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Sample records for brain activity evoked

  1. Perceived causality influences brain activity evoked by biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, James P; Pelphrey, Kevin A; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated brain activity in an observer who watched the hand and arm motions of an individual when that individual was, or was not, the cause of the motion. Subjects viewed a realistic animated 3D character who sat at a table containing four pistons. On Intended Motion trials, the character raised his hand and arm upwards. On Unintended Motion trials, the piston under one of the character's hands pushed the hand and arm upward with the same motion. Finally, during Non-Biological Motion control trials, a piston pushed a coffee mug upward in the same smooth motion. Hand and arm motions, regardless of intention, evoked significantly more activity than control trials in a bilateral region that extended ventrally from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region and which was more spatially extensive in the right hemisphere. The left pSTS near the temporal-parietal junction, robustly differentiated between the Intended Motion and Unintended Motion conditions. Here, strong activity was observed for Intended Motion trials, while Unintended Motion trials evoked similar activity as the coffee mug trials. Our results demonstrate a strong hemispheric bias in the role of the pSTS in the perception of causality of biological motion. PMID:18633843

  2. Optimal stimulus scheduling for active estimation of evoked brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We consider the problem of optimal probing to learn connections in an evoked dynamic network. Such a network, in which each edge measures an input-output relationship between sites in sensor/actuator-space, is relevant to emerging applications in neural mapping and neural connectivity estimation. Approach. We show that the problem of scheduling nodes to a probe (i.e., stimulate) amounts to a problem of optimal sensor scheduling. Main results. By formulating the evoked network in state-space, we show that the solution to the greedy probing strategy has a convenient form and, under certain conditions, is optimal over a finite horizon. We adopt an expectation maximization technique to update the state-space parameters in an online fashion and demonstrate the efficacy of the overall approach in a series of detailed numerical examples. Significance. The proposed method provides a principled means to actively probe time-varying connections in neuronal networks. The overall method can be implemented in real time and is particularly well-suited to applications in stimulation-based cortical mapping in which the underlying network dynamics are changing over time.

  3. The relation of ongoing brain activity, evoked neural responses, and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Sadaghiani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing brain activity has been observed since the earliest neurophysiological recordings and is found over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. It is characterized by remarkably large spontaneous modulations. Here, we review evidence for the functional role of these ongoing activity fluctuations and argue that they constitute an essential property of the neural architecture underlying cognition. The role of spontaneous activity fluctuations is probably best understood when considering both their spatiotemporal structure and their functional impact on cognition. We first briefly argue against a ‘segregationist’ view on ongoing activity, both in time and space, countering this view with an emphasis on integration within a hierarchical spatiotemporal organization of intrinsic activity. We then highlight the flexibility and context-sensitivity of intrinsic functional connectivity that suggest its involvement in functionally relevant information processing. This role in information processing is pursued by reviewing how ongoing brain activity interacts with afferent and efferent information exchange of the brain with its environment. We focus on the relationship between the variability of ongoing and evoked brain activity, and review recent reports that tie ongoing brain activity fluctuations to variability in human perception and behavior. Finally, these observations are discussed within the framework of the free-energy principle which – applied to human brain function - provides a theoretical account for a non-random, coordinated interaction of ongoing and evoked activity in perception and behaviour.

  4. Changes in choice evoked brain activations after a weight loss intervention in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Fernanda; Verdejo-Roman, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Yücel, Murat; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate if treatment-related success in weight loss (i.e., reductions of BMI and fat percentage) is linked to significant changes in choice evoked brain activity in adolescents with excess weight. Sixteen adolescents with excess weight (age range: 12-18; BMI range: 22-36) performed the Risky-Gains Task during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) both before and after a 12-week weight loss intervention. Success in weight loss was selectively associated with increased activation in the anterior insula. We concluded that adolescents with the greatest increases in activation of the insula-related interoceptive neural circuitry also show greater reductions in BMI and fat mass. PMID:27058280

  5. Optical Topography of Evoked Brain Activity during Mental Tasks Involving Whole Number Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Students start to memorize arithmetic facts from early elementary school mathematics activities. Their fluency or lack of fluency with these facts could affect their efforts as they carry out mental calculations as adults. This study investigated participants' levels of brain activation and possible reasons for these levels as they solved…

  6. Manganese-enhanced MR imaging of brain activation evoked by noxious peripheral electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Myeounghoon; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chulhyun; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Cheong, Chaejoon; Sohn, Jin-Hun; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2016-02-01

    As imaging technology develops, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has furthered our understanding of brain function by clarifying the anatomical structure and generating functional imaging data related to information processing in pain conditions. Recent studies have reported that manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides valuable information about the functions of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify specific brain regions activated during noxious electric stimulation using high-resolution MEMRI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: naïve, sham electrical stimulation, and noxious electric stimulation. Under urethane with α-chloralose mixture anesthesia, a catheter was placed in the external carotid artery to administrate 20% mannitol and manganese chloride (25mM MnCl2). Noxious electric stimulation (2Hz, 10V) was applied to the hind paw with a needle electrode. Stimulation-induced neuronal activation was detected using 4.7-T MRI. In response to noxious electrical stimulation, remarkable Mn(2+)-enhanced signals were observed in the agranular insular cortex, auditory cortex, primary somatosensory cortex of the hind limb, and granular and dysgranular insular cortex, which correspond to sensory tactile electric stimulus to the hindpaws. These results indicate that the combination of MEMRI with activity-induced Mn(2+)-dependent contrast can delineate functional areas in the rat brain. PMID:26733299

  7. Short-term meditation modulates brain activity of insight evoked with solution cue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Cao, Chen; Deng, Yuqin; Wang, Yan; Xin, Xiu; Posner, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been shown to improve creativity in some situation. However, little is known about the brain systems underling insight into a problem when the person fails to solve the problem. Here, we examined the neural correlation using Chinese Remote Association Test, as a measure of creativity. We provide a solution following the failure of the participant to provide one. We examine how meditation in comparison with relaxation influences the reaction of the participant to a correct solution. The event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging showed greater activity, mainly distributed in the right cingulate gyrus (CG), insula, putamen, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (MFG), the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the superior temporal gyrus (STG). This pattern of activation was greater following 5 h of meditation training than the same amount of relaxation. Based on prior research, we speculate on the function of this pattern of brain activity: (i) CG may be involved in detecting conflict and breaking mental set, (ii) MFG/IFG may play an important role in restructuring of the problem representation, (iii) insula, IPL and STG may be associated with error detection, problem understanding or general attentive control and (iv) putamen may be activated by ‘Aha’ feeling. PMID:24532700

  8. Neural portraits of perception: reconstructing face images from evoked brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Alan S; Chun, Marvin M; Kuhl, Brice A

    2014-07-01

    Recent neuroimaging advances have allowed visual experience to be reconstructed from patterns of brain activity. While neural reconstructions have ranged in complexity, they have relied almost exclusively on retinotopic mappings between visual input and activity in early visual cortex. However, subjective perceptual information is tied more closely to higher-level cortical regions that have not yet been used as the primary basis for neural reconstructions. Furthermore, no reconstruction studies to date have reported reconstructions of face images, which activate a highly distributed cortical network. Thus, we investigated (a) whether individual face images could be accurately reconstructed from distributed patterns of neural activity, and (b) whether this could be achieved even when excluding activity within occipital cortex. Our approach involved four steps. (1) Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify components that efficiently represented a set of training faces. (2) The identified components were then mapped, using a machine learning algorithm, to fMRI activity collected during viewing of the training faces. (3) Based on activity elicited by a new set of test faces, the algorithm predicted associated component scores. (4) Finally, these scores were transformed into reconstructed images. Using both objective and subjective validation measures, we show that our methods yield strikingly accurate neural reconstructions of faces even when excluding occipital cortex. This methodology not only represents a novel and promising approach for investigating face perception, but also suggests avenues for reconstructing 'offline' visual experiences-including dreams, memories, and imagination-which are chiefly represented in higher-level cortical areas. PMID:24650597

  9. BRAIN STEM EVOKED RESPONSE AUDIOMETRY A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem evoked response audiometry (BERA is a useful objective assessment of hearing. Major advantage of this procedure is its ability to test even infants in whom conventional audiometry may not be useful. This investigation can be used as a screening test for deafness in high risk infants. Early diagnosis and rehabilitation will reduce disability in these children. This article attempts to review the published literature on this subject.

  10. EVOKED CAVERNOUS ACTIVITY: NEUROANATOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Vicars, Brenda; Yang, Claire C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited 7 males with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction and 6 males who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS subjects, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into t...

  11. Submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli evoke electrical brain responses.

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    Sperdin, Holger F; Spierer, Lucas; Becker, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Landis, Theodor

    2015-04-01

    Subliminal perception is strongly associated to the processing of meaningful or emotional information and has mostly been studied using visual masking. In this study, we used high density 256-channel EEG coupled with an liquid crystal display (LCD) tachistoscope to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of the brain response to visual checkerboard stimuli (Experiment 1) or blank stimuli (Experiment 2) presented without a mask for 1 ms (visible), 500 µs (partially visible), and 250 µs (subliminal) by applying time-wise, assumption-free nonparametric randomization statistics on the strength and on the topography of high-density scalp-recorded electric field. Stimulus visibility was assessed in a third separate behavioral experiment. Results revealed that unmasked checkerboards presented subliminally for 250 µs evoked weak but detectable visual evoked potential (VEP) responses. When the checkerboards were replaced by blank stimuli, there was no evidence for the presence of an evoked response anymore. Furthermore, the checkerboard VEPs were modulated topographically between 243 and 296 ms post-stimulus onset as a function of stimulus duration, indicative of the engagement of distinct configuration of active brain networks. A distributed electrical source analysis localized this modulation within the right superior parietal lobule near the precuneus. These results show the presence of a brain response to submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli independently of their emotional saliency or meaningfulness and opens an avenue for new investigations of subliminal stimulation without using visual masking. PMID:25487054

  12. Fast joint detection-estimation of evoked brain activity in event-related fMRI using a variational approach

    OpenAIRE

    Chaari, Lotfi; Vincent, Thomas; Forbes, Florence; Dojat, Michel; Ciuciu, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience In standard within-subject analyses of event-related fMRI data, two steps are usually performed separately: detection of brain activity and estimation of the hemodynamic response. Because these two steps are inherently linked, we adopt the socalled region-based Joint Detection-Estimation (JDE) framework that addresses this joint issue using a multivariate inference for detection and estimation. JDE is built by making use of a regional bilinear generative model of the...

  13. Fast joint detection-estimation of evoked brain activity in event-related fMRI using a variational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In standard within-subject analyses of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, two steps are usually performed separately: detection of brain activity and estimation of the hemodynamic response. Because these two steps are inherently linked, we adopt the so-called region-based joint detection-estimation (JDE) framework that addresses this joint issue using a multivariate inference for detection and estimation. JDE is built by making use of a regional bilinear generative model of the BOLD response and constraining the parameter estimation by physiological priors using temporal and spatial information in a Markovian model. In contrast to previous works that use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to sample the resulting intractable posterior distribution, we recast the JDE into a missing data framework and derive a variational expectation-maximization (VEM) algorithm for its inference. A variational approximation is used to approximate the Markovian model in the unsupervised spatially adaptive JDE inference, which allows automatic fine-tuning of spatial regularization parameters. It provides a new algorithm that exhibits interesting properties in terms of estimation error and computational cost compared to the previously used MCMC-based approach. Experiments on artificial and real data show that VEM-JDE is robust to model mis-specification and provides computational gain while maintaining good performance in terms of activation detection and hemodynamic shape recovery. (authors)

  14. Premature infants display increased noxious-evoked neuronal activity in the brain compared to healthy age-matched term-born infants.

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    Slater, Rebeccah; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Worley, Alan; Meek, Judith; Boyd, Stewart; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2010-08-15

    This study demonstrates that infants who are born prematurely and who have experienced at least 40days of intensive or special care have increased brain neuronal responses to noxious stimuli compared to healthy newborns at the same postmenstrual age. We have measured evoked potentials generated by noxious clinically-essential heel lances in infants born at term (8 infants; born 37-40weeks) and in infants born prematurely (7 infants; born 24-32weeks) who had reached the same postmenstrual age (mean age at time of heel lance 39.2+/-1.2weeks). These noxious-evoked potentials are clearly distinguishable from shorter latency potentials evoked by non-noxious tactile sensory stimulation. While the shorter latency touch potentials are not dependent on the age of the infant at birth, the noxious-evoked potentials are significantly larger in prematurely-born infants. This enhancement is not associated with specific brain lesions but reflects a functional change in pain processing in the brain that is likely to underlie previously reported changes in pain sensitivity in older ex-preterm children. Our ability to quantify and measure experience-dependent changes in infant cortical pain processing will allow us to develop a more rational approach to pain management in neonatal intensive care. PMID:20438855

  15. Methylxanthine-evoked perturbation of spontaneous and evoked activities in isolated newborn rat hippocampal networks.

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    Ruangkittisakul, A; Sharopov, S; Kantor, C; Kuribayashi, J; Mildenberger, E; Luhmann, H J; Kilb, W; Ballanyi, K

    2015-08-20

    Treatment of apnea of prematurity with methylxanthines like caffeine, aminophylline or theophylline can evoke hippocampal seizures. However, it is unknown at which interstitial brain concentrations methylxanthines promote such neonatal seizures or interfere with physiological 'early network oscillations' (ENOs) that are considered as pivotal for maturation of hippocampal neural networks. We studied theophylline and caffeine effects on ENOs in CA3 neurons (CA3-ENOs) and CA3 electrical stimulation-evoked monosynaptic CA1 field potentials (CA1-FPs) in sliced and intact hippocampi, respectively, from 8 to 10-days-old rats. Submillimolar doses of theophylline and caffeine, blocking adenosine receptors and phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), did not affect CA3-ENOs, ENO-associated cytosolic Ca(2+) transients or CA1-FPs nor did they provoke seizure-like discharges. Low millimolar doses of theophylline (⩾1mM) or caffeine (⩾5mM), blocking GABAA and glycine receptors plus sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA)-type Ca(2+) ATPases, evoked seizure-like discharges with no indication of cytosolic Ca(2+) dysregulation. Inhibiting PDE4 with rolipram or glycine receptors with strychnine had no effect on CA3-ENOs and did not occlude seizure-like events as tested with theophylline. GABAA receptor blockade induced seizure-like discharges and occluded theophylline-evoked seizure-like discharges in the slices, but not in the intact hippocampi. In summary, submillimolar methylxanthine concentrations do not acutely affect spontaneous CA3-ENOs or electrically evoked synaptic activities and low millimolar doses are needed to evoke seizure-like discharges in isolated developing hippocampal neural networks. We conclude that mechanisms of methylxanthine-related seizure-like discharges do not involve SERCA inhibition-related neuronal Ca(2+) dysregulation, PDE4 blockade or adenosine and glycine receptor inhibition, whereas GABA(A) receptor blockade may contribute partially. PMID

  16. Analysis of evoked deep brain connectivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    Piscataway: IEEE Service Center, 2013, s. 4358-4361. ISBN 978-1-4577-0216-7. ISSN 1557-170X. [Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society /35./. Osaka (JP), 03.07.2013-07.07.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biomedical electrodes * brain * electroencephalography Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  17. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

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    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  18. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Seok-Kyun; Kim, Gwang-Won; Yang, Jong-Chul; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Kang, Heoung-Keun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. Materials and Methods A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with bot...

  19. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seok Kyun; Kim, Gwang Won; Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Gwang Woo [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jong Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Kwun [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males.

  20. Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males.

  1. [Determination of irreversibility of clinical brain death. Electroencephalography and evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, H; Ferbert, A

    2016-02-01

    Principally, in the fourth update of the rules for the procedure to finally determine the irreversible cessation of function of the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem, the importance of an electroencephalogram (EEG), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are confirmed. This paper presents the reliability and validity of the electrophysiological diagnosis, discusses the amendments in the fourth version of the guidelines and introduces the practical application, problems and sources of error.An EEG is the best established supplementary diagnostic method for determining the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome. It should be noted that residual brain activity can often persist for many hours after the onset of brain death syndrome, particularly in patients with primary brainstem lesions. The derivation and analysis of an EEG requires a high level of expertise to be able to safely distinguish artefacts from primary brain activity. The registration of EEGs to demonstrate the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome is extremely time consuming.The BAEPs can only be used to confirm the irreversibility of brain death syndrome in serial examinations or in the rare cases of a sustained wave I or sustained waves I and II. Very often, an investigation cannot be reliably performed because of existing sound conduction disturbances or failure of all potentials even before the onset of clinical brain death syndrome. This explains why BAEPs are only used in exceptional cases.The SEPs of the median nerve can be very reliably derived, are technically simple and with few sources of error. A serial investigation is not required and the time needed for examination is short. For these reasons SEPs are given preference over EEGs and BAEPs for establishing the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome. PMID:26785843

  2. BRAIN DYSFUNCTION OF PATIENTS WITH QIGONG INDUCED MENTAL DISORDER REVEALED BY EVOKED POTENTIALS RECORDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yingzhi; ZONG Wenbin; CHEN Xingshi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to investigate the brain function of patients with Qigong induced mental disorder (QIMD), this study was carried out. Methods: Four kinds of evoked potentials, including contingent negative variation (CNV), auditory evoked potentials (AEP), visual evoked potentials (VEP), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), were recorded from 12 patients with Qigong induced mental disorder.Comparison of their evoked potentials with the data from some normal controls was made. Results: The results revealed that there were 3 kinds of abnormal changes in evoked potentials of patients with QIMD that is latency prolongation, amplitude increase and amplitude decrease, as compared with normal controls. Conclusion: Brain dysfunction of patients with QIMD was confirmed. Its biological mechanism needs further studying.

  3. Baroreceptor activation attenuates attentional effects on pain-evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Marcus A.; Minati, Ludovico; Paoletti, Giulia; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2010-01-01

    Focused attention typically enhances neural nociceptive responses, reflected electroencephalographically as increased amplitude of pain-evoked event-related potentials (ERPs). Additionally, pain-evoked ERPs are attenuated by hypertension and baroreceptor activity, through as yet unclear mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these two effects may interact, suggesting that baroreceptor-related modulation of nociception is more than a low-level gating phenomenon. To address this hypothesis...

  4. In vivo photoacoustic neuronal imaging of odor-evoked calcium signals in the drosophila brain (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Rao, Bin; Rong, Haoyang; Raman, Baranidharan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Neural scientists can benefit greatly from imaging tools that can penetrate thick brain tissue. Compared with traditional optical microscopy methods, photoacoustic imaging can beat the optical diffusion limit and achieve such deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution. In this study, we used an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the odor-evoked neuronal activities in a drosophila model. Drosophila brain neurons stably express GCaMP5G, a calcium-sensitive fluorescent protein whose optical absorption coefficient changes with calcium influx during action potentials. We recorded an ~20% odor-evoked fractional photoacoustic signal increase at all depths of the drosophila brain in vivo, with and without removal of the brain cuticle, at a recording rate of 1 kHz. Our results were confirmed by concurrent fluorescent recordings. Furthermore, by performing fast 2D scanning, we imaged the antenna lobe region, which is of particular interest in neuroscience, at a volumetric rate of ~1 Hz with a sub-neuron resolution of 3 μm. Unlike optical imaging, which requires surgical removal of the scattering brain cuticle, our photoacoustic system can image through the cuticle and measure neuronal signals of the whole drosophila brain without invasive surgery, enabling minimal disturbance to the animal's behaviors. In conclusion, we have demonstrated photoacoustic imaging of calcium signals in drosophila brains for the first time. Utilizing the deep imaging capability of photoacoustic tomography, our methods could potentially be extended to in vivo imaging of neuronal activities from deep brains in other animal models.

  5. Do resting brain dynamics predict oddball evoked-potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Tien-Wen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oddball paradigm is widely applied to the investigation of cognitive function in neuroscience and in neuropsychiatry. Whether cortical oscillation in the resting state can predict the elicited oddball event-related potential (ERP is still not clear. This study explored the relationship between resting electroencephalography (EEG and oddball ERPs. The regional powers of 18 electrodes across delta, theta, alpha and beta frequencies were correlated with the amplitude and latency of N1, P2, N2 and P3 components of oddball ERPs. A multivariate analysis based on partial least squares (PLS was applied to further examine the spatial pattern revealed by multiple correlations. Results Higher synchronization in the resting state, especially at the alpha spectrum, is associated with higher neural responsiveness and faster neural propagation, as indicated by the higher amplitude change of N1/N2 and shorter latency of P2. None of the resting quantitative EEG indices predict P3 latency and amplitude. The PLS analysis confirms that the resting cortical dynamics which explains N1/N2 amplitude and P2 latency does not show regional specificity, indicating a global property of the brain. Conclusions This study differs from previous approaches by relating dynamics in the resting state to neural responsiveness in the activation state. Our analyses suggest that the neural characteristics carried by resting brain dynamics modulate the earlier/automatic stage of target detection.

