of niacin correlated with AA levels in schizophrenia. An expected correlation between the levels of AA and its elongation product (adrenic acid) was absent in schizophrenia. Adrenic acid levels correlated with niacin efficacy in schizophrenia. Conclusions The schizophrenia-associated niacin response abnormality involves both diminished sensitivity and reduced efficacy. The lack of expected correlation between levels of AA and adrenic acid suggests homeostatic imbalance within the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) pathway in schizophrenia. Though AA levels were unrelated to measures of niacin response in schizophrenia, the correlation between adrenic acid and niacin efficacy in schizophrenia suggests relevance of the n-6 PUFA pathway to the blunted niacin response. PMID:20417059

  5. DMPD: Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10080535 Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activ...on of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. PubmedID 10080535 Title Regulation ...of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. Authors Gij

  6. Arachidonic acid production by Mortierella alpina using raw crop materials.

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    Cao, Ganggang; Guan, Zhengbing; Liu, Feixian G; Liao, Xiangru; Cai, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) is one of the three essential fatty acids, and it is important for human body to keep healthy and is widely used. At present, expensive materials such as glucose and yeast extract are generally reported to be optimal for ARA production. A new cost-effective fermentation process including cheaper material for ARA production is of great significance. Feasibility of using corn meal and powdered soybean for fungal growth and lipid accumulation was evaluated by means of single factor test. N-hexadecane concentration was optimized, and the effect of temperature on biomass and ARA content was examined. Mortierella alpina made better use of the aforementioned material as carbon and nitrogen sources for both hyphae growth and ARA production compared with glucose and yeast extract. Maximal levels of 10.9 g/L ARA and 26.1 g/L total lipids were obtained when 66 g/L corn meal, 54 g/L soybean meal and 6% (v/v) n-hexadecane were supplemented. A temperature-shift strategy involved three steps, namely, 30°C (3 days) - 25°C (4 days) - 20°C (4 days), which further improved ARA production by 24.7%. Several factors such as carbon and nitrogen sources, temperature and dissolved oxygen had great influence on biomass and microbial oil production. Mortierella alpina preferred corn and soybean meal compared with glucose and yeast extract, which would surely alleviate the high cost of ARA production. Based on this study, the new process is both low cost and practicable.

  7. Relation between Ocular Comfort, Arachidonic Acid Mediators, and Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Simin; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Contact lenses are associated with discomfort during wear. This may be the result of stimulation of the ocular surface and production of pro-inflammatory mediators which are then released into the tears. This study examined changes in the concentration in tears of arachidonic acid metabolites (AAM) prostaglandins, cysteinyl leukotrienes, and resolvin-D1, as well as histamine in a general contact lens population in the morning and evening. Tears were collected twice a day (morning and evening) for up to 10 days on two different occasions (with and without contact lens wear) from 30 experienced contact lens wearers for analysis of AAM and a separate group (N = 33) for analysis of histamine. Ocular comfort was rated subjectively on an ordinal scale at each time of tear collection. Tears were analyzed using commercial immunoassay-based kits. Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed model test. Ocular comfort decreased from morning to evening with and without contact lenses (p = 0.001), and the difference in comfort in the evening was greater with contact lens wear (80.9 ± 16.2 vs. 75.5 ± 16.8; p = 0.008). The total concentration of PGs (10.7 ± 10.8 ng/ml), cysteinyl leukotrienes (8.7 ± 0.38 ng/ml), resolvin-D1 (1.6 ± 0.5 ng/ml), or histamine 13.8 ± 10.4 ng/ml) did not change during the day or during contact lens wear (p > 0.05). Prostaglandins, cysteinyl leukotrienes, resolvin-D1, or histamine concentrations did not alter in relation to changes in comfort of the eye during the day or during contact lens wear. These results suggest that release of these mediators is not responsible for contact lens discomfort.

  8. Production of Arachidonic Acid by Mortierella alpina I49-N18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Arachidonic acid (AA, an essential fatty acid in human body, fermented by Mortierella alpina I49-N18 was investigated in a shake-flask, and a 50-ton fermentor. In order to optimize the culture conditions, the effects of temperature, initial pH, culture time, carbon and nitrogen sources were studied. Furthermore, the way of adding sugar during fermentation was evaluated in a 50-ton fermentor. Under the optimum culture conditions, arachidonic acid produced in shake-flask and 50-ton fermentor was 4.55 and 5.11 g/L media, respectively. It was shown that the highest percentage of AA in lipids in shake-flask and 50-ton fermentor reached 70.20 and 53.01 %, respectively. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry tests showed that the oil contained 80 % of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid, γ-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid.

  9. Adipose tissue arachidonic acid and the metabolic syndrome in Costa Rican adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Eric S; Baylin, Ana; Campos, Hannia

    2007-08-01

    Arachidonic acid, a precursor to a series of inflammatory mediators, may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. We examined the association between adipose tissue arachidonic acid and the metabolic syndrome in Costa Rica, a country in which the metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent. The 484 study participants each provided a fasting blood sample and an adipose tissue biopsy that was analyzed for fatty acid composition. Criteria for the metabolic syndrome were those established in the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel. The data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Subjects with greater adipose tissue arachidonic acid content had an increasing risk of the metabolic syndrome across quintiles: odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.00; 1.51 (0.78-2.91); 2.40 (1.26-4.55); 3.50 (1.84-6.66); and 6.01 (3.11-11.61); test for trend, P<0.0001, after adjustment for age, gender and area of residence. Further adjustment for metabolic risk factors, including adipose fatty acids and body mass index, did not significantly modify the result. Adipose tissue arachidonic acid was also independently associated with abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, elevated fasting glucose, and high blood pressure. This study identifies arachidonic acid as an important independent marker of metabolic dysregulation. A better understanding of the role of this fatty acid in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is warranted.

  10. Effect of supplementation of arachidonic acid (AA) or a combination of AA plus docosahexaenoic acid on breastmilk fatty acid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Koopmann, M; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    We investigated whether supplementation with arachidonic acid (20:4 omega 6; AA), ora combination of AA and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3; DHA) would affect human milk polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition. Ten women were daily supplemented with 300 mg AA, eight with 300 mg AA, 110 mg

  11. Prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status : the importance of a balanced intake of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    This review addresses the effect of prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status on neuro-developmental outcome. It focuses on the major LPCUFA doxosahexaenoic acid (DNA; 22:6 omega 3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4 omega 6). Due to enzymatic competition high DHA intake results in

  12. Arachidonic acid intestinal absorption: mechanism of transport and influence of luminal factors of absorption in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S L; Hollander, D

    1978-11-01

    The mechanism and characteristics of intestinal absorption of arachidonic acid were studied in vitro using everted intestinal sacs of the rat. Arachidonic acid absorption was studied at concentrations of 5 micron to 8.36 mM. The plot of absorption rate vs. concentration fitted best to a rectangular hyperbola at low micron concentrations and to a straight linear relationship in the mM range of concentrations. Metabolic inhibitors and uncouplers did not change absorption in either range of concentrations. The absorption of arachidonic acid increased with thinning of the unstirred water-layer, decrease in the pH, or the substitution of sodium taurocholate by Pluronic F 68 OR Tween 80. Absorption decreased following the equimolar additions of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. Absorption rate did not change when the taurocholate concentration was varied from 5-15 mM or following the additions of butyric or glutamic acids, leucine, lysine, or dextrose. It was concluded that arachidonic acid is absorbed by a concentration-dependent dual mechanism of transport which is not energy dependent. At the low micron range of concentrations, facilitated diffusion is predominant, while at mM concentrations, simple diffusion is the dominant mechanism of absorption. Changes in the intestinal fluid composition, flow rate, and pH can modify the rate of absorption of arachidonic acid.

  13. The stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism in human platelets by hydrodynamic stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Sridhar; Mcintire, Larry V.; Hall, Elizabeth R.; Wu, Kenneth K.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of stimulating human platelets by thrombin and by hydrodynamic stresses on the platelets' arachidonic acid metabolism were investigated using (1-C-14)-arachidonic acid label and a specially designed viscometer that ensured laminar shear flow with a nearly uniform shear rate throughout the flow region. It was found that platelets activated by thrombin formed principally thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxy 5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid and 12-hydroxy 5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE). On the other hand, platelets activated by shear, formed only 12-HETE (although arachidonic acid metabolism was stimulated); no cyclooxygenase metabolites were detected. Results indicate that platelets may greatly increase their 12-HETE production when activated by passage through a high-stress region of the circulation, such as an atherosclerotic stenosis.

  14. Raloxifene and hormone replacement therapy increase arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic levels in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Duschek, E.J.J.; Katan, M.B.; Neele, S.J.; Netelenbos, J.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens may affect the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3). Therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy and raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, in two randomized,

  15. Transformation of arachidonic acid into an iodolactone by the rat thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeynaems, J M; Hubbard, W C

    1980-10-10

    In the presence of iodide and hydrogen peroxide, lactoperoxidase, an enzyme model for thyroid peroxidase, catalyzed the conversion of arachidonic acid into several iodinated products. The major product was identified as 6-iodo-5-hydroxy-eicosatrienoic acid, delta-lactone (iodolactone), on the basis of 125I incorporation, mass spectrometry, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and chemical modifications. Using this compound as a standard, two methods were developed to establish and quantitate the production of iodolactone by the rat thyroid in vitro: 125I labeling followed by reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Addition of iodide and arachidonic acid to rat thyroid lobes resulted in the formation and release of the iodolactone, which was inhibited by methimazole. These data suggest that peroxidases capable of oxidizing halides could provide a new pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism, besides cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases.

  16. Arachidonic acid metabolism in reproductive tissues of pregnant guinea pig under in vivo circumstances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucha, I.; Tanacs, B.; Bagdany, S.

    1983-10-01

    Uptake and metabolism of tritium labelled arachidonic acid have been studied under in vivo circumstances in placenta, uterus and fetal membranes of pregnant guinea pigs on days 40 and 60 of pregnancy. Distribution of radioactivity within the lipid fractions of the selected tissues showed a characteristic pattern depending on the gestational ages. Composition of labelled lipids was determined by radio thin layer chromatography and quantitated with liquid scintillation measurements. The main site of arachidonic acid incorporation was the 2-position of phosphatidylcholine. Near term, a considerable PGF2 alpha-synthesis from exogenously administered 3-H-arachidonic acid could be demonstrated for the first time ''in vivo''.

  17. The effect of fluid mechanical stress on cellular arachidonic acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Rhee, B. G.; Eskin, S. G.; Hall, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of sublytic levels of mechanical perturations of cells on cell metabolism were investigated by analyzing the products of arachidonic acid (used as a marker metabolite) in blood platelets, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and cultured umbilical-vein endothelial cells after the suspensions of these cells were subjected to a shear stress in a modified viscometer. It is shown that the sublytic levels of mechanical stress stimulated the arachidonic acid metabolism in all these cell types. Possible biological implications of this stress-metabolism coupling are discussed.

  18. Prenatal arachidonic acid exposure and selected immune-related variables in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirix, Chantal E. H.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Rump, Patrick; Hendriks, Johannes J. E.; Bruins, Maaike; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is considered essential in fetal development and some of its metabolites are thought to be important mediators of the immune responses. Therefore, we studied whether prenatal exposure to AA is associated with some immune-related clinical conditions and plasma markers in

  19. The effect of cigarette smoke on the metabolism of arachidonic acid in isolated hamster lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maennistoe, J.; Toivonen, H.; Hartiala, J.; Bakhle, Y.S.; Uotila, P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of cigarette smoke on the metabolism of exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) were investigated in isolated hamster lungs. Arachidonate was injected into the pulmonary circulation and the metabolites were analysed from the nonrecirculating perfusion effluent by thin layer chromatography. After the pulmonary injection of 66 nmol of 14C-AA about 20% of the injected radioactivity appeared in the perfusion effluent mostly as metabolites in six minutes. When isolated lungs were ventilated with cigarette smoke during the perfusion, the amounts of PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and two unidentified metabolite groups increased in the lung effluent. In two other experimental series hamsters were exposed to cigarette smoke before the lung perfusion either once for 30 min or during one hour daily for ten consecutive days. Neither pre-exposures caused any changes in the amounts of arachidonate metabolites in the lung effluent.

  20. Metabolism of arachidonic acid in hamster lung microsomes is not completely inhibited by aspirin and indomethacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uotila, P.; Paajanen, H.; Schalin, M.; Simberg, N.

    1983-10-01

    Aspirin (100 microM or 1 mM) or indomethacin (10 microM or 100 microM) was incubated with a microsomal preparation of hamster lungs in the presence of NADPH for 10 min. Then 14C-arachidonic acid (20 microM) was added and the incubation was continued for an additional 20 min. The metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate first at pH 7.4 and then at pH 3.5 and analysed by thin layer chromatography. Both aspirin and indomethacin inhibited dose dependently the formation of all identified prostaglandins, including PGF2 alpha, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2 and PGD2. The rate of formation of some unidentified metabolites extracted at pH 7.4 and 3.5 was, however, not changed by aspirin or indomethacin. We have earlier reported that in isolated perfused hamster lungs the formation of all arachidonate metabolites is inhibited by both aspirin and indomethacin. As the present study indicates that in the microsomes of hamster lungs all metabolic pathways of arachidonic acid are not inhibited by aspirin or indomethacin, it is possible that in isolated tissues and in vivo aspirin-like drugs have some other inhibitory effects on arachidonate metabolism than the inhibition of the cyclo-oxygenase enzyme.

  1. Differential stimulation of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and arachidonic acid metabolism in rat peritoneal neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Cullinan, C.A.; Berkenkopf, J.W.; Weichman, B.M.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) induced the production of radical oxygen species (ROS) from rat peritoneal neutrophils as assessed by CL. ROS generation occurred in a time- (maximum at 13.5 min) and dose- (concentration range of 1.7-498 nM) related fashion. However, 166 nM PMA did not induce either cyclooxygenase (CO) or lipoxygenase (LPO) product formation by 20 min post-stimulation. Conversely, A23187, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 ..mu..M, stimulated both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, but had little or no effect upon ROS production. When suboptimal concentrations of PMA (5.5 nM) and A23187 (0.1-1 ..mu..M) were coincubated with the neutrophils, a synergistic ROS response was elicited. However, arachidonic acid metabolism in the presence of PMA was unchanged relative to A12187 alone. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited both PMA-induced CL (IC/sub 50/ = 0.9 ..mu..M) and A23187-induced arachidonic acid metabolism (IC/sub 50/ = 1.7 ..mu..M and 6.0 ..mu..M for LPO and CO, respectively). The mixed LPO-CO inhibitor, BW755C, behaved in a qualitatively similar manner to NDGA, whereas the CO inhibitors, indomethacin, piroxicam and naproxen had no inhibitory effect on ROS generation at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NDGA and BW755C may inhibit CL and arachidonic acid metabolism by distinct mechanisms in rat neutrophils.

  2. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant a-Synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Mikhail; Rosenberger, Thad; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2006-01-01

    Because alpha-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of alpha-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids using...... an established steady-state kinetic model. Liver was used as a negative control, and no changes were observed between groups. In Snca-/- brains, there was a marked reduction in 20:4n-6-CoA mass and in microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl) activity toward 20:4n-6. Microsomal Acsl activity was completely restored...... after the addition of exogenous wild-type mouse or human alpha-synuclein, but not by A30P, E46K, and A53T forms of alpha-synuclein. Acsl and acyl-CoA hydrolase expression was not different between groups. The incorporation and turnover of 20:4n-6 into brain phospholipid pools were markedly reduced...

  3. Dietary supplementation with arachidonic acid alters the stress response of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anholt, R.D. van; Koven, W.M.; Lutzky, S.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) larvae were fed Artemia nauplii enriched with a low or high level of arachidonic acid (ArA, 20:4n-6; 1.5 and 7.5 mg ArA/g dw, respectively) and their response to two stressors was determined. Larvae of 28 and 50 days post-hatch (DPH) were subjected to 90 s of air

  4. Arachidonic Acid Metabolite as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiz F. Borin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (BC (also referred to as stage IV spreads beyond the breast to the bones, lungs, liver, or brain and is a major contributor to the deaths of cancer patients. Interestingly, metastasis is a result of stroma-coordinated hallmarks such as invasion and migration of the tumor cells from the primary niche, regrowth of the invading tumor cells in the distant organs, proliferation, vascularization, and immune suppression. Targeted therapies, when used as monotherapies or combination therapies, have shown limited success in decreasing the established metastatic growth and improving survival. Thus, novel therapeutic targets are warranted to improve the metastasis outcomes. We have been actively investigating the cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4 family of enzymes that can biosynthesize 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in the regulation of vascular tone and angiogenesis. We have shown that 20-HETE can activate several intracellular protein kinases, pro-inflammatory mediators, and chemokines in cancer. This review article is focused on understanding the role of the arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in BC metastasis with an emphasis on 20-HETE as a novel therapeutic target to decrease BC metastasis. We have discussed all the significant investigational mechanisms and put forward studies showing how 20-HETE can promote angiogenesis and metastasis, and how its inhibition could affect the metastatic niches. Potential adjuvant therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment showing anti-tumor properties against BC and its lung metastasis are discussed at the end. This review will highlight the importance of exploring tumor-inherent and stromal-inherent metabolic pathways in the development of novel therapeutics for treating BC metastasis.

  5. Arachidonic acid is a chemoattractant for Dictyostelium discoideum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    composition of the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. The occurrence of previously undescribed fatty acids; J. Biol. Chem. 238 3199–3209. Flaadt H, Jaworski E and Malchow D 1993a Evidence for two intracellular calcium pools in Dictyostelium: the cAMP-induced calcium influx is directed into a NBD-Cl- and 2 ...

  6. Effects of fluticasone propionate inhalation on levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert T. Verhoeven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In smoking COPD patients the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid contains high numbers of inflammatory cells. These cells might produce arachidonic acid (AA metabolites, which contribute to inflammation and an increased bronchomotor tone.

  7. Plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid content and calcium metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, B; Budakovic, A; Nassuato, M A; Vezzoli, G; Manzato, E; Luisetto, G; Zaninotto, M

    2000-09-01

    Reports of an increase in plasma and erythrocyte phospholipid arachidonic acid content and in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) excretion in patients with idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis suggested their crucial role in the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria, a well-known risk factor for lithogenesis. To confirm this hypothesis, 15 healthy subjects and 20 nephrolithiasis patients were evaluated for plasma phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acid content and PGE2 concentration, serum parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxyvitamin D3, 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels, as well as urinary excretion of calcium, biochemical markers of bone resorption (hydroxyproline and crossLaps), and intestinal calcium absorption. Furthermore, the effect of a 30-day fish-oil diet supplementation on the previously mentioned parameters was investigated in the patients. At baseline, patients compared with controls showed higher levels of plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid content (P = 0.002), PGE2 (P = 0.0004), serum 25-vitamin D3 (P = 0.001), and 1,25-vitamin D3 (P = 0.001), urinary excretion of calcium (P = 0.001), hydroxyproline (P = 0.007), and crossLaps (P = 0.019), as well as intestinal calcium absorption (P = 0.03 at 60 min). Fish oil supplementation induced a reduction in the plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid level (P < 0.0001), and except for serum concentrations of 25-vitamin D3, normalized baseline blood and urinary parameters, including intestinal calcium absorption. A close correlation between plasma PGE2 and serum 1,25-vitamin D3 (P = 0.004) and between phospholipid arachidonic acid and intestinal calcium absorption (P = 0.0002) and calciuria (P = 0.007) was observed, as well as between urine excretion of crossLaps and hydroxyproline (P < 0.0001), crossLaps and calcium (P < 0.0001), and hydroxyproline and calcium (P < 0.0001). These findings indicate that the phospholipid arachidonic acid content anomaly could represent the primary event

  8. Arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism in bovine neutrophils and platelets: effect of calcium ionophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.M.; Laegreid, W.W.; Heidel, J.R.; Straub, K.M.; Liggitt, H.D.; Silflow, R.M.; Breeze, R.G.; Leid, R.W.

    1987-09-01

    Substitution of dietary fatty acids has potential for altering the inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to define the metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) secreted by bovine peripheral blood neutrophils and platelets. High performance liquid chromatography was used to characterize cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites secreted in response to the calcium ionophore A23187. Cells were prelabelled with /sup 3/H-AA or /sup 3/H-EPA prior to challenge with the calcium ionophore. Bovine neutrophils secreted leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) as the major metabolites of AA, as well as the corresponding leukotriene B5 (LTB5) and 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (5-HEPE) metabolites of EPA. Peptidoleukotrienes derived from /sup 3/H-AA or /sup 3/H-EPA were not detected under these conditions. The major tritiated metabolites secreted from bovine platelets were: thromboxane A2, measured as the stable metabolite thromboxane B2 (TXB2); hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 12-HETE derived from /sup 3/H-AA; and the omega-3 analogs TXB3 and 12-HEPE, derived from /sup 3/H-EPA. Preferred substrate specificities existed amongst the AA- and EPA-derived metabolites for the intermediary enzymes involved in the arachidonic acid cascade. These findings support the hypothesis that substitution of membrane-bound AA by EPA has potential for modulation of the host inflammatory response following cellular phospholipid mobilization.

  9. 5-Aminolevulinic acid promotes arachidonic acid biosynthesis in the red microalga Porphyridium purpureum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kailin; Chang, Jingyu; Zeng, Xianhai; Ng, I-Son; Xiao, Zongyuan; Sun, Yong; Tang, Xing; Lin, Lu

    2017-01-01

    The microalga Porphyridium purpureum within Rhodophyta abundantly produces several valuable proteins, polysaccharides, pigments and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid; it is especially effective in accumulating arachidonic acid (ARA). However, this high ARA yield is always achieved in conditions unfavourable for cell growth. In this study, we present a method for obtaining desirable ARA levels from P. purpureum while simultaneously promoting cell growth using appropriate concentrations of the growth hormone 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA). Both the biomass and the ARA content of P. purpureum were enhanced by stimulation with 20 mg/L 5-ALA, leading to an optimal ARA yield of 170.32 mg/L-a 70.82% increase compared with control conditions. This ARA yield is the highest ever reported for microalgae. Based on variations in the fatty acid composition, total lipids, total proteins, total carbohydrates and pigment content during the cultivation period, we propose that the accumulation of ARA stimulated by 5-ALA occurs at the expense of other UFAs and total proteins, which may be related to decreased zeaxanthin. Lipidomic analysis revealed that triacylglycerols (TAGs) accounted for 47.5 ± 3.6% of all detected lipids, followed by phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). As the levels of the most abundant TAGs increased under 5-ALA promotion and because 78.1 ± 3.4% (by weight) of detected TAG-branched chains contained ARA, the increase of ARA was mainly caused by TAG accumulation. This work demonstrated a simple and effective strategy to promote both biomass and ARA yield in P. purpureum by introducing a small amount of 5-ALA. These results are helpful for understanding the microalgae metabolic pathways affected by phytohormones and for guiding the development of bioproducts from microalgae.

  10. Arachidonic acid metabolism and regulation of ion transport in rabbit Clara cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Scott, M.R.; McIntire, M.R.; Henke, D.C. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Sonicates of freshly isolated Clara cells produced thromboxane B2 (TxB2), prostaglandin (PG) D2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT), and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) as detected using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sonicates of Clara cells cultured on collagen matrices produced the same metabolites. Rates of (3H)arachidonic acid metabolism increased in culture, but the changes were not associated with changes in cell number. Sonicates of freshly isolated tracheal cells produced mainly 12-HETE. Cyclooxygenase products were not produced consistently. Sonicates of tracheal cultures produced significant quantities of TxB2, PGD2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and HHT, but 12-HETE remained the major metabolite. Equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) across cultured Clara cell epithelia was unaffected by bilateral exposure to TxB2, PGD2, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, HHT, or 12-HETE. A minor (1%) decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rt) followed exposure to PGD2. Indomethacin had no significant effect on Rt or Ieq, but exposure of indomethacin-pretreated preparations to PGE2 revealed a minor (2%) increase in Ieq. In contrast, tracheal cell epithelia exhibited significant changes in Rt and Ieq in response to PGF2 alpha, PGE2, and HHT. These results indicate that Clara cells metabolize arachidonic acid to biologically active eicosanoids, but the resulting products do not play a major role in regulation of transepithelial ion transport by this cell type.

  11. Effect of amiloride on arachidonic acid and histamine release from rat mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnebjerg, H.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a putative Na/H exchange inhibition on histamine and [C]arachidonic acid ([C]AA) release has been examined in rat peritoneal mast cells, using either addition of amiloride or removal of extracellular Na. The cells were stimulated by non-immunological agents, i.e. calcium ionophore A......23187, nerve growth factor (NGF), thapsigargin and compound 48/80. On the basis of the results obtained, a possible role for Na/H exchange in rat mast cell secretion is discussed....

  12. The influence of supplemental docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids during pregnancy and lactation on neurodevelopment at eighteen months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Saskia A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Schaafsma, Anne; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are important for neurodevelopment. The effects of DHA (220 mg/day, n=41), DHA+AA (220 mg/day, n=39) or placebo (n=34) during pregnancy and lactation on neurodevelopment at 18 months, and the relations between umbilical cord DHA, AA and Mead acid

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) balance in developmental outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, John; Jill Shaddy, D; Kerling, Elizabeth H; Gustafson, Kathleen M; Carlson, Susan E

    2017-06-01

    The DHA Intake and Measurement of Neural Development (DIAMOND) trial represents one of only a few studies of the long-term dose-response effects of LCPUFA-supplemented formula feeding during infancy. The trial contrasted the effects of four formulations: 0.00% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/0.00% arachidonic acid (ARA), 0.32% DHA/0.64% ARA, 0.64% DHA/0.64% ARA, and 0.96% DHA/0.64% ARA against a control condition (0.00% DHA/0.00% ARA). The results of this trial have been published elsewhere, and show improved cognitive outcomes for infants fed supplemented formulas, but a common finding among many of the outcomes show a reduction of benefit for the highest DHA dose (i.e., 0.96%DHA/0.64% ARA, that is, a DHA: ARA ratio 1.5:1.0). The current paper gathers and summarizes the evidence for the reduction of benefit at this dose, and in an attempt to account for this reduced benefit, presents for the first time data from infants' red blood cell (RBC) assays taken at 4 and 12 months of age. Those assays indicate that blood DHA levels generally rose with increased DHA supplementation, although those levels tended to plateau as the DHA-supplemented level exceeded 0.64%. Perhaps more importantly, ARA levels showed a strong inverted-U function in response to increased DHA supplementation; indeed, infants assigned to the formula with the highest dose of DHA (and highest DHA/ARA ratio) showed a reduction in blood ARA relative to more intermediate DHA doses. This finding raises the possibility that reduced ARA may be responsible for the reduction in benefit on cognitive outcomes seen at this dose. The findings implicate the DHA/ARA balance as an important variable in the contribution of LCPUFAs to cognitive and behavioral development in infancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Food Polyphenol Apigenin Inhibits the Cytochrome P450 Monoxygenase Branch of the Arachidonic Acid Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuck, Maryvonne; Hellhake, Stefan; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2016-11-30

    The product of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) ω-hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA), 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), is a potent vasoconstrictor. Utilizing microsomes as well as individual CYP4 isoforms we demonstrate here that flavonoids can block 20-HETE formation. Apigenin inhibits CYP4F2 with an IC50 value of 4.6 μM and 20-HETE formation in human liver and kidney microsomes at 2.4-9.8 μM. Interestingly, the structurally similar naringenin shows no relevant effect on the formation of 20-HETE. Based on these in vitro data, it is impossible to evaluate if a relevant blockade of 20-HETE formation can result in humans from intake of polyphenols with the diet. However, the potency of apigenin is comparable to those of P450 inhibitors such as ketoconazole. Moreover, an IC50 value in the micromolar range is also described for the inhibition of CYP-mediated drug metabolism leading to food-drug interactions. The modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade by food polyphenols therefore warrants further investigation.

  15. Effect of aspirin on the metabolism of exogenous arachidonic acid in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Uotila, P.

    1984-08-01

    When human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) were incubated with exogenous /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid (/sup 14/C-AA), both lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase metabolites were detected. The amount of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolites formed, including 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), was small. The amount of other mono-HETE's (migrating in the vicinity of 12-HETE) was greater, but this was obviously mainly due to the small amount of contaminating platelets. In the presence of calcium ionophore A23187 the rate of formation of 5-HETE was increased, but the formation of other metabolites remained unchanged. When PMNL were incubated with aspirin in the presence of A23187 the formation of the cyclo-oxygenase products was decreased but that of 5-HETE was unchanged. The present study indicates that the calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates specifically the 5-lipoxygenase in human PMNL and that aspirin has no effect on the formation of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid in human PMNL.

  16. Expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin enhances production of arachidonic acid and lipids in Mortierella alpina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huidan; Feng, Yingang; Cui, Qiu; Song, Xiaojin

    2017-08-30

    Arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4, n-6), which belongs to the omega-6 series of polyunsaturated fatty acids and has a variety of biological activities, is commercially produced in Mortierella alpina. Dissolved oxygen or oxygen utilization efficiency is a critical factor for Mortierella alpina growth and arachidonic acid production in large-scale fermentation. Overexpression of the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene is thought to significantly increase the oxygen utilization efficiency of the cells. An optimized Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was introduced into Mortierella alpina via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Compared with the parent strain, the VHb-expressing strain, termed VHb-20, grew faster under both limiting and non-limiting oxygen conditions and exhibited dramatic changes in cell morphology. Furthermore, VHb-20 produced 4- and 8-fold higher total lipid and ARA yields than those of the wild-type strain under a microaerobic environment. Furthermore, ARA production of VHb-20 was also 1.6-fold higher than that of the wild type under normal conditions. The results demonstrated that DO utilization was significantly increased by expressing the VHb gene in Mortierella alpina. The expression of VHb enhances ARA and lipid production under both lower and normal dissolved oxygen conditions. This study provides a novel strategy and an engineered strain for the cost-efficient production of ARA.

  17. Obesity is positively associated with arachidonic acid-derived 5- and 11-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Charles Austin; Sordillo, Lorraine M; Zhang, Chen; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2017-05-01

    Oxylipids are oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites that are responsible for the onset and resolution of the inflammatory response. Enzymatic oxygenation through the lipoxygenase (LOX) or cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways can form oxylipids that have either proinflammatory or proresolving functions depending on the type of PUFA substrate and degree of metabolism. The objective of this study was to determine how PUFA substrates and their corresponding oxylipids are associated with obesity. Plasma non-esterified FA and oxylipids were isolated from 123 Caucasian males using solid phase extraction and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses included linear regressions and polytomous logistic regressions, and the responses were body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and serum leptin, total adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and C-peptide. Models were adjusted for age and smoking, and p-values were corrected for false discovery per Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni. We report that BMI, WC, and several serum cytokines were highly associated arachidonic acid (ARA)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and vicinal diols (i.e., alcohols on adjacent carbon atoms) derived from several PUFAs. There was a significant linear relationship between BMI, WC, and serum leptin, and ARA-derived 5-, 11-, and 15-HETE. Specifically, BMI and WC were positively associated with proinflammatory 5- and 11-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), even after normalization to ARA concentrations and false discovery p-value correction. Individuals with 5-HETE concentrations >5.01nmol/L or 11-HETE concentrations and >0.89nmol/L were over 5 times more likely to be obese compared to those with ≤1.86nmol/L and ≤0.39nmol/L, respectively. Vicinal diols from linoleic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acid were inversely associated with obesity. Across all statistical

  18. Arachidonic and oleic acid exert distinct effects on the DNA methylome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Martínez, Guillermo A.; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Abnormal fatty acid metabolism and availability are landmarks of metabolic diseases, which in turn are associated with aberrant DNA methylation profiles. To understand the role of fatty acids in disease epigenetics, we sought DNA methylation profiles specifically induced by arachidonic...... (AA) or oleic acid (OA) in cultured cells and compared those with published profiles of normal and diseased tissues. THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with AA or OA and analyzed using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina) and Human Exon 1.0 ST array (Affymetrix). Data were corroborated......, AA and OA exert distinct effects on the DNA methylome. The observation that AA may contribute to shape the epigenome of important metabolic diseases, supports and expands current diet-based therapeutic and preventive efforts....

  19. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism during differentiation of the human monoblastoid cell line U937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, L; Hass, R; Wessel, K; DeWitt, D L; Kaever, V; Resch, K; Goppelt-Struebe, M

    1990-02-23

    The human cell line U937 was used as a model for differentiation along the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. Following treatment with the phorbol ester TPA, PGE2 and TxB2 secretion was induced 50-100-fold, and both PGF2 alpha and PGI2 levels became detectable in the supernatant of TPA-differentiated U937 cells. The content of the prostaglandin precursor, arachidonic acid, remained unchanged in the cellular phospholipids of undifferentiated and TPA-differentiated U937 cells. Of the enzymes involved in the availability and metabolism of arachidonic acid, phospholipase A2 activity was increased 2-fold in the membranes of TPA-differentiated U937 cells, whereas lysophosphatide acyltransferase activity remained unaltered. Cyclooxygenase activity, however, was enhanced 5-10-fold, which was due to enhanced expression of the enzyme as demonstrated by dot-blot analysis. The data suggest that the capacity to secrete prostaglandins is acquired during differentiation with TPA and results mainly from an increased cyclooxygenase activity. Despite the capacity of TPA-differentiated U937 cells to synthesize prostaglandins, none of the known monocytic stimuli further stimulated prostaglandin secretion in TPA-differentiated U937 cells. Generation of leukotrienes appears to represent a later state in the differentiation along the monocyte-macrophage lineage, since neither LTB4 nor cysteinyl-leukotrienes were detectable in the supernatants of either undifferentiated or TPA-differentiated U937 cells.

  20. Arachidonic acid has protective effects on oxygen-glucose deprived astrocytes mediated through enhancement of potassium channel TREK-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Zhang, Guangru; Song, Chunli; Wang, Xuexi; Qian, Weina; Wang, Zhuanling; Liu, Yanan; Gong, Sheng; Zhou, Shuning

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain diseases. The newly discovered potassium channel "TREK-1" is a promising target for therapies against neurodegeneration. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an n-6 PUFA, as well as a potent TREK-1 activator. We previously showed that TREK-1 is expressed at high levels in astrocytes. However, the effect of AA on astrocytes in ischemia remains unknown. Here, we assessed the effects of 3-30μM AA on astrocyte apoptosis, glutamate uptake, and expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and TREK-1 under different conditions. Under normal conditions, 3-30μM AA showed no effect on astrocytic apoptosis or TREK-1 expression, whereas glutamate uptake decreased significantly and its change paralleled the decreased expression of GLT-1. When astrocytes were subjected to 4h of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), 10μM AA markedly alleviated OGD-induced cell death, recovering from 63.50±1.90% to 82.96±4.63% of the control value. AA also rescued the decreased glutamate uptake and increased mRNA, as well as protein levels of GLT-1 and TREK-1. Our results provide new evidence of a protective effect of AA on astrocytes under OGD conditions, suggesting that a low concentration of AA may protect against brain ischemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Norambuena

    Full Text Available Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3, with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad-time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher

  2. Inhibition by amiloride and by Na-depletion of A23187-stimulated arachidonic acid and histamine release from rat mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnebjerg, H.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1988-01-01

    of protein kinase C inhibitors resulted in only a modest decrease of [C]arachidonic acid and histamine release. [C]Arachidonic acid was hydrolyzed from both phosphatidylcholine and triacylglycerol. Amiloride inhibited only the hydrolysis from phosphatidylcholine. It is suggested that an Na/H exchange...

  3. Arachidonic Acid Derivatives and Their Role in Peripheral Nerve Degeneration and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodrigo Camara-Lemarroy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available After peripheral nerve injury, a process of axonal degradation, debris clearance, and subsequent regeneration is initiated by complex local signaling, called Wallerian degeneration (WD. This process is in part mediated by neuroglia as well as infiltrating inflammatory cells and regulated by inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, and the activation of transcription factors also related to the inflammatory response. Part of this neuroimmune signaling is mediated by the innate immune system, including arachidonic acid (AA derivatives such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The enzymes responsible for their production, cyclooxygenases and lipooxygenases, also participate in nerve degeneration and regeneration. The interactions between signals for nerve regeneration and neuroinflammation go all the way down to the molecular level. In this paper, we discuss the role that AA derivatives might play during WD and nerve regeneration, and the therapeutic possibilities that arise.

  4. Ozone toxicity: hormone-like oxidation products from arachidonic acid by ozone-catalyzed autoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roycroft, J.H.; Cunter, W.B.; Menzel, D.B.

    1977-09-01

    The effects of peroxidation by ozone on the activity of arachidonic acid (AA) with and without vitamin E, on the initiation of human platelet aggregation, and on the contraction of superfused smooth muscle strips, are described. AA was rapidly oxidized by a stream of air containing 2 ppm of ozone to peroxides having biological activity similar to prostaglandin endoperoxides. Ozone-formed AA peroxides contracted both rabbit aortic strips and rat fundus strips in the presence of indomethacin and vasoactive hormones at doses comparable to naturally formed prostaglandin endoperoxides. Vitamin E had no effect on the activity of AA peroxides once formed. Ozone-formed AA peroxides also aggregated human platelets in platelet rich plasma, but this activity was blocked by the addition of indomethacin. (2 diagrams, 3 graphs, 8 references)

  5. Pulmonary arachidonic acid metabolism following acute exposures to ozone and nitrogen dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, R.B.; Driscoll, K.E.; Gunnison, A.F.; Zelikoff, J.T. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) are common air pollutants, and exposure to these gases has been shown to affect pulmonary physiology, biochemistry, and structure. This study examined their ability to modulate arachidonic acid metabolites (eicosanoids) in the lungs. Rabbits were exposed for 2 h to O{sub 3} at 0.1, 0.3, or 1 ppm; NO{sub 2} at 1, 3, or 10 ppm; or to a mixture of 0.3 ppm O{sub 3} and 3 ppm NO{sub 2}. Groups of animals sacrificed either immediately or 24 h after each exposure underwent broncho-pulmonary lavage. Selected eicosanoids were assessed in lavage fluid by radioimmunoassay. Increases in prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) and F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) were found immediately after exposure to 1 ppm O{sub 3}. Exposure to 10 ppm NO{sub 2} resulted in a depression of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, while thromboxane B2 (TxB2) was elevated after exposure to 1 ppm NO{sub 2} and depressed following 3 and 10 ppm. The O{sub 3}/NO{sub 2} mixture resulted in synergistic increases in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, with the response appearing to be driven by O{sub 3}. This study has demonstrated that acute exposure to either O{sub 3} or NO{sub 2} can alter pulmonary arachidonic acid metabolism and that the responses to these oxidants differ, both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  6. Characteristics of obese children with low content of arachidonic acid in plasma lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoo; Sato, Noriko F; Kuromori, Yuki; Miyashita, Michio; Tanigutchi, Kazuo; Iwata, Fujihiko; Hara, Mitsuhiko; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Harada, Kensuke; Saito, Emiko

    2007-08-01

    Although there have been many studies on the relationship between obesity and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA), the results and their interpretation are controversial, especially in children. Arachidonic acid (AA), the product of n-6 LCPUFA, is reported to be related to insulin resistance. The purpose of the present paper was to investigate the LCPUFA profile in obese children and mechanisms that contribute to reduced AA content. An age- and sex-matched control study was performed. The study subjects were 59 obese children (mean age, 11.8 years) and 53 healthy non-obese children (mean age, 12.5 years). The study parameters included anthropometric measurements, serum lipids, leptin and fatty acid composition in plasma. Plasma fatty acids in obese children had lower linoleic acid (P children. In all subjects combined, delta-6 desaturase (D6D) index (ratios of [C 18:3n-6+C 20:2n-6]/C 20:4n-6 or C 20:4n-6/C 18: 2n-6) correlated with leptin (P children, in whom D6D index was not elevated in spite of high insulin concentration. Obese children had changes in plasma LCPUFA profile that indicate upregulation of n-6 LCPUFA metabolism, probably caused by activated D6D activity to compensate AA demand. Heterogeneity of AA content in obese children depends on D6D and delta-5-desaturase activity, which may reflect insulin sensitivity.

  7. Liquid human milk fortifier significantly improves docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid status in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berseth, C L; Harris, C L; Wampler, J L; Hoffman, D R; Diersen-Schade, D A

    2014-09-01

    We report the fatty acid composition of mother׳s own human milk from one of the largest US cohorts of lactating mothers of preterm infants. Milk fatty acid data were used as a proxy for intake at enrollment in infants (n=150) who received human milk with a powder human milk fortifier (HMF; Control) or liquid HMF [LHMF; provided additional 12mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 20mg arachidonic acid (ARA)/100mL human milk]. Mothers provided milk samples (n=129) and reported maternal DHA consumption (n=128). Infant blood samples were drawn at study completion (Study Day 28). Human milk and infant PPL fatty acids were analyzed using capillary column gas chromatography. DHA and ARA were within ranges previously published for US term and preterm human milk. Compared to Control HMF (providing no DHA or ARA), human milk fortified with LHMF significantly increased infant PPL DHA and ARA and improved preterm infant DHA and ARA status. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS.

  9. Stimulation of protease activated receptors on RT4 cells mediates arachidonic acid release via Ca2+ independent phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHowat, J; Creer, M H; Rickard, A

    2001-06-01

    Protease activated receptors (PAR) represent a family of G protein coupled receptors with 7 membrane spanning domains that are activated by proteolysis of the N-terminus of the receptor by serine proteases. The presence of multiple PARs on the same cell is thought to extend the range of proteases a cell responds to rather than expand the range of intracellular responses. We investigated arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release in the human urothelial carcinoma cell line RT4 in response to stimulation with thrombin, which activates PAR-1, and tryptase, which activates PAR-2. RT4 cells were incubated with thrombin, tryptase or PAR agonist peptides and intracellular phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release were measured. Pretreatment with bromoenol lactone, a selective inhibitor for Ca2+ independent PLA2 (iPLA2), was also investigated. Thrombin and tryptase stimulation resulted in a 2 to 3-fold increase in membrane associated iPLA2 that was accompanied by comparative increases in arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release. These responses were also observed when synthetic peptides representing the tethered ligand for each receptor were incubated with RT4 cells. Arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release, and iPLA2 activation were completely inhibited by pretreatment with bromoenol lactone. Stimulating RT4 cells with PAR-1 or PAR-2 leads to the selective activation of iPLA2 as well as the release of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2, which may provide cytoprotection during an acute inflammatory reaction.

  10. Data of added-value lipid production, Arachidonic acid, among other lipids by Mortierella elongata, using low cost simulated wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Soares Fernandes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presented an innovative data of feasibility to produce Arachidonic acid (ARA, as added-value Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA, among other lipids from Mortierella elongata, using simulated low cost sugarcane wastewater, vinasse, as a carbon source. Data from lipids quantification by total lipids extraction and by lipid classes was presented. M. elongata was able to produce 156.45mg of ARA per g of total lipids.

  11. Fish oil reduces cholesterol and arachidonic acid levels in plasma and lipoproteins from hypercholesterolemic chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M; Amalik, F; Linares, A; García-Peregrín, E

    2000-07-01

    The value of fish oil for prevention and/or treatment of human atherosclerosis has not been fully established. This study shows that replacement of saturated fat in young chick diet with menhaden oil produced a significant reversion of the hypercholesterolemia previously induced by coconut oil feeding. Fish oil also produced a clear decrease of plasma triacylglycerol levels. Coconut oil increased the percentages of 12:0 and 14:0 fatty acids, while menhaden oil increased those of 20:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3. Percentages of 20:4 n-6, 18:2 n-6 and 18:1 n-9 significantly decreased by fish oil addition to the diet. Total cholesterol, phospholipid and protein contents of high and low density lipoproteins increased by coconut oil feeding. When coconut oil was replaced by menhaden oil, total cholesterol was significantly reduced in high, low and very low density lipoproteins. All chemical components of VLDL were decreased by menhaden oil feeding. Our results show a strong hypocholesterolemic effect of menhaden oil when this fat was supplemented to hypercholesterolemic chicks. The clear decrease found in arachidonic acid content of chick plasma and lipoproteins may contribute to the beneficial effects of fish oil consumption by lowering the production of its derived eicosanoids.

  12. The TIP30 protein complex, arachidonic acid and coenzyme A are required for vesicle membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengliang Zhang

    Full Text Available Efficient membrane fusion has been successfully mimicked in vitro using artificial membranes and a number of cellular proteins that are currently known to participate in membrane fusion. However, these proteins are not sufficient to promote efficient fusion between biological membranes, indicating that critical fusogenic factors remain unidentified. We have recently identified a TIP30 protein complex containing TIP30, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 4 (ACSL4 and Endophilin B1 (Endo B1 that promotes the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles, which transport endosomal acidification enzymes vacuolar (H⁺-ATPases (V-ATPases to the early endosomes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the TIP30 protein complex facilitates the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles in vitro. Fusion of the two vesicles also depends on arachidonic acid, coenzyme A and the synthesis of arachidonyl-CoA by ACSL4. Moreover, the TIP30 complex is able to transfer arachidonyl groups onto phosphatidic acid (PA, producing a new lipid species that is capable of inducing close contact between membranes. Together, our data suggest that the TIP30 complex facilitates biological membrane fusion through modification of PA on membranes.

  13. 2-hydroxy arachidonic acid: a new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Lopez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are a family of COX1 and COX2 inhibitors used to reduce the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators. In addition, inflammation often leads to a harmful generation of nitric oxide. Efforts are being done in discovering safer NSAIDs molecules capable of inhibiting the synthesis of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators and nitric oxide to reduce the side effects associated with long term therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analogue of arachidonic acid (AA, 2-hydroxy-arachidonic acid (2OAA, was designed to inhibit the activities of COX1 and COX2 and it was predicted to have similar binding energies as AA for the catalytic sites of COX1 and COX2. The interaction of AA and 2OAA with COX1 and COX2 was investigated calculating the free energy of binding and the Fukui function. Toxicity was determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. COX1 and COX2 (PGH2 production activities were measured in vitro. COX1 and COX2 expression in human macrophage-like U937 cells were carried out by Western blot, immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. NO production (Griess method and iNOS (Western blot were determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. The comparative efficacy of 2OAA, ibuprofen and cortisone in lowering TNF-α serum levels was determined in C57BL6/J mice challenged with LPS. We show that the presence of the -OH group reduces the likelihood of 2OAA being subjected to H* abstraction in COX, without altering significantly the free energy of binding. The 2OAA inhibited COX1 and COX2 activities and the expression of COX2 in human U937 derived macrophages challenged with LPS. In addition, 2OAA inhibited iNOS expression and the production of NO in BV-2 microglial cells. Finally, oral administration of 2OAA decreased the plasma TNF-α levels in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate the potential of 2OAA as a NSAID.

  14. Inhibition of duodenal enterocyte Mg2+-ATPase by arachidonic acid is not mediated by an effect on protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, M; Leonard, F; Magada, O N; Kruger, M C

    2000-03-01

    Active absorption processes in the duodenal enterocyte are driven by various ATPases. It is known that the activity of Na+,K+-ATPase, Ca2+-ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase can be modulated by polyunsaturated fatty acids of the n-6 series, for example by linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids. These effects may be achieved by protein phosphorylation via protein kinase C. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of arachidonic acid on Mg2+-ATPase (measured colorimetrically) activity in basolateral membranes prepared from rat duodenum. It shows, for the first time, significant dose-dependent inhibition of Mg2+-ATPase (26-62%) by arachidonic acid (10-50 microg/ml) which already takes place after one minute of exposure, indicating involvement of a rapid signal transduction mechanism. Addition of the protein kinase C inhibitors bisimidolylmaleimide (2.5 microM) and calphostin (0.5 microM) did not influence the action of arachidonic acid on Mg2+-ATPase; protein kinase C involvement in this process is thus not indicated.

  15. Clinical implications of eicosapentaenoic acid/arachidonic acid ratio (EPA/AA) in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Miki; Inai, Kei; Shinohara, Tokuko; Tomimatsu, Hirofumi; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies showed that a low ratio between the levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and those of arachidonic acid (EPA/AA) is associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease and poor prognosis of heart failure, arrhythmia, and cardiac sudden death. However, the clinical implications of EPA/AA in adult patients with congenital heart disease remain unclear. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of EPA/AA regarding cardiac events in adult patients with congenital heart disease. We measured the serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid in 130 adult patients (median age, 31 years) stratified into two groups according to their EPA/AA (low, ≤0.22; high, >0.22). We prospectively analyzed the association between EPA/AA and incidence of cardiac events during a mean observation period of 15 months, expressed in terms of hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). In the subgroup of patients with biventricular circulation (2VC) (n = 76), we analyzed the same clinical endpoints. In our study population, EPA/AA was not associated with the incidence of arrhythmic events (HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.82-2.85; p = 0.19), but low EPA/AA was a predictor of heart failure hospitalization (HR, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.35-6.30; p AA of ≤0.25 was associated with a significantly higher risk of arrhythmic events (HR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.11-6.41; p = 0.03) and heart failure hospitalization (HR, 5.20; 95% CI, 1.78-18.1; p AA represents a useful predictor of cardiac events in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

  16. Effects of dietary arachidonic acid on the reproductive physiology of female Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Birgitta; Kleppe, Lene; Andersson, Eva; Thorsen, Anders; Rosenlund, Grethe; Hamre, Kristin

    2017-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate potential effects of arachidonic acid (ARA) on the reproductive physiology of female Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.). Two-year old Atlantic cod of both sexes were equally distributed into eight sea cages after completion of their first spawning in May 2005. Four experimental groups were established and fed diets with different levels of ARA corresponding to 0.5, 1, 2 and 4% of total fatty acid. Ovarian growth and development was documented every month. Fatty acid composition was analysed in ovaries, liver and plasma at the beginning of the experiment, one month prior to spawning, and in spent fish, one month after spawning was completed. Plasma concentrations of estradiol-17β, testosterone and vitellogenin, and ovarian gene transcript levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), P450aromatase (cyp19a1a) and 20β-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase (20bhsd/cbr1) were monitored every month in fish fed the experimental diets and related to oocyte stage. Potential fecundity was calculated based on ovarian samples taken one month before onset of spawning. Ovarian and plasma ARA levels were highly correlated to dietary ARA levels. There was a net accumulation of ARA compared to other essential fatty acids in ovarian tissue that was reflected in a decrease in EPA:ARA ratio. Plasma concentrations of vitellogenin, estradiol-17β and testosterone and key gene transcript levels were affected by dietary ARA and stage of maturation. The results show that ARA has a significant influence on the reproductive physiology of female Atlantic cod. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pregnancy duration and the ratio of long-chain n-3 fatty acids to arachidonic acid in erythrocytes from Faroese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.F.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1989-01-01

    Dietary long-chain n-3 fatty acids (FA) may prolong gestation by inhibiting formation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. FA were quantified in phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and total lipids (TL) of red cells sampled during pregnancy from 29 Faroese women. The rati...

  18. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha/arachidonic acid signaling mediates depolarization-induced suppression of excitation in the cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse is an endocannabinoid-mediated short-term retrograde plasticity. Intracellular Ca(2+ elevation is critical for the endocannabinoid production and DSE. Nevertheless, how elevated Ca(2+ leads to DSE is unclear.We utilized cytosolic phospholipase A(2 alpha (cPLA(2α knock-out mice and whole-cell patch clamp in cerebellar slices to observed the action of cPLA(2α/arachidonic acid signaling on DSE at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. Our data showed that DSE was significantly inhibited in cPLA(2α knock-out mice, which was rescued by arachidonic acid. The degradation enzyme of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL, blocked DSE, while another catabolism enzyme for N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, did not affect DSE. These results suggested that 2-AG is responsible for DSE in Purkinje cells. Co-application of paxilline reversed the blockade of DSE by internal K(+, indicating that large conductance Ca(2+-activated potassium channel (BK is sufficient to inhibit cPLA(2α/arachidonic acid-mediated DSE. In addition, we showed that the release of 2-AG was independent of soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE, protein kinase C and protein kinase A.Our data first showed that cPLA(2α/arachidonic acid/2-AG signaling pathway mediates DSE at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse.

  19. The biosynthesis of N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), a putative endocannabinoid and endovanilloid, via conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bradshaw, Heather B; Benton, Valery M; Chen, Jay Shih-Chieh; Huang, Susan M; Minassi, Alberto; Bisogno, Tiziana; Masuda, Kim; Tan, Bo; Roskoski, Robert; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Walker, J Michael

    2009-10-01

    N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) is an endogenous ligand that activates the cannabinoid type 1 receptor and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel. Two potential biosynthetic pathways for NADA have been proposed, though no conclusive evidence exists for either. The first is the direct conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine and the other is via metabolism of a putative N-arachidonoyl tyrosine (NA-tyrosine). In the present study we investigated these biosynthetic mechanisms and report that NADA synthesis requires TH in dopaminergic terminals; however, NA-tyrosine, which we identify here as an endogenous lipid, is not an intermediate. We show that NADA biosynthesis primarily occurs through an enzyme-mediated conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine. While this conjugation likely involves a complex of enzymes, our data suggest a direct involvement of fatty acid amide hydrolase in NADA biosynthesis either as a rate-limiting enzyme that liberates arachidonic acid from AEA, or as a conjugation enzyme, or both.

  20. Combination Therapy of PPAR Ligands and Inhibitors of Arachidonic Acid in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Tauler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and five-year survival remains low. Numerous studies have shown that chronic inflammation may lead to progression of carcinogenesis. As a result of inflammatory stimulation, arachidonic acid (AA metabolism produces proliferation mediators through complex and dynamic interactions of the products of the LOX/COX enzymes. One important mediator in the activation of the AA pathways is the nuclear protein PPAR. Targeting LOX/COX enzymes and inducing activation of PPAR have resulted in significant reduction of cell growth in lung cancer cell lines. However, specific COX-inhibitors have been correlated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Clinical applications are still being explored with a novel generation of dual LOX/COX inhibitors. PPAR activation through synthetic ligands (TZDs has revealed a great mechanistic complexity since effects are produced through PPAR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Furthermore, PPAR could also be involved in regulation of COX-2. Overexpression of PPAR has reported to play a role in control of invasion and differentiation. Exploring the function of PPAR, in this new context, may provide a better mechanistic model of its role in cancer and give an opportunity to design a more efficient therapeutic approach in combination with LOX/COX inhibitors.

  1. The metabolism of arachidonic acid in isolated perfused fetal and neonatal rabbit lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simberg, N.; Uotila, P.

    1983-05-01

    The developmental pattern of fetal and neonatal rabbit lungs to metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to different cyclo-oxygenase products was studied in isolated rabbit lungs, which were perfused with Krebs bicarbonate buffer. /sup 14/C-AA (66 nmol) was injected into the pulmonary circulation and the nonrecirculating perfusion effluent was collected for four minutes. About ten per cent of the injected radioactivity was found in the 0-4 min perfusion effluent. The metabolites of AA in the effluent were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. The major metabolites of AA were PGE2 and its 15-keto-derivates, but also PGF2 alpha and its 15-keto-derivates, TXB2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha were found in the effluent. The most drastic developmental change was the increase in the amount of 15-keto-metabolites of PGE2 from late fetal period to the lungs of one day old rabbits (1.8 fold increase between birth and first postnatal day). Smaller changes were detected in the amounts of other cyclo-oxygenase products.

  2. Improving arachidonic acid fermentation by Mortierella alpina through multistage temperature and aeration rate control in bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min-Jie; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2016-05-18

    Effective production of arachidonic acid (ARA) using Mortierella alpina was conducted in a 30-L airlift bioreactor. Varying the aeration rate and temperature significantly influenced cell morphology, cell growth, and ARA production, while the optimal aeration rate and temperature for cell growth and product formation were quite different. As a result, a two-stage aeration rate control strategy was constructed based on monitoring of cell morphology and ARA production under various aeration rate control levels (0.6-1.8 vvm). Using this strategy, ARA yield reached 4.7 g/L, an increase of 38.2% compared with the control (constant aeration rate control at 1.0 vvm). Dynamic temperature-control strategy was implemented based on the fermentation performance at various temperatures (13-28°C), with ARA level in total cellular lipid increased by 37.1% comparing to a constant-temperature control (25°C). On that basis, the combinatorial fermentation strategy of two-stage aeration rate control and dynamic temperature control was applied and ARA production achieved the highest level of 5.8 g/L.

  3. Dietary arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid regulate liver fatty acid desaturase (FADS) alternative transcript expression in suckling piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Downs, Ian; Srigley, Cynthia Tyburczy; Kothapalli, Kumar S D; Park, Woo Jung; Blank, Bryant S; Zimmer, J Paul; Butt, C M; Salem, Norman; Brenna, J Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Molecular regulation of fatty acid desaturase (Fads) gene expression by dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during early post-natal period, when the demand for long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) is very high, has not been well defined. The objective of the current study was to determine regulation of liver Fads1, Fads2 and Fads3 classical (CS) and alternative transcripts (AT) expression by dietary ARA and DHA, within the physiological range present in human breast milk, in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed one of six milk replacer formula diets (formula-reared groups, FR) with varying ARA and DHA content from days 3-28 of age. The ARA/DHA levels of the six formula diets were as follows (% total fatty acid, FA/FA): (A1) 0.1/1.0; (A2) 0.53/1.0; (A3-D3) 0.69/1.0; (A4) 1.1/1.0; (D2) 0.67/0.62; and (D1) 0.66/0.33. The control maternal-reared (MR) group remained with the dam. Fads1 expression was not significantly different between FR and MR groups. Fads2 expression was down-regulated significantly in diets with 1:1 ratio of ARA:DHA, compared to MR. Fads2 AT1 expression was highly correlated to Fads2 expression. Fads3 AT7 was the only Fads3 transcript sensitive to dietary LC-PUFA intake and was up-regulated in the formula diets with lowest ARA and DHA contents compared to MR. Thus, the present study provides evidence that the proportion of dietary ARA:DHA is a significant determinant of Fads2 expression and LC-PUFA metabolism during the early postnatal period. Further, the data suggest that Fads3 AT7 may have functional significance when dietary supply of ARA and DHA are low during early development. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Arachidonic Acid-enriched Oil Diet Supplementation on the Taste of Broiler Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Takahashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the relationship between the arachidonic acid (AA content and the taste of broiler meat, the effects of AA-enriched oil (AAO supplements on the fatty acid content and sensory perceptions of thigh meat were evaluated. Four types of oil, including corn oil (CO, a 1:1 mixture of AAO and palm oil (PO (1/2 AAO, a 1:3 mixture of AAO and PO (1/4 AAO, and a 1:7 mixture of AAO and PO (1/8 AAO were prepared. Each type of oil was mixed with silicate at a ratio of 7:3, and added to the diet at a final proportion of 5% of fresh matter. Broiler chickens were fed these diets for 1 wk before slaughter. In thigh meat, the AA content of the 1/2 and 1/4 AAO groups was significantly higher than that of the CO group. The AA content in thigh meat (y, mg/g increased linearly with increasing dietary AAO content (x, g/100 g of diet, according to the equation y = 0.5674+0.4596× (r2 = 0.8454. The content of other fatty acids was not significantly different among the 4 diet groups. Sensory evaluation showed that the flavor intensity, umami (L-glutamate taste, kokumi (continuity, mouthfulness, and thickness, and aftertaste of the 1/2 and 1/4 AAO groups were significantly higher than that of the CO group. There were significant positive correlations between AA content in thigh meat and the flavor intensity, total taste intensity, umami, and aftertaste. These data suggest that the taste of broiler meat can be improved by the amount of dietary AA supplementation.