  6. MDMA (ecstasy) modulates locomotor and prefrontal cortex sensory evoked activity.

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    Atkins, Kristal; Burks, Tilithia; Swann, Alan C; Dafny, Nachum

    2009-12-11

    Ingestion of 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) leads to heightened response to sensory stimulation; thus, MDMA is referred to as "ecstasy" because it produces pleasurable enhancement of such sensation. There have been no electrophysiological studies that report the consequences of MDMA on sensory input. The present study was initiated to study the effects of acute and chronic MDMA on locomotor activity and sensory evoked field potential from freely behaving rats previously implanted with permanent electrodes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The main findings of this study are that: (1) acute MDMA augments locomotor behavior and attenuates the incoming sensory input, (2) chronic treatment of MDMA elicits behavioral sensitization, (3) chronic administration of MDMA results in attenuation of the baseline activity of the sensory evoked field potential, and (4) administration of rechallenge MDMA result in enhancement of the PFC sensory evoked field potential. PMID:19769950

  7. Role of adrenal catecholamines in cerebrovasodilation evoked from brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied whether adrenal medullary catecholamines (CAs) contribute to the metabolically linked increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal medullary reticular formation (DMRF). Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. The DMRF was electrically stimulated with intermittent trains of pulses through microelectrodes stereotaxically implanted. Blood gases were controlled and, during stimulation, arterial pressure was maintained within the autoregulated range for rCBF. rCBF and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were determined in homogenates of brain regions by using [14C]iodoantipyrine and α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), respectively, as tracers. Plasma CAs (epinephrine and norepinephrine) were measured radioenzymatically. DMRF stimulation increased rCBF throughout the brain and elevated plasma CAs substantially. Acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the increase in plasma epinephrine, reduced the increases in flow in cerebral cortex, and abolished them elsewhere in brain. They conclude that the increases in rCBF elicited from the DMRF has two components, one dependent on, and the other independent of CAs. Since the BBB is impermeable to CAs and DMRF stimulation fails to open the BBB, the results suggest that DMRF stimulations allows, through a mechanism not yet determined, circulating CAs to act on brain and affect brain function

  8. Steady state visually evoked potentials based Brain computer interface test outside the lab

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Francisco Caicedo Bravo; Jaiber Evelio Cardona Aristizábal

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steady State Visually Evoked Potentials (SSVEP) are brain signals which are one of the most promising signals for Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) implementation, however, SSVEP based BCI generally are proven in a controlled environment and there are a few tests in demanding conditions.Method: We present a SSVEP based BCI system that was used outside the lab in a noisy environment with distractions, and with the presence of public. For the tests, we showed a maze in a laptop where th...

  9. Evaluation of Auditory Brain Stems Evoked Response in Newborns With Pathologic Hyperbilirubinemia in Mashhad, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Okhravi, Tooba; Tarvij Eslami, Saeedeh; Hushyar Ahmadi, Ali; Nassirian, Hossain; Najibpour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal jaundice is a common cause of sensorneural hearing loss in children. Objectives: We aimed to detect the neurotoxic effects of pathologic hyperbilirubinemia on brain stem and auditory tract by auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) which could predict early effects of hyperbilirubinemia. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was performed on newborns with pathologic hyperbilirubinemia. The inclusion criteria were healthy term and near term (35 - 37 weeks) newbor...

  10. Cerebral activation associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the limbic system: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Sung Jong; Kong, Gwang Woo; Kim, Hyung Joong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Cho, Ki Hyun; Yoon, Ka Hyun [School of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Yo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-01

    To identify the brain centers associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the human brain, and to investigate the neural mechanism for sexual arousal using functional MRI (fMRI). A total of 20 sexually potent volunteers consisting of 10 males (mean age: 24) and 10 females (mean age: 23) underwent fMRI on a 1.5T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 slices (10 mm slice thickness) parallel to the AC-PC (anterior commissure and posterior commissure) line, giving a total of 511 MR images. The sexual stimulation consisted of a 1-minute rest with black screen, followed by a 4-minute stimulation by an erotic video film, and concluded with a 2-minute rest. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by the statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99) program. The brain activation regions associated with visual sexual arousal in the limbic system are the posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, hypothalamus, medial cingulate gyrus, thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate gyrus, insula, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen. Especially, the parahippocampal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, thalamus and hypothalamus were highly activated in comparison with other areas. The overall activities of the limbic lobe, diencephalon, and basal ganglia were 11.8%, 10.5%, and 3.4%, respectively. In the correlation test between brain activity and sexual arousal, the hypothalamus and thalamus showed positive correlation, but the other brain areas showed no correlation. The fMRI is useful to quantitatively evaluate the cerebral activation associated with visually evoked, sexual arousal in the human brain. This result may be helpful by providing clinically valuable information on sexual disorder in humans as well as by increasing the understanding of the neuroanatomical correlates of sexual arousal.

  11. Cerebral activation associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the limbic system: functional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the brain centers associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the human brain, and to investigate the neural mechanism for sexual arousal using functional MRI (fMRI). A total of 20 sexually potent volunteers consisting of 10 males (mean age: 24) and 10 females (mean age: 23) underwent fMRI on a 1.5T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 slices (10 mm slice thickness) parallel to the AC-PC (anterior commissure and posterior commissure) line, giving a total of 511 MR images. The sexual stimulation consisted of a 1-minute rest with black screen, followed by a 4-minute stimulation by an erotic video film, and concluded with a 2-minute rest. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by the statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99) program. The brain activation regions associated with visual sexual arousal in the limbic system are the posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, hypothalamus, medial cingulate gyrus, thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate gyrus, insula, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen. Especially, the parahippocampal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, thalamus and hypothalamus were highly activated in comparison with other areas. The overall activities of the limbic lobe, diencephalon, and basal ganglia were 11.8%, 10.5%, and 3.4%, respectively. In the correlation test between brain activity and sexual arousal, the hypothalamus and thalamus showed positive correlation, but the other brain areas showed no correlation. The fMRI is useful to quantitatively evaluate the cerebral activation associated with visually evoked, sexual arousal in the human brain. This result may be helpful by providing clinically valuable information on sexual disorder in humans as well as by increasing the understanding of the neuroanatomical correlates of sexual arousal

  12. Baroreceptor activation attenuates attentional effects on pain-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Marcus A; Minati, Ludovico; Paoletti, Giulia; Critchley, Hugo D

    2010-12-01

    Focused attention typically enhances neural nociceptive responses, reflected electroencephalographically as increased amplitude of pain-evoked event-related potentials (ERPs). Additionally, pain-evoked ERPs are attenuated by hypertension and baroreceptor activity, through as yet unclear mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these two effects may interact, suggesting that baroreceptor-related modulation of nociception is more than a low-level gating phenomenon. To address this hypothesis, we explored in a group of healthy participants the combined effects of cue-induced expectancy and baroreceptor activity on the amplitude of pain-evoked ERPs. Brief nociceptive skin stimuli were delivered during a simple visual task; half were preceded by a visual forewarning cue, and half were unpredictable. Nociceptive stimuli were timed to coincide either with systole (maximum activation of cardiac baroreceptors) or with diastole (minimum baroreceptor activation). We observed a strong interaction between expectancy and cardiac timing for the amplitude of the P2 ERP component; no effects were observed for the N2 component. Cued stimuli were associated with larger P2 amplitude, but this effect was abolished for stimuli presented during baroreceptor activation. No cardiac timing effect was observed for un-cued stimuli. Taken together, these findings suggest a close integration of cognitive-affective aspects of expectancy and baroreceptor influences on pain, and as such may cast further light on mechanisms underlying mental and physiological contributions to clinical pain. PMID:20965656

  13. Prognostic value of evoked and event-related potentials in moderate to severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Henry L; Poole, John H; Castaneda, Annabel; Salerno, Rose Marie; Gray, Max

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians are often expected to project patients' clinical outcomes to allow effective planning for future care. This can be a challenge in patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who are often unable to participate reliably in clinical evaluations. With recent advances in computer instrumentation and signal processing, evoked potentials and event-related potentials show increasing promise as powerful tools for prognosticating the trajectory of recovery and ultimate outcome from the TBI. Short- and middle-latency evoked potentials can now effectively predict coma outcomes in patients with acute TBI. Long-latency event-related potential components hold promise in predicting recovery of higher order cognitive abilities. PMID:16915010

  14. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  15. Changes of evoked potentials and evaluation of mild hypothermia for treatment of severe brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the changes of evoked pote ntials after severe brain injury and the effect of mild hypothermia on acute sev ere brain injury.   Methods: A total of 44 patients with severe closed head injury (GCS 3-8, admitted within 10 hours from injury) admitted from May 1998 to March 1999 were selected for this study. All patients were admitted into the intensiv e care unit and divided into 2 groups, Group A (GCS 3-5) and Group B (GCS 6 -8). Patients were also randomly assigned to either normothermia or hypothermia subgroups. Patients in the hypothermia group were cooled to 32-34℃. Median nerve short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SLSEP) and brain stem aud itory evoked potentials (BAEP) were recorded before cooling and 4, 24, 48, 72, 9 6 and 120 hours, respectively after cooling and temperature resuming. SLSEP and BAEP were measured at the same time in the normothermia group (control group). T he changes of evoked potentials (EP) were analyzed by statistical methods.   Results: In the Group B, N20 amplitudes in SLSEP and I/V amplitudes in BAEP after mild hypothermia treatment in the hypothermia group dif fered significantly from those in the control group (P<0.05). However, in the Group A, no significant difference in all paramet ers was found.   Conclusions: These results demonstrate that mild hypothermia tr eatment (32-34℃) in the Group B has a significant neuroelectrophysiological effect on severe brain injury. Nevertheless, the effect of mild hypothermia in t he Group A is not apparent and needs further studying.

  16. Effect of Acupuncture on the Auditory Evoked Brain Stem Potential in Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玲玲; 何崇; 刘跃光; 朱莉莉

    2002-01-01

    @@ Under the auditory evoked brain stem potential (ABP) examination, the latent period of V wave and the intermittent periods of III-V peak and I-V peak were significantly shortened in Parkinson's disease patients of the treatment group (N=29) after acupuncture treatment. The difference of cumulative scores in Webster's scale was also decreased in correlation analysis. The increase of dopamine in the brain and the excitability of the dopamine neurons may contribute to the therapeutic effects, in TCM terms, of subduing the pathogenic wind and tranquilizing the mind.

  17. Analysis of brain-stem auditory evoked potential and visual evoked potential in patients with Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiaorong Deng; Jianzhong Deng; Yanmin Zhao; Xiaohai Yan; Pin Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the development of neuroelectrophysiology, it had been identified that all kinds of evoked potentials might reflect the functional status of corresponding pathway. Evoked potentials recruited in the re search of PD, it can be known whether other functional pathway of nervous system is impaired. OBJECTIVE: To observe whether brainstem auditory and visual passageway are impaired in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and compare with non-PD patients concurrently. DESIGN: A non-randomized concurrent controlled observation. SETTINGS: Henan Provincial Tumor Hospital; Anyang District Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two cases of PD outpatients and inpatients, who registered in the Department of Neurology, Anyang District Hospital from October 1997 to February 2006, were enrolled as the PD group, including 20 males and 12 females, aged 50-72 years old. Inclusive criteria: In accordance with the diagnostic criteria of PD recommended by the dyskinesia and PD group of neurology branch of Chinese Medical Association. Patients with diseases that could cause Parkinson syndrome were excluded by CT scanning or MRI examination. Meanwhile, 30 cases with non-neurological disease were selected from the Department of Internal Medicine of our hospital as the control group, including 19 males and 11 females, aged 45-70 years old. Including criteria: Without history of neurological disease or psychiatric disease; showing normal image on CT. And PD, Parkinson syndrome and Parkinsonism-plus were excluded by professional neurologist. All the patients were informed and agreed with the examination and clinical observation. METHODS: The electrophysiological examination and clinical observation of the PD patients and controls were conducted. The Reporter type 4-channel evoked potential machine (Italy) was used to check brain-stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Why to be examined was explained to test taker. BAEP recording electrode was plac

  18. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7-36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs. PMID:24828128

  19. Childhood physical abuse predicts stressor-evoked activity within central visceral control regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihashemi, Layla; Sheu, Lei K; Midei, Aimee J; Gianaros, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    Early life experience differentially shapes later stress reactivity, as evidenced by both animal and human studies. However, early experience-related changes in the function of central visceral neural circuits that control stress responses have not been well characterized, particularly in humans. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), amygdala (Amyg) and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) form a core visceral stress-responsive circuit. The goal of this study is to examine how childhood emotional and physical abuse relates to adulthood stressor-evoked activity within these visceral brain regions. To evoke acute states of mental stress, participants (n = 155) performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-adapted versions of the multi-source interference task (MSIT) and the Stroop task with simultaneous monitoring of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate. Regression analyses revealed that childhood physical abuse correlated positively with stressor-evoked changes in MAP, and negatively with unbiased, a priori extractions of fMRI blood-oxygen level-dependent signal change values within the sgACC, BNST, PVN and Amyg (n = 138). Abuse-related changes in the function of visceral neural circuits may reflect neurobiological vulnerability to adverse health outcomes conferred by early adversity. PMID:24847113

  20. Early changes of auditory brain stem evoked response after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma - a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, S.K.; Wei, W.I.; Sham, J.S.T.; Choy, D.T.K.; Hui, Y. (Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong))

    1992-10-01

    A prospective study of the effect of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma on hearing was carried out on 49 patients who had pure tone, impedance audiometry and auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) recordings before, immediately, three, six and 12 months after radiotherapy. Fourteen patients complained of intermittent tinnitus after radiotherapy. We found that 11 initially normal ears of nine patients developed a middle ear effusion, three to six months after radiotherapy. There was mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing impairment after radiotherapy. Persistent impairment of ABR was detected immediately after completion of radiotherapy. The waves I-III and I-V interpeak latency intervals were significantly prolonged one year after radiotherapy. The study shows that radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma impairs hearing by acting on the middle ear, the cochlea and the brain stem auditory pathway. (Author).

  1. Maternal immune activation evoked by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid does not evoke microglial cell activation in the embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eSmolders

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that inflammation during pregnancy increases the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Morphological brain abnormalities combined with deviations in the inflammatory status of the brain can be observed in patients of both autism and schizophrenia. It was shown that acute infection can induce changes in maternal cytokine levels which in turn are suggested to affect fetal brain development and increase the risk on the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Animal models of maternal immune activation reproduce the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In this study the poly (I:C model was used to mimic viral immune activation in pregnant mice in order to assess the activation status of fetal microglia in these developmental disorders. Because microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain they were expected to be activated due to the inflammatory stimulus.Microglial cell density and activation level in the fetal cortex and hippocampus were determined. Despite the presence of a systemic inflammation in the pregnant mice, there was no significant difference in fetal microglial cell density or immunohistochemically determined activation level between the control and inflammation group. These data indicate that activation of the fetal microglial cells is not likely to be responsible for the inflammation induced deficits in the offspring in this model.

  2. The restless brain: how intrinsic activity organizes brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-05-19

    Traditionally studies of brain function have focused on task-evoked responses. By their very nature such experiments tacitly encourage a reflexive view of brain function. While such an approach has been remarkably productive at all levels of neuroscience, it ignores the alternative possibility that brain functions are mainly intrinsic and ongoing, involving information processing for interpreting, responding to and predicting environmental demands. I suggest that the latter view best captures the essence of brain function, a position that accords well with the allocation of the brain's energy resources, its limited access to sensory information and a dynamic, intrinsic functional organization. The nature of this intrinsic activity, which exhibits a surprising level of organization with dimensions of both space and time, is revealed in the ongoing activity of the brain and its metabolism. As we look to the future, understanding the nature of this intrinsic activity will require integrating knowledge from cognitive and systems neuroscience with cellular and molecular neuroscience where ion channels, receptors, components of signal transduction and metabolic pathways are all in a constant state of flux. The reward for doing so will be a much better understanding of human behaviour in health and disease. PMID:25823869

  3. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and...

  4. Statistical mapping of sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain using Mn-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Zou, Jing; Babb, James S; Johnson, Glyn; Sanes, Dan H; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been developed to image brain activity in small animals, including normal and genetically modified mice. Here, we report the use of a MEMRI-based statistical parametric mapping method to analyze sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain, the inferior colliculus (IC). Acoustic stimuli with defined frequency and amplitude components were shown to activate and enhance neuronal ensembles in the IC. These IC activity patterns were analyzed quantitatively using voxel-based statistical comparisons between groups of mice with or without sound stimulation. Repetitive 40-kHz pure tone stimulation significantly enhanced ventral IC regions, which was confirmed in the statistical maps showing active regions whose volumes increased in direct proportion to the amplitude of the sound stimuli (65 dB, 77 dB, and 89 dB peak sound pressure level). The peak values of the activity-dependent MEMRI signal enhancement also increased from 7% to 20% for the sound amplitudes employed. These results demonstrate that MEMRI statistical mapping can be used to analyze both the 3D spatial patterns and the magnitude of activity evoked by sound stimuli carrying different energy. This represents a significant advance in the development of MEMRI for quantitative and unbiased analysis of brain function in the deep brain nuclei of mice. PMID:17919926

  5. A Brain Computer Interface for Robust Wheelchair Control Application Based on Pseudorandom Code Modulated Visual Evoked Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohebbi, Ali; Engelsholm, Signe K.D.; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan;

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, a novel and minimalistic Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based wheelchair control application was developed. The system was based on pseudorandom code modulated Visual Evoked Potentials (c-VEPs). The visual stimuli in the scheme were generated based on the Gold code, and the...

  6. Cortical evoked potential and extracellular K+ and H+ at critical levels of brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, J; Symon, L; Branston, N M; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    evoked response. This study tests the hypothesis that electrical failure in ischemia may be directly associated with a massive release of intracellular K+ or with a critical degree of extracellular acidosis. By microelectrode techniques, measurements of blood flow, extracellular activity of K+ and H+ as...... occurred at 18 greater than 6 greater than 2 ml/100 gm per minute (median with 5% confidence limits). Thus a dual threshold in ischemia for neuronal function is described, the threshold for release of K+ being clearly lower than the threshold for complete electrical failure. Further, the findings support...

  7. Human cortical activity evoked by the assignment of authenticity when viewing works of art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengfei eHuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The expertise of others is a major social influence on our everyday decisions and actions. Many viewers of art, whether expert or naïve, are convinced that the full aesthetic appreciation of an artwork depends upon the assurance that the work is genuine rather than fake. Rembrandt portraits provide an interesting image set for testing this idea, as there is a large number of them and recent scholarship has determined that quite a few fakes and copies exist. Use of this image set allowed us to separate the brain's response to images of genuine and fake pictures from the brain's response to external advice about the authenticity of the paintings. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, viewing of artworks assigned as ‘copy’, rather than ‘authentic’, evoked stronger responses in frontopolar cortex (FPC and right precuneus, regardless of whether the portrait was actually genuine. Advice about authenticity had no direct effect on the cortical visual areas responsive to the paintings, but there was a significant psychophysiological interaction between the FPC and the lateral occipital area, which suggests that these visual areas may be modulated by FPC. We propose that the activation of brain networks rather than a single cortical area in this paradigm supports the art-scholars’ view that aesthetic judgments are multi-faceted and multi-dimensional in nature.

  8. Steady state visually evoked potentials based Brain computer interface test outside the lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Francisco Caicedo Bravo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Steady State Visually Evoked Potentials (SSVEP are brain signals which are one of the most promising signals for Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs implementation, however, SSVEP based BCI generally are proven in a controlled environment and there are a few tests in demanding conditions.Method: We present a SSVEP based BCI system that was used outside the lab in a noisy environment with distractions, and with the presence of public. For the tests, we showed a maze in a laptop where the user could move an avatar looking for a target that is represented by a house.  In order to move the avatar, the volunteer must stare at one of the four visual stimuli; the four visual stimuli represent the four directions: right, up, left, and down. The system is proven without any calibration procedure.Results: 32 volunteers utilized the system and 20 achieved the target with an accuracy above 60%, including 9 with an accuracy of 100%, 7 achieved the target with an accuracy below 60% and 5 left without achieving the goal. For the volunteers who reached accuracy above 60%, the results of the performance achieved an average of 6,4s for command detections, precision of 79% and information transfer rate (ITR of 8,78 bits/s.Conclusions: We showed a SSVEP based BCI system with low cost, it was proved in a public event, it did not have calibration procedures, it was easy to install, and it was used for people in a wide age range. The results show that it is possible to bring this kind of systems to environments outside the laboratory.

  9. Functional MRI brain imaging studies using the Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS in a human volunteer topical capsaicin pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ravikiran Shenoy1, Katherine Roberts1, Anastasia Papadaki2, Donald McRobbie2, Maarten Timmers3, Theo Meert3, Praveen Anand11Peripheral Neuropathy Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London; 2Imaging Sciences Department, Charing Cross Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 3Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Beerse, BelgiumAbstract: Acute application of topical capsaicin produces spontaneous burning and stinging pain similar to that seen in some neuropathic states, with local hyperalgesia. Use of capsaicin applied topically or injected intradermally has been described as a model for neuropathic pain, with patterns of activation in brain regions assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and positron emission tomography. The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS is a noninvasive clinically practical method of stimulating cutaneous A-delta nociceptors. In this study, topical capsaicin (1% was applied to the left volar forearm for 15 minutes of twelve adult healthy human volunteers. fMRI scans and a visual analog pain score were recorded during CHEPS stimulation precapsaicin and postcapsaicin application. Following capsaicin application there was a significant increase in visual analog scale (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 26.4 ± 5.3; postcapsaicin 48.9 ± 6.0; P < 0.0001. fMRI demonstrated an overall increase in areas of activation, with a significant increase in the contralateral insular signal (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 0.434 ± 0.03; postcapsaicin 0.561 ± 0.07; P = 0.047. The authors of this paper recently published a study in which CHEPS-evoked A-delta cerebral potential amplitudes were found to be decreased postcapsaicin application. In patients with neuropathic pain, evoked pain and fMRI brain responses are typically increased, while A-delta evoked potential amplitudes are decreased. The protocol of recording fMRI following CHEPS stimulation

  10. Maternal immune activation evoked by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid does not evoke microglial cell activation in the embryo.

    OpenAIRE

    Silke eSmolders; Sophie MT Smolders; Nina eSwinnen; Annette eGärtner; Jean-Michel eRigo; Pascal eLegendre; Bert eBrône

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that inflammation during pregnancy increases the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Morphological brain abnormalities combined with deviations in the inflammatory status of the brain can be observed in patients of both autism and schizophrenia. It was shown that acute infection can induce changes in maternal cytokine levels which in turn are suggested to affect fetal brain development and increase the risk on the development...

  11. Subarachnoid blood converts neurally evoked vasodilation to vasoconstriction in rat brain cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Koide, Masayo; Bonev, Adrian D.; Nelson, Mark T.; Wellman, George C.

    2013-01-01

    The matching of blood flow to regional brain function, called functional hyperemia or neurovascular coupling, involves the coordinated activity of neurons, astrocytes and parenchymal arterioles. Under physiological conditions, localized neuronal activation leads to elevated astrocyte endfoot Ca2+ and vasodilation, resulting in an increase in cerebral blood flow. In this study, we examined the impact of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on neurovascular coupling. SAH model rats received two inject...

  12. Music-evoked emotions: principles, brain correlates, and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes principles underlying the evocation of emotion with music: evaluation, resonance, memory, expectancy/tension, imagination, understanding, and social functions. Each of these principles includes several subprinciples, and the framework on music-evoked emotions emerging from these principles and subprinciples is supposed to provide a starting point for a systematic, coherent, and comprehensive theory on music-evoked emotions that considers both reception and production of music, as well as the relevance of emotion-evoking principles for music therapy. PMID:25773635

  13. Regularity increases middle latency evoked and late induced beta brain response following proprioceptive stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2008-01-01

    as an indication of increased readiness. This is achieved through detailed analysis of both evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Electroencephalography in a 64 channels montage was recorded in four-teen healthy subjects. Two paradigms were explored: A Regular alternation between hand......Focal attention increases the middle-latency amplitude of somatosensory evoked potentials. Previously this effect has been suggested to be due to increased readiness in somatosensory cortex. Presently, we examine whether regularity of stimulus occurrence increases the proprioceptive evoked response...

  14. Long-range neural activity evoked by premotor cortex stimulation: a TMS/EEG co-registration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eZanon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The premotor cortex is one of the fundamental structures composing the neural networks of the human brain. It is implicated in many behaviors and cognitive tasks, ranging from movement to attention and eye-related activity. Therefore, neural circuits that are related to premotor cortex have been studied to clarify their connectivity and/or role in different tasks. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the propagation of the neural activity evoked in the dorsal premotor cortex using transcranial magnetic stimulation/electroencephalography (TMS/EEG. Towards this end, interest was focused on the neural dynamics elicited in long-ranging temporal and spatial networks. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent a single-pulse TMS protocol in a resting condition with eyes closed, and the evoked activity, measured by EEG, was compared to a sham condition in a time window ranging from 45 msec to about 200 msec after TMS. Spatial and temporal investigations were carried out with sLORETA. TMS was found to induce propagation of neural activity mainly in the contralateral sensorimotor and frontal cortices, at about 130 msec after delivery of the stimulus. Different types of analyses showed propagated activity also in posterior, mainly visual, regions, in a time window between 70 and 130 msec. Finally, a likely rebounding activation of the sensorimotor and frontal regions, was observed in various time ranges. Taken together, the present findings further characterize the neural circuits that are driven by dorsal premotor cortex activation in healthy humans.

  15. Brain potentials evoked by intraepidermal electrical stimuli reflect the central sensitization of nociceptive pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, M.; Lee, M. C.; O'Neill, J.; Dickenson, A.H.; Iannetti, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitization (CS), the increased sensitivity of the central nervous system to somatosensory inputs, accounts for secondary hyperalgesia, a typical sign of several painful clinical conditions. Brain potentials elicited by mechanical punctate stimulation using flat-tip probes can provide neural correlates of CS, but their signal-to-noise ratio is limited by poor synchronisation of the afferent nociceptive input. Additionally, mechanical punctate stimulation does not activate nociceptor...

  16. Validation of fetal auditory evoked cortical responses to enhance the assessment of early brain development using fetal MEG measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maturation of fetal auditory evoked cortical responses (fAECRs) is an important aspect of developmental medicine, but their reliable identification is limited due to the technical restrictions in prenatal diagnosis. The signal-to-noise ratio of the fAECRs extracted exclusively from fetal magnetoencephalography is a known issue which limits their analysis as markers of brain development. The objective of this work was to develop a signal analysis strategy to address these problems and find appropriate processing steps. In this study, a group of 147 normal fetuses with gestations between 26 and 41 weeks underwent auditory evoked response testing. We combine different approaches that address data cleaning, fAECR determination and statistical fAECR validation to reduce the uncertainty in the detection of the auditory evoked responses. For the statistical validation of the evoked responses, we use parameters computed from bootstrap-based test statistics and the correlation between different averaging modes. Appropriate thresholds for those parameters are identified using linear regression analyses by looking at the maximum correlation coefficients. The results show that by using different validation parameters, the selected fAECRs conduct to similar regression slopes with an average of −13.6 ms/week gestational age which agree with previous studies. Our novel processing framework provides an objective way to identify and eliminate non-physiological variation in the data induced by artifacts. This approach has the potential to produce more reliable data needed in clinical studies for fetal brain maturation as well as extending the investigations to high-risk groups

  17. Cortical activities evoked by the signals ascending through unmyelinated C fibers in humans. A fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute pain is classified as first and second pain associated with rapidly conducting Aδ fibers and slowly conducting unmyelinated C fibers, respectively. First pain aims at achieving relative safety from the source of injury, whereas second pain, with its strong affective component, attracts longer-lasting attention and initiates behavioral responses in order to limit further injury and optimize recovery. Accordingly, the distinct brain representations for first and second pain should reflect distinct biological functions of both sensations. In this study, therefore, an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate brain processing of the signals ascending from peripheral C and Aδ fibers evoked by phasic laser stimuli on the right hand in humans. The stimulation of both C and Aδ nociceptors activated the bilateral thalamus, bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), right (ipsilateral) middle insula, and bilateral Brodmann's area (BA) 24/32, with the majority of activity found in the posterior portion of the anterior cingulate cortex (pACC). However, magnitude of activity in the right (ipsilateral) BA32/8/6, including dorsal parts in the anterior portion of the ACC (aACC) and pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), and the bilateral anterior insula was significantly stronger following the stimulation of C nociceptors than Aδ nociceptors. It was concluded that the activation of C nociceptors, related to second pain, evokes different brain processing from that of Aδ nociceptors, related to first pain, probably due to the differences in the emotional and motivational aspects of either pain, which are mainly related to the aACC, pre-SMA and anterior insula. (author)

  18. A STUDY OF HEARING EVALUATION FOR NEONATES WITH HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA USING OTOACOUSTIC EMISSION AND BRAIN STEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jaundice is one of the most common problems occurring in newborns. Although most of jaundiced patients are normal; because of the bilirubin toxicity, high serum levels can lead to kernicterus. It is important to identify and evaluate the jaundice early to prevent complications like bilirubin encephalopathy leading to hearing loss. Such early detection is possible only if some form of routine screening is used, one of which is otoacoustic emission. By detecting the hearing loss in time with screening methods we can ensure normal language development by appropriate intervention like hearing aids and infant stimulation. In this study otoacoustic emission will be followed by brain stem auditory evoked response and the results will be analyzed to look for the effectiveness of using otoacoustic emission for mass screening. METHODOLOGY: after obtaining approval and clearance from the institutional ethics committee this study included 105 children which satisfied the inclusion criteria. A standard case record was maintained for each subject. The neonate was subjected to otoacoustic emission just before discharge from the hospital. Otoacoustic emission was followed by brain stem auditory evoked response and the results compiled. Result of brain stem auditory evoked response was taken as gold standard and the results were analyzed. RESULTS: Abnormal OAE changes were seen in 6 and abnormal BERA was seen in 9 babies out of a total of 105 babies tested with hyperbilirubinemia. CONCLUSION: use of otoacoustic emissions as initial screening test provides as easy, cost effective and quick method to detect infants with hearing loss. As it is less invasive and less time consuming than BERA, dpOAE can be used as initial screening method for hearing loss in infants with BERA being reserved for infants that fail dpOAE.

  19. Stimulation of the brainstem reticular formation evokes locomotor activity in embryonic chicken (in ovo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, J I; Hasan, S J; Steeves, J D

    1990-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the period of embryonic chick development during which descending brainstem-spinal projections, originating from defined avian brainstem locomotor regions, become functionally active. Locomotor activity was examined using a new in ovo preparation for the focal electrical stimulation of embryonic brainstem locomotor regions. Embryos or hatchlings were anesthetized and mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus. Leg and wing muscle electromyographic (EMG) recordings were used to monitor any brainstem-stimulated motor activity. At present, we have been successful in demonstrating coordinated brainstem-evoked locomotion in embryos as early as embryonic day 15. The patterns of evoked locomotor activity were similar to locomotion evoked in hatchling chicks and were of 4 types: (1) alternating hindlimb movements ('stepping'), (2) synchronous (in-phase) hindlimb movements ('hatching'), (3) synchronous wing movements ('flapping'), and (4) simultaneous 'stepping' and 'flapping'. The cycle durations of evoked embryonic hindlimb movements are shorter than those observed for hatchling chicks. The present results are the first direct demonstration of functional connections between descending supraspinal neurons and spinal locomotor circuits at such an early stage of embryonic development. With modifications in technique, it may be possible to demonstrate functional connections at even earlier stages of embryonic development. PMID:2279325

  20. Controlling Interneuron Activity in Caenorhabditis Elegans to Evoke Chemotactic Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V.; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its small nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behaviour. Extensive work on the nematode has identified the neurons that are necessary for the different locomotory behaviours underlying chemotaxis through the use of laser ablation, activity recording in immobilized animals and the study of mutants. Howe...

  1. Single Trial Predictors for Gating Motor-Imagery Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Sensorimotor Rhythm and Visual Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronimo, Andrew; Kamrunnahar, Mst; Schiff, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    For brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that utilize visual cues to direct the user, the neural signals extracted by the computer are representative of ongoing processes, visual evoked responses, and voluntary modulation. We proposed to use three brain signatures for predicting success on a single trial of a BCI task. The first two features, the amplitude and phase of the pre-trial mu amplitude, were chosen as a correlate for cortical excitability. The remaining feature, related to the visually evoked response to the cue, served as a possible measure of fixation and attention to the task. Of these three features, mu rhythm amplitude over the central electrodes at the time of cue presentation and to a lesser extent the single trial visual evoked response were correlated with the success on the subsequent imagery task. Despite the potential for gating trials using these features, an offline gating simulation was limited in its ability to produce an increase in device throughput. This discrepancy highlights a distinction between the identification of predictive features, and the use of this knowledge in an online BCI. Using such a system, we cannot assume that the user will respond similarly when faced with a scenario where feedback is altered by trials that are gated on a regular basis. The results of this study suggest the possibility of using individualized, pre-task neural signatures for personalized, and asynchronous (self-paced) BCI applications, although these effects need to be quantified in a real-time adaptive scenario in a future study. PMID:27199630

  2. New Perspectives on Spontaneous Brain Activity: Dynamic Networks and Energy Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Zare, Marzieh; Benasich, April A.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has received increasing attention as demonstrated by the exponential rise in the number of published article on this topic over the last 30 years. Such “intrinsic” brain activity, generated in the absence of an explicit task, is frequently associated with resting-state or default-mode networks (DMN)s. The focus on characterizing spontaneous brain activity promises to shed new light on questions concerning the structural and functional architecture of the brain and how they are related to “mind”. However, many critical questions have yet to be addressed. In this review, we focus on a scarcely explored area, specifically the energetic requirements and constraints of spontaneous activity, taking into account both thermodynamical and informational perspectives. We argue that the “classical” definitions of spontaneous activity do not take into account an important feature, that is, the critical thermodynamic energetic differences between spontaneous and evoked brain activity. Spontaneous brain activity is associated with slower oscillations compared with evoked, task-related activity, hence it exhibits lower levels of enthalpy and “free-energy” (i.e., the energy that can be converted to do work), thus supporting noteworthy thermodynamic energetic differences between spontaneous and evoked brain activity. Increased spike frequency during evoked activity has a significant metabolic cost, consequently, brain functions traditionally associated with spontaneous activity, such as mind wandering, require less energy that other nervous activities. We also review recent empirical observations in neuroscience, in order to capture how spontaneous brain dynamics and mental function can be embedded in a non-linear dynamical framework, which considers nervous activity in terms of phase spaces, particle trajectories, random walks, attractors and/or paths at the edge of the chaos. This takes us from the thermodynamic free-energy, to the realm

  3. Vibrotactile aid and brain cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, H; Cibils, D; Caffa, C; Silveira, A; Basalo, S; Svirsky, M

    1997-03-01

    Six profoundly deaf patients were studied with mapping evoked potentials (MEP) using an acoustic signal passed through the vibrotactile prosthesis. This stimulus produced an activation of the central sulcus brain cortex. When the proSthesis was placed in the presenternal area it showed N1 P1 potentials with higher voltage and a more defined cortical dipole inversion than when the prosthesis was placed in the arm or abdomen: thus the presternal stimulation is considered an adequate place for the use of vibrotactile stimulation. The MEP were recorded in 2 patients after a period of audiological training and they showed new earlier potentials. These suggest plastic changes in the processing of an acoustic signal sent from the presternal skin by the somatosensory pathway after training and involving learning procedures. PMID:9105450

  4. Steady-state evoked potentials to study the processing of tactile and nociceptive somatosensory input in the human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Colon, Elisabeth; Legrain, Valéry; Mouraux, André

    2012-01-01

    The periodic presentation of a sensory stimulus induces, at certain frequencies of stimulation, a sustained electroencephalographic response of corresponding frequency, known as steady-state evoked potentials (SS-EP). In visual, auditory and vibrotactile modalities, studies have shown that SS-EP reflect mainly activity originating from early, modality-specific sensory cortices. Furthermore, it has been shown that SS-EP have several advantages over the recording of transient event-related brai...

  5. Temporal coupling between stimulus-evoked neural activity and hemodynamic responses from individual cortical columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using previously published data from the whisker barrel cortex of anesthetized rodents (Berwick et al 2008 J. Neurophysiol. 99 787-98) we investigated whether highly spatially localized stimulus-evoked cortical hemodynamics responses displayed a linear time-invariant (LTI) relationship with neural activity. Presentation of stimuli to individual whiskers of 2 s and 16 s durations produced hemodynamics and neural activity spatially localized to individual cortical columns. Two-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy (2D-OIS) measured hemoglobin responses, while multi-laminar electrophysiology recorded neural activity. Hemoglobin responses to 2 s stimuli were deconvolved with underlying evoked neural activity to estimate impulse response functions which were then convolved with neural activity evoked by 16 s stimuli to generate predictions of hemodynamic responses. An LTI system more adequately described the temporal neuro-hemodynamics coupling relationship for these spatially localized sensory stimuli than in previous studies that activated the entire whisker cortex. An inability to predict the magnitude of an initial 'peak' in the total and oxy- hemoglobin responses was alleviated when excluding responses influenced by overlying arterial components. However, this did not improve estimation of the hemodynamic responses return to baseline post-stimulus cessation.

  6. Relaxation of evoked contractile activity of isolated guinea-pig ileum by (+/-)-kavain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, U; Ameri, A; Pelzer, H; Gleitz, J; Peters, T

    1997-08-01

    Kava pyrones are the pharmacologically active compounds of Piper methysticum Forst. In the present study, the effect of the synthetic kava pyrone (+/-)-kavain was investigated on evoked contractile activity of isolated guinea-pig ileum. (+/-)-Kavain (1 microM-1 mM) dose-dependently reduced contractions of ileum evoked by carbachol (10 microM), by BAY K 8644 (0.3 microM), or by substance P (0.05 microM). (+/-)-Kavain also inhibited the contractile responses induced by raising the extracellular K+ concentration from 4 to 20 mM and by blocking the K+ channel by barium chloride (1 mM) or 4-aminopyridine (0.3 mM). After pre-incubation with 1 microM nifedipine, carbachol (1 microM) evoked 18.2 +/- 14.3% of contraction at control (i.e. prior pre-incubation with nifedipine). This remaining response was completely abolished by high concentrations of (+/-)-kavain (400 microM). After treatment of the longitudinal ileum strips with pertussis toxin (PTX), carbachol (1 microM) evoked 27.0 +/- 6.2% of the control response in untreated ileum. These contractions were also blocked by (+/-)-kavain (400 microM). However, (+/-)-kavain had no effect on the caffeine-induced (20 mM) contractions of ileum strips, which were permeabilized with digitonin or beta-escin. Moreover, it failed to affect Ca(2+)-evoked contractions of skinned muscles. These results suggest that the kava pyrone (+/-)-kavain may act in a non-specific musculotropic way on the smooth muscle membrane. PMID:9270372

  7. Auditory evoked potentials to spectro-temporal modulation of complex tones in normal subjects and patients with severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S J; Vaz Pato, M; Sprague, L; Stokes, M; Munday, R; Haque, N

    2000-05-01

    In order to assess higher auditory processing capabilities, long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded to synthesized musical instrument tones in 22 post-comatose patients with severe brain injury causing variably attenuated behavioural responsiveness. On the basis of normative studies, three different types of spectro-temporal modulation were employed. When a continuous 'clarinet' tone changes pitch once every few seconds, N1/P2 potentials are evoked at latencies of approximately 90 and 180 ms, respectively. Their distribution in the fronto-central region is consistent with generators in the supratemporal cortex of both hemispheres. When the pitch is modulated at a much faster rate ( approximately 16 changes/s), responses to each change are virtually abolished but potentials with similar distribution are still elicited by changing the timbre (e.g. 'clarinet' to 'oboe') every few seconds. These responses appear to represent the cortical processes concerned with spectral pattern analysis and the grouping of frequency components to form sound 'objects'. Following a period of 16/s oscillation between two pitches, a more anteriorly distributed negativity is evoked on resumption of a steady pitch. Various lines of evidence suggest that this is probably equivalent to the 'mismatch negativity' (MMN), reflecting a pre-perceptual, memory-based process for detection of change in spectro-temporal sound patterns. This method requires no off-line subtraction of AEPs evoked by the onset of a tone, and the MMN is produced rapidly and robustly with considerably larger amplitude (usually >5 microV) than that to discontinuous pure tones. In the brain-injured patients, the presence of AEPs to two or more complex tone stimuli (in the combined assessment of two authors who were 'blind' to the clinical and behavioural data) was significantly associated with the demonstrable possession of discriminative hearing (the ability to respond differentially to verbal commands

  8. Limb suction evoked during arterial occlusion causes systemic sympathetic activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl; Herr, Michael D; Drew, Rachel C; Muller, Matthew D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-09-01

    Venous saline infusions in an arterially occluded forearm evokes reflex increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that the application of suction to the human limbs would activate this venous distension reflex and raise sympathetic outflow. We placed airtight pressure tanks and applied 100 mmHg negative pressure to an arterially occluded limb (occlusion and suction, O&S) to induce tissue deformation without fluid translocation. BP, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were assessed in 19 healthy subjects during 2 min of arm or leg O&S. Occlusion without suction served as a control. During a separate visit, saline (5% forearm volume) was infused into veins of the arterially occluded arm (n = 13). The O&S increased limb circumference, MSNA burst rate (arm: Δ6.7 ± 0.7; leg: Δ6.8 ± 0.7 bursts/min), and total activity (arm: Δ199 ± 14; leg: Δ172 ± 22 units/min) and BP (arm: Δ4.3 ± 0.3; leg: Δ9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg) from the baseline. The MSNA and BP responses during arm O&S correlated with those during leg O&S. Occlusion alone had no effect on MSNA and BP. MSNA (r = 0.607) responses during arm O&S correlated with those evoked by the saline infusion into the arm. These correlations suggest that sympathetic activation during limb O&S is likely, at least partially, to be evoked via the venous distension reflex. These data suggest that suction of an occluded limb evokes sympathetic activation and that the limb venous distension reflex exists in arms and legs of normal humans. PMID:26136530

  9. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Jun; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Lili, Li; Wang, Jing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xu, Guang-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710054 (China)

    2015-03-10

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces n{sup n} with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method.