  5. Protective effects of arachidonic acid against palmitic acid-mediated lipotoxicity in HIT-T15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Sik; Kim, Chi Hyun; Kim, Ki Young; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2012-05-01

    Saturated fatty acids have been considered major contributing factors in type 2 diabetes, whereas unsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects for preventing the development of diabetes. However, the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in pancreatic β cells have not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on palmitic acid (PA)-mediated lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells. AA prevented the PA-induced lipotoxicity as indicated by cell viability, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential, whereas eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a non-metabolizable AA, had little effect on PA-induced lipotoxicity. In parallel with its protective effects against PA-induced lipotoxicity, AA restored impaired insulin expression and secretion induced by PA. AA but not ETYA increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) in the presence of PA compared with PA alone, and xanthohumol, a diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitor, reversed AA-induced protection from PA. Taken together, our results suggest that AA protects against PA-induced lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells, and the protective effects may be associated with TG accumulation, possibly through sequestration of lipotoxic PA into TG.

  6. Synergism between thapsigargin and the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate on the release of [C]arachidonic acid and histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1987-01-01

    Thapsigargin is a potent skin irritating sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the roots of Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae). In rat peritoneal mast cells thapsigargin induced a calcium-dependent non-cytotoxic [C]arachidonic acid and histamine release. A minor amount of the released [C]arachidonic a......Thapsigargin is a potent skin irritating sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the roots of Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae). In rat peritoneal mast cells thapsigargin induced a calcium-dependent non-cytotoxic [C]arachidonic acid and histamine release. A minor amount of the released [C...

  7. Effect of dietary arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on survival, growth and pigmentation in larvae of common sole ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence confirms that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, DHA are involved in growth as well in pigmentation of marine fish larvae. In the present study we examined the performance of common sole larvae reared...... to increased dietary ARA content. However, pigmentation was not affected by inclusion levels of EPA or DHA when ARA was high. This, and no relation between DHA: EPA or ARA: EPA ratios and pigmentation and only a weak relation to ARA: DHA ratio, advocate for that it is the absolute concentration of ARA...

  8. Supplementation of DHA but not DHA with arachidonic acid during pregnancy and lactation influences general movement quality in 12-week-old term infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Saskia A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Doornbos, Bennard; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Schaafsma, Anne; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    DHA and arachidonic acid (AA) are important for neurodevelopment. A traditional neonatal neurological examination and the evaluation of general movement quality are sensitive techniques for assessing neurodevelopment in young infants. Mildly abnormal general movement,,; at 3 months have been

  9. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    glutamate and sPLA2 from bee venom. sPLA2, at concentrations eliciting low neurotoxicity (acid into triacylglycerols. Free [3H]arachidonic acid accumulated at higher enzyme concentrations......, from Taipan snake venom. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 blocked glutamate effects and partially inhibited sPLA2 OS2 but not sPLA2 from bee venom-induced arachidonic acid release. Thus, the synergy with glutamate and very low concentrations of exogenously added sPLA2 suggests a potential role......Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding...

  10. Dose-dependent changes in neuroinflammatory and arachidonic acid cascade markers with synaptic marker loss in rat lipopolysaccharide infusion model of neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellom Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation, caused by six days of intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, stimulates rat brain arachidonic acid (AA metabolism. The molecular changes associated with increased AA metabolism are not clear. We examined effects of a six-day infusion of a low-dose (0.5 ng/h and a high-dose (250 ng/h of LPS on neuroinflammatory, AA cascade, and pre- and post-synaptic markers in rat brain. We used artificial cerebrospinal fluid-infused brains as controls. Results Infusion of low- or high-dose LPS increased brain protein levels of TNFα, and iNOS, without significantly changing GFAP. High-dose LPS infusion upregulated brain protein and mRNA levels of AA cascade markers (cytosolic cPLA2-IVA, secretory sPLA2-V, cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase, and of transcription factor NF-κB p50 DNA binding activity. Both LPS doses increased cPLA2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase levels, while reducing protein levels of the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin. Post-synaptic markers drebrin and PSD95 protein levels were decreased with high- but not low-dose LPS. Conclusions Chronic LPS infusion has differential effects, depending on dose, on inflammatory, AA and synaptic markers in rat brain. Neuroinflammation associated with upregulated brain AA metabolism can lead to synaptic dysfunction.

  11. Arachidonic acid-mediated inhibition of a potassium current in the giant neurons of Aplysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to investigate the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in the modulation of an inwardly rectifying potassium current (I{sub R}) in the giant neurons of the marine snail, Aplysia californica. Using ({sup 3}H)AA as tracer, the intracellular free AA pool in Aplysia ganglia was found to be in a state of constant and rapid turnover through deacylation and reacylation of phospholipid, primarily phosphatidyl-inositol. This constant turnover was accompanied by a constant release of free AA and eicosanoids into the extracellular medium. The effects of three pharmacological agents were characterized with regard to AA metabolism in Aplysia ganglia. 4-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated liberation of AA from phospholipid, and 4-bromophenacylbromide (BPB), an inhibitor of phospholipate A{sub 2}, inhibited this liberation. Indomethacin at 250 {mu}M was found to inhibit uptake of AA, likely through inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase. These agents were also found to modulate I{sub R} in ways which were consistent with their biological effects: TPA inhibited I{sub R}, and both BPB and indomethacin stimulated I{sub R} . Modulation of I{sub R} by these substances was found not to involve cAMP metabolism. Acute application of exogenous AA did not affect I{sub R}; however, I{sub R} in giant neurons was found to be inhibited after dialysis with AA or other unsaturated fatty acids. Also, after perfusion with BSA overnight, a treatment which strips the giant neurons of AA in lipid storage, I{sub R} was found to have increased over 2-fold. This perfusion-induced increase was inhibited by the presence of AA or by pretreatment of the giant neurons with BPB. These results suggest AA, provided through constant turnover from phospholipid, mediates constitutive inhibition of I{sub R}.

  12. Extracts from Tribulus species may modulate platelet adhesion by interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to study the effects of crude extracts from Tribulus pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on selected biological functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus, at the final concentrations of 0.5, 5 and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin, was used. The effects of crude extracts from T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on adhesion of blood platelets to collagen were determined by method according to Tuszynski and Murphy. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In these studies we also compared the action of tested crude plant extracts with the effects of the polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, which has antiplatelet and antioxidative properties. The performed assays demonstrated that the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus and the phenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of this tested extract and its phenolic fraction on adhesion of resting platelets and thrombin - stimulated platelets to collagen was found. We also observed that the crude extract from T. pterocarpus, like the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced TBARS production in blood platelets. In the comparative studies, the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus was not found to be more effective antiplatelet factor, than the polyphenolic fraction from this plant. The results obtained suggest that T. pterocarpus may be a promising source of natural compounds, valuable in the prevention of the enhanced activity of blood platelets in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  13. The arachidonic acid-LTB4-BLT2 pathway enhances human B-CLL aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guriec, Nathalie; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine; Simon, Brigitte; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Tempescul, Adrian; Dréano, Yvonne; Salaün, Jean-Pierre; Berthou, Christian; Corcos, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Deregulation of the oxidative cascade of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been associated with several cancers, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA), is produced by B-CLL and contributes to their survival. The aim of the present study was to analyze the activity of the oxidative cascade of PUFAs in B-CLL. Purified B cells from patients and normal B CD5 positive cells were subjected to flow cytometry, Western-blot and RT-qPCR analyses. LTB4 plasma and intracellular concentrations were determined by ELISA. Our results showed that aggressive B-CLL tumor cells, i.e. cells with an annual proliferation index above 2, over-expressed calcium-dependent and calcium-independent phospholipases A2 (cPLA2-alpha and iPLA2-beta, respectively), 5-lipoxygenase (5LOX) and leukotriene A4 hydroxylase (LTA4H). Intracellular LTB4 levels were lower in the most aggressive cells than in cells with a smaller proliferation index, despite equivalent plasma levels, and lower expression of cytochrome P450 4F3A (CYP4F3A), one major enzyme involved in LTB4 inactivation. Since BLT2, a LTB4 membrane receptor was also more often expressed on aggressive tumor cells, and since a BLT2 inhibitor significantly impaired B-CLL viability in vitro, we propose that LTB4 was efficiently trapped onto BLT2 present on aggressive tumors, thereby eliciting an autocrine response. Taken together our results demonstrate a major deregulation of the pathway leading to LTB4 synthesis and degradation in B-CLL cells, and provide a framework for understanding how these modifications promote cell survival and proliferation, especially in the most aggressive BCLL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimated Dietary Intakes of Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid in Infants and Young Children Living in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Stewart; Gautier, Sheila; Salem, Norman

    2016-01-01

    There are only few data on dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake in infants from developing countries, and current global recommendations on intake during early life may not reflect the needs of the world's most vulnerable infants. The aim of the study was to provide estimates of intake of ARA and DHA in infants and young children aged 6-36 months who live in developing countries. FAO Food Balance Sheets and fatty acid composition data from Australian food composition tables were utilized to generate mean per capita intake estimates for DHA and ARA in developing countries. The median daily intake of DHA and ARA in children age 6-36 months in each country was determined by combining the fatty acid composition of breast milk and complementary foods with the estimated intakes being weighted according to median duration of any breastfeeding. The median daily dietary intake for ARA and DHA across 76 developing countries was 64.0 and 48.9 mg/day, respectively. The lowest complementary food intake of ARA and DHA was present in countries with the lowest gross national income and highest birth rates. Global recommendations on ARA and DHA in early life need to reflect the specific needs of infants and families living in low income countries, and country-specific food policies should address gaps between recommended and achieved intakes. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Reciprocal regulation of TREK-1 channels by arachidonic acid and CRH in mouse corticotropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy K; Smart, James L; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J; Tse, Amy

    2011-05-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is generated in the anterior pituitary gland upon stimulation by the ACTH secretagogue, CRH. Using the patch clamp technique, we examined the action of AA on the excitability of single pituitary corticotropes obtained from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses the enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the proopiomelanocortin promoter. CRH evoked depolarization, but AA caused hyperpolarization. Under voltage clamp condition, AA caused a rapid inhibition of the delayed rectifier K(+) current and then increased a background K(+) current. Inhibition of AA metabolism did not prevent the activation of the K(+) current by AA, suggesting a direct action of AA. The sensitivity of the AA-activated K(+) current to fluoxetine, chlorpromazine, extracellular acidification, diphenylbutylpiperidine antipsychotics, and the membrane permeable cAMP analog [8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP] suggest that the current is mediated via TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK)-1 channels. Activation of the CRH receptors that are coupled to the adenylate cyclase pathway suppressed the activation of TREK-1 current by AA and reversed the AA-mediated hyperpolarization. Intracellular acidification (pH 7.0) increased the basal amplitude of TREK-1 current and resulted in hyperpolarizaton. CRH suppressed the basal TREK-1 current in cells with intracellular acidification and caused depolarization. Our finding indicates that TREK-1 channels are important in setting the resting potential in corticotropes. The opposing actions of CRH and AA on the excitability of corticotropes raise the possibility that AA may act as a negative feedback regulator to reduce the stimulatory action of CRH and thus prevent excessive ACTH release during chronic stress.

  16. Regulation of rat intrapulmonary arterial tone by arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoliang Yan

    Full Text Available Arachidonic acid (AA and its metabolites, prostaglandins (PG are known to be involved in regulation of vascular homeostasis including vascular tone and vessel wall tension, but their potential role in Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of AA and PGE2 on the hypoxic response in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs.We carried out the investigation on IPAs by vessel tension measurement. Isotetrandrine (20 µM significantly inhibited phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of hypoxic vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (100 µM and NS398 attenuated KPSS-induced vessel contraction and phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of HPV, implying that COX-2 plays a primary role in the hypoxic response of rat IPAs. PGE2 alone caused a significant vasoconstriction in isolated rat IPAs. This constriction is mediated by EP4. Blockage of EP4 by L-161982 (1 µM significantly inhibited phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of hypoxic vasoconstriction. However, AH6809 (3 µM, an antagonist of EP1, EP2, EP3 and DP1 receptors, exerted no effect on KPSS or hypoxia induced vessel contraction. Increase of cellular cAMP by forskolin could significantly reduce KPSS-induced vessel contraction and abolish phase I, phase II b and phase II c of HPV.Our results demonstrated a vasoconstrictive effect of PGE2 on rat IPAs and this effect is via activation of EP4. Furthermore, our results suggest that intracellular cAMP plays dual roles in regulation of vascular tone, depending on the spatial distribution of cAMP and its coupling with EP receptor and Ca(2+ channels.

  17. Effects of 9,12,15-octadecatrien-6-ynoic acid on the metabolism of arachidonic acid in platelets and on the platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichardant, M; Michel, M; Borel, C; Fay, L; Crozier, G; Magnolato, D; Finot, P A

    1992-01-01

    An acetylenic fatty acid: 9,12,15-octadecatrien-6-ynoic acid (dicranin), extracted from Dicranum Scoparium was preincubated with platelets stimulated by exogenous arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6). Dicranin (10(-4) M) weakly inhibited the cyclooxygenase activity as assessed by measurement of 12-hydroxy-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) In contrast, the 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) synthesized by the 12-lipoxygenase was strongly increased by about 650%. The same effects were observed with 10(-6) M of dicranin but to a lesser extent. The main platelet hydroxylated dicranin metabolite determined by GC-MS was a 13-hydroxy derivative Platelet aggregation induced either by thrombin or by arachidonic acid or by U46619, an structural PGH2 analogue was inhibited by 10(-4) M of dicranin.

  18. Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Suppress Osteoclast Formation and Activity in Human CD14+ Monocytes, In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasonga, Abe E.; Deepak, Vishwa; Kruger, Marlena C.; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    An unbalanced diet can have adverse effects on health. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been the focus of research owing to their necessity of inclusion in a healthy diet. However, the effects of LCPUFAs on human osteoclast formation and function have not been explored before. A human CD14+ monocyte differentiation model was used to elucidate the effects of an ω-3 LCPUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and an ω-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid (AA), on osteoclast formation and activity. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors and stimulated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to generate osteoclasts. Data from this study revealed that both the LCPUFAs decreased osteoclast formation potential of CD14+ monocytes in a dose-dependent manner when treated at an early stage of differentiation. Moreover, when exposed at a late stage of osteoclast differentiation AA and DHA impaired the bone resorptive potential of mature osteoclasts without affecting osteoclast numbers. AA and DHA abrogated vitronectin receptor expression in differentiating as well as mature osteoclasts. In contrast, the degree of inhibition for calcitonin receptor expression varied between the LCPUFAs with only AA causing inhibition during osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, AA and DHA down regulated the expression of key osteoclast-specific genes in differentiating as well as mature osteoclasts. This study demonstrates for the first time that LCPUFAs can modulate osteoclast formation and function in a human primary osteoclast cell line. PMID:25867515

  19. Pythium irregulare fermentation to produce arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) using soybean processing co-products as substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Junyi; Wang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) were produced by Pythium irregulare fungus using soybean cotyledon fiber and soy skim, two co-products from soybean aqueous processing, as substrates in different fermentation systems. Parameters such as moisture content, substrate glucose addition, incubation time, and vegetable oil supplementation were found to be important in solid-state fermentation (SSF) of soybean fiber, which is to be used as animal feed with enriched long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Soybean fiber with 8 % (dwb) glucose supplementation for a 7-day SSF produced 1.3 mg of ARA and 1.6 mg of EPA in 1 g of dried substrate. When soy skim was used as substrate for submerged fermentation, total ARA yield of 125.7 mg/L and EPA yield of 92.4 mg/L were achieved with the supplementation of 7 % (w/v) soybean oil. This study demonstrates that the values of soybean fiber and soy skim co-products could be enhanced through the long-chain PUFA production by fermentation.

  20. Effects of Long-Term Oral Administration of Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on the Immune Functions of Young Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Shido

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have many functional activities, including cytotoxicity and the capacity to produce cytokines and chemokines. NK cell activity is regulated partly by eicosanoids, which are produced from arachidonic acid (ARA and eicosapentaenoic (EPA acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term therapy with ARA or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA on the cytotoxic effects of the NK cells of young rats, which were fed on a nonfish oil diet for two generations. Control oil, ARA (240 mg/kg BW/day or DHA (240 mg/kg BW/day were orally administrated to the rats for 13 weeks before determining the cytotoxic activity of NK cells from the spleen against YAC-1 mouse lymphoma cell line, as well as the plasma levels of docosanoids or eicosanoids and inflammatory cytokines. Long-term ARA administration significantly suppressed the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. Moreover, ARA administration significantly increased the plasma levels of ARA, prostaglandin (PG E2, and PGD2. However, DHA administration did not produce any different effects compared with those in the control rats. Furthermore, the inflammatory cytokine levels were not affected by the administration of ARA or DHA. These results suggest that long-term ARA administration has an inhibitory effect on the tumor cytotoxicity of NK cells in rat spleen lymphocytes owing to the enhanced synthesis of PGE2 and PGD2 from ARA because of the elevated plasma ARA levels in young rats.

  1. Participation of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism in the Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Soto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a pleiotropic genetic disease involving the cardiovascular system where a fibrillin-1 mutation is present. This mutation is associated with accelerated activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ1 which contributes to the formation of aneurysms in the root of the aorta. There is an imbalance in the synthesis of thromboxane A2 (TXA2 and prostacyclin, that is a consequence of a differential protein expression of the isoforms of cyclooxygenases (COXs, suggesting an alteration of arachidonic acid (AA metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyze the participation of AA metabolism associated with inflammatory factors in the dilation and dissection of the aortic aneurysm in patients with MFS. A decrease in AA (p = 0.02, an increase in oleic acid (OA, TGFβ1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 (p < 0.05, and COXs activity (p = 0.002 was found. The expressions of phospholipase A2 (PLA2, cytochrome P450 (CYP450 4A, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, COX2 and TXA2R (p < 0.05 showed a significant increase in the aortic aneurysm of patients with MFS compared to control subjects. COX1, 6-keto-prostaglandin 1 alpha (6-keto-PG1α and 8-isoprostane did not show significant changes. Histological examination of the aortas showed an increase of cystic necrosis, elastic fibers and collagen in MFS. The results suggest that there are inflammatory factors coupled to genetic factors that predispose to aortic endothelial dysfunction in the aortic tissue of patients with MFS. There is a decrease in the percentage of AA, associated with an increase of PLA2, COX2/TXA2R, CYP450 4A, and 5-LOX which leads to a greater synthesis of PGE2 than of 6-keto-PGF1α, thus contributing to the formation of the aortic aneurysm. The evident loss of the homeostasis in these mechanisms confirms that there is a participation of the AA pathway in the aneurysm progression in MFS.

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation in pregnancy differentially modulates arachidonic acid and DHA status across FADS genotypes in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, S A; Kerling, E H; Shaddy, D J; Li, S; Thodosoff, J M; Colombo, J; Carlson, S E

    2015-03-01

    Some FADS alleles are associated with lower DHA and ARA status assessed by the relative amount of arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in plasma and red blood cell (RBC) phospholipids (PL). We determined two FADS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a cohort of pregnant women and examined the relationship of FADS1rs174533 and FADS2rs174575 to DHA and ARA status before and after supplementation with 600mg per day of DHA. The 205 pregnant women studied were randomly assigned to placebo (mixed soy and corn oil) (n=96) or 600mg algal DHA (n=109) in 3 capsules per day for the last two trimesters of pregnancy. Women homozygous for the minor allele of FADS1rs174533 (but not FADS2rs174575) had lower DHA and ARA status at baseline. At delivery, minor allele homozygotes of FADS1rs174533 in the placebo group had lower RBC-DHA compared to major-allele carriers (P=0.031), while in the DHA-supplemented group, all genotypes had higher DHA status compared to baseline (P=0.001) and status did not differ by genotype (P=0.941). Surprisingly, DHA but not the placebo decreased ARA status of minor allele homozygotes of both FADS SNPs but not major allele homozygotes at delivery. Any physiological effects of changing the DHA to ARA ratio by increasing DHA intake appears to be greater in minor allele homozygotes of some FADS SNPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tamoxifen and the Rafoxifene analog LY117018: their effects on arachidonic acid release from cells in culture and on prostaglandin I2 production by rat liver cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine Lawrence

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tamoxifen is being used successfully to treat breast cancer. However, tamoxifen also increases the risk of developing endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women. Raloxifene also decreases breast cancer in women at high risk and may have a lower risk at developing cancer of the uterus. Tamoxifen has been shown to stimulate arachidonic acid release from rat liver cells. I have postulated that arachidonic acid release from cells may be associated with cancer chemoprevention. Methods Rat liver, rat glial, human colon carcinoma and human breast carcinoma cells were labelled with [3H] arachidonic acid. The release of the radiolabel from these cells during incubation with tamoxifen and the raloxifene analog LY117018 was measured. The prostaglandin I2 produced during incubation of the rat liver cells with μM concentrations of tamoxifen and the raloxifene analog was quantitatively estimated. Results Tamoxifen is about 5 times more effective than LY117018 at releasing arachidonic acid from all the cells tested. In rat liver cells only tamoxifen stimulates basal prostaglandin I2 production and that induced by lactacystin and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate. LY117018, however, blocks the tamoxifen stimulated prostaglandin production. The stimulated prostaglandin I2 production is rapid and not affected either by preincubation of the cells with actinomycin or by incubation with the estrogen antagonist ICI-182,780. Conclusions Tamoxifen and the raloxifene analog, LY117018, may prevent estrogen-independent as well as estrogen-dependent breast cancer by stimulating phospholipase activity and initiating arachidonic acid release. The release of arachidonic acid and/or molecular reactions that accompany that release may initiate pathways that prevent tumor growth. Oxygenation of the intracellularly released arachidonic acid and its metabolic products may mediate some of the pharmacological actions of tamoxifen and raloxifene.

  4. Crystal structure of a lipoxygenase in complex with substrate: the arachidonic acid-binding site of 8R-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neau, David B; Bender, Gunes; Boeglin, William E; Bartlett, Sue G; Brash, Alan R; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2014-11-14

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) play critical roles in mammalian biology in the generation of potent lipid mediators of the inflammatory response; consequently, they are targets for the development of isoform-specific inhibitors. The regio- and stereo-specificity of the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by the enzymes is understood in terms of the chemistry, but structural observation of the enzyme-substrate interactions is lacking. Although several LOX crystal structures are available, heretofore the rapid oxygenation of bound substrate has precluded capture of the enzyme-substrate complex, leaving a gap between chemical and structural insights. In this report, we describe the 2.0 Å resolution structure of 8R-LOX in complex with arachidonic acid obtained under anaerobic conditions. Subtle rearrangements, primarily in the side chains of three amino acids, allow binding of arachidonic acid in a catalytically competent conformation. Accompanying experimental work supports a model in which both substrate tethering and cavity depth contribute to positioning the appropriate carbon at the catalytic machinery. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Effect of extra virgin olive oil components on the arachidonic acid cascade, colorectal cancer and colon cancer cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Storniolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mediterranean diet (MD reduced the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC, and olive oil, the primary source of fat in the MD, has also been found to have a protective effect. However, animals fed with oleic acid present a high number of intestinal tumours, suggesting that oleic acid and olive oil consumption can exert different effects on CRC. Considering that extra virgin olive oil (EVOO is a complex mix of fatty acids and minor compounds such as polyphenols, hydrocarbons, phytosterols and triterpenes; and that these compounds have antioxidant activity and consequently they can modulate the arachidonic acid (AA cascade and eicosanoid synthesis. This review analyzes the state of the art of olive oil components on the AA cascade and cellular mechanism involved in CRC such as intestinal epithelial cell growth/apoptosis, to understand the fact that the consumption of seed oils with high oleic content or EVOO will probably have different effects on CRC development.

  6. Structure-activity relationship studies of 1-substituted 3-dodecanoylindole-2-carboxylic acids as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A2-mediated arachidonic acid release in intact platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessbach, Klaus; Klimt, Monika; Schulze Elfringhoff, Alwine; Lehr, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    A series of 3-dodecanoylindole-2-carboxylic acid derivatives with varied carboxylic acid substituents at the indole 1-position were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit arachidonic acid release in human platelets mediated by the cytosolic phospholipase A(2). Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that increasing the polarity of these substituents by the introduction of additional polar groups in the proximity of the carboxylic acid moiety reduced activity. Conformational restriction of the indole-1-carboxylic acid substituents in distinct positions as well as extending the length of these residues led to compounds which did not substantially differ in their potencies.

  7. Lung, aorta, and platelet metabolism of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid in vitamin E deficient rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentovic, M.A.; Gairola, C.; Lubawy, W.C.

    1982-08-01

    /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid metabolism was determined in aortas, platelets, and perfused lungs from rats pair fed a basal diet supplemented with 0 or 100 ppm vitamin E for 11 weeks. Spontaneous erythrocyte hemolysis tests showed 92% and 8% hemolysis for the 0 and 100 ppm vitamin E groups, respectively. Elevated lung homogenate levels of malonaldehyde in the 0 ppm group confirmed its deficient vitamin E status. Aortas from the vitamin E deficient group synthesized 54% less prostacyclin than aortas from the supplemented group (p less than 0.05). Although thromboxane generation by platelets from the vitamin E deficient group exhibited a 37% increase, this difference was not statistically significant compared to the supplemented animals. Greater amounts of PGE2, PGF2 alpha, TXB2, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha were obtained in albumin buffer perfusates from lungs of vitamin E deficient rats than in those from supplemented rats. Significant differences (p less than 0.05) were noticed, however, only for PGE2 and PGF2 alpha. These studies indicate that vitamin E quantitatively alters arachidonic acid metabolism in aortic and lung tissue but its effect on thromboxane synthesis by platelets is less marked.

  8. Roles of phospholipase A2 isoforms in swelling- and melittin-induced arachidonic acid release and taurine efflux in NIH3T3 fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Poulsen, Kristian Arild; Lambert, Ian H.

    2006-01-01

    by cell swelling but also decreased by cell shrinkage. Arachidonic acid release to the cell exterior was similarly decreased by shrinkage yet not detectably increased by swelling. NIH3T3 cells were found to express cytosolic calcium-dependent cPLA2-IVA, cPLA2-IVB, cPLA2-IVC, iPLA2-VIA, iPLA2-VIB......, and secretory sPLA2-V. Arachidonic acid release from swollen cells was partially inhibited by BEL and by the sPLA2-inhibitor manoalide. Cell swelling elicited BEL-sensitive arachidonic acid release from the nucleus, to which iPLA2-VIA localized. Exposure to the bee venom peptide melittin, to increase PLA2...

  9. Effects of dronedarone, amiodarone and their active metabolites on sequential metabolism of arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhanis, Aneesh; Tram, Nhan Dai Thien; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2017-12-15

    Cardiac enzymes such as cytochrome P450 2J2 (CYP2J2) metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to cardioprotective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which in turn are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). As EETs and less potent DHETs exhibit cardioprotective and vasoprotective functions, optimum levels of cardiac EETs are paramount in cardiac homeostasis. Previously, we demonstrated that dronedarone, amiodarone and their main metabolites, namely N-desbutyldronedarone (NDBD) and N-desethylamiodarone (NDEA), potently inhibit human cardiac CYP2J2-mediated astemizole metabolism in vitro. In this study, we investigated the inhibition of recombinant human CYP450 enzymes (rhCYP2J2, rhCYP2C8, rhCYP2C9)-mediated AA metabolism and human recombinant sEH (rhsEH)-mediated EET metabolism by dronedarone, amiodarone, NDBD and NDEA. A static model describing sequential metabolism was further developed to predict the aggregate effect of dual-inhibition of rhCYP2J2 and rhsEH on the fold-of 14,15-EET level (CEET'/CEET). Dronedarone, amiodarone and NDBD inhibit rhCYP2J2-mediated metabolism of AA to 14,15-EET with Ki values of 3.25, 5.48, 1.39µM respectively. Additionally, dronedarone, amiodarone, NDBD and NDEA inhibit rhsEH-mediated metabolism of 14,15-EET to 14,15-DHET with Ki values of 5.10, 13.08, 2.04, 1.88µM respectively. Based on static sequential metabolism modelling, dronedarone (CEET'/CEET=0.85), amiodarone (CEET'/CEET=0.48) and NDBD (CEET'/CEET=0.76) were predicted to decrease cardiac 14,15-EET level whereas NDEA (CEET'/CEET>35.5) was predicted to elevate it. Based on our novel findings, we postulate the differential cardiac exacerbation potential of dronedarone and amiodarone is partly associated with their differential inhibition potencies of cardiac CYP2J2 and sEH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Decreased arachidonic acid content and metabolism in tissues of NZB/W F1 females fed a diet containing 0. 45% dehydroisoandrosterone (DHA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, A.; Cottam, G.L.

    1987-05-01

    A diet containing 0.45% DHA fed to NZB/W mice, a model of systemic lupus erythematosus, delays the time of onset, improves survival and decreases the formation of antibodies to ds-DNA. Essential fatty acid-deficient diets or inclusion of eicosapentaenoic acid have similar beneficial effects and led them to investigate arachidonic acid metabolism in response to feeding DHA. The arachidonic acid content of plasma cholesteryl ester decreased from 37.4 +/- 2.2 to 28.2 +/- 1.3 mg%. In total liver phospholipid the value decreased from 18.1 +/- 0.52 to 13.7 +/- 1.3 mg%, in total kidney phospholipid the value decreased from 24.10 +/- 0.87 to 20.7 +/- 0.32 mg% and in resident peritoneal macrophages the value decreased from 15.4 +/- 4.6 to 3.6 +/- 1.4 mg%. The metabolism of exogenous (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid by resident peritoneal macrophages in response to Zymosan stimulation for 2 hr was examined by extraction of metabolites and separation by HPLC. Cells isolated from DHA-fed animals produced less PGE2 than controls, yet similar amounts of 6-keto PGF1..cap alpha.. were produced. Arachidonic acid metabolites have significant effects on the immune system and may be a mechanism involved in the benefits obtained by inclusion of DHA in the diet.

  11. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  12. Stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells by hormones and drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feyen, J.H.; van der Wilt, G.; Moonen, P.; Di Bon, A.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1984-12-01

    The effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH), dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2 D3), thrombin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (PMA) on the biosynthesis and release of arachidonic acid metabolites were studied in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells isolated from 18-day-old chick embryo calvaria. Cells were labelled with (/sup 14/C)-arachidonic acid for 30 h. The radioactive eicosanoids were extracted from the cell culture media after a further 30 h stimulation period and analysed on a PRP-1 column by HPLC. The radioactive products were characterized by co-elution of (/sup 3/H) standard prostanoids. Osteoblasts showed a basal release of the prostanoids 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, TXB2, PGF2 alpha, PGE2, PGD2 and PGB2, the latter being the most abundant one. Indomethacin (10(-5) M) effectively inhibited the basal release, but not that of an as yet unidentified compound. The release of prostanoids was stimulated by PTH (2 U/ml), thrombin (0.4 NIH/ml), EGF (50 ng/ml) and PMA (25 ng/ml), the latter being by far the most potent one. 1,25-(OH)2D3 was found to slightly inhibit the prostanoid release. These results indicate: (1) primary cultures of osteoblasts synthesize several prostaglandins, thromboxane B2 and one unidentified product. (2) the action on bone of PTH and the various drugs tested may be, at least partly, mediated by an increased prostaglandin production by osteoblasts. Clearly this does not apply to 1,25-(OH)2D3.

  13. Evaluation of a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase, with arachidonic acid oil derived from Mortierella alpina in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, R.A.; Lina, B.A.R.; Haggitt, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid oil (ARA-oil) derived from the fungus Mortierella alpina for use in infant nutrition was tested in a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study in rats, preceded by an in utero exposure phase. The ARA-oil was administered as admixture to the rodent diet at dose levels of 3000 ppm,

  14. The relation between the omega-3 index and arachidonic acid is bell shaped : Synergistic at low EPA plus DHA status and antagonistic at high EPA plus DHA status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luxwolda, Martine F.; Kuipers, Remko S.; Smit, Ella N.; Velzing-Aarts, Francien V.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The relation between docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) vs. arachidonic acid (AA) seems characterized by both synergism and antagonism. Materials and methods: Investigate the relation between EPA + DHA and AA in populations with a wide range of EPA + DHA status and across

  15. The synthesis and in vivo pharmacokinetics of fluorinated arachidonic acid: implications for imaging neuroinflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pichika, Rama; Taha, Ameer Y; Gao, Fei; Kotta, Kishore; Cheon, Yewon; Chang, Lisa; Kiesewetter, Dale; Rapoport, Stanley I; Eckelman, William C

    2012-01-01

    ...]AA and with PET in Alzheimer disease patients using [1-(11)C]AA. Radiotracer brain AA uptake is independent of cerebral blood flow, making it an ideal tracer despite altered brain functional activity. However...

  16. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation decreases asymmetric dimethyl arginine and arachidonate accumulation in aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Laura; Lodovici, Maura; Visioli, Francesco; Sartiani, Laura; Cioni, Laura; Alfarano, Chiara; Banchelli, Grazia; Pirisino, Renato; Cecchi, Enrica; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Mugelli, Alessandro

    2005-09-01

    Plasma accumulation of asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) is considered as a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and a strong predictor for coronary heart diseases. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) increasing plasma levels have been positively associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality with a mechanism( s) yet unclear. We hypothesised that ADMA reduction might be a part of EPA and DHA beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To verify this hypothesis we measured ADMA plasma levels in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) supplemented for 8 weeks with EPA and DHA. 16-month-old SHR were supplemented with EPA and DHA (EPA-DHA) or with olive oil (1 g/kg/day; OLIVE). At the end of the treatments, the plasma of each animal was analysed for 1) the total fatty acid composition, by gas-cromatography, 2) ADMA levels, by high pressure liquid chromatography, 3) nitrite and homocysteine concentration by chemiluminescence and by polarisation immunoassay respectively. Moreover, the activity of dimethyl arginine dimethyl amino hydrolase, the main enzyme involved in ADMA metabolism, was measured spectrophotometrically in the kidney from each rat. Animals supplemented with EPA and DHA showed: 1) lower ADMA and arachidonate plasma levels (587.4 +/- 113.7 nM and 0.49 +/- 0.11 mM respectively) than the values found in OLIVE rats (1365 +/- 399 nM and 1.07 +/- 0.07 mM respectively) 2) higher nitrite content (0.73 +/- 0.05 microM) than OLIVE (0.23 +/- 0.08 microM). EPA and DHA supplementation reduced ADMA accumulation in SHR in parallel with a decrease of arachidonate availability. This finding suggests that the control of the inflammatory ground of endothelium might play an important role in EPA and DHA effect on this novel and highly predictive cardiovascular risk factor.

  17. Consumption of pomegranate juice decreases blood lipid peroxidation and levels of arachidonic acid in women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojadinovic, Milica I; Arsic, Aleksandra C; Debeljak-Martacic, Jasmina D; Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra I; Kardum, Nevena Dj; Popovic, Tamara B; Glibetic, Marija D

    2017-04-01

    Pomegranate juice is a rich source of polyphenols and is thus a promising dietary antioxidant with numerous health-promoting effects. These include a beneficial impact on cardiovascular health that could be partly attributed to the effects of polyphenols on lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether consumption of pomegranate juice for 6 weeks could modify lipid peroxidation and phospholipid fatty acid composition of plasma and erythrocytes in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Twenty-three women, aged 40-60 years, were enrolled and randomly assigned into two groups: the intervention group, in which each participant consumed 300 mL of juice per day for 6 weeks; and a control group. A statistically significant decrease in the relative amount of arachidonic acid (P lipids and the values for blood pressure were not changed during the study. The results obtained indicate a positive impact of the consumption of pomegranate juice on lipid peroxidation and fatty acid status in subjects with metabolic syndrome and suggest potential anti-inflammatory and cardio-protective effects. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Influence of omega-6 PUFA arachidonic acid and bone marrow adipocytes on metastatic spread from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M D; Hart, C; Gazi, E; Gardner, P; Lockyer, N; Clarke, N

    2010-01-19

    Prostate cancer (CaP) preferentially metastasises to the bone, and we have previously shown that the poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) is a potent stimulator of CaP invasion. Here we present that AA promotes CaP invasion by inducing bone marrow adipocyte formation. Boyden invasion-chamber assays assessed the ability of dietary oils, their PUFA components, and specific PUFA-loaded adipocytes to induce PC-3 invasion. Lipid transfer and metabolism was followed using deuterated AA and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Poly-unsaturated fatty acid constituents, but not their corresponding dietary oils, induced PC-3 invasion. PUFAs induce bone marrow adipocyte (BM-Ad) differentiation with AA inducing higher levels of BM-Ad differentiation, as compared with other PUFAs (3998+/-514.4 vs 932+/-265.8; P=0.00002), which stimulated greater PC-3 invasion than free AA (22 408.5+/-607.4 vs 16 236+/-313.9; P=0.01111) or adipocytes generated in the presence of other PUFAs. In bone marrow co-culture PC-3 and BM-Ad interactions result in direct uptake and metabolism of AA by PC-3 cells, destruction of the adipocyte and subsequent formation of a bone metastasis. The data supports the hypothesis that AA not only promotes CaP invasion, it also prepares the 'soil', making it more supportive for implantation and propagation of the migrating metastatic cell.

  19. Arachidonic acid is involved in the regulation of hCG induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didolkar, A.K.; Sundaram, K.

    1987-07-27

    Phospholipase C (PLC), an enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipid- phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate to insositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol, and Phorbol 12, myristate 13, acetate (PMA) could significantly stimulate testosterone (T) secretion from Leydig cells. Arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated T secretion by about 2 fold. The steroidogenic effect of PLC and AA was biphasic. At low concentrations both PLC and AA augmented hCG induced T secretion, while at higher concentrations they inhibited steroid production. AA also had a biphasic effect on hCG induced cyclic AMP secretion. 5,8,11,14 Eicosatetrayenoic acid, a general inhibitor of AA metabolism, and Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an inhibitor of the lipoxygenase pathway of AA metabolism, inhibited hCG induced T secretion while indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase pathway, had no effect on hCG induced T secretion. The authors conclude from these data that AA plays a role in the regulation of hCG induced steroidogenic responses in rat Leydig cells and that the metabolite(s) of AA that are involved are not cyclo-oxygenase products. 28 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Arachidonic Acid, but Not Omega-3 Index, Relates to the Prevalence and Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Population-Based Study of Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S; Kristensen, Katrine L; Burillo, Elena

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models support dietary omega-3 fatty acids protection against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but clinical data are scarce. The sum of red blood cell proportions of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, known as omega-3 index, is a valid surrogate for long...... patients reached criteria for vascular surgical repair. Participants were high consumers of omega-3 (average omega-3 index: 7.6%). No significant associations were found for omega-3 index. In contrast, arachidonic acid in AAA patients was higher than in controls (P...% confidence interval, 1.127-2.114; P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Omega-3 index is unrelated to men with AAA from a country in which fish consumption is customarily high. Arachidonic acid is associated with AAA presence and progression. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique...

  1. Mechanisms of formation and function of eosinophil lipid bodies: inducible intracellular sites involved in arachidonic acid metabolism

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    Bozza Patricia T

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies, inducible lipid-rich cytoplasmic inclusions, are characteristically abundant in cells associated with inflammation, including eosinophils. Here we reviewed the formation and function of lipid bodies in human eosinophils. We now have evidence that the formation of lipid bodies is not attributable to adverse mechanisms, but is centrally mediated by specific signal transduction pathways. Arachidonic acid and other cis fatty acids by an NSAID-inhibitable process, diglycerides, and PAF by a 5-lipoxygenase dependent pathway are potent stimulators of lipid body induction. Lipid body formation develops rapidly by processes that involve PKC, PLC, and de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. These structures clearly serve as repositoires of arachidonyl-phospholipids and are more than inert depots. Specific enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAP kinases, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, associate with lipid bodies. Lipid bodies appear to be dynamic, organelle-like structures involved in intracellular pathways of lipid mobilization and metabolism. Indeed, increases in lipid body numbers correlated with enhanced production of both lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We hypothesize that lipid bodies are distinct inducible sites for generating eicosanoids as paracrine mediators with varied activities in inflammation. The capacity of lipid body formation to be specifically and rapidly induced in leukocytes enhances eicosanoid mediator formation, and conversely pharmacologic inhibition of lipid body induction represents a potential novel and specific target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  2. Arachidonic acid is important for efficient use of light by the microalga Lobosphaera incisa under chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, Boris; Pal-Nath, Dipasmita; Lukyanov, Alexandr; Smolskaya, Sviatlana; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Didi-Cohen, Shoshana; Boussiba, Sammy; Cohen, Zvi; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Solovchenko, Alexei

    2017-09-01

    The oleaginous microalga Lobosphaera incisa (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) contains arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4 n-6) in all membrane glycerolipids and in the storage lipid triacylglycerol. The optimal growth temperature of the wild-type (WT) strain is 25°C; chilling temperatures (≤15°C) slow its growth. This effect is more pronounced in the delta-5-desaturase ARA-deficient mutant P127, in which ARA is replaced with dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3 n-6). In nutrient-replete cells grown at 25°C, the major chloroplast lipid monogalactosylglycerol (MGDG) was dominated by C18/C16 species in both strains. Yet ARA constituted over 10% of the total fatty acids in the WT MGDG as a component of C20/C18 and C20/C20 species, whereas DGLA was only a minor component of MGDG in P127. Both strains increased the percentage of 18:3 n-3 in membrane lipids under chilling temperatures. The temperature downshift led to a dramatic increase in triacylglycerol at the expense of chloroplast lipids. WT and P127 showed a similarly high photochemical quantum yield of photosystem II, whereas non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and violaxanthin de-epoxidation were drastically higher in P127, especially at 15°C. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that ARA-containing MGDG might contribute to sustaining chloroplast membrane fluidity upon dropping to the chilling temperature. We hypothesize that conformational changes in chloroplast membranes and increased rigidity of the ARA-deficient MGDG of P127 at chilling temperatures are not compensated by trienoic fatty acids. This might 'lock' violaxanthin de-epoxidase in the activated state causing high constitutive NPQ and alleviate the risk of photodamage under chilling conditions in the mutant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Arachidonic acid drives postnatal neurogenesis and elicits a beneficial effect on prepulse inhibition, a biological trait of psychiatric illnesses.

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    Motoko Maekawa

    Full Text Available Prepulse inhibition (PPI is a compelling endophenotype (biological markers for mental disorders including schizophrenia. In a previous study, we identified Fabp7, a fatty acid binding protein 7 as one of the genes controlling PPI in mice and showed that this gene was associated with schizophrenia. We also demonstrated that disrupting Fabp7 dampened hippocampal neurogenesis. In this study, we examined a link between neurogenesis and PPI using different animal models and exploring the possibility of postnatal manipulation of neurogenesis affecting PPI, since gene-deficient mice show biological disturbances from prenatal stages. In parallel, we tested the potential for dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, arachidonic acid (ARA and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, to promote neurogenesis and improve PPI. PUFAs are ligands for Fabp members and are abundantly expressed in neural stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus. Our results are: (1 an independent model animal, Pax6 (+/- rats, exhibited PPI deficits along with impaired postnatal neurogenesis; (2 methylazoxymethanol acetate (an anti-proliferative drug elicited decreased neurogenesis even in postnatal period, and PPI defects in young adult rats (10 weeks when the drug was given at the juvenile stage (4-5 weeks; (3 administering ARA for 4 weeks after birth promoted neurogenesis in wild type rats; (4 raising Pax6 (+/- pups on an ARA-containing diet enhanced neurogenesis and partially improved PPI in adult animals. These results suggest the potential benefit of ARA in ameliorating PPI deficits relevant to psychiatric disorders and suggest that the effect may be correlated with augmented postnatal neurogenesis.

  4. Phospholipid, arachidonate and eicosanoid signaling in schizophrenia

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    Messamore Erik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the potential role of arachidonic acid in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We discuss how abnormal levels of arachidonic acid may arise, and how dysregulation of signaling molecules derived from it have the potential to disrupt not only dopamine signaling, but numerous other physiological processes associated with the illness. Pharmacological doses of niacin stimulate the release of arachidonic acid; and arachidonic acid-derived molecules in turn dilate blood vessels in the skin. A blunted skin flush response to niacin is reliably observed among patients with schizophrenia. The niacin response abnormality may thus serve as a biomarker to identify a physiological subtype of schizophrenia associated with defective arachidonic acid-derived signaling.

  5. SIRT1 prevents pulmonary thrombus formation induced by arachidonic acid via downregulation of PAF receptor expression in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hak; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Oh, Sae Ock; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-12-01

    SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, is critically involved in cellular response to stress and modulates cardiovascular risk factors. However, its role in thrombus formation is largely unknown. Thus, this study investigated the effect of SIRT1 on pulmonary thrombus formation, and then identified its role in the modulation of platelet aggregation. In isolated human platelets, cell aggregation was increased by various platelet activators, such as platelet activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA), ADP, and thrombin. AA- and PAF-mediated platelet aggregations were suppressed by WEB2086, a PAF receptor (PAFR) antagonist. Pulmonary thrombus formation induced by PAF or AA was also attenuated by WEB2086, suggesting that PAFR plays a key role in AA-induced platelet aggregation. In platelets isolated from SIRT1-TG mice as well as in platelets treated with resveratrol or reSIRT1, PAFR expression was decreased, whereas this expressional downregulation by SIRT1 activators was inhibited in platelets treated with MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor) or NH 4 Cl (a lysosome inhibitor). Furthermore, platelet aggregation induced by AA was markedly attenuated by resveratrol and reSIRT1. Likewise, the increased pulmonary thrombus formation in mice treated with AA was also attenuated by SIRT1 activators. In line with these results, pulmonary thrombus formation was markedly attenuated in SIRT1-TG mice. Taken together, this study showed that SIRT1 downregulates PAFR expression on platelets via proteasomal and lysosomal pathways, and that this downregulation inhibits platelet aggregation in vitro and pulmonary thrombus formation in vivo.

  6. Arachidonic acid containing phosphatidylcholine increases due to microglial activation in ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn following spared sciatic nerve injury.

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    Tomohiro Banno

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury induces substantial molecular changes in the somatosensory system that leads to maladaptive plasticity and cause neuropathic pain. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for the development of neuropathic pain is essential to the development of novel rationally designed therapeutics. Although lipids make up to half of the dry weight of the spinal cord, their relation with the development of neuropathic pain is poorly understood. We aimed to elucidate the regulation of spinal lipids in response to neuropathic peripheral nerve injury in mice by utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, which allows visualization of lipid distribution within the cord. We found that arachidonic acid (AA containing [PC(diacyl-16:0/20:4+K]+ was increased temporarily at superficial ipsilateral dorsal horn seven days after spared nerve injury (SNI. The spatiotemporal changes in lipid concentration resembled microglia activation as defined by ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1 immunohistochemistry. Suppression of microglial function through minocycline administration resulted in attenuation of hypersensitivity and reduces [PC(diacyl-16:0/20:4+K]+ elevation in the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggested that AA containing [PC(diacyl-16:0/20:4+K]+ is related to hypersensitivity evoked by SNI and implicate microglial cell activation in this lipid production.

  7. Hydroxyurea Therapy Mobilises Arachidonic Acid from Inner Cell Membrane Aminophospholipids in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease

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    A. A. Daak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic compound hydroxyurea (HU is effective therapy for sickle cell disease. However, its effect on unsaturated membrane lipids is unknown. Red cell fatty acids were investigated in HU-treated (n=19 and HU-untreated (n=17 sickle cell patients and controls (n=20. The HU-treated compared with the HU-untreated patients had lower arachidonic (AA acid level in ethanolamine, physphoglycerids (EPG (22.9±1.2   versus   24.0±1.1%,  P<0.05 serine SPG (22.13±2.2   versus   24.9±2.3%,  P<0.01 phosphoglycerides. The treated patients and controls had comparable levels of docosahexaenoic (DHA and total n-3 fatty acids in EPG and choline phosphoglycerides (CPG. In contrast, the untreated group had significantly (P<0.05 lower DHA and total n-3 compared with the controls in EPG (2.7±0.4   versus   3.2±0.6% and 4.6±0.5   versus   5.2±0.7% and CPG (0.7±0.2   versus   1.0±0.2% and 1.2±0.2   versus   1.4±0.3. HU is known to activate cytosolic phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase 2, and from this study, it appears to induce mobilisation of AA from the inner cell membrane EPG and SPG. Hence, eicosanoids generated from the released AA may play a role in clinical improvements which occur in HU-treated patients.

  8. Effect of dietary fat saturation on lipid metabolism, arachidonic acid turnover and peritoneal macrophage oxidative stress in mice

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    L.B. Oliveros

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of a saturated fat diet on lipid metabolism and arachidonic acid (AA turnover in mouse resident peritoneal macrophages. The pro-oxidative effect of this diet was also studied. Female C57BL/6 mice were weaned at 21 days of age and assigned to either the experimental diet containing coconut oil (COCO diet, or the control diet containing soybean oil as fat source (10 mice per group. The fat content of each diet was 15% (w/w. Mice were fed for 6 weeks and then sacrificed. The concentration of total lipids, triglycerides, (LDL + VLDL-cholesterol, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS and reduced glutathione were increased in the plasma of mice fed the COCO diet, without changes in phospholipid or total cholesterol concentrations compared to control. The concentrations of total cholesterol, free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, and TBARS were increased in the macrophages of COCO-fed mice, while the content of total phospholipids did not change. The phospholipid composition showed an increase of phosphatidylcholine and a decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine. The [³H]-AA distribution in the phospholipid classes showed an increase in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Incorporation of [³H]-cholesterol into the macrophages of COCO-fed mice and into the cholesterol ester fraction was increased. The COCO diet did not affect [³H]-AA uptake but induced an increase in [³H]-AA release. The COCO diet also enhanced AA mobilization induced by lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that the COCO diet, high in saturated fatty acids, alters the lipid metabolism and AA turnover of peritoneal macrophages in female mice and also produces a significant degree of oxidative stress.

  9. Supplementation of arachidonic acid-enriched oil increases arachidonic acid contents in plasma phospholipids, but does not increase their metabolites and clinical parameters in Japanese healthy elderly individuals: a randomized controlled study

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    Kakutani Saki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of arachidonic acid (ARA among the elderly has recently gained increased attention. The effects of ARA supplementation in the elderly are not fully understood, although ARA is considered to be associated with various diseases. We investigate whether ARA supplementation to Japanese elderly subjects affects clinical parameters involved in cardiovascular, inflammatory, and allergic diseases. We also examine the levels of ARA metabolites such as prostanoids during intervention. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled parallel group intervention trial. ARA-enriched oil (240 or 720 mg ARA per day or placebo was administered to Japanese healthy men and women aged 55-70 years for 4 weeks followed by a 4-week washout period. The fatty acid contents of plasma phospholipids, clinical parameters, and ARA metabolites were determined at baseline, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Results The ARA content in plasma phospholipids in the ARA-administrated groups increased dose-dependently and was almost the same at 2 weeks and at 4 weeks. The elevated ARA content decreased to nearly baseline during a 4-week washout period. During the supplementation and washout periods, no changes were observed in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents. There were no changes in clinical blood parameters related to cardiovascular, inflammatory and allergic diseases. ARA supplementation did not alter the level of ARA metabolites such as urinary 11-dehydro thromboxane B2, 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin (PG F1α and 9,15-dioxo-11α-hydroxy-13,14-dihydro-2,3,4,5-tetranor-prostan-1,20-dioic acid (tetranor-PGEM, and plasma PGE2 and lipoxin A4. ARA in plasma phospholipids was not correlated with ARA metabolite levels in the blood or urine. Conclusion These results indicate that ARA supplementation, even at a relatively high dose, does not increase ARA metabolites, and suggest that it does not induce cardiovascular

  10. Food sources of arachidonic acid (PFA 20:4), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

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    Food sources of arachidonic acid (PFA 20:4), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

  11. Novel liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method shows that vitamin E deficiency depletes arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos

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    Katie M. Lebold

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that embryogenesis depends upon α-tocopherol (E to protect embryo polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs from lipid peroxidation, new methodologies were applied to measure α-tocopherol and fatty acids in extracts from saponified zebrafish embryos. A solid phase extraction method was developed to separate the analyte classes, using a mixed mode cartridge (reverse phase, π–π bonding, strong anion exchange, then α-tocopherol and cholesterol were measured using standard techniques, while the fatty acids were quantitated using a novel, reverse phase liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS approach. We also determined if α-tocopherol status alters embryonic lipid peroxidation products by analyzing 24 different oxidized products of arachidonic or docosahexaenoic (DHA acids in embryos using LC with hybrid quadrupole-time of flight MS. Adult zebrafish were fed E− or E+ diets for 4 months, and then were spawned to obtain E− and E+ embryos. Between 24 and 72 hours post-fertilization (hpf, arachidonic acid decreased 3-times faster in E− (21 pg/h compared with E+ embryos (7 pg/h, P<0.0001, while both α-tocopherol and DHA concentrations decreased only in E− embryos. At 36 hpf, E− embryos contained double the 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acids and 7-hydroxy-DHA concentrations, while other hydroxy-lipids remained unchanged. Vitamin E deficiency during embryogenesis depleted DHA and arachidonic acid, and increased hydroxy-fatty acids derived from these PUFA, suggesting that α-tocopherol is necessary to protect these critical fatty acids.

  12. Relation between defective regulation of arachidonic acid release and symptoms in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandvik, B; Brönnegård, M; Gilljam, H; Carlstedt-Duke, J

    1988-01-01

    A hypothesis is formed about the basic defect in CF based on the findings of 1) a defective inhibition of AA release by dexamethasone stimulation of lymphocytes from patients with CF, probably due to a defect in or absence of lipocortin and 2) the essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) in CF reported by different authors for 25 years. Both in lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with CF increased AA release has been demonstrated. AA, substrate for the eicosanoid system (prostaglandins, leukotrienes, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, thromboxanes), has been shown to increase mucus release, influence chloride transport and the stimulus-secretion coupling (Ca++ balance), all factors suggested as basic defects in CF. The increased release of AA might explain the development of EFAD, since AA is synthesized from linoleic acid. In animals EFAD gives rise to symptoms similar to those in CF, e.g. defect Na transport, liver steatosis, increased caloric need, disturbed insulin release, increased bacterial colonization of airways, and decreased immune response. Regular supplementation with fat emulsion (Intralipid) to CF patients normalizes the renal Na transport and prevents liver steatosis. We suggest that the basic defect in CF is a defect in or absence of lipocortin, causing an increased release of AA, which regulates synthesis in the eicosanoid system. An increase of the products in this system gives rise to the basic signs and symptoms of CF. The resulting EFAD is dependent on the rate of AA turnover and could explain most of the clinical symptoms and the progression of the disease.

  13. Associations between dietary n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and arachidonic acid compositions in plasma and erythrocytes in young and elderly Japanese volunteers

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    Kawabata Terue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported that the compositions of arachidonic acid (ARA in erythrocytes and plasma phospholipids (PL in the elderly were lower than those in the young, though the ARA intake was nearly identical. Objective We further analyzed data in four study groups with different ages and sexes, and determined that the blood ARA levels were affected by the kinds of dietary fatty acids ingested. Methods One hundred and four healthy young and elderly volunteers were recruited. Dietary records together with photographic records from 28 consecutive days were reviewed and the fatty acid composition in plasma lipid fractions and erythrocyte PL was analyzed. Results No correlations for ARA between dietary fatty acids and blood lipid fractions were observed. A significant negative correlation between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA intake and ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was observed. ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was significantly lower in elderly subjects than in young subjects, because EPA and DHA intake in elderly subjects was higher than in young subjects. However, after removing the effect of dietary EPA+DHA intake, the ARA composition in erythrocyte PL in elderly subjects was significantly lower than that in young subjects. Conclusions Changes in physical conditions with aging influenced the low ARA composition of erythrocyte in elderly subjects in addition to the effects of dietary EPA and DHA.

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals unique C4-like photosynthesis and oil body formation in an arachidonic acid-rich microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl H4301.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Chen, Si-Hong; Li, Yan; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2013-06-13

    Arachidonic acid (ArA) is important for human health because it is one of the major components of mammalian brain membrane phospholipids. The interest in ArA inspired the search for a new sustainable source, and the green microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl H4301 has been found a potential ArA-producer due to a high content of intracellular ArA. To gain more molecular information about metabolism pathways, including the biosynthesis of ArA in the non-model microalga, a transcriptomic analysis was performed. The 454 pyrosequencing generated 371,740 high-quality reads, which were assembled into 51,908 unique sequences consisting of 22,749 contigs and 29,159 singletons. A total of 11,873 unique sequences were annotated through BLAST analysis, and 3,733 were assigned to Gene Ontology (GO) categories. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis uncovered a C4-like photosynthesis pathway in M. incisa. The biosynthesis pathways of lipid particularly those of ArA and triacylglycerol (TAG) were analyzed in detail, and TAG was proposed to be accumulated in oil bodies in the cytosol with the help of caleosin or oil globule-associated proteins. In addition, the carotenoid biosynthesis pathways are discussed. This transcriptomic analysis of M. incisa enabled a global understanding of mechanisms involved in photosynthesis, de novo biosynthesis of ArA, metabolism of carotenoids, and accumulation of TAG in M. incisa. These findings provided a molecular basis for the research and possibly economic exploitation of this ArA-rich microalga.

  15. How dietary arachidonic- and docosahexaenoic- acid rich oils differentially affect the murine hepatic transcriptome

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    Roberts Matthew A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Herein, we expand our previous work on the effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA on the murine hepatic transcriptome using novel statistical and bioinformatic approaches for evaluating microarray data. The analyses focuses on key differences in the transcriptomic response that will influence metabolism following consumption of FUNG (rich in 20:4n6, FISH (rich in 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 and COMB, the combination of the two. Results Using a variance-stabilized F-statistic, 371 probe sets (out of 13 K probe sets in the Affymetrix Mu11K chip set were changed by dietary treatment (P Conclusion Distinct transcriptomic, signaling cascades, and predicted affects on murine liver metabolism have been elucidated for 20:4n6-rich dietary oils, 22:6n3-rich oils, and a surprisingly distinct set of genes were affected by the combination of the two. Our results emphasize that the balance of dietary n6 and n3 LC-PUFA provided for infants and in nutritional and neutraceutical applications could have profoundly different affects on metabolism and cell signaling, beyond that previously recognized.

  16. Affinity labeling of the rabbit 12/15-lipoxygenase using azido derivatives of arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Stepan; Wiesner, Rainer; Myagkova, Galina; Kuhn, Hartmut; Ivanov, Igor

    2006-03-21

    Lipoxygenases are lipid-peroxidizing enzymes, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of important diseases. They consist of a single polypeptide chain, which is folded into a two-domain structure. The large catalytic domain contains the putative substrate-binding pocket and the catalytic non-heme iron. To identify structural elements of the rabbit 12/15-lipoxygenase that are involved in enzyme/substrate and/or enzyme/product interaction, we synthesized a set of radioactively labeled lipoxygenase substrates carrying a photoreactive azido group (17-azido-ETE, 18-azido-ETE, 19-azido-ETE) and used these compounds as affinity probes. After photoaffinity labeling, the enzyme was digested proteolytically and modified tryptic cleavage peptides were identified by a combination of radio-HPLC and mass spectral analysis. Following this strategy, we observed covalent linkage of a cleavage peptide that contained Ile593, which has previously been identified as the sequence determinant for the positional specificity. These data are consistent with the previous suggestion that this peptide lines the substrate-binding pocket. Surprisingly, we also observed strong labeling of cleavage peptides originating from the N-terminal beta-barrel domain, and our mass spectral data suggested covalent linkage of oxidized affinity probes. Taken together, these results confirm the previous conclusion that Ile593 and surrounding amino acids are constituents of the active site, but they also implicate the N-terminal beta-barrel in enzyme/substrate and/or enzyme/product interaction.

  17. FADS genotypes and desaturase activity estimated by the ratio of arachidonic acid to linoleic acid are associated with inflammation and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Malerba, Giovanni; Guarini, Patrizia; Illig, Thomas; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Sandri, Marco; Friso, Simonetta; Pizzolo, Francesca; Schaeffer, Linda; Heinrich, Joachim; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Corrocher, Roberto; Olivieri, Oliviero

    2008-10-01

    The delta-5 and delta-6 desaturases, encoded by FADS1 and FADS2 genes, are key enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism that catalyze the conversion of linoleic acid (LA) into arachidonic acid (AA) and that of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) into eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FADS1 and FADS2 have been associated with different concentrations of AA and LA, and those associations have possible functional consequences for desaturase activity. We aimed to evaluate the possible association among FADS genotypes, desaturase activity, inflammation, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirteen FADS SNPs and the ratio of AA to LA (AA/LA) on red blood cell (RBC) membranes, a marker of desaturase activity, were evaluated in 876 subjects with (n = 610) or without (n = 266) angiographically documented CAD. Both AA/LA and the ratio of EPA to ALA (EPA/ALA) were higher in patients with CAD than in those without CAD, but, in a multiple logistic regression model, only a higher AA/LA resulted an independent risk factor for CAD (odds ratio: 2.55; 95% CI: 1.61, 4.05 for higher compared with lower ratio tertile; P for trend FADS haplotypes, including the alleles associated with a higher ratio. In populations following a Western diet, subjects carrying FADS haplotypes that are associated with higher desaturase activity may be prone to a proinflammatory response favoring atherosclerotic vascular damage.

  18. Low Na intake suppresses expression of CYP2C23 and arachidonic acid-induced inhibition of ENaC.

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    Sun, Peng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Wang, Tong; Babilonia, Elisa; Wang, Zhijian; Jin, Yan; Kemp, Rowena; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2006-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that arachidonic acid (AA) inhibits epithelial Na channels (ENaC) through the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenase-dependent pathway (34). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low Na intake suppresses the expression of CYP2C23, which is mainly responsible for converting AA to epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) in the kidney (11) and attenuates the AA-induced inhibition of ENaC. Immunostaining showed that CYP2C23 is expressed in the Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-positive and aquaporin 2 (AQP2)-positive tubules. This suggests that CYP2C23 is expressed in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and collecting duct (CD). Na restriction significantly suppressed the expression of CYP2C23 in the TAL and CD. Western blot also demonstrated that the expression of CYP2C23 in renal cortex and outer medulla diminished in rats on Na-deficient diet (Na-D) but increased in those on high-Na diet (4%). Moreover, the content of 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) decreased in the isolated cortical CD from rats on Na-D compared with those on a normal-Na diet (0.5%). Patch-clamp study showed that application of 15 microM AA inhibited the activity of ENaC by 77% in the CCD of rats on a Na-D for 3 days. However, the inhibitory effect of AA on ENaC was significantly attenuated in rats on Na-D for 14 days. Furthermore, inhibition of CYP epoxygenase with MS-PPOH increased the ENaC activity in the CCD of rats on a control Na diet. We also used microperfusion technique to examine the effect of MS-PPOH on Na transport in the distal nephron. Application of MS-PPOH significantly increased Na absorption in the distal nephron of control rats but had no significant effect on Na absorption in rats on Na-D for 14 days. We conclude that low Na intake downregulates the activity and expression of CYP2C23 and attenuates the inhibitory effect of AA on Na transport.

  19. Intake of farmed Atlantic salmon fed soybean oil increases hepatic levels of arachidonic acid-derived oxylipins and ceramides in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtbø, Lisa Kolden; Borkowska, Alison G; Bernhard, Annette; Rønnevik, Alexander Krokedal; Lock, Erik-Jan; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Torstensen, Bente E; Liaset, Bjørn; Brattelid, Trond; Pedersen, Theresa L; Newman, John W; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2015-06-01

    Introduction of vegetable ingredients in fish feed has affected the fatty acid composition in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L). Here we investigated how changes in fish feed affected the metabolism of mice fed diets containing fillets from such farmed salmon. We demonstrate that replacement of fish oil with rapeseed oil or soybean oil in fish feed had distinct spillover effects in mice fed western diets containing the salmon. A reduced ratio of n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fish feed, reflected in the salmon, and hence also in the mice diets, led to a selectively increased abundance of arachidonic acid in the phospholipid pool in the livers of the mice. This was accompanied by increased levels of hepatic ceramides and arachidonic acid-derived pro-inflammatory mediators and a reduced abundance of oxylipins derived from eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. These changes were associated with increased whole body insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Our data suggest that an increased ratio between n-6 and n-3-derived oxylipins may underlie the observed marked metabolic differences between mice fed the different types of farmed salmon. These findings underpin the need for carefully considering the type of oil used for feed production in relation to salmon farming. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An arachidonic acid-enriched diet does not result in more colonic inflammation as compared with fish oil- or oleic acid-enriched diets in mice with experimental colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers, Julian D.; Mensink, Ronald P.; Verstege, Marleen I.; te Velde, Anje A.; Plat, Jogchum

    2008-01-01

    Fish oils (FO) - rich in EPA and DHA - may protect against colitis development. Moreover, inflammatory bowel disease patients have elevated colonic arachidonic acid (AA) proportions. So far, effects of dietary AA v. FO on colitis have never been examined. We therefore designed three isoenergetic

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation in pregnancy differentially modulates arachidonic acid and DHA status across FADS genotypes in pregnancy1–3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, SA; Kerling, EH; Shaddy, DJ; Li, S; Thodosoff, JM; Colombo, J; Carlson, SE

    2014-01-01

    Some FADS alleles are associated with lower DHA and ARA status assessed by the relative amount of arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in plasma and red blood cell (RBC) phospholipids (PL). We determined two FADS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a cohort of pregnant women and examined the relationship of FADS1rs174533 and FADS2rs174575 to DHA and ARA status before and after supplementation with 600 mg per day of DHA. The 205 pregnant women studied were randomly assigned to placebo (mixed soy and corn oil) (n= 96) or 600 mg algal DHA (n=109) in 3 capsules per day for the last two trimesters of pregnancy. Women homozygous for the minor allele of FADS1rs174533 (but not FADS2rs174575) had lower DHA and ARA status at baseline. At delivery, minor allele homozygotes of FADS1rs174533 in the placebo group had lower RBC-DHA compared to major-allele carriers (P = 0.031), while in the DHA-supplemented group, all genotypes had higher DHA status compared to baseline (P = 0.001) and status did not differ by genotype (P = 0.941). Surprisingly, DHA but not the placebo decreased ARA status of minor allele homozygotes of both FADS SNPs but not major allele homozygotes at delivery. Any physiological effects of changing the DHA to ARA ratio by increasing DHA intake appears to be greater in minor allele homozygotes of some FADS SNPs. PMID:25500337

  2. Optimization of in vitro conditions to study the arachidonic acid induction of 4R isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutreja, Yamini; Gamblin, Truman C

    2017-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau exists in six different isoforms that accumulate as filamentous aggregates in a wide spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases classified as tauopathies. One potential source of heterogeneity between these diseases could arise from differential tau isoform aggregation. in vitro assays employing arachidonic acid as an inducer of aggregation have been pivotal in gaining an understanding of the longest four repeat tau isoform (2N4R). These approaches have been less successful for modeling the shorter 1N4R and 0N4R tau isoforms in vitro. Through a careful analysis of in vitro conditions for aggregation, we found that the differences in the acidity of tau isoform N-terminal projection domains determine whether tau filaments cluster into larger assemblies in solution. Beyond the potential biological implications of filament clustering, we provide optimized conditions for the arachidonic acid induction of shorter 4R tau isoforms aggregation in vitro that greatly reduce filament clustering and improved modeling results. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

  4. Developmental Outcomes at 24 Months of Age in Toddlers Supplemented with Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid: Results of a Double Blind Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Devlin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about arachidonic acid (ARA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA requirements in toddlers. A longitudinal, double blind, controlled trial in toddlers (n = 133 age 13.4 ± 0.9 months (mean ± standard deviation, randomized to receive a DHA (200 mg/day and ARA (200 mg/day supplement (supplement or a corn oil supplement (control until age 24 months determined effects on neurodevelopment. We found no effect of the supplement on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development 3rd Edition (Bayley-III cognitive and language composites and Beery–Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual–Motor Integration (Beery VMI at age 24 months. Supplemented toddlers had higher RBC phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, and plasma DHA and ARA compared to placebo toddlers at age 24 months. A positive relationship between RBC PE ARA and Bayley III Cognitive composite (4.55 (0.21–9.00, B (95% CI, p = 0.045 in supplemented boys, but not in control boys, was observed in models adjusted for baseline fatty acid, maternal non-verbal intelligence, and BMI z-score at age 24 months. A similar positive relationship between RBC PE ARA and Bayley III Language composite was observed for supplemented boys (11.52 (5.10–17.94, p < 0.001 and girls (11.19 (4.69–17.68, p = 0.001. These findings suggest that increasing the ARA status in toddlers is associated with better neurodevelopment at age 24 months.

  5. Differences in Arachidonic Acid Levels and Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) Gene Variants in African Americans and European Americans with Diabetes/Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Susan; Hugenschmidt, Christina E.; Rudock, Megan E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Ivester, Priscilla; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Case, L. Douglas; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Chilton, Floyd H.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, increases in dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as linoleic acid, have been hypothesized to cause or exacerbate chronic inflammatory diseases. This study examines an individual’s innate capacity to synthesize n-6-long chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs), with respect to the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) locus in Americans of African and European descent with diabetes/metabolic syndrome. Compared to European Americans (EAm), African Americans (AfAm) exhibited markedly higher serum levels of arachidonic acid (AA) (EAm 7.9±2.1; AfAm 9.8±1.9 % of total fatty acids, mean ± sd; pFADS1 activity (EAm 5.4±2.2, AfAm 6.9±2.2; p=1.44×10−5). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) mapping to the FADS locus revealed strong association with AA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) in the EAm. Importantly, EAm homozygous for the minor allele (T) had significantly lower AA levels (TT: 6.3±1.0; GG: 8.5±2.1; p=3.0×10−5) and AA/DGLA ratios (TT: 3.4±0.8; GG: 6.5±2.3; p=2.2×10−7) but higher DGLA levels (TT: 1.9±0.4; GG: 1.4±0.4; p=3.3×10−7) compared to those homozygous for the major allele (GG). Allele frequency patterns suggest that the GG genotype at rs174537 (associated with higher circulating levels of AA) is much higher in AfAm (0.81) compared to EAm (0.46). Similarly, marked differences in rs174537 genotypic frequencies were observed in HapMap populations. These data suggest that there are likely important differences in the capacity of different populations to synthesize LC-PUFAs. These differences may provide a genetic mechanism contributing to health disparities between populations of African and European descent. PMID:21733300

  6. The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the metabolism of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid by human gingival tissue in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elattar, T.M.; Lin, H.S.; Tira, D.E.

    1983-09-01

    We investigated the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on prostaglandins (PGs) and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) formation by inflamed human gingival tissues. Gingival tissue homogenates were incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid in the presence of indomethacin, piroxicam, or ibuprofen, and the organic solvent extracts were chromatographed on silica gel plates with standards for radiometric assay. There was a significant negative trend between the doses (10(-7)-10(-3) M) of each of indomethacin, piroxicam, and ibuprofen, and the amounts of PGF2 alpha, PGE2, PGD2, and 15-keto-PGE2 produced. All three drugs have a significant inhibitory effect on PGs and 12-HETE production at 10(-3) M when compared with the control. The rank order effectiveness of the drugs, at 10(-3) M, on PG inhibition was indomethacin greater than piroxicam greater than ibuprofen, and on 12-HETE inhibition was indomethacin greater than ibuprofen greater than piroxicam.

  7. Short-term diets rich in arachidonic acid influence plasma phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and prostacyclin and thromboxane production in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A J; Mann, N J

    1996-04-01

    Two small-scale dietary intervention studies were conducted to examine the effect of diets rich in arachidonic acid (AA) and n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCP), on the in vivo production of prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane (TXA2). The first was a pilot study and contained insufficient numbers for statistical analyses. It involved a 7-d intervention with 10 subjects divided into three groups, consuming diets rich in AA (500 mg/d), rich in AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (500 mg/d of each), or rich in DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (approximately 1500 mg/d of n-3 LCP). Plasma phospholipid (PL) levels of AA increased in all subjects in groups 1 (n = 4) and 2 (n = 3). DHA levels increased in all subjects in Groups 2 and 3 (n = 3), and EPA levels increased in all subjects from Group 3 but fell in all subjects from Group 1. The in vivo production of PGI2, measured as its urinary metabolite, was increased in two subjects in Group 1 and one subject in Group 2, with all other subjects showing little change. Urinary TXA2 metabolite increased in all subjects from Group 1. The second study was conducted in seven subjects, who consumed a low fat diet for 2 wk: the 1st wk was a vegetarian diet (no LCP) followed by a 2nd wk where the subjects were required to consume 500 g (raw weight) of kangaroo meat daily (305 mg/d AA, 325 mg/d n-3 LCP). The meat diet was associated with a marked rise in the serum PL levels of AA, EPA and docosapentaenoic acid 22:5(n-3) and with a significant increase in the urinary output of the prostacyclin metabolite, but no effect on TXA2 production, as measured by its urinary metabolite level. The results of these studies have shown that diets that contain both AA and n-3 LCP are associated with an increase in PGI2 production, without affecting TXA2 production. Further studies with purified LCP are warranted.

  8. Differences in arachidonic acid levels and fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene variants in African Americans and European Americans with diabetes or the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Susan; Hugenschmidt, Christina E; Rudock, Megan E; Ziegler, Julie T; Ivester, Priscilla; Ainsworth, Hannah C; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Case, L Douglas; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W; Mathias, Rasika A; Chilton, Floyd H

    2012-02-01

    Over the past 50 years, increases in dietary n-6 PUFA, such as linoleic acid, have been hypothesised to cause or exacerbate chronic inflammatory diseases. The present study examines an individual's innate capacity to synthesise n-6 long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) with respect to the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) locus in Americans of African and European descent with diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Compared with European Americans (EAm), African Americans (AfAm) exhibited markedly higher serum levels of arachidonic acid (AA) (EAm 7·9 (sd 2·1), AfAm 9·8 (sd 1·9) % of total fatty acids; P FADS1 activity (EAm 5·4 (sd 2·2), AfAm 6·9 (sd 2·2); P = 1·44 × 10⁻⁵). In all, seven SNP mapping to the FADS locus revealed strong association with AA, EPA and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) in the EAm. Importantly, EAm homozygous for the minor allele (T) had significantly lower AA levels (TT 6·3 (sd 1·0); GG 8·5 (sd 2·1); P = 3·0 × 10⁻⁵) and AA:DGLA ratios (TT 3·4 (sd 0·8), GG 6·5 (sd 2·3); P = 2·2 × 10⁻⁷) but higher DGLA levels (TT 1·9 (sd 0·4), GG 1·4 (sd 0·4); P = 3·3 × 10⁻⁷) compared with those homozygous for the major allele (GG). Allele frequency patterns suggest that the GG genotype at rs174537 (associated with higher circulating levels of AA) is much higher in AfAm (0·81) compared with EAm (0·46). Similarly, marked differences in rs174537 genotypic frequencies were observed in HapMap populations. These data suggest that there are probably important differences in the capacity of different populations to synthesise LC-PUFA. These differences may provide a genetic mechanism contributing to health disparities between populations of African and European descent.

  9. Acute arsenic toxicity alters cytochrome P450 and soluble epoxide hydrolase and their associated arachidonic acid metabolism in C57Bl/6 mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; Kim, Seok H; Althurwi, Hassan N; Zordoky, Beshay N M; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2012-12-01

    Acute arsenic (As(III)) exposure has been reported to cause cardiac toxicity, however this toxicity was never linked to the disturbance in cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Therefore, we investigated the effect of acute As(III) toxicity on the expression of P450 and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and their associated arachidonic acid metabolism in mice hearts. As(III) toxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of 12.5 mg/kg of As(III). Our results showed that As(III) treatment caused a significant induction of the cardiac hypertrophic markers in addition to Cyp1b1, Cyp2b, Cyp2c, Cyp4f, and sEH gene expression in mice hearts. Furthermore, As(III) increased sEH protein expression and activity in hearts with a consequent decrease in 11,12-, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) formation. Whereas the formation of 8,9-, 11,12-, 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) was significantly increased. As(III) also increased sEH mRNA and protein expression levels in addition to the hypertrophic markers which was reversed by knockdown of sEH in H9c2 cells. In conclusion, acute As(III) toxicity alters the expression of several P450s and sEH enzymes with a consequent decrease in the cardioprotective EETs which may represent a novel mechanism by which As(III) causes progressive cardiotoxicity. Furthermore, inhibiting sEH might represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent As(III)-induced hypertrophy.

  10. High dietary arachidonic acid levels induce changes in complex lipids and immune-related eicosanoids and increase levels of oxidised metabolites in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Anne-Catrin; Lie, Kai K; Moren, Mari; Skjærven, Kaja H

    2017-04-01

    This study explores the effect of high dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) levels (high ARA) compared with low dietary ARA levels (control) on the general metabolism using zebrafish as the model organism. The fatty acid composition of today's 'modern diet' tends towards higher n-6 PUFA levels in relation to n-3 PUFA. Low dietary n-3:n-6 PUFA ratio is a health concern, as n-6 PUFA give rise to eicosanoids and PG, which are traditionally considered pro-inflammatory, especially when derived from ARA. Juvenile zebrafish fed a high-ARA diet for 17 d had a lower whole-body n-3:n-6 PUFA ratio compared with zebrafish fed a low-ARA (control) diet (0·6 in the control group v. 0·2 in the high-ARA group). Metabolic profiling revealed altered levels of eicosanoids, PUFA, dicarboxylic acids and complex lipids such as glycerophospholipids and lysophospholipids as the most significant differences compared with the control group. ARA-derived hydroxylated eicosanoids, such as hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acids, were elevated in response to high-ARA feed. In addition, increased levels of oxidised lipids and amino acids indicated an oxidised environment due to n-6 PUFA excess in the fish. To conclude, our results indicate that an ARA-enriched diet induces changes in complex lipids and immune-related eicosanoids and increases levels of oxidised lipids and amino acids, suggesting oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation.

  11. Influence of dietary arachidonic acid combined with light intensity and tank colour on pigmentation of common sole (Solea solea L.) larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    Supplementation of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) is known to cause hypopigmentation in common sole larvae (Solea solea L.). This study examined a possible link between dietary ARA supplementation - light intensity and tank colour on pigment defects in common sole larvae. Larval tissue ARA...... treated with the ARA supplemented emulsion during premetamorphosis showed partly or complete dorsal hypopigmentation. There were no significant effects of light intensity or tank background colour in combination with ARA on malpigmentation. Larval hypopigmentation was below 10% in the groups not treated...... to be related to a higher feed intake. Early pigment cell (chromatophor) development until 11 dph (i.e. start of metamorphosis) was not significantly related to dietary treatment, but during metamorphosis (from 16 dph) total chromatophore concentration (cells larvae (-1)) was significantly lower for larvae...

  12. cPLA2alpha-evoked formation of arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids is required for exocytosis in mouse pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Kirstine; Høy, Marianne; Olsen, Hervør L

    2003-01-01

    Using capacitance measurements, we investigated the effects of intracellularly applied recombinant human cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha) and its lipolytic products arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in single mouse pancreatic beta-cells. cPLA2alpha...... by the Cl- channel inhibitor DIDS and in cells pretreated with ClC-3 Cl- channel antisense oligonucleotides. We propose that cPLA2alpha has an important role in controlling the rate of exocytosis in beta-cells. This effect of cPLA2alpha reflects an enhanced transgranular Cl- flux, leading to an increase...... dose dependently (EC50 = 86 nM) stimulated depolarization-evoked exocytosis by 450% without affecting the whole cell Ca2+ current or cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels. The stimulatory effect involved priming of secretory granules as reflected by an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of granules...

  13. cPLA2a-evoked formation of arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids is required for exocytosis in mouse pancreatic ß-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Kirstine; Høy, Marianne; Olsen, Hervør L.

    2003-01-01

    Using capacitance measurements, we investigated the effects of intracellularly applied recombinant human cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 ) and its lipolytic products arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in single mouse pancreatic -cells. cPLA2 dose dependently...... and in cells pretreated with ClC-3 Cl- channel antisense oligonucleotides. We propose that cPLA2 has an important role in controlling the rate of exocytosis in -cells. This effect of cPLA2 reflects an enhanced transgranular Cl- flux, leading to an increase in the number of granules available for release...... (EC50 = 86 nM) stimulated depolarization-evoked exocytosis by 450% without affecting the whole cell Ca2+ current or cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels. The stimulatory effect involved priming of secretory granules as reflected by an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of granules from 70...

  14. Differential induction and suppression of potato 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes in response to Phytophthora infestans and to its elicitor arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D; Ward, B L; Bostock, R M

    1992-10-01

    Induction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is essential for the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins and steroid derivatives in Solanaceous plants following stresses imposed by wounding and pathogen infection. To better understand this complex step in stress-responsive isoprenoid synthesis, we isolated three classes of cDNAS encoding HMGR (hmg1, hmg2, and hmg3) from a potato tuber library using a probe derived from an Arabidopsis HMGR cDNA. The potato cDNAs had extensive homology in portions of the protein coding regions but had low homology in the 3' untranslated regions. RNA gel blot analyses using gene-specific probes showed that hmg1 was strongly induced in tuber tissue by wounding, but the wound induction was strongly suppressed by treatment of the tissue with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid or by inoculation with an incompatible or compatible race of the fungal pathogen Phytophtora infestans. The hmg2 and hmg3 mRNAs also accumulated in response to wounding, but in contrast to hmg1, these mRNAs were strongly enhanced by arachidonic acid or inoculation. Inoculation with a compatible race of P. infestans resulted in similar patterns in HMGR gene expression of hmg2 and hmg3 except that the magnitude and rate of the changes in mRNA levels were reduced relative to the incompatible interaction. The differential regulation of members of the HMGR gene family may explain in part the previously reported changes in HMGR enzyme activities following wounding and elicitor treatment. The suppression of hmg1 and the enhancement of hmg2 and hmg3 transcript levels following elicitor treatment or inoculation with the incompatible race parallel the suppression in steroid and stimulation of sesquiterpenoid accumulations observed in earlier investigations. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that there are discrete organizational channels for sterol and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in potato and other Solanaceous species.

  15. Drug-Disease Interaction: Effect of Inflammation and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs on Cytochrome P450 Metabolites of Arachidonic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh-Habashi, Ali; Asghar, Waheed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2017-10-06

    Inflammatory conditions increase cardiovascular (CV) risk. Some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that are used to treat pain and inflammation are also associated with CV complications. Inflammation, but not NSAIDs, disrupts the balance of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor components of the renin-angiotensin system within the heart. Herein, we report the effect of both inflammation and NSAIDs (rofecoxib, celecoxib, and meloxicam) on the physiologically active cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (ArA) in the rat with adjuvant arthritis. After oral administration of 7 daily therapeutically equivalent doses of NSAIDs or vehicle, the anti-inflammatory response, as well as the ArA metabolites and drug concentrations in plasma, heart and kidneys were assessed. Inflammation in the form of adjuvant arthritis caused a significant tissue-dependent imbalance of ArA metabolites by elevating the ratio of cardiotoxic 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid over cardioprotective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in the heart, and reducing the ratio in the kidney. The observed imbalance was augmented by cardiotoxic rofecoxib but not by other examined NSAIDs with known milder cardiotoxicity. The cardio-renal toxicity of NSAIDs with known severe CV side effects may be due to altered cytochrome P450-mediated ArA acid metabolism. The ArA metabolism profile may be a marker of NSAIDs safety and toxicity. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  17. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Yuzhong [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Jing [Animal Experimental Center of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390,USA (United States); Guo, Austin M. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu2013@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic

  18. Changes in PTGS1 and ALOX12 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Associated with Changes in Arachidonic Acid, Oxylipins, and Oxylipin/Fatty Acid Ratios in Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire C Berthelot

    Full Text Available There is a high degree of inter-individual variability among people in response to intervention with omega-3 fatty acids (FA, which may partly explain conflicting results on the effectiveness of omega-3 FA for the treatment and prevention of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study we sought to evaluate whether part of this inter-individual variability in response is related to the regulation of key oxylipin metabolic genes in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs.Plasma FA and oxylipin profiles from 12 healthy individuals were compared to PBMC gene expression profiles following six weeks of supplementation with fish oil, which delivered 1.9 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and 1.5 g/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Fold changes in gene expression were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR.Healthy individuals supplemented with omega-3 FA had differential responses in prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 1 (PTGS1, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX12, and interleukin 8 (IL-8 gene expression in isolated PBMCs. In those individuals for whom plasma arachidonic acid (ARA in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE lipid class decreased in response to omega-3 intervention, there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression for PTGS1 and ALOX12. Several oxylipin product/FA precursor ratios (e.g. prostaglandin E2 (PGE2/ARA for PTGS1 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE/ARA for ALOX12 were also associated with fold change in gene expression, suggesting an association between enzyme activity and gene expression. The fold-change in PTGS1 gene expression was highly positively correlated with ALOX12 gene expression but not with PTGS2, whereas IL-8 and PTGS2 were positively correlated.The regulation of important oxylipin metabolic genes in PBMCs varied with the extent of change in ARA concentrations in the case of PTGS1 and ALOX12 regulation. PBMC gene expression changes in

  19. Changes in PTGS1 and ALOX12 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Associated with Changes in Arachidonic Acid, Oxylipins, and Oxylipin/Fatty Acid Ratios in Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Claire C; Kamita, Shizuo George; Sacchi, Romina; Yang, Jun; Nording, Malin L; Georgi, Katrin; Hegedus Karbowski, Christine; German, J Bruce; Weiss, Robert H; Hogg, Ronald J; Hammock, Bruce D; Zivkovic, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    There is a high degree of inter-individual variability among people in response to intervention with omega-3 fatty acids (FA), which may partly explain conflicting results on the effectiveness of omega-3 FA for the treatment and prevention of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study we sought to evaluate whether part of this inter-individual variability in response is related to the regulation of key oxylipin metabolic genes in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plasma FA and oxylipin profiles from 12 healthy individuals were compared to PBMC gene expression profiles following six weeks of supplementation with fish oil, which delivered 1.9 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1.5 g/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Fold changes in gene expression were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Healthy individuals supplemented with omega-3 FA had differential responses in prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 1 (PTGS1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX12), and interleukin 8 (IL-8) gene expression in isolated PBMCs. In those individuals for whom plasma arachidonic acid (ARA) in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipid class decreased in response to omega-3 intervention, there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression for PTGS1 and ALOX12. Several oxylipin product/FA precursor ratios (e.g. prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)/ARA for PTGS1 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE)/ARA for ALOX12) were also associated with fold change in gene expression, suggesting an association between enzyme activity and gene expression. The fold-change in PTGS1 gene expression was highly positively correlated with ALOX12 gene expression but not with PTGS2, whereas IL-8 and PTGS2 were positively correlated. The regulation of important oxylipin metabolic genes in PBMCs varied with the extent of change in ARA concentrations in the case of PTGS1 and ALOX12 regulation. PBMC gene expression changes in

  20. Understanding traditional Chinese medicine anti-inflammatory herbal formulae by simulating their regulatory functions in the human arachidonic acid metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuo; Yin, Ning; Pei, Jianfeng; Lai, Luhua

    2013-07-01

    Through history, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has adopted oriental philosophical practices of drug combination and interaction to address human diseases. To investigate this from a systems biology point of view, we analysed 28 TCM herbs for their anti-inflammatory function, using molecular docking and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolic network simulation. The inhibition potential of each herb toward five essential enzymes as well as their possible side effects were examined. Three commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory formulae were simulated to discover the combinatorial properties of each contained herb in regulating the whole metabolic network. We discovered that different ingredients of a formula tend to inhibit different targets, which almost covered all the targets in the whole network. We also found that herbal combinations could achieve the same therapeutic effect at lower doses compared with individual usage. New herbal combinations were also predicted based on the inhibition potentials and two types of synergistic drug combinations of TCM theory were discussed from the perspective of systems biology. Using this combined approach of molecular docking and network simulation, we were able to computationally elucidate the combinatorial effects of TCM to intervene disease networks. We expect novel TCM formulae or modern drug combinations to be developed based on this research.

  1. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  2. Identification of a cyclooxygenase gene from the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla and bioconversion of arachidonic acid to PGF(2α) in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamoto, Hirosuke; Takemura, Miho; Ohyama, Kanji

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are important local messenger molecules in many tissues and organs of animals including human. For applications in medicine and animal care, PGs are mostly purified from animal tissues or chemically synthesized. To generate a clean, reliable, and inexpensive source for PGs, we have now engineered expression of a suitable cyclooxygenase gene in Escherichia coli and achieved production levels of up to 2.7 mg l(-1) PGF(2α). The cyclooxygenase gene cloned from the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla appears to be fully functional without any eukaryotic modifications in E. coli. A crude extract of the recombinant E. coli cells is able to convert in vitro the substrate arachidonic acid (AA) to PGF(2α). Furthermore, these E. coli cells produced PGF(2α) in a medium supplemented with AA and secreted the PGF(2α) product. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the functional expression of a cyclooxygenase gene and concomitant production of PGF(2α) in E. coli. The successful microbial synthesis of PGs with reliable yields promises a novel pharmaceutical tool to produce PGF(2α) at significantly reduced prices and greater purity.

  3. Efficient production of arachidonic acid by Mortierella alpina through integrating fed-batch culture with a two-stage pH control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyu; Lin, Ye; Chang, Ming; Jin, Qingzhe; Wang, Xingguo

    2015-04-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) yield and productivity of Mortierella alpina mutant D20 were enhanced by integrating a fed-batch culture combined with a two-stage pH control strategy. Following a kinetic analysis of the whole fermentation process, a two-stage pH control strategy was developed in which the pH was maintained at 5.5 for the first 48 h and then shifted to 6.5 till the end of fermentation. Using this strategy, a maximum ARA production of 8.12 g/L was achieved. On the basis of pH control, the effects of fed-batch cultures on ARA productivity were further investigated. A maximum ARA productivity of 1.40 g/L/d was obtained with a two-stage constant-speed glucose feeding strategy, starting with a glucose concentration of 50 g/L. This strategy was simple and economical to operate, and it may be possible to apply this approach for large-scale industrial production of ARA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Arachidonic acid affects biofilm formation and PGE2 level in Candida albicans and non-albicans species in presence of subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole and terbinafine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Ali, Shakir; Shukla, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans utilizes arachidonic acid (AA) released during the course of infection (Candidiasis) from phospholipids of infected host cell membranes and synthesizes extracellular prostaglandin(s) which play an important role in hyphae formation and host cell damage. C. albicans biofilms secrete significantly more prostaglandin(s) and evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to majority of antifungal drugs. AA influences the saturation level of lipids and fluidity of yeast cell membranes. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AA alone or in combination with antifungal agents on biofilm formation and production of prostaglandin (PGE2) in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans amphotericin B resistant strain (AmBR). Maximum biofilm formation was found to be in the case of C. albicans compared to C. non-albicans species. However, among the non-albicans species C. tropicalis exhibited highest biofilm formation. Treatment with AA in combination with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and terbinafine separately exhibited significant (p<0.05) reduction in biofilm formation against C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and AmBR as compared to their individual effect. Further, these two antifungal agents in combination with AA caused an increase in production of prostaglandin from fungal cell itself which was significant (p<0.05) in case of all the strains tested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. High extracellular Ca2+ stimulates Ca2+-activated Cl- currents in frog parathyroid cells through the mediation of arachidonic acid cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Okada

    Full Text Available Elevation of extracellular Ca(2+ concentration induces intracellular Ca(2+ signaling in parathyroid cells. The response is due to stimulation of the phospholipase C/Ca(2+ pathways, but the direct mechanism responsible for the rise of intracellular Ca(2+ concentration has remained elusive. Here, we describe the electrophysiological property associated with intracellular Ca(2+ signaling in frog parathyroid cells and show that Ca(2+-activated Cl(- channels are activated by intracellular Ca(2+ increase through an inositol 1,4,5-trisphophate (IP(3-independent pathway. High extracellular Ca(2+ induced an outwardly-rectifying conductance in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50 ∼6 mM. The conductance was composed of an instantaneous time-independent component and a slowly activating time-dependent component and displayed a deactivating inward tail current. Extracellular Ca(2+-induced and Ca(2+ dialysis-induced currents reversed at the equilibrium potential of Cl(- and were inhibited by niflumic acid (a specific blocker of Ca(2+-activated Cl(- channel. Gramicidin-perforated whole-cell recording displayed the shift of the reversal potential in extracellular Ca(2+-induced current, suggesting the change of intracellular Cl(- concentration in a few minutes. Extracellular Ca(2+-induced currents displayed a moderate dependency on guanosine triphosphate (GTP. All blockers for phospholipase C, diacylglycerol (DAG lipase, monoacylglycerol (MAG lipase and lipoxygenase inhibited extracellular Ca(2+-induced current. IP(3 dialysis failed to induce conductance increase, but 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, arachidonic acid and 12S-hydroperoxy-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (12(S-HPETE dialysis increased the conductance identical to extracellular Ca(2+-induced conductance. These results indicate that high extracellular Ca(2+ raises intracellular Ca(2+ concentration through the DAG lipase/lipoxygenase pathway, resulting in the activation of Cl(- conductance.

  6. Identification and absolute configuration of dihydroxy-arachidonic acids formed by oxygenation of 5S-HETE by native and aspirin-acetylated COX-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Surafel; Suzuki, Takashi; Hernandez, Noemi Tejera; Griesser, Markus; Boeglin, William E.; Schneider, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the prostaglandin endoperoxide by the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is accompanied by formation of a small amount of 11R-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 15R-HETE, and 15S-HETE as by-products. Acetylation of COX-2 by aspirin abrogates prostaglandin synthesis and triggers formation of 15R-HETE as the sole product of oxygenation of arachidonic acid. Here, we investigated the formation of by-products of the transformation of 5S-HETE by native COX-2 and by aspirin-acetylated COX-2 using HPLC-ultraviolet, GC-MS, and LC-MS analysis. 5S,15S- dihydroxy (di)HETE, 5S,15R-diHETE, and 5S,11R-diHETE were identified as by-products of native COX-2, in addition to the previously described di-endoperoxide (5S,15S-dihydroxy-9S,11R,8S,12S-diperoxy-6E,13E-eicosadienoic acid) as the major oxygenation product. 5S,15R-diHETE was the only product formed by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. Both 5,15-diHETE and 5,11-diHETE were detected in CT26 mouse colon carcinoma cells as well as in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells incubated with 5S-HETE, and their formation was attenuated in the presence of the COX-2 specific inhibitor, NS-398. Aspirin-treated CT26 cells gave 5,15-diHETE as the most prominent product formed from 5S-HETE. 5S,15S-diHETE has been described as a product of the cross-over of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and 15-LOX activities in elicited rat mononuclear cells and human leukocytes, and our studies implicate cross-over of the 5-LOX and COX-2 pathways as an additional biosynthetic route. PMID:19752399

  7. Consumption of Red Meat, but Not Cooking Oils High in Polyunsaturated Fat, Is Associated with Higher Arachidonic Acid Status in Singapore Chinese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jowy Yi Hoong Seah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4 n − 6 status may have adverse effects on inflammation and risk of cardiovascular diseases. Concerns about high intake of n − 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are based on the premise that endogenous conversion from linoleic acid (LA; 18:2 n − 6 is an important source of AA, but few population-based studies have investigated dietary determinants of AA status. In this study, we examined habitual food consumption in relation to plasma concentrations of AA and other PUFAs in population-based studies. We used cross-sectional data from 269 healthy, ethnic Chinese participants (25–80 years old with contrasting intakes of fish and red meat from the Singapore Prospective Study Program and 769 healthy participants (44–74 years old from the Singapore Chinese Health Study as a validation set. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine PUFA intake (% energy and food sources of PUFA (fish, red meat, poultry, soy and cooking oils in relation to plasma PUFAs (AA, LA, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA; 20:3 n − 6, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3 n − 3, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 n − 3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n − 3 concentrations. Higher intake of red meat was associated with higher plasma AA concentrations. High intake of PUFA or PUFA-rich oils was associated with higher plasma ALA but not with plasma AA. Higher intakes of soy were associated with higher ALA and fish with higher DHA and EPA concentrations. These associations were statistically significant (p < 0.05 in both studies. Red meat consumption, but not PUFA or PUFA-rich cooking oil, was associated with circulating AA suggesting that intake of pre-formed AA rather than LA is an important determinant of AA status. A diet high in fish, soy products and polyunsaturated cooking oil, and low in red meat may be associated with an optimal plasma profile of PUFA in this Chinese population.

  8. Impact of arachidonic versus eicosapentaenoic acid on exotonin-induced lung vascular leakage: relation to 4-series versus 5-series leukotriene generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimminger, F; Wahn, H; Mayer, K; Kiss, L; Walmrath, D; Seeger, W

    1997-02-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin (HlyA) is a proteinaceous pore-forming exotoxin that is implicated as a significant pathogenicity factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections including sepsis. In perfused rabbit lungs, subcytolytic concentrations of the toxin evoke thromboxane-mediated vasoconstriction and prostanoid-independent protracted vascular permeability increase (11). In the present study, the influence of submicromolar concentrations of free arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on the HlyA-induced leakage response was investigated. HlyA at concentration from 0.02 to 0.06 hemolytic units/ml provoked a dose-dependent, severalfold increase in the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), accompanied by the release of leukotriene(LT)B4, LTC4, and LTE4 into the recirculating buffer fluid. Simultaneous application of 100 nmol/L AA markedly augmented the HlyA-elicited leakage response, concomitant with an amplification of LTB4 release and a change in the kinetics of cysteinyl-LT generation. In contrast, 50 to 200 nmol/L EPA suppressed in a dose-dependent manner the HlyA-induced increase in Kfc values. This was accompanied by a blockage of 4-series LT generation and a dose-dependent appearance of LTB5, LTC5, and LTE5. In addition, EPA fully antagonized the AA-induced amplification of the HlyA-provoked Kfc increase, again accompanied by a shift from 4-series to 5-series LT generation. We conclude that the vascular leakage provoked by HlyA in rabbit lungs is differentially influenced by free AA versus free EPA, related to the generation of 4- versus 5-series leukotrienes. The composition of lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition may thus influence inflammatory capillary leakage.

  9. Arachidonic acid and lipoxin A4 attenuate alloxan-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5F cells in vitro and type 1 diabetes mellitus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundala, Naveen K V; Naidu, Vegi G M; Das, Undurti N

    2017-03-01

    We studied whether polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can protect rat insulinoma (RIN5F) cells against alloxan-induced apoptosis in vitro and type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1 DM) in vivo and if so, mechanism of this beneficial action. In vitro study was conducted using RIN5F cells while in vivo study was performed in Wistar rats. The effect of PUFAs, cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors, various eicosanoids and PUFAs metabolites: lipoxin A4 (LXA4), resolvin D2 and protectin against alloxan-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5F cells and type 1 DM was studied. Expression of PDX1, P65 NF-kB and IKB in RIN5F cells and Nrf2, GLUT2, COX2, iNOS protein levels in the pancreatic tissue and plasma glucose, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-α and antioxidants, lipid peroxides and nitric oxide were measured. Of all, arachidonic acid (AA) was found to be the most effective against alloxan-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5F cells and preventing type 1 DM. Both cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors did not block the beneficial actions of AA in vitro and in vivo. Alloxan inhibited LXA4 production by RIN5F cells and in alloxan-induced type 1 DM Wistar rats. AA-treatment restored LXA4 levels to normal both in vitro and in vivo. LXA4 protected RIN5F cells against alloxan-induced cytotoxicity and prevented type 1 DM and restored expression of Nrf2, Glut2, COX2, and iNOS genes and abnormal antioxidants to near normal. AA seems to bring about its beneficial actions against alloxan-induced cytotoxicity and type 1 DM by enhancing the production of LXA4. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(2):251-271, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Protection of palmitic acid-mediated lipotoxicity by arachidonic acid via channeling of palmitic acid into triglycerides in C2C12

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive saturated fatty acids have been considered to be one of major contributing factors for the dysfunction of skeletal muscle cells as well as pancreatic beta cells, leading to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Results PA induced cell death in a dose dependent manner up to 1.5 mM, but AA protected substantially lipotoxicity caused by PA at even low concentration of 62 μM, at which monounsaturated fatty acids including palmitoleic acid (POA) and oleic acid (OA) did not protect as much as AA did. Induction of cell death by PA was resulted from mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and AA effectively blocked the progression of apoptosis. Furthermore, AA rescued significantly PA-impaired glucose uptake and -signal transduction of Akt in response to insulin. Based on the observations that polyunsaturated AA generated competently cellular droplets at low concentration within the cytosol of myotubes compared with other monounsaturated fatty acids, and AA-driven lipid droplets were also enhanced in the presence of PA, we hypothesized that incorporation of harmful PA into inert triglyceride (TG) may be responsible for the protective effects of AA against PA-induced lipotoxicity. To address this assumption, C2C12 myotubes were incubated with fluorescent probed-PA analogue 4, 4-difluoro-5, 7-dimethyl-4-boro-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid (BODIPY FL C16) in the presence of AA and their subsequent lipid profiles were analyzed. The analyses of lipids on thin layer chromatograpy (TLC) showed that fluorescent PA analogue was rapidly channeled into AA-driven TG droplets. Conclusion Taken together, it is proposed that AA diverts PA into inert TG, therefore reducing the availability of harmful PA into intracellular target molecules. PMID:24521082

  11. Protection of palmitic acid-mediated lipotoxicity by arachidonic acid via channeling of palmitic acid into triglycerides in C2C12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Hyae Gyeong; Cho, Young Sik

    2014-02-12

    Excessive saturated fatty acids have been considered to be one of major contributing factors for the dysfunction of skeletal muscle cells as well as pancreatic beta cells, leading to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. PA induced cell death in a dose dependent manner up to 1.5 mM, but AA protected substantially lipotoxicity caused by PA at even low concentration of 62 μM, at which monounsaturated fatty acids including palmitoleic acid (POA) and oleic acid (OA) did not protect as much as AA did. Induction of cell death by PA was resulted from mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and AA effectively blocked the progression of apoptosis. Furthermore, AA rescued significantly PA-impaired glucose uptake and -signal transduction of Akt in response to insulin.Based on the observations that polyunsaturated AA generated competently cellular droplets at low concentration within the cytosol of myotubes compared with other monounsaturated fatty acids, and AA-driven lipid droplets were also enhanced in the presence of PA, we hypothesized that incorporation of harmful PA into inert triglyceride (TG) may be responsible for the protective effects of AA against PA-induced lipotoxicity. To address this assumption, C2C12 myotubes were incubated with fluorescent probed-PA analogue 4, 4-difluoro-5, 7-dimethyl-4-boro-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid (BODIPY FL C16) in the presence of AA and their subsequent lipid profiles were analyzed. The analyses of lipids on thin layer chromatography (TLC) showed that fluorescent PA analogue was rapidly channeled into AA-driven TG droplets. Taken together, it is proposed that AA diverts PA into inert TG, therefore reducing the availability of harmful PA into intracellular target molecules.

  12. The influence of dietary concentrations of arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid at various stages of larval ontogeny on eye migration, pigmentation and prostaglandin content of common sole larvae ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Banta, G.

    2008-01-01

    Dietary manipulations of arachidonic acid, ARA and eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA may have an influence on pigmentation in common sole larvae (Solea solea L., Linnaeus 1758) which may be related to a "pigmentation window". This is a specific period in the larval ontogeny where nutritional factors...... determine pigmentation. Malpigmentation defined as hypomelanosis was significantly related to elevated dietary and larval ARA contents, but not to EPA. The study reports evidence for a pigmentation window, as larval sensitivity to ARA or its derivatives was much higher during pre metamorphosis, than during...... metamorphosis. Initiation of metamorphosis (i.e. start of eye migration) was related to the size of larvae and not related to ARA or EPA content. Dietary EPA or DHA did not retard the advance of eye migration. More than 90 % of highly malpigmented juveniles, (i.e. "albinos") had a permanent aberrant eye...

  13. Exogenous addition of arachidonic acid to the culture media enhances the functionality of dendritic cells for their possible use in cancer immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeetendra Kumar

    Full Text Available The development of dendritic cell based vaccines is a promising approach in cancer immunotherapy. For their successful use in the clinics, the propagation and functionality of DCs is crucial. We earlier established a two-step method for the large scale generation of DCs from umbilical cord blood derived MNCs/CD34(+ cells. This work aims at improving their functionality based on the following observations: in vitro generated DCs can be less efficient in migration and other functional activities due to lower eicosanoid levels. The production of eicosanoids from Arachidonic Acid (AA can be hampered due to suppression of the enzyme phospholipase A2 by IL-4, an essential cytokine required for the differentiation of DCs. We hypothesized that exogenous addition of AA to the culture media during DC generation may result in DCs with improved functionality. DCs were generated with and without AA. The two DC sets were compared by phenotypic analysis, morphology and functional assays like antigen uptake, MLR, CTL assay and in vitro and in vivo migration. Though there were no differences between the two types of DCs in terms of morphology, phenotype and antigen uptake, AA(+ DCs exhibited an enhanced in vitro and in vivo migration, T cell stimulatory capacity, CTL activity and significantly higher transcript levels of COX-2. AA(+ DCs also show a favorable Th1 cytokine profile than AA- DCs. Thus addition of AA to the culture media is skewing the DCs towards the secretion of more IL-12 and less of IL-10 along with the restoration of eicosanoids levels in a COX-2 mediated pathway thereby enhancing the functionality of these cells to be used as a potent cellular vaccine. Taken together, these findings will be helpful in the better contriving of DC based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

  14. A profile of NSAID-targeted arachidonic acid metabolisms in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs): implication of the negative effects of NSAIDs on heart tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillar, Annirudha; So, Shui-Ping; Ruan, Cheng-Huai; Shelat, Harnath; Geng, Yong-Jian; Ruan, Ke-He

    2011-08-04

    An emerging technology using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to regenerate infarcted heart tissue has been underdeveloped. However, because non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, are taken during the infarction, it becomes critical to know whether the NSAIDs have negative impacts on heart tissue regeneration when using hESCs. Mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses were used to analyze the functional presence of the elaborate prostanoids' biosynthesis and signaling systems in hESCs. The detected endogenous arachidonic acid (AA) released in the hESC membranes reflects the activity of phospholipase which directly controls the biosyntheses of the prostanoids. The complete inhibition of the endogenous prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) biosynthesis by the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, NS398, confirmed that the major prostanoids synthesized in the hESCs are mediated by the COX-2 enzyme. We also found that PGE(2) and the prostacyclin (PGI(2)) metabolite, 6-keto-PGF(1α), are present in the undifferentiated hESCs. This indicated different cyclooxygenase (COX)-downstream synthases and metabolizing enzymes are involved in the AA products' signaling through the COX-1 and COX-2 pathways. The presence of many enzymes' and receptors' [(COX-1, COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES), cytosolic prostaglandin E synthase (cPGES), prostaglandin I synthase (PGIS), the PGE(2) subtype receptors (EP(1), EP(2), and EP(4)) and the prostacyclin receptor (IP)] involvement in the prostanoid biosynthesis and activity was confirmed by western blot. The studies implied the negative effects of NSAIDs, such as aspirin and COX-2 inhibitors, which suppress prostanoid production during tissue regeneration for infarcted heart when using hESCs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple roles of protein kinase a in arachidonic acid-mediated Ca2+ entry and tumor-derived human endothelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Genova, Tullio; Pupo, Emanuela; Tomatis, Cristiana; Genazzani, Armando; Zaninetti, Roberta; Munaron, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We recently showed that arachidonic acid (AA) triggers calcium signals in endothelial cells derived from human breast carcinoma (B-TEC). In particular, AA-dependent Ca(2+) entry is involved in the early steps of tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we investigated the multiple roles of the nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathways in AA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in the same cells. B-TEC stimulation with 5 μmol/L AA resulted in endothelial NO synthase (NOS) phosphorylation at Ser(1177), and NO release was measured with the fluorescent NO-sensitive probe DAR4M-AM. PKA inhibition by the use of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitory peptide myristoylated PKI(14-22) completely prevented both AA- and NO-induced calcium entry and abolished B-TEC migration promoted by AA. AA-dependent calcium entry and cell migration were significantly affected by both the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide, suggesting that NO release is functionally involved in the signaling dependent on AA. Moreover, pretreatment with carboxyamidotriazole, an antiangiogenic compound that interferes with agonist-activated calcium entry, prevented AA-dependent B-TEC motility. Interestingly, even in the absence of AA, enhancement of the cyclic AMP/PKA pathway with the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin evoked a calcium entry dependent on NOS recruitment and NO release. The functional relevance of AA-induced calcium entry could be restricted to tumor-derived endothelial cells (EC) because AA evoked a smaller calcium entry in normal human microvascular ECs compared with B-TECs, and even more importantly, it was unable to promote cell motility in wound healing assay. This evidence opens an intriguing opportunity for differential pharmacologic treatment between normal and tumor-derived human ECs. ©2010 AACR.

  16. High dietary arachidonic acid levels affect the process of eye migration and head shape in pseudoalbino Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis early juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglino, A; Wishkerman, A; Darias, M J; Andree, K B; de la Iglesia, P; Estévez, A; Gisbert, E

    2013-11-01

    The effect of high dietary levels of arachidonic acid (ARA) on the eye migration and cranial bone remodelling processes in Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis early juveniles (age: 50 days post hatch) was evaluated by means of geometric morphometric analysis and alizarin red staining of cranial skeletal elements. The incidence of normally pigmented fish fed the control diet was 99·1 ± 0·3% (mean ± s.e.), whereas it was only 18·7 ± 7·5% for those fed high levels of ARA (ARA-H). The frequency of cranial deformities was significantly higher in fish fed ARA-H (95·1 ± 1·5%) than in those fed the control diet (1·9 ± 1·9%). Cranial deformities were significantly and negatively correlated with the incidence of normally pigmented animals (r² = -0·88, P < 0·001, n = 16). Thus, fish displaying pigmentary disorders differed in the position of their eyes with regard to the vertebral column and mouth axes, and by the interocular distance and head height, which were shorter than in fish not displaying pigmentary disorders. In addition to changes in the positioning of both eyes, pseudoalbino fish showed some ARA-induced osteological differences for some of the skeletal elements from the splanchnocranium (e.g. right premaxillary, dentary, angular, lacrimal, ceratohyal and branchiostegal rays) and neurocranium (e.g. sphenotic, left lateral ethmoid and left frontal) by comparison to normally pigmented specimens. Pseudoalbino fish also had teeth in both lower and upper jaws. This is the first study in Pleuronectiformes that describes impaired metamorphic relocation of the ocular side eye, the right eye in the case of S. senegalensis, whereas the left eye migrated into the ocular side almost normally. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. Mildly abnormal general movement quality in infants is associated with higher Mead acid and lower arachidonic acid and shows a U-shaped relation with the DHA/AA ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goor, S A; Schaafsma, A; Erwich, J J H M; Dijck-Brouwer, D A J; Muskiet, F A J

    2010-01-01

    We showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation during pregnancy and lactation was associated with more mildly abnormal (MA) general movements (GMs) in the infants. Since this finding was unexpected and inter-individual DHA intakes are highly variable, we explored the relationship between GM quality and erythrocyte DHA, arachidonic acid (AA), DHA/AA and Mead acid in 57 infants of this trial. MA GMs were inversely related to AA, associated with Mead acid, and associated with DHA/AA in a U-shaped manner. These relationships may indicate dependence of newborn AA status on synthesis from linoleic acid. This becomes restricted during the intrauterine period by abundant de novo synthesis of oleic and Mead acids from glucose, consistent with reduced insulin sensitivity during the third trimester. The descending part of the U-shaped relation between MA GMs and DHA/AA probably indicates DHA shortage next to AA shortage. The ascending part may reflect a different developmental trajectory that is not necessarily unfavorable. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fifteen weeks of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid deprivation increases turnover of n-6 docosapentaenoic acid in rat-brain phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Miki; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Gao, Fei; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    Docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6, 22:5n-6) is an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) whose brain concentration can be increased in rodents by dietary n-3 PUFA deficiency, which may contribute to their behavioral dysfunction. We used our in vivo intravenous infusion method to see if brain DPAn-6 turnover and metabolism also were altered with deprivation. We studied male rats that had been fed for 15 weeks post-weaning an n-3 PUFA adequate diet containing 4.6% alpha-linolenic acid (α-LNA, 18:3n-3) or a deficient diet (0.2% α-LNA), each lacking docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6). [1-14C]DPAn-6 was infused intravenously for 5 min in unanesthetized rats, after which the brain underwent high-energy microwaving, and then was analyzed. The n-3 PUFA deficient compared with adequate diet increased DPAn-6 and decreased DHA concentrations in plasma and brain, while minimally changing brain AA concentration. Incorporation rates of unesterified DPAn-6 from plasma into individual brain phospholipids were increased 5.2–7.7 fold, while turnover rates were increased 2.1–4.7 fold. The observations suggest that increased metabolism and brain concentrations of DPAn-6 and its metabolites, together with a reduced brain DHA concentration, contribute to behavioral and functional abnormalities reported with dietary n-3 PUFA deprivation in rodents. PMID:22142872

  19. Essential function of linoleic acid esterified in acylglucosylceramide and acylceramide in maintaining the epidermal water permeability barrier. Evidence from feeding studies with oleate, linoleate, arachidonate, columbinate and a-linolenate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1985-01-01

    Essential fatty acid-deficient rats were supplemented with 300 mg per day of pure fatty acid esters: oleate (O), linoleate (L), arachidonate (A), and columbinate (C) for 10 days. During this period, the rats in groups L, A, and C all showed a decrease in their initially high trans-epidermal water...... loss, a classical essential fatty acid-deficiency symptom, to a level seen in non-deficient rats (group N). The trans-epidermal water loss in rats of group O was unaffected by the supplementation. Fatty acid composition of two epidermal sphingolipids, acylglucosylceramide and acylceramide, from...... the skin were determined. The results indicate that re-establishment of a low trans-epidermal water loss was associated with incorporation of linolenate into the two epidermal sphingolipids. Supplementation with columbinate resulted in relatively high amounts of this fatty acid in the investigated...

  20. Understanding the Mechanism of the Hydrogen Abstraction from Arachidonic Acid Catalyzed by the Human Enzyme 15-Lipoxygenase-2. A Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Free Energy Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suardíaz, Reynier; Jambrina, Pablo G; Masgrau, Laura; González-Lafont, Àngels; Rosta, Edina; Lluch, José M

    2016-04-12

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are a family of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of several lipid mediators. In the case of human 15-LOX, the 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 isoforms show slightly different reaction regiospecificity and substrate specificity, indicating that substrate binding and recognition may be different, a fact that could be related to their different biological role. Here, we have used long molecular dynamics simulations, QM(DFT)/MM potential energy and free energy calculations (using the newly developed DHAM method), to investigate the binding mode of the arachidonic acid (AA) substrate into 15-LOX-2 and the rate-limiting hydrogen-abstraction reaction 15-LOX-2 catalyzes. Our results strongly indicate that hydrogen abstraction from C13 in 15-LOX-2 is only consistent with the "tail-first" orientation of AA, with its carboxylate group interacting with Arg429, and that only the pro-S H13 hydrogen will be abstracted (being the pro-R H13 and H10 too far from the acceptor oxygen atom). At the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level the potential and free energy barriers for the pro-S H13 abstraction of AA by 15-LOX-2 are 18.0 and 18.6 kcal/mol, respectively. To analyze the kinetics of the hydrogen abstraction process, we determined a Markov model corresponding to the unbiased simulations along the state-discretized reaction coordinate. The calculated rates based on the second largest eigenvalue of the Markov matrices agree well with experimental measurements, and also provide the means to directly determine the pre-exponential factor for the reaction by comparing with the free energy barrier height. Our calculated pre-exponential factor is close to the value of kBT/h. On the other hand, our results suggest that the spin inversion of the complete system (including the O2 molecule) that is required to happen at some point along the full process to lead to the final hydroperoxide product, is likely to take place during the hydrogen transfer, which is a proton coupled electron transfer

  1. Influence of dietary fatty acids on endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain, liver and small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Andreas; Petersen, Gitte; Hellgren, Lars

    2008-01-01

    (AA)) on tissue levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, stearoylethanolamide, linoleoylethanolamide, eicosapentaenoylethanolamide, docosahexaenoylethanolamide and tissue fatty acid composition. The LA-diet increased linoleoylethanolamide and linoleic...... acid in brain, jejunum and liver. The OA-diet increased brain levels of anandamide and oleoylethanolamide (not 2-arachidonoylglycerol) without changing tissue fatty acid composition. The same diet increased oleoylethanolamide in liver. All five dietary fats decreased oleoylethanolamide in jejunum......Endocannabinoids and N-acylethanolamines are lipid mediators regulating a wide range of biological functions including food intake. We investigated short-term effects of feeding rats five different dietary fats (palm oil (PO), olive oil (OA), safflower oil (LA), fish oil (170) and arachidonic acid...