  10. High-frequency combination coding-based steady-state visual evoked potential for brain computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a new steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm for brain computer interface (BCI) systems. The goal of this study is to increase the number of targets using fewer stimulation high frequencies, with diminishing subject’s fatigue and reducing the risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures. The new paradigm is High-Frequency Combination Coding-Based High-Frequency Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (HFCC-SSVEP).Firstly, we studied SSVEP high frequency(beyond 25 Hz)response of SSVEP, whose paradigm is presented on the LED. The SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of high frequency(beyond 40 Hz) response is very low, which is been unable to be distinguished through the traditional analysis method; Secondly we investigated the HFCC-SSVEP response (beyond 25 Hz) for 3 frequencies (25Hz, 33.33Hz, and 40Hz), HFCC-SSVEP produces nn with n high stimulation frequencies through Frequence Combination Code. Further, Animproved Hilbert-huang transform (IHHT)-based variable frequency EEG feature extraction method and a local spectrum extreme target identification algorithmare adopted to extract time-frequency feature of the proposed HFCC-SSVEP response.Linear predictions and fixed sifting (iterating) 10 time is used to overcome the shortage of end effect and stopping criterion,generalized zero-crossing (GZC) is used to compute the instantaneous frequency of the proposed SSVEP respondent signals, the improved HHT-based feature extraction method for the proposed SSVEP paradigm in this study increases recognition efficiency, so as to improve ITR and to increase the stability of the BCI system. what is more, SSVEPs evoked by high-frequency stimuli (beyond 25Hz) minimally diminish subject’s fatigue and prevent safety hazards linked to photo-induced epileptic seizures, So as to ensure the system efficiency and undamaging.This study tests three subjects in order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method

  11. Limb venous distension evokes sympathetic activation via stimulation of the limb afferents in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently shown that a saline infusion in the veins of an arterially occluded human forearm evokes a systemic response with increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure. In this report, we examined whether this response was a reflex that was due to venous distension. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography) were assessed in 14 young healthy subjects. In the saline trial (n = 14), 5% forearm volume normal saline was infused in an ar...

  12. Variability of motor potentials evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation depends on muscle activation

    OpenAIRE

    Darling, Warren G.; Wolf, Steven L.; Butler, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether motor cortex excitability assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is less variable when subjects maintain a visually controlled low-level contraction of the muscle of interest. We also examined the dependence of single motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude on stimulation intensity and pre-stimulus muscle activation level using linear and non-linear multiple regression analysis. Eight healthy adult subjects received single p...

  13. Usefulness of functional MRI associated with PET scan and evoked potentials in the evaluation of brain functions after severe brain injury: preliminary results.

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Stéphane; Nicolas-Ong, Caroline; Schunck, Thérèse; Schenck, Malika; Collange, Olivier; Mutschler, Véronique; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Delon-Martin, Chantal; Schneider, Francis

    2010-01-01

    In many patients, there is a good concordance between fMRI and brain functions suggested by EP and metabolic activity demonstrated with PET. In few others, fMRI can be integrated in the early evaluation of brain functions to further augment our capacity for a proper evaluation of brain functions in critically ill patients.

  14. Assessment of Electrically Evoked Auditory Brain Stem Response of 30 Implanted Patients With Nucleus Multichannel Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Soqrat Faghihzadeh

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods and Materials: Investigation of electrically evoked auditory brain stem response (EABR is a new issue, especially in implanted patients. Experiments were performed in C.I Center of Iranian Institute for Science and research expansion,1996 on 30 implanted patients with 22 spectra and MSP cochlear implant system and 30 normal subjects with the range of 3-33 years. Findings: I- EABR was obtained in the implanted patients. 2- Absolute latency of EABR waves is 1-1.5 ms shorter than ABR waves ‘P<0.05. 3-Absolute latency of wave V decreases as a function of electric stimulus magnitude (P<0.05. 4- No significant difference was observed in IPL Ill-V between ABR and EABR.

  15. Infrared neural stimulation fails to evoke neural activity in the deaf guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander C; Fallon, James B; Wise, Andrew K; Wade, Scott A; Shepherd, Robert K; Stoddart, Paul R

    2015-06-01

    At present there is some debate as to the processes by which infrared neural stimulation (INS) activates neurons in the cochlea, as the lasers used for INS can potentially generate a range of secondary stimuli e.g. an acoustic stimulus is produced when the light is absorbed by water. To clarify whether INS in the cochlea requires functioning hair cells and to explore the potential relevance to cochlear implants, experiments using INS were performed in the cochleae of both normal hearing and profoundly deaf guinea pigs. A response to laser stimulation was readily evoked in normal hearing cochlea. However, no response was evoked in any profoundly deaf cochleae, for either acute or chronic deafening, contrary to previous work where a response was observed after acute deafening with ototoxic drugs. A neural response to electrical stimulation was readily evoked in all cochleae after deafening. The absence of a response from optical stimuli in profoundly deaf cochleae suggests that the response from INS in the cochlea is hair cell mediated. PMID:25796297

  16. Functional imaging of glucose-evoked rat islet activities using transient intrinsic optical signals

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Cui, Wan-Xing; Li, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Rong-Wen; Thompson, Anthony; Amthor, Franklin; Wang, Xu-Jing

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging of intact rat islet, which consists of many endocrine cells working together. A near-infrared digital microscope was employed for optical monitoring of islet activities evoked by glucose stimulation. Dynamic NIR images revealed transient IOS responses in the islet activated by low-dose (2.75mM) and high-dose (5.5mM) glucose stimuli. Comparative experiments and quantitative analysis indicated that both glucose metabolism and calcium/insulin...

  17. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Keith N.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Owoc, Maryanna; Kozin, Elliott; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway, and it measured the evoked response to optical stimulation. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50 dB SPL acoustic click stimulus. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of GFP label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320 Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50 Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics will be necessary to convey information in rates typical of many auditory signals. PMID:25481416

  18. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A Dienel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models.

  19. A PET activation study of brush-evoked allodynia in patients with nerve injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kupers, Ron; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    . A direct post hoc comparison of brush -and allodynia-induced rCBF changes showed that allodynia was associated with significantly stronger activations in orbitofrontal cortex and ipsilateral insula whereas non-painful brushing more strongly activated SI and BA 5/7. These findings indicate that...... allodynia. Nine patients with peripheral nerve injury were scanned during rest, brush-evoked allodynia, and brushing of normal contralateral skin. PET data were analyzed for the whole group and for single subjects. Allodynic stimulation activated the contralateral orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11) in every...... patient. Whereas normal brushing activated most strongly the contralateral insular cortex, allodynic brushing produced an ipsilateral activation in this area. Another important difference between normal and allodynic brushing was the absence of a contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI) activation...

  20. MSG-Evoked c-Fos Activity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Is Dependent upon Fluid Delivery and Stimulation Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Jennifer M; Thompson, John A

    2016-03-01

    The marker of neuronal activation, c-Fos, can be used to visualize spatial patterns of neural activity in response to taste stimulation. Because animals will not voluntarily consume aversive tastes, these stimuli are infused directly into the oral cavity via intraoral cannulae, whereas appetitive stimuli are given in drinking bottles. Differences in these 2 methods make comparison of taste-evoked brain activity between results that utilize these methods problematic. Surprisingly, the intraoral cannulae experimental conditions that produce a similar pattern of c-Fos activity in response to taste stimulation remain unexplored. Stimulation pattern (e.g., constant/intermittent) and hydration state (e.g., water-restricted/hydrated) are the 2 primary differences between delivering tastes via bottles versus intraoral cannulae. Thus, we quantified monosodium glutamate (MSG)-evoked brain activity, as measured by c-Fos, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS; primary taste nucleus) across several conditions. The number and pattern of c-Fos neurons in the nTS of animals that were water-restricted and received a constant infusion of MSG via intraoral cannula most closely mimicked animals that consumed MSG from a bottle. Therefore, in order to compare c-Fos activity between cannulae-stimulated and bottle-stimulated animals, cannulated animals should be water restricted prior to stimulation, and receive taste stimuli at a constant flow. PMID:26762887

  1. Changes of paired-pulse evoked responses during the development of epileptic activity in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou-yan FENG; Xiao-jing ZHENG; Cong TIAN; Yang WANG; Hao-yu XING

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunction of inhibitory synaptic transmission can destroy the balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs in neurons,thereby inducing epileptic activity.The aim of the paper is to investigate the effects of successive excitatory inputs on the epileptic activity induced in the absence of inhibitions.Paired-pulse orthodromic and antidromic stimulations were used to test the changes in the evoked responses in the hippocampus.Picrotoxin (PTX),y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptor antagonist,was added to block the inhibitory synaptic transmission and to establish the epileptic model.Extracellular evoked population spike (PS) was recorded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus.The results showed that the application of PTX induced a biphasic change in the paired-pulse ratio of PS amplitude.A short latency increase of the second PS (PS2) was later followed by a reappearance of PS2 depression.This type of depression was observed in both orthodromic and antidromic paired-pulse responses,whereas the GABAergic PS2 depression [called paired-pulse depression (PPD)] during baseline recordings only appeared in orthodromic-evoked responses.In addition,the depression duration at approximately 100 ms was consistent with a relative silent period observed within spontaneous burst discharges induced by prolonged application of PTX.In conclusion,the neurons may ignore the excitatory inputs and intrinsically generate bursts during epileptic activity.The depolarization block could be the mechanisms underlying the PPD in the absence of GABAA inhibitions.The distinct neuronal responses to stimulations during different epileptic stages may implicate the different antiepileptic effects of electrical stimulation.

  2. Toward brain-computer interface based wheelchair control utilizing tactually-evoked event-related potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Herweg, Andreas; Kübler, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background People with severe disabilities, e.g. due to neurodegenerative disease, depend on technology that allows for accurate wheelchair control. For those who cannot operate a wheelchair with a joystick, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) may offer a valuable option. Technology depending on visual or auditory input may not be feasible as these modalities are dedicated to processing of environmental stimuli (e.g. recognition of obstacles, ambient noise). Herein we thus validated the feasi...

  3. Evaluation of brain stem auditory evoked potentials in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Prem

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Though there are few studies addressing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, subclinical BAEP abnormalities in stable COPD patients have not been studied. The present study aimed to evaluate the BAEP abnormalities in this study group. Materials and Methods : In the present study, 80 male subjects were included: COPD group comprised 40 smokers with stable COPD with no clinical neuropathy; 40 age-matched healthy volunteers served as the control group. Latencies of BAEP waves I, II, III, IV, and V, together with interpeak latencies (IPLs of I-III, I-V, and III-V, and amplitudes of waves I-Ia and V-Va were studied in both the groups to compare the BAEP abnormalities in COPD group; the latter were correlated with patient characteristics and Mini-Mental Status Examination Questionnaire (MMSEQ scores to seek any significant correlation. Results: Twenty-six (65% of the 40 COPD patients had BAEP abnormalities. We observed significantly prolonged latencies of waves I, III, V over left ear and waves III, IV, V over right ear; increased IPLs of I-V, III-V over left ear and of I-III, I-V, III-V over right side. Amplitudes of waves I-Ia and V-Va were decreased bilaterally. Over left ear, the latencies of wave I and III were significantly correlated with FEV 1 ; and amplitude of wave I-Ia, with smoking pack years. A weak positive correlation between amplitude of wave I-Ia and duration of illness; and a weak negative correlation between amplitude of wave V-Va and MMSEQ scores were seen over right side. Conclusions : We observed significant subclinical BAEP abnormalities on electrophysiological evaluation in studied stable COPD male patients having mild-to-moderate airflow obstruction.

  4. [A wireless smart home system based on brain-computer interface of steady state visual evoked potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Xing, Xiao; Guo, Xuhong; Liu, Zehua; He, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) system is a system that achieves communication and control among humans and computers and other electronic equipment with the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. This paper describes the working theory of the wireless smart home system based on the BCI technology. We started to get the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) using the single chip microcomputer and the visual stimulation which composed by LED lamp to stimulate human eyes. Then, through building the power spectral transformation on the LabVIEW platform, we processed timely those EEG signals under different frequency stimulation so as to transfer them to different instructions. Those instructions could be received by the wireless transceiver equipment to control the household appliances and to achieve the intelligent control towards the specified devices. The experimental results showed that the correct rate for the 10 subjects reached 100%, and the control time of average single device was 4 seconds, thus this design could totally achieve the original purpose of smart home system. PMID:25764705

  5. Functional imaging of glucose-evoked rat islet activities using transient intrinsic optical signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Cui, Wan-Xing; Li, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Rong-Wen; Thompson, Anthony; Amthor, Franklin; Wang, Xu-Jing

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging of intact rat islet, which consists of many endocrine cells working together. A near-infrared digital microscope was employed for optical monitoring of islet activities evoked by glucose stimulation. Dynamic NIR images revealed transient IOS responses in the islet activated by low-dose (2.75 mM) and high-dose (5.5 mM) glucose stimuli. Comparative experiments and quantitative analysis indicated that both glucose metabolism and calcium/insulin dynamics might contribute to the observed IOS responses. Further investigation of the IOS imaging technology may provide a high resolution method for ex vivo functional examination of the islet, which is important for advanced study of diabetes associated islet dysfunctions and for improved quality control of donor islets for transplantation.

  6. Contralateral acoustic suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions: Activation of the medial olivocochlear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Zoran

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Medial olivocochlear pathway represents the final part of efferent acoustic pathway which comes from the superior olivary complex ending at outer hair cells. Activation of medial olivocochlear system (MOCS alters the cochlear output decreasing the travelling wave within cochlea. Stimulation of MOCS provides protection against moderate levels of noise, encoding noise signals as well as selecting hearing attention. Activation of MOCS can be performed using contralateral acoustic stimulation. The principal result of presentation of contralateral acoustic stimulation during screening of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE is an attenuation of the TEOAE amplitude. Thirty-eight ears were examined in this study: twenty-eight ears from 14 normal-hearing adults and 10 patients with unilateral deafness. Healthy subjects were exposed to contralateral broad-band noise of various intensities (40, 30, 20 and 10 dB SL, as well as 30 dB SL pure tone stimulation (1 kHz and 4 kHz. A decrease of TEOAE amplitudes during contralateral stimulation with 40 and 30 dB SL broad-band noise and pure tones was established. This effect was a result of MOCS activation. A greater intensity of contralateral stimulation evoked greater decrease of TEOAE amplitude; stimulation with broad-band noise caused greater attenuation than with pure tone stimulation. Contralateral stimulation of deaf ears in the group with unilateral deafness was also performed. Statistically significant difference between TEOAE amplitude before and during contralateral stimulation was not established. This circumstance explains that activation of MOCS and consequent reduction of outer hair cells motility is very possibly caused by contralateral acoustic stimulation. Apart from studying physiological significance of efferent auditory system, results of this and similar studies can be used for production of hearing aids improving speech discrimination in noisy environment.

  7. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author)

  8. Parahippocampal activation evoked by masked traumatic images in posttraumatic stress disorder: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hideshi; Fukuda, Rin; Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Rogers, Mark; Kasai, Kiyoto; Machida, Toru; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Yamasue, Hidenori; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Nobumasa

    2005-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been widely studied, but its neural mechanism is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to identify dysfunctional areas in PTSD throughout the whole brain to help to elucidate the neural mechanisms of PTSD. Sixteen patients with PTSD and sixteen healthy controls participated in this study. Traumatic images under perceptual threshold including scenes of earthquakes, traffic accidents, ambulances, emergency rooms, and crimes were presented to the participants, and brain activation was measured using functional MRI. Functional brain images of both groups were evaluated with random effect analysis for the whole brain. In the control group, activation in the ventral frontoparietal areas correlated significantly with presentation of the masked traumatic stimuli. In the PTSD group, activation was not observed in these areas, but significant activation correlated with the masked traumatic stimuli in the parahippocampal region including the left parahippocampal gyrus and tail of the left hippocampus. These results suggest that in PTSD patients activation in the ventral frontoparietal network associated with visual attention processing is attenuated, while the left hippocampal area associated with episodic and autobiographical memory is abnormally easily activated. This pattern of activation corresponds well to the clinical characteristics of PTSD, in which even slight traumatic stimuli tend to induce intrusive recollection or flashbacks, despite a general decrease in attention and ability to concentrate. PMID:15955491

  9. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-Wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300–500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures.

  10. Neural activity patterns evoked by a spouse's incongruent emotional reactions when recalling marriage-relevant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrican, Raluca; Rosenbaum, Rachel Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2015-10-01

    Resonance with the inner states of another social actor is regarded as a hallmark of emotional closeness. Nevertheless, sensitivity to potential incongruities between one's own and an intimate partner's subjective experience is reportedly also important for close relationship quality. Here, we tested whether perceivers show greater neurobehavioral responsiveness to a spouse's positive (rather than negative) context-incongruent emotions, and whether this effect is influenced by the perceiver's satisfaction with the relationship. Thus, we used fMRI to scan older long-term married female perceivers while they judged either their spouse's or a stranger's affect, based on incongruent nonverbal and verbal cues. The verbal cues were selected to evoke strongly polarized affective responses. Higher perceiver marital satisfaction predicted greater neural processing of the spouse's (rather than the strangers) nonverbal cues. Nevertheless, across all perceivers, greater neural processing of a spouse's (rather than a stranger's) nonverbal behavior was reliably observed only when the behavior was positive and the context was negative. The spouse's positive (rather than negative) nonverbal behavior evoked greater activity in putative mirror neuron areas, such as the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL). This effect was related to a stronger inhibitory influence of cognitive control areas on mirror system activity in response to a spouse's negative nonverbal cues, an effect that strengthened with increasing perceiver marital satisfaction. Our valence-asymmetric findings imply that neurobehavioral responsiveness to a close other's emotions may depend, at least partly, on cognitive control resources, which are used to support the perceiver's interpersonal goals (here, goals that are relevant to relationship stability). PMID:26219536

  11. Four weeks' inhalation exposure of Long Evans rats to 4-tert-butyltoluene: Effect on evoked potentials, behaviour and brain neurochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Ladefoged, Ole; Østergaard, Grete;

    2000-01-01

    somatosensory evoked potentials were not affected by TBT In Auditory Brain Stem Response there was no shift in hearing threshold, but the amplitude of the first wave was increased in both exposed groups at high stimulus levels. Three to four months after the end of exposure, behavioural studies in Morris water......, respectively. We hypothesise that a reduced yield of synaptosomal protein reflects a more general effect of organic solvent exposure on the software of the brain. The synaptosomal concentration per mg synaptosomal protein and the total amount of 5-hydroxytryptamine were not affected whereas the total amount of...... maze and eight-arm maze failed to demonstrate any TBT induced effects. Exposure was followed by a 5 months exposure-free period prior to gross regional and subcellular (synaptosomal) neurochemical investigations of the brain. TBT reduced the NA concentration in whole brain minus cerebellum...