  2. The impact of dietary sn-2 palmitic triacylglycerols in combination with docosahexaenoic acid or arachidonic acid on lipid metabolism and host faecal microbiota composition in Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jianchun; Hu, Songyou; Jacoby, Jörg J; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Yaqiong; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2017-05-24

    Sn-2 palmitic acid triacylglycerols (sn2PA fat) and polyunsaturated fatty acids are thought to influence the metabolic status and intestinal bacterial population of the host. In this study, the impact of sn2PA fat in combination with DHA or ARA in the diet on lipid metabolism in the liver and faecal microbiota composition were investigated in rats fed diets containing sn2PA fat, 90% sn2PA fat + 10% DHA oil (wt%), or 90% sn2PA fat + 10% ARA oil (wt%). Tissue fatty acid composition was measured using gas chromatography (GC), whereas the faecal microbial composition was assessed using 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, faecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed that sn2PA fat in combination with DHA or ARA significantly reduced liver triacylglyceride (TG) content compared with the sn2PA fat only group. Moreover, the supplementation with sn2PA fat in combination with DHA or ARA significantly promoted the growth of Lactobacillus in the feces at the genus level. On the other hand, the growth of the opportunistic pathogen Desulfovibrio was significantly inhibited by sn2PA fat in combination with ARA compared with the sn2PA fat group. In addition, sn2PA fat in combination with DHA or ARA significantly increased total SCFA concentration in the faeces, suggesting a beneficial effect on host intestinal health.

  3. Alpha-synuclein gene ablation increases docosahexaenoic acid incorporation and turnover in brain phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Mikhail Y; Rosenberger, Thad A; Feddersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that ablation of alpha-synuclein (Snca) reduces arachidonate (20:4n-6) turnover in brain phospholipids through modulation of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl). The effect of Snca ablation on docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) metabolism is unknown....... In the present study, we examined the effect of Snca gene ablation on brain 22:6n-3 metabolism. We determined 22:6n-3 uptake and incorporation into brain phospholipids by infusing awake, wild-type and Snca-/- mice with [1-14C]22:6n-3 using steady-state kinetic modeling. In addition, because Snca modulates 20:4n......-6-CoA formation, we assessed microsomal Acsl activity using 22:6n-3 as a substrate. Although Snca gene ablation does not affect brain 22:6n-3 uptake, brain 22:6n-3-CoA mass was elevated 1.5-fold in the absence of Snca. This is consistent with the 1.6- to 2.2-fold increase in the incorporation rate...

  4. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): An essential nutrient and a nutraceutical for brain health and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes; Fritsche, Kevin L; Chuang, Dennis Y; Hannink, Mark; Gu, Zezong; Greenlief, C Michael; Yao, Jeffrey K; Lee, James C; Beversdorf, David Q

    2017-03-10

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) enriched in phospholipids in the brain and retina, is known to play multi-functional roles in brain health and diseases. While arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), DHA is linked to action of the Ca2+-independent iPLA2. DHA undergoes enzymatic conversion by 15-lipoxygenase (Alox 15) to form oxylipins including resolvins and neuroprotectins, which are powerful lipid mediators. DHA can also undergo non-enzymatic conversion by reacting with oxygen free radicals (ROS), which cause the production of 4-hydoxyhexenal (4-HHE), an aldehyde derivative which can form adducts with DNA, proteins and lipids. In studies with both animal models and humans, there is evidence that inadequate intake of maternal n-3 PUFA may lead to aberrant development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). What is less certain is whether consumption of n-3 PUFA is important in maintaining brain health throughout one's life span. Evidence mostly from non-human studies suggests that DHA intake above normal nutritional requirements might modify the risk/course of a number of diseases of the brain. This concept has fueled much of the present interest in DHA research, in particular, in attempts to delineate mechanisms whereby DHA may serve as a nutraceutical and confer neuroprotective effects. Current studies have revealed ability for the oxylipins to regulation of cell redox homeostasis through the Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2/Antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) anti-oxidant pathway, and impact signaling pathways associated with neurotransmitters, and modulation of neuronal functions involving brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). This review is aimed at describing recent studies elaborating these mechanisms with special regard to aging and Alzheimer's disease, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Copyright

  6. beta-oxidation modulates metabolic competition between eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid regulating prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in rat hepatocytes-Kupffer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Zhen-Yu; Ma, Tao; Winterthun, Synnøve

    2010-01-01

    and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) for PGE(2) synthesis in a rat hepatocyte-Kupffer cell (HPC/KC) co-culture system when the cellular oxidation capacity was enhanced by exogenous l-carnitine. We demonstrate that in the absence of l-carnitine, 1) beta-oxidation rates of EPA and AA were comparable in HPCs and in KCs; 2) AA...... and not EPA was preferentially incorporated into glycerolipids; and 3) addition of EPA significantly decreased AA-dependent PGE(2) synthesis in HPCs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in co-cultured HPCs/KCs. However, enhancing the cellular oxidation capacity by the addition of l-carnitine 1...... inhibition of AA-dependent PGE(2) synthesis and COX-2 expression by EPA. Taken together, the results strongly suggest that l-carnitine affects competition between AA and EPA in PG synthesis in liver cells by enhancing oxidation of EPA in HPCs. This implies that the beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA, especially...

  7. Cross-validated stable-isotope dilution GC-MS and LC-MS/MS assays for monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) activity by measuring arachidonic acid released from the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Schauerte, Celina; Kling, Katharina; Herbers, Jan; Beckmann, Bibiana; Engeli, Stefan; Jordan, Jens; Zoerner, Alexander A; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2017-03-15

    2-Arachidonoyl glycerol (2AG) is an endocannabinoid that activates cannabinoid (CB) receptors CB1 and CB2. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inactivates 2AG through hydrolysis to arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol, thus modulating the activity at CB receptors. In the brain, AA released from 2AG by the action of MAGL serves as a substrate for cyclooxygenases which produce pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Here we report stable-isotope GC-MS and LC-MS/MS assays for the reliable measurement of MAGL activity. The assays utilize deuterium-labeled 2AG (d8-2AG; 10μM) as the MAGL substrate and measure deuterium-labeled AA (d8-AA; range 0-1μM) as the MAGL product. Unlabelled AA (d0-AA, 1μM) serves as the internal standard. d8-AA and d0-AA are extracted from the aqueous buffered incubation mixtures by ethyl acetate. Upon solvent evaporation the residue is reconstituted in the mobile phase prior to LC-MS/MS analysis or in anhydrous acetonitrile for GC-MS analysis. LC-MS/MS analysis is performed in the negative electrospray ionization mode by selected-reaction monitoring the mass transitions [M-H]-→[M-H - CO2]-, i.e., m/z 311→m/z 267 for d8-AA and m/z 303→m/z 259 for d0-AA. Prior to GC-MS analysis d8-AA and d0-AA were converted to their pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) esters by means of PFB-Br. GC-MS analysis is performed in the electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode by selected-ion monitoring the ions [M-PFB]-, i.e., m/z 311 for d8-AA and m/z 303 for d0-AA. The GC-MS and LC-MS/MS assays were cross-validated. Linear regression analysis between the concentration (range, 0-1μM) of d8-AA measured by LC-MS/MS (y) and that by GC-MS (x) revealed a straight line (r2=0.9848) with the regression equation y=0.003+0.898x, indicating a good agreement. In dog liver, we detected MAGL activity that was inhibitable by the MAGL inhibitor JZL-184. Exogenous eicosatetraynoic acid is suitable as internal standard for the quantitative determination of d8-AA produced from d8-2AG by

  8. Brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA levels of young rats are related to alpha-linolenic acid (ALA levels and fat matrix of the diet: impact of dairy fat*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delplanque Bernadette

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dososahexaenoate (DHA is highly concentrated in mammalian nervous and visual systems and its deficiency during gestation, lactation and early life, could have dramatic impacts on brain functions and mental health. Achieving an appropriate DHA status in the neonatal brain is an important goal of neonatal nutrition. We evaluated how a-linolenic acid (ALA provided by different dietary fat matrices improved DHA content in the brains of both young male and female rats. Young rats born from dams fed during gestation and lactation with a low ALA diet (0.4% of fatty acids were subjected for 6 weeks after weaning to an anhydrous dairy fat blend-based diet that provided 1.5% ALA or to a palm oil blend-based diet that provided the same ALA level: either 1.5% ALA or 1.5% ALA and 0.12% DHA with 0.4% arachidonic acid (ARA. With each diet the n-6/ n-3 ratio was similar (10 to follow the values generally recommended for infant formula. Fatty acids analysis in whole brain showed that 1.5% ALA dairy fat blend was superior to both 1.5% ALA palm-oil blends, supplemented or not with dietary DHA, for increasing brain DHA. Females compared to males had significantly higher brain DHA with the 1.5% ALA palm-blend diet, but the dietary supplementation with DHA smoothed the differences by a specific increase of males DHA brain. In conclusion, dairy fat blend enriched with ALA appear to be an interesting strategy for achieving optimal DHA levels in the brain of post-weaning rats. Inclusion of dairy fat in infant formulas should be reconsidered.

  9. Changes in the Fatty Acid Composition of Brain and Liver Phospholipids from Rats Fed Fat-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Delaš

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been undertaken with the aim of elucidating the effect of a fat-free diet (FFD, which is known to be deficient in essential fatty acids (EFA, on the composition of fatty acids in the brain and liver glycerophospholipids of rats. Changes in the stereochemical distribution of fatty acids linked to the sn-1 or sn-2 position were of special interest. Two groups of animals were fed either the control diet (CD or the FFD for two weeks. From the total lipid extracts of the brain and liver tissues, phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylinositol+phosphatidylserine (PI+PS fractions were separated by column and thin layer chromatography (TLC. After digestion with phospholipase A2 (PLA2, fatty acids from the sn-1 and sn-2 positions were separately converted into methyl esters and analyzed by gas chromatography. In animals fed FFD, the relative levels of unsaturated fatty acids increased in the sn-1 position of the PI+PS fraction in both liver and brain tissues, as well as in the PE fraction from the brain tissue. In other fractions no statistically significant differences were found. When the levels of particular fatty acids were evaluated, significant decreases in the amounts of palmitic (PA, 16:0, stearic (SA, 18:0, and nervonic (NA, 24:1n-9 acids, and/or significant increases of eicosenoic (ENA, 20:1n-9, arachidonic (AA, 20:4n-6 and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6n-3 acids were detected in some fractions. It can be concluded that in the brain and liver glycerophospholipids of rats fed FFD, the EFAs lacking in the diet were moderately substituted by endogenously synthesized unsaturated fatty acids.

  10. Interactions between 5-Lipoxygenase Polymorphisms and Adipose Tissue Contents of Arachidonic and Eicosapentaenoic Acids Do Not Affect Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Middle-Aged Men and Women in a Danish Case-Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammelmark, Anders; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Tjønneland, Anne; Schmidt, Erik B; Overvad, Kim; Nielsen, Michael S

    2017-07-01

    Background: The 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been linked to atherothrombotic disease, and a functional tandem repeat polymorphism in the arachidonate lipoxygenase-5 (ALOX-5) gene has been associated with the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Interestingly, 2 studies have reported an interaction between dietary intakes of the ALOX-5 substrates, arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and genotype.Objective: We investigated whether the interactions between the ALOX-5 tandem repeat polymorphism (rs59439148) and adipose tissue AA and EPA were associated with incident MI.Methods: In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we conducted a case-cohort study including 3089 participants with incident MI identified from national registries and a randomly selected subcohort of 3000 participants. Participants were men and women with a median age of 56 y at baseline and no previous history of cancer. Adipose tissue and blood samples were collected at baseline along with comprehensive questionnaires on lifestyle and demographic data. The ALOX-5 tandem repeat polymorphism was genotyped by multititer plate sequencing. Associations were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazards models.Results: We observed a higher risk of MI for homozygous carriers of the variant alleles in the fifth quintile of AA content than for the reference group with the lowest quintile of AA and carrying the wild-type allele (HR: 3.02; 95% CI: 1.41, 6.44). In contrast, homozygotes for the variant alleles tended to have a higher risk of MI when comparing the lowest quintile of EPA content with the reference group with the highest quintile of EPA and carrying the wild-type allele (HR: 2.15; 95% CI: 0.91, 5.09; P = 0.08). Although our results suggested interactions between the polymorphism and adipose tissue AA and EPA, a quantitative evaluation of interaction by calculating the relative excess risk due to interactions was not significant.Conclusions: Adipose tissue EPA and AA and the ALOX-5

  11. Different sensitivity of Na(+,K(+-ATPase and Mg(2+-АТРase to ethanol and arachidonic acid in rat colon smooth muscle under pretreatment of cellular membranes with Ds-Na

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kaplia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The methodological procedure provides the detection of the relatively high Na+,K+-ATPase functional activity in the crude cellular membranes of rat colon smooth muscle (CSM following standard detergent pretreatment (with Ds-Na vs digitonin. It includes the essential discrete steps: detergent membrane permeabilization under optimal detergent/protein ratio and active site protection by ATP (for Ds-Na prior enzymatic reaction with substantial detergent dilution far below critical micelle concentration in the ATPase medium. The high level of the Na+,K+-ATPase activity, originally detected in CSM, did not differ for two detergents and was comparable with ouabain-resistant Mg2+,АТР-hydrolase activity, The features of ATPase protein-lipid complexes were evaluated by the enzyme sensitivity to the effect of ethanol and arachidonic acid with different membrane disordering effectiveness. The long-chain fatty acid is a more effective inhibitor as compared with aliphatic alcohol for both ATPases. Mg2+,АТР-hydrolase appeared to be much more resistant to inactivation than Na+,K+-ATPase. The data reflect the possible differences in lipid dependence of two enzymatic systems due to the peculiarities of the structural arrangement in membrane and importance of the hydrophobic microenvironment for mechanism of catalysis. Thus, the data represent the approach to the simple and reliable Na+,K+-АТРase activity determination in nonpurified CSM membranes, acceptable for different tissues and appropriate for quantitative comparison in pathophysiological studies and for testing the impact of diverse effectors on Na+,K+-АТРase.

  12. Increased brain fatty acid uptake in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti

    2010-01-01

    To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it.......To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it....

  13. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine...... actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from...... the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within...

  14. Fatty acids add grease to exocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Rickman and Davletov suggest a novel mechanism for biological lipids to regulate synaptic transmission in the brain. Physiologically relevant concentrations of arachidonic acid help to dissociate a protein complex involved in exocytosis. ©2005 Elsevier Ltd All

  15. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain carbonic acid acidosis after acetazolamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuser, D; Astrup, J; Lassen, N A

    1975-01-01

    of the carbonic anhydrase inhibition on the brain tissue. As a further support for this conclusion was considered the finding of a prolonged response time of brain pH to HCO3-minus i.v. to CO2-minus inhalation, and to hyperventilation after the acetazolamide inhibtion. No changes in brain extracelllular potassium...

  17. Virus-induced enhancement of arachidonate metabolism by bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laegreid, W.W.; Taylor, S.M.; Leid, R.W.; Silflow, R.M.; Evermann, J.R.; Breeze, R.G.; Liggitt, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Virus infection of alveolar macrophages both in vivo and in vitro has been associated with a variety of changes in cellular function. Some of these changes are identical to the effects that arachidonate-derived mediators, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, have on macrophage function. Virus infection of macrophages has been previously shown to increase the output of some arachidonate metabolites, most notably PGE2. However, the effect of virus infection on arachidonate metabolism in general has not been well described. In our experiments, primary cultures of alveolar macrophages obtained from normal cattle by bronchoalveolar lavage, were infected in vitro with parainfluenza type 3 virus. At days 0 to 4 post-infection (p.i.) these cells were labelled with 3H-arachidonic acid and stimulated with either serum-coated zymosan, the calcium ionophore A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate. The complete spectrum of arachidonate-derived metabolites was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV and on-line radiometric monitoring of column eluant. The total output of metabolites of arachidonic acid by virus-infected alveolar macrophages was increased over that of noninfected controls (with all stimuli tested) by day 4 p.i. (P less than or equal to 0.05). The production of metabolites by the cyclooxygenase, 12- and 5-lipoxygenase enzyme systems was significantly increased, as was the release of 3H-arachidonate. The lack of stimulus specificity and the increases in arachidonate release suggest that greater substrate availability, due either to increased phospholipase activity or direct virus-membrane interaction, may be responsible for the virus-induced enhancement of metabolite output.

  18. Anandamide hydrolysis by human cells in culture and brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Stelt, M. van der; Rossi, A.; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide; AnNH) has important neuromodulatory and immunomodulatory activities. This lipid is rapidly taken up and hydrolyzed to arachidonate and ethanolamine in many organisms. As yet, AnNH inactivation has not been studied in humans. Here, a human brain fatty-acid amide

  19. Association between fatty acid metabolism in the brain and Alzheimer disease neuropathology and cognitive performance: A nontargeted metabolomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Snowden

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD pathology and expression of AD symptoms is poorly understood. Omega-3 and -6 fatty acids have previously been linked to both protective and pathogenic effects in AD. However, to date little is known about how the abundance of these species is affected by differing levels of disease pathology in the brain.We performed metabolic profiling on brain tissue samples from 43 individuals ranging in age from 57 to 95 y old who were stratified into three groups: AD (N = 14, controls (N = 14 and "asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease" (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD neuropathology at death but without evidence for cognitive impairment during life (N = 15 from the autopsy sample of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA. We measured 4,897 metabolite features in regions both vulnerable in the middle frontal and inferior temporal gyri (MFG and ITG and resistant (cerebellum to classical AD pathology. The levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs in whole brain were compared in controls versus AD, and the differences were as follows: linoleic acid (p = 8.8 x 10-8, FC = 0.52, q = 1.03 x 10-6, linolenic acid (p = 2.5 x 10-4, FC = 0.84, q = 4.03 x 10-4, docosahexaenoic acid (p = 1.7 x 10-7, FC = 1.45, q = 1.24 x 10-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (p = 4.4 x 10-4, FC = 0.16, q = 6.48 x 10-4, oleic acid (p = 3.3 x 10-7, FC = 0.34, q = 1.46 x 10-6, and arachidonic acid (p = 2.98 x 10-5, FC = 0.75, q = 7.95 x 10-5. These fatty acids were strongly associated with AD when comparing the groups in the MFG and ITG, respectively: linoleic acid (p ASYMAD>AD and increases in docosahexanoic acid (AD>ASYMAD>control may represent regionally specific threshold levels of these metabolites beyond which the accumulation of AD pathology triggers the expression of clinical symptoms. The main limitation of this study is the relatively small sample size. There are few cohorts with extensive longitudinal cognitive assessments

  20. Ethanol and arachidonic acid synergize to activate Kupffer cells and modulate the fibrogenic response via tumor necrosis factor alpha, reduced glutathione, and transforming growth factor beta-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, Francisco Javier; Nieto, Natalia

    2008-12-01

    Because of the contribution of ethanol and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to alcoholic liver disease, we investigated whether chronic ethanol administration and arachidonic acid (AA) could synergistically mediate Kupffer cell (KC) activation and modulate the stellate cell (HSC) fibrogenic response. (1) the effects of ethanol and AA on KC and HSC were as follows: Cell proliferation, lipid peroxidation, H(2)O(2), O(2).(-), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced form (NADPH) oxidase activity, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were higher in KC(ethanol) than in KC(control), and were enhanced by AA; HSC(ethanol) proliferated faster, increased collagen, and showed higher GSH than HSC(control), with modest effects by AA. (2) AA effects on the control co-culture: We previously reported the ability of KC to induce a pro-fibrogenic response in HSC via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent mechanisms; we now show that AA further increases cell proliferation and collagen in the control co-culture. The latter was prevented by vitamin E (an antioxidant) and by diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). (3) Ethanol effects on the co-cultures: Co-culture with KC(control) or KC(ethanol) induced HSC(control) and HSC(ethanol) proliferation; however, the pro-fibrogenic response in HSC(ethanol) was suppressed because of up-regulation of TNF-alpha and GSH, which was prevented by a TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody (Ab) and by L-buthionine-sulfoximine, a GSH-depleting agent. (4) Ethanol plus AA effects on the co-cultures: AA lowered TNF-alpha in the HSC(control) co-cultures, allowing for enhanced collagen deposition; furthermore, AA restored the pro-fibrogenic response in the HSC(ethanol) co-cultures by counteracting the up-regulation of TNF-alpha and GSH with a significant increase in GSSG and in pro-fibrogenic transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). These results unveil synergism between ethanol and AA to the mechanism whereby KC mediate ECM

  1. Clinical Implications of 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid in the Kidney, Liver, Lung and Brain: An Emerging Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama H. Elshenawy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA is an important pathway for the formation of eicosanoids. The ω-hydroxylation of AA generates significant levels of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE in various tissues. In the current review, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in the kidney, liver, lung, and brain during physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in tumor formation, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In the kidney, 20-HETE is involved in modulation of preglomerular vascular tone and tubular ion transport. Furthermore, 20-HETE is involved in renal 19 ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and polycystic kidney diseases. The role of 20-HETE in the liver is not clearly understood although it represents 50%–75% of liver CYP-dependent AA metabolism, and it is associated with liver cirrhotic ascites. In the respiratory system, 20-HETE plays a role in pulmonary cell survival, pulmonary vascular tone and tone of the airways. As for the brain, 20-HETE is involved in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 20-HETE has angiogenic and mitogenic properties and thus helps in tumor promotion. Several inhibitors and inducers of the synthesis of 20-HETE as well as 20-HETE analogues and antagonists are recently available and could be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of many disease states in the future.

  2. Analysis of Free Amino Acids in Mammalian Brain Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, A L; Boyko, A I; Mkrtchyan, G V; Tashlitsky, V N; Timofeeva, A V; Graf, A V; Bunik, V I; Baratova, L A

    2017-10-01

    An optimized method for analysis of free amino acids using a modified lithium-citrate buffer system with a Hitachi L-8800 amino acid analyzer is described. It demonstrates clear advantages over the sodium-citrate buffer system commonly used for the analysis of protein hydrolysates. A sample pretreatment technique for amino acid analysis of brain extracts is also discussed. The focus has been placed on the possibility of quantitative determination of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) with simultaneous analysis of all other amino acids in brain extracts. The method was validated and calibration coefficient (KGSH) was determined. Examples of chromatographic separation of free amino acids in extracts derived from different parts of the brain are presented.

  3. Arachidonic acid and lipoxinA4 attenuate streptozotocin-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5 F cells in vitro and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundala, Naveen K V; Naidu, Vegi G M; Das, Undurti N

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe whether polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can protect rat insulinoma (RIN5 F) cells against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced apoptosis in vitro and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) in vivo and if so, what would be the mechanism of this action. RIN5 F cells were used for the in vitro study, whereas the in vivo study was performed in Wistar rats. STZ was used to induce apoptosis of RIN5 F cells in vitro and T1- and T2DM in vivo. The effect of PUFAs: γ-linolenic acid (GLA), arachidonic acid (AA) of ω-6 series, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) of ω-3 series; cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitors and antiinflammatory metabolite of AA and DHA, lipoxin A4 (LXA4), and resolvin D2 and protectin, respectively against STZ-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5 F cells in vitro and LXA4 against T1- and T2DM in vivo was studied. Changes in the antioxidant content, lipid peroxides, nitric oxide, and expression of PDX1, P65, nuclear factor-κb (NF-κb), and IKB genes in STZ-treated RIN5 F cells in vitro and Nrf2, GLUT2, COX2, iNOS protein levels in the pancreatic tissue of T1- and T2DM and LPCLN2 (lipocalin 2), NF-κb, IKB I in adipose tissue of T2DM after LXA4 treatment were studied. Plasma glucose, insulin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels also were measured in STZ-induced T1- and T2DM Wistar rats. Among all PUFAs tested, AA and EPA are the most effective against STZ-induced cytotoxicity to RIN5 F cells in vitro. Neither COX nor LOX inhibitors blocked the cytoprotective action of AA in vitro and T1- and T2DM by STZ. LXA4 production by RIN5 F cells in vitro and plasma LXA4 levels in STZ-induced T1- and T2DM animals were decreased by STZ that reverted to normal after AA treatment. AA prevented both T1- and T2DM induced by STZ. Antiinflammatory metabolite of AA and LXA4 prevented both T1- and T2DM induced by STZ. The expression of Pdx1, NF-κb, IKB genes in the

  4. n-3 long-chain fatty acids and regulation of glucose transport in two models of rat brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Fabien; Jouin, Mélanie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Roux, Françoise; Perrière, Nicolas; Langelier, Bénédicte; Lavialle, Monique; Cunnane, Stephen; Guesnet, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Several in vivo studies suggest that docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3), the main n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) of brain membranes, could be an important regulator of brain energy metabolism by affecting glucose utilization and the density of the two isoforms of the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) (endothelial and astrocytic). This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that 22:6 n-3 in membranes may modulate glucose metabolism in brain endothelial cells. It compared the impact of 22:6 n-3 and the other two main LC-PUFA, arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3), on fatty acid composition of membrane phospholipids, glucose uptake and expression of 55-kDa GLUT1 isoform in two models of rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC), in primary culture and in the immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line RBE4. Without PUFA supplementation, both types of cerebral endothelial cells were depleted in 22:6 n-3, RBE4 being also particularly low in 20:4 n-6. After exposure to supplemental 20:4 n-6, 20:5 n-3 or 22:6 n-3 (15microM, i.e. a physiological dose), RBEC and RBE4 avidly incorporated these PUFA into their membrane phospholipids thereby resembling physiological conditions, i.e. the PUFA content of rat cerebral microvessels. However, RBE4 were unable to incorporate physiological level of 20:4 n-6. Basal glucose transport in RBEC (rate of [(3)H]-3-o-methylglucose uptake) was increased after 20:5 n-3 or 22:6 n-3 supplementation by 50% and 35%, respectively, whereas it was unchanged with 20:4 n-6. This increase of glucose transport was associated with an increased GLUT1 protein, while GLUT1 mRNA was not affected. The different PUFA did not impact on glucose uptake in RBE4. Due to alterations in n-6 PUFA metabolism and weak expression of GLUT1, RBE4 seems to be less adequate than RBEC to study PUFA metabolism and glucose transport in brain endothelial cells. Physiological doses of n-3 LC-PUFA have a direct and positive effect on glucose

  5. Neuroprotective effects of Ellagic acid on Neonatal Hypoxic Brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate if ellagic acid exerts neuroprotective effects in hypoxic ischemic (HI) brain injury by inhibiting apoptosis and inflammatory responses. Methods: Separate groups of rat pups from post-natal day 4 (D4) were administered with ellagic acid (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg body weight) orally till post- natal day 10 ...

  6. Fabp1 gene ablation inhibits high-fat diet-induced increase in brain endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Chung, Sarah; Dangott, Lawrence J; Seeger, Drew R; Murphy, Eric J; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system shifts energy balance toward storage and fat accumulation, especially in the context of diet-induced obesity. Relatively little is known about factors outside the central nervous system that may mediate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on brain endocannabinoid levels. One candidate is the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), a cytosolic protein highly prevalent in liver, but not detected in brain, which facilitates hepatic clearance of fatty acids. The impact of Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) on the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on brain and plasma endocannabinoid levels was examined and data expressed for each parameter as the ratio of high-fat diet/control diet. In male wild-type mice, HFD markedly increased brain N-acylethanolamides, but not 2-monoacylglycerols. LKO blocked these effects of HFD in male mice. In female wild-type mice, HFD slightly decreased or did not alter these endocannabinoids as compared with male wild type. LKO did not block the HFD effects in female mice. The HFD-induced increase in brain arachidonic acid-derived arachidonoylethanolamide in males correlated with increased brain-free and total arachidonic acid. The ability of LKO to block the HFD-induced increase in brain arachidonoylethanolamide correlated with reduced ability of HFD to increase brain-free and total arachidonic acid in males. In females, brain-free and total arachidonic acid levels were much less affected by either HFD or LKO in the context of HFD. These data showed that LKO markedly diminished the impact of HFD on brain endocannabinoid levels, especially in male mice. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...... amounts of GFA, up to 85 times the concentration in parietal grey substance of normal human brain. GFA was not found in neurinomas, meningiomas, adenomas of the hypophysis, or in a single case of metastasis of adenocarcinoma. Non-glial tumours of craniopharyngioma and haemangioblastoma were infiltrated...

  8. The multiple roles of Fatty Acid Handling Proteins in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine SF Moullé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are essential components of a living organism as energy source but also as constituent of the membrane lipid bilayer. In addition fatty acid (FA derivatives interact with many signaling pathways. FAs have amphipathic properties and therefore require being associated to protein for both transport and intracellular trafficking. Here we will focus on several fatty acid handling proteins, among which the fatty acid translocase/CD36 (FAT/CD36, members of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs, and lipid chaperones fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. A decade of extensive studies has helped decipher the mechanism of action of these proteins in peripheral tissue with high lipid metabolism. However, considerably less information is available regarding their role in the brain, despite the high lipid content of this tissue. This review will primarily focus on the recent studies that have highlighted the crucial role of lipid handling proteins in brain FA transport, neuronal differentiation and development, cognitive processes and brain diseases. Finally a special focus will be made on the recent studies that have revealed the role of FAT/CD36 in brain lipid sensing and nervous control of energy balance.

  9. Genetic variants in the FADS gene cluster are associated with arachidonic acid concentrations of human breast milk at 1.5 and 6 mo postpartum and influence the course of milk dodecanoic, tetracosenoic, and trans-9-octadecenoic acid concentrations over the duration of lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattka, Eva; Rzehak, Peter; Szabó, Éva; Jakobik, Viktoria; Weck, Melanie; Weyermann, Maria; Grallert, Harald; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Heinrich, Joachim; Brenner, Hermann; Decsi, Tamás; Illig, Thomas; Koletzko, Berthold

    2011-02-01

    Breastfeeding is considered an optimal nutritional source of n-6 (omega-6) and n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids (FAs) for the proper visual and cognitive development of newborn children. In addition to maternal nutrition as an important regulator of FA concentrations, first results exist on an association of breast-milk FAs with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FADS gene cluster, which encodes the rate-limiting enzymes in the elongation-desaturation pathway of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). We analyzed the influence of FADS SNPs on breast-milk FA concentrations and their time course during lactation in the Ulm Birth Cohort study, which comprised 772 nursing mothers at 1.5 mo after giving birth, and in a subset of 463 mothers who were still breastfeeding at 6 mo postpartum. We conducted linear regression analysis of 8 FADS SNPs with FA concentrations at both time points separately and assessed the genotype effect over time in a longitudinal analysis by using a generalized estimating equation regression model. We observed significant associations of FADS genotypes with arachidonic acid (AA) concentrations and the 20:4n-6/20:3n-6 ratio at both time points but no association of FADS SNPs with the time course of AA concentrations. A longitudinal analysis of FAs other than LC-PUFAs by genotype over time showed associations for dodecanoic acid, cis-15-tetracosenoic acid, and trans-9-octadecenoic acid. Maternal FADS genotypes are associated with breast-milk AA concentrations and might therefore influence the supply of this FA for children. Furthermore, our data indicate an interrelation between the LC-PUFA pathway and saturated and monounsaturated FAs.

  10. Impact of fatty acids on brain circulation, structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haast, R.A.M.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of dietary intervention has evolved into a promising approach to prevent the onset and progression of brain diseases. The positive relationship between intake of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega3-LCPUFAs) and decreased onset of disease- and aging-related deterioration of

  11. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic Acid and dihydrokainic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-01-01

    tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion...... technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK...... is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug...

  12. Milk in the island of Chole [Tanzania] is high in lauric, myristic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids, and low in linoleic acid - Reconstructed diet of infants born to our ancestors living in tropical coastal regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Remko S.; Smit, Ella N.; van der Meulen, Jan; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Boersma, E. Rudy; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    Background: We need information on the diet on which our genes evolved. Objective: We studied the milk fatty acid [FA] composition of mothers living in the island of Chole [Tanzania, Indian Ocean]. These mothers have high intakes of boiled marine fish and coconut, and consume plenty amount of fruits

  13. Fatty Acids, Antioxidants and Physical Activity in Brain Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hércules Rezende Freitas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants are important mediators in the central nervous system. Lipid derivatives may control the production of proinflammatory agents and regulate NF-κB activity, microglial activation, and fatty acid oxidation; on the other hand, antioxidants, such as glutathione and ascorbate, have been shown to signal through transmitter receptors and protect against acute and chronic oxidative stress, modulating the activity of different signaling pathways. Several authors have investigated the role of these nutrients in the brains of the young and the aged in degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and during brain aging due to adiposity- and physical inactivity-mediated metabolic disturbances, chronic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Through a literature review, we aimed to highlight recent data on the role of adiposity, fatty acids, antioxidants, and physical inactivity in the pathophysiology of the brain and in the molecular mechanisms of senescence. Data indicate the complexity and necessity of endogenous/dietary antioxidants for the maintenance of redox status and the control of neuroglial signaling under stress. Recent studies also indicate that omega-3 and -6 fatty acids act in a competitive manner to generate mediators for energy metabolism, influencing feeding behavior, neural plasticity, and memory during aging. Finding pharmacological or dietary resources that mitigate or prevent neurodegenerative affections continues to be a great challenge and requires additional effort from researchers, clinicians, and nutritionists in the field.

  14. Fatal Hyperammonemic Brain Injury from Valproic Acid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Bega

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperammonemia is known to cause neuronal injury, and can result from valproic acid exposure. Prompt reduction of elevated ammonia levels may prevent permanent neurological injury. We report a case of fatal hyperammonemic brain injury in a woman exposed to valproic acid. Case: A 38-year-old woman with schizoaffective disorder and recent increase in valproic acid dosage presented with somnolence and confusion and rapidly progressed to obtundation. Brain MRI showed diffuse bilateral restricted diffusion in nearly the entire cerebral cortex. She had normal liver function tests but serum ammonia level was severely elevated at 288 µmol/l. Genetic testing showed no mutation in urea cycle enzymes. Despite successful elimination of ammonia with hemodialysis she developed fatal cerebral edema. Conclusion: Cerebral edema secondary to hyperammonemia is potentially reversible if recognized early. Ammonia excretion can be facilitated by initiation of hemodialysis and administration of scavenging agents (sodium phenylacetate and sodium benzoate. Severe hyperammonemia can result from valproic acid exposure even in the absence of hepatotoxicity or inborn errors of metabolism. It is important to check serum ammonia in any patient with encephalopathy who has had recent valproic acid exposure.

  15. Long chain fatty acids in early human brain development

    OpenAIRE

    Gina Fernanda Lenis-Zamudio; Mario Delgado-Noguera

    2012-01-01

    The Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (LCPUFA) are essential substances for brain growth period, it have also potential effects on the prevention of chronic diseases, allergic and immune system modulation. The maternal diet, genetical predisposition and geographical variability, influence the levels of these substances transferred to the children during pregnancy and lactation. Until now, the evidence is controversial with regard to supplementation with these substances to improve child´...

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of anandamide, an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor, by brain membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Devane, W A; Axelrod, J

    1994-01-01

    Anandamide, an endogenous eicosanoid derivative (arachidonoylethanolamide), binds to the cannabinoid receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled superfamily. It also inhibits both adenylate cyclase and N-type calcium channel opening. The enzymatic synthesis of anandamide in bovine brain tissue was examined by incubating brain membranes with [14C]ethanolamine and arachidonic acid. Following incubation and extraction into toluene, a radioactive product was identified which had the same Rf value...

  17. Dietary guanidinoacetic acid increases brain creatine levels in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Ostojic, Jelena; Drid, Patrik; Vranes, Milan; Jovanov, Pavle

    2017-01-01

    Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is an experimental dietary additive that might act as a creatine source in tissues with high-energy requirements. In this case study, we evaluated brain levels of creatine in white matter, gray matter, cerebellum, and thalamus during 8 wk oral GAA administration in five healthy men and monitored the prevalence and severity of side effects of the intervention. Volunteers were supplemented daily with 36 mg/kg body weight (BW) of GAA for the first 4 wk of the intervention; afterward GAA dosage was titrated ≤60 mg/kg BW of GAA daily. At baseline, 4, and 8 wk, the participants underwent brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy, clinical chemistry studies, and open-ended questionnaire for side-effect prevalence and severity. Brain creatine levels increased in similar fashion in cerebellum, and white and gray matter after GAA supplementation, with an initial increase of 10.7% reported after 4 wk, and additional upsurge (7.7%) from the weeks 4 to 8 follow-up (P creatine levels decreased after 4 wk for 6.5% (P = 0.02), and increased nonsignificantly after 8 wk for 8% (P = 0.09). GAA induced an increase in N-acetylaspartate levels at 8-wk follow-up in all brain areas evaluated (P creatine pool in the human brain. This might be relevant for restoring cellular bioenergetics in disorders characterized by low brain creatine and functional enzymatic machinery for creatine synthesis, including neurodegenerative diseases, brain tumors, or cerebrovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Binge Ethanol-induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Organotypic Brain Slice Cultures: Effects of PLA2 Inhibitor Mepacrine and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James; Achille, Nicholas; Neafsey, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Using rat organotypic hippocampal-entorhinal cortical (HEC) slice cultures, we examined whether phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity is involved in binge alcohol (ethanol)-induced neurodegeneration, and whether docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), a fish oil-enriched fatty acid that is anti-inflammatory in brain damage models, is neuroprotective. Assessed with propidium iodide and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, neurodamage from ethanol (6 days 100 mM ethanol with four withdrawal periods) was prevented by the PLA2 pan-inhibitor, mepacrine. Also, ethanol-dependent neurodegeneration— particularly in the entorhinal region—was significantly ameliorated by DHA supplementation (25 µM); however, adrenic acid, a 22:4n-6 analog, was ineffective. Consistent with PLA2 activation, [3H] liberation was approximately fivefold greater in [3H]arachidonic acid-preloaded HEC slice cultures during ethanol withdrawal compared to controls, and DHA supplementation suppressed [3H] release to control levels. DHA might antagonize PLA2 activity directly or suppress upstream activators (e.g., oxidative stress); however, other DHA mechanisms could be important in subdueing ethanol-induced PLA2-dependent and independent neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:18592376

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fundamental fatty acid for the brain: New dietary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Francisca; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Catalina Hernandez-Rodas, María; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2017-09-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (C22: 6n-3, DHA) is a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid of marine origin fundamental for the formation and function of the nervous system, particularly the brain and the retina of humans. It has been proposed a remarkable role of DHA during human evolution, mainly on the growth and development of the brain. Currently, DHA is considered a critical nutrient during pregnancy and breastfeeding due their active participation in the development of the nervous system in early life. DHA and specifically one of its derivatives known as neuroprotectin D-1 (NPD-1), has neuroprotective properties against brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases and injury caused after brain ischemia-reperfusion episodes. This paper discusses the importance of DHA in the human brain given its relevance in the development of the tissue and as neuroprotective agent. It is also included a critical view about the ways to supply this noble fatty acid to the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Long chain fatty acids in early human brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Fernanda Lenis-Zamudio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (LCPUFA are essential substances for brain growth period, it have also potential effects on the prevention of chronic diseases, allergic and immune system modulation. The maternal diet, genetical predisposition and geographical variability, influence the levels of these substances transferred to the children during pregnancy and lactation. Until now, the evidence is controversial with regard to supplementation with these substances to improve child´s neurodevelopment. Therefore, from the systematic review conducted by one of the authors in 2010, this article reviews the current evidence on the subject.

  1. Interaction of ethacrynic acid with bovine brain tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludueña, R F; Roach, M C; Epstein, D L

    1994-04-29

    Ethacrynic acid is a diuretic agent that reacts with sulfhydryl groups in proteins, and which shows promise of effectiveness in the treatment of glaucoma. Ethacrynic acid is a known inhibitor of microtubule assembly in vitro (Xu et al., Arch Biochem Biophys 296: 462-67, 1992). We have used N,N'-ethylenebis (iodoacetamide) (EBI) as a probe to examine the sulfhydryl groups of tubulin; EBI can form two intra-chain cross-links in beta-tubulin. One of these, beta*, connects Cys239 with Cys354; the other, beta s, joins Cys12 with either Cys201 or Cys211 (Little and Ludueña, EMBO J 4: 51-56, 1985; Biochim Biophys Acta 912: 28-33, 1987). Formation of beta * inhibits microtubule assembly in vitro, consistent with the hypothesis that Cys239 has an assembly-critical sulfhydryl (Bai et al., Biochemistry 28: 5606-5612, 1989). We have examined the interaction of ethacrynic acid with the sulfhydryl groups of bovine brain tubulin. We found that 130 microM ethacrynic acid gave half-maximal inhibition of assembly, but had no effect on the formation of the beta * cross-link by EBI. Ethacrynic acid, however, did inhibit substantially formation of the beta s cross-link at this concentration and half-maximally inhibited it at approximately 185 microM. Half-maximal inhibition of the alkylation of tubulin sulfhydryls by iodo [14C]acetamide was obtained at an ethacrynic acid concentration in the range of 190-325 microM. These results indicate that ethacrynic acid can inhibit microtubule assembly by reacting with sulfhydryl groups other than those of Cys239 and Cys354 and suggest that other sulfhydryl groups in tubulin could be assembly-critical. These results also raise the possibility that these other assembly-critical sulfhydryls may be those of Cys12, Cys201 or Cys211.

  2. Subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase, with arachidonate-enriched triglyceride oil (SUNTGA40S) in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Suwa, Y.; Fujikawa, S.; Ishikura, Y.; Tsuda, S.; Dohnalek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are natural constituents found in human milk, fish oil or egg yolk. Until recently, infant formulas, though providing the essential fatty acid precursors for these PUFAs, did not contain preformed ARA

  3. An in vitro investigation of the actions of reproductive hormones on the cervix of the ewe in the follicular stage: the effects of 17β-estradiol, oxytocin, FSH, and arachidonic acid on the cervical pathway for the synthesis of prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, L; Scaramuzzi, R J

    2015-04-01

    During the periovulatory period, the cervix of the ewe relaxes and this mechanism is thought to be mediated by oxytocin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in response to increased concentrations of 17β-estradiol and perhaps FSH. The aim of the study was to determine the in vitro effects of 17β-estradiol, FSH, oxytocin, and arachidonic acid (AA) on the synthesis of PGE2 and on the expression of oxytocin receptor (OTR), cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in explants of cervical tissue collected from ewes in the periovulatory phase of the estrous cycle. Cervical minces from ewes in the follicular phase of the estrous cycle were cultured in supplemented Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium for 48 hours with 17β-estradiol, FSH, oxytocin, or AA. After incubation, the tissue was stored at -80 °C and the media at -20 °C. Western immunoblotting was used to determine relative levels of OTR, cPLA2, and COX-2 in cervical tissue, and the media was analyzed by RIA, to determine the concentration of PGE2. The addition of 17β-estradiol increased the concentration of PGE2 in the media (P = 0.001), the levels of COX-2 (P = 0.02) and OTR (P = 0.006) but not those of cPLA2 (P = 0.15). The addition of FSH increased the levels of COX-2 (P = 0.01) but, it had no effect on the concentration of PGE2 (P = 0.08) or on the levels of OTR (P = 0.07) and cPLA2 (P = 0.15). Oxytocin did not increase the levels of COX-2 (P = 0.38) but increased those of OTR (P = 0.001) and cPLA2 (P = 0.01) but not on the concentration of PGE2 in the media. Arachidonic acid increased the levels of cPLA2 (P = 0.01) and those of COX-2 (P = 0.02) but not the concentration of PGE2 in the media. Our findings suggest that the PGE2-mediated mechanisms of cervical relaxation in the ewe during the follicular phase are stimulated by FSH, 17β-estradiol, oxytocin, and AA. They all appear to act by inducing receptors and enzymes along the synthetic pathway for PGE2

  4. Sheep erythrocyte membrane binding and transfer of long-chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Inge Norby; Bojesen, Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, sheep erythrocyte ghosts, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport, transport rate constants......Palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, sheep erythrocyte ghosts, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport, transport rate constants...

  5. Influencia del α-tocoferol en la incorporación y peroxidación del ácido araquidónico en alevines parr de salmón del Atlántico (Salmo salar L. Influence of α-tocopherol on arachidonic acid deposition and peroxidation in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Dantagnan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el efecto sinérgico del ácido araquidónico (ARA (20:4n-6 y el α-tocoferol en la acumulación de estos nutrientes y su peroxidación en el músculo e hígado en juveniles de salmón del Atlántico (Salmo salar. Grupos por triplicado se alimentaron por 12 semanas con ocho dietas experimentales que contenían diferentes niveles de ácido araquidónico y α-tocoferol. Los parámetros productivos no se vieron afectados (P > 0,05 por las dietas suministradas. La acumulación del ARA en el músculo e hígado mostró diferencias significativas (P The synergistic effect of arachidonic acid (ARA (20:4n-6 and α-tocopherol on the accumulation of fatty acids and the peroxidation of lipids in liver and muscle was evaluated in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar juveniles. Triplicate groups were fed during 12 weeks with eight experimental diets with different levels of ARA and α-tocopherol. In all experimental diets the productive parameters were not affected (P > 0.05. ARA accumulation in muscle and liver showed significant differences (P < 0.05 between treatments. The synergic relationship between ARAAx4ocopherol was influenced (P < 0.05 only in the liver, showing that high levels of α-tocopherol and ARA favored the fatty acids accumulation in this organ. Results indicate that a dietary concentration up to 0.6% ARA, the increment of α-tocopherol is not necessary. The data obtained in this study demonstrated that the interaction between the ARA and α-tocopherol influenced the accumulation of fatty acids in the liver.

  6. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  7. A possible association between elevated serum levels of brain-specific auto-antibodies and reduced plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid in autistic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Gehan A; El-Khashab, Heba Y; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2015-03-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are not only essential for energy production, but they also exhibit a range of immunomodulatory properties that progress through T cell mediated events. Autoimmunity may have a pathogenic role in a subgroup of autistic children. This study is the first to investigate the relationship between serum levels of anti-myelin basic protein (anti-MBP) brain-specific auto-antibodies and reduced plasma levels of PUFAs in autistic children. Plasma levels of PUFAs (including linoleic, alphalinolenic, arachidonic "AA" and docosahexaenoic "DHA" acids) and serum anti-MBP were measured in 80 autistic children, aged between 4 and 12 years, and 80 healthy-matched children. Autistic patients had significantly lower plasma levels of PUFAs than healthy children. On the other hand, ω6/ω3 ratio (AA/DHA) was significantly higher in autistic patients than healthy children. Low plasma DHA, AA, linolenic and linoleic acids were found in 67.5%, 50%, 40% and 35%, respectively of autistic children. On the other hand, 70% of autistic patients had elevated ω6/ω3 ratio. Autistic patients with increased serum levels of anti-MBP auto-antibodies (75%) had significantly lower plasma DHA (Pchildren have a significant positive association between reduced levels of plasma DHA and increased serum levels of anti-MBP brain-specific auto-antibodies. However, replication studies of larger samples are recommended to validate whether reduced levels of plasma PUFAs are a mere association or have a role in the induction of the production of anti-MBP in some autistic children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differences in fatty acid composition between cerebral brain lobes in juvenile pigs after fish oil feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullemeijer, C.; Zock, P.L.; Coronel, R.; den Ruijter, H.M.; Katan, M.B.; Brummer, R.J.; Kok, F.J.; Beekman, J.; Brouwer, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    Very long-chain n-3 PUFA from fish are suggested to play a role in the development of the brain. Fish oil feeding results in higher proportions of n-3 PUFA in the brains of newborn piglets. However, the effect of fish oil on the fatty acid composition of specific cerebral brain lobes in juvenile

  9. Sexually dimorphic brain fatty acid composition in low and high fat diet-fed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodriguez-Navas

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Our data suggest male and female brains, and not plasma, differ in their fatty acid profile. This is the first time, to our knowledge, lipidomic analyses has been used to directly test the hypothesis there is a sexual dimorphism in brain and plasma fatty acid composition following consumption of the chow diet, as well as following exposure to the WD.

  10. The function of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá, Angel

    2010-02-01

    The mammalian pineal gland is a prominent secretory organ with a high metabolic activity. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the main secretory product of the pineal gland, efficiently scavenges both the hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals counteracting lipid peroxidation in biological membranes. Approximately 25% of the total fatty acids present in the rat pineal lipids are represented by arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3). These very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids play important roles in the pineal gland. In addition to the production of melatonin, the mammalian pineal gland is able of convert these polyunsaturated fatty acids into bioactive lipid mediators. Lipoxygenation is the principal lipoxygenase (LOX) activity observed in the rat pineal gland. Lipoxygenation in the pineal gland is exceptional because no other brain regions express significant LOX activities under normal physiological conditions. The rat pineal gland expresses both 12- and 15-lipoxygenase (LOX) activities, producing 12- and 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12- and 15-HpETE) from arachidonic acid and 14- and 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (14- and 17-HdoHE) from docosahexaenoic acid, respectively. The rat pineal also produces hepoxilins via LOX pathways. The hepoxilins are bioactive epoxy-hydroxy products of the arachidonic acid metabolism via the 12S-lipoxygenase (12S-LOX) pathway. The two key pineal biochemical functions, lipoxygenation and melatonin synthesis, may be synergistically regulated by the status of n-3 essential fatty acids. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as lysophosphatidylcholine, but not as free acid, enriches brain DHA and improves memory in adult mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sugasini, Dhavamani; Thomas, Riya; Yalagala, Poorna C. R.; Tai, Leon M.; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2017-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is uniquely concentrated in the brain, and is essential for its function, but must be mostly acquired from diet. Most of the current supplements of DHA, including fish oil and krill oil, do not significantly increase brain DHA, because they are hydrolyzed to free DHA and are absorbed as triacylglycerol, whereas the transporter at blood brain barrier is specific for phospholipid form of DHA. Here we show that oral administration of DHA to normal adult mice as lysopho...

  12. Accumulation of pantothenic acid by the isolated choroid plexus and brain slices in vitro. [Rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, R.; Boose, B.

    1984-08-01

    In vitro, the transport of (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid into and from the isolated rabbit choroid plexus, an anatomical locus of the blood-CSF barrier, and brain slices was studied. The choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid from the medium against a concentration gradient, although at low concentrations (less than 1 microM) there was substantial intracellular phosphorylation and binding of the (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid. The saturable accumulation process in choroid plexus was inhibited by probenecid and caproic acid but not by nicotinic acid or by weak bases. The accumulation process was markedly inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, poly-L-lysine (which blocks sodium transport), and low temperatures. (/sup 14/C)Pantothenic acid was readily released from choroid plexus by a temperature-dependent process. Brain slices also accumulated and, at low concentrations, phosphorylated (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid from the medium by a temperature-, probenecid-, and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive saturable process. However, unlike choroid plexus, brain slices did not concentrate free pantothenic acid and (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid accumulation was not sensitive to poly-L-lysine. (/sup 14/C)Pantothenic acid was readily released from brain slices by a temperature-sensitive process. These results are consistent with the view that (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid enters the isolated choroid plexus and brain slices by active transport and facilitated diffusion, respectively.

  13. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase.

  14. N-3 fatty acids, neuronal activity and energy metabolism in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbeby Emilie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The content of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in brain membranes is of crucial importance for the optimum development of brain functions. A lack of DHA accretion in the brain is accompanied by deficits in learning behavior linked to impairments in neurotransmission processes, which might result from alteration of brain fuel supply and hence energy metabolism. Experimental data we published support the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acids may modulate brain glucose utilization and metabolism. Indeed rats made deficient in DHA by severe depletion of total n-3 fatty acid intake have 1 a lower brain glucose utilization, 2 a decrease of the glucose transporter protein content GLUT1 both in endothelial cells and in astrocytes, 3 a repression of GLUT1 gene expression in basal state as well as upon neuronal activation. This could be due to the specific action of DHA on the regulation of GLUT1 expression since rat brain endothelial cells cultured with physiological doses of DHA had an increased GLUT1 protein content and glucose transport when compared to non-supplemented cells. These experimental data highlight the impact of n-3 fatty acids on the use of brain glucose, thereby constituting a key factor in the control of synaptic activity. This emerging role suggests that dietary intake of n-3 fatty acids can help to reduce the cognitive deficits in the elderly and possibly symptomatic cerebral metabolic alterations in Alzheimer disease by promoting brain glucose metabolism.

  15. Sialic Acids in the Brain: Gangliosides and Polysialic Acid in Nervous System Development, Stability, Disease, and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Every cell in nature carries a rich surface coat of glycans, its glycocalyx, which constitutes the cell's interface with its environment. In eukaryotes, the glycocalyx is composed of glycolipids, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans, the compositions of which vary among different tissues and cell types. Many of the linear and branched glycans on cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids of vertebrates are terminated with sialic acids, nine-carbon sugars with a carboxylic acid, a glycerol side-chain, and an N-acyl group that, along with their display at the outmost end of cell surface glycans, provide for varied molecular interactions. Among their functions, sialic acids regulate cell-cell interactions, modulate the activities of their glycoprotein and glycolipid scaffolds as well as other cell surface molecules, and are receptors for pathogens and toxins. In the brain, two families of sialoglycans are of particular interest: gangliosides and polysialic acid. Gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids, are the most abundant sialoglycans of nerve cells. Mouse genetic studies and human disorders of ganglioside metabolism implicate gangliosides in axon-myelin interactions, axon stability, axon regeneration, and the modulation of nerve cell excitability. Polysialic acid is a unique homopolymer that reaches >90 sialic acid residues attached to select glycoproteins, especially the neural cell adhesion molecule in the brain. Molecular, cellular, and genetic studies implicate polysialic acid in the control of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, intermolecular interactions at cell surfaces, and interactions with other molecules in the cellular environment. Polysialic acid is essential for appropriate brain development, and polymorphisms in the human genes responsible for polysialic acid biosynthesis are associated with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder. Polysialic acid also appears to play a role in adult brain plasticity

  16. Effect of extra virgin olive oil components on the arachidonic acid cascade, colorectal cancer and colon cancer cell proliferation; Efecto de los componentes del aceite de oliva virgen extra en la cascada del ácido araquidónico, el cáncer colorrectal y la proliferación de células de cáncer de colon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storniolo, C.E.; Moreno, J.J.

    2016-07-01

    The mediterranean diet (MD) reduced the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), and olive oil, the primary source of fat in the MD, has also been found to have a protective effect. However, animals fed with oleic acid present a high number of intestinal tumours, suggesting that oleic acid and olive oil consumption can exert different effects on CRC. Considering that extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is a complex mix of fatty acids and minor compounds such as polyphenols, hydrocarbons, phytosterols and triterpenes; and that these compounds have antioxidant activity and consequently they can modulate the arachidonic acid (AA) cascade and eicosanoid synthesis. This review analyzes the state of the art of olive oil components on the AA cascade and cellular mechanism involved in CRC such as intestinal epithelial cell growth/apoptosis, to understand the fact that the consumption of seed oils with high oleic content or EVOO will probably have different effects on CRC development. [Spanish] La dieta Mediterranea (DM) y el aceite de oliva reducen el riesgo de cáncer colorrectal (CCR). Sin embargo, animales alimentados con dietas ricas en ácido oleico presentan un elevado número de tumores intestinales, lo que sugiere que el consumo de ácido oleico y aceite de oliva pueden tener efectos diferentes sobre el desarrollo de CCR. Considerando que el aceite de oliva extra virgen (AOEV) es una compleja mezcla de ácidos grasos y compuestos minoritarios como polifenoles, lignanos, hidrocarburos, fitoesteroles y triterpenos; y que algunos de estos compuestos son antioxidantes y modulan la cascada del ácido araquidónico (AA) y la producción de eicosanoides. Analizamos la información existente sobre el efecto de los componentes del AOEV sobre la cascada del AA y los mecanismos implicados en el CCR como el crecimiento de las células epiteliales intestinales/apoptosis, lo que nos permitirá entender por qué el consumo de aceites de semillas altos en oleico o AOEV probablemente tendr

  17. FABP-1 gene ablation impacts brain endocannabinoid system in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Chung, Sarah; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Huang, Huan; Dangott, Lawrence J; Peng, Xiaoxue; Kaczocha, Martin; Seeger, Drew R; Murphy, Eric J; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2016-08-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (FABP1, L-FABP) has high affinity for and enhances uptake of arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4, n-6) which, when esterified to phospholipids, is the requisite precursor for synthesis of endocannabinoids (EC) such as arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The brain derives most of its ARA from plasma, taking up ARA and transporting it intracellularly via cytosolic fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs 3,5, and 7) localized within the brain. In contrast, the much more prevalent cytosolic FABP1 is not detectable in the brain but is instead highly expressed in the liver. Therefore, the possibility that FABP1 outside the central nervous system may regulate brain AEA and 2-AG was examined in wild-type (WT) and FABP1 null (LKO) male mice. LKO increased brain levels of AA-containing EC (AEA, 2-AG), correlating with increased free and total ARA in brain and serum. LKO also increased brain levels of non-ARA that contain potentiating endocannabinoids (EC*) such as oleoyl ethanolamide (OEA), PEA, 2-OG, and 2-PG. Concomitantly, LKO decreased serum total ARA-containing EC, but not non-ARA endocannabinoids. LKO did not elicit these changes in the brain EC and EC* as a result of compensatory up-regulation of brain protein levels of enzymes in EC synthesis (NAPEPLD, DAGLα) or cytosolic EC chaperone proteins (FABPs 3, 5, 7, SCP-2, HSP70), or cannabinoid receptors (CB1, TRVP1). These data show for the first time that the non-CNS fatty acid-binding protein FABP1 markedly affected brain levels of both ARA-containing endocannabinoids (AEA, 2-AG) as well as their non-ARA potentiating endocannabinoids. Fatty acid-binding protein-1 (FABP-1) is not detectable in brain but instead is highly expressed in liver. The possibility that FABP1 outside the central nervous system may regulate brain endocannabinoids arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) was examined in wild-type (WT) and FABP-1 null (LKO) male mice. LKO

  18. Dietary guanidinoacetic acid does not accumulate in the brain of healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostojic, Sergej M.; Ostojic, Jelena

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously completed trial to determine the effects of 8-week guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) loading on brain GAA levels in five healthy men. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was taken at baseline and post-administration, with spectra additionally ...

  19. Imaging plasma docosahexaenoic acid (dha incorporation into the brain in vivo, as a biomarker of brain DHA: Metabolism and neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport Stanley I.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is critical for normal brain structure and function, and its brain concentration depends on dietary DHA content and hepatic conversion from its dietary derived n-3 precursor, a-linolenic acid (α-LNA. We developed an in vivo method in rats using quantitative autoradiography to image incorporation into brain of unesterified plasma DHA, and showed that the incorporation rate equals the rate of brain metabolic DHA consumption. Thus, quantitative imaging of DHA incorporation from plasma into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain DHA metabolism and neurotransmission. The method has been extended to humans with the use of positron emission tomography (PET. Furthermore, imaging in unanesthetized rats using DHA incorporation as a biomarker in response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA administration confirms that regional DHA signaling is independent of extracellular calcium, and likely mediated by a calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2. Studies in mice in which iPLA2-VIA (β was knocked out confirmed that this enzyme is critical for baseline and muscarinic cholinergic signaling involving DHA.

  20. Retinoic Acid Induces Blood-Brain Barrier Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizee, M.R.; Wooldrik, D.; Lakeman, K.A.M.; van het Hof, B.; Drexhage, J.A.R.; Geerts, D.; Bugiani, M.; Aronica, E.; Mebius, R.E.; Prat, A.; de Vries, H.E.; Reijerkerk, A.