  12. Double function of noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring based on flash visual evoked potentials in unconscious patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingzhong; Ma, Shuang; Guan, Yongchang; Du, Jinghua; Liu, Guojun; Zhao, Xianlin

    2016-05-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring based on flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEP) is a noninvasive method of monitoring ICP. The early diagnosis of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) in unconscious patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of F-VEP ICP monitoring in predicting TON and detecting contusion enlargement (CE) in unconscious TBI patients using a modified approach. A series of F-VEP ICP-monitored unconscious TBI patients were included in the study. The interocular differences in N2 wave latency (DL) and amplitude (DA) were obtained through monocular flash stimulation. The increases in ICP (dxP) and interchannel difference (dxDC) across various time points were obtained through binocular flash stimulation. The predictive power of DL and DA on TON, as well as of dxP and dxDC on CE, was assessed by logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Patients with TON had a longer DL and a higher DA than those without TON. The dxP and dxDC of patients with CE were both higher than those of patients without CE. The differences were statistically significant. The logistic regression showed that both DL and DA were predictors of TON, whereas only dxDC was a predictor of CE. However, the ROC curve analysis showed that DL had greater predictive power for TON, and dxDC had greater predictive power for CE. An F-VEP ICP monitoring system with a modified approach is beneficial for early diagnosis of TON and prediction of CE in unconscious TBI patients. PMID:26922509

  13. Effect of current frequency during electrical stunning in a water bath on somatosensory evoked responses in turkey's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchonière, M; Le Pottier, G; Fernandez, X

    2000-08-01

    Somatosensory evoked responses (SEP) in a turkey's brain were determined after water-bath stunning with a 150-mA (constant current) delivered with 50, 300 or 600 Hz, or with 75 mA, delivered with 50-Hz alternating current (AC) in order to evaluate the effectiveness of stunning. Ninety-four BUT 9 turkey hens 12 weeks of age were surgically implanted with EEG recording and left wing nerve stimulating electrodes 4 hours before stunning. They were individually stunned by immersion of the head and upper part of the neck in a water bath for 4 s. Using a 150-mA current, all birds stunned at 50 Hz showed cardiac arrest and a flat EEG immediately after the stun with no SEP recovery. The incidence of cardiac arrest at stunning decreased with increasing current frequency but SEP were lost in all birds. In birds that survived the stun, the duration of SEP abolition was on average 69 and 34 seconds at 300 and 600 Hz, respectively. Stunning with a 75-mA AC, delivered with 50 Hz, induced cardiac arrest in 32 per cent of turkeys. SEP were abolished in only 71 per cent of the birds that survived the stun, with an average duration of SEP of 66 seconds. The results indicate that increasing the frequency of a 150-mA AC current leads to a decreased stunning efficiency. A current of 75 mA per bird is unacceptable since 29 per cent of the birds do not show SEP abolition. PMID:10924394

  14. Combination of Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers inhibits acetylcholine-evoked nitric oxide release in rat superior mesenteric artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevičius, E; Lopez-Valverde, V; Rivera, L; Hughes, A D; Mulvany, M J; Simonsen, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study investigated whether calcium-activated K+ channels are involved in acetylcholine-evoked nitric oxide (NO) release and relaxation. Experimental approach: Simultaneous measurements of NO concentration and relaxation were performed in rat superior mesenteric artery and endothelial cell membrane potential and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) were measured. Key results. A combination of apamin plus charybotoxin, which are, respectively, blockers of small-conductance and of intermediate- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K channels abolished acetylcholine (10 μM)-evoked hyperpolarization of endothelial cell membrane potential. Acetylcholine-evoked NO release was reduced by 68% in high K+ (80 mM) and by 85% in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin. In noradrenaline-contracted arteries, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an inhibitor of NO synthase inhibited acetylcholine-evoked NO release and relaxation. However, only further addition of oxyhaemoglobin or apamin plus charybdotoxin eliminated the residual acetylcholine-evoked NO release and relaxation. Removal of extracellular calcium or an inhibitor of calcium influx channels, SKF96365, abolished acetylcholine-evoked increase in NO concentration and [Ca2+]i. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 30 μM), an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase, caused a sustained NO release in the presence, but only a transient increase in the absence, of extracellular calcium. Incubation with apamin and charybdotoxin did not change acetylcholine or CPA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, but inhibited the sustained NO release induced by CPA. Conclusions and Implications: Acetylcholine increases endothelial cell [Ca2+]i by release of stored calcium and calcium influx resulting in activation of apamin and charybdotoxin-sensitive K channels, hyperpolarization and release of NO in the rat superior mesenteric artery. PMID:16967048

  15. Musical Brains. A study of evoked musical sensations without external auditory stimuli. Preliminary report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There are individuals, usually musicians, who are seemingly able to evoke musical sensations without external auditory stimuli. However, to date there is no available evidence to determine if it is feasible to have musical sensations without using external sensory receptors nor if there is a biological substrate to these sensations. Study design: Two single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) evaluations with [99mTc]-HMPAO were conducted in each of three female musicians. One was done under basal conditions (without evoking) and the other one while evoking these sensations. Results: In the NeuroSPECT studies of the musicians who were tested while evoking a musical composition, there was a significant increase in perfusion above the normal mean in the right and left hemispheres in Brodmann's areas 9 and 8 (frontal executive area) and in areas 40 on the left side (auditory center). However, under basal conditions there was no hyper perfusion of areas 9, 8, 39 and 40. In one case hyper perfusion was found under basal conditions in area 45, however it was less than when she was evoking. Conclusions: These findings are suggestive of a biological substrate to the process of evoking musical sensations (au)

  16. Modeling of region-specific fMRI BOLD neurovascular response functions in rat brain reveals residual differences that correlate with the differences in regional evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawela, Christopher P; Hudetz, Anthony G; Ward, B Douglas; Schulte, Marie L; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S; Mauck, Matthew C; Cho, Younghoon R; Neitz, Jay; Hyde, James S

    2008-06-01

    The response of the rat visual system to flashes of blue light has been studied by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The BOLD temporal response is dependent on the number of flashes presented and demonstrates a refractory period that depends on flash frequency. Activated brain regions included the primary and secondary visual cortex, superior colliculus (SC), dorsal lateral geniculate (DLG), and lateral posterior nucleus (LP), which were found to exhibit differing temporal responses. To explain these differences, the BOLD neurovascular response function was modeled. A second-order differential equation was developed and solved numerically to arrive at region-specific response functions. Included in the model are the light input from the diode (duty cycle), a refractory period, a transient response following onset and cessation of stimulus, and a slow adjustment to changes in the average level of the signal. Constants in the differential equation were evaluated for each region by fitting the model to the experimental BOLD response from a single flash, and the equation was then solved for multiple flashes. The simulation mimics the major features of the data; however, remaining differences in the frequency dependence of the response between the cortical and subcortical regions were unexplained. We hypothesized that these discrepancies were due to regional-specific differences in neuronal response to flash frequency. To test this hypothesis, cortical visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded using the same stimulation protocol as the fMRI. Cortical VEPs were more suppressed than subcortical VEPs as flash frequency increased, supporting our hypothesis. This is the first report that regional differences in neuronal activation to the same stimulus lead to differential BOLD activation. PMID:18406628

  17. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  18. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  19. Cholinergic pairing with visual activation results in long-term enhancement of visual evoked potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Il Kang

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh contributes to learning processes by modulating cortical plasticity in terms of intensity of neuronal activity and selectivity properties of cortical neurons. However, it is not known if ACh induces long term effects within the primary visual cortex (V1 that could sustain visual learning mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed visual evoked potentials (VEPs in V1 of rats during a 4-8 h period after coupling visual stimulation to an intracortical injection of ACh analog carbachol or stimulation of basal forebrain. To clarify the action of ACh on VEP activity in V1, we individually pre-injected muscarinic (scopolamine, nicotinic (mecamylamine, alpha7 (methyllycaconitine, and NMDA (CPP receptor antagonists before carbachol infusion. Stimulation of the cholinergic system paired with visual stimulation significantly increased VEP amplitude (56% during a 6 h period. Pre-treatment with scopolamine, mecamylamine and CPP completely abolished this long-term enhancement, while alpha7 inhibition induced an instant increase of VEP amplitude. This suggests a role of ACh in facilitating visual stimuli responsiveness through mechanisms comparable to LTP which involve nicotinic and muscarinic receptors with an interaction of NMDA transmission in the visual cortex.

  20. A high-fat diet impairs cooling-evoked brown adipose tissue activation via a vagal afferent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-08-01

    In dramatic contrast to rats on a control diet, rats maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) failed to activate brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cooling despite robust increases in their BAT activity following direct activation of their BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in the raphe pallidus. Cervical vagotomy or blockade of glutamate receptors in the nucleus of the tractus solitarii (NTS) reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of cold-evoked BAT activity. Thus, a HFD does not prevent rats from mounting a robust, centrally driven BAT thermogenesis; however, a HFD does alter a vagal afferent input to NTS neurons, thereby preventing the normal activation of BAT thermogenesis to cooling. These results, paralleling the absence of cooling-evoked glucose uptake in the BAT of obese humans, reveal a neural mechanism through which consumption of a HFD contributes to reduced energy expenditure and thus to weight gain. PMID:27354235

  1. Resting state brain activity and functional brain mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wang Peijun; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Functional brain imaging studies commonly use either resting or passive task states as their control conditions, and typically identify the activation brain region associated with a specific task by subtracting the resting from the active task conditions. Numerous studies now suggest, however, that the resting state may not reflect true mental "rest" conditions. The mental activity that occurs during"rest" might therefore greatly influence the functional neuroimaging observations that are collected through the usual subtracting analysis strategies. Exploring the ongoing mental processes that occur during resting conditions is thus of particular importance for deciphering functional brain mapping results and obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of human brain functions. In this review article, we will mainly focus on the discussion of the current research background of functional brain mapping at resting state and the physiological significance of the available neuroimaging data.

  2. Evoked bioelectrical activity of efferent fibers of the sciatic nerve of white rats in experimental menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodinsky A.G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was analysis of the bioelectrical activity of efferent fibers of the sciatic nerve in experimental menopause condition. Experiments were performed on 25 female white rats, divided into experimental and control groups. Menopause was modeled by total ovariohysterectomy. In 120 days after modeling we had recorded evoked action potentials of fibers of isolated ventral root L5 induced by stimulation of sciatic nerve with rectangular pulses. Threshold, chronaxia, latency, amplitude and duration of the action potential (AP were analysed. Refractory phenomenon was investigated by applying paired stimuli at intervals of 2 to 20 ms. In the context of long-term hypoestrogenemy threshold of AP appearance was 55,32±7,69%, chronaxy – 115,09±2,67%, latent period – 112,62±1,74% as compared with the control animals (p<0.01. In conditions of paired stimuli applying the amplitude of response to the testing stimulus in animals with ovariohysterectomy at intervals 3 and 4 ms was 61,25±36,45% and 53,48±18,64% (p<0.05 respectively.

  3. Cerebral cortical neurons with activity linked to central neurogenic spontaneous and evoked elevations in cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We recorded neurons in rat cerebral cortex with activity relating to the neurogenic elevations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) coupled to stereotyped bursts of EEG activity, burst-cerebrovascular wave complexes, appearing spontaneously or evoked by electrical stimulation of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) or fastigial nucleus (FN). Of 333 spontaneously active neurons only 15 (5%), in layers 5-6, consistently (P neurons in deep cortical laminae whose activity correlates with neurogenic elevations of rCBF. These neurons may function to transduce afferent neuronal signals into vasodilation.

  4. The Theoretical Distribution of Evoked Brainstem Activity in Preterm, High-Risk, and Healthy Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamy, A.

    1981-01-01

    Determines the frequency distribution of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential variables (BAEP) for premature babies at different stages of development--normal newborns, infants, young children, and adults. The author concludes that the assumption of normality underlying most "standard" statistical analyses can be met for many BAEP measures.…

  5. Decoding Subjective Intensity of Nociceptive Pain from Pre-stimulus and Post-stimulus Brain Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yiheng; Tan, Ao; Bai, Yanru; Hung, Yeung Sam; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a highly subjective experience. Self-report is the gold standard for pain assessment in clinical practice, but it may not be available or reliable in some populations. Neuroimaging data, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have the potential to be used to provide physiology-based and quantitative nociceptive pain assessment tools that complements self-report. However, existing neuroimaging-based nociceptive pain assessments only rely on the information in pain-evoked brain activities, but neglect the fact that the perceived intensity of pain is also encoded by ongoing brain activities prior to painful stimulation. Here, we proposed to use machine learning algorithms to decode pain intensity from both pre-stimulus ongoing and post-stimulus evoked brain activities. Neural features that were correlated with intensity of laser-evoked nociceptive pain were extracted from high-dimensional pre- and post-stimulus EEG and fMRI activities using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). Further, we used support vector machine (SVM) to predict the intensity of pain from pain-related time-frequency EEG patterns and BOLD-fMRI patterns. Results showed that combining predictive information in pre- and post-stimulus brain activities can achieve significantly better performance in classifying high-pain and low-pain and in predicting the rating of perceived pain than only using post-stimulus brain activities. Therefore, the proposed pain prediction method holds great potential in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:27148029

  6. Decoding Subjective Intensity of Nociceptive Pain from Pre-stimulus and Post-stimulus Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yiheng; Tan, Ao; Bai, Yanru; Hung, Yeung Sam; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a highly subjective experience. Self-report is the gold standard for pain assessment in clinical practice, but it may not be available or reliable in some populations. Neuroimaging data, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have the potential to be used to provide physiology-based and quantitative nociceptive pain assessment tools that complements self-report. However, existing neuroimaging-based nociceptive pain assessments only rely on the information in pain-evoked brain activities, but neglect the fact that the perceived intensity of pain is also encoded by ongoing brain activities prior to painful stimulation. Here, we proposed to use machine learning algorithms to decode pain intensity from both pre-stimulus ongoing and post-stimulus evoked brain activities. Neural features that were correlated with intensity of laser-evoked nociceptive pain were extracted from high-dimensional pre- and post-stimulus EEG and fMRI activities using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). Further, we used support vector machine (SVM) to predict the intensity of pain from pain-related time-frequency EEG patterns and BOLD-fMRI patterns. Results showed that combining predictive information in pre- and post-stimulus brain activities can achieve significantly better performance in classifying high-pain and low-pain and in predicting the rating of perceived pain than only using post-stimulus brain activities. Therefore, the proposed pain prediction method holds great potential in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:27148029

  7. Dynamic brain architectures in local brain activity and functional network efficiency associate with efficient reading in bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gangyi; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; Zhu, Zude; He, Yong; Wang, Suiping

    2015-10-01

    The human brain is organized as a dynamic network, in which both regional brain activity and inter-regional connectivity support high-level cognitive processes, such as reading. However, it is still largely unknown how the functional brain network organizes to enable fast and effortless reading processing in the native language (L1) but not in a non-proficient second language (L2), and whether the mechanisms underlying local activity are associated with connectivity dynamics in large-scale brain networks. In the present study, we combined activation-based and multivariate graph-theory analysis with functional magnetic resonance imaging data to address these questions. Chinese-English unbalanced bilinguals read narratives for comprehension in Chinese (L1) and in English (L2). Compared with L2, reading in L1 evoked greater brain activation and recruited a more globally efficient but less clustered network organization. Regions with both increased network efficiency and enhanced brain activation in L1 reading were mostly located in the fronto-temporal reading-related network (RN), whereas regions with decreased global network efficiency, increased clustering, and more deactivation in L2 reading were identified in the default mode network (DMN). Moreover, functional network efficiency was closely associated with local brain activation, and such associations were also modulated by reading efficiency in the two languages. Our results demonstrate that an economical and integrative brain network topology is associated with efficient reading, and further reveal a dynamic association between network efficiency and local activation for both RN and DMN. These findings underscore the importance of considering interregional connectivity when interpreting local BOLD signal changes in bilingual reading. PMID:26095088

  8. Changes in music tempo entrain movement related brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Roesch, Etienne; Weaver, James; Williams, Duncan; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2014-01-01

    The neural mechanisms of music listening and appreciation are not yet completely understood. Based on the apparent relationship between the beats per minute (tempo) of music and the desire to move (for example feet tapping) induced while listening to that music it is hypothesised that musical tempo may evoke movement related activity in the brain. Participants are instructed to listen, without moving, to a large range of musical pieces spanning a range of styles and tempos during an electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment. Event-related desynchronisation (ERD) in the EEG is observed to correlate significantly with the variance of the tempo of the musical stimuli. This suggests that the dynamics of the beat of the music may induce movement related brain activity in the motor cortex. Furthermore, significant correlations are observed between EEG activity in the alpha band over the motor cortex and the bandpower of the music in the same frequency band over time. This relationship is observed to correlate with the strength of the ERD, suggesting entrainment of motor cortical activity relates to increased ERD strength. PMID:25571015

  9. Different modulation by Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers and herbimycin of acetylcholine- and flow-evoked vasodilatation in rat mesenteric small arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsgaard, Michael; Lopez, Vanesa; Buus, Niels H; Simonsen, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    The present study addressed whether endothelium-dependent vasodilatation evoked by acetylcholine and flow are mediated by the same mechanisms in isolated rat mesenteric small arteries, suspended in a pressure myograph for the measurement of internal diameter. In pressurized arterial segments contracted with U46619 in the presence of indomethacin, shear stress generated by the flow evoked relaxation. Thus, in endothelium-intact segments low (5.1±0.6 dyn cm−2) and high (19±2 dyn cm−2) shear stress evoked vasodilatations that were reduced by, respectively, 68±11 and 68±8% (P<0.05, n=7) by endothelial cell removal. Acetylcholine (0.01–1 μM) evoked concentration-dependent vasodilatation that was abolished by endothelial cell removal. Incubation with indomethacin alone did not change acetylcholine and shear stress-evoked vasodilatation, while the combination of indomethacin with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, NG,NG-asymmetric dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA 1 mM), reduced low and high shear stress-evoked vasodilatation with, respectively, 52±15 and 58±10% (P<0.05, n=9), but it did not change acetylcholine-evoked vasodilatation. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated K+ channels with a combination of apamin (0.5 μM) and charybdotoxin (ChTX) (0.1 μM) did not change shear stress- and acetylcholine-evoked vasodilatation. In the presence of indomethacin and ADMA, the combination of apamin (0.5 μM) and ChTx (0.1 μM) increased contraction induced by U46619, but these blockers did not change the vasodilatation evoked by shear stress. In contrast, acetylcholine-evoked vasodilatation was abolished by the combination of apamin and charybdotoxin. In the presence of indomethacin, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A (1 μM), inhibited low and high shear stress-evoked vasodilatation with, respectively, 32±12 and 68±14% (P<0.05, n=8), but it did not change vasodilatation induced by acetylcholine. In the presence of indomethacin and ADMA, herbimycin A neither

  10. Active tactile exploration using a brain-machine-brain interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, Joseph E; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Ifft, Peter J; Zhuang, Katie Z; Shokur, Solaiman; Bleuler, Hannes; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2011-11-10

    Brain-machine interfaces use neuronal activity recorded from the brain to establish direct communication with external actuators, such as prosthetic arms. It is hoped that brain-machine interfaces can be used to restore the normal sensorimotor functions of the limbs, but so far they have lacked tactile sensation. Here we report the operation of a brain-machine-brain interface (BMBI) that both controls the exploratory reaching movements of an actuator and allows signalling of artificial tactile feedback through intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the primary somatosensory cortex. Monkeys performed an active exploration task in which an actuator (a computer cursor or a virtual-reality arm) was moved using a BMBI that derived motor commands from neuronal ensemble activity recorded in the primary motor cortex. ICMS feedback occurred whenever the actuator touched virtual objects. Temporal patterns of ICMS encoded the artificial tactile properties of each object. Neuronal recordings and ICMS epochs were temporally multiplexed to avoid interference. Two monkeys operated this BMBI to search for and distinguish one of three visually identical objects, using the virtual-reality arm to identify the unique artificial texture associated with each. These results suggest that clinical motor neuroprostheses might benefit from the addition of ICMS feedback to generate artificial somatic perceptions associated with mechanical, robotic or even virtual prostheses. PMID:21976021