    2013-01-01

    The blood- brain barrier (BBB) is crucial in the maintenance of a controlled environment within the brain to safeguard optimal neuronal function. The endothelial cells (ECs) of theBBBpossess specific properties that restrict the entry of cells and metabolites into the CNS. The specialized BBB

  1. Retinoic acid induces blood-brain barrier development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizee, Mark R.; Wooldrik, Desiree; Lakeman, Kim A. M.; van het Hof, Bert; Drexhage, Joost A. R.; Geerts, Dirk; Bugiani, Marianna; Aronica, Eleonora; Mebius, Reina E.; Prat, Alexandre; de Vries, Helga E.; Reijerkerk, Arie

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is crucial in the maintenance of a controlled environment within the brain to safeguard optimal neuronal function. The endothelial cells (ECs) of the BBB possess specific properties that restrict the entry of cells and metabolites into the CNS. The specialized BBB

  2. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as lysophosphatidylcholine, but not as free acid, enriches brain DHA and improves memory in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugasini, Dhavamani; Thomas, Riya; Yalagala, Poorna C R; Tai, Leon M; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2017-09-12

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is uniquely concentrated in the brain, and is essential for its function, but must be mostly acquired from diet. Most of the current supplements of DHA, including fish oil and krill oil, do not significantly increase brain DHA, because they are hydrolyzed to free DHA and are absorbed as triacylglycerol, whereas the transporter at blood brain barrier is specific for phospholipid form of DHA. Here we show that oral administration of DHA to normal adult mice as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) (40 mg DHA/kg) for 30 days increased DHA content of the brain by >2-fold. In contrast, the same amount of free DHA did not increase brain DHA, but increased the DHA in adipose tissue and heart. Moreover, LPC-DHA treatment markedly improved the spatial learning and memory, as measured by Morris water maze test, whereas free DHA had no effect. The brain derived neurotrophic factor increased in all brain regions with LPC-DHA, but not with free DHA. These studies show that dietary LPC-DHA efficiently increases brain DHA content and improves brain function in adult mammals, thus providing a novel nutraceutical approach for the prevention and treatment of neurological diseases associated with DHA deficiency, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Ascorbic acid glucoside reduces neurotoxicity and glutathione depletion in mouse brain induced by nitrotriazole radiosensitazer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdyntseva, Nadezda V; Ivanova, Anna A; Ivanov, Vladimir V; Cherdyntsev, Evgeny; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan; Kagiya, Tsutomu V

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the potential of the anti-oxidant ascorbic acid glucoside (AA-2G) to modulate neurotoxicity induced by high doses of nitrotriazole radiosensitizer. Male and female C56Bl/6xCBA hybrid mice aged 8-14 weeks (weight 18-24 g) were used. Nitrotriazole drug radiosensitizer sanazole at a high dose of 2, 1 g/kg was per os administered to induce neurotoxicity at mice. Ascorbic acid glucoside was given 30 min before the sanazole administration. Serum ascorbic acid, brain glutathione level, as well as behavioral performance using open field apparatus were measured. Administration of high (non-therapeutic) doses of the nitrotriazole drug sanazole results in neurotoxicity in mice as evidenced from behavioral performance, emotional activity and depletion of the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, in the brain. The serum levels of ascorbic acid was also found reduced in high dose sanazole treated animals. Per os administration of ascorbic acid glucoside significantly reduced the neurotoxicity. This effect was associated with the prevention of glutathione depletion in mouse brain and restoring the ascorbic acid level in serum. Administration of ascorbic acid glucoside, but not ascorbic acid, before sanazole administration protected from sanazole-induced neurotoxicity by preventing the decrease in the brain reduced glutathione level and providing high level of ascorbic acid in plasma.

  4. Ascorbic acid glucoside reduces neurotoxicity and glutathione depletion in mouse brain induced by nitrotriazole radiosensitazer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezda V Cherdyntseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the potential of the anti-oxidant ascorbic acid glucoside (AA-2G to modulate neurotoxicity induced by high doses of nitrotriazole radiosensitizer. Materials and Methods: Male and female C56Bl/6xCBA hybrid mice aged 8-14 weeks (weight 18-24 g were used. Nitrotriazole drug radiosensitizer sanazole at a high dose of 2, 1 g/kg was per os administered to induce neurotoxicity at mice. Ascorbic acid glucoside was given 30 min before the sanazole administration. Serum ascorbic acid, brain glutathione level, as well as behavioral performance using open field apparatus were measured. Results: Administration of high (non-therapeutic doses of the nitrotriazole drug sanazole results in neurotoxicity in mice as evidenced from behavioral performance, emotional activity and depletion of the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, in the brain. The serum levels of ascorbic acid was also found reduced in high dose sanazole treated animals. Per os administration of ascorbic acid glucoside significantly reduced the neurotoxicity. This effect was associated with the prevention of glutathione depletion in mouse brain and restoring the ascorbic acid level in serum. Conclusion: Administration of ascorbic acid glucoside, but not ascorbic acid, before sanazole administration protected from sanazole-induced neurotoxicity by preventing the decrease in the brain reduced glutathione level and providing high level of ascorbic acid in plasma.

  5. Mixed acid-base disorder secondary to topiramate use in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Golla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a man with traumatic brain injury. He was started on to prophylactic topiramate which led to a mixed acid-base disorder. He had severe metabolic acidosis secondary to renal tubular acidification defect and respiratory alkalosis secondary to hyperventilation. Withdrawal of the offending drug led to the prompt resolution of the acid-base disturbance.

  6. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Mediates the Uptake of Fatty Acids, but not Drugs, Into Human Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gordon S; Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-12-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the involvement of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), a lipid-binding protein expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in fatty acid and drug uptake into human brain endothelial cells. Following transfection with siRNA against hFABP5, human brain endothelial cell (hCMEC/D3) uptake of lipophilic ligands with varying affinity to FABP5 was assessed with intracellular concentrations quantified by liquid scintillation counting, HPLC, or LCMS/MS. The in situ BBB transport of [3H]-diazepam was also assessed in wild type and FABP5-deficient mice. hFABP5 siRNA reduced FABP5 expression in hCMEC/D3 cells by 39.9 ± 3.8% (mRNA) and 38.8 ± 6.6% (protein; mean ± SEM), leading to a reduction in uptake of [14C]-lauric acid, [3H]-oleic acid, and [14C]-stearic acid by 37.5 ± 8.8%, 41.7 ± 11.6%, and 50.7 ± 13.6%, respectively, over 1 min. No significant changes in [14C]-diazepam, pioglitazone, and troglitazone uptake were detected following FABP5 knockdown in hCMEC/D3 cells. Similarly, no difference in BBB transport of [3H]-diazepam was observed between wild type and FABP5-deficient mice. Therefore, although FABP5 facilitates brain endothelial cell uptake of fatty acids, it has limited effects on brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of drugs with lower affinity for FABP5. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arachidonic acid is a chemoattractant for Dictyostelium discoideum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a natural chemoattractant of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. It is detected by cell surface cAMP receptors. Besides a signalling cascade involving phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), Ca2+ signalling has been shown to have a major role in chemotaxis. Previously, we have ...

  8. Citric acid effects on brain and liver oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Youness, Eman R; Mohammed, Nadia A; Morsy, Safaa M Youssef; Omara, Enayat A; Sleem, Amany A

    2014-05-01

    Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1-2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1-2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1-2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation.

  9. Alteration of amino acid neurotransmitters in brain tissues of immature rats treated with realgar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Taoguang; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yinghua; Chen, Zaixing; Li, Weikai; Jiang, Hong

    2012-01-05

    Realgar is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has been used for thousands of years and are claimed to have therapeutic effects. The toxicity from realgar or realgar-containing traditional medicines has raised public concern. However, the neurotoxicity induced by realgar is less reported. Amino acid neurotransmitters are closely linked to the vulnerability of the immature brain to neuronal injury. The investigation of amino acid neurotransmitters is important to understand the evolution of developmental brain damage. An improved HPLC-UV method was developed and applied to analyzing amino acid neurotransmitters of aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, homocysteine, serine, glycine, γ-aminobutyric acid and taurine in brain tissues of immature rats after the treatment of realgar. Significant changes of these amino acid neurotransmitters were observed in realgar treated groups. Negative correlations were found between the levels of some amino acids and the contents of arsenic in brain tissues. The result indicates that the neurotoxicity induced by realgar is associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during brain maturation reduces neuronal and behavioral plasticity in adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Singh Bhatia

    Full Text Available Omega-3-fatty acid DHA is a structural component of brain plasma membranes, thereby crucial for neuronal signaling; however, the brain is inefficient at synthesizing DHA. We have asked how levels of dietary n-3 fatty acids during brain growth would affect brain function and plasticity during adult life. Pregnant rats and their male offspring were fed an n-3 adequate diet or n-3 deficient diets for 15 weeks. Results showed that the n-3 deficiency increased parameters of anxiety-like behavior using open field and elevated plus maze tests in the male offspring. Behavioral changes were accompanied by a level reduction in the anxiolytic-related neuropeptide Y-1 receptor, and an increase in the anxiogenic-related glucocorticoid receptor in the cognitive related frontal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus. The n-3 deficiency reduced brain levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and increased the ratio n-6/n-3 assessed by gas chromatography. The n-3 deficiency reduced the levels of BDNF and signaling through the BDNF receptor TrkB, in proportion to brain DHA levels, and reduced the activation of the BDNF-related signaling molecule CREB in selected brain regions. The n-3 deficiency also disrupted the insulin signaling pathways as evidenced by changes in insulin receptor (IR and insulin receptor substrate (IRS. DHA deficiency during brain maturation reduces plasticity and compromises brain function in adulthood. Adequate levels of dietary DHA seem crucial for building long-term neuronal resilience for optimal brain performance and aiding in the battle against neurological disorders.

  11. Manifold decrease of sialic acid synthase in fetal Down syndrome brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulesserian, T; Engidawork, E; Fountoulakis, M; Lubec, G

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. A large series of biochemical defects have been observed in fetal and adult DS brain that help in unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying mental retardation. As sialylation of glycoconjugates plays an important role in brain development, this study aimed to look at the sialic acid metabolism by measuring sialic acid synthase (SAS; N-acetylneuraminate synthase) in early second trimester fetal control and DS brain. In this regard, protein profiling was performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass-spectrometry followed by database search and subsequent quantification of spot using specific software. SAS, the enzyme catalyzing synthesis of N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (syn: sialic acid) was represented as a single spot and found to be significantly and manifold reduced (P sialic acid metabolism, required for brain development and, more specifically, for sialylation of key brain proteins, including neuronal cell adhesion molecule and myelin associated glycoprotein.

  12. Large neutral amino acids: dietary effects on brain neurochemistry and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernstrom, John D

    2013-09-01

    The ingestion of large neutral amino acids (LNAA), notably tryptophan, tyrosine and the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), modifies tryptophan and tyrosine uptake into brain and their conversion to serotonin and catecholamines, respectively. The particular effect reflects the competitive nature of the transporter for LNAA at the blood-brain barrier. For example, raising blood tryptophan or tyrosine levels raises their uptake into brain, while raising blood BCAA levels lowers tryptophan and tyrosine uptake; serotonin and catecholamine synthesis in brain parallel the tryptophan and tyrosine changes. By changing blood LNAA levels, the ingestion of particular proteins causes surprisingly large variations in brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis, with minimal effects on tyrosine uptake and catecholamine synthesis. Such variations elicit predictable effects on mood, cognition and hormone secretion (prolactin, cortisol). The ingestion of mixtures of LNAA, particularly BCAA, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis. Though argued to improve physical performance by reducing serotonin function, such effects are generally considered modest at best. However, BCAA ingestion also lowers tyrosine uptake, and dopamine synthesis in brain. Increasing dopamine function in brain improves performance, suggesting that BCAA may fail to increase performance because dopamine is reduced. Conceivably, BCAA administered with tyrosine could prevent the decline in dopamine, while still eliciting a drop in serotonin. Such an LNAA mixture might thus prove an effective enhancer of physical performance. The thoughtful development and application of dietary proteins and LNAA mixtures may thus produce treatments with predictable and useful functional effects.

  13. Effect of arachidonic acid supplementation and cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibition on the development of early bovine embryos Influência do ácido araquidónico e da inibição da ciclo-oxigenase ou lipo-oxigenase no desenvolvimento inicial de embriões bovinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Pereira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of arachidonic acid (AA cascade on bovine embryo development in a granulosa cell co-culture system was studied. Arachidonic acid (100 µM was supplemented from 1-cell to 8-16 cell block stage (first three days of co-culture and from 1-cell to hatching. Specific cyclooxygenase (indomethacin, 28 µM and lipoxygenase (nordihydroguaiaretic acid - NDGA, 28 µM inhibitors were used from 1-cell to 8-16 cell block stage with AA. Embryo development was assessed by cleavage, day 7-day 8 and hatched embryo rates and by measuring growth rates through development stages found in days 7-10 of culture (day 0 = insemination day. Embryo quality was scored at day 8. A 6.5-10.4% increase on cleavage rate after AA supplementation was found. This AA supplementation from 1-cell to hatching delayed embryo growth rate beyond day 7 and a reduction on hatching rate was detected. When AA supplementation was restricted to the first three days of co-culture those negative effects were overcome. Also, indomethacin and NDGA prevented the positive effect of AA and induced a significant reduction on cleavage, respectively. NDGA further decreased day 7 embryo rate and quality. Results suggest that AA has a two-phase action on bovine embryos, promoting early development and impairing embryo growth from day 7 onwards and hatching rates. Both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase were found to be important pathways to promote cleavage.Estudou-se a influência da cascata do ácido araquidónico (AA no desenvolvimento de embriões bovinos produzidos in vitro em co-cultura com células da granulosa. Os embriões foram suplementados com AA (100 µM desde o estádio de 1 célula até 8-16 células (primeiros três dias de co-cultura ou até a eclosão. Introduziram-se inibidores específicos da ciclo-oxigenase (indometacina, 28 µM e da lipo-oxigenase (ácido nordihidroguaiarético - NDGA, 28 µM, juntamente com o ácido araquidónico, desde o estádio de 1 célula até 8-16 c

  14. Antagonism of histamine-activated adenylate cyclase in brain by D-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J P; Johnson, C L; Weinstein, H; Maayani, S

    1977-01-01

    D-Lysergic acid diethylamide and D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide are competitive antagonists of the histamine activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); E.C. 4.6.1.1] in broken cell preparations of the hippocampus and cortex of guinea pig brain. The adenylate cyclase is linked to the histamine H2-receptor. Both D-lysergic acid diethylamide and D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide show topological congruency with potent H2-antagonists. D-2-Bromolysergic acid diethylamide is 10 times more potent as an H2-antagonist than cimetidine, which has been the most potent H2-antagonist reported, and D-lysergic acid diethylamide is about equipotent to cimetidine. Blockade of H2-receptors could contribute to the behavioral effects of D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide and D-lysergic acid diethylamide. Images PMID:23536

  15. Lipoic Acid Treatment after Brain Injury: Study of the Glial Reaction

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    Brenda Rocamonde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After trauma brain injury, oxidative substances released to the medium provoke an enlargement of the initial lesion, increasing glial cell activation and, occasionally, an influx of immune cells into the central nervous system, developing the secondary damage. In response to these stimuli, microglia are activated to perform upregulation of intracellular enzymes and cell surface markers to propagate the immune response and phagocytosis of cellular debris. The phagocytosis of debris and dead cells is essential to limit the inflammatory reaction and potentially prevent extension of the damage to noninjured regions. Lipoic acid has been reported as a neuroprotectant by acting as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Furthermore, angiogenic effect promoted by lipoic acid has been recently shown by our group as a crucial process for neural regeneration after brain injury. In this work, we focus our attention on the lipoic acid effect on astroglial and microglial response after brain injury.

  16. Effect of carbohydrate ingestion on brain exchange of amino acids during sustained exercise in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrand, Eva; Møller, Kirsten; Secher, Niels Henry

    2005-01-01

    occasions; either supplemented with a 6% carbohydrate solution or with flavoured water (placebo). Catheters were inserted into the right internal jugular vein and the radial artery of the non-dominant arm. The brain exchange of amino acids during exercise was calculated from the arterial-jugular venous......AIM: This study investigated the effect of prolonged exercise with and without carbohydrate intake on the brain exchange of amino acids, especially focussing on tryptophan and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). METHODS: Five male subjects exercised for 3 h on a cycle ergometer at 200 +/- 7 W on two...... concentration difference multiplied by plasma flow. RESULTS: About 106 micromol (22 mg) of tryptophan was taken up by the brain during exercise in the placebo trial, whereas no significant uptake was observed in the carbohydrate trial. In accordance, the arterial concentration of free tryptophan increased from...

  17. Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    brushing your teeth . Your care giver or family member may respond to these questions for you. You have the right to refuse to answer any of the questions...guidelines emphasize the importance of early and effective hemodynamic resuscitation following TBI and stress the deleterious effects of hemorrhagic shock...and development of cerebral edema The development of cerebral edema is another important type of secondary brain injury. It is clear that the

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Could Alleviate the Risks of Traumatic Brain Injury – A Mini Review

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    Parvathy R. Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an acquired brain trauma that occurs when any sudden trauma/injury causes damage to the brain. TBI is characterized by tissue damage and imbalance in the cerebral blood flow and metabolism. It has been established through laboratory experiments that the dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs could reduce the oxidative stress developed in brain due to TBI. The inclusion of omega-3 FA in diet could normalize the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and thus, it could restore the survival of neuronal cells. BDNF improves the synaptic transmission by regulating synapsin 1 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP response element binding protein. The brain tissue analysis of TBI models supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs showed significantly reduced lipid peroxidation, nucleic acid and protein oxidation, thereby promoting neuronal and glial cell survival. Thus, omega-3 FA intake could be considered as a therapeutic option to reduce the secondary neuronal damages initiated by TBI.

  19. Sialic acid is an essential nutrient for brain development and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing

    2009-01-01

    The rapid growth of infant brains places an exceptionally high demand on the supply of nutrients from the diet, particularly for preterm infants. Sialic acid (Sia) is an essential component of brain gangliosides and the polysialic acid (polySia) chains that modify neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAM). Sia levels are high in human breast milk, predominately as N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). In contrast, infant formulas contain a low level of Sia consisting of both Neu5Ac and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Neu5Gc is implicated in some human inflammatory diseases. Brain gangliosides and polysialylated NCAM play crucial roles in cell-to-cell interactions, neuronal outgrowth, modifying synaptic connectivity, and memory formation. In piglets, a diet rich in Sia increases the level of brain Sia and the expression of two learning-related genes and enhances learning and memory. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence showing the importance of dietary Sia as an essential nutrient for brain development and cognition.

  20. Reversal learning enhanced by lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD): concomitant rise in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A R; Martin, I L; Melville, K A

    1974-11-01

    1 Small doses of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) (12.5-50 mug/kg) consistently facilitated learning of a brightness discrimination reversal.2 2-Bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL-148), a structural analogue of LSD, with similar peripheral anti-5-hydroxytrypamine activity but no psychotomimetic properties, had no effect in this learning situation at a similar dose (25 mug/kg).3 LSD, but not BOL-148, caused a small but significant increase in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, but had no effect on the levels of catecholamines in the brain at 25 mug/kg.

  1. Effect of Boric Acid Supplementation on the Expression of BDNF in African Ostrich Chick Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Juan; Zheng, Xing-ting; Xiao, Ke; Wang, Kun-lun; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yun-xiao; Wang, Ke; Wang, Wei; Lu, Shun; Yang, Ke-li; Sun, Peng-Peng; Khaliq, Haseeb; Zhong, Juming; Peng, Ke-Mei

    2016-03-01

    The degree of brain development can be expressed by the levels of brain brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF plays an irreplaceable role in the process of neuronal development, protection, and restoration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of boric acid supplementation in water on the ostrich chick neuronal development. One-day-old healthy animals were supplemented with boron in drinking water at various concentrations, and the potential effects of boric acid on brain development were tested by a series of experiments. The histological changes in brain were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. Expression of BDNF was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Apoptosis was evaluated with Dutp-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) reaction, and caspase-3 was detected with QRT-PCR. The results were as follows: (1) under the light microscope, the neuron structure was well developed with abundance of neurites and intact cell morphology when animals were fed with less than 160 mg/L of boric acid (groups II, III, IV). Adversely, when boric acid doses were higher than 320 mg/L(groups V, VI), the high-dose boric acid neuron structure was damaged with less neurites, particularly at 640 mg/L; (2) the quantity of BDNF expression in groups II, III, and IV was increased while it was decreased in groups V and VI when compared with that in group I; (3) TUNEL reaction and the caspase-3 mRNA level showed that the amount of cell apoptosis in group II, group III, and group IV were decreased, but increased in group V and group VI significantly. These results indicated that appropriate supplementation of boric acid, especially at 160 mg/L, could promote ostrich chicks' brain development by promoting the BDNF expression and reducing cell apoptosis. Conversely, high dose of boric acid particularly in 640 mg/L would damage the neuron structure of

  2. Improvement of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Traumatic Brain Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock Following Treatment With Valproic Acid and Fresh Frozen Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolian, Vahagn C; Dekker, Simone E; Bambakidis, Ted; Higgins, Gerald A; Dennahy, Isabel S; Georgoff, Patrick E; Williams, Aaron M; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Alam, Hasan B

    2018-01-01

    Combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock are highly lethal. Following injuries, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier can be impaired, contributing to secondary brain insults. The status of the blood-brain barrier represents a potential factor impacting long-term neurologic outcomes in combined injuries. Treatment strategies involving plasma-based resuscitation and valproic acid therapy have shown efficacy in this setting. We hypothesize that a component of this beneficial effect is related to blood-brain barrier preservation. Following controlled traumatic brain injury, hemorrhagic shock, various resuscitation and treatment strategies were evaluated for their association with blood-brain barrier integrity. Analysis of gene expression profiles was performed using Porcine Gene ST 1.1 microarray. Pathway analysis was completed using network analysis tools (Gene Ontology, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and Parametric Gene Set Enrichment Analysis). Female Yorkshire swine were subjected to controlled traumatic brain injury and 2 hours of hemorrhagic shock (40% blood volume, mean arterial pressure 30-35 mmHg). Subjects were resuscitated with 1) normal saline, 2) fresh frozen plasma, 3) hetastarch, 4) fresh frozen plasma + valproic acid, or 5) hetastarch + valproic acid (n = 5 per group). After 6 hours of observation, brains were harvested for evaluation. Immunofluoroscopic evaluation of the traumatic brain injury site revealed significantly increased expression of tight-junction associated proteins (zona occludin-1, claudin-5) following combination therapy (fresh frozen plasma + valproic acid and hetastarch + valproic acid). The extracellular matrix protein laminin was found to have significantly improved expression with combination therapies. Pathway analysis indicated that valproic acid significantly modulated pathways involved in endothelial barrier function and cell signaling. Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma results in improved expression of

  3. FADS2 Genetic Variance in Combination with Fatty Acid Intake Might Alter Composition of the Fatty Acids in Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais S Rizzi

    Full Text Available Multiple lines of evidence suggest that fatty acids (FA play an important role in cognitive function. However, little is known about the functional genetic pathways involved in cognition. The main goals of this study were to replicate previously reported interaction effects between breast feeding (BF and FA desaturase (FADS genetic variation on IQ and to investigate the possible mechanisms by which these variants might moderate BF effect, focusing on brain expression. Using a sample of 534 twins, we observed a trend in the moderation of BF effects on IQ by FADS2 variation. In addition, we made use of publicly available gene expression databases from both humans (193 and mice (93 and showed that FADS2 variants also correlate with FADS1 brain expression (P-value<1.1E-03. Our results provide novel clues for the understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating FA brain expression and improve the current knowledge of the FADS moderation effect on cognition.

  4. Epsilon Aminocaproic Acid Pretreatment Provides Neuroprotection Following Surgically Induced Brain Injury in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komanapalli, Esther S; Sherchan, Prativa; Rolland, William; Khatibi, Nikan; Martin, Robert D; Applegate, Richard L; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can damage viable brain tissue unintentionally by a wide range of mechanisms. This surgically induced brain injury (SBI) can be a result of direct incision, electrocauterization, or tissue retraction. Plasmin, a serine protease that dissolves fibrin blood clots, has been shown to enhance cerebral edema and hemorrhage accumulation in the brain through disruption of the blood brain barrier. Epsilon aminocaproic acid (EAA), a recognized antifibrinolytic lysine analogue, can reduce the levels of active plasmin and, in doing so, potentially can preserve the neurovascular unit of the brain. We investigated the role of EAA as a pretreatment neuroprotective modality in a SBI rat model, hypothesizing that EAA therapy would protect brain tissue integrity, translating into preserved neurobehavioral function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: sham (n = 7), SBI (n = 7), SBI with low-dose EAA, 150 mg/kg (n = 7), and SBI with high-dose EAA, 450 mg/kg (n = 7). SBI was induced by partial right frontal lobe resection through a frontal craniotomy. Postoperative assessment at 24 h included neurobehavioral testing and measurement of brain water content. Results at 24 h showed both low- and high-dose EAA reduced brain water content and improved neurobehavioral function compared with the SBI groups. This suggests that EAA may be a useful pretherapeutic modality for SBI. Further studies are needed to clarify optimal therapeutic dosing and to identify mechanisms of neuroprotection in rat SBI models.

  5. Determination of l-glutamic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in mouse brain tissue utilizing GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Christine A; Farthing, Don E; Gress, Ronald E; Sweet, Douglas H

    2017-11-15

    A rapid and selective method for the quantitation of neurotransmitters, l-Glutamic acid (GA) and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), was developed and validated using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The novel method utilized a rapid online hot GC inlet gas phase sample derivatization and fast GC low thermal mass technology. The method calibration was linear from 0.5 to 100μg/mL, with limits of detections of 100ng/mL and 250ng/mL for GA and GABA, respectively. The method was used to investigate the effects of deletion of organic anion transporter 1 (Oat1) or Oat3 on murine CNS levels of GA and GABA at 3 and 18 mo of age, as compared to age matched wild-type (WT) animals. Whole brain concentrations of GA were comparable between WT, Oat1-/-, and Oat3-/- 18 mo at both 3 and 18 mo of age. Similarly, whole brain concentrations of GABA were not significantly altered in either knockout mouse strain at 3 or 18 mo of age, as compared to WT. These results indicate that the developed GC-MS/MS method provides sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for the quantitation of these neurotransmitters in mouse brain tissue. Furthermore, these results suggest that loss of Oat1 or Oat3 function in isolation does not result in significant alterations in brain tissue levels of GA or GABA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dietary fatty acids alter blood pressure, behavior and brain membrane composition of hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, MC; Hogyes, E; Kiliaan, AJ; Farkas, T; Luiten, PGM; Farkas, E; Wilde, Martijn C. de; Hőgyes, Endre; Kiliaan, Amanda J.

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on developing hypertension has been repeatedly demonstrated. However. related changes in brain membrane composition and its cognitive correlates have remained unclear. Our study aimed at a comprehensive analysis of behavior and

  7. gamma-Aminobutyric acid esters. 2. Synthesis, brain uptake, and pharmacological properties of lipid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, J N; Shashoua, V E; Campbell, A; Baldessarini, R J

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid esters of U-14C-labeled and unlabeled gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were synthesized to test the possibility that natural lipid analogues, which resemble normal components of lipid bilayer membranes, can penetrate the blood-brain barrier and transport exogenous GABA to the brain. The uptake of 1-linolenoyl-2,3-bis(4-aminobutyryl)propane-1,2,3-triol and 1,2-dilinolenoyl-3-(4-aminobutyryl)propane-1,2,3-triol into mouse brain relative to liver was found to be, respectively, 75- and 127-fold greater than that of free GABA. The results indicate that there is little or no blood-brain barrier for the GABA ester molecules at doses up to 0.36 mmol/kg. Both ester compounds, but neither free GABA nor the lipid components delivered systemically, demonstrated central nervous system depressant properties by inhibiting the general motor activity of mice. Brain tissue has esterase activity which can release GABA from these compounds. This suggests that these compounds function as "prodrugs" to release GABA in the CNS.

  8. Evidence for dual cyclooxygenases in mouse and rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeting, P.E.; Zweig, A.; Lysz, T.W.

    1986-05-01

    The existence of dual forms of cyclooxygenase (CO) in the whole brain of rat and mouse was investigated. Using microsomes prepared from tissue homogenized in 10 mM EDTA and 1% BSA, they assayed for prostaglandin (PG) in a medium containing 1-(/sup 14/C)-arachidonic acid (AA: 1 ..mu..g; 300,000 cpm) 1.2 mM epinephrine, and 1 mM glutathione. The mouse microsomal PGE/sub 2/ synthesis rose rapidly and plateaued within 5 minutes while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ levels continued to rise through the 60 minute incubation. Evidence for the existence of two forms of the CO in the mouse brain came from the observations that (1) 0.4 ..mu..M indomethacin inhibited PGE/sub 2/ production) by 80% while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ synthesis decreased only 20% and (2) a 3 minute preincubation of the mouse microsomes with unlabelled AA (1 ..mu.. g) eliminated PGE/sub 2/ synthesis while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ synthesis continued. Similar results were obtained with rat brain microsomes. Rat kidney microsomal preparations appear not to have the two CO forms. From these observations, it is concluded that there are PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ associated CO in mouse and rat brain microsomal preparations. The PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ associated CO is somewhat resistant to arachidonate induced destruction while the PGE/sub 2/ associated CO undergoes autodestruction readily.

  9. Photolabeling of brain membrane proteins by lysergic acid diethylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, A.C.; Hartig, P.R.

    1982-04-05

    /sup 3/H-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 3/H-LSD) is irreversibly incorporated into bovine caudate membranes during ultraviolet light illumination. The incorporated radioligand apparently forms a covalent bond with a sub-population of the membrane proteins. Although the photolabeling pattern differs significantly from the Coomassie blue staining pattern on SDS gels, the photolabeling is apparently not specific for LSD binding sites associated with neurotransmitter receptors. /sup 3/H-LSD photolabeling can occur during prolonged exposure of membrane samples to room lighting and thus may introduce artifacts into receptor binding assays.

  10. Clenbuterol enhances the production of kynurenic acid in brain cortical slices and glial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchowska, Elzbieta; Kloc, Renata; Wnuk, Sebastian; Olajossy, Bartosz; Wielosz, Marian; Urbańska, Ewa M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a beta(2)-adrenergic agonist, clenbuterol on the production of a glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid was studied in vitro. Clenbuterol enhanced the production of kynurenic acid in brain cortical slices (0.1-1.0 mM) and in glial cultures (1-50 muM). Timolol, a non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist prevented this effect. The presented data indicate a novel mechanism of action of beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and suggest that an increased formation of the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid could partially contribute to their neuroprotective activity.

  11. Female Mice are Resistant to Fabp1 Gene Ablation-Induced Alterations in Brain Endocannabinoid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Chung, Sarah; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Dangott, Lawrence J; Peng, Xiaoxue; Kaczocha, Martin; Murphy, Eric J; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1, L-FABP) is not detectable in the brain, Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) markedly increases endocannabinoids (EC) in brains of male mice. Since the brain EC system of females differs significantly from that of males, it was important to determine if LKO differently impacted the brain EC system. LKO did not alter brain levels of arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing EC, i.e. arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but decreased non-ARA-containing N-acylethanolamides (OEA, PEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) that potentiate the actions of AEA and 2-AG. These changes in brain potentiating EC levels were not associated with: (1) a net decrease in levels of brain membrane proteins associated with fatty acid uptake and EC synthesis; (2) a net increase in brain protein levels of cytosolic EC chaperones and enzymes in EC degradation; or (3) increased brain protein levels of EC receptors (CB1, TRVP1). Instead, the reduced or opposite responsiveness of female brain EC levels to loss of FABP1 (LKO) correlated with intrinsically lower FABP1 level in livers of WT females than males. These data show that female mouse brain endocannabinoid levels were unchanged (AEA, 2-AG) or decreased (OEA, PEA, 2-OG) by complete loss of FABP1 (LKO).

  12. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Sialic Acid as an Essential Nutrient for Brain Development and Cognition123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    The early stages of neurodevelopment in infants are crucial for establishing neural structures and synaptic connections that influence brain biochemistry well into adulthood. This postnatal period of rapid neural growth is of critical importance for cell migration, neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity, and axon fasciculation. These processes thus place an unusually high demand on the intracellular pool of nutrients and biochemical precursors. Sialic acid (Sia), a family of 9-carbon sugar acids, occurs in large amounts in human milk oligosaccharides and is an essential component of brain gangliosides and sialylated glycoproteins, particularly as precursors for the synthesis of the polysialic acid (polySia) glycan that post-translationally modify the cell membrane-associated neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAM). Human milk is noteworthy in containing exceptionally high levels of Sia-glycoconjugates. The predominate form of Sia in human milk is N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Infant formula, however, contains low levels of Sia consisting of both Neu5Ac and N-glycolyneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Current studies implicate Neu5Gc in several human inflammatory diseases. Polysialylated NCAM and neural gangliosides both play critical roles in mediating cell-to-cell interactions important for neuronal outgrowth, synaptic connectivity, and memory formation. A diet rich in Sia also increases the level of Sia in the brains of postnatal piglets, the expression level of 2 learning-related genes, and enhances learning and memory. PMID:22585926

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids as a putative treatment for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasadsri, Linda; Wang, Bonnie H; Lee, James V; Erdman, John W; Llano, Daniel A; Barbey, Aron K; Wszalek, Tracey; Sharrock, Matthew F; Wang, Huan John

    2013-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global public health epidemic. In the US alone, more than 3 million people sustain a TBI annually. It is one of the most disabling injuries as it may cause motor and sensory deficits and lead to severe cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial impairment, crippling vital areas of higher functioning. Fueled by the recognition of TBI as the "signature injury" in our wounded soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan, and its often devastating impact on athletes playing contact sports, interest in TBI and TBI research has increased dramatically. Unfortunately, despite increased awareness of its detrimental consequences, there has been little progress in developing effective TBI interventions. Recent evidence, however, strongly indicates that nutritional intervention may provide a unique opportunity to enhance the neuronal repair process after TBI. To date, two omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), have the most promising laboratory evidence for their neuro-restorative capacities in TBI. Although both animal models and human studies of brain injuries suggest they may provide benefits, there has been no clinical trial evaluating the effects of n-3 fatty acids on resilience to, or treatment, of TBI. This article reviews the known functions of n-3 fatty acids in the brain and their specific role in the cellular and biochemical pathways underlying neurotraumatic injury. We also highlight recent studies on the therapeutic impact of enhanced omega 3 intake in vivo, and how this may be a particularly promising approach to improving functional outcome in patients with TBI.

  14. Molecular mechanism underlying sialic acid as an essential nutrient for brain development and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing

    2012-05-01

    The early stages of neurodevelopment in infants are crucial for establishing neural structures and synaptic connections that influence brain biochemistry well into adulthood. This postnatal period of rapid neural growth is of critical importance for cell migration, neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity, and axon fasciculation. These processes thus place an unusually high demand on the intracellular pool of nutrients and biochemical precursors. Sialic acid (Sia), a family of 9-carbon sugar acids, occurs in large amounts in human milk oligosaccharides and is an essential component of brain gangliosides and sialylated glycoproteins, particularly as precursors for the synthesis of the polysialic acid (polySia) glycan that post-translationally modify the cell membrane-associated neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAM). Human milk is noteworthy in containing exceptionally high levels of Sia-glycoconjugates. The predominate form of Sia in human milk is N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Infant formula, however, contains low levels of Sia consisting of both Neu5Ac and N-glycolyneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Current studies implicate Neu5Gc in several human inflammatory diseases. Polysialylated NCAM and neural gangliosides both play critical roles in mediating cell-to-cell interactions important for neuronal outgrowth, synaptic connectivity, and memory formation. A diet rich in Sia also increases the level of Sia in the brains of postnatal piglets, the expression level of 2 learning-related genes, and enhances learning and memory.

  15. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perera Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, alpha lipoic acid alone (100 mg/kg p.o for 21 days, haloperidol alone (2 mg/kg i.p for 21 days, and haloperidol with alpha lipoic acid groups (for 21 days. Haloperidol treatment significantly decreased levels of the brain antioxidant enzymes super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and concurrent treatment with alpha lipoic acid significantly reversed the oxidative effects of haloperidol. Histopathological changes revealed significant haloperidol-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, and substantia nigra. Alpha lipoic acid significantly reduced this damage and there were very little neuronal atrophy. Areas of angiogenesis were also seen in the alpha lipoic acid-treated group. In conclusion, the study proves that alpha lipoic acid treatment significantly reduces haloperidol-induced neuronal damage.

  16. Domoic acid disrupts the activity and connectivity of neuronal networks in organotypic brain slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiolski, E M; Ito, S; Beggs, J M; Lefebvre, K A; Litke, A M; Smith, D R

    2016-09-01

    Domoic acid is a neurotoxin produced by algae and is found in seafood during harmful algal blooms. As a glutamate agonist, domoic acid inappropriately stimulates excitatory activity in neurons. At high doses, this leads to seizures and brain lesions, but it is unclear how lower, asymptomatic exposures disrupt neuronal activity. Domoic acid has been detected in an increasing variety of species across a greater geographical range than ever before, making it critical to understand the potential health impacts of low-level exposure on vulnerable marine mammal and human populations. To determine whether prolonged domoic acid exposure altered neuronal activity in hippocampal networks, we used a custom-made 512 multi-electrode array with high spatial and temporal resolution to record extracellular potentials (spikes) in mouse organotypic brain slice cultures. We identified individual neurons based on spike waveform and location, and measured the activity and functional connectivity within the neuronal networks of brain slice cultures. Domoic acid exposure significantly altered neuronal spiking activity patterns, and increased functional connectivity within exposed cultures, in the absence of overt cellular or neuronal toxicity. While the overall spiking activity of neurons in domoic acid-exposed cultures was comparable to controls, exposed neurons spiked significantly more often in bursts. We also identified a subset of neurons that were electrophysiologically silenced in exposed cultures, and putatively identified those neurons as fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. These results provide evidence that domoic acid affects neuronal activity in the absence of cytotoxicity, and suggest that neurodevelopmental exposure to domoic acid may alter neurological function in the absence of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of narcotic drugs on ribonucleic acid and nucleotide metabolism in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R A; Harris, L S; Dunn, A

    1975-02-01

    Mice either were administered 10, 30 or 100 mg/kg of morphine sulfate acutely or were chronically implanted with pellets containing morphine, naloxone or pentazocine. They were then injected intraperitoneally or intracerebroventricularly with [5-3H] uridine or [5-3H] orotic acid either 30 minutes, 24 hours of 48 hours before sacrifice. The incorporation of the 3H into brain total homogenate, ribonucleic acid (RNA) and uridine nucleotides was measured. The RNA content of brain and liver was also assayed. When [3H] uridine was injected. i.p. 30 minutes before sacrifice, acute injection of 30 or 100 mg/kg of morphine sulfate or chronic implantation of morphine pellets decreased the incorporation of the [3H] uridine into brain RNA. However, neither the acute administration of 10 mg/kg of morphine sulfate, nor the chronic administration of naloxone or pentazocine, altered the amount of radioactivity incorporated into RNA. Chronic morphine treatment decreased the incorporation of 3H into uridine nucleotides and nucleotide sugars due partially to increased catabolism of the [3H] uridine. The brain and liver RNA concentration was unchanged by chronic morphine administration. Thus, chronic morphine treatment alters the metabolism of uridine nucleotides but does not appear to alter the net synthesis of the total brain RNA.

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Inflammatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C. Calder

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Long chain fatty acids influence inflammation through a variety of mechanisms; many of these are mediated by, or at least associated with, changes in fatty acid composition of cell membranes. Changes in these compositions can modify membrane fluidity, cell signaling leading to altered gene expression, and the pattern of lipid mediator production. Cell involved in the inflammatory response are typically rich in the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, but the contents of arachidonic acid and of the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA can be altered through oral administration of EPA and DHA. Eicosanoids produced from arachidonic acid have roles in inflammation. EPA also gives rise to eicosanoids and these often have differing properties from those of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids. EPA and DHA give rise to newly discovered resolvins which are anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving. Increased membrane content of EPA and DHA (and decreased arachidonic acid content results in a changed pattern of production of eicosanoids and resolvins. Changing the fatty acid composition of cells involved in the inflammatory response also affects production of peptide mediators of inflammation (adhesion molecules, cytokines etc.. Thus, the fatty acid composition of cells involved in the inflammatory response influences their function; the contents of arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA appear to be especially important. The anti-inflammatory effects of marine n-3 PUFAs suggest that they may be useful as therapeutic agents in disorders with an inflammatory component.

  19. Ascorbic Acid and the Brain: Rationale for the Use against Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Bowman, Gene L.; Polidori, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused upon the role of ascorbic acid (AA, vitamin C) in the promotion of healthy brain aging. Particular attention is attributed to the biochemistry and neuronal metabolism interface, transport across tissues, animal models that are useful for this area of research, and the human studies that implicate AA in the continuum between normal cognitive aging and age-related cognitive decline up to Alzheimer’s disease. Vascular risk factors and comorbidity relationships with cognitive decline and AA are discussed to facilitate strategies for advancing AA research in the area of brain health and neurodegeneration. PMID:24763117

  20. Rapid and reversible enhancement of blood–brain barrier permeability using lysophosphatidic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Ngoc H; Savant, Sanjot; Toews, Myron; Miller, Donald W

    2013-01-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) on blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability focusing specifically on the time of onset, duration, and magnitude of LPA-induced changes in cerebrovascular permeability in the mouse using both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFR). Furthermore, potential application of LPA for enhanced drug delivery to the brain was also examined by measuring the brain accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate. Exposure of primary cultured brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs) to LPA produced concentration-dependent increases in permeability that were completely abolished by clostridium toxin B. Administration of LPA disrupted BBB integrity and enhanced the permeability of small molecular weight marker gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent, the large molecular weight permeability marker, IRdye800cwPEG, and the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter probe, Rhodamine 800 (R800). The increase in BBB permeability occurred within 3 minutes after LPA injection and barrier integrity was restored within 20 minutes. A decreased response to LPA on large macromolecule BBB permeability was observed after repeated administration. The administration of LPA also resulted in 20-fold enhancement of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain. These studies indicate that administration of LPA in combination with therapeutic agents may increase drug delivery to the brain. PMID:24045401

  1. Pipecolic acid: a new type of alpha-amino acid possessing bicuculline-sensitive action in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, K; Miyata, T; Hashimoto, T; Okano, Y; Hitoshi, T; Kasé, Y

    1982-05-06

    Using unit recording and electrophoretic techniques, pharmacological properties of pipecolic acid (PA) were studied in the brain neurons of rats. PA response was blocked by bicuculline more effectively than GABA response but not blocked by strychnine. Stereochemical findings obtained using the HGS-model demonstrated that PA structure is almost the same as a part of bicuculline structure. The present results suggest that PA might be a new type of substance possessing bicuculline-sensitive action. The site of the action of PA was also discussed.

  2. Age-related changes in kynurenic acid production in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, J B; Schmidt, W; Turski, W A

    1992-01-01

    months of age in all five brain regions examined. No changes were observed in the liver. The changes were particularly pronounced in the cortex and in the striatum where enzyme activity increased three-fold during the period studied. KYNA production from its bioprecursor L-kynurenine was also...... investigated in tissue slices and was found to be significantly enhanced in the cortex and hippocampus of old animals. The effect of depolarizing agents or sodium replacement was virtually identical in tissues from young and old rats. These data, which are in excellent agreement with reports on an age......-dependent increase of KYNA concentration in brain tissue, suggest an enhanced KYNA tone in the aged brain. Together with the reported decline in cerebral excitatory amino acid receptor densities with age, increased production of KYNA may play a role in cognitive and memory dysfunction in old animals....

  3. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. The Ketogenic Diet Suppresses the Cathepsin E Expression Induced by Kainic Acid in the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Hojeong; Kim, Yoon-Kyoung; Park, Sang-Kyu; Kang, Dong-Won

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The ketogenic diet has long been used to treat epilepsy, but its mechanism is not yet clearly understood. To explore the potential mechanism, we analyzed the changes in gene expression induced by the ketogenic diet in the rat kainic acid (KA) epilepsy model. Materials and Methods KA-administered rats were fed the ketogenic diet or a normal diet for 4 weeks, and microarray analysis was performed with their brain tissues. The effects of the ketogenic diet on cathepsin E messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression were analyzed in KA-administered and normal saline-administered groups with semi-quantitative and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Brain tissues were dissected into 8 regions to compare differential effects of the ketogenic diet on cathepsin E mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry with an anti-cathepsin E antibody was performed on slides of hippocampus obtained from whole brain paraffin blocks. Results The microarray data and subsequent RT-PCR experiments showed that KA increased the mRNA expression of cathepsin E, known to be related to neuronal cell death, in most brain areas except the brain stem, and these increases of cathepsin E mRNA expression were suppressed by the ketogenic diet. The expression of cathepsin E mRNA in the control group, however, was not significantly affected by the ketogenic diet. The change in cathepsin E mRNA expression was greatest in the hippocampus. The protein level of cathepsin E in the hippocampus of KA-administered rat was elevated in immunohistochemistry and the ketogenic diet suppressed this increase. Conclusion Our results showed that KA administration increased cathepsin E expression in the rat brain and its increase was suppressed by the ketogenic diet. PMID:20635438

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Pipecolic acid enhancement of GABA response in single neurons of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, K; Hashimoto, T; Wang, M W; Akaike, N; Hitoshi, T; Okano, Y; Kasé, Y; Miyata, T

    1986-03-01

    Using unit recording and microelectrophoresis, influence of pipecolic acid (PA), a major metabolite of lysine in the brain, on GABA and glycine responses was studied in the cerebral cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons of rats. With small currents, PA had no effect on the single neuron activities but enhanced GABA response without affecting glycine response. The finding provides a new evidence that PA may have a connection with central GABA system.

  7. Pathways of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Utilization: Implications for Brain Function in Neuropsychiatric Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joanne J.; Green, Pnina; Mann, J. John; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25498862

  8. The effect of lead exposure on fatty acid composition in mouse brain analyzed using pseudo-catalytic derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong-Min; Lee, Jechan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jang, In Geon; Song, Jae Gwang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Tack, Filip M G; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kwon, Eilhann E; Kim, Hyung-Wook

    2017-03-01

    We performed toxicological study of mice exposed to lead by quantifying fatty acids in brain of the mice. This study suggests that the introduced analytical method had an extremely high tolerance against impurities such as water and extractives; thus, it led to the enhanced resolution in visualizing the spectrum of fatty acid profiles in animal brain. Furthermore, one of the biggest technical advantages achieved in this study was the quantitation of fatty acid methyl ester profiles of mouse brain using a trace amount of sample (e.g., 100 μL mixture). Methanol was screened as the most effective extraction solvent for mouse brain. The behavioral test of the mice before and after lead exposure was conducted to see the effect of lead exposure on fatty acid composition of the mice' brain. The lead exposure led to changes in disease-related behavior of the mice. Also, the lead exposure induced significant alterations of fatty acid profile (C16:0, C 18:0, and C 18:1) in brain of the mice, implicated in pathology of psychiatric diseases. The alteration of fatty acid profile of brain of the mice suggests that the derivatizing technique can be applicable to most research fields associated with the environmental neurotoxins with better resolution in a short time, as compared to the current protocols for lipid analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Old Things New View: Ascorbic Acid Protects the Brain in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Covarrubias-Pinto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid is a key antioxidant of the Central Nervous System (CNS. Under brain activity, ascorbic acid is released from glial reservoirs to the synaptic cleft, where it is taken up by neurons. In neurons, ascorbic acid scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS generated during synaptic activity and neuronal metabolism where it is then oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid and released into the extracellular space, where it can be recycled by astrocytes. Other intrinsic properties of ascorbic acid, beyond acting as an antioxidant, are important in its role as a key molecule of the CNS. Ascorbic acid can switch neuronal metabolism from glucose consumption to uptake and use of lactate as a metabolic substrate to sustain synaptic activity. Multiple evidence links oxidative stress with neurodegeneration, positioning redox imbalance and ROS as a cause of neurodegeneration. In this review, we focus on ascorbic acid homeostasis, its functions, how it is used by neurons and recycled to ensure antioxidant supply during synaptic activity and how this antioxidant is dysregulated in neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. The role of thyroid hormones in regulating of fatty acid spectrum of brain lipids: ontogenetic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodynskiy A.G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In experiments on rats of three age groups the role of thyroid hormones in the regulation of fatty acid spectrum of cortical and hippocampus lipids was studied. It was found that on the background of decreased thyroid status content of polyunsaturated fractions of free fatty acids, significantly changed depending on the age of the animals. In particular, in juvenile rats hypothyroidism was accompanied by a decrease almost twice the number of pentacodan acid decreased lipids viscosity in neurocortex. In old rats reduce of pentacodan acid in the cortex (38% was supplemented by significant (77% decrease in linoleic and linolenic acids. Unlike the two age groups deficiency of thyroid hormones in young animals caused accumulation of free polyunsatarated fatty acids (C18: 2.3 in the cerebral cortex by 74%, which may be associated with a decrease of this fraction in fatty acid spectrum of lipids and increase of viscosity properties of the membranes. These restruc­turing may be associated with modulation of synaptic transmission of specific neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

  11. Old Things New View: Ascorbic Acid Protects the Brain in Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias-Pinto, Adriana; Acuña, Aníbal Ignacio; Beltrán, Felipe Andrés; Torres-Díaz, Leandro; Castro, Maite Aintzane

    2015-11-27

    Ascorbic acid is a key antioxidant of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Under brain activity, ascorbic acid is released from glial reservoirs to the synaptic cleft, where it is taken up by neurons. In neurons, ascorbic acid scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during synaptic activity and neuronal metabolism where it is then oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid and released into the extracellular space, where it can be recycled by astrocytes. Other intrinsic properties of ascorbic acid, beyond acting as an antioxidant, are important in its role as a key molecule of the CNS. Ascorbic acid can switch neuronal metabolism from glucose consumption to uptake and use of lactate as a metabolic substrate to sustain synaptic activity. Multiple evidence links oxidative stress with neurodegeneration, positioning redox imbalance and ROS as a cause of neurodegeneration. In this review, we focus on ascorbic acid homeostasis, its functions, how it is used by neurons and recycled to ensure antioxidant supply during synaptic activity and how this antioxidant is dysregulated in neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Old Things New View: Ascorbic Acid Protects the Brain in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias-Pinto, Adriana; Acuña, Aníbal Ignacio; Beltrán, Felipe Andrés; Torres-Díaz, Leandro; Castro, Maite Aintzane

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is a key antioxidant of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Under brain activity, ascorbic acid is released from glial reservoirs to the synaptic cleft, where it is taken up by neurons. In neurons, ascorbic acid scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during synaptic activity and neuronal metabolism where it is then oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid and released into the extracellular space, where it can be recycled by astrocytes. Other intrinsic properties of ascorbic acid, beyond acting as an antioxidant, are important in its role as a key molecule of the CNS. Ascorbic acid can switch neuronal metabolism from glucose consumption to uptake and use of lactate as a metabolic substrate to sustain synaptic activity. Multiple evidence links oxidative stress with neurodegeneration, positioning redox imbalance and ROS as a cause of neurodegeneration. In this review, we focus on ascorbic acid homeostasis, its functions, how it is used by neurons and recycled to ensure antioxidant supply during synaptic activity and how this antioxidant is dysregulated in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26633354

  13. Brain energy metabolism spurns fatty acids as fuel due to their inherent mitotoxicity and potential capacity to unleash neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Peter; Reiser, Georg

    2017-10-01

    The brain uses long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) to a negligible extent as fuel for the mitochondrial energy generation, in contrast to other tissues that also demand high energy. Besides this generally accepted view, some studies using cultured neural cells or whole brain indicate a moderately active mitochondrial β-oxidation. Here, we corroborate the conclusion that brain mitochondria are unable to oxidize fatty acids. In contrast, the combustion of liver-derived ketone bodies by neural cells is long-known. Furthermore, new insights indicate the use of odd-numbered medium-chain fatty acids as valuable source for maintaining the level of intermediates of the citric acid cycle in brain mitochondria. Non-esterified LCFAs or their activated forms exert a large variety of harmful side-effects on mitochondria, such as enhancing the mitochondrial ROS generation in distinct steps of the β-oxidation and therefore potentially increasing oxidative stress. Hence, the question arises: Why do in brain energy metabolism mitochondria selectively spurn LCFAs as energy source? The most likely answer are the relatively higher content of peroxidation-sensitive polyunsaturated fatty acids and the low antioxidative defense in brain tissue. There are two remarkable peroxisomal defects, one relating to α-oxidation of phytanic acid and the other to uptake of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) which lead to pathologically high tissue levels of such fatty acids. Both, the accumulation of phytanic acid and that of VLCFAs give an enlightening insight into harmful activities of fatty acids on neural cells, which possibly explain why evolution has prevented brain mitochondria from the equipment with significant β-oxidation enzymatic capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatty acid oxidation in brain is limited by the low activity of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.; He, X.; Schulz, H.

    1987-05-01

    In an attempt to establish why the brain is virtually incapable of oxidizing fatty acids, the activities of the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in rat brain and rat heart mitochondria were measured and compared with each other. Although the apparent K/sub m/ values and chain-length specificities of the brain and heart enzymes are similar, the specific activities of all but one brain enzyme are between 4% and 50% of those observed in heart mitochondria. The exception is 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase (EC 2.3.1.16) whose specific activity in brain mitochondria is 125-times lower than in heart mitochondria. The partially purified brain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase was shown to be catalytically and immunologically identical with the heart enzyme. The low rate of fatty acid oxidation in brain mitochondria estimated on the basis of palmitoylcarnitine-supported respiration and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitoylcarnitine degradation may be the consequence of the low activity of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. Inhibition of (1-/sup 14/C)palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by 4-bromocrotonic acid proves that the observed oxidation of fatty acids in brain is dependent on 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and thus occurs via ..beta..-oxidation. Since the reactions catalyzed by carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.21) and acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3) do not seem to restrict fatty acid oxidation in brain, it is concluded that the oxidation of fatty acids in rat brain is limited by the activity of the mitochondrial 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase.

  15. Extra virgin olive oil modulates brain docosahexaenoic acid level and oxidative damage caused by 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amel, Nakbi; Wafa, Tayeb; Samia, Dabbou; Yousra, Belaid; Issam, Chargui; Cheraif, Imed; Attia, Nebil; Mohamed, Hammami

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is an important pathomechanism of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease, cardiovascular disorders and many others. This study sought to verify whether extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), lipophilic fraction (OOLF) and hydrophilic fraction (OOHF) exerted a brain protective effect against the oxidative stress caused by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) pesticide at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. 2,4-D, EVOO and its fractions were administered to rats by gavages for four consecutive weeks. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring brain lipid peroxide level, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), antioxidant enzyme activities and fatty acid composition. 2,4-D induced a decrease in both plasma and brain acetylcholinesterase activity and a rise in Brain TBARS (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) level and antioxidant enzyme activities compared with the control group. These changes were partly reversed by either EVOO or its fractions oral administration to 2,4-D treated rats. EVOO enhanced a neuroprotective effect evaluated by the restoration of brain fatty acid composition especially the level of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Our results indicate that EVOO exerts a neuroprotective activity against oxidative damage in brain induced by 2,4-D, which could be attributed to its antioxidative property.

  16. Beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 supplementation on brain docosahexaenoic acid, brain derived neurotrophic factor, and cognitive performance in the second-generation Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Richa S; Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-01-01

    In vegetarian population, vitamin B12 deficiency coexists with suboptimal levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Studies indicate a need for supplementation/fortification of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids to reduce the risk of brain disorders. We have described the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain development in F1 generation animals. The current study investigates the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on brain function and cognition. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned the following groups: control, vitamin B12 deficient (BD), vitamin B12 deficient + omega-3 fatty acid (BDO), vitamin B12 supplemented (BS), vitamin B12 supplemented + omega-3 fatty acid (BSO). The same diets were continued for two generations. BDO group showed higher (P acid) in the cortex and hippocampus as compared with the BD group. The cognitive performance was also normalized in this group. BS showed comparable levels of DHA, BDNF (protein and mRNA), and CREB mRNA (cAMP response element-binding protein) to that of control group while Tropomyosin receptor kinase mRNA levels were higher. The combined vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation further enhanced the levels of DHA (P omega-3 fatty acid supplementation across two generations on brain development and function. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in rat brain using a liquid chromatographic method with electrochemical detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Odink, J.

    1991-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for the simultaneous measurement of 5-hydroxytryptamine and its main metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in rat brain is described. Brain tissue samples were only deproteinated and, without further extraction, were injected directly onto a high-performance liquid

  18. Characterisation of (R-2-(2-Fluorobiphenyl-4-yl-N-(3-Methylpyridin-2-ylPropanamide as a Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase: Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gouveia-Figueira

    Full Text Available Increased endocannabinoid tonus by dual-action fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and substrate selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2 inhibitors is a promising approach for pain-relief. One such compound with this profile is 2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl-N-(3-methylpyridin-2-ylpropanamide (Flu-AM1. These activities are shown by Flu-AM1 racemate, but it is not known whether its two single enantiomers behave differently, as is the case towards COX-2 for the parent flurbiprofen enantiomers. Further, the effects of the compound upon COX-2-derived lipids in intact cells are not known.COX inhibition was determined using an oxygraphic method with arachidonic acid and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG as substrates. FAAH was assayed in mouse brain homogenates using anandamide (AEA as substrate. Lipidomic analysis was conducted in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Both enantiomers inhibited COX-2 in a substrate-selective and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values in the absence of a preincubation phase of: (R-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid 6 μM; COX-2 (arachidonic acid 20 μM; COX-2 (2-AG 1 μM; (S-Flu-AM1, COX-1 (arachidonic acid 3 μM; COX-2 (arachidonic acid 10 μM; COX-2 (2-AG 0.7 μM. The compounds showed no enantiomeric selectivity in their FAAH inhibitory properties. (R-Flu-AM1 (10 μM greatly inhibited the production of prostaglandin D2 and E2 in both unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Levels of 2-AG were not affected either by (R-Flu-AM1 or by 10 μM flurbiprofen, either alone or in combination with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (1 μM.Both enantiomers of Flu-AM1 are more potent inhibitors of 2-AG compared to arachidonic acid oxygenation by COX-2. Inhibition of COX in lipopolysaccharide + interferon γ- stimulated RAW 264.7 cells is insufficient to affect 2-AG levels despite the large induction of COX-2 produced by this treatment.