  11. Reversal of evoked gamma oscillation deficits is predictive of antipsychotic activity with a unique profile for clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M R; Rind, G; O'Brien, T J; Jones, N C

    2016-01-01

    Recent heuristic models of schizophrenia propose that abnormalities in the gamma frequency cerebral oscillations may be closely tied to the pathophysiology of the disorder, with hypofunction of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAr) implicated as having a crucial role. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is a behavioural measure of sensorimotor gating that is disrupted in schizophrenia. We tested the ability for antipsychotic drugs with diverse pharmacological actions to (1) ameliorate NMDAr antagonist-induced disruptions to gamma oscillations and (2) attenuate NMDAr antagonist-induced disruptions to PPI. We hypothesized that antipsychotic-mediated improvement of PPI deficits would be accompanied by a normalization of gamma oscillatory activity. Wistar rats were implanted with extradural electrodes to facilitate recording of electroencephalogram during PPI behavioural testing. In each session, the rats were administered haloperidol (0.25 mg kg(-1)), clozapine (5 mg kg(-1)), olanzapine (5 mg kg(-1)), LY379268 (3 mg kg(-1)), NFPS (sarcosine, 1 mg kg(-1)), d-serine (1800 mg kg(-1)) or vehicle, followed by the NMDAr antagonists MK-801(0.16 mg kg(-1)), ketamine (5 mg kg(-1)) or vehicle. Outcome measures were auditory-evoked, as well as ongoing, gamma oscillations and PPI. Although treatment with all the clinically validated antipsychotic drugs reduced ongoing gamma oscillations, clozapine was the only compound that prevented the sensory-evoked gamma deficit produced by ketamine and MK-801. In addition, clozapine was also the only antipsychotic that attenuated the disruption to PPI produced by the NMDAr antagonists. We conclude that disruptions to evoked, but not ongoing, gamma oscillations caused by NMDAr antagonists are functionally relevant, and suggest that compounds, which restore sensory-evoked gamma oscillations may improve sensory processing in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27093066

  12. [Effect of the novel dipeptide nootropic agent noopept and its metabolite cyclo-L-prolylglycine on the transcallosal evoked potential in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodavkin, G M; Borlikova, G G; Voronina, T A; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Tushmalova, N A; Seredenin, S B

    2002-01-01

    The effect of new nootropic dipeptides--noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine, GVS-111) and its metabolite (cyclo-L-prolylglycine)--and a standard nootrope piracetam on the transcallosal evoked potential (TEP) in rat brain was studied. In the dose range from 150 to 300 mg/kg, piracetam increased the TEP amplitude, which exhibited a maximum after 1.5-2 h and then gradually decreased. Both noopept and cyclo-L-prolylglycine also increased the TEP amplitude, which attained a plateau and retained this level over the entire observation time (above 3.5 h). All the nootropes studied increased both components of the evoked potential. Piracetam and cyclo-L-prolylglycine led to an approximately equal increase in both waves, while noopept induced a somewhat greater increase in the negative TEP wave amplitude. It is suggested that the positive effect of noopept and cyclo-L-prolylglycine upon the interhemispheric signal transfer (indicated by the improved transcallosal response) can be considered as a potential neurophysiological basis for a positive drug influence on the behavioral level. PMID:12109288

  13. Prognostic Value of Cortically Induced Motor Evoked Activity by TMS in Chronic Stroke: Caveats from a Revealing Single Clinical Case

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amengual, Julià L

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundWe report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury) showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand.Case presentationMultimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP), and Cortical Silent period (CSP) as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST). Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity (indexed by CSP) demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations.ConclusionsThe potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  14. Optical mapping of brain activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fejtová, M.; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana; Konopková, Renata

    Praha: ČVUT Praha, 2006. s. 21-22. ISBN 80-01-03439-9. [Workshop CVUT. 20.02.2006-24.02.2006, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS501210509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : optical mapping * intrinsic signals * brain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  15. The Effects of NMDA Antagonists on Neuronal Activity in Cat Spinal Cord Evoked by Acute Inflammation in the Knee Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Hans-Georg; Grubb, Blair D.; Neugebauer, Volker; Oppmann, Maria

    1991-01-01

    In alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized, spinalized cats we examined the effects of NMDA antagonists on the discharges of 71 spinal neurons which had afferent input from the knee joint. These neurons were rendered hyperexcitable by acute arthritis in the knee induced by kaolin and carrageenan. They were located in the deep dorsal and ventral horn and some of them had ascending axons. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists ketamine and d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), were administered ionophoretically, and ketamine was also administered intravenously. In some of the experiments the antagonists were tested against the agonists NMDA and quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonists consisted of a significant reduction in the resting activity of neurons and/or the responses of the same neurons to mechanical stimulation of the inflamed knee. Intravenous ketamine was most effective in suppressing the resting and mechanically evoked activity in 25 of 26 neurons tested. Ionophoretically applied ketamine had a suppressive effect in 11 of 21 neurons, and AP5 decreased activity in 17 of 24 cells. The reduction in the resting and/or the mechanically evoked discharges was achieved with doses of the antagonists which suppressed the responses to NMDA but not those to quisqualate. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the enhanced responses and basal activity of spinal neurons induced by inflammation in the periphery. PMID:12106256

  16. Decoding dynamic brain patterns from evoked responses: A tutorial on multivariate pattern analysis applied to time-series neuroimaging data

    OpenAIRE

    Grootswagers, Tijl; Wardle, Susan G.; Carlson, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) or brain decoding methods have become standard practice in analysing fMRI data. Although decoding methods have been extensively applied in Brain Computing Interfaces (BCI), these methods have only recently been applied to time-series neuroimaging data such as MEG and EEG to address experimental questions in Cognitive Neuroscience. In a tutorial-style review, we describe a broad set of options to inform future time-series decoding studies from a Cognitive N...

  17. Acute effects of electromagnetic stimulation of the brain on cortical activity, cortical blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate in the cat: an evaluation of safety.

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, J A; Flecknell, P. A.; Kenyon, B R; Koh, T H; Miller, S.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of repeated high intensity electromagnetic stimulation of the brain on cortical activity, cortical blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate has been investigated in the cat, to evaluate the safety of the method. The observations have been made in preparations under propofol anaesthesia before, during and after periods of anoxia. Electromagnetic stimulation of the brain evoked activity in descending motor pathways and was recorded by activity in the median nerve and by muscle tw...

  18. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  19. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar to...... the emission evoked by click stimuli. It is concluded that significant information is obtained by the click rather than by the tonal stimuli. The click-evoked emissions were also recorded from both ears in a consecutive series of 100 full-term and otherwise normal babies 2-4 days after birth. The...

  20. Steady-state motion visual evoked potentials produced by oscillating Newton's rings: implications for brain-computer interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xie

    Full Text Available In this study, we utilize a special visual stimulation protocol, called motion reversal, to present a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP-based BCI paradigm that relied on human perception of motions oscillated in two opposite directions. Four Newton's rings with the oscillating expansion and contraction motions served as visual stimulators to elicit subjects' SSMVEPs. And four motion reversal frequencies of 8.1, 9.8, 12.25 and 14 Hz were tested. According to Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA, the offline accuracy and ITR (mean ± standard deviation over six healthy subjects were 86.56 ± 9.63% and 15.93 ± 3.83 bits/min, respectively. All subjects except one exceeded the level of 80% mean accuracy. Circular Hotelling's T-Squared test (T2 circ also demonstrated that most subjects exhibited significantly strong stimulus-locked SSMVEP responses. The results of declining exponential fittings exhibited low-adaptation characteristics over the 100-s stimulation sequences in most experimental conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that the proposed paradigm can provide comparable performance with low-adaptation characteristic and less visual discomfort for BCI applications.

  1. An Idle-State Detection Algorithm for SSVEP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Using a Maximum Evoked Response Spatial Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Huang, Bisheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Siliang

    2015-11-01

    Although accurate recognition of the idle state is essential for the application of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) in real-world situations, it remains a challenging task due to the variability of the idle state. In this study, a novel algorithm was proposed for the idle state detection in a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. The proposed algorithm aims to solve the idle state detection problem by constructing a better model of the control states. For feature extraction, a maximum evoked response (MER) spatial filter was developed to extract neurophysiologically plausible SSVEP responses, by finding the combination of multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) signals that maximized the evoked responses while suppressing the unrelated background EEGs. The extracted SSVEP responses at the frequencies of both the attended and the unattended stimuli were then used to form feature vectors and a series of binary classifiers for recognition of each control state and the idle state were constructed. EEG data from nine subjects in a three-target SSVEP BCI experiment with a variety of idle state conditions were used to evaluate the proposed algorithm. Compared to the most popular canonical correlation analysis-based algorithm and the conventional power spectrum-based algorithm, the proposed algorithm outperformed them by achieving an offline control state classification accuracy of 88.0 ± 11.1% and idle state false positive rates (FPRs) ranging from 7.4 ± 5.6% to 14.2 ± 10.1%, depending on the specific idle state conditions. Moreover, the online simulation reported BCI performance close to practical use: 22.0 ± 2.9 out of the 24 control commands were correctly recognized and the FPRs achieved as low as approximately 0.5 event/min in the idle state conditions with eye open and 0.05 event/min in the idle state condition with eye closed. These results demonstrate the potential of the proposed algorithm for implementing practical SSVEP BCI systems. PMID

  2. Mapping of Brain Activity by Automated Volume Analysis of Immediate Early Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renier, Nicolas; Adams, Eliza L; Kirst, Christoph; Wu, Zhuhao; Azevedo, Ricardo; Kohl, Johannes; Autry, Anita E; Kadiri, Lolahon; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Victoria X; Tang, Cheuk Y; Olsen, Olav; Dulac, Catherine; Osten, Pavel; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-06-16

    Understanding how neural information is processed in physiological and pathological states would benefit from precise detection, localization, and quantification of the activity of all neurons across the entire brain, which has not, to date, been achieved in the mammalian brain. We introduce a pipeline for high-speed acquisition of brain activity at cellular resolution through profiling immediate early gene expression using immunostaining and light-sheet fluorescence imaging, followed by automated mapping and analysis of activity by an open-source software program we term ClearMap. We validate the pipeline first by analysis of brain regions activated in response to haloperidol. Next, we report new cortical regions downstream of whisker-evoked sensory processing during active exploration. Last, we combine activity mapping with axon tracing to uncover new brain regions differentially activated during parenting behavior. This pipeline is widely applicable to different experimental paradigms, including animal species for which transgenic activity reporters are not readily available. PMID:27238021

  3. [Synchronized, oscillatory brain activity in visual perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunitzer, Gábor

    2008-09-30

    The present study investigates one of the most promising developments of the brain-mind question, namely the possible links between synchronized oscillatory brain activity and certain (visual) perceptual processes. Through a review of the relevant literature, the author introduces the reader to the most important theories of coherent perception ('binding'), and makes an attempt to show how synchronization of EEG-registrable oscillatory activities from various frequency bands might explain binding. Finally, a number of clinical problems are also mentioned, regarding which the presented theoretical framework might deserve further consideration. PMID:18841649

  4. Changing Balance of Spinal Cord Excitability and Nociceptive Brain Activity in Early Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Caroline; Moultrie, Fiona; Gursul, Deniz; Hoskin, Amy; Adams, Eleri; Rogers, Richard; Slater, Rebeccah

    2016-08-01

    In adults, nociceptive reflexes and behavioral responses are modulated by a network of brain regions via descending projections to the spinal dorsal horn [1]. Coordinated responses to noxious inputs manifest from a balance of descending facilitation and inhibition. In contrast, young infants display exaggerated and uncoordinated limb reflexes [2]. Our understanding of nociceptive processing in the infant brain has been advanced by the use of electrophysiological and hemodynamic imaging [3-6]. From approximately 35 weeks' gestation, nociceptive-specific patterns of brain activity emerge [7], whereas prior to this, non-specific bursts of activity occur in response to noxious, tactile, visual, and auditory stimulation [7-10]. During the preterm period, refinement of spinal cord excitability is also observed: reflex duration shortens, response threshold increases, and improved discrimination between tactile and noxious events occurs [2, 11, 12]. However, the development of descending modulation in human infants remains relatively unexplored. In 40 infants aged 28-42 weeks' gestation, we examined the relationship between nociceptive brain activity and spinal reflex withdrawal activity in response to a clinically essential noxious procedure. Nociceptive-specific brain activity increases in magnitude with gestational age, whereas reflex withdrawal activity decreases in magnitude, duration, and latency across the same developmental period. By recording brain and spinal cord activity in the same infants, we demonstrate that the maturation of nociceptive brain activity is concomitant with the refinement of noxious-evoked limb reflexes. We postulate that, consistent with studies in animals, infant reflexes are influenced by the development of top-down inhibitory modulation from maturing subcortical and cortical brain networks. PMID:27374336

  5. Characterizing neural activities evoked by manual acupuncture through spiking irregularity measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neural system characterizes information in external stimulations by different spiking patterns. In order to examine how neural spiking patterns are related to acupuncture manipulations, experiments are designed in such a way that different types of manual acupuncture (MA) manipulations are taken at the ‘Zusanli’ point of experimental rats, and the induced electrical signals in the spinal dorsal root ganglion are detected and recorded. The interspike interval (ISI) statistical histogram is fitted by the gamma distribution, which has two parameters: one is the time-dependent firing rate and the other is a shape parameter characterizing the spiking irregularities. The shape parameter is the measure of spiking irregularities and can be used to identify the type of MA manipulations. The coefficient of variation is mostly used to measure the spike time irregularity, but it overestimates the irregularity in the case of pronounced firing rate changes. However, experiments show that each acupuncture manipulation will lead to changes in the firing rate. So we combine four relatively rate-independent measures to study the irregularity of spike trains evoked by different types of MA manipulations. Results suggest that the MA manipulations possess unique spiking statistics and characteristics and can be distinguished according to the spiking irregularity measures. These studies have offered new insights into the coding processes and information transfer of acupuncture. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. Biological Activity of Propolis-Honey Balm in the Treatment of Experimentally-Evoked Burn Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaneta Jastrzębska-Stojko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Medicines of biogenic origin with micro-organic, regenerative and analgesic properties are becoming more and more significant in the treatment of burn wounds. These properties are found in apitherapeutics such as propolis and honey—products collected and processed by a honey bee. Their effect on the course of the healing processes is multidirectional. The aim of the study was a histopathological and biochemical analysis of the processes of scar formation in experimentally evoked burn wounds in white pigs treated with the 1% and 3% Sepropol balms containing standardized extracts of propolis and honey. The results were compared with the therapeutic effects obtained with dermazin cream (1% silver sulfadiazine. The level of collagen was determined in the wounds treated with 1% and 3% Sepropol and compared with the collagen level in healthy skin and wounds treated with dermazin. Granulation and regenerated epithelium formation times were compared, with the 3% Sepropol being by far the most effective. The 3% Sepropol also increased the collagen level to 116% with the control sub-groups scoring between 80% and 98%. The results show the healing process of burn wounds in pigs treated with the Sepropol balm starts earlier and has a faster course than the standard dermazin therapy.

  7. Telomerase activity in 144 brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, T; Asai, A.; Mishima, K.; Fujimaki, T.; Kirino, T.

    1998-01-01

    Unlimited proliferation in immortalized cells is believed to be highly dependent on the activity of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein that synthesizes telomeric repeats onto chromosome ends. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay, we analysed telomerase activity in 99 benign and 45 malignant brain tumours. The TRAP assay results were quantitated by normalizing the telomerase activity of each specimen to that of human glioma cell line T98G to...

  8. Evaluation of auditory brain-stem evoked response in middle: Aged type 2 diabetes mellitus with normal hearing subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debadatta Mahallik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is commonly metabolic disorders of carbohydrate in which blood glucose levels are abnormally high due to relative or absolute insulin deficiency. In addition, it is characterized by abnormal metabolism of fat, protein resulting from insulin deficit or insulin action, or both. There are two broad categories of DM are designated as type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is due to predominantly insulin resistance with relative insulin deficiency noninsulin-dependent DM. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than insulin-dependent DM. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, if there is any abnormality in neural conduction in auditory brain-stem pathway in type 2 DM patients having normal hearing sensitivity when compared to age-matched healthy populations. Materials and Methods: This study included middle - aged 25 subjects having normal hearing with diabetes type 2 mellitus. All were submitted to the full audiological history taking, otological examination, basic audiological evaluation and auditory brain-stem response audiometry which was recorded in both ears, followed by calculation of the absolute latencies of wave I, III and V, as well as interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, I-V. Results: Type 2 DM patients showed significant prolonged absolute latencies of I, III (P = 0.001 and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V in left ear (P = 0.001 and absolute latencies of I, V (P = 0.001, interpeak latencies III-V was statistically significant in right ear. Conclusions: The prolonged absolute latencies and interpeak latencies suggests abnormal neural firing synchronization or in the transmission in the auditory pathways in normal hearing type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  9. Assessment of brain cell function using 123I-IMP SPECT of cerebral blood flow and visual evoked potential by photic stimulation in normal and demented elderly subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow was quantitatively measured using 123I-IMP SPECT by photic stimulation and visual evoked potential (VEPs) in normal and dementia subjects: 8 with Alzheimer-type dementia, 9 with cerebrovascular dementia and 7 normal elderly subjects were divided into the three groups based on the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) grade: Group I (CDR 0), Group II (CDR 0.5-1), Group III (CDR 2-3). The 123I-IMP SPECT measurement was conducted at rest with the eyes closed and also during photic stimulation. VEPs were measured simultaneously. The results reveal prolongation of the P2 latency of the VEPs prolonged in accordance with the increasing severity of the dementia, and quantitative cerebral blood flow was lower in Group II and Group III than in Group I at rest, while during photic stimulation it significantly increased in Group I and II, but showed no change in Group III. The results suggest that quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow using 123I-IMP SPECT by photic stimulation may enable more detailed assessment of brain cell function. (author)

  10. Regional brain activity correlates of nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jed E; Behm, Frederique M; Salley, Alfred N; Bates, James E; Coleman, R Edward; Hawk, Thomas C; Turkington, Timothy G

    2007-12-01

    Fifteen smokers participated in a study investigating brain correlates of nicotine dependence. Dependence was reduced by having subjects switch to denicotinized cigarettes for 2 weeks while wearing nicotine skin patches. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans assessed regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) after overnight nicotine abstinence on three occasions: (1) at baseline; (2) after 2 weeks of exposure to denicotinized cigarettes+nicotine patches; and (3) 2 weeks after returning to smoking the usual brands of cigarettes. Craving for cigarettes and scores on the Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) questionnaire decreased at the second session relative to the first and last sessions. Regional brain metabolic activity (normalized to whole brain values) at session 2 also showed a significant decrease in the right hemisphere anterior cingulate cortex. Exploratory post hoc analyses showed that the change in craving across sessions was negatively correlated with the change in rCMRglc in several structures within the brain reward system, including the ventral striatum, orbitofrontal cortex and pons. The between-session difference in thalamus activity (right hemisphere) was positively correlated with the difference in FTND scores. Correlational analyses also revealed that reported smoking for calming effects was associated with a decrease (at session 2) in thalamus activity (bilaterally) and with an increase in amygdala activity (left hemisphere). Reported smoking to enhance pleasurable relaxation was associated with an increase in metabolic activity of the dorsal striatum (caudate, putamen) at session 2. These findings suggest that reversible changes in regional brain metabolic activity occur in conjunction with alterations in nicotine dependence. The results also highlight the likely role of thalamic gating processes as well as striatal reward and corticolimbic regulatory pathways in the maintenance of cigarette addiction. PMID:17356570

  11. Modulation of Brain Activity during Phonological Familiarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, S.; Van der Linden, M.; Collette, F.; Laureys, S.; Poncelet, M.; Degueldre, C.; Delfiore, G.; Luxen, A.; Salmon, E.

    2005-01-01

    We measured brain activity in 12 adults for the repetition of auditorily presented words and nonwords, before and after repeated exposure to their phonological form. The nonword phoneme combinations were either of high (HF) or low (LF) phonotactic frequency. After familiarization, we observed, for both word and nonword conditions, decreased…

  12. Complex networks in brain electrical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, G; Grau, C; Marco, J; Ray, C

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the complex networks associated with brain electrical activity. Multichannel EEG measurements are first processed to obtain 3D voxel activations using the tomographic algorithm LORETA. Then, the correlation of the current intensity activation between voxel pairs is computed to produce a voxel cross-correlation coefficient matrix. Using several correlation thresholds, the cross-correlation matrix is then transformed into a network connectivity matrix and analyzed. To study a specific example, we selected data from an earlier experiment focusing on the MMN brain wave. The resulting analysis highlights significant differences between the spatial activations associated with Standard and Deviant tones, with interesting physiological implications. When compared to random data networks, physiological networks are more connected, with longer links and shorter path lengths. Furthermore, as compared to the Deviant case, Standard data networks are more connected, with longer links and shorter path lengths--i....

  13. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. I. Superior olivary complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 45 days after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally or bilaterally into the superior olivary complex (SOC) to produce neuronal destruction while sparing fibers of passage and the terminals of axons of extrinsic origin connecting to SOC neurons. The components of the ABR in cat were labeled by their polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents labeled P1a and P1b. The correspondences we have assumed between the ABR components in cat and man are indicated by providing a Roman numeral designation for the human component in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P4 (V). With bilateral SOC destruction, there was a significant and marked attenuation of waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), P4 (V), P5 (VI), and the sustained potential shift (SPS) amounting to as much as 80% of preoperative values. Following unilateral SOC destruction the attenuation of many of these same ABR components, in response to stimulation of either ear, was up to 50%. No component of the ABR was totally abolished even when the SOC was lesioned 100% bilaterally. In unilaterally lesioned cats with extensive neuronal loss (greater than 75%) the latencies of the components beginning at P3 (IV) were delayed to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection site but not to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection. Binaural interaction components of the ABR were affected in proportion to the attenuation of the ABR. These results are compatible with multiple brain regions contributing to the generation of the components of the ABR beginning with P2 (III) and that components P3 (IV), P4 (V), and P5 (VI) and the sustained potential shift depend particularly on the integrity of the neurons of the SOC bilaterally. The neurons of the lateral subdivision (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body

  14. Modulation of brain activity during phonological familiarization

    OpenAIRE

    Majerus, Steve; Van der Linden, Martial; Collette, Fabienne; Laureys, Steven; Poncelet, Martine; Degueldre, Christian; Delfiore, Guy; Luxen, André; Salmon, Eric

    2005-01-01

    We measured brain activity in 12 adults for the repetition of auditorily presented words and nonwords, before and after repeated exposure to their phonological form. The nonword phoneme combinations were either of high (HF) or low (LF) phonotactic frequency. After familiarization, we observed, for both word and nonword conditions, decreased activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus, in the bilateral temporal pole and middle temporal gyri. At the same time, interaction analysis ...

  15. A high frequency steady-state visually evoked potential based brain computer interface using consumer-grade EEG headset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Piotr; Milanowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluates a possibility of creating a high-frequency, SSVEP-based brain computer interface using a low cost EEG recording hardware - an Emotiv EEG Neuro-headset. Both above aspects are crucial to enable deploying the BCI technology in the consumer market. High frequencies can be used to create a non-tiring and more pleasant interface. Commercial EEG systems, as the Emotiv EEG, although demonstrating large underperformance, are much more affordable than standard, clinical-grade EEG amplifiers. A system classifying between two stimuli and rest is designed and tested in two experiments: on five and ten subject respectively. First, the accuracy of the system is compared for frequencies in lower range (17Hz, 19Hz, 23Hz, 25Hz) and higher range (31Hz, 33Hz, 37Hz, 40Hz). The mean online accuracy is 80%±15% for the former and 67%±12% for the latter. Second, a more thorough investigation is done by evaluating the system for frequencies within a set of 35Hz-40Hz. Although the mean accuracy, 64% ± 22%, is relatively low, most of the users were able to achieve satisfying accuracy, with the mean reaching 82%±5%, which would allow for an efficient, and yet pleasant, usage of the BCI system. In each case a user dependent approach is applied, with a calibration session lasting about five minutes. EEG feature extraction is done using common spatial pattern (CSP) filtering, canonical correlation analysis (CCA), and linear discrimination analysis (LDA). PMID:25571225

  16. The sum of its parts--effects of gastric distention, nutrient content and sensory stimulation on brain activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje S Spetter

    Full Text Available During food consumption the brain integrates multiple interrelated neural and hormonal signals involved in the regulation of food intake. Factors influencing the decision to stop eating include the foods' sensory properties, macronutrient content, and volume, which in turn affect gastric distention and appetite hormone responses. So far, the contributions of gastric distention and oral stimulation by food on brain activation have not been studied. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of gastric distention with an intra-gastric load and the additional effect of oral stimulation on brain activity after food administration. Our secondary objective was to study the correlations between hormone responses and appetite-related ratings and brain activation. Fourteen men completed three functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions during which they either received a naso-gastric infusion of water (stomach distention, naso-gastric infusion of chocolate milk (stomach distention + nutrients, or ingested chocolate-milk (stomach distention + nutrients + oral exposure. Appetite ratings and blood parameters were measured at several time points. During gastric infusion, brain activation was observed in the midbrain, amygdala, hypothalamus, and hippocampus for both chocolate milk and water, i.e., irrespective of nutrient content. The thalamus, amygdala, putamen and precuneus were activated more after ingestion than after gastric infusion of chocolate milk, whereas infusion evoked greater activation in the hippocampus and anterior cingulate. Moreover, areas involved in gustation and reward were activated more after oral stimulation. Only insulin responses following naso-gastric infusion of chocolate milk correlated with brain activation, namely in the putamen and insula. In conclusion, we show that normal (oral food ingestion evokes greater activation than gastric infusion in stomach distention and food intake-related brain areas. This

  17. Brain Regions Associated to a Kinesthetic Illusion Evoked by Watching a Video of One's Own Moving Hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminari Kaneko

    Full Text Available It is well known that kinesthetic illusions can be induced by stimulation of several sensory systems (proprioception, touch, vision…. In this study we investigated the cerebral network underlying a kinesthetic illusion induced by visual stimulation by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in humans. Participants were instructed to keep their hand still while watching the video of their own moving hand (Self Hand or that of someone else's moving hand (Other Hand. In the Self Hand condition they experienced an illusory sensation that their hand was moving whereas the Other Hand condition did not induce any kinesthetic illusion. The contrast between the Self Hand and Other Hand conditions showed significant activation in the left dorsal and ventral premotor cortices, in the left Superior and Inferior Parietal lobules, at the right Occipito-Temporal junction as well as in bilateral Insula and Putamen. Most strikingly, there was no activation in the primary motor and somatosensory cortices, whilst previous studies have reported significant activation in these regions for vibration-induced kinesthetic illusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study that indicates that humans can experience kinesthetic perception without activation in the primary motor and somatosensory areas. We conclude that under some conditions watching a video of one's own moving hand could lead to activation of a network that is usually involved in processing copies of efference, thus leading to the illusory perception that the real hand is indeed moving.

  18. Effect of hypnotic pain modulation on brain activity in patients with temporomandibular disorder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Randi; Dietz, Martin; Lodahl, Sanne;

    2010-01-01

    Hypnosis modulates pain perception but the associated brain mechanisms in chronic pain conditions are poorly understood. Brain activity evoked by painful repetitive pin-prick stimulation of the left mental nerve region was investigated with use of fMRI in 19 patients with painful temporomandibular...... disorders (TMD) during hypnotic hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia and a control condition. Pain intensity and unpleasantness of the painful stimulation was scored on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS). NRS pain and unpleasantness scores during hypnotic hypoalgesia were significantly lower than in the control...... condition and significantly higher in the hypnotic hyperalgesia condition. In the control condition, painful stimulation caused significant activation of right posterior insula, primary somatosensory cortex (SI), BA21, and BA6, and left BA40 and BA4. Painful stimulation during hypnotic hyperalgesia...

  19. Watching TV news as a memory task -- brain activation and age effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frings Lars

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies which investigate brain activity underlying declarative memory processes typically use artificial, unimodal laboratory stimuli. In contrast, we developed a paradigm which much more closely approximates real-life situations of information encoding. Methods In this study, we tested whether ecologically valid stimuli - clips of a TV news show - are apt to assess memory-related fMRI activation in healthy participants across a wide age range (22-70 years. We contrasted brain responses during natural stimulation (TV news video clips with a control condition (scrambled versions of the same clips with reversed audio tracks. After scanning, free recall performance was assessed. Results The memory task evoked robust activation of a left-lateralized network, including primarily lateral temporal cortex, frontal cortex, as well as the left hippocampus. Further analyses revealed that - when controlling for performance effects - older age was associated with greater activation of left temporal and right frontal cortex. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of assessing brain activity underlying declarative memory using a natural stimulation paradigm with high ecological validity. The preliminary result of greater brain activation with increasing age might reflect an attempt to compensate for decreasing episodic memory capacity associated with aging.

  20. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. II. Cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 6 weeks after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally into the cochlear nucleus (CN) producing extensive neuronal destruction. The ABR components were labeled by the polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents, P1a and P1b. The assumed correspondence between the ABR components in cat and man is indicated by providing human Roman numeral designations in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P2 (III). To stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection, the ABR changes consisted of a loss of components P2 (III) and P3 (IV), and an attenuation and prolongation of latency of components P4 (V) and P5 (VI). The sustained potential shift from which the components arose was not affected. Wave P1a (I) was also slightly but significantly attenuated compatible with changes of excitability of nerve VIII in the cochlea secondary to cochlear nucleus destruction. Unexpectedly, to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection side, waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), and P4 (V) were also attenuated and delayed in latency but to a lesser degree than to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection. Changes in binaural interaction of the ABR following cochlear nucleus lesions were similar to those produced in normal animals by introducing a temporal delay of the input to one ear. The results of the present set of studies using kainic acid to induce neuronal loss in auditory pathway when combined with prior lesion and recording experiments suggest that each of the components of the ABR requires the integrity of an anatomically diffuse system comprising a set of neurons, their axons, and the neurons on which they terminate. Disruption of any portion of the system will alter the amplitude and/or the latency of that component. PMID:1716569

  1. Brain's reward circuits mediate itch relief. a functional MRI study of active scratching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D P Papoiu

    Full Text Available Previous brain imaging studies investigating the brain processing of scratching used an exogenous intervention mimicking scratching, performed not by the subjects themselves, but delivered by an investigator. In real life, scratching is a conscious, voluntary, controlled motor response to itching, which is directed to the perceived site of distress. In this study we aimed to visualize in real-time by brain imaging the core mechanisms of the itch-scratch cycle when scratching was performed by subjects themselves. Secondly, we aimed to assess the correlations between brain patterns of activation and psychophysical ratings of itch relief or pleasurability of scratching. We also compared the patterns of brain activity evoked by self-scratching vs. passive scratching. We used a robust tridimensional Arterial Spin Labeling fMRI technique that is less sensitive to motion artifacts: 3D gradient echo and spin echo (GRASE--Propeller. Active scratching was accompanied by a higher pleasurability and induced a more pronounced deactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex and insula, in comparison with passive scratching. A significant involvement of the reward system including the ventral tegmentum of the midbrain, coupled with a mechanism deactivating the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG, suggests that itch modulation operates in reverse to the mechanism known to suppress pain. Our findings not only confirm a role for the central networks processing reward in the pleasurable aspects of scratching, but also suggest they play a role in mediating itch relief.

  2. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Tuan V; Brownstone, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. PMID:25673740

  3. Ranking of stimuli that evoked memories in significant others after exposure to circumcerebral magnetic fields: correlations with ambient geomagnetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J N; Charette, J C; Persinger, M A

    2002-10-01

    To identify means to enhance the laboratory production of alleged paranormal phenomena, 15 pairs of men and women involved emotionally were tested by male and female experimenters who were not familiar with the hypothesis that ambient (geomagnetic) activity could modulate this production. While the female of the pair was exposed to six different patterns of complex magnetic fields designed to affect states of consciousness, the male wrote his reminiscences about shared experiences evoked by a postcard randomly selected from a collection of five. Increased global geomagnetic activity (k values between 0 and 5) at the time of the experiments was significantly and moderately correlated with the more accurate ranking of the stimulus cards. These results were similar to those of a previous study. We suggest that alleged paranormal phenomena involve processes that might be produced by experimentally altering the electroencephalographic correlates of consciousness with circumcerebral applications of counterclockwise weak magnetic fields. However, these processes may be enhanced if global geomagnetic activity is increasing during the periods of exposure. PMID:12434850

  4. In vivo optical microprobe imaging for intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in response to dopaminergic signaling in deep brain evoked by cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongchi; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Ca2+ plays a vital role as second messenger in signal transduction and the intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) change is an important indicator of neuronal activity in the brain, including both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Due to the highly scattering and absorption of brain tissue, it is challenging to optically access the deep brain regions (e.g., striatum at >3mm under the brain surface) and image [Ca2+]i changes with cellular resolutions. Here, we present two micro-probe approaches (i.e., microlens, and micro-prism) integrated with a fluorescence microscope modified to permit imaging of neuronal [Ca2+]i signaling in the striatum using a calcium indicator Rhod2(AM). While a micro-prism probe provides a larger field of view to image neuronal network from cortex to striatum, a microlens probe enables us to track [Ca2+]i dynamic change in individual neurons within the brain. Both techniques are validated by imaging neuronal [Ca2+]i changes in transgenic mice with dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R) expressing EGFP. Our results show that micro-prism images can map the distribution of D1R- and D2R-expressing neurons in various brain regions and characterize their different mean [Ca2+]i changes induced by an intervention (e.g., cocaine administration, 8mg/kg., i.p). In addition, microlens images can characterize the different [Ca2+]i dynamics of D1 and D2 neurons in response to cocaine, including new mechanisms of these two types of neurons in striatum. These findings highlight the power of the optical micro-probe imaging for dissecting the complex cellular and molecular insights of cocaine in vivo.

  5. Characterization of the cerebral activity by time–frequency representation of evoked EEG potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) are the electrical response of the brain while performing a particular task. Methods traditionally used to study ERPs measure the amplitude and duration of the waveform in order to quantify the changes, being signal morphology dependent. However, the frequency characteristics of those events remain uncovered. The aim of this work was the study of new measures to characterize, by means of time–frequency representation (TFR) techniques, the ERPs recorded while subjects conducted a choice reaction time task (Ericksen flanker task) following the administration of different alprazolam doses. Several measures defined from energy, instantaneous frequency and group delay functions were obtained by means of TFR techniques applied to the Choi–Williams distribution (CWD) of EEG signals. These measures, which are signal morphology independent, were studied in four frequency bands, δ (0–4 Hz), θ (4–8 Hz), α (8–15 Hz), β (15–30 Hz), and for certain time periods. Based on these measures, differences between ERPs were analyzed by comparing the different response types (successes or successfully corrected failures) of the subject performing the task, and comparing the applied drug doses. For each subject, the CWD of EEG signals was applied in two different ways: (a) all ERPs were averaged per channel, and then the CWD was applied; (b) the CWD was applied to each one of the ERPs. When the CWD was applied to each ERP, the energy measures in the δ, θ and β bands, the instantaneous frequency measures in the α and β bands, and the group delay measures in the δ, θ and α bands showed a statistically significant level p < 0.0005 in the analysis of the response type. Also, the energy measures in the θ and β bands and the instantaneous frequency measures in the α band showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.0005) between placebo and low and high drug doses. In contrast, poor results were obtained when all epochs of

  6. Effect of scorpion venom analgesic active peptide extracted from Buthus martensii Karsch on evoked potential in the thalamic posterior nucleus group in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuhong Lin; Xinxin Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Buthus martensii Karsch is a rare medicinal animal, and dried integral Buthus martensii Karsch is an important drug in traditional Chinese medicine. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of scorpion venom analgesic active peptide (SAP) extracted from Buthus martensii Karsch on evoked unit discharge of the common peroneal nerve in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus using a stereotaxic electrophysiological extracellular microelectrode recording. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: One-way designed study, performed in the Physiological Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College on September 15, 2006. MATERIALS: Fifty 3-4 months old Wistar rats (25 males and 25 females) were used. SAP was provided by Shenyang Pharmaceutical University. Morphine solution was made by the First Drug Manufactory, Northeastern Drug Manufacture Group (batch number: H20013351). Naloxone solution was made by Hunan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (batch number: H43021669). Type ATAC-350 medical data processing equipment was made by the Photoelectricity Company, Japan.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Evoked discharge in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus and effects of SAP alone and SAP in combination with saline, morphine, or naloxone on discharges in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus as measured by TQ-19 medical data processing equipment.RESULTS: SAP group: At 1-3 minutes after SAP injection, evoked discharges in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus were inhibited, and the inhibitory time lasted for (45.0?.7) minutes. Saline group: Evoked discharges in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus did not change after saline injection. Morphine group: At 1-3 minutes after morphine injection, evoked discharges in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus were inhibited, and the inhibitory time lasted for (35.0?.8) minutes. Naloxone group: SAP had no effects on evoked potentials in the posterior nucleus group of the thalamus.

  7. Support vector regression correlates single-sweep evoked brain potentials to gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, C; Frokjaer, J B; Brock, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-factorial and complex disease causing autonomic neuropathy and gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients. The neural mechanisms behind these symptoms are poorly understood, but it is believed that both peripheral and central mechanisms are involved. To gain...... performance of 86.2% (P=0.01) was obtained by applying a majority voting scheme to the 5 best performing channels. The biomarker was identified as decreased theta band activity. The regression value was correlated to symptoms reported by the patients (P=0.04). The methodology is an improvement of the present...... approach to study central mechanisms in diabetes mellitus, and may provide a future application for a clinical tool to optimize treatment in individual patients....

  8. Disparate effects of serum on basal and evoked NFAT activity in primary astrocyte cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, Jennifer L.; Artiushin, Irina A.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    In astrocytes, the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) strongly regulates neuro-immune/inflammatory cascades through activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). While primary cell cultures provide a useful model system for investigating astrocytic CN/NFAT signaling, variable results may arise both within and across labs because of differences in culture conditions. Here, we determined the extent to which serum and cell confluency affect ...

  9. Bayesian Inference for Neural Electromagnetic Source Localization: Analysis of MEG Visual Evoked Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a Bayesian approach to the analysis of neural electromagnetic (MEG/EEG) data that can incorporate or fuse information from other imaging modalities and addresses the ill-posed inverse problem by sarnpliig the many different solutions which could have produced the given data. From these samples one can draw probabilistic inferences about regions of activation. Our source model assumes a variable number of variable size cortical regions of stimulus-correlated activity. An active region consists of locations on the cortical surf ace, within a sphere centered on some location in cortex. The number and radi of active regions can vary to defined maximum values. The goal of the analysis is to determine the posterior probability distribution for the set of parameters that govern the number, location, and extent of active regions. Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to generate a large sample of sets of parameters distributed according to the posterior distribution. This sample is representative of the many different source distributions that could account for given data, and allows identification of probable (i.e. consistent) features across solutions. Examples of the use of this analysis technique with both simulated and empirical MEG data are presented

  10. Bayesian Inference for Neural Electromagnetic Source Localization: Analysis of MEG Visual Evoked Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-02-01

    We have developed a Bayesian approach to the analysis of neural electromagnetic (MEG/EEG) data that can incorporate or fuse information from other imaging modalities and addresses the ill-posed inverse problem by sarnpliig the many different solutions which could have produced the given data. From these samples one can draw probabilistic inferences about regions of activation. Our source model assumes a variable number of variable size cortical regions of stimulus-correlated activity. An active region consists of locations on the cortical surf ace, within a sphere centered on some location in cortex. The number and radi of active regions can vary to defined maximum values. The goal of the analysis is to determine the posterior probability distribution for the set of parameters that govern the number, location, and extent of active regions. Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to generate a large sample of sets of parameters distributed according to the posterior distribution. This sample is representative of the many different source distributions that could account for given data, and allows identification of probable (i.e. consistent) features across solutions. Examples of the use of this analysis technique with both simulated and empirical MEG data are presented.