  19. The effects of avermectin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Cao, Ye; Yao, Hai-Dong; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of avermectin (AVM) on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain. Four groups two-month-old American king pigeons (n=20/group) were fed either a commercial diet or an AVM-supplemented diet (20mg/kg·diet, 40 mg/kg·diet, or 60 mg/kg·diet) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The contents of aspartic acid (ASP), glutamate (GLU), glycine (GLY), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues were determined using ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The expression levels of the GLU and GABA receptor genes were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that AVM exposure significantly enhances the contents of GABA, GLY, GLU, and ASP in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. In addition, AVM exposure increases the mRNA expression levels of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A), and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that the most damaged organ was the cerebrum, followed by the cerebellum, and then the optic lobe. These results show that the AVM-induced neurotoxicity may be associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors. The information presented in this study will help supplement the available data for future AVM toxicity studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  1. Uptake in brain and neurophysiological activity of two lipid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, G W; Jacob, J N; Shashoua, V E

    1988-06-01

    Two lipid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 1-linolenoyl-2,3-bis(4-aminobutyryl)propane-1,2,3-triol and 1,2-dilinolenoyl-3-(4-aminobutyryl)propane-1,2,3-triol, were found to have brain uptake indices of greater than 30% using the single-pass carotid artery injection technique. Both compounds produced dose-dependent inhibition of the evoked population spike in slices of rat hippocampus maintained in vitro. This effect was blocked reversibly by picrotoxin. The magnitude of the inhibition produced by the lipid esters of GABA was comparable to that of similar doses of GABA, but for both compounds the duration of the effect was at least 10 times longer than that produced by GABA. These data are consistent with the idea that the lipid esters of GABA can effectively penetrate the blood-brain barrier and act as prodrugs for the delivery of GABA to the central nervous system.

  2. Aspartic acid-promoted highly selective and sensitive colorimetric sensing of cysteine in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qin; Deng, Jingjing; Wang, Dalei; Yang, Lifen; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-11-06

    Direct selective determination of cysteine in the cerebral system is of great importance because of the crucial roles of cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we report a sensitive and selective colorimetric assay for cysteine in the rat brain with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as the signal readout. Initially, Au-NPs synthesized with citrate as the stabilizer are red in color and exhibit absorption at 520 nm. The addition of an aqueous solution (20 μL) of cysteine or aspartic acid alone to a 200 μL Au-NP dispersion causes no aggregation, while the addition of an aqueous solution of cysteine into a Au-NP dispersion containing aspartic acid (1.8 mM) causes the aggregation of Au-NPs and thus results in the color change of the colloid from wine red to blue. These changes are ascribed to the ion pair interaction between aspartic acid and cysteine on the interface between Au-NPs and solution. The concentration of cysteine can be visualized with the naked eye and determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The signal output shows a linear relationship for cysteine within the concentration range from 0.166 to 1.67 μM with a detection limit of 100 nM. The assay demonstrated here is highly selective and is free from the interference of other natural amino acids and other thiol-containing species as well as the species commonly existing in the brain such as lactate, ascorbic acid, and glucose. The basal dialysate level of cysteine in the microdialysate from the striatum of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats is determined to be around 9.6 ± 2.1 μM. The method demonstrated here is facile but reliable and durable and is envisaged to be applicable to understanding the chemical essence involved in physiological and pathological events associated with cysteine.

  3. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of brain targeting l-ascorbic acid prodrugs of ibuprofen with "lock-in" function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Qu, Boyi; Wu, Xueying; Li, Xiaocen; Liu, Qingqing; Jin, Xiuxiu; Guo, Li; Hai, Li; Wu, Yong

    2014-07-23

    A novel brain targeting l-ascorbic acid derivatives with "lock-in" function were designed and synthesized as prodrugs to achieve the effective delivery of ibuprofen to brain by glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the Na(+)-dependent vitamin C transporter SVCT2. Ibuprofen-loaded four prodrugs were tested in the animals. Results from the in vivo distribution study after i.v. administration of these four prodrugs and naked ibuprofen indicated that four prodrugs exhibited excellent transport ability across the BBB and significantly increased the level of ibuprofen in brain. Among them, prodrugs 4 showed higher brain concentration. Both biodistribution data and pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that l-ascorbic acid thiamine disulfide delivery system was a promising carrier to enhance CNS drug's delivery ability into brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Rat brain slices produce and liberate kynurenic acid upon exposure to L-kynurenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turski, W A; Gramsbergen, J B; Traitler, H

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of L-kynurenine (L-KYN) into kynurenic acid (KYNA) was examined in rat brain slices. KYNA was measured in the slices and in the incubation medium after purification by ion-exchange and HPLC chromatography. In pilot experiments, the formation of KYNA was confirmed by gas...... chromatography. KYNA was produced stereoselectively from L-KYN, and approximately 90% of the newly synthesized KYNA was recovered from the incubation medium. Intracellular KYNA was not actively retained by the tissue and was lost from the cells upon repeated washes. Thus, regulation of the levels...

  5. Identification and quantification of 5-hydroxypipecolic acid and hydroxyproline in mammalian brain and blood by selected ion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, T; Okano, Y; Nagata-Tanoue, J; Ijima-Miyamura, S; Iwamura, H; Takahama, K; Hitoshi, T

    1987-06-01

    A method for the analysis of 5-hydroxypipecolic acid and 4-hydroxyproline in mammalian brain and blood is reported. The identification and quantification of the two hydroxyimino acids were accomplished with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry including a selected ion-monitoring technique following HPLC prepurification. The lower limit of detection for the method is 2 to 10 pmol. The amounts of 5-hydroxypipecolic acid and 4-hydroxyproline in blood were 20 to 30 pmol/ml and 3 to 6 nmol/ml, respectively. Their concentrations in the rabbit whole brain were determined to be 5 and 120 pmol/g, respectively.

  6. Brain fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7 is diurnally regulated in astrocytes and hippocampal granule cell precursors in adult rodent brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Gerstner

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7, which is important in early nervous system development, is expressed in astrocytes and neuronal cell precursors in mature brain. We report here that levels of Fabp7 mRNA in adult murine brain change over a 24 hour period. Unlike Fabp5, a fatty acid binding protein that is expressed widely in various cell types within brain, RNA analysis revealed that Fabp7 mRNA levels were elevated during the light period and lower during dark in brain regions involved in sleep and activity mechanisms. This pattern of Fabp7 mRNA expression was confirmed using in situ hybridization and found to occur throughout the entire brain. Changes in the intracellular distribution of Fabp7 mRNA were also evident over a 24 hour period. Diurnal changes in Fabp7, however, were not found in postnatal day 6 brain, when astrocytes are not yet mature. In contrast, granule cell precursors of the subgranular zone of adult hippocampus did undergo diurnal changes in Fabp7 expression. These changes paralleled oscillations in Fabp7 mRNA throughout the brain suggesting that cell-coordinated signals likely control brain-wide Fabp7 mRNA expression. Immunoblots revealed that Fabp7 protein levels also underwent diurnal changes in abundance, with peak levels occurring in the dark period. Of clock or clock-regulated genes, the synchronized, global cycling pattern of Fabp7 expression is unique and implicates glial cells in the response or modulation of activity and/or circadian rhythms.

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Management of Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Silvia; Martorell, Miquel; Capó, Xavier; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni; Sureda, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with multiple double bonds. Linolenic and alpha-linolenic acids are omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs, precursors for the synthesis of long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs), such as arachidonic acid (omega-6 PUFA), and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (omega-3 PUFAs). The three most important omega-3 fatty acids are alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, which cannot be synthesized in enough amounts by the body, and therefore they must be supplied by the diet. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the correct functioning of the organism and participate in many physiological processes in the brain. Epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous chronic brain disorder characterized by recurrent epileptic seizures leading to neuropsychiatric disabilities. The prevalence of epilepsy is high achieving about 1% of the general population. There is evidence suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids may have neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects and, accordingly, may have a potential use in the treatment of epilepsy. In the present review, the potential use of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of epilepsy, and the possible proposed mechanisms of action are discussed. The present article summarizes the recent knowledge of the potential protective role of dietary omega-3 fatty acids in epilepsy.

  8. Carboxylic Acid Ionophores as Probes of the Role of Calcium in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    The biological effects of calcium ionophores are described, focusing on arachidonic acid oxygenation, and the formation of a number of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. These metabolites are involved in a number of bodily functions, and their production may be regulated by calcium.

  9. Characterisation, in-vitro and in-vivo evaluation of valproic acid-loaded nanoemulsion for improved brain bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Suk Fei; Kirby, Brian P; Stanslas, Johnson; Basri, Hamidon Bin

    2017-11-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the potential of formulated valproic acid-encapsulated nanoemulsion (VANE) to improve the brain bioavailability of valproic acid (VPA). Valproic acid-encapsulated nanoemulsions were formulated and physically characterised (osmolarity, viscosity, drug content, drug encapsulation efficiency). Further investigations were also conducted to estimate the drug release, cytotoxic profile, in-vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, pharmacokinetic parameter and the concentration of VPA and VANE in blood and brain. Physical characterisation confirmed that VANE was suitable for parenteral administration. Formulating VPA into nanoemulsion significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of VPA. In-vitro drug permeation suggested that VANEs crossed the BBB as freely as VPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters of VANE-treated rats in plasma and brain showed F3 VANE had a remarkable improvement in AUC, prolongation of half-life and reduction in clearance compared to VPA. Given the same extent of in-vitro BBB permeation of VPA and VANE, the higher bioavailability of VANE in brain was believed to have due to higher concentration of VANE in blood. The brain bioavailability of VPA was improved by prolonging the half-life of VPA by encapsulating it within the nanoemulsion-T80. Nanoemulsion containing VPA has alleviated the cytotoxic effect of VPA and improved the plasma and brain bioavailability for parenteral delivery of VPA. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA: An Ancient Nutrient for the Modern Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Bradbury

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern humans have evolved with a staple source of preformed docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in the diet. An important turning point in human evolution was the discovery of high-quality, easily digested nutrients from coastal seafood and inland freshwater sources. Multi-generational exploitation of seafood by shore-based dwellers coincided with the rapid expansion of grey matter in the cerebral cortex, which characterizes the modern human brain. The DHA molecule has unique structural properties that appear to provide optimal conditions for a wide range of cell membrane functions. This has particular implications for grey matter, which is membrane-rich tissue. An important metabolic role for DHA has recently been identified as the precursor for resolvins and protectins. The rudimentary source of DHA is marine algae; therefore it is found concentrated in fish and marine oils. Unlike the photosynthetic cells in algae and higher plants, mammalian cells lack the specific enzymes required for the de novo synthesis of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the precursor for all omega-3 fatty acid syntheses. Endogenous synthesis of DHA from ALA in humans is much lower and more limited than previously assumed. The excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in the modern Western diet further displaces DHA from membrane phospholipids. An emerging body of research is exploring a unique role for DHA in neurodevelopment and the prevention of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. DHA is increasingly being added back into the food supply as fish oil or algal oil supplementation.

  11. Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W; Hutchison, Michael G

    2017-01-05

    Despite the prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), pharmaceutical treatment options for brain injury remain limited. However, nutritional intervention (such as with branched chain amino acids [BCAAs]) has emerged as a promising treatment option for TBI. (1) To determine whether TBI patients have lower levels of endogenous BCAAs postinjury; and (2) to evaluate whether post-TBI BCAA supplementation improves clinical outcome. A systematic review of primary research articles examining the relationship between BCAAs and TBI recovery indexed in Ovid/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. Of the 11 studies identified, 3 examined the effects of TBI on endogenous BCAA levels and consistently reported that BCAA concentrations were depressed postinjury. The remaining 8 studies examined the effects of BCAA supplementation on TBI outcome in animals (n = 3) and humans (n = 5). The animal studies (in mild-to-moderate TBI) showed that BCAAs improved post-TBI outcome. Similar results were found in human trials (conducted primarily in patients with severe TBI), with 4 of the 5 studies reporting improved outcome with BCAA supplementation. Although our review demonstrates an overall positive association between BCAAs and TBI outcome, the evidence of the efficacy of supplementation has been limited to severe TBI. To date, there is insufficient evidence to determine the benefits of BCAAs in mild TBI. Given the high frequency of mild TBI and the promise of BCAAs as an intervention in severe TBI, future research should examine the effects of BCAAs in milder brain injury.

  12. Increased BDNF expression in fetal brain in the valproic acid model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis E F; Roby, Clinton D; Krueger, Bruce K

    2014-03-01

    Human fetal exposure to valproic acid (VPA), a widely-used anti-epileptic and mood-stabilizing drug, leads to an increased incidence of behavioral and intellectual impairments including autism; VPA administration to pregnant rats and mice at gestational days 12.5 (E12.5) or E13.5 leads to autistic-like symptoms in the offspring and is widely used as an animal model for autism. We report here that this VPA administration protocol transiently increased both BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein levels 5-6-fold in the fetal mouse brain. VPA exposure in utero induced smaller increases in the expression of mRNA encoding the other neurotrophins, NT3 (2.5-fold) and NT4 (2-fold). Expression of the neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB and trkC were minimally affected, while levels of the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, p75(NTR), doubled. Of the nine 5'-untranslated exons of the mouse BDNF gene, only expression of exons I, IV and VI was stimulated by VPA in utero. In light of the well-established role of BDNF in regulating neurogenesis and the laminar fate of postmitotic neurons in the developing cortex, an aberrant increase in BDNF expression in the fetal brain may contribute to VPA-induced cognitive disorders by altering brain development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment modifies glutamic acid decarboxylase activity during rat brain postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña-Guerrero, Mónica Elisa; López-Pérez, Silvia Josefina; Beas-Zárate, Carlos

    2003-03-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) produces neurodegeneration in several brain regions when it is administered to neonatal rats. From an early embryonic age to adulthood, GABA neurons appear to have functional glutamatergic receptors, which could convert them in an important target for excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Changes in the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), have been shown after different neuronal insults. Therefore, this work evaluates the effect of neonatal MSG treatment on GAD activity and kinetics in the cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum of the rat brain during postnatal development. Neonatal MSG treatment decreased GAD activity in the cerebral cortex at 21 and 60 postnatal days (PD), mainly due to a reduction in the enzyme affinity (K(m)). In striatum, the GAD activity and the enzyme maximum velocity (V(max)) were increased at PD 60 after neonatal MSG treatment. Finally, in the hippocampus and cerebellum, the GAD activity and V(max) were increased, but the K(m) was found to be lower in the experimental group. The results could be related to compensatory mechanisms from the surviving GABAergic neurons, and suggest a putative adjustment in the GAD isoform expression throughout the development of the postnatal brain, since this enzyme is regulated by the synaptic activity under physiological and/or pathophysiological conditions.

  14. The ability of tolfenamic acid to penetrate the brain: a model for testing the brain disposition of candidate Alzheimer's drugs using multiple platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaiea, Gehad M; Alansi, Bothaina H; Serra, David A; Alwan, Maged; Zawia, Nasser H

    2011-12-01

    Evidence from our laboratory suggests that tolfenamic acid has a potential for slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through lowering cortical levels of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its pathogenic amyloid beta (Aβ) intermediates [1]. In this study, we examined the ability of tolfenamic acid to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) by predicting its logBB and logPS values, the indexes of BBB permeability, using computational models. We also determined, via in vitro methods, the brain penetration capacity factor [(K(IAM)/MW(4))x10(10)] using phosphatidylcholine column chromatography. The obtained logBB, logPS and (K(IAM)/MW(4))x10(10) values predicted that tolfenamic acid can passively transfer into the central nervous system (CNS). These results were validated in vivo using LC-MS analysis after administration of tolfenamic acid intravenously to guinea pigs and mice. The present study provides the first evidence of the ability of tolfenamic acid to cross the BBB and offers a comparative analysis of approaches used to predict the ability of compounds to penetrate into the brain.

  15. Development and Validation of a HPTLC Method for Simultaneous Estimation of L-Glutamic Acid and γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Mice Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancheti, J S; Shaikh, M F; Khatwani, P F; Kulkarni, Savita R; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2013-11-01

    A new robust, simple and economic high performance thin layer chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous estimation of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid in brain homogenate. The high performance thin layer chromatographic separation of these amino acid was achieved using n-butanol:glacial acetic acid:water (22:3:5 v/v/v) as mobile phase and ninhydrin as a derivatising agent. Quantitation of the method was achieved by densitometric method at 550 nm over the concentration range of 10-100 ng/spot. This method showed good separation of amino acids in the brain homogenate with Rf value of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid as 21.67±0.58 and 33.67±0.58, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for L-glutamic acid was found to be 10 and 20 ng and for γ-amino butyric acid it was 4 and 10 ng, respectively. The method was also validated in terms of accuracy, precision and repeatability. The developed method was found to be precise and accurate with good reproducibility and shows promising applicability for studying pathological status of disease and therapeutic significance of drug treatment.

  16. Phenylacetic acids and the structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac bind to specific gamma-hydroxybutyric acid sites in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe; Skonberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a proposed neurotransmitter or neuromodulator with a yet unresolved mechanism of action. GHB binds to both specific high-affinity GHB binding sites and to gamma-aminobutyric acid subtype B (GABA(B)) receptors in the brain. To separate specific GHB effects from...... GABA(B) receptor effects, it is imperative to develop GHB selective and potent compounds. We generated the compound, 4-(biphen-4-yl)-4-hydroxybutyric acid, which is the 4-hydroxyl analogue of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) fenbufen (referred to as gamma-hydroxyfenbufen). When measured...... in a rat brain homogenate [(3)H]NCS-382 binding assay, gamma-hydroxyfenbufen inhibited [(3)H]NCS-382 binding with a 10-fold higher affinity than GHB (K(i) 0.44 microM), thus establishing it as a novel lead structure. The active metabolite of fenbufen, 4-biphenylacetic acid inhibited [(3)H]NCS-382 binding...

  17. Benefits of Docosahexaenoic Acid, Folic Acid, Vitamin D and Iodine on Foetal and Infant Brain Development and Function Following Maternal Supplementation during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature is increasingly reporting on dietary deficiencies in many populations of some nutrients critical for foetal and infant brain development and function. Purpose: To highlight the potential benefits of maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other important complimentary nutrients, including vitamin D, folic acid and iodine during pregnancy and/or breast feeding for foetal and/or infant brain development and/or function. Methods: English language systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, cross-sectional and case-control studies were obtained through searches on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials from January 2000 through to February 2012 and reference lists of retrieved articles. Reports were selected if they included benefits and harms of maternal supplementation of DHA, vitamin D, folic acid or iodine supplementation during pregnancy and/or lactation. Results: Maternal DHA intake during pregnancy and/or lactation can prolong high risk pregnancies, increase birth weight, head circumference and birth length, and can enhance visual acuity, hand and eye co-ordination, attention, problem solving and information processing. Vitamin D helps maintain pregnancy and promotes normal skeletal and brain development. Folic acid is necessary for normal foetal spine, brain and skull development. Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone production necessary for normal brain and nervous system development during gestation that impacts childhood function. Conclusion: Maternal supplementation within recommended safe intakes in populations with dietary deficiencies may prevent many brain and central nervous system malfunctions and even enhance brain development and function in their offspring. PMID:22852064

  18. Xanthurenic Acid Formation from 3-Hydroxykynurenine in the Mammalian Brain: Neurochemical Characterization and Physiological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyasaikumar, K V; Tararina, M; Wu, H-Q; Neale, S A; Weisz, F; Salt, T E; Schwarcz, R

    2017-12-26

    Xanthurenic acid (XA), formed from 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, may modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission by inhibiting the vesicular glutamate transporter and/or activating Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Here we examined the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which 3-HK controls the neosynthesis of XA in rat, mouse and human brain, and compared the physiological actions of 3-HK and XA in the rat brain. In tissue homogenates, XA formation from 3-HK was observed in all three species and traced to a major role of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II). Transamination of 3-HK to XA was also demonstrated using human recombinant KAT II. Neosynthesis of XA was significantly increased in the quinolinate-lesioned rat striatum, indicating a non-neuronal localization of the process. Studies using rat cortical slices revealed that newly produced XA is rapidly released into the extracellular compartment, and that XA biosynthesis can be manipulated experimentally in the same way as the production of kynurenic acid from kynurenine (omission of Na+ or glucose, depolarizing conditions, or addition of 2-oxoacids). The synthesis of XA from 3-HK was confirmed in vivo by striatal microdialysis. In slices from the rat hippocampus, both 3-HK and XA reduced the slopes of dentate gyrus field EPSPs. The effect of 3-HK was reduced in the presence of the KAT inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid. Finally, both 3-HK and XA reduced the power of gamma-oscillatory activity recorded from the hippocampal CA3 region. Endogenous XA, newly formed from 3-HK, may therefore play a physiological role in attentional and cognitive processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Amajad Iqbal Kazi; Anna Oommen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g) ...

  20. Nutrition and brain aging: role of fatty acids with an epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samieri Cécilia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of identified etiologic treatment for dementia, the potential preventive role of nutrition may offer an interesting perspective. The objective of the thesis of C. Samieri was to study the association between nutrition and brain aging in 1,796 subjects, aged 65 y or older, from the Bordeaux sample of the Three-City study, with a particular emphasis on fatty acids. Considering the multidimensional nature of nutritional data, several complementary strategies were used. At the global diet level, dietary patterns actually observed in the population were identified by exploratory methods. Older subjects with a ‘‘healthy’’ pattern, who consumed more than 3.5 weekly servings of fish in men and more than 6 daily servings of fruits and vegetables in women, showed a better cognitive and psychological health. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet, measured according to a score-based confirmatory method, was associated with slower global cognitive decline after 5 y of follow-up. At the nutrient biomarker level, higher plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, a long-chain omega-3 fatty acid, was associated with a decreased dementia risk, and the omega-6-to-omega-3 fatty acids ratio to an increased risk, particularly in depressed subjects. EPA was also related to slower working memory decline in depressed subjects or in carriers of the e4 allele of the ApoE gene. Docosahexaenoic acid was related to slower working memory decline only in ApoE4 carriers. Overall, this work suggests a positive impact of a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables and fish, and notably the Mediterranean diet, on cognition in older subjects. Long-chain n-3 PUFA, in particular EPA, may be key protective nutrients against risk of dementia and cognitive decline.

  1. Evaluation of acid-base status in brain dead donors and the impact of metabolic acidosis on organ retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Kim, M S; Na, S; Koh, S O; Sim, J; Choi, Y S

    2013-09-01

    Pathophysiologic changes after brain death can lead to acid-base disturbances. The primary aim of this study was to clarify the acid-base state and its source in brain dead donors using Stewart's approach. Additionally, we investigated whether the presence of metabolic acidosis affected the number of organs retrieved from donors. A retrospective review of electronic medical records was performed for brain dead donors who had undergone organ harvesting during the past 5 years in a tertiary medical center. The parameters related to acid-base disturbance and the number of organs retrieved from the donors was assessed. Sixty one brain dead donors were evaluated in this study. Twenty three (37.7%) of these patients had metabolic acidosis at the initial diagnosis of brain death. Metabolic acidosis resulted from hyperchloremia and a large strong ion gap. The severity of metabolic acidosis was masked by hypernatremia and hypoalbuminemia. In addition, donors without metabolic acidosis also showed mixed acid-base disturbances in which metabolic acidosis induced by significant hyperchloremia was combined with metabolic alkalosis caused by hypoalbuminemia and hypernatremia. Although more organs were retrieved from the donors without metabolic acidosis than those with metabolic acidosis (P=0.012), serum albumin level (P=0.010) and donor age (Pmetabolic acid-base disturbances, significantly correlated with the number of organs retrieved in multivariate regression analysis. Most brain dead donors exhibited metabolic acid-base disturbances. However, rather than metabolic acidosis, serum albumin level and donor age were well correlated with the number of organs retrieved.

  2. Anandamide synthesis is induced by arachidonate mobilizing agonists in cells of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestonjamasp, V K; Burstein, S H

    1998-11-02

    The hypothesis that the capability of agents to mobilize arachidonic acid (AA) could predict increased anandamide (ANA) synthesis in a macrophage cell line has been examined. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), platelet-activating factor (PAF) and cannabinoids such as Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and anandamide were all found to be agonists for the release of AA and led to increased ANA synthesis in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Nitric oxide, in contrast, stimulated AA release without raising ANA levels. ANA stimulation of its own synthesis indicates the existence of a positive feedback mechanism. The possible involvement of the CB2 receptor in THC-mediated AA release and ANA synthesis is addressed using the antagonist SR144528. ANA synthesis is also increased by the combination of calcium ionophore and indomethacin, suggesting that ANA is metabolized by a cyclooxygenase in this system. The data imply that ANA could play a role in the response of the immune system to cannabinoids and bacterial endotoxins and that AA mobilization is a predictor for increased ANA synthesis.

  3. Effect of pH on pulmonary vascular tone, reactivity, and arachidonate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, I S; Gurtner, G H; Terry, P B; Tohidi, W; Yang, J N; Adkinson, N F; Michael, J R

    1989-07-01

    We studied the effects of perfusate pH on pulmonary vascular tone, reactivity, and thromboxane and prostacyclin synthesis in isolated buffer-perfused rabbit lungs. Extracellular acidosis did not affect base-line vascular tone, but alkalosis had a biphasic effect. Increasing the perfusate pH from 7.40 to 7.65 caused vasodilation, whereas raising pH to 7.70-8.10 caused vasoconstriction. Removing calcium (Ca2+) from the perfusate completely prevented the vasoconstriction caused by alkalosis. Perfusate pH strikingly affected pulmonary vascular reactivity. Acidosis inhibited the vasoconstriction caused by thromboxane and potassium chloride (KCl) but did not affect the response to angiotensin II. Alkalosis, in contrast, augmented the vasoconstriction caused by thromboxane and angiotensin II but reduced the vasoconstriction caused by KCl. Changes in pH also altered thromboxane and prostacyclin synthesis after the infusion of exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) or the endogenous release of AA by the lipid peroxide tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

  4. α-linolenic omega-3 fatty acid for stroke protection: from brain preconditioning paradigm to nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondeau Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death, due to its high incidence, the severity of the insult, and lack of treatment options. The only therapeutic is restoration of cerebral blood flow achieved by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment, but only approximately 5% of patients receive it. In addition, therapeutics aimed at achieving neuroprotection by blocking the ischemic cascade, as identified in numerous preclinical studies, failed in clinical trials. This failure in translation from experimental models to clinical trials led to a re-evaluation of properties which would constitute the ‘‘best-in class’’ therapeutics to be used against stroke. Given that neuroprotection appears ineffective per se, an emerging direction is to identify therapies, probably combinatorial in nature, which protect the whole neurovascular unit and target timedependent neurotoxic mechanisms. Molecules that activate complex cellular signaling cascades that render the brain resistant to subsequent ischemia, known as preconditioners, offer a novel perspective in stroke protection. Preconditioning elicits complex endogenous neuroprotective responses that act by pleiotropic mechanisms to block death pathways, promote survival pathways and increase resistance. In addition to chemical preconditioners, natural/endogenous compounds such as adenosine, glutamate, lysophospholipids, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been demonstrated to be excellent preconditioners. Consequently, a major new concept in preconditioning to combat stroke is introduced, which is preconditioning achieved through supplementation of an essential item in diet or as a nutraceutical. Several epidemiologic studies suggested a beneficial effect of a seafood/omega-3-enriched diet in cerebral diseases, but the omega-3-induced protective mechanisms are still poorly identified. This review highlights how α-linolenic acid (ALA, the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid precursor

  5. [Effect of a new derivative of glutamic and apovincaminic acids on brain metabolism in post-ischemic period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L M; Prikhod'ko, M A; Pogorelyĭ, V E; Skachilova, S Ia; Mirzoian, R S

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprotective properties of the new derivative of glutamic and apovincaminic acids, ethyl -(3-alpha,16-alpha)-eburnamenin-14-carbopxylate of 2-aminopentadionic acid (LHT 1-02) were studied on a model of acute brain ischemia in cats. LHT 1-02 has proved to be more effective than the reference drugs vinpocetin and glycine in preventing the reperfusive damage, which was manifested by decreased postischemic hyperglycemia, activated utilization of oxygen in the brain, and suppressed postischemic metabolic lactate acidosis. Thus, the results of this comparative study show expediency of further investigations of LHT 1 - 02 as a potential neuroprotective drug.

  6. A New Pain Regulatory System via the Brain Long Chain Fatty Acid Receptor GPR40/FFA1 Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    An increasingly large number of pharmacological and physiological works on fatty acids have shown that the functional properties of fatty acids are regulated by the amount of individual fatty acid intake and the distribution of fatty acids among organs. Recently, it has been determined that G-protein-coupled receptor 40/free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFA1) is activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR40/FFA1 is mainly expressed in the β cell of the pancreas, spinal cord and brain. It is reported that this receptor has a functional role in controlling blood glucose levels via the modulation of insulin secretion. However, its physiological function in the brain remains unknown. Our previous studies have shown that GPR40/FFA1 is expressed in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-positive neurons of the arcuate nucleus, serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus, and in noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Furthermore, the intracerebroventricular injection of DHA or GW9508, which is a selective GPR40/FFA1 agonist, attenuates formalin-induced inflammatory pain behavior through increasing β-endorphin release in the hypothalamus. It also suppresses complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest that brain free long-chain fatty acids-GPR40/FFA1 signaling might have an important role in the modulation of endogenous pain control systems. In this review, I discuss the current status and our recent study regarding a new pain regulatory system via the brain long chain fatty acid receptor GPR40/FFA1 signal.

  7. Toxic synergism between quinolinic acid and organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes: Relevance for metabolic acidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-11-12

    The brain of children affected by organic acidemias develop acute neurodegeneration linked to accumulation of endogenous toxic metabolites like glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids. Excitotoxic and oxidative events are involved in the toxic patterns elicited by these organic acids, although their single actions cannot explain the extent of brain damage observed in organic acidemias. The characterization of co-adjuvant factors involved in the magnification of early toxic processes evoked by these metabolites is essential to infer their actions in the human brain. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway (KP) - a metabolic route devoted to degrade tryptophan to form NAD(+) - produce increased levels of the excitotoxic metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN), which has been involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Herein we investigated the effects of subtoxic concentrations of GA, 3-OHGA, MMA and PA, either alone or in combination with QUIN, on early toxic endpoints in rat brain synaptosomes. To establish specific mechanisms, we pre-incubated synaptosomes with different protective agents, including the endogenous N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KA), the antioxidant S-allylcysteine (SAC) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). While the incubation of synaptosomes with toxic metabolites at subtoxic concentrations produced no effects, their co-incubation (QUIN+GA, +3-OHGA, +MMA or +PA) decreased the mitochondrial function and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation. For all cases, this effect was partially prevented by KA and l-NAME, and completely avoided by SAC. These findings suggest that early damaging events elicited by organic acids involved in metabolic acidemias can be magnified by toxic synergism with QUIN, and this process is mostly mediated by oxidative stress, and in a lesser extent by excitotoxicity and

  8. A single dose of lysergic acid diethylamide influences gene expression patterns within the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Charles D; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have profound effects on humans including hallucinations and detachment from reality. These remarkable behavioral effects have many similarities to the debilitating symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The effects of hallucinogens are thought to be mediated by serotonin receptor activation; however, how these drugs elicit the unusual behavioral effects remains largely a mystery, despite much research. We have undertaken the first comprehensive analysis of gene expression influenced by acute LSD administration in the mammalian brain. These studies represent a novel approach to elucidate the mechanism of action of this class of drugs. We have identified a number of genes that are predicted to be involved in the processes of synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling and cytoskeletal architecture. Understanding these molecular events will lead to new insights into the etiology of disorders whose behavioral symptoms resemble the temporary effects of hallucinogenic drugs, and also may ultimately result in new therapies.

  9. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    -induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use......Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation......-associated protein 2, and --e) general and specific neuronal and glial cell stains. The results show good correlation between the different markers, and are in accordance with results obtained in vivo. Examples presented in this review will focus on the use of PI uptake to monitor the excitotoxic effects of --a) KA...

  10. Demonstration of glucuronic acid on brain glycoproteins which react with HNK-1 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, V E; Daniel, P F; Moore, M E; Jungalwala, F B

    1986-07-31

    Ependymins, a family of extracellular glycoproteins of goldfish and mammalian brain, were shown to contain N-linked complex glycan chains. These glycoproteins reacted with a monoclonal antibody, HNK-1 which recognizes a membrane antigen on a subset of human lymphocytes, myelin-associated glycoprotein glycoprotein epitope reacting with HNK-1 antibody was previously shown to include a terminal 3-sulfoglucuronosyl residue present in certain glycolipids of the nervous tissue (Chou et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1985, 128, 383-388). In this report, the presence of glucuronic acid in ependymins was demonstrated by gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. We suggest that a 3-sulfoglucuronosyl residue may be the common epitope on HNK-1-reactive glycoproteins.

  11. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the human brain-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) in its apo form and the holo forms binding to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oeemig, Jesper S; Jørgensen, Mathilde L; Hansen, Mikka S

    2009-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid.......In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid....

  12. Efficacy, Dosage, and Duration of Action of Branched Chain Amino Acid Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Lim, Miranda M.; Johnson, Brian N.; Palmer, Chris P.; Putnam, Brendan J.; Kirschen, Matthew P.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in long-lasting cognitive impairments for which there is currently no accepted treatment. A well-established mouse model of mild to moderate TBI, lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI), shows changes in network excitability in the hippocampus including a decrease in net synaptic efficacy in area CA1 and an increase in net synaptic efficacy in dentate gyrus. Previous studies identified a novel therapy consisting of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), which restored normal mouse hippocampal responses and ameliorated cognitive impairment following FPI. However, the optimal BCAA dose and length of treatment needed to improve cognitive recovery is unknown. In the current study, mice underwent FPI then consumed 100 mM BCAA supplemented water ad libitum for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 days. BCAA therapy ameliorated cognitive impairment at 5 and 10 days duration. Neither BCAA supplementation at 50 mM nor BCAAs when dosed 5 days on then 5 days off was sufficient to ameliorate cognitive impairment. These results suggest that brain injury causes alterations in hippocampal function, which underlie and contribute to hippocampal cognitive impairment, which are reversible with at least 5 days of BCAA treatment, and that sustaining this effect is dependent on continuous treatment. Our findings have profound implications for the clinical investigation of TBI therapy. PMID:25870584

  13. Administration of Protocatechuic Acid Reduces Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Neuronal Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hwon Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic acid (PCA was first purified from green tea and has shown numerous biological activities, including anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherosclerotic effects. The effect of PCA on traumatic brain injury (TBI-induced neuronal death has not previously been evaluated. TBI is defined as damage to the brain resulting from external mechanical force, such as rapid acceleration or deceleration, impact, blast waves, or penetration by a projectile. TBI causes neuronal death in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of PCA on TBI-induced neuronal death. Here, TBI was induced by a controlled cortical impact model using rats. PCA (30 mg/kg was injected into the intraperitoneal (ip space immediately after TBI. Neuronal death was evaluated with Fluoro Jade-B (FJB staining at 24 h after TBI. Oxidative injury was detected by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE, glutathione (GSH concentration was analyzed by glutathione adduct with N-ethylmaleimide (GS-NEM staining at 24 h after TBI, and microglial activation in the hippocampus was detected by CD11b immunohistochemistry at one week after TBI. We found that the proportion of degenerating neurons, oxidative injury, GSH depletion, and microglia activation in the hippocampus and cortex were all reduced by PCA treatment following TBI. Therefore, our study suggests that PCA may have therapeutic potential in preventing TBI-induced neuronal death.

  14. Efficacy, dosage and duration of action of branched chain amino acid therapy for traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclynn eElkind

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in long-lasting cognitive impairments for which there is currently no accepted treatment. A well-established mouse model of mild to moderate TBI, lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI, shows changes in network excitability in the hippocampus including a decrease in net synaptic efficacy in area CA1 and an increase in net synaptic efficacy in dentate gyrus. Previous studies identified a novel therapy consisting of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs which restored normal mouse hippocampal responses and ameliorated cognitive impairment following FPI. However, the optimal BCAA dose and length of treatment needed to improve cognitive recovery is unknown. In the current study mice underwent FPI then consumed 100 mM BCAA supplemented water ad libitum for 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10 days. BCAA therapy ameliorated cognitive impairment at 5 and 10 days duration. Neither BCAA supplementation at 50 mM, nor BCAAs when dosed 5 days on then 5 days off, was sufficient to ameliorate cognitive impairment. These results suggest that brain injury causes alterations in hippocampal function which underlie and contribute to hippocampal cognitive impairment which are reversible with at least 5 days of BCAA treatment, and that sustaining this effect is dependent on continuous treatment. Our findings have profound implications for the clinical investigation of TBI therapy.

  15. Therapeutic impact of eicosapentaenoic acid on ischemic brain damage following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masayuki; Inaba, Toshiki; Nito, Chikako; Kamiya, Nobuo; Katayama, Yasuo

    2013-06-26

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), have been shown to reduce ischemic neuronal injury. We investigated the effects of ethyl-EPA (EPA-E) on ischemic brain damage using a rat transient focal cerebral ischemia model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=105) were subjected to 90 min of focal cerebral ischemia. EPA-E (100mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered once a day for 3, 5 or 7 days prior to ischemia. Different withdrawal intervals of 3, 5, and 7 days prior to ischemia following 7-day pretreatment with EPA-E or vehicle were also examined. In addition, post-ischemic administration of EPA-E was investigated. Pretreatment with EPA-E for 7 and 5 days, but not 3 days, showed significant infarct volume reduction and neurological improvements when compared with vehicle pretreatment. In addition, withdrawal of EPA-E administration for 3 days, but not 5 and 7 days, also demonstrated significant infarct volume reduction and neurological improvements when compared with vehicle treatment. Post-ischemic treatment of EPA-E did not show any neuroprotection. Immunohistochemistry revealed that 7-day pretreatment with EPA-E significantly reduced cortical expression of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (maker for oxidative DNA damage), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (maker for lipid peroxidation), phosphorylated adducin (marker for Rho-kinase activation) and von Willebrand factor (endothelial marker) when compared with vehicle pretreatment. In addition, phosphorylated adducin expression co-localized with von Willebrand factor immunoreactivity. The present study established the neuroprotective effect of EPA-E on ischemic brain damage following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats, which may be involved in the suppression of oxidative stress and endothelial Rho-kinase activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Presumptive brain influx of large neutral amino acids and the effect of phenylalanine supplementation in patients with Tyrosinemia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Willem G; van Vliet, Danique; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; de Blaauw, Pim; Rubio Gozalbo, M Estela; Heiner-Fokkema, M Rebecca; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a rare metabolic disease caused by a defect in the tyrosine degradation pathway. Current treatment consists of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) and a tyrosine and phenylalanine restricted diet. Recently, neuropsychological deficits have been seen in HT1 patients. These deficits are possibly associated with low blood phenylalanine concentrations and/or high blood tyrosine concentrations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was threefold. Firstly, we aimed to calculate how the plasma amino acid profile in HT1 patients may influence the presumptive brain influx of all large neutral amino acids (LNAA). Secondly, we aimed to investigate the effect of phenylalanine supplementation on presumptive brain phenylalanine and tyrosine influx. Thirdly, we aimed to theoretically determine minimal target plasma phenylalanine concentrations in HT1 patient to ensure adequate presumptive brain phenylalanine influx. Data of plasma LNAA concentrations were obtained. In total, 239 samples of 9 HT1 children, treated with NTBC, diet, and partly with phenylalanine supplementation were collected together with 596 samples of independent control children. Presumptive brain influx of all LNAA was calculated, using Michaelis-Menten parameters (Km) and Vmax-values obtained from earlier articles. In HT1 patients, plasma concentrations and presumptive brain influx of tyrosine were higher. However, plasma and especially brain influx of phenylalanine were lower in HT1 patients. Phenylalanine supplementation did not only tend to increase plasma phenylalanine concentrations, but also presumptive brain phenylalanine influx, despite increased plasma tyrosine concentrations. However, to ensure sufficient brain phenylalanine influx in HT1 patients, minimal plasma phenylalanine concentrations may need to be higher than considered thus far. This study clearly suggests a role for disturbed brain LNAA biochemistry, which is not well

  17. Methanol extract of Nigella sativa seed induces changes in the levels of neurotransmitter amino acids in male rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Tarek; Carretero, María Emilia; Arce, Carmen; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar

    2017-12-01

    Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae) (NS) has been used for medicinal and culinary purposes. Different parts of the plant are used to treat many disorders. This study investigates the effects of NS methanol extract on brain neurotransmitter amino acid levels. We measured the changes in aspartate, glutamate, glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid in five brain regions of male Wistar rats after methanol extract treatment. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with saline solution (controls) or NS methanol extract (equivalent of 2.5 g/kg body weight) and sacrificed 1 h later or after administering 1 daily dose for 8 days. The neurotransmitters were measured in the hypothalamus, cortex, striatum, hippocampus and thalamus by HPLC. Results showed significant changes in amino acids compared to basal values. Glutamate increased significantly (16-36%) in the regions analyzed except the striatum. Aspartate in the hypothalamus (50 and 76%) and glycine in hippocampus (32 and 25%), thalamus (66 and 29%) and striatum (75 and 48%) also increased with the two treatment intervals. γ-Aminobutyric acid significantly increased in the hippocampus (38 and 32%) and thalamus (22 and 40%) but decreased in the cortex and hypothalamus although in striatum only after eight days of treatment (24%). Our results suggest that injected methanol extract modifies amino acid levels in the rat brain regions. These results could be of interest since some neurodegenerative diseases are related to amino acid level imbalances in the central nervous system, suggesting the prospect for therapeutic use of NS against these disorders.

  18. Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration in Adult Rat Brain from Binge Ethanol Exposure: Abrogation by Docosahexaenoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajuddin, Nuzhath; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Marshall, S. Alex; Nixon, Kimberly; Neafsey, Edward J.; Kim, Hee-Yong; Collins, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence that brain edema and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels have roles in experimental binge ethanol-induced neurodegeneration has stimulated interest in swelling/edema-linked neuroinflammatory pathways leading to oxidative stress. We report here that neurotoxic binge ethanol exposure produces comparable significant effects in vivo and in vitro on adult rat brain levels of AQP4 as well as neuroinflammation-linked enzymes: key phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family members and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). In adult male rats, repetitive ethanol intoxication (3 gavages/d for 4 d, ∼9 g/kg/d, achieving blood ethanol levels ∼375 mg/dl; “Majchrowicz” model) significantly increased AQP4, Ca+2-dependent PLA2 GIVA (cPLA2), phospho-cPLA2 GIVA (p-cPLA2), secretory PLA2 GIIA (sPLA2) and PARP-1 in regions incurring extensive neurodegeneration in this model—hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and olfactory bulb—but not in two regions typically lacking neurodamage, frontal cortex and cerebellum. Also, ethanol reduced hippocampal Ca+2-independent PLA2 GVIA (iPLA2) levels and increased brain “oxidative stress footprints” (4-hydroxynonenal-adducted proteins). For in vitro studies, organotypic cultures of rat hippocampal-entorhinocortical slices of adult age (∼60 d) were ethanol-binged (100 mM or ∼450 mg/dl) for 4 d, which augments AQP4 and causes neurodegeneration (Collins et al. 2013). Reproducing the in vivo results, cPLA2, p-cPLA2, sPLA2 and PARP-1 were significantly elevated while iPLA2 was decreased. Furthermore, supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), known to quell AQP4 and neurodegeneration in ethanol-treated slices, blocked PARP-1 and PLA2 changes while counteracting endogenous DHA reduction and increases in oxidative stress footprints (3-nitrotyrosinated proteins). Notably, the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 suppressed binge ethanol-dependent neurodegeneration, indicating PARP upstream involvement. The results with corresponding models

  19. Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in adult rat brain from binge ethanol exposure: abrogation by docosahexaenoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuzhath Tajuddin

    Full Text Available Evidence that brain edema and aquaporin-4 (AQP4 water channels have roles in experimental binge ethanol-induced neurodegeneration has stimulated interest in swelling/edema-linked neuroinflammatory pathways leading to oxidative stress. We report here that neurotoxic binge ethanol exposure produces comparable significant effects in vivo and in vitro on adult rat brain levels of AQP4 as well as neuroinflammation-linked enzymes: key phospholipase A2 (PLA2 family members and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. In adult male rats, repetitive ethanol intoxication (3 gavages/d for 4 d, ∼ 9 g/kg/d, achieving blood ethanol levels ∼ 375 mg/dl; "Majchrowicz" model significantly increased AQP4, Ca+2-dependent PLA2 GIVA (cPLA2, phospho-cPLA2 GIVA (p-cPLA2, secretory PLA2 GIIA (sPLA2 and PARP-1 in regions incurring extensive neurodegeneration in this model--hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and olfactory bulb--but not in two regions typically lacking neurodamage, frontal cortex and cerebellum. Also, ethanol reduced hippocampal Ca+2-independent PLA2 GVIA (iPLA2 levels and increased brain "oxidative stress footprints" (4-hydroxynonenal-adducted proteins. For in vitro studies, organotypic cultures of rat hippocampal-entorhinocortical slices of adult age (∼ 60 d were ethanol-binged (100 mM or ∼ 450 mg/dl for 4 d, which augments AQP4 and causes neurodegeneration (Collins et al. 2013. Reproducing the in vivo results, cPLA2, p-cPLA2, sPLA2 and PARP-1 were significantly elevated while iPLA2 was decreased. Furthermore, supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3, known to quell AQP4 and neurodegeneration in ethanol-treated slices, blocked PARP-1 and PLA2 changes while counteracting endogenous DHA reduction and increases in oxidative stress footprints (3-nitrotyrosinated proteins. Notably, the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 suppressed binge ethanol-dependent neurodegeneration, indicating PARP upstream involvement. The results with corresponding models

  20. Reducing dietary intake of linoleic acid of mouse dams during lactation increases offspring brain n-3 LCPUFA content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, L.; Oosting, A.; Scheurink, A J W; van Dijk, G.; van der Bee, E. M.

    Omega (n-)3 and n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) accumulation in the infant brain after birth is strongly driven by dietary supply of n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs and their C18 precursors through breast milk or infant formula. n-3 LCPUFA accretion is associated with positive effects on

  1. Brain-specific fatty acid-binding protein is elevated in serum of patients with dementia-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.; de Vente, J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Vreeling, F.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Glatz, J.F.C.; Pelsers, M.A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers in accessible matrices, such as blood, for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) and heart-type FABP in patients with dementia-involving diseases.

  2. Circulating Omega‐3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Subclinical Brain Abnormalities on MRI in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jyrki K.; Siscovick, David S.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Longstreth, William T.; Spiegelman, Donna; Rimm, Eric B.; King, Irena B.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish, is associated with fewer subclinical brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the association between plasma phospholipid omega‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), objective biomarkers of exposure, and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI. Methods and Results In the community‐based Cardiovascular Health Study, 3660 participants aged ≥65 underwent brain MRI in 1992–1994, and 2313 were rescanned 5 years later. MRIs were centrally read by neuroradiologists in a standardized, blinded manner. Participants with recognized transient ischemic attacks or stroke were excluded. Phospholipid PUFAs were measured in stored plasma collected in 1992–1993 and related to cross‐sectional and longitudinal MRI findings. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for having a prevalent subclinical infarct was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.82; P for trend=0.001) in the highest versus lowest long‐chain omega‐3 PUFA quartile. Higher long‐chain omega‐3 PUFA content was also associated with better white matter grade, but not with sulcal or ventricular grades, markers of brain atrophy, or with incident subclinical infarcts. The phospholipid intermediate‐chain omega‐3 PUFA alpha‐linolenic acid was associated only with modestly better sulcal and ventricular grades. However, this finding was not supported in the analyses with alpha‐linolenic acid intake. Conclusions Among older adults, higher phospholipid long‐chain omega‐3 PUFA content was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and better white matter grade on MRI. Our results support the beneficial effects of fish consumption, the major source of long‐chain omega‐3 PUFAs, on brain health in later life. The role of plant‐derived alpha‐linolenic acid in brain health requires further investigation. PMID:24113325

  3. Circulating omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jyrki K; Siscovick, David S; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Longstreth, William T; Spiegelman, Donna; Rimm, Eric B; King, Irena B; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2013-10-10

    Consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish, is associated with fewer subclinical brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the association between plasma phospholipid omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), objective biomarkers of exposure, and subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI. In the community-based Cardiovascular Health Study, 3660 participants aged ≥ 65 underwent brain MRI in 1992-1994, and 2313 were rescanned 5 years later. MRIs were centrally read by neuroradiologists in a standardized, blinded manner. Participants with recognized transient ischemic attacks or stroke were excluded. Phospholipid PUFAs were measured in stored plasma collected in 1992-1993 and related to cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI findings. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for having a prevalent subclinical infarct was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.82; P for trend = 0.001) in the highest versus lowest long-chain omega-3 PUFA quartile. Higher long-chain omega-3 PUFA content was also associated with better white matter grade, but not with sulcal or ventricular grades, markers of brain atrophy, or with incident subclinical infarcts. The phospholipid intermediate-chain omega-3 PUFA alpha-linolenic acid was associated only with modestly better sulcal and ventricular grades. However, this finding was not supported in the analyses with alpha-linolenic acid intake. Among older adults, higher phospholipid long-chain omega-3 PUFA content was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and better white matter grade on MRI. Our results support the beneficial effects of fish consumption, the major source of long-chain omega-3 PUFAs, on brain health in later life. The role of plant-derived alpha-linolenic acid in brain health requires further investigation.

  4. Molecular basis of activation of the arachidonate-regulated Ca2+ (ARC) channel, a store-independent Orai channel, by plasma membrane STIM1.

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    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2013-07-15

    Currently, Orai proteins are known to encode two distinct agonist-activated, highly calcium-selective channels: the store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, and the store-independent, arachidonic acid-activated ARC channels. Surprisingly, whilst the trigger for activation of these channels is entirely different, both depend on stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1). However, whilst STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is the critical sensor for the depletion of this calcium store that triggers CRAC channel activation, it is the pool of STIM1 constitutively resident in the plasma membrane that is essential for activation of the ARC channels. Here, using a variety of approaches, we show that the key domains within the cytosolic part of STIM1 identified as critical for the activation of CRAC channels are also key for activation of the ARC channels. However, examination of the actual steps involved in such activation reveal marked differences between these two Orai channel types. Specifically, loss of calcium from the EF-hand of STIM1 that forms the key initiation point for activation of the CRAC channels has no effect on ARC channel activity. Secondly, in marked contrast to the dynamic and labile nature of interactions between STIM1 and the CRAC channels, STIM1 in the plasma membrane appears to be constitutively associated with the ARC channels. Finally, specific mutations in STIM1 that induce an extended, constitutively active, conformation for the CRAC channels actually prevent activation of the ARC channels by arachidonic acid. Based on these findings, we propose that the likely role of arachidonic acid lies in inducing the actual gating of the channel.

  5. Effect of fish oils containing different amounts of EPA, DHA, and antioxidants on plasma and brain fatty acids and brain nitric oxide synthase activity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Karin; Saldeen, Ann-Sofie; Yang, Baichun; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The interest in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has expanded significantly in the last few years, due to their many positive effects described. Consequently, the interest in fish oil supplementation has also increased, and many different types of fish oil supplements can be found on the market. Also, it is well known that these types of fatty acids are very easily oxidized, and that stability among supplements varies greatly. Aims of the study In this pilot study we investigated the effects of two different types of natural fish oils containing different amounts of the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and antioxidants on plasma and brain fatty acids, blood lipids, vitamin E, and in vivo lipid peroxidation, as well as brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, an enzyme which has been shown to be important for memory and learning ability. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed regular rat chow pellets enriched with 5% (w/w) of butter (control group), a natural fish oil (17.4% EPA and 11.7% DHA, referred to as EPA-rich), and a natural fish oil rich in DHA (7.7% EPA and 28.0% DHA, referred to as DHA-rich). Both of the fish oils were stabilized by a commercial antioxidant protection system (Pufanox®) at production. The fourth group received the same DHA-rich oil, but without Pufanox® stabilization (referred to as unstable). As an index of stability of the oils, their peroxide values were repeatedly measured during 9 weeks. The dietary treatments continued until sacrifice, after 10 days. Results Stability of the oils varied greatly. It took the two stabilized oils 9 weeks to reach the same peroxide value as the unstable oil reached after only a few days. Both the stabilized EPA- and DHA-rich diets lowered the triacylglycerols and total cholesterol compared to control (-45%, P < 0.05 and -54%, P < 0.001; -31%, P < 0.05 and -25%, P < 0.01) and so did the unstable oil, but less efficiently

  6. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations. Copyright 2002 IBRO

  7. The influence of feeding linoleic, gamma-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acid rich oils on rat brain tumor fatty acids composition and fatty acid binding protein 7 mRNA expression

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    Abdi Khosro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies indicate that gamma linolenic acid (GLA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA may inhibit glioma cells growth but effects of oral consumption of these fatty acids on brain tumor fatty acid composition have not been determined in vivo. Methods GLA oil (GLAO; 72% GLA, DHA oil (DHAO; 73% DHA were fed to adult wistar rats (1 mL/rat/day starting one week prior to C6 glioma cells implantation and continued for two weeks after implantation. Control group were fed same amount of high linoleic acid safflower oil (74–77% linoleic acid. Fatty acid composition of tumor samples was determined in a set of 8–12 animals in each group and serum fatty acid in 6 animals per each group. Gene expression of tumor fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ and retinoid × receptor-α (RXR-α were determined in a set of 18 animals per group. Results DHAO feeding increased EPA of brain tumors and decreased ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids. Serum levels of EPA were also increased in DHAO group. A similar trend in serum and tumor levels of DHA were observed in DHAO group but it did not achieve statistical significance. GLAO increased serum concentration of GLA but had no significant effect on tumor GLA or dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA concentrations. Gene expression of FABP7 was up-regulated in tumors of DHAO group but no other significant effects were observed on EGFR, PPAR-γ or RXR-α expression, and expression of these genes in tumors of GLAO were not different from SFO group. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of DHA containing oil could be an effective way to increase levels of long chain n-3 fatty acids in brain tumors and this increase may be mediated partly by up-regulation of FABP7 expression.

  8. Search for viral nucleic acid sequences in brain tissues of patients with schizophrenia using nested polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taller, A M; Asher, D M; Pomeroy, K L; Eldadah, B A; Godec, M S; Falkai, P G; Bogert, B; Kleinman, J E; Stevens, J R; Torrey, E F

    1996-01-01

    We used polymerase chain reaction to search for nucleic acid sequences of several viruses in DNA and RNA extracted from brain tissues of schizophrenic and control subjects. We extracted DNA and RNA templates from frozen brain specimens of 31 patients with schizophrenia and 23 nonschizophrenic control patients with other diseases. The extracts were subjected to polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers for 12 different viruses (cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpesvirus type 6, varicellazoster virus, measles virus, mumps virus, rubella virus, the picornavirus group, influenza A virus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I, and St Louis encephalitis virus), several of which have been suspected of involvement in schizophrenia. Nested primers were used to increase the sensitivity of the method. No amplified nucleic acid sequences encoded by the selected viral genomes were detected in extracts of any brain specimens from either schizophrenic or control patients. These data agree with previous studies that failed to find sequences of a number of viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid or selected areas of the brains of schizophrenic patients. Additional efforts should be undertaken to identify other known and unknown pathogens in schizophrenia, sampling more areas of the brain from subjects with a variety of clinical types of schizophrenia.

  9. Increase in the penetration of tracer compounds into the rat brain during 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elo, H.A.; Ylitalo, P.; Kyoettilae, J.; Hervonen, H. (Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland)

    1982-01-01

    The penetration of different intravenous tracer molecules such as /sup 14/C-labelled 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (/sup 14/C-MCPA), /sup 14/C-p-aminobenzoic acid (/sup 14/C-PABA), /sup 14/C-sucrose, /sup 14/C-antipyrine and iodinated (/sup 125/I) human albumin (/sup 125/I-HA) into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was studied in MCPA-intoxicated and control rats. Toxic subcutaneous doses of sodium salt of MCPA (200-500 mg/kg) increased highly the brain/plasma and CSF/plasma ratios of /sup 14/C-MCPA and /sup 14/C-PABA, as compared to the muscle/plasma ratio. Probenecid (200 mg/kg) did not affect the cerebral MCPA concentration in the intoxicated animals. The tissue/plasma ratios of /sup 14/C-sucrose, /sup 14/C-antipyrine and /sup 125/I-HA were also increased in the brain and CSF of intoxicated animals, but the increases were less pronounced than those of /sup 14/C-MCPA or /sup 14/C-PABA. The results indicate that MCPA intoxication caused a selective damage of the blood-brain barrier in the brain areas studied.

  10. Effect of maternal micronutrients (folic acid and vitamin B12) and omega 3 fatty acids on indices of brain oxidative stress in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Suchitra; Sable, Pratiksha; Khaire, Amrita; Randhir, Karuna; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2014-03-01

    Our earlier studies have shown that a maternal diet imbalanced with micronutrients like folic acid, vitamin B12 has adverse effects on fatty acid metabolism, global methylation patterns and levels of brain neurotrophins in the offspring at birth. However, it is not clear if these effects are mediated through oxidative stress. The role of oxidative stress in influencing epigenetic mechanisms and thereby fetal programming is not well studied. Pregnant female rats were divided into six treatment groups at two levels of folic acid both in the presence and absence of vitamin B12. Omega 3 fatty acid supplementation was given to the vitamin B12 deficient groups. Following delivery, 8 dams from each group were randomly shifted back to control and the remaining 8 continued on the same treatment diet. Our results indicate for the first time that an imbalance in maternal micronutrients reduces the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (pacid supplementation normalizes the levels of GPx. Our data shows that maternal micronutrient imbalance adversely affects antioxidant defense mechanisms while omega 3 fatty acid supplementation ameliorates some of the negative effects. Our study throws light on the role of oxidative stress in fetal brain programming and consequential risk for neurodegenerative disorders in later life. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Essential fatty acids and lipid mediators. Endocannabinoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramia, G

    2012-01-01

    In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) as precursors of "lipid mediator" molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines, maresins that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that the balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids has a profound influence on all the body's inflammatory responses and a raised level of PUFA omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The CYP-catalyzed epoxidation and hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA) were established recently as the so-called third branch of AGE cascade. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases convert AA to four epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) regioisomers, that produce vascular relaxation anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels and in the kidney, promote angiogenesis, and protect ischemic myocardium and brain. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are accessible to CYP enzymes in the same way as AA. Metabolites derived from EPA include epoxye-icosatetraenoic acids (EETR) and hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (19- and 20-HEPE), whereas DHA include epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (21- and 22-HDoHE). For many of the CYP isoforms, the n-3 PUFAs are the preferred substrates and the available data suggest that some of the vasculo- and cardioprotective effects attributed to dietary n-3 PUFAs may be mediated by CYP-dependent metabolites of EPA and DHA. From AA derives also endocannabinoids like anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, capable of mimicking the pharmacological actions of the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations such as hashish and

  12. Essential fatty acids and lipid mediators. Endocannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caramia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA as precursors of “lipid mediator” molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines, maresins that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that the balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids has a profound influence on all the body’s inflammatory responses and a raised level of PUFA omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The CYP-catalyzed epoxidation and hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA were established recently as the so-called third branch of AGE cascade. Cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenases convert AA to four epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET regioisomers, that produce vascular relaxation anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels and in the kidney, promote angiogenesis, and protect ischemic myocardium and brain. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are accessible to CYP enzymes in the same way as AA. Metabolites derived from EPA include epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (EETR and hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (19- and 20-HEPE, whereas DHA include epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (21- and 22-HDoHE. For many of the CYP isoforms, the n-3 PUFAs are the preferred substrates and the available data suggest that some of the vasculo- and cardioprotective effects attributed to dietary n-3 PUFAs may be mediated by CYP-dependent metabolites of EPA and DHA. From AA derives also endocannabinoids like anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, capable of mimicking the pharmacological actions of the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations such as

  13. The relation of high fat diet, metabolic disturbances and brain oxidative dysfunction: modulation by hydroxy citric acid

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    Kamel Hamdy H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims This study aimed to examine the effect of high fat diet (HFD to modulate brain dysfunction, and understand the linkages between obesity, metabolic disturbances and the brain oxidative stress (BOS dysfunction and modulation with hydroxyl citric acid of G. Cambogia. Methods Rats were divided into 3 groups; 1st control, maintained on standard normal rat chow diet, 2nd HFD, maintained on high fat diet along 12 week and 3rd HFD+G, administered G. Cambogia for 4 weeks and each group include 8 rats. Blood, brain and abdominal fat were collected for biochemical measurements. Results HFD group showed significant increase in energy intake, final BW and BW gain. Also significant increase in weight of abdominal fat in HFD group. HFD induce metabolic disturbance through increasing the lipid profile (LDL, TG, TC, γGT and α-amylase activity, uric acid level and hyperglycemia, while decreasing creatine kinase (CK activity. These changes associated with lowering in brain nitric oxide (NO level and rising in serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, brain catalase activity and MDA levels as oxidative stress markers. These alterations improved by G. Cambogia that decrease BOS and increased NO level. Conclusions Rats fed HFD showed, metabolic disturbances produce hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia and increased LDL associated with increased BOS. Involvement of BuChE, NO and oxidative stress associated with metabolic disturbances in the pathophysiological progression in brain, suggesting association between obesity, metabolic disorders and brain alteration while, using G. Cambogia, ameliorate the damaging effects of the HFD via lowering feed intake and BOS.

  14. Effects of Intake of Maternal Dietary Elaidic Acids during Pregnancy and Lactation on the Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma, Erythrocyte Membrane, and Brain in Rat Pups

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    Noriko Komatsuzaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of a dam’s dietary elaidic acid (EA intake during pregnancy and lactation on the fatty acid composition of plasma, erythrocyte membrane, and brain in rat pups, we fed two groups of dams either a soybean oil diet (SOD or a shortening diet (SHD containing soybean oil (10% or shortening (10%, respectively. Although EA was not detected in the SOD, EA accounted for 25.3% of all fatty acid content in the SHD. On day 8 after birth, the EA levels in the stomach, plasma, and erythrocyte membrane of pups nursed by the dams fed the SHD were %, %, and %, respectively. Although on day 8 after birth the EA level of the brains of pups nursed by SHD-fed dams was %, EA was not detected on day 21 or day 82 after birth. These results suggest that EA intake during pregnancy and lactation supplies EA to plasma, remains in the erythrocyte membrane of pups, and moves into the brain in early infancy.

  15. Combination of omega-3 Fatty acids, lithium, and aripiprazole reduces oxidative stress in brain of mice with mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunagiri, Pandiyan; Rajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Shanthakumar, Janakiraman; Tamilselvan, Thangavel; Balamurugan, Elumalai

    2014-09-01

    Manic episode in bipolar disorder (BD) was evaluated in the present study with supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in combination with aripiprazole and lithium on methylphenidate (MPD)-induced manic mice model. Administration of MPD 5 mg/kg bw intraperitoneally (i.p.) caused increase in oxidative stress in mice brain. To retract this effect, supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids 1.5 ml/kg (p.o.), aripiprazole 1.5 mg/kg bw (i.p.), and lithium 50 mg/kg bw (p.o) were given to mice. Omega-3 fatty acids alone and in combination with aripiprazole- and lithium-treated groups significantly reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) in the brain. MPD treatment significantly decreased the reduced glutathione (GSH) level and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and they were restored by supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids with aripiprazole and lithium. There is no remarkable difference in the effect of creatine kinase (CK) activity between MPD-induced manic model and the treatment groups. Therefore, our results demonstrate that oxidative stress imbalance and mild insignificant CK alterations induced by administration of MPD can be restored back to normal physiological levels through omega-3 fatty acids combined with lithium and aripiprazole that attributes to effective prevention against mania in adult male Swiss albino mice.

  16. Probing the interaction of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP with model membranes.

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    Fábio Dyszy

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP interacts with biological membranes and delivers polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs via a collisional mechanism. The binding of FAs in the protein and the interaction with membranes involve a motif called "portal region", formed by two small α-helices, A1 and A2, connected by a loop. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron spin resonance to probe the changes in the protein and in the membrane model induced by their interaction. Spin labeled B-FABP mutants and lipidic spin probes incorporated into a membrane model confirmed that B-FABP interacts with micelles through the portal region and led to structural changes in the protein as well in the micelles. These changes were greater in the presence of LPG when compared to the LPC models. ESR spectra of B-FABP labeled mutants showed the presence of two groups of residues that responded to the presence of micelles in opposite ways. In the presence of lysophospholipids, group I of residues, whose side chains point outwards from the contact region between the helices, had their mobility decreased in an environment of lower polarity when compared to the same residues in solution. The second group, composed by residues with side chains situated at the interface between the α-helices, experienced an increase in mobility in the presence of the model membranes. These modifications in the ESR spectra of B-FABP mutants are compatible with a less ordered structure of the portal region inner residues (group II that is likely to facilitate the delivery of FAs to target membranes. On the other hand, residues in group I and micelle components have their mobilities decreased probably as a result of the formation of a collisional complex. Our results bring new insights for the understanding of the gating and delivery mechanisms of FABPs.

  17. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M. [Department of Biochemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Salati, Lisa M., E-mail: lsalati@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  18. Comparison of Amino Acid Positron Emission Tomographic Radiotracers for Molecular Imaging of Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Juhász

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging technology that can detect and characterize tumors based on their molecular and biochemical properties, such as altered glucose, nucleoside, or amino acid metabolism. PET plays a significant role in the diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of various cancers, including brain tumors. In this article, we compare uptake mechanisms and the clinical performance of the amino acid PET radiotracers (L-[methyl-11C]methionine [MET], 18F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine [FET], 18F-fluoro-L- dihydroxy-phenylalanine [FDOPA], and 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan [AMT] most commonly used for brain tumor imaging. First, we discuss and compare the mechanisms of tumoral transport and accumulation, the basis of differential performance of these radioligands in clinical studies. Then we summarize studies that provided direct comparisons among these amino acid tracers and to clinically used 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose [FDG] PET imaging. We also discuss how tracer kinetic analysis can enhance the clinical information obtained from amino acid PET images. We discuss both similarities and differences in potential clinical value for each radioligand. This comparative review can guide which radiotracer to favor in future clinical trials aimed at defining the role of these molecular imaging modalities in the clinical management of brain tumor patients.

  19. A mathematical approach for assessing the transport of large neutral amino acids across the blood-brain barrier in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Rasmus Holmboe; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is thought to contribute to brain dysfunction in a number of clinical conditions, including phenylketonuria, acute liver failure, and sepsis. Here, we present a novel approach for estimating BBB permeability and the LNAA concentrations in brain extracellular fluid, by demonstrating that they can be mathematically derived on the basis of kinetic constants of the BBB available from the literature, if cerebral blood flow and the arterial and jugular venous LNAA concentrations are known. While it is well known that the permeability surface area product of the BBB to a LNAA from blood to brain (PS1) can be calculated from the arterial LNAA concentrations and kinetic constants of the BBB, we demonstrate that the permeability surface area product from brain to blood (PS2) can be calculated by deriving the substrate activity of the saturable transporter from the kinetic constants and arterial and jugular venous LNAA concentrations, and that the concentration of the LNAA in brain extracellular fluid can then be determined. This approach is methodically simple, and may be useful for assessing the transcerebral exchange kinetics of LNAAs in future human-experimental and clinical studies.

  20. Brain Control of Plasma Cholesterol Involves Polysialic Acid Molecules in the Hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Brenachot

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The polysialic acid (PSA is a large glycan that is added to cell-surface proteins during their post-translational maturation. In the brain, PSA modulates distances between cells and controls the plasticity of the nervous system. In the hypothalamus, PSA is involved in many aspects of energy balance including food intake, osmoregulation, circadian rhythm, and sleep. In this work, we investigated the role of hypothalamic PSA in the regulation of plasma cholesterol levels and distribution. We report that HFD consumption in mice rapidly increased plasma cholesterol, including VLDL, LDL, and HDL-cholesterol. Although plasma VLDL-cholesterol was normalized within the first week, LDL and HDL were still elevated after 2 weeks upon HFD. Importantly, we found that hypothalamic PSA removal aggravated LDL elevation and reduced HDL levels upon HFD. These results indicate that hypothalamic PSA controls plasma lipoprotein profile by circumventing the rise of LDL-to-HDL cholesterol ratio in plasma during overfeeding. Although mechanisms by which hypothalamic PSA controls plasma cholesterol homeostasis remains to be elucidated, these findings also suggest that low level of hypothalamic PSA might be a risk factor for dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Brain-specific modulation of kynurenic acid synthesis in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, J B; Hodgkins, P S; Rassoulpour, A

    1997-01-01

    consequential in the immature than in the adult brain and was entirely ineffective in the lesioned striatum and in the periphery. These results further link cellular, especially astrocytic, energy metabolism to kynurenate formation in the brain. More generally, the existence of brain-specific mechanisms...

  2. Ethanol drinking, brain mitochondrial DNA, polyunsaturated fatty acids and effects of dietary anthocyanins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Demeilliers

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: These data demonstrate that moderate ethanol drinking reduces certain brain n-6 and results in mtDNA injury. The antioxidant anthocyanins protect brain mtDNA but do not restore normal n-6 levels. Further studies are required to investigate the consequences of a decrease in n-6 levels in brain.

  3. Whole body synthesis rates of DHA from α-linolenic acid are greater than brain DHA accretion and uptake rates in adult rats[S

    OpenAIRE

    Domenichiello, Anthony F.; Chen, Chuck T; Trepanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P. Mark; Richard P. Bazinet

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is important for brain function, however, the exact amount required for the brain is not agreed upon. While it is believed that the synthesis rate of DHA from α-linolenic acid (ALA) is low, how this synthesis rate compares with the amount of DHA required to maintain brain DHA levels is unknown. The objective of this work was to assess whether DHA synthesis from ALA is sufficient for the brain. To test this, rats consumed a diet low in n-3 PUFAs, or a diet containing...

  4. Preferential incorporation of sn-2 lysoPC DHA over unesterified DHA in the young rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, F; Pillon, C; Moliere, P; Lagarde, M; Lecerf, J

    1994-11-01

    The uptake and metabolism of [3H]docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) esterified at the sn-2 position of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC DHA) and in the unesterified form, both bound to albumin, was studied in 20-day-old rats. LysoPC DHA was preferentially recovered in the brain (4-5% of the injected radioactivity) over the unesterified form of DHA (0.3-0.4%). Conversely, the lysoPC form was taken up less than or at the same extent as the unesterified form by the liver, heart, and kidney. In the brain, DHA was mainly recovered in phosphatidylethanolamine whether the esterified or the unesterified form was used, although DHA from lysoPC was esterified at the same extent in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine after 2.5 min. The uptake of labeled palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and arachidonic acids, esterified or not in lysophosphatidylcholine, was also studied in brain, liver, heart, and kidney. Only the brain preferentially incorporated unsaturated (but not saturated) lysoPC, with the uptake increasing with the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid moiety. These results strongly suggest that the young rat brain specifically utilizes albumin-lysoPC-containing polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  5. Prenatal alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis in rat brain cerebral cortex: protective effect of folic acid and betaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogut, Ibrahim; Uysal, Onur; Oglakci, Aysegul; Yucel, Ferruh; Kartkaya, Kazim; Kanbak, Gungor

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol consumption in pregnancy may cause fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) in the infant. This study aims to investigate prenatal alcohol exposure related neuroapoptosis on the cerebral cortex tissues of newborn rats and possible neuroprotective effects of betaine, folic acid, and combined therapy. Pregnant rats were divided into five experimental groups: control, ethanol, ethanol + betaine, ethanol + folic acid, and ethanol + betaine + folic acid combined therapy groups. We measured cytochrome c release, caspase-3, calpain and cathepsin B and L. enzyme activities. In order to observe apoptotic cells in the early stages, TUNEL method was chosen together with histologic methods such as assessing the diameters of the apoptotic cells, their distribution in unit volume and volume proportion of cortical intact neuron nuclei. Calpain, caspase-3 activities, and cytochrome c levels were significantly increased in alcohol group while cathepsin B and L. activities were also found to be elevated albeit not statistically significant. These increases were significantly reversed by folic acid and betaine + folic acid treatments. While ethanol increased the number of apoptotic cells, this increase was prevented in ethanol + betaine and ethanol + betaine + folic acid groups. Morphometric examination showed that the mean diameter of apoptotic cells was increased with ethanol administration while this increase was reduced by betaine and betaine + folic acid treatments. We observed that ethanol is capable of triggering apoptotic cell death in the newborn rat brains. Furthermore, folic acid, betaine, and combined therapy of these supplements may reduce neuroapoptosis related to prenatal alcohol consumption, and might be effective on preventing fetal alcohol syndrome in infants.

  6. Increased brain uptake of targeted nanoparticles by adding an acid-cleavable linkage between transferrin and the nanoparticle core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew J; Davis, Mark E

    2015-10-06

    Most therapeutic agents are excluded from entering the central nervous system by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Receptor mediated transcytosis (RMT) is a common mechanism used by proteins, including transferrin (Tf), to traverse the BBB. Here, we prepared Tf-containing, 80-nm gold nanoparticles with an acid-cleavable linkage between the Tf and the nanoparticle core to facilitate nanoparticle RMT across the BBB. These nanoparticles are designed to bind to Tf receptors (TfRs) with high avidity on the blood side of the BBB, but separate from their multidentate Tf-TfR interactions upon acidification during the transcytosis process to allow release of the nanoparticle into the brain. These targeted nanoparticles show increased ability to cross an in vitro model of the BBB and, most important, enter the brain parenchyma of mice in greater amounts in vivo after systemic administration compared with similar high-avidity nanoparticles containing noncleavable Tf. In addition, we investigated this design with nanoparticles containing high-affinity antibodies (Abs) to TfR. With the Abs, the addition of the acid-cleavable linkage provided no improvement to in vivo brain uptake for Ab-containing nanoparticles, and overall brain uptake was decreased for all Ab-containing nanoparticles compared with Tf-containing ones. These results are consistent with recent reports of high-affinity anti-TfR Abs trafficking to the lysosome within BBB endothelium. In contrast, high-avidity, Tf-containing nanoparticles with the acid-cleavable linkage avoid major endothelium retention by shedding surface Tf during their transcytosis.

  7. Does Short-Term Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Influence Brain Hippocampus Gene Expression of Zinc Transporter-3?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Farhana Ahmad Sopian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary omega-3 fatty acids have been recognized to improve brain cognitive function. Deficiency leads to dysfunctional zinc metabolism associated with learning and memory impairment. The objective of this study is to explore the effect of short-term dietary omega-3 fatty acids on hippocampus gene expression at the molecular level in relation to spatial recognition memory in mice. A total of 24 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups and fed a standard pellet as a control group (CTL, n = 6, standard pellet added with 10% (w/w fish oil (FO, n = 6, 10% (w/w soybean oil (SO, n = 6 and 10% (w/w butter (BT, n = 6. After 3 weeks on the treatment diets, spatial-recognition memory was tested on a Y-maze. The hippocampus gene expression was determined using a real-time PCR. The results showed that 3 weeks of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improved cognitive performance along with the up-regulation of α-synuclein, calmodulin and transthyretin genes expression. In addition, dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency increased the level of ZnT3 gene and subsequently reduced cognitive performance in mice. These results indicate that the increased the ZnT3 levels caused by the deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids produced an abnormal zinc metabolism that in turn impaired the brain cognitive performance in mice.

  8. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates hippocampal synaptic transmission by increasing N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Eric S; Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been found to regulate synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings from cultured hippocampal neurons revealed a mechanism responsible for enhanced synaptic strength. Specifically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor augmented glutamate-evoked, but not acetylcholine-evoked, currents 3-fold and increased N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor open probability. Activation of trkB NT receptors was critical, as glutamate curr...

  10. Harmful effect of kainic acid on brain ischemic damage is not related to duration of status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Hasson, Henry; Malhotra, Samit; Giorgi, Filippo S.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Moshé, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    Status epilepticus is common in infants and may have long-term consequences on the brain persisting into adulthood. Vascular ischemia is a common cause of stroke in adulthood. The extent of stroke in 15-day-old rats is larger when previously exposed to kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. In this paper, we assess whether shortening the duration of seizures modifies subsequent susceptibility to middle cerebral artery occlusion. We administered pentobarbital 50 mg/kg to abort seizures after ...

  11. Epileptic Activity Increases Cerebral Amino Acid Transport Assessed by 18F-Fluoroethyl-l-Tyrosine Amino Acid PET: A Potential Brain Tumor Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Markus; Ebner, Yvonne; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Willuweit, Antje; McCoy, Mark; Egger, Barbara; Schröder, Michael; Wendl, Christina; Hellwig, Dirk; Grosse, Jirka; Menhart, Karin; Proescholdt, Martin; Fritsch, Brita; Urbach, Horst; Stockhammer, Guenther; Roelcke, Ulrich; Galldiks, Norbert; Meyer, Philipp T; Langen, Karl-Josef; Hau, Peter; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-01-01

    O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET is a well-established method increasingly used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and monitoring in gliomas. Epileptic activity, frequently occurring in glioma patients, can influence MRI findings. Whether seizures also affect (18)F-FET PET imaging is currently unknown. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to investigate the brain amino acid metabolism during epileptic seizures by (18)F-FET PET and to elucidate the pathophysiologic background. Ten patients with 11 episodes of serial seizures or status epilepticus, who underwent MRI and (18)F-FET PET, were studied. The main diagnosis was glioma World Health Organization grade II-IV (n = 8); 2 patients suffered from nonneoplastic diseases. Immunohistochemical assessment of LAT1/LAT2/CD98 amino acid transporters was performed in seizure-affected cortex (n = 2) and compared with glioma tissues (n = 3). All patients exhibited increased seizure-associated strict gyral (18)F-FET uptake, which was reversible in follow-up studies or negative shortly before and without any histologic or clinical signs of tumor recurrence. (18)F-FET uptake corresponded to structural MRI changes, compatible with cortical vasogenic and cytotoxic edema, partial contrast enhancement, and hyperperfusion. Patients with prolonged postictal symptoms lasting up to 8 wk displayed intensive and widespread (≥ 1 lobe) cortical (18)F-FET uptake. LAT1/LAT2/CD98 was strongly expressed in neurons and endothelium of seizure-affected brains and less in reactive astrocytosis. Seizure activity, in particular status epilepticus, increases cerebral amino acid transport with a strict gyral (18)F-FET uptake pattern. Such periictal pseudoprogression represents a potential pitfall of (18)F-FET PET and may mimic brain tumor. Our data also indicate a seizure-induced upregulation of neuronal, endothelial, and less astroglial LAT1/LAT2/CD98 amino acid transporter expression. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear

  12. Quantitative LC–MS/MS analysis of arachidonoyl amino acids in mouse brain with treatment of FAAH inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bingnan; Wright, Rachel; Kirchhoff, Aaron M.; Chester, Julia A.; Cooper, Bruce R.; Davisson, Vincent Jo; Barker, Eric

    2012-01-01

    An additional class of endogenous lipid amides, N-arachidonoyl amino acids (Ara-AAs), is growing in significance in the field of endocannabinoids. The development, validation, and application of a sensitive and selective method to simultaneously monitor and quantify the level of Ara-AAs along with anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) in mouse brain has been established. The linearity of the method over the concentration ranges of 0.2–120 pg/μl for the standards of N-arachidonoyl amino acids, N-arachidonoyl alanine (NAAla), serine (NASer), γ-aminobutyric acid (NAGABA), and glycine (NAGly); 0.7–90 pg/μl for AEA-d0/d8; and 7.5–950 pg/μl for 2-AG was determined with R2 values of 0.99. Also the effects of the FAAH inhibitor URB 597 on the endogenous levels of these analytes were investigated. AEA and NASer brain levels exhibit a dose-dependent increase after systemic administration of URB 597, whereas NAGly and NAGABA were significantly decreased after treatment. NAAla and 2-AG were not altered after URB 597 treatment. The potential benefit of establishing this assay extends beyond the quantification of the Ara-AAs along with AEA and 2-AG in mouse brain, to reveal a variety of pharmacological effects and physiological roles of these analytes. PMID:23044255

  13. Kainic acid-induced seizures and brain damage in the rat: role of calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Michael; Bruhn, Torben; Frandsen, Aa.

    1995-01-01

    Kainic acid, neorutoxicity, limbic seizures, calcium, protection, Dantrolene, Nimodipine, neuropathology......Kainic acid, neorutoxicity, limbic seizures, calcium, protection, Dantrolene, Nimodipine, neuropathology...

  14. AAV-mediated delivery of BDNF augments neurogenesis in the normal and quinolinic acid-lesioned adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rebecca A; Hughes, Stephanie M; Connor, Bronwen

    2007-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a major role in regulating the survival and fate of progenitor cells in the adult brain. In order to extend previous observations in the normal adult brain and advance our knowledge regarding the effect of BDNF on neurogenesis in the injured brain, this study directly compared the effect of BDNF on basal and injury-induced neurogenesis in relation to progenitor cell distribution and levels of neuronal differentiation and survival. BDNF was overexpressed in the subventricular zone (SVZ) via recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV(1/2)) delivery, and newly generated cells were identified using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling. Selective striatal cell loss was induced in a subgroup of rats by unilateral striatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA) 21 days after AAV(1/2) injection. In the normal brain, BDNF overexpression significantly increased BrdU-positive cell numbers in the rostral migratory stream, indicating enhanced progenitor cell migration. Following QA lesioning, we observed a reduction in BrdU immunoreactivity in the SVZ. Overexpression of BDNF restored BrdU-positive cell numbers in the QA-lesioned SVZ to that observed in the normal brain. Most significantly, BDNF enhanced the recruitment of progenitor cells to the QA-lesioned striatum and promoted neuronal differentiation in both the normal and QA-lesioned striatum. Our findings indicate that BDNF augments the recruitment, neuronal differentiation and survival of progenitor cells in both neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions of the normal or QA-lesioned brain. Enhanced expression of BDNF may therefore be a viable strategy for augmenting neurogenesis from endogenous progenitor cells.

  15. Expression of Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Aminotransferase and α-Keto-Acid Dehydrogenase in Rat Brain: Implications for Neurotransmitter Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, metabolism of the essential branched chain amino acids (BCAAs leucine, isoleucine and valine, is regulated in part by protein synthesis requirements. Excess BCAAs are catabolized or excreted. The first step in BCAA catabolism is catalyzed by the branched chain aminotransferase (BCAT isozymes, mitochondrial BCATm and cytosolic BCATc. A product of this reaction, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter -aminobutyric acid (GABA. The BCATs are thought to participate in an α-keto-acid nitrogen shuttle that provides nitrogen for synthesis of glutamate from -ketoglutarate. The branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC catalyzes the second and first irreversible step in BCAA metabolism, which is oxidative decarboxylation of the branched-chain α-keto acid (BCKA products of the BCAT reaction. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD results from genetic defects in BCKDC, which leads to accumulation of toxic levels of BCAAs and BCKAs that result in brain swelling. Immunolocalization of BCATm and BCKDC in rats revealed that BCATm is present in astrocytes in white matter and in neuropil, while BCKDC is expressed only in neurons. BCATm appears uniformly distributed in astrocyte cell bodies throughout the brain. The segregation of BCATm to astrocytes and BCKDC to neurons provides further support for the existence of a BCAA-dependent glial-neuronal nitrogen shuttle since the data show that BCKAs produced by glial BCATm must be exported to neurons. Additionally, the neuronal localization of BCKDC suggests that MSUD is a neuronal defect involving insufficient oxidation of BCKAs, with secondary effects extending beyond the neuron.

  16. Krebs cycle intermediates modulate thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in rat brain in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntel, Robson L; Nogueira, Cristina W; Rocha, João B T

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Krebs cycle intermediates on basal and quinolinic acid (QA)- or iron-induced TBARS production in brain membranes. Oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate and malate reduced significantly the basal and QA-induced TBARS production. The potency for basal TBARS inhibition was in the order (IC50 is given in parenthesis as mM) citrate (0.37) > oxaloacetate (1.33) = succinate (1.91) > > malate (12.74). alpha-Ketoglutarate caused an increase in TBARS production without modifying the QA-induced TBARS production. Cyanide (CN-) did not modify the basal or QA-induced TBARS production; however, CN- abolished the antioxidant effects of succinate. QA-induced TBARS production was enhanced by iron ions, and abolished by desferrioxamine (DFO). The intermediates used in this study, except for alpha-ketoglutarate, prevented iron-induced TBARS production. Oxaloacetate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate and malate, but no succinate and QA, exhibited significantly iron-chelating properties. Only alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced deoxyribose degradation, while succinate and malate showed a modest effect against Fe2+/H2O2-induced deoxyribose degradation. Using heat-treated preparations citrate, malate and oxaloacetate protected against basal or QA-induced TBARS production, whereas alpha-ketoglutarate induced TBARS production. Succinate did not offer protection against basal or QA-induced TBARS production. These results suggest that oxaloacetate, malate, succinate, and citrate are effective antioxidants against basal and iron or QA-induced TBARS production, while alpha-ketoglutarate stimulates TBARS production. The mechanism through which Krebs cycle intermediates offer protection against TBARS production is distinct depending on the intermediate used. Thus, under pathological conditions such as ischemia, where citrate concentrations vary it can assume an important role as a modulator of oxidative

  17. Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors and Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Are Selectively Overexpressed in Neuritic Plaque-Associated Glia in Alzheimer's Disease Brains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benito, Cristina; Nunez, Estefania; Tolon, Rosa M; Carrier, Erica J; Rabano, Alberto; Hillard, Cecilia J; Romero, Julian

    2003-01-01

    .... We have studied the status of some of the components of the endocannabinoid system, fatty acid amide hydrolase and cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, in postmortem brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease...

  18. Brain Activity of Thioctic Acid Enantiomers: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies in an Animal Model of Cerebrovascular Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Khosrow Tayebati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between the production of free radicals and antioxidant defense mechanisms, potentially leading to tissue damage. Oxidative stress has a key role in the development of cerebrovascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases. This phenomenon is mainly mediated by an enhanced superoxide production by the vascular endothelium with its consequent dysfunction. Thioctic, also known as alpha-lipoic acid (1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid, is a naturally occurring antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals in the fatty and watery regions of cells. Both the reduced and oxidized forms of the compound possess antioxidant ability. Thioctic acid has two optical isomers designated as (+- and (−-thioctic acid. Naturally occurring thioctic acid is the (+-thioctic acid form, but the synthetic compound largely used in the market for stability reasons is a mixture of (+- and (−-thioctic acid. The present study was designed to compare the antioxidant activity of the two enantiomers versus the racemic form of thioctic acid on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in a rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and free oxygen radical species (ROS production was assessed by flow cytometry. Antioxidant activity of the two enantiomers and the racemic form of thioctic acid was also evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR used as an in vivo model of increased oxidative stress. A 3-h exposure of PC12 cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 significantly decreased cell viability and increased levels of intracellular ROS production. Pre-treatment with racemic thioctic acid or (+-enantiomer significantly inhibited H2O2-induced decrease in cell viability from the concentration of 50 μmol/L and 20 μmol/L, respectively. Racemic thioctic acid and (+-salt decreased levels of intracellular ROS, which were unaffected by (−-thioctic acid. In the brain of

  19. Dopamine receptor alterations in female rats with diet-induced decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): interactions with reproductive status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul F.; Ozias, Marlies K.; Carlson, Susan E.; Reed, Gregory A.; Winter, Michelle K.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Levant, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Decreased tissue levels of n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are implicated in the etiologies of non-puerperal and postpartum depression. This study examined the effects of a diet-induced loss of brain DHA content and concurrent reproductive status on dopaminergic parameters in adult female Long–Evans rats. An α-linolenic acid-deficient diet and breeding protocols were used to produce virgin and parous female rats with cortical phospholipid DHA levels 20–22% lower than those fed a control diet containing adequate α-linolenic acid. Decreased brain DHA produced a significant main effect of decreased density of ventral striatal D2-like receptors. Virgin females with decreased DHA also exhibited higher density of D1-like receptors in the caudate nucleus than virgin females with normal DHA. These receptor alterations are similar to those found in several rodent models of depression, and are consistent with the proposed hypodopaminergic basis for anhedonia and motivational deficits in depression. PMID:20670471

  20. Gestational age dependent changes of the fetal brain, liver and adipose tissue fatty acid compositions in a population with high fish intakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Remko S.; Luxwolda, Martine F.; Offringa, Pieter J.; Boersma, E. Rudy; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: There are no data on the intrauterine fatty acid (FA) compositions of brain, liver and adipose tissue of infants born to women with high fish intakes. Subjects and methods: We analyzed the brain (n = 18), liver (n = 14) and adipose tissue (n = 11) FA compositions of 20 stillborn

  1. Providing male rats deficient in iron and n-3 fatty acids with iron and alpha-linolenic acid alone affects brain serotonin and cognition differently from combined provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2014-06-13

    We recently showed that a combined deficiency of iron (ID) and n-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAD) in rats disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than ID or n-3 FAD alone. Providing these double-deficient rats with either iron (Fe) or preformed docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) alone affected brain monoamine pathways differently from combined repletion and even exacerbated cognitive deficits associated with double-deficiency. Iron is a co-factor of the enzymes responsible for the conversion of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) to EPA and DHA, thus, the provision of ALA with Fe might be more effective in restoring brain EPA and DHA and improving cognition in double-deficient rats than ALA alone. In this study we examined whether providing double-deficient rats with ALA and Fe, alone or in combination, can correct deficits in monoamine metabolism and cognition associated with double-deficiency. Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats with concurrent ID and n-3 FAD were fed an Fe + ALA, Fe + n-3 FAD, ID + ALA, or ID + n-3 FAD diet for 5 weeks (postnatal day 56-91). Biochemical measures, and spatial working and reference memory (using the Morris water maze) were compared to age-matched controls. In the hippocampus, we found a significant Fe × ALA interaction on DHA: Compared to the group receiving ALA alone, DHA was significantly higher in the Fe + ALA group. In the brain, we found significant antagonistic Fe × ALA interactions on serotonin concentrations. Provision of ALA alone impaired working memory compared with age-matched controls, while in the reference memory task ALA provided with Fe significantly improved performance. These results indicate that providing either iron or ALA alone to double-deficient rats affects serotonin pathways and cognitive performance differently from combined provision. This may be partly explained by the enhancing effect of Fe on the conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA.

  2. Whole body synthesis rates of DHA from α-linolenic acid are greater than brain DHA accretion and uptake rates in adult rats[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenichiello, Anthony F.; Chen, Chuck T.; Trepanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P. Mark; Bazinet, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is important for brain function, however, the exact amount required for the brain is not agreed upon. While it is believed that the synthesis rate of DHA from α-linolenic acid (ALA) is low, how this synthesis rate compares with the amount of DHA required to maintain brain DHA levels is unknown. The objective of this work was to assess whether DHA synthesis from ALA is sufficient for the brain. To test this, rats consumed a diet low in n-3 PUFAs, or a diet containing ALA or DHA for 15 weeks. Over the 15 weeks, whole body and brain DHA accretion was measured, while at the end of the study, whole body DHA synthesis rates, brain gene expression, and DHA uptake rates were measured. Despite large differences in body DHA accretion, there was no difference in brain DHA accretion between rats fed ALA and DHA. In rats fed ALA, DHA synthesis and accretion was 100-fold higher than brain DHA accretion of rats fed DHA. Also, ALA-fed rats synthesized approximately 3-fold more DHA than the DHA uptake rate into the brain. This work indicates that DHA synthesis from ALA may be sufficient to supply the brain. PMID:24212299

  3. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) modulates the effect of serum albumin on brain development by restraining the neurotrophic effect of oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Alejandro G; Polo-Hernández, Erica; Tabernero, Arantxa; Medina, José M

    2015-10-22

    We have previously shown that serum albumin controls perinatal rat brain development through the regulation of oleic acid synthesis by astrocytes. In fact, oleic acid synthesized and released by astrocytes promoted neurite growth, neuron migration and the arrangement of prospective synapses. In this work we show that alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is also present in the brain during embryonic development, its concentrations peaking at E15.5 and at E19.5. However, after E19.5 AFP concentrations plummeted concurrently with a sharp increase in serum albumin concentrations. At E15.5, AFP is present in caudal regions of the brain, particularly in brain areas undergoing differentiation during this period, such as the thalamic reticular nucleus of the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the amygdala and the hippocampus. Albumin was not detected in the brain at E15.5 but stained brain cells substantially on day E19.5, showing a very similar distribution to that of AFP under the same circumstances. The concentrations of free oleic acid in the brain were inversely correlated with those of AFP, suggesting that the signals elicited by AFP and oleic acid can be inversely associated. GAP-43, a marker of axonal growth that is highly expressed by the presence of oleic acid, was not co-localized with AFP except in the marginal zone and areas delimiting the subplate. AFP prevented the increase in GAP-43 expression caused by the presence of oleic acid in neurons in primary culture in vitro and in organotypic cultures of embryonic rat brain ex vivo, suggesting that AFP may modulate the effect of serum albumin on brain development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Col1a1+ perivascular cells in the brain are a source of retinoic acid following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathleen K; MacPherson, Amber M; Grewal, Himmat; Strnad, Frank; Jones, Jace W; Yu, Jianshi; Pierzchalski, Keely; Kane, Maureen A; Herson, Paco S; Siegenthaler, Julie A

    2016-07-15

    Perivascular stromal cells (PSCs) are a recently identified cell type that comprises a small percentage of the platelet derived growth factor receptor-β+ cells within the CNS perivascular space. PSCs are activated following injury to the brain or spinal cord, expand in number and contribute to fibrotic scar formation within the injury site. Beyond fibrosis, their high density in the lesion core makes them a potential significant source of signals that act on neural cells adjacent to the lesion site. Our developmental analysis of PSCs, defined by expression of Collagen1a1 in the maturing brain, revealed that PSCs first appear postnatally and may originate from the meninges. PSCs express many of the same markers as meningeal fibroblasts, including expression of the retinoic acid (RA) synthesis proteins Raldh1 and Raldh2. Using a focal brain ischemia injury model to induce PSC activation and expansion, we show a substantial increase in Raldh1+/Raldh2+ PSCs and Raldh1+ activated macrophages in the lesion core. We find that RA levels are significantly elevated in the ischemic hemisphere and induce signaling in astrocytes and neurons in the peri-infarct region. This study highlights a dual role for activated, non-neural cells where PSCs deposit fibrotic ECM proteins and, along with macrophages, act as a potentially important source of RA, a potent signaling molecule that could influence recovery events in a neuroprotective fashion following brain injury.

  5. Differential activation of acid sphingomyelinase and ceramide release determines invasiveness of Neisseria meningitidis into brain endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Simonis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction with brain endothelial cells is central to the pathogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis infections. Here, we show that N. meningitidis causes transient activation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM followed by ceramide release in brain endothelial cells. In response to N. meningitidis infection, ASM and ceramide are displayed at the outer leaflet of the cell membrane and condense into large membrane platforms which also concentrate the ErbB2 receptor. The outer membrane protein Opc and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C that is activated upon binding of the pathogen to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, are required for N. meningitidis-mediated ASM activation. Pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ASM abrogated meningococcal internalization without affecting bacterial adherence. In accordance, the restricted invasiveness of a defined set of pathogenic isolates of the ST-11/ST-8 clonal complex into brain endothelial cells directly correlated with their restricted ability to induce ASM and ceramide release. In conclusion, ASM activation and ceramide release are essential for internalization of Opc-expressing meningococci into brain endothelial cells, and this segregates with invasiveness of N. meningitidis strains.

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid and phosphatidylserine improves the antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo and cognitive functions of the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaung, Hso-Chi; Chang, Chin-Dong; Chen, Pi-Hang; Chang, Chia-Jung; Liu, Shyh-Hwa; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Fish oil during early postnatal period may modulate the impact of oxidative stress in the developing brain and thus improve memory and cognitive behaviour. This study investigated the impacts of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3) and/or phosphatidylserine (PS) on antioxidant activities in vitro, and the beneficial effects of feeding with DHA and/or PS on antioxidant activities in brain and liver tissues and on the cognitive functions of the developing brain. Results indicated that DHA and/or PS significantly enhanced antioxidant activities and increased cell viabilities in vitro. Feeding with DHA and/or PS supplementation not only significantly improved escape latency of animals, but it also improved the oxidative parameters in the brain, enhanced glutathione peroxidase activity as well as reduced nitric mono-oxide levels in the liver. DHA and PS may serve to protect cells from oxidative stress and further improve learning and memory ability in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid- induced gastric ulcer in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakieh Keshavarzi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gut–brain axis (GBA is very important in creation and modulation of gastrointestinal problems. Aloe vera gel has gastroprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid gastric ulcer induction. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcer was induced by injection of 20% acetic acid into the subserosal layer in male rats. Rats were randomly assigned into three groups: intact group, gastric ulcer group and Aloe vera group (treatment with Aloe vera following gastric ulcer induction. The acid levels and brain and intestinal water content of each sample were measured eight days after the gastric ulcer induction. Results: Gastric acid levels were significantly decreased in Aloe vera group when compared with gastric ulcer group (p

  8. Major involvement of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) in uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid by human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yasuo; Ito, Katsuaki; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the expression of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) and its contribution to the supply of biotin and pantothenic acid to the human brain via the blood-brain barrier. DNA microarray and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that SLC5A6 is expressed in microvessels of human brain. The absolute expression levels of SLC5A6 protein in isolated human and monkey brain microvessels were 1.19 and 0.597 fmol/μg protein, respectively, as determined by a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. Using an antibody-free method established by Kubo et al. (2015), we found that SLC5A6 was preferentially localized at the luminal membrane of brain capillary endothelium. Knock-down analysis using SLC5A6 siRNA showed that SLC5A6 accounts for 88.7% and 98.6% of total [(3) H]biotin and [(3) H]pantothenic acid uptakes, respectively, by human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. SLC5A6-mediated transport in hCMEC/D3 was markedly inhibited not only by biotin and pantothenic acid, but also by prostaglandin E2, lipoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, indomethacin, ketoprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone, and flurbiprofen. This study is the first to confirm expression of SLC5A6 in human brain microvessels and to provide evidence that SLC5A6 is a major contributor to luminal uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid at the human blood-brain barrier. In humans, it was unclear (not concluded) about what transport system at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the brain uptakes of two vitamins, biotin and pantothenic acid, which are necessary for brain proper function. This study clarified for the first time that the solute carrier 5A6/Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter SLC5A6/SMVT is responsible for the supplies of biotin and pantothenic acid into brain across the BBB in humans. DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; NSAID, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; PGE2, prostaglandin E2. © 2015

  9. Evidence for the unique function of DHA during the evolution of the modern hominid brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The African savanna ecosystem of the large mammals and primates was associated with a dramatic decline in relative brain capacity. This reduction happened to be associated with a decline in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA from the food chain. DHA is required for brain structures and growth. The biochemistry implies that the expansion of the human brain required a plentiful source of preformed DHA. The richest source of DHA is the marine food chain while the savannah environment offers very little of it. Consequently H. sapiens could not have evolved on the savannahs. Recent fossil evidence indicates that the lacustrine and marine food chain was being extensively exploited at the time cerebral expansion took place and suggests the alternative that the transition from the archaic to modern humans took place at the land\\\\water interface. Contemporary data on tropical lake shore dwellers reaffirms the above view. Lacustrine habitats provide nutritional support for the vascular system, the development of which would have been a prerequisite for cerebral expansion. Both arachidonic acid (AA and DHA would have been freely available from such habitats providing the double stimulus of preformed acyl components for the developing blood vessels and brain. The w3 docosapentaenoic acid precursor (w3DPA was the major w3 metabolite in the savanna mammals. Despite this abundance, neither it or the corresponding w6DPA were used for the photoreceptor nor the synapse. A substantial difference between DHA and other fatty acids is required to explain this high specificity. Studies on fluidity and other mechanical features of cell membranes have not revealed a difference of such magnitude between even a-linolenic acid (LNA and DHA sufficient to explain the exclusive use of DHA. We suggest that the evolution of the large human brain depended on a rich source of DHA from the land\\\\water interface. We review a number of proposals for the possible influence of DHA on

  10. Relation of fatty acid composition in lead-exposed mallards to fat mobilization, lipid peroxidation and alkaline phosphatase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, R.; Beyer, W.N.; Spann, J.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    The increase of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in animal tissues has been proposed as a mechanism of lead (Pb) poisoning through lipid peroxidation or altered eicosanoids metabolism. We have studied fatty acid (FA) composition in liver and brain of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding for 3 weeks on diets containing combinations of low or high levels of vitamin E (20 or 200 UI/kg) and Pb (0 or 2 g/kg). Saturated FA, n-6 PUFA and total concentrations of FA were higher in livers of Pb-exposed mallards, but not in their brains. The percentage of n-6 PUFA in liver and brain was slightly higher in Pb-exposed mallards. The increase of n-6 PUFA in liver was associated with decreased triglycerides and increased cholesterol in plasma, thus could be in part attributed to feed refusal and fat mobilization. The hepatic ratios between adrenic acid (22:4 n-6) and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) or between adrenic acid and linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) were higher in Pb exposed birds, supporting the existing hypothesis of increased fatty acid elongation by Pb. Among the possible consequences of increased n-6 PUFA concentration in tissues, we found increased lipid peroxidation in liver without important histopathological changes, and decreased plasma alkaline phosphatase activity that may reflect altered bone metabolism in birds.

  11. The use of amino acid PET and conventional MRI for monitoring of brain tumor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Law, Ian; Pope, Whitney B

    2017-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring of brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced MRI. However, the capacity of conventional MRI to differentiate tumor tissue from posttherapeutic effects following neurosurgical resection, chemoradiation, alkylating chemotherapy, radiosurgery, and......),O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) and summarizes investigations regarding monitoring of brain tumor therapy....

  12. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size 95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. FADS2 Genetic Variance in Combination with Fatty Acid Intake Might Alter Composition of the Fatty Acids in Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzi, T.S.; van der Sluis, S.; Derom, C.; Thiery, E.; van Kesteren, R.E.; Jacobs, N.; van Gestel, S.; Vlietinck, R; Verhage, M.; Heutink, P.; Posthuma, D.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that fatty acids (FA) play an important role in cognitive function. However, little is known about the functional genetic pathways involved in cognition. The main goals of this study were to replicate previously reported interaction effects between breast feeding

  14. FADS2 Genetic Variance in Combination with Fatty Acid Intake Might Alter Composition of the Fatty Acids in Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.S. Rizzi (Thais); S. van der Sluis (Sophie); C. Derom (Catherine); E. Thiery (Evert); R.E. Kesteren (Ronald); N. Jacobs (Nele); S. van Gestel (Sofie); R. Vlietinck (Robert); M. Verhage (Matthijs); P. Heutink (Peter); D. Posthuma (Danielle)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMultiple lines of evidence suggest that fatty acids (FA) play an important role in cognitive function. However, little is known about the functional genetic pathways involved in cognition. The main goals of this study were to replicate previously reported interaction effects between

  15. Development of an optimized hyaluronic acid-based lipidic nanoemulsion co-encapsulating two polyphenols for nose to brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maha

    2016-05-01

    The development of mucoadhesive lipidic nanoemulsion based on hyaluronic acid, co-encapsulating two polyphenols (resveratrol and curcumin) for the transnasal treatment of neurodegenerative diseases was attempted in the current manuscript. Nanoemulsions were prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method, and were characterized for their particle size, zeta potential, mucoadhesive strength and morphology. The selected formula was tested for its antioxidant potential, in vitro and ex vivo release of the two polyphenols, safety on nasal mucosa and in vivo quantification of the two drugs in rat brains. Its stability was tested by monitoring the change in particle size, zeta potential, drugs' content and antioxidant potential upon storage for 3 months. The optimized hyaluronic acid based nanoemulsion formula displayed a particle size of 115.2 ± 0.15 and a zeta potential of -23.9 ± 1.7. The formula displayed a spherical morphology and significantly higher mucoadhesive strength compared to its non mucoadhesive counterpart. In addition, the nanoemulsion was able to preserve the antioxidant ability of the two polyphenols and protect them from degradation. Diffusion controlled release of the two drugs was achievable till 6 hours, with an ex vivo flux across sheep nasal mucosa of 2.86 and 2.09 µg/cm(2)hr for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively. Moreover, the mucoadhesive nanoemulsion was safe on nasal mucosa and managed to increase the amounts of the two polypehnols in the brain (about 7 and 9 folds increase in AUC0-7 h for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively). Hyaluronic acid based lipidic nanoemulsion proved itself as a successful carrier enhancing the solubility, stability and brain targetability of polyphenols.

  16. Epoxide metabolites of arachidonate and docosahexaenoate function conversely in acute kidney injury involved in GSK3β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bing-Qing; Luo, Ying; Kang, Xin; Li, Chang-Bin; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Huang, Jian; Hu, Da-Yong; Wu, Ming-Yu; Peng, Ai; Hammock, Bruce D; Liu, Jun-Yan

    2017-11-21

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) causes severe morbidity and mortality for which new therapeutic strategies are needed. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), arachidonic acid (ARA), and their metabolites have various effects in kidney injury, but their molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that 14 (15)-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid [14 (15)-EET] and 19 (20)-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid [19 (20)-EDP], the major epoxide metabolites of ARA and DHA, respectively, have contradictory effects on kidney injury in a murine model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-caused AKI. Specifically, 14 (15)-EET mitigated while 19 (20)-EDP exacerbated I/R kidney injury. Manipulation of the endogenous 19 (20)-EDP or 14 (15)-EET by alteration of their degradation or biosynthesis with selective inhibitors resulted in anticipated effects. These observations are supported by renal histological analysis, plasma levels of creatinine and urea nitrogen, and renal NGAL. The 14 (15)-EET significantly reversed the I/R-caused reduction in glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation in murine kidney, dose-dependently inhibited the hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-caused apoptosis of murine renal tubular epithelial cells (mRTECs), and reversed the H/R-caused reduction in GSK3β phosphorylation in mRTECs. In contrast, 19 (20)-EDP dose-dependently promoted H/R-caused apoptosis and worsened the reduction in GSK3β phosphorylation in mRTECs. In addition, 19 (20)-EDP was more metabolically stable than 14 (15)-EET in vivo and in vitro. Overall, these epoxide metabolites of ARA and DHA function conversely in I/R-AKI, possibly through their largely different metabolic stability and their opposite effects in modulation of H/R-caused RTEC apoptosis and GSK3β phosphorylation. This study provides AKI patients with promising therapeutic strategies and clinical cautions.

  17. Unconjugated bile acids in rat brain: Analytical method based on LC/ESI-MS/MS with chemical derivatization and estimation of their origin by comparison to serum levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Shui; Tomaru, Koki; Yamazaki, Wataru; Yoshizawa, Kazumi; Ogawa, Shoujiro; Nagao, Hidenori; Minato, Kouichi; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Mano, Nariyasu

    2017-09-01

    Although some studies have revealed the implication of bile acids (BAs) and neurological diseases, the levels and origin of the BAs in the brain are not fully understood. In this study, we first developed and validated a sensitive and specific method for the determination of three unconjugated BAs [cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA)] in the rat brain by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry combined with chemical derivatization. The measured brain concentrations (mean±standard deviation, n=10) of normal rats were 58.7±48.8, 14.2±11.7 and 13.2±8.7ng/g tissue for CA, CDCA and DCA, respectively. For their origin, we developed the hypothesis that they might be mostly derived from the periphery. To test this hypothesis, the brain BA levels were compared with the serum levels. The brain levels had high correlations with the serum levels, and were always lower than the serum levels for the three unconjugated BAs. Furthermore, the higher brain-to-serum concentration ratios were found for the BAs with higher logD values (higher lipophilicity). Moreover, the brains of the rats intraperitoneally administered with deuterium-labeled CA and CDCA were also analyzed; the deuterium-labeled BAs were detected in the brain of the rats administered with these compounds. Based on all the results, we concluded that the BAs found in the brain are mostly derived from the periphery and the major mechanism for the transportation of the unconjugated BAs to the brain is by passive diffusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acid Sphingomyelinase-Derived Ceramide Regulates ICAM-1 Function during T Cell Transmigration across Brain Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kroon, Jeffrey; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Geerts, Dirk; van Het Hof, Bert; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Buul, Jaap D; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the CNS characterized by immune cell infiltration across the brain vasculature into the brain, a process not yet fully understood. We previously demonstrated that the sphingolipid metabolism is altered in MS lesions. In particular, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a critical enzyme in the production of the bioactive lipid ceramide, is involved in the pathogenesis of MS; however, its role in the brain vasculature remains unknown. Transmigration of T lymphocytes is highly dependent on adhesion molecules in the vasculature such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this article, we hypothesize that ASM controls T cell migration by regulating ICAM-1 function. To study the role of endothelial ASM in transmigration, we generated brain endothelial cells lacking ASM activity using a lentiviral shRNA approach. Interestingly, although ICAM-1 expression was increased in cells lacking ASM activity, we measured a significant decrease in T lymphocyte adhesion and consequently transmigration both in static and under flow conditions. As an underlying mechanism, we revealed that upon lack of endothelial ASM activity, the phosphorylation of ezrin was perturbed as well as the interaction between filamin and ICAM-1 upon ICAM-1 clustering. Functionally this resulted in reduced microvilli formation and impaired transendothelial migration of T cells. In conclusion, in this article, we show that ASM coordinates ICAM-1 function in brain endothelial cells by regulating its interaction with filamin and phosphorylation of ezrin. The understanding of these underlying mechanisms of T lymphocyte transmigration is of great value to develop new strategies against MS lesion formation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amajad Iqbal Kazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P < 0.05. Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%, hippocampus (17%, and cerebellum (33%. Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  20. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Amajad Iqbal; Oommen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g) were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks) in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum) and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%), hippocampus (17%), and cerebellum (33%). Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  1. The contribution of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase in tissue macrophages to adipose tissue remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, H-J.; Kim, S-N; Kim, Y-A; Lee, Y-H

    2016-01-01

    Cellular plasticity in adipose tissue involves adipocyte death, its clearance, and de novo adipogenesis, enabling homeostatic turnover and adaptation to metabolic challenges; however, mechanisms regulating these serial events are not fully understood. The present study investigated the roles of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (Alox15) in the clearance of dying adipocytes by adipose tissue macrophages. First, upregulation of Alox15 expression and apoptotic adipocyte death in gonadal white adipose...

  2. Advantages of analyzing postmortem brain samples in routine forensic drug screening—case series of three non-natural deaths tested positive for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardal, Marie; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Thomsen, Ragnar

    2017-01-01

    Three case reports are presented, including autopsy findings and toxicological screening results, which were tested positive for the potent hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). LSD and its main metabolites were quantified in brain tissue and femoral blood, and furthermore hematoma...... levels. The cause of death in case 1 was collision-induced brain injury, while it was drowning in case 2 and 3 and thus not drug intoxication. However, the toxicological findings could help explain the decedent’s inability to cope with brain injury or drowning incidents. The presented findings could help...... establish reference concentrations in brain samples and assist in interpretation of results from forensic drug screening in brain tissue. This is to the author’s knowledge the first report of LSD, iso-LSD, and oxo-HO-LSD measured in brain tissue samples....

  3. Maternal fatty acids in pregnancy, FADS polymorphisms, and child intelligence quotient at 8 y of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Colin D; Lattka, Eva; Koletzko, Berthold; Golding, Jean; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2013-12-01

    Brain tissue is selectively enriched with highly unsaturated fatty acids (FAs). Altering the maternal FA status in pregnancy may improve fetal neural development with lasting consequences for child development. We explored whether maternal FAs in erythrocytes, either measured directly or indirectly by maternal FADS genetic variants, are associated with child intelligence quotient (IQ). Linear regression analyses, adjusted for 18 confounders, were used to investigate the associations in 2839 mother-child pairs from the population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort. Low levels of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) were associated with lower performance IQ (-2.0 points; 95% CI: -3.5, -0.6 points; P = 0.007, increased R² = 0.27%), high levels of osbond acid (22:5n-6) were associated with verbal IQ (-1.8 points; 95% CI: -3.2, -0.4 points; P = 0.014, R² = 0.20%), and high levels of adrenic acid (22:4n-6) were associated with verbal IQ (-1.7 points; 95% CI:-3.1, -0.3 points; P = 0.016, R² = 0.19%). There was some evidence to support a negative association of low docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) with full-scale IQ (R² = 0.15%). Novel weak associations were also observed for low levels of osbond acid (R² ≤ 0.29%) and FADS variants with opposite effects for intron variants and variants in the promoter region such as rs3834458 (R² ≤ 0.38%). These results support the positive role of maternal arachidonic acid and DHA on fetal neural development, although the effects on child IQ by 8 y of age were small (0.1 SD), with other factors contributing more substantially. The endogenous synthesis of these FAs by FADS genes, especially FADS2, may also be important. The replication of these results is recommended.

  4. Relative abundance of short chain and polyunsaturated fatty acids in propionic acid-induced autistic features in rat pups as potential markers in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Al-Ayadhi, Laila

    2014-08-31

    Fatty acids are essential dietary nutrients, and one of their important roles is providing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the growth and function of nervous tissue. Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are a group of compounds derived from the host microbiome that were recently linked to effects on the gut, the brain, and behavior. They are therefore linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. Reduced levels of PUFAs are associated with impairments in cognitive and behavioral performance, which are particularly important during brain development. Recent studies suggest that omega -3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are involved in neurogenesis, neurotransmission, and protection from oxidative stress. Omega-3 PUFAs mediate some of these effects by antagonizing Omega-6 PUFA (arachidonic acid, AA)-induced proinflammatory prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) formation. In this work, the absolute and relative concentrations of propionic (PPA), butyric and acetic acids, as well as PUFAs and their precursors (α-Linolenic and linoleic), were measured in the brain tissue of PPA-neurointoxicated rat pups (receiving 250 mg PPA/Kg body weight for 3 consecutive days) as a rodent model with persistent autistic features compared with healthy controls. The data revealed remarkably lower levels of omega6/omega3, α-Linolenic/Linoleic, α-Linolenic/EPA, α-Linolenic/DHA, EPA/DHA, and AA/Linoleic acid ratios in PPA-intoxicated rats. The role of these impaired ratios is discussed in relation to the activity of desaturases and elongases, which are the two enzymatic groups involved in the synthesis of PUFAs from their precursors. The relationship between the abnormal relative concentrations of the studied fatty acids and oxidative stress, neurotransmission, and neuroinflammation is also discussed in detail. This study demonstrates that fatty acid ratios are useful for understanding the mechanism of PPA neurotoxicity in a rodent model

  5. In vitro evidence for an antioxidant role of 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipnitz, Guilhian; Schumacher, Cristiana; Dalcin, Karina B; Scussiato, Karina; Solano, Alexandre; Funchal, Cláudia; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Latini, Alexandra; Wajner, Moacir

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HKyn), 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3HAA), kynurenine (Kyn) and anthranilic acid (AA) on various parameters of oxidative stress in rat cerebral cortex and in cultured C6 glioma cells. It was demonstrated that 3HKyn and 3HAA significantly reduced the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and chemiluminescence measurements in rat cerebral cortex, indicating that these metabolites prevent lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, GSH spontaneous oxidation was significantly prevented by 3HAA, but not by the other kynurenines in cerebral cortex. We also verified that 3HKyn and 3HAA significantly decreased the peroxyl radicals induced by the thermolysis of 2,2'-azo-bis-(2-amidinopropane)-derived peroxyl radicals, and to a higher degree than the classical peroxyl scavenger trolox. 2-Deoxy-d-ribose degradation was also significantly prevented by 3HKyn, implying that this metabolite was able to scavenge hydroxyl radicals. Furthermore, the total antioxidant reactivity of C6 glioma cells was significantly increased when these cells were exposed from 1 to 48h to 3HKyn, being the effect more prominent at shorter incubation times. TBA-RS values in C6 cells were significantly reduced by 3HKyn when exposed from 1 to 6h with this kynurenine. However, C6 cell morphology was not altered by 3HKyn. Finally, we tested whether 3HKyn could prevent the increased free radical production induced by glutaric acid (GA), the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I, by evaluating the isolated and combined effects of these compounds on TBA-RS levels and 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation in rat brain. GA provoked a significant increase of TBA-RS values and of DCFH oxidation, effects that were attenuated and fully prevented, respectively, by 3HKyn. The results strongly indicate that 3HKyn and 3HAA behave as antioxidants in cerebral cortex and C6 glioma cells from rats.

  6. Novel strategies of Raman imaging for brain tumor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Imiela; Bartosz, Polis; Lech, Polis; Halina, Abramczyk

    2017-10-17

    levels of the saturated fatty acids were significantly reduced in the high grade medulloblastoma samples compared with non-tumor brain samples and low grade astrocytoma. Differences were also noted in the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) content between medulloblastoma and non-tumor brain samples. The content of the oleic acid (OA) was significantly smaller in almost all brain high grade brain tumors than that observed in the control samples. It indicates that the fatty acid composition of human brain tumors differs from that found in non-tumor brain tissue. The iodine number N I for the normal brain tissue is 60. For comparison OA has 87, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 464, α-linolenic acid (ALA) 274. The high grade tumors have the iodine numbers between that for palmitic acid, stearic acid, arachidic acid (N I =0) and oleic acid (N I =87). Most low grade tumors have N I similar to that of OA. The iodine number for arachidonic acid (AA) (N I =334) is much higher than those observed for all studied samples.

  7. Effect of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain neurotrophins and cognition in rats: A multigeneration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Richa S; Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids are important nutrients required for neuronal functioning. We have demonstrated the beneficial effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain neurotrophins and cognition in the first and second generation offspring. However, there is a need to examine if the effects are sustained in the third generation offspring. This study reports the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation across three consecutive generations on brain neurotrophins like brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); nerve growth factor (NGF) and cognitive performance in the third generation male offspring. Three successive generations of Wistar rats were assigned the following groups throughout pregnancy, lactation and adulthood: i) Control, ii) vitamin B12 deficient (BD), iii) vitamin B12 deficient + omega-3 fatty acid (BDO), iv) vitamin B12 supplemented (BS) and v) vitamin B12 supplemented + omega-3 fatty acid (BSO). The BD group demonstrated lower (p Vitamin B12 supplementation showed comparable BDNF levels in the hippocampus while their levels were lower in the cortex as compared to the control (p vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid showed higher (p vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids in improving brain development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. Stearic acid based, systematically designed oral lipid nanoparticles for enhanced brain delivery of dimethyl fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Sharma, Gajanand; Kumar, Rajendra; Malik, Ruchi; Singh, Bhupinder; Katare, Om Prakash; Raza, Kaisar

    2017-12-01

    Dimethyl fumarate is a frequent prescription for the management of numerous neurological disorders. Despite immense promises, DMF is associated with various problems such as multiple dosing (2-3 oral doses daily) and lower brain permeability. Our aim was to enhance the oral bioavailability and increase the brain concentrations of dimethyl fumarate. Solid lipid nanoparticles were systematically formulated by optimizing the composition based on the desired attributes viz. particle size, entrapment efficiency and amount of drug released in 6 h. Results & conclusion: The developed system offered nanometric particle size with entrapment efficiency > 90%. Enhanced Caco-2 cells cellular uptake by optimized solid lipid nanoparticless with superior pharmacokinetic and higher brain biodistribution were observed.

  9. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Similar effect of sodium nitroprusside and acetylsalicylic acid on antioxidant system improvement in mouse liver but not in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Maria; Góralska, Joanna; Jurkowska, Halina; Sura, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relative antioxidant effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in mouse liver and brain. The activity of rhodanese, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) and γ-cystathionase (CSE), functioning as antioxidant proteins and capable of producing H2S, was investigated in mouse liver and brain after intraperitoneal once a day administration of sodium nitroprusside (5 mg/kg body weight) or acetylsalicylic acid (500 mg/kg body weight) continued for 5 days. The tissues were homogenized and then the obtained supernatants were used for further determinations. At the same time, the levels of sulfane sulfur, reduced and oxidized glutathione, cysteine, cystine, and cystathionine were also studied in these tissues. Both ASA and SNP show a statistically significant increase of sulfurtransferases activities in liver. The mechanism of action of sodium nitroprusside appears to consist in liberation of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule in the mammalian body. SNP also releases cyanide ions, which are converted in the liver to thiocyanate by the enzyme rhodanese and/or MPST and/or γ-cystathionase - the activities of all the enzymes were elevated in reaction to SNP. The action of γ-cystathionase is dependent upon converting cystathionine to cysteine, a precursor of the major cellular antioxidant, glutathione. Under oxidizing conditions, an increase in cystathionine β-synthase activity might indirectly result in an increase in the antioxidant glutathione level; this was reflected by the increased GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, but not in the brain, where a trace activity of γ-cystathionase is normally detected. The results of the present investigations show that ASA and SNP may stimulate the GSH-dependent antioxidant system and protect liver cells from oxidative stress. An increased activity of the H2S-producing enzymes and the increased GSH/GSSG ratio may lead to an elevated level of H2

  11. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gáspár Oláh,1 Judit Herédi,1 Ákos Menyhárt,1 Zsolt Czinege,2 Dávid Nagy,1 János Fuzik,1 Kitti Kocsis,1 Levente Knapp,1 Erika Krucsó,1 Levente Gellért,1 Zsolt Kis,1 Tamás Farkas,1 Ferenc Fülöp,3 Árpád Párdutz,4 János Tajti,4 László Vécsei,4 József Toldi1 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, 2Department of Software Engineering, 3Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and MTA-SZTE Research Group for Stereochemistry, 4Department of Neurology and MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Abstract: Cortical spreading depression (CSD involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid. We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease

  12. Centella asiatica and Its Fractions Reduces Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Quinolinic Acid and Sodium Nitroprusside in Rat Brain Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Naiani Ferreira; Stefanello, Sílvio Terra; Froeder, Amanda L F; Busanello, Alcindo; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Soares, Félix A A; Fachinetto, Roselei

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in several pathologies including neurological disorders. Centella asiatica is a popular medicinal plant which has long been used to treat neurological disturbances in Ayurvedic medicine. In the present study, we quantified of compounds by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and examined the phenolic content of infusion, ethyl acetate, n-butanolic and dichloromethane fractions. Furthermore, we analyzed the ability of the extracts from C. asiatica to scavenge the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) radical as well as total antioxidant activity through the reduction of molybdenum (VI) (Mo(6+)) to molybdenum (V) (Mo(5+)). Finally, we examined the antioxidant effect of extracts against oxidant agents, quinolinic acid (QA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), on homogenates of different brain regions (cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus). The HPLC analysis revealed that flavonoids, triterpene glycoside, tannins, phenolic acids were present in the extracts of C. asiatica and also the phenolic content assay demonstrated that ethyl acetate fraction is rich in these compounds. Besides, the ethyl acetate fraction presented the highest antioxidant effect by decreasing the lipid peroxidation in brain regions induced by QA. On the other hand, when the pro-oxidant agent was SNP, the potency of infusion, ethyl acetate and dichloromethane fractions was equivalent. Ethyl acetate fraction from C. asiatica also protected against thiol oxidation induced by SNP and QA. Thus, the therapeutic potential of C. asiatica in neurological diseases could be associated to its antioxidant activity.

  13. Effect of all-trans retinoic acid on the proliferation and differentiation of brain tumor stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Chao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid(ATRA on the proliferation and differentiation of brain tumor stem cells(BTSCs in vitro. Methods Limiting dilution and clonogenic assay were used to isolate and screen BTSCs from the fresh specimen of human brain glioblastoma. The obtained BTSCs, which were cultured in serum-free medium, were classified into four groups in accordance with the composition of the different treatments. The proliferation of the BTSCs was evaluated by MTT assay. The BTSCs were induced to differentiate in serum-containing medium, and classified into the ATRA group and control group. On the 10th day of induction, the expressions of CD133 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in the differentiated BTSCs were detected by immunofluorescence. The differentiated BTSCs were cultured in serum-free medium, the percentage and the time required for formation of brain tumor spheres (BTS were observed. Results BTSCs obtained by limiting dilution were all identified as CD133-positive by immunofluorescence. In serum-free medium, the proliferation of BTSCs in the ATRA group was observed significantly faster than that in the control group, but slower than that in the growth factor group and ATRA/growth factor group, and the size of the BTS in the ATRA group was smaller than that in the latter two groups(P P P P Conclusion ATRA can promote the proliferation and induce the differentiation of BTSCs, but the differentiation is incomplete, terminal differentiation cannot be achieved and BTSs can be formed again.

  14. Sweet grass protection against oxidative stress formation in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczaj, Wojciech; Jarocka-Karpowicz, Iwona; Bielawska, Katarzyna; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the influences of sweet grass on chronic ethanol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Chronic ethanol intoxication decreased activities and antioxidant levels resulting in enhanced lipid peroxidation. Administration of sweet grass solution to ethanol-intoxicated rats partially normalized the activity activities of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, as well as levels of reduced glutathione and vitamins C, E, and A. Sweet grass also protected unsaturated fatty acids (arachidonic and docosahexaenoic) from oxidations and decreased levels of lipid peroxidation products: 4-hydroxynonenal, isoprostanes, and neuroprostanes. The present in vivo study confirms previous in vitro data demonstrating the bioactivity of sweet grass and suggests a possible role for sweet grass in human health protection from deleterious consequences associated with oxidative stress formation.

  15. Expression of the retinoic acid catabolic enzyme CYP26B1 in the human brain to maintain signaling homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Patrick N; Fragoso, Yara D; Saeed, Reem Bu; Ashton, Anna; Goodman, Timothy; Simons, Claire; Gomaa, Mohamed S; Sementilli, Angelo; Sementilli, Leonardo; Ross, Alexander W; Morgan, Peter J; McCaffery, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent regulator of gene transcription via its activation of a set of nuclear receptors controlling transcriptional activation. Precise maintenance of where and when RA is generated is essential and achieved by local expression of synthetic and catabolic enzymes. The catabolic enzymes Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 have been studied in detail in the embryo, where they limit gradients of RA that form patterns of gene expression, crucial for morphogenesis. This paracrine role of RA has been assumed to occur in most tissues and that the RA synthetic enzymes release RA at a site distant from the catabolic enzymes. In contrast to the embryonic CNS, relatively little is known about RA metabolism in the adult brain. This study investigated the distribution of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 transcripts in the rat brain, identifying several novel regions of expression, including the cerebral cortex for both enzymes and striatum for Cyp26b1. In vivo use of a new and potent inhibitor of the Cyp26 enzymes, ser 2-7, demonstrated a function for endogenous Cyp26 in the brain and that hippocampal RA levels can be raised by ser 2-7, altering the effect of RA on differential patterning of cell proliferation in the hippocampal region of neurogenesis, the subgranular zone. The expression of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 was also investigated in the adult human brain and colocalization of CYP26A1 and the RA synthetic enzyme RALDH2 indicated a different, autocrine role for RA in human hippocampal neurons. Studies with the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line implied that the co-expression of RA synthetic and catabolic enzymes maintains retinoid homeostasis within neurons. This presents a novel view of RA in human neurons as part of an autocrine, intracellular signaling system.

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid esters. 1. Synthesis, brain uptake, and pharmacological studies of aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashoua, V.E.; Jacob, J.N.; Ridge, R.; Campbell, A.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    1984-05-01

    Labeled and unlabeled aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-amino(U-/sup 14/C)butyric acid (GABA) were synthesized and tested for their capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and for evidence of central neuropharmacological activity in rodents. The uptake of the labeled 9,12,15-octadecatrienyl (linolenyl), 3-cholesteryl, 1-butyl, and the 9-fluoro-11 beta,17-dihydroxy-16 alpha-methyl-3,20-dioxopregna -1,4-dien-21-yl (dexamethasone) esters of GABA into mouse brain increased 2-, 25-, 74-, and 81-fold over GABA, respectively. The cholesteryl ester of GABA depressed the general motor activity of mice and rats in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the 1-butyl, linolenyl, and dexamethasone esters were inactive by this test. Studies of the rates of hydrolysis, GABA receptor binding capacity, and octanol/water partition coefficients indicated that pharmacological activity of the esters after entry into the central nervous system (CNS) was dependent on their capacity to release GABA by enzymatic hydrolysis and their lipid solubility.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid esters. 1. Synthesis, brain uptake, and pharmacological studies of aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, V E; Jacob, J N; Ridge, R; Campbell, A; Baldessarini, R J

    1984-05-01

    Labeled and unlabeled aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-amino[U-14C]butyric acid (GABA) were synthesized and tested for their capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and for evidence of central neuropharmacological activity in rodents. The uptake of the labeled 9,12,15- octadecatrienyl ( linolenyl ), 3-cholesteryl, 1-butyl, and the 9-fluoro-11 beta,17-dihydroxy-16 alpha-methyl-3,20- dioxopregna -1,4-dien-21-yl (dexamethasone) esters of GABA into mouse brain increased 2-, 25-, 74-, and 81-fold over GABA, respectively. The cholesteryl ester of GABA depressed the general motor activity of mice and rats in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the 1-butyl, linolenyl , and dexamethasone esters were inactive by this test. Studies of the rates of hydrolysis, GABA receptor binding capacity, and octanol/water partition coefficients indicated that pharmacological activity of the esters after entry into the central nervous system (CNS) was dependent on their capacity to release GABA by enzymatic hydrolysis and their lipid solubility.

  18. Omega-6 fatty acid biomarkers and incident type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jason H.Y.; Marklund, Matti; Imamura, Fumiaki; Tintle, Nathan; Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Goede, de Janette; Zhou, Xia; Yang, Wei Sin; Oliveira Otto, de Marcia C.; Kröger, Janine; Qureshi, Waqas; Virtanen, Jyrki K.; Bassett, Julie K.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Lankinen, Maria; Murphy, Rachel A.; Rajaobelina, Kalina; Gobbo, Del Liana C.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nick; Kalsbeek, Anya; Veenstra, Jenna; Luo, Juhua; Hu, Frank B.; Lin, Hung Ju; Siscovick, David S.; Boeing, Heiner; Chen, Tzu An; Steffen, Brian; Steffen, Lyn M.; Hodge, Allison; Eriksdottir, Gudny; Smith, Albert V.; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Harris, Tamara B.; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Berr, Claudine; Helmer, Catherine; Samieri, Cecilia; Laakso, Markku; Tsai, Michael Y.; Giles, Graham G.; Nurmi, Tarja; Wagenknecht, Lynne; Schulze, Matthias B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Chien, Kuo Liong; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Sun, Qi; Harris, William S.; Lind, Lars; Ärnlöv, Johan; Riserus, Ulf; Micha, Renata; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Background: The metabolic effects of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) remain contentious, and little evidence is available regarding their potential role in primary prevention of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to assess the associations of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid biomarkers with

  19. Glutamate signalling and secretory phospholipase A2 modulate the release of arachidonic acid from neuronal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez De Turco, Elena B; Jackson, Fannie R; DeCoster, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    -activated cytosolic calcium-dependent PLA(2) (cPLA(2)) and by sPLA(2). Treatment of (3)H-AA-labeled cortical neurons with mildly toxic concentrations of sPLA(2) (25 ng/ml, 1.78 nM) for 45 min resulted in a two- to threefold higher loss of (3)H-AA from phosphatidylcholine (PC) than from phosphatidylethanolamine (PE...

  20. Relationships between Arachidonic Acid, Uterine Activity and Metabolic Regulation of Placental Lactogen Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    the same time as rapid lobulo - -23- alveolar development of the mammary gland. This development of lobulo - alveolar tissue, largely complete by...mammary gland growth in hypo- physecomized and bromocryptine, which inhibits prolactin secretion, pregnant goats. Development of lobulo -alveolar tissue...Kelly, P.A., H.A. Roberson and H.G. Friesan. 1974. Temporal pattern of placental lactogen and progesterone secretion in sheep. Nature 248: 435. Kim

  1. LysoPC and PAF Trigger Arachidonic Acid Release by Divergent Signaling Mechanisms in Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Oestvang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDLs play an important role during the development of atherosclerosis characterized by intimal inflammation and macrophage accumulation. A key component of LDL is lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC. LysoPC is a strong proinflammatory mediator, and its mechanism is uncertain, but it has been suggested to be mediated via the platelet activating factor (PAF receptor. Here, we report that PAF triggers a pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive intracellular signaling pathway leading to sequential activation of sPLA2, PLD, cPLA2, and AA release in human-derived monocytes. In contrast, lysoPC initiates two signaling pathways, one sequentially activating PLD and cPLA2, and a second parallel PTX-sensitive pathway activating cPLA2 with concomitant activation of sPLA2, all leading to AA release. In conclusion, lysoPC and PAF stimulate AA release by divergent pathways suggesting involvement of independent receptors. Elucidation of monocyte lysoPC-specific signaling mechanisms will aid in the development of novel strategies for atherosclerosis prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) enhances the therapeutic potential of neonatal neural stem cell transplantation post-Traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazale, Hussein; Ramadan, Naify; Mantash, Sara; Zibara, Kazem; El-Sitt, Sally; Darwish, Hala; Chamaa, Farah; Boustany, Rose Mary; Mondello, Stefania; Abou-Kheir, Wassim; Soueid, Jihane; Kobeissy, Firas

    2018-03-15

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide with 1.5 million people inflicted yearly. Several neurotherapeutic interventions have been proposed including drug administration as well as cellular therapy involving neural stem cells (NSCs). Among the proposed drugs is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, exhibiting neuroprotective properties. In this study, we utilized an innovative intervention of neonatal NSCs transplantation in combination with DHA injections in order to ameliorate brain damage and promote functional recovery in an experimental model of TBI. Thus, NSCs derived from the subventricular zone of neonatal pups were cultured into neurospheres and transplanted in the cortex of an experimentally controlled cortical impact mouse model of TBI. The effect of NSC transplantation was assessed alone and/or in combination with DHA administration. Motor deficits were evaluated using pole climbing and rotarod tests. Using immunohistochemistry, the effect of transplanted NSCs and DHA treatment was used to assess astrocytic (Glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP) and microglial (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1, IBA-1) activity. In addition, we quantified neuroblasts (doublecortin; DCX) and dopaminergic neurons (tyrosine hydroxylase; TH) expression levels. Combined NSC transplantation and DHA injections significantly attenuated TBI-induced motor function deficits (pole climbing test), promoted neurogenesis, coupled with an increase in glial reactivity at the cortical site of injury. In addition, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons was found to increase markedly in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra in the combination therapy group. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that DHA+NSCs treated animals showed decreased levels of 38kDa GFAP-BDP (breakdown product) and 145kDa αII-spectrin SBDP indicative of attenuated calpain/caspase activation. These data demonstrate that prior

  3. Different Resuscitation Strategies and Novel Pharmacologic Treatment with Valproic Acid in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-25

    in children receiving valproic acid. Journal of Child Neurology, 17, 41. Shang, Y., Jiang, Y. X., Ding, Z. J., Shen, A. L., Xu, S. P., Yuan, S. Y...future research opportunities using valproic acid and related drugs are discussed. J Neuro Res. 2018;96:711–719. wileyonlinelibrary.com/ journal /jnr VC...locomotor function in rat spinal cord injury based on epigenetic science. Iranian Biomedical Journal , 16, 90–100. Alam, H. B., Stegalkina, S., Rhee, P

  4. The antagonizing effect of aspartic acid on morphine withdrawal and levallorphan-precipitated abstinence syndrome signs and on associated changes in brain levels of free amino acids in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncuoğlu, H; Güngör, M; Eroğlu, L; Sağduyu, H

    1979-03-29

    We have previously demonstrated the antagonizing effect of aspartic acid on some effects of morphine and on the development of physical dependence on, and tolerance to, morphine. In the present study, we have withdrawal from morphine or administration of a morphine antagonist. For this purpose sixty five white rats were given morphine and aspartic acid separately and in combination in a 5% saccharose solution instead of drinking water for 30 days. Some of the dependent rats were then withdrawn and others were injected with levallorphan. Flying, jumping, wet-dog shaking, body weight loss and motor activity were estimated and free amino acid levels in the brain were determined. Aspartic acid was found to prevent or antagonize the behavioural signs and the changes in the free amino acid levels in the brain. The results are discussed in the light of the previous data.

  5. Synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm newborns fed formula with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnielli, Virgilio P.; Simonato, Manuela; Verlato, Giovanna; Luijendijk, Ingrid; De Curtis, Mario; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Cogo, Paola E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPs) that play pivotal roles in growth and neurodevelopment. Objective: We aimed to quantify the synthesis of LCPs in preterm infants fed infant formula containing LCPs. Design: Twenty-two

  6. The effects of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid- induced gastric ulcer in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Rezapour, Taha Mohammad; Vatanchian, Mehran; Zare Hesari, Mohammad; Nabizade Haghighi, Hadi; Izanlu, Mostafa; Sabaghian, Maryam; Shahveisi, Kaveh

    2014-03-01

    Gut-brain axis (GBA) is very important in creation and modulation of gastrointestinal problems. Aloe vera gel has gastroprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid gastric ulcer induction. Gastric ulcer was induced by injection of 20% acetic acid into the subserosal layer in male rats. Rats were randomly assigned into three groups: intact group, gastric ulcer group and Aloe vera group (treatment with Aloe vera following gastric ulcer induction). The acid levels and brain and intestinal water content of each sample were measured eight days after the gastric ulcer induction. Gastric acid levels were significantly decreased in Aloe vera group when compared with gastric ulcer group (pAloe vera groups with intact group. After Aloe vera administration, the amount of brain water content had no difference with intact and gastric ulcer groups (pAloe vera group was significantly reduced compared with intact group (pAloe vera group. The administration of Aloe vera has an inhibitory effect on the gastric acid output.

  7. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the brains of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubber, P; Hartounian, V; Gibson, G E; Blass, J P

    2011-03-01

    Images of brain metabolism and measurements of activities of components of the electron transport chain support earlier studies that suggest that brain glucose oxidation is inherently abnormal in a significant proportion of persons with schizophrenia. Therefore, we measured the activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic (TCA) cycle in dorsolateral-prefrontal-cortex from schizophrenia patients (N=13) and non-psychiatric disease controls (N=13): the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), citrate synthase (CS), aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), succinate thiokinase (STH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), fumarase and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). Activities of aconitase (18.4%, pTCA cycle, were lower, but SDH (18.3%, pTCA cycle and cognitive function, age or choline acetyl transferase activity, except for aconitase activity which decreased slightly with age (r=0.55, p=003). The increased activities of dehydrogenases in the second half of the TCA cycle may reflect a compensatory response to reduced activities of enzymes in the first half. Such alterations in the components of TCA cycle are adequate to alter the rate of brain metabolism. These results are consistent with the imaging studies of hypometabolism in schizophrenia. They suggest that deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes can be associated with mental disease that takes the form of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. Fatty acid-induced gut-brain signaling attenuates neural and behavioral effects of sad emotion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oudenhove, Lukas; McKie, Shane; Lassman, Daniel; Uddin, Bilal; Paine, Peter; Coen, Steven; Gregory, Lloyd; Tack, Jan; Aziz, Qasim

    2011-08-01

    Although a relationship between emotional state and feeding behavior is known to exist, the interactions between signaling initiated by stimuli in the gut and exteroceptively generated emotions remain incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the interaction between nutrient-induced gut-brain signaling and sad emotion induced by musical and visual cues at the behavioral and neural level in healthy nonobese subjects undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects received an intragastric infusion of fatty acid solution or saline during neutral or sad emotion induction and rated sensations of hunger, fullness, and mood. We found an interaction between fatty acid infusion and emotion induction both in the behavioral readouts (hunger, mood) and at the level of neural activity in multiple pre-hypothesized regions of interest. Specifically, the behavioral and neural responses to sad emotion induction were attenuated by fatty acid infusion. These findings increase our understanding of the interplay among emotions, hunger, food intake, and meal-induced sensations in health, which may have important implications for a wide range of disorders, including obesity, eating disorders, and depression.

  9. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rats disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone1-3

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M; Malan, Linda; Arnold, Myrtha; Yee, Benjamin K

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in combination, on brain monoamine pathways (by measuring monoamines and related gene expression) and spatial working and reference memory (by Morris water maze testing). Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats were fed...

  10. Dietary Oil Source and Selenium Supplementation Modulate Fads2 and Elovl5 Transcriptional Levels in Liver and Brain of Meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Brito, Francisca; Magnoni, Leonardo J; Fonseca, Sthelio Braga; Peixoto, Maria João; Castro, L Filipe C; Cunha, Isabel; de Almeida Ozório, Rodrigo Otávio; Magalhães, Fernando Antunes; Gonçalves, José Fernando Magalhães

    2016-06-01

    The meagre (Argyrosomus regius) is taking on increasing importance in the aquaculture industry. In view of the limited supply of fish oil (FO) as a feed ingredient, the study of the capacity to biosynthesize long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from alternative dietary oil sources is important. We analyzed changes in fatty acid (FA) desaturase 2 (fads2) and FA elongase 5 (elovl5) mRNA levels in livers and brains in response to FO replacement with a blend of vegetable oils (VO) and selenium (Se) supplementation. Fish were fed for 60 days with either a diet containing FO or a diet including VO, each supplemented or not with organic Se. Results showed that fads2 and elovl5 transcription was higher in liver when fish were fed VO diets. The brain mRNA levels of both genes were not affected by the dietary replacement of FO by VO. FA composition in the liver and skeletal muscle was altered by FO replacement, particularly by decreasing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents. The α-linolenic, linoleic, and arachidonic acid contents increased in both liver and brain of fish fed VO diets. The effect of Se supplementation on lipid metabolism was evident only in fish fed FO, showing a decrease in the transcription of hepatic fads2. Results indicate that the total replacement of FO by VO in diets modulates the expression of genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in meagre, affecting the FA profile of the fish flesh.

  11. Thiamine Induces Long-Term Changes in Amino Acid Profiles and Activities of 2-Oxoglutarate and 2-Oxoadipate Dehydrogenases in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepkova, P M; Artiukhov, A V; Boyko, A I; Aleshin, V A; Mkrtchyan, G V; Zvyagintseva, M A; Ryabov, S I; Ksenofontov, A L; Baratova, L A; Graf, A V; Bunik, V I

    2017-06-01

    Molecular mechanisms of long-term changes in brain metabolism after thiamine administration (single i.p. injection, 400 mg/kg) were investigated. Protocols for discrimination of the activities of the thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent 2-oxoglutarate and 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenases were developed to characterize specific regulation of the multienzyme complexes of the 2-oxoglutarate (OGDHC) and 2-oxoadipate (OADHC) dehydrogenases by thiamine. The thiamine-induced changes depended on the brain-region-specific expression of the ThDP-dependent dehydrogenases. In the cerebral cortex, the original levels of OGDHC and OADHC were relatively high and not increased by thiamine, whereas in the cerebellum thiamine upregulated the OGDHC and OADHC activities, whose original levels were relatively low. The effects of thiamine on each of the complexes were different and associated with metabolic rearrangements, which included (i) the brain-region-specific alterations of glutamine synthase and/or glutamate dehydrogenase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, (ii) the brain-region-specific changes of the amino acid profiles, and (iii) decreased levels of a number of amino acids in blood plasma. Along with the assays of enzymatic activities and average levels of amino acids in the blood and brain, the thiamine-induced metabolic rearrangements were assessed by analysis of correlations between the levels of amino acids. The set and parameters of the correlations were tissue-specific, and their responses to the thiamine treatment provided additional information on metabolic changes, compared to that gained from the average levels of amino acids. Taken together, the data suggest that thiamine decreases catabolism of amino acids by means of a complex and long-term regulation of metabolic flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which includes coupled changes in activities of the ThDP-dependent dehydrogenases of 2-oxoglutarate and 2-oxoadipate and adjacent enzymes.

  12. Ascorbic acid glucoside reduces neurotoxicity and glutathione depletion in mouse brain induced by nitrotriazole radiosensitazer

    OpenAIRE

    Nadezda V Cherdyntseva; Ivanova, Anna?A.; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Evgeny Cherdyntsev; Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan Nair; Kagiya, Tsutomu V.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the potential of the anti-oxidant ascorbic acid glucoside (AA-2G) to modulate neurotoxicity induced by high doses of nitrotriazole radiosensitizer. Materials and Methods: Male and female C56Bl/6xCBA hybrid mice aged 8-14 weeks (weight 18-24 g) were used. Nitrotriazole drug radiosensitizer sanazole at a high dose of 2, 1 g/kg was per os administered to induce neurotoxicity at mice. Ascorbic acid glucoside was given 30 min before the sanazole administration. Serum ascorb...

  13. Plasma Anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Autoantibody Levels during the Acute and Chronic Phases of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K. W.); Yang, Z. (Zhihui); J.K. Yue (John); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); E.A. Winkler (Ethan A.); A.M. Puccio (Ava); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); E.L. Yuh (Esther); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); Valadka, A.B. (Alex B.); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); D. Okonkwo (David); G. Manley (Geoffrey); S.R. Cooper (Shelly); K. Dams-O'connor (Kristen); A.J. Hricik (Allison); T. Inoue (Tomoo); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); D.M. Schnyer (David); T.K. Sinha (Tuhin); M.J. Vassar (Mary)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe described recently a subacute serum autoantibody response toward glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its breakdown products 5-10 days after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we expanded our anti-GFAP autoantibody (AutoAb[GFAP]) investigation to the multicenter

  14. Oiling the Brain: A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychopathology across the Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. C. Howe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Around one in four people suffer from mental illness at some stage in their lifetime. There is increasing awareness of the importance of nutrition, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA, for optimal brain development and function. Hence in recent decades, researchers have explored effects of n-3 PUFA on mental health problems over the lifespan, from developmental disorders in childhood, to depression, aggression, and schizophrenia in adulthood, and cognitive decline, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in late adulthood. This review provides an updated overview of the published and the registered clinical trials that investigate effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation on mental health and behavior, highlighting methodological differences and issues.

  15. Excitatory amino acid release and electrocortical brain activity after hypoxemia in near-term lambs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, S.H.G. van; Ruitenbeek, W.; Hopman, J.; Bor, M. van de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Energy failure due to insufficient cerebral O(2)-supply leads to excess accumulation of calcium ions in presynaptic neurons, followed by excess release of excitatory amino acids (EAAs), which are potent neurotoxins, into the synaptic cleft. AIM: The aim of the present study was to

  16. Age and haplotype variations within FADS1 interact and associate with alterations in fatty acid composition in human male cortical brain tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Freemantle

    Full Text Available Fatty acids (FA play an integral role in brain function and alterations have been implicated in a variety of complex neurological disorders. Several recent genomic studies have highlighted genetic variability in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS1/2/3 gene cluster as an important contributor to FA alterations in serum lipids as well as measures of FA desaturase index estimated by ratios of relevant FAs. The contribution to alterations of FAs within the brain by local synthesis is still a matter of debate. Thus, the impact of genetic variants in FADS genes on gene expression and brain FA levels is an important avenue to investigate.Analyses were performed on brain tissue from prefrontal cortex Brodmann area 47 (BA47 of 61 male subjects of French Canadian ancestry ranging in age from young adulthood to middle age (18-58 years old, with the exception of one teenager (15 years old. Haplotype tagging SNPs were selected using the publicly available HapMap genotyping dataset in conjunction with Haploview. DNA sequencing was performed by the Sanger method and gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. FAs in brain tissue were analysed by gas chromatography. Variants in the FADS1 gene region were sequenced and analyzed for their influence on both FADS gene expression and FAs in brain tissue.Our results suggest an association of the minor haplotype with alteration in estimated fatty acid desaturase activity. Analysis of the impact of DNA variants on expression and alternative transcripts of FADS1 and FADS2, however, showed no differences. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between haplotype and age on certain brain FA levels.This study suggests that genetic variability in the FADS genes cluster, previously shown to be implicated in alterations in peripheral FA levels, may also affect FA composition in brain tissue, but not likely by local synthesis.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction: a crucial event in okadaic acid (ICV) induced memory impairment and apoptotic cell death in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradeep K; Tota, Santoshkumar; Shukla, Rakesh; Ali, Shakir; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Nath, Chandishwar

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities have been identified in a large proportion of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently we have reported that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of okadaic acid (OKA) causes memory impairment in rat. However involvement of mitochondrial function in OKA induced memory impairment and neuronal damage has not been determined. OKA (200 ng) was administered by ICV route. After 13th day of OKA administration memory function was evaluated by Morris Water Maze test. Following completion of behavioral studies on 16th day, mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species were evaluated in mitochondrial preparation of cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum of rat brain. While ATP, mitochondrial activity, lipid peroxidation and nitrite were investigated in synaptosomal preparation of rat brain areas. The activities and mRNA expression of apoptotic factors, caspase-3 and caspase-9, were studied in rat brain regions. The neuronal damage was also confirmed by histopathological study. OKA treated rats showed memory impairment including increased Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and mitochondrial activity in mitochondrial preparation. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and nitrite in synaptosomal preparations. Preventive treatment daily for 13 days with antidementic drugs, donepezil (5 mg/kg, p.o) and memantine (10 mg/kg, p.o), significantly attenuated OKA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptotic cell death, memory impairment and histological changes. Mitochondrial dysfunction appeared as a key factor in OKA induced memory impairment and apoptotic cell death. This study indicates that clinically used antidementic drugs are effective against OKA induced adverse changes at behavioral, cellular, and histological levels and mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETES PARTIALLY ATTENUATES THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH-FAT DIET ON LIVER AND BRAIN FATTY ACID COMPOSITION IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Beth; Ozias, Marlies K.; Guilford, Brianne L.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    The current study addresses the effects of a high-fat diet on liver and brain fatty acid compositions and the interaction of that diet with diabetes in a type 1 mouse model. Adult, male, normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice were fed standard (14% kcals from fat) or high-fat (54% kcals from fat, hydrogenated vegetable shortening and corn oil) diets for 8 weeks. Liver and whole brain total phospholipid fatty acid compositions were then determined by TLC/GC. In the liver of non-diabetic mice, the high-fat diet increased the percentages of 18:1n-9, 20:4n-6, and 22:5n-6 and decreased 18:2n-6 and 22:6n-3. Diabetes increased 16:0 in liver, and decreased 18:1n-7 and 20:4n-6. The effects of the high-fat diet on liver phospholipids in diabetic mice were similar to those in non-diabetic mice, or were of smaller magnitude. In the brain, the high-fat diet increased 18:0 and 20:4n-6 of non-diabetic, but not diabetic mice. Brain 22:5n-6 acid was increased by the high-fat diet in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice, but this increase was smaller in diabetic mice. Diabetes alone did not alter the percentage of any individual fatty acid in brain. This indicates that the effects of a high-fat diet on liver and brain phospholipid fatty acid compositions are mitigated by concomitant hyperglycemia with hypoinsulinemia. PMID:23893338

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activation and prevent behavior deficits after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Chao, Honglu; Li, Zheng; Xu, Xiupeng; Liu, Yinlong; Bao, Zhongyuan; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoming; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Ji, Jing

    2017-04-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 FAs) attenuate inflammation and improve neurological outcome in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI), but the specific anti-inflammatory mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we found that NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokines were activated in human brains after TBI. Rats treated with ω-3 FAs had significantly less TBI-induced caspase-1 cleavage and IL-1β secretion than those with vehicle. G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) was observed to be involved in this anti-inflammation. GW1100, a GPR40 inhibitor, eliminated the anti-inflammatory effect of ω-3 FAs after TBI. β-Arrestin-2 (ARRB2), a downstream scaffold protein of GPR40, was activated to inhibit inflammation via directly binding with NLRP3 in the ω-3 FAs treatment group. Interestingly, we also observed that ω-3 FAs prevented NLRP3 mitochondrial localization, which was reversed by GW1100. Furthermore, ω-3 FAs markedly ameliorated neuronal death and behavioral deficits after TBI, while GW1100 significantly suppressed this effect. Collectively, these data indicate that the GPR40-mediated pathway is involved in the inhibitory effects of ω-3 FAs on TBI-induced inflammation and ARRB2 is activated to interact with NLRP3. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Laser Acupuncture Improves Behavioral Disorders and Brain Oxidative Stress Status in the Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongrum, Jurairat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic strategy against autism, a severe neurological development disorder, is one of the challenges of this decade. Recent findings show that oxidative stress plays a crucial role on the pathophysiology of autism, and laser acupuncture at Shenmen (HT7) can improve oxidative status in many neurological disorders. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 on behavior disorders and oxidative stress status in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus of the valproic acid rat model of autism. Laser acupuncture was performed once daily during postnatal day (PND) 14-PND 40. Behavioral tests including rotarod, open-field, learning and memory, and social behavior tests were performed during PND 14-PND 40. At the end of study, brain oxidative status including malondialdehyde levels and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were determined in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. Laser acupuncture at HT7 significantly improved autistic-like behaviors. Decreased malondialdehyde levels were observed in all areas mentioned above, however, increased glutathione peroxidase activity was observed only in the striatum and hippocampus. No changes in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were observed in any investigated area of the brain. Therefore, our study suggests that laser acupuncture at HT7 partly mitigates autistic-like symptoms via improved oxidative status. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and endocannabinoids in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Hércules Rezende; Isaac, Alinny Rosendo; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; Diaz, Bruno Lourenço; Trevenzoli, Isis Hara; De Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto

    2017-07-07

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are lipid derivatives of omega-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA, and eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA) or of omega-6 (arachidonic acid, ARA) synthesized from membrane phospholipids and used as a precursor for endocannabinoids (ECs). They mediate significant effects in the fine-tune adjustment of body homeostasis. Phyto- and synthetic cannabinoids also rule the daily life of billions worldwide, as they are involved in obesity, depression and drug addiction. Consequently, there is growing interest to reveal novel active compounds in this field. Cloning of cannabinoid receptors in the 90s and the identification of the endogenous mediators arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) and 2-arachidonyglycerol (2-AG), led to the characterization of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), together with their metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters. Today, the ECS is known to be involved in diverse functions such as appetite control, food intake, energy balance, neuroprotection, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, mood disorders, emesis, modulation of pain, inflammatory responses, as well as in cancer therapy. Western diet as well as restriction of micronutrients and fatty acids, such as DHA, could be related to altered production of pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. eicosanoids) and ECs, contributing to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, depression or impairing conditions, such as Alzheimer' s disease. Here we review how diets based in PUFAs might be linked to ECS and to the maintenance of central and peripheral metabolism, brain plasticity, memory and learning, blood flow, and genesis of neural cells.

  2. Arsenic intoxication-induced reduction of glutathione level and of the activity of related enzymes in rat brain regions: reversal by dl-{alpha}-lipoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shila, Samuel; Subathra, Marimuthu; Devi, Muthuswamy Anusuya; Panneerselvam, Chinnakkannu [University of Madras, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Chennai (India)

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of dl-{alpha}-lipoic acid (LA) on arsenic (As) induced alteration of glutathione (GSH) level and of the activity of glutathione-related enzymes - glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) - in rat brain regions (cortex, hypothalamus, striatum, cerebellum and hippocampus). Male Wistar rats of 150{+-}10 g weight were divided into four groups: control and three experimental groups supplemented with arsenic (sodium arsenite) alone (100 ppm mixed in drinking water), lipoic acid alone (70 mg kg{sup -1} body weight), arsenic plus lipoic acid (100 ppm arsenic in drinking water plus 70 mg lipoic acid kg{sup -1} body weight). The arsenic content of brain regions was found to increase with the administration of sodium arsenite. Arsenic exposure elicited a significant decline in glutathione content and in the activity of related enzymes, with the greatest decreases seen in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus, whereas there were no significant differences between control rats and the group treated with lipoic acid alone. Highly elevated content of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance malondialdehyde (MDA) in the brain regions of arsenic-exposed rats reflected extensive lipid peroxidation (LPO) processes. Simultaneous lipoic acid treatment was effective in reducing brain regional arsenic levels and lipid peroxidation and in increasing the glutathione content and the activity of its related enzymes. Lipoic acid, by acting as an alternative sulfhydryl nucleophile to glutathione, prevents its oxidation to glutathione disulfide in detoxifying reactions against reactive oxygen species and consequently increases the activity of glutathione-related enzymes. (orig.)

  3. Advantages of analyzing postmortem brain samples in routine forensic drug screening-Case series of three non-natural deaths tested positive for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardal, Marie; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Thomsen, Ragnar; Linnet, Kristian

    2017-09-01

    Three case reports are presented, including autopsy findings and toxicological screening results, which were tested positive for the potent hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). LSD and its main metabolites were quantified in brain tissue and femoral blood, and furthermore hematoma and urine when available. LSD, its main metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (oxo-HO-LSD), and iso-LSD were quantified in biological samples according to a previously published procedure involving liquid-liquid extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). LSD was measured in the brain tissue of all presented cases at a concentration level from 0.34-10.8μg/kg. The concentration level in the target organ was higher than in peripheral blood. Additional psychoactive compounds were quantified in blood and brain tissue, though all below toxic concentration levels. The cause of death in case 1 was collision-induced brain injury, while it was drowning in case 2 and 3 and thus not drug intoxication. However, the toxicological findings could help explain the decedent's inability to cope with brain injury or drowning incidents. The presented findings could help establish reference concentrations in brain samples and assist in interpretation of results from forensic drug screening in brain tissue. This is to the author's knowledge the first report of LSD, iso-LSD, and oxo-HO-LSD measured in brain tissue samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Growth Hormone–Releasing Hormone Effects on Brain γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Seth D.; Baker, Laura D.; Borson, Soo; Jensen, J. Eric; Barsness, Suzanne M.; Craft, Suzanne; Merriam, George R.; Otto, Randolph K.; Novotny, Edward J.; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Growth hormone–releasing hormone (GHRH) has been previously shown to have cognition-enhancing effects. The role of neurotransmitter changes, measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, may inform the mechanisms for this response. Objective To examine the neurochemical effects of GHRH in a subset of participants from the parent trial. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled substudy of a larger trial. Setting Clinical research unit at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Participants Thirty adults (17 with mild cognitive impairment [MCI]), ranging in age from 55 to 87 years, were enrolled and successfully completed the study. Interventions Participants self-administered daily subcutaneous injections of tesamorelin (Theratechnologies Inc), a stabilized analogue of human GHRH (1 mg/d), or placebo 30 minutes before bedtime for 20 weeks. At baseline and weeks 10 and 20, participants underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy protocols and cognitive testing and provided blood samples after fasting. Participants also underwent glucose tolerance tests before and after intervention. Main Outcomes and Measures Brain levels of glutamate, inhibitory transmitters γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), and myo-inositol (MI), an osmolyte linked to Alzheimer disease in humans, were measured in three 2×2×2-cm3 left-sided brain regions (dorsolateral frontal, posterior cingulate, and posterior parietal). Glutamate, GABA, and MI levels were expressed as ratios to creatine plus phospho-creatine, and NAAG was expressed as a ratio to N-acetylaspartate. Results After 20 weeks of GHRH administration, GABA levels were increased in all brain regions (P<.04), NAAG levels were increased (P=.03) in the dorsolateral frontal cortex, and MI levels were decreased in the posterior cingulate (P=.002). These effects were similar in adults with MCI and older adults with normal cognitive function. No changes in

  5. Evaluation of Marine Microalga Diacronema vlkianum Biomass Fatty Acid Assimilation in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina de Mello-Sampayo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diacronema vlkianum is a marine microalgae for which supposed health promoting effects have been claimed based on its phytochemical composition. The potential use of its biomass as health ingredient, including detox-shakes, and the lack of bioavailability studies were the main concerns. In order to evaluate the microalgae-biomass assimilation and its health-benefits, single-dose (CD1-mice studies were followed by 66-days repeated-dose study in Wistar rats with the highest tested single-dose of microalgae equivalent to 101 mg/kg eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid (EPA+DHA. Microalgae-supplementation modulated EPA and docosapentaenoic acid enrichment at arachidonic acid content expenditure in erythrocytes and liver, while increasing EPA content of heart and adipose tissues of rats. Those fatty acid (FA changes confirmed the D. vlkianum-biomass FA assimilation. The principal component analyses discriminated brain from other tissues, which formed two other groups (erythrocytes, liver, and heart separated from kidney and adipose tissues, pointing to a distinct signature of FA deposition for the brain and for the other organs. The improved serum lipid profile, omega-3 index and erythrocyte plasticity support the cardiovascular benefits of D. vlkianum. These results bolster the potential of D. vlkianum-biomass to become a “heart-healthy” food supplement providing a safe and renewable source of bioavailable omega-3 FA.

  6. Red blood cell polyunsaturated fatty acids measured in red blood cells and schizophrenia: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Wendela P.; Lijmer, Jeroen G.; Duran, Marinus; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; van Beveren, Nico J. M.; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2013-01-01

    Alterations of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in schizophrenia have been reported, but there is substantial variation in the findings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid (LA), and arachidonic acid (AA). We

  7. Folic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids improve cognitive function and prevent depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease--but how and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Low blood folate and raised homocysteine concentrations are associated with poor cognitive function. Folic acid supplementation improves cognitive function. Folic acid enhances the plasma concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) are of benefit in dementia and Alzheimer's disease by up-regulating gene expression concerned with neurogenesis, neurotransmission and connectivity, improving endothelial nitric oxide (eNO) generation, enhancing brain acetylcholine levels, and suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. EPA, DHA, and AA also form precursors to anti-inflammatory compounds such as lipoxins, resolvins, and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) that protect neurons from the cytotoxic action of various noxious stimuli. Furthermore, various neurotrophins and statins enhance the formation of NPD1 and thus, protect neurons from oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis Folic acid improves eNO generation, enhances plasma levels of EPA/DHA and thus, could augment the formation of NPD1. These results suggest that a combination of EPA, DHA, AA and folic acid could be of significant benefit in dementia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease and improve cognitive function.

  8. [The pathomechanism underlying ischemic brain edema: the role of Na+, K+-ATPase of the brain microvessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, T; Johshita, H; Gotoh, O; Usui, M; Koide, T; Shigeno, T; Takakura, K

    1985-11-01

    In the present study, the anti-edema effect of AVS [1,2-bis (nicotineamide)-propane] was evaluated using the cat MCA occlusion model with or without recirculation. In the prolonged ischemia (PI) group, cortical edema as assessed by the changes in specific gravity, developed in those cortical areas where the mean 1-CBF was less than 25-30 ml/100 g/min during MCA occlusion (4 hours). In the recirculation group (2 hours' ischemia followed by 2 hours' recirculation: RC group), the ischemic threshold for edema development was almost the same as in the PI group. In both groups, the drop in cortical specific gravity was significantly suppressed by AVS. Regarding the time-course of 1-CBF, there was no difference between the PI-AVS-treated and PI-saline-treated groups. In the RC group, however, the postischemic hypoperfusion was significantly ameliorated by AVS. Based on the present and previous data showing the antiedema effect of AVS, the mechanism of action of AVS was discussed in relation to the pathomechanism underlying ischemic brain edema. Our new concept of ischemic brain edema is briefly stated below. Related in vitro studies have shown the followings: (i) the influx of sodium not of proteins is the principal cause of ischemic brain edema: (ii) the eicosanoid synthetic capacity of the brain microvessel (MV) is increased simultaneous to edema development (iii) an elevation in the level of hydroperoxides enhances the activities of Na+, K+-ATPase as well as the arachidonate cascade of MV. These data suggest that free fatty acids and free radicals liberated following cerebral ischemia stimulate the activity of the MV-Na+, K+-ATPase, which results in increased sodium influx across the BBB. AVS was shown to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and to inhibit the stimulatory effects of a lipid hydroperoxide (15-HPAA) on the activities of Na+, K+-ATPase and the arachidonate cascade of the MV. These actions of AVS may be linked to its antiedema effect.

  9. Effects of different fatty acids composition of phosphatidylcholine on brain function of dementia mice induced by scopolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miao-Miao; Xue, Yong; Sun, Shu-Hong; Wen, Min; Li, Zhao-Jie; Xu, Jie; Wang, Jing-Feng; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu

    2016-08-24

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major source of dietary choline, has been demonstrated to improve the capability of learning and memory in rodent and the amelioration of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on anti-aging and anti-oxidation is widely known as well. In this study, three kinds of PC were chose to demonstrate the role of different fatty acids composition on glycerol backbone in improving the brain function of mice induced by scopolamine which was used to impair cholinergic system and cause oxidative stress. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: model (M) group, control (Con) group, egg yolk lecithin (EL) group, squid PC (SQ-PC) group and sea cucumber PC (SC-PC) group. The intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine hydrobromide (5 mg/kg) was carried out on the 8(th) of group feeding and sustained daily until the end of test. Morris water maze test was used to evaluate the improvement of cognitive decline and the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AchE), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in brain were measured to assess the physiological changes. In behavior test, the latency of PC groups was significantly reduced, while number of crossing the platform and time in target quadrant were increased in comparison with M group and the improvements of SQ-PC and SC-PC were better than that of EL (P < 0.05). Similar trend was observed in physiological changes. The AchE activity was effectively decreased and the SOD activity increased in hippocampus, cortex and white matter when comparing PC groups with M group. SQ-PC, SC-PC and EL respectively showed 22.82, 28.80 and 11.81 % decrease in MDA level in brain compared with M group. The MAO activity in white matter of SQ-PC, SC-PC and EL group separately depressed 33.05, 33.64 and 19.73 % in comparison with M group. No significance between SQ-PC and SC-PC was found in these indicators except the SOD activity in hippocampus and white

  10. Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic omega-3 fatty acid does not influence serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in diabetes mellitus patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Assies, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are observed in both depressed and diabetes patients. Animal research has shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase BDNF levels. In this exploratory randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study in diabetes patients ...

  11. Long-term valproic acid exposure increases the number of neocortical neurons in the developing rat brain. A possible new animal model of autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Bertelsen, Freja C B; Scheel-Krüger, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that long-term fetal valproic acid (VPA) exposure at doses relevant to the human clinic interferes with normal brain development. Pregnant rats were given intraperitoneal injections of VPA (20mg/kg or 100mg/kg) continuously during the last 9-12 days...

  12. Dietary long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent impaired social behaviour and normalize brain dopamine levels in food allergic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, Caroline G M; van den Elsen, Lieke W J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Milosevic, Vanja; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Broersen, Laus M; Korte, S Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2015-03-01

    Allergy is suggested to exacerbate impaired behaviour in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. We have previously shown that food allergy impaired social behaviour in mice. Dietary fatty acid composition may affect both the immune and nervous system. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) on food allergy-induced impaired social behaviour and associated deficits in prefrontal dopamine (DA) in mice. Mice were fed either control or n-3 LCPUFA-enriched diet before and during sensitization with whey. Social behaviour, acute allergic skin response and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Monoamine levels were measured in brain and intestine and fatty acid content in brain. N-3 LCPUFA prevented impaired social behaviour of allergic mice. Moreover, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporation into the brain and restored reduced levels of prefrontal DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and homovanillic acid in allergic mice. In addition to these brain effects, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation reduced the allergic skin response and restored decreased intestinal levels of serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in allergic mice. N-3 LCPUFA may have beneficial effects on food allergy-induced deficits in social behaviour, either indirectly by reducing the allergic response and restoring intestinal 5-HT signalling, or directly by DHA incorporation into neuronal membranes, affecting the DA system. Therefore, it is of interest to further investigate the relevance of food allergy-enhanced impairments in social behaviour in humans and the potential benefits of dietary n-3 LCPUFA supplementation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Boron-containing acids: preliminary evaluation of acute toxicity and access to the brain determined by Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Farfán-García, Eunice D; López-Cabrera, Yessica; Querejeta, Enrique; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G

    2014-01-01

    Boron-containing compounds (BCCs), particularly boron containing acids (BCAs), have become attractive moieties or molecules in drug development. It has been suggested that when functional groups with boron atoms are added to well-known drugs, the latter are conferred with greater potency and efficacy in relation to their target receptors. However, the use of BCAs in drug development is limited due to the lack of a toxicological profile. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of boric and boronic acids. Thus, a determination was made of the lethal dose (LD50) of test compounds in male CD1 mice, as well as the effective dose required to negatively affect spontaneous motor activity and to produce notable behavioral abnormalities. After treatment of animals at different doses, macroscopic observations were made from a necropsy, and Raman scattering spectroscopic studies were carried out on brain tissue samples. In general, the results show that most of the tested BCAs have very low toxicity, evidenced by the high doses required to induce notable toxic effects (greater than 100 mg/kg of body weight for all compounds, except for 3-thyenilboronic acid). Such toxic effects, presumably mediated by action on the CNS, include eye damage, gastrointestinal effects (e.g., gastric-gut dilatation and fecal retention), sedation, hypnosis and/or trembling. This preliminary toxicological profile suggests that BCAs can be considered potential therapeutic agents or moieties to be added to other compounds in the development of new drugs. Future studies are required to explore possible chronic toxicity of BCCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rates disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, J.; Smuts, C.M.; Malan, L.; Arnold, M.; Yee, B.K.; Bianco, L.E.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Muller, M.R.; Langhans, W.; Hurrell, R.F.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in

  15. Automated synthesis of {sup 11}C-acetoacetic acid, a key alternate brain fuel to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, Sebastien [Research Center on Aging, Sherbrooke University Geriatric Institute, 1036 Belvedere Street South, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 4C4 (Canada)]. E-mail: Sebastien.Tremblay@USherbrooke.ca; Ouellet, Rene [Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Centre, Etienne-LeBel Clinical Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Rodrigue, Serge [Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Centre, Etienne-LeBel Clinical Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Langlois, Rejean [Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Centre, Etienne-LeBel Clinical Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Benard, Francois [Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Centre, Etienne-LeBel Clinical Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Cunnane, Stephen C. [Research Center on Aging, Sherbrooke University Geriatric Institute, 1036 Belvedere Street South, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 4C4 (Canada); Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2007-08-15

    An automated, one-pot radio-synthesis module for the routine preparation of 1-[{sup 11}C]acetoacetic acid has been developed. The enolate anion of acetone was reacted with [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} in tetrahydrofuran (THF), followed by hydrolysis and purification by ion-exchange chromatography. The total synthesis time was 18 min and radiochemical yield was 34% after decay correction. HPLC analysis showed {<=}3% impurities while residual THF ({<=}200 ppm) and ethanol ({<=}500 ppm) were well under the tolerable limits for human studies.

  16. Autosomal dominant inheritance of brain cardiolipin fatty acid abnormality in VM/DK mice: association with hypoxic-induced cognitive insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Nathan L; Jia, Xibei; Kiebish, Michael; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a complex polyglycerol phospholipid found almost exclusively in the inner mitochondrial membrane and regulates numerous enzyme activities especially those related to oxidative phosphorylation and coupled respiration. Abnormalities in cardiolipin can impair mitochondrial function and bioenergetics. We recently demonstrated that the ratio of shorter chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1) to longer chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (C18:2; C20:4; C22:6) was significantly greater in the brains of adult VM/DK (VM) inbred mice than in the brains of C57BL/6 J (B6) mice. The cardiolipin fatty acid abnormalities in VM mice are also associated with alterations in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In this study we found that the abnormal brain fatty acid ratio in the VM strain was inherited as an autosomal dominant trait in reciprocal B6 × VM F1 hybrids. To evaluate the potential influence of brain cardiolipin fatty acid composition on cognitive sensitivity, we placed the parental B6 and VM mice and their reciprocal male and female B6VMF1 hybrid mice (3-month-old) in a hypoxic chamber (5 % O2). Cognitive awareness (conscientiousness) under hypoxia was significantly lower in the VM parental mice and F1 hybrid mice (11.4 ± 0.4  and 11.0 ± 0.4 min, respectively) than in the parental B6 mice (15.3 ± 1.4 min), indicating an autosomal dominant inheritance like that of the brain cardiolipin abnormalities. These findings suggest that impaired cognitive awareness under hypoxia is associated with abnormalities in neural lipid composition.

  17. Differential effect of maternal diet supplementation with α-Linolenic adcid or n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on glial cell phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine fatty acid profile in neonate rat brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Hernandez Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA are of crucial importance for the development of neural tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dietary supplementation in n-3 fatty acids in female rats during gestation and lactation on fatty acid pattern in brain glial cells phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylserine (PS in the neonates. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed during the whole gestation and lactation period with a diet containing either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.55% and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 0.75% of total fatty acids or α-linolenic acid (ALA, 2.90%. At two weeks of age, gastric content and brain glial cell PE and PS of rat neonates were analyzed for their fatty acid and dimethylacetal (DMA profile. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results In the neonates from the group fed with n-3 LC-PUFA, the DHA level in gastric content (+65%, P Conclusion The present study confirms that early supplementation of maternal diet with n-3 fatty acids supplied as LC-PUFA is more efficient in increasing n-3 in brain glial cell PE and PS in the neonate than ALA. Negative correlation between n-6 DPA, a conventional marker of DHA deficiency, and DMA in PE suggests n-6 DPA that potentially be considered as a marker of tissue ethanolamine plasmalogen status. The combination of multivariate and bivariate statistics allowed to underline that the accretion pattern of n-3 LC-PUFA in PE and PS differ.

  18. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids normalize BDNF levels, reduce oxidative damage, and counteract learning disability after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiguo; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2004-10-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., docosahexaenoic acid; DHA) regulate signal transduction and gene expression, and protect neurons from death. In this study we examined the capacity of dietary omega3 fatty acids supplementation to help the brain to cope with the effects of traumatic injury. Rats were fed a regular diet or an experimental diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids, for 4 weeks before a mild fluid percussion injury (FPI) was performed. FPI increased oxidative stress, and impaired learning ability in the Morris water maze. This type of lesion also reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin I, and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB). It is known that BDNF facilitates synaptic transmission and learning ability by modulating synapsin I and CREB. Supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet counteracted all of the studied effects of FPI, that is, normalized levels of BDNF and associated synapsin I and CREB, reduced oxidative damage, and counteracted learning disability. The reduction of oxidative stress indicates a benevolent effect of this diet on mechanisms that maintain neuronal function and plasticity. These results imply that omega-3 enriched dietary supplements can provide protection against reduced plasticity and impaired learning ability after traumatic brain injury.

  19. Neuroprotection by extract of Petasites japonicus leaves, a traditional vegetable, against oxidative stress in brain of mice challenged with kainic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, D-E; Oh, S H; Kim, Y-B; Kang, H-G; Kim, M R

    2006-03-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many neurologic disorders and brain dysfunctions. Kainic acid has been used as a model agent for the study of neurotoxicity of various excitatory amino acids, since it induces neuronal damage through excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Petasites japonicus MAX (butterbur), cultivated as culinary vegetables in Eastern Asia, contains various kinds of phenolic compounds as well as sesquiterpenes, such as petasin. In European countries, the extracts from roots of Petasites species have been used in the therapy of headache or asthma. The objective of our study is to examine the neuroprotective action of the Petasites japonicus MAX (butterbur) extract against oxidative damage in the brain of mice treated with kainic acid. Male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks of age, were administered orally the butanol fraction from methanol extract of Petasites japonicus (BMP) or its subfraction (BMP-I or BMP-II) for 5 consecutive days. Thirty min after the final administration, the animals were challenged s. c. with kainic acid (45 mg/kg), and neurobehavioral activities were monitored. In addition, biomarkers of oxidative stress and neuronal loss in the hippocampus for the biochemical, neurobehavioral,morphological evaluations were analyzed 2 days after the kainic acid challenge. During 5-day treatment with BMP or BMP-1, the body weight gain was not significantly different from that of vehicle- treated control animals. Administration of kainic acid alone induced severe epileptiform seizures, causing a lethality of approximately 50%, and injuries of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus of mice which survived the challenge. Kainic acid exposure also resulted in a remarkable decrease in total glutathione level and glutathione peroxidase activity, and an increase in the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) value in brain tissues. In comparison, coadministration with BMP (400 mg/kg) reduced the 54% lethality of

  20. Fe(3+)-functionalized carbon quantum dots: A facile preparation strategy and detection for ascorbic acid in rat brain microdialysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linbo; Wang, Chao; Luo, Jingxuan; Guo, Quanwei; Liu, Kangyu; Liu, Kun; Zhao, Wenji; Lin, Yuqing

    2015-11-01

    This study reports an Fe(3+)-functionalized carbon quantum dots (Fe(3+)-functionalized CQDs) for the highly sensitive and selective detection of ascorbic acid (AA) in rat brain microdialysates based on the specific redox reaction between iron(III) ions and AA. The carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were synthesized by one-step pyrolysis of a small organic molecules i.e. tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris). Fe(3+) can tightly chelate to the surface of CQDs by the hydroxyl group to form Fe(3+)-functionalized CQDs while the fluorescence of CQDs can be effectively quenched by Fe(3+) via Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The fluorescence of the Fe(3+)-functionalized CQDs can be sensitively turned on by AA to give an "on-off-on" fluorescence response through the oxidation-reduction between Fe(3+) and AA since the produced Fe(2+) has much lower chelating ability to CQDs and the fluorescence of CQDs can be restored. This Fe(3+)-functionalized CQDs based nanoprobe shows high selective and sensitive response in the concentration of AA ranging from 0.1 μM to 50 μM with the detection limit as lower as 9.1 nM, which is lower than other assays. Finally, the proposed fluorescent probe was successfully applied to direct analysis of AA in biological fluids, i.e. rat brain microdialysates, and may pave a new route to the design of effective carbon quantum dots-based fluorescence probes for other bioassay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatty acid amide hydrolase-dependent generation of antinociceptive drug metabolites acting on TRPV1 in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Barrière

    Full Text Available The discovery that paracetamol is metabolized to the potent TRPV1 activator N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (AM404 and that this metabolite contributes to paracetamol's antinociceptive