  11. Brain Activation During Singing: "Clef de Sol Activation" Is the "Concert" of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N; Pyrgelis, Efstratios-Stylianos

    2016-03-01

    Humans are the most complex singers in nature, and the human voice is thought by many to be the most beautiful musical instrument. Aside from spoken language, singing represents a second mode of acoustic communication in humans. The purpose of this review article is to explore the functional anatomy of the "singing" brain. Methodologically, the existing literature regarding activation of the human brain during singing was carefully reviewed, with emphasis on the anatomic localization of such activation. Relevant human studies are mainly neuroimaging studies, namely functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography studies. Singing necessitates activation of several cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, and brainstem areas, served and coordinated by multiple neural networks. Functionally vital cortical areas of the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes bilaterally participate in the brain's activation process during singing, confirming the latter's role in human communication. Perisylvian cortical activity of the right hemisphere seems to be the most crucial component of this activation. This also explains why aphasic patients due to left hemispheric lesions are able to sing but not speak the same words. The term clef de sol activation is proposed for this crucial perisylvian cortical activation due to the clef de sol shape of the topographical distribution of these cortical areas around the sylvian fissure. Further research is needed to explore the connectivity and sequence of how the human brain activates to sing. PMID:26966964

  12. Mechanical Compression and Nucleus Pulposus Application on Dorsal Root Ganglia Differentially Modify Evoked Neuronal Activity in the Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Elin; Brisby, Helena; Rask, Katarina; Hammar, Ingela

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A combination of mechanical compression caused by a protruding disc and leakage of nucleus pulposus (NP) from the disc core is presumed to contribute to intervertebral disc hernia-related pain. Experimental models of disc hernia including both components have resulted in changes in neuronal activity at the level of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord, but changes within the brain have been less well studied. However, acute application of NP to a DRG without mechanical comp...

  13. Physical activity and brain plasticity in late adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Gildengers, Ariel G.; Butters, Meryl A.

    2013-01-01

    The human brain shrinks with advancing age, but recent research suggests that it is also capable of remarkable plasticity, even in late life. In this review we summarize the research linking greater amounts of physical activity to less cortical atrophy, better brain function, and enhanced cognitive function, and argue that physical activity takes advantage of the brain's natural capacity for plasticity. Further, although the effects of physical activity on the brain are relatively widespread,...

  14. Cannabinoid receptor activation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata evokes cardiorespiratory effects in anaesthetised rats

    OpenAIRE

    Padley, James R; Li, Qun; Pilowsky, Paul M.; Goodchild, Ann K

    2003-01-01

    The nature of the cardiorespiratory effects mediated by cannabinoids in the hindbrain is poorly understood. In the present study we investigated whether cannabinoid receptor activation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata (RVLM) affects cardiovascular and/or respiratory function.Initially, we looked for evidence of CB1 receptor gene expression in rostral and caudal sections of the rat ventrolateral medulla (VLM) using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Second, the pote...

  15. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlbarracIn, A L [Catedra de Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Av. Roca 2200, PC 4000 (Argentina); Farfan, F D [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina); Felice, C J [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  16. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K., E-mail: o-kabou@echo.nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Tajima, S.; Song, D.; Uchiyama, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hamada, N.; Cai, C. [Aichi Steel Corporation, Tokai (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.

  17. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement

  18. Three-Dimensional Distribution of Sensory Stimulation-Evoked Neuronal Activity of Spinal Dorsal Horn Neurons Analyzed by In Vivo Calcium Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    NISHIDA, Kazuhiko; Matsumura, Shinji; Taniguchi, Wataru; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established i...

  19. Significance probability mapping: an aid in the topographic analysis of brain electrical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, F H; Bartels, P H; Burchfiel, J L

    1981-05-01

    We illustrate the application of significance probability mapping (SPM) to the analysis of topographic maps of spectral analyzed EEG and visual evoked potential (VEP) activity from patients with brain tumors, boys with dyslexia, and control subjects. When the VEP topographic plots of tumor patients were displayed as number of standard deviations from a reference mean, more subjects were correctly identified than by inspection of the underlying raw data. When topographic plots of EEG alpha activity obtained while listening to speech or music were compared by t statistic to plots of resting alpha activity, regions of cortex presumably activated by speech or music were delineated. DIfferent regions were defined in dyslexic boys and controls. We propose that SPM will prove valuable in the regional localization of normal and abnormal functions in other clinical situations. PMID:6165544

  20. Glucocorticoids Inhibit CRH/AVP-Evoked Bursting Activity of Male Murine Anterior Pituitary Corticotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Peter J; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Corticotroph cells from the anterior pituitary are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are electrically excitable and fire spontaneous single-spike action potentials and also display secretagogue-induced bursting behavior. The HPA axis function is dependent on effective negative feedback in which elevated plasma glucocorticoids result in inhibition at the level of both the pituitary and the hypothalamus. In this study, we have used an electrophysiological approach coupled with mathematical modeling to investigate the regulation of spontaneous and CRH/arginine vasopressin-induced activity of corticotrophs by glucocorticoids. We reveal that pretreatment of corticotrophs with 100 nM corticosterone (CORT; 90 and 150 min) reduces spontaneous activity and prevents a transition from spiking to bursting after CRH/arginine vasopressin stimulation. In addition, previous studies have identified a role for large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in the generation of secretagogue-induced bursting in corticotrophs. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we demonstrated that CRH-induced bursting can be switched to spiking by subtracting a fast BK current, whereas the addition of a fast BK current can induce bursting in CORT-treated cells. In addition, recordings from BK knockout mice (BK(-/-)) revealed that CORT can also inhibit excitability through BK-independent mechanisms to control spike frequency. Thus, we have established that glucocorticoids can modulate multiple properties of corticotroph electrical excitability through both BK-dependent and BK-independent mechanisms. PMID:27254001

  1. Effects of intravenous metamizole on ongoing and evoked activity of dura-sensitive thalamic neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Alexey Y; Lyubashina, Olga A; Sivachenko, Ivan B; Panteleev, Sergey S

    2014-05-15

    Migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) are the most common forms of primary headaches. A general key mechanism underlying development of both the diseases is the trigeminal system activation associated with the ascending nociceptive transmission via the trigemino-thalamo-cortical pathway. The ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus is a key thalamic structure, receiving afferent inflow from the craniofacial region; it holds the third-order neurons responsible for conveying sensory information from the extra- and intracranial nociceptors to the cortex. The VPM is currently seen as a therapeutic target for various antimigraine medications, which is shown to reduce the VPM neuronal excitability. A non-opioid analgesic metamizole is widely used in some countries for acute treatment of migraine or TTH. However, the precise mechanisms underlying anticephalgic action of metamizole remain unclear. The objective of our study performed in the rat model of trigemino-durovascular nociception was to evaluate the effects of intravenously administered metamizole on ongoing and evoked firing of the dura-sensitive VPM neurons. The experiments were carried out on rats under urethane-chloralose anesthesia. Cumulative administration of metamizole (thrice-repeated intravenous infusion of 150 mg/kg performed 30 min apart) in 56% of cases produced a suppression of both the ongoing activity of the thalamic VPM neurons and their responses to dural electrical stimulation. Although the inhibitory effect was prevailing, a number of VPM neurons were indifferent to the administration of metamizole. These data suggest that one of the main components of neural mechanism underlying anticephalgic action of metamizole is suppression of the thalamo-cortical nociceptive transmission associated with trigemino-vascular activation. PMID:24650732

  2. Temperament, character and serotonin activity in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, L; Salo, J; Hirvonen, J;

    2013-01-01

    The psychobiological model of personality by Cloninger and colleagues originally hypothesized that interindividual variability in the temperament dimension 'harm avoidance' (HA) is explained by differences in the activity of the brain serotonin system. We assessed brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT...

  3. Brain mapping of median nerve somatosensory evoked potential with combined 99mTc-ECD single-photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed during electrical median nerve stimulation and used to detect focal neuronal activation in the somatosensory pathways. Intravenously administered technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) was used as a blood flow tracer to obtain baseline and activated images in each of three subjects. After image registration, baseline images were compared voxel by voxel with the activation images. In addition, the mean summation of the activated-state images of the subjects was compared with the mean summation of the baseline-state images of ten normal subjects. Discrete brain regions occupying 0.9%-1.6% of total brain volume showed an increase in signal from 33.6% to 35.0%. For further anatomical localization of regional increases in signal, the MRI scan of each subject was registered and superimposed on the activated-state SPET image. This method may be used to localize lesions in various disorders of the central nervous system. (orig.)

  4. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer, which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each...

  5. Brain-Computer Interfaces for 1-D and 2-D Cursor Control: Designs Using Volitional Control of the EEG Spectrum or Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Leonard J.; Matthews, Bryan; Rosipal, Roman

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and tested two EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for users to control a cursor on a computer display. Our system uses an adaptive algorithm, based on kernel partial least squares classification (KPLS), to associate patterns in multichannel EEG frequency spectra with cursor controls. Our first BCI, Target Practice, is a system for one-dimensional device control, in which participants use biofeedback to learn voluntary control of their EEG spectra. Target Practice uses a KF LS classifier to map power spectra of 30-electrode EEG signals to rightward or leftward position of a moving cursor on a computer display. Three subjects learned to control motion of a cursor on a video display in multiple blocks of 60 trials over periods of up to six weeks. The best subject s average skill in correct selection of the cursor direction grew from 58% to 88% after 13 training sessions. Target Practice also implements online control of two artifact sources: a) removal of ocular artifact by linear subtraction of wavelet-smoothed vertical and horizontal EOG signals, b) control of muscle artifact by inhibition of BCI training during periods of relatively high power in the 40-64 Hz band. The second BCI, Think Pointer, is a system for two-dimensional cursor control. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are triggered by four flickering checkerboard stimuli located in narrow strips at each edge of the display. The user attends to one of the four beacons to initiate motion in the desired direction. The SSVEP signals are recorded from eight electrodes located over the occipital region. A KPLS classifier is individually calibrated to map multichannel frequency bands of the SSVEP signals to right-left or up-down motion of a cursor on a computer display. The display stops moving when the user attends to a central fixation point. As for Target Practice, Think Pointer also implements wavelet-based online removal of ocular artifact; however, in Think Pointer muscle

  6. Protein Kinase D and Gβγ Subunits Mediate Agonist-evoked Translocation of Protease-activated Receptor-2 from the Golgi Apparatus to the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Dane D; Zhao, Peishen; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lieu, TinaMarie; Gerges, Marina; Yeatman, Holly R; Canals, Meritxell; Vanner, Stephen J; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2016-05-20

    Agonist-evoked endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors has been extensively studied. The mechanisms by which agonists stimulate mobilization and plasma membrane translocation of G protein-coupled receptors from intracellular stores are unexplored. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) traffics to lysosomes, and sustained protease signaling requires mobilization and plasma membrane trafficking of PAR2 from Golgi stores. We evaluated the contribution of protein kinase D (PKD) and Gβγ to this process. In HEK293 and KNRK cells, the PAR2 agonists trypsin and 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 activated PKD in the Golgi apparatus, where PKD regulates protein trafficking. PAR2 activation induced translocation of Gβγ, a PKD activator, to the Golgi apparatus, determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Gγ-Venus and giantin-Rluc8. Inhibitors of PKD (CRT0066101) and Gβγ (gallein) prevented PAR2-stimulated activation of PKD. CRT0066101, PKD1 siRNA, and gallein all inhibited recovery of PAR2-evoked Ca(2+) signaling. PAR2 with a photoconvertible Kaede tag was expressed in KNRK cells to examine receptor translocation from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Irradiation of the Golgi region (405 nm) induced green-red photo-conversion of PAR2-Kaede. Trypsin depleted PAR2-Kaede from the Golgi apparatus and repleted PAR2-Kaede at the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 inhibited PAR2-Kaede translocation to the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 also inhibited sustained protease signaling to colonocytes and nociceptive neurons that naturally express PAR2 and mediate protease-evoked inflammation and nociception. Our results reveal a major role for PKD and Gβγ in agonist-evoked mobilization of intracellular PAR2 stores that is required for sustained signaling by extracellular proteases. PMID:27030010

  7. 脑干听觉诱发电位在脑干梗死诊断中的应用%Application of brain stem auditory evoked potential machine in diagnosis of brain stem infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒙凌

    2015-01-01

    目的 对脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)检测在脑干梗死诊断中的应用价值进行分析探讨.方法 30例脑干梗死患者作为观察组, 对其分别进行头颅CT或核磁共振(MRI)及BAEP检查, 对比3种检查方法 检测阳性率.以30例健康志愿者作为对照组, 对比两组研究对象的BAEP检测结果 .结果 BAEP检测阳性率为83.33%, MRI检测阳性率为56.67%, CT检测阳性率为46.67%, BAEP检测阳性率明显高于MRI及CT, 差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).观察组患者Ⅲ波及Ⅴ波潜伏期(PL), Ⅰ~Ⅲ波及Ⅲ~Ⅴ波峰间潜伏期(IPL)延长同对照组比较, 差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 对脑干梗死患者采用BAEP检查敏感性较高, 可为该病的早期诊断提供依据.%Objective To analyze and investigate application value of brain stem auditory evoked potential machine (BAEP) in diagnosis of brain stem infarction.Methods There were 30 patients with brain stem infarction as observation group. They received head CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and BAEP for examination. Comparison was made on positive rate across the 3 examination methods. Another 30 healthy volunteers were taken as control group. BAEP detection outcomes were compared between the two groups.Results Positive rate of BAEP was 83.33%, that of MRI was 56.67%, and that of CT was 46.67%. BAEP had much higher positive rate than MRI and CT, and the difference had statistical significance (P<0.05). The difference of prolonged Ⅲ wave and Ⅴ wave peak latencies (PL), Ⅰ~Ⅲ wave and Ⅲ~Ⅴ wave interpeak latencies (IPL) had statistical significance between the observation group and the control group (P<0.05).Conclusion Implement of BAEP for brain stem infarction patients shows high sensitivity in detection, and it can provide reference for early diagnosis.

  8. Brain Activity in Response to Visual Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bertamini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have explored visual symmetry processing by measuring event related potentials and neural oscillatory activity. There is a sustained posterior negativity (SPN related to the presence of symmetry. There is also functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI activity in extrastriate visual areas and in the lateral occipital complex. We summarise the evidence by answering six questions. (1 Is there an automatic and sustained response to symmetry in visual areas? Answer: Yes, and this suggests automatic processing of symmetry. (2 Which brain areas are involved in symmetry perception? Answer: There is an extended network from extrastriate areas to higher areas. (3 Is reflection special? Answer: Reflection is the optimal stimulus for a more general regularity-sensitive network. (4 Is the response to symmetry independent of view angle? Answer: When people classify patterns as symmetrical or random, the response to symmetry is view-invariant. When people attend to other dimensions, the network responds to residual regularity in the image. (5 How are brain rhythms in the two hemispheres altered during symmetry perception? Answer: Symmetry processing (rather than presence produces more alpha desynchronization in the right posterior regions. Finally, (6 does symmetry processing produce positive affect? Answer: Not in the strongest sense, but behavioural measures reveal implicit positive evaluation of abstract symmetry.

  9. Brain activities during synchronized tapping task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Akiho; Mao Gto; Yokouchi, Hisatake

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to investigate how people process information about other people to determine a response during human-to-human cooperative work. As a preliminary study, the mechanism of cooperative work was examined using interaction between a machine and a human. This machine was designed to have an "other person" model that simulates an emotional model of another person. The task performed in the experiment was a synchronized tapping task. Two models were prepared for this experiment, a simple model that does not employ the other person model and a synchronized model that employs the other person model. Subjects performed cooperative work with these machines. During the experiment, brain activities were measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. It was observed that the left inferior frontal gyrus was activated more with the synchronized model than the simple model. PMID:26737670

  10. Pre-target oscillatory brain activity and the attentional blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Nathan M; Keil, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Reporting the second of two targets within a stream of distracting words during rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) is impaired when the targets are separated by a single distractor word, a deficit in temporal attention that has been referred to as the attentional blink (AB). Recent conceptual and empirical work has pointed to pre-target brain states as potential mediators of the AB effect. The current study examined differences in pre-target electrophysiology between correctly and incorrectly reported trials, considering amplitude and phase measures of alpha oscillations as well as the steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP) evoked by the RSVP stream. For incorrectly reported trials, relatively lower alpha-band power and greater ssVEP inter-trial phase locking were observed during extended time periods preceding presentation of the first target. These results suggest that facilitated processing of the pre-target distracter stream indexed by reduced alpha and heightened phase locking characterizes a dynamic brain state that predicts lower accuracy in terms of reporting the second target under strict temporal constraints. Findings align with hypotheses in which the AB effect is attributed to neurocognitive factors such as fluctuations in pre-target attention or to cognitive strategies applied at the trial level. PMID:26341931

  11. Contact heat evoked potentials using simultaneous EEG and fMRI and their correlation with evoked pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atherton Duncan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS utilises rapidly delivered heat pulses with adjustable peak temperatures to stimulate the differential warm/heat thresholds of receptors expressed by Aδ and C fibres. The resulting evoked potentials can be recorded and measured, providing a useful clinical tool for the study of thermal and nociceptive pathways. Concurrent recording of contact heat evoked potentials using electroencephalogram (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has not previously been reported with CHEPS. Developing simultaneous EEG and fMRI with CHEPS is highly desirable, as it provides an opportunity to exploit the high temporal resolution of EEG and the high spatial resolution of fMRI to study the reaction of the human brain to thermal and nociceptive stimuli. Methods In this study we have recorded evoked potentials stimulated by 51°C contact heat pulses from CHEPS using EEG, under normal conditions (baseline, and during continuous and simultaneous acquisition of fMRI images in ten healthy volunteers, during two sessions. The pain evoked by CHEPS was recorded on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results Analysis of EEG data revealed that the latencies and amplitudes of evoked potentials recorded during continuous fMRI did not differ significantly from baseline recordings. fMRI results were consistent with previous thermal pain studies, and showed Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD changes in the insula, post-central gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA, middle cingulate cortex and pre-central gyrus. There was a significant positive correlation between the evoked potential amplitude (EEG and the psychophysical perception of pain on the VAS. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of recording contact heat evoked potentials with EEG during continuous and simultaneous fMRI. The combined use of the two methods can lead to identification of distinct patterns of brain

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  13. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  14. Сhanges of brain bioelectric activity by diabetic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Vitaly P. Omelchenko; Elena A. Timoshenko

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the analysis of brain bioelectric activity by diabetic encephalopathy. Paid attention to the establishment of EEG parameters and patients psychological characteristics interrelation.

  15. The differences of brain cortical activation between superficial pain and deep pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) technology, we investigated the difference of pain related brain cortical activation derived from noxious stimulation to the skin and muscular tissue. Ten healthy volunteers who have no history of brain vascular disease were enrolled in this study. A cutaneous pain was provoked by isotonic (0.9%) saline injection into intra-dermal space on right lower leg through 24G plastic catheter, and a muscle pain was provoked by hypertonic (3%) saline injection into right tibialis anterior muscle. We used event-related FMRI to measure brain activity during each injection. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to quantify pain intensity and unpleasantness, and pain quality was assessed with several verbal descriptions. Pain unpleasantness rating was higher in the muscle pain compared to the cutaneous pain, despite the same pain intensity rating. The cutaneous pain had more acute pain onset than the muscle pain. Pain duration after stimulation was short in the cutaneous pain, but long in the muscle pain. The extent of the painful region tended to be larger with the muscle pain, but there was no statistical significance. Evoked FMRI response from the cutaneous pain showed distinct brain activation in the inferior and superior parietal cortex (BA: Brodmann area 5/7/40), primary and secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 and S2), insula, supplementary motor area (SMA, BA6), posterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum. On the other hand, FMRI response from muscle pain showed distinct brain activation mainly in the contralateral insula. These results suggest that the parietal lobe including the S1 is the essential area for cognition of sharp and well-localized pain conditions such as cutaneous pain, and may not be essential for cognition of diffuse pain derived from muscular tissue. (author)

  16. Synchronous and asynchronous electrically evoked motor activities during wind-up stimulation are differentially modulated following an acute spinal transection

    OpenAIRE

    Frigon, Alain; Hurteau, Marie-France; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C.J.; Telonio, Alessandro; Thibaudier, Yann

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used a novel technique to study reflex wind-up when the spinal cord is intact and following an acute spinal transection. Specifically, we evaluated reflex responses evoked by a series of 10 electrical pulses to the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves in 9 decerebrate adult cats, before and after an acute spinal transection. Electromyograms were recorded in four hindlimb muscles (lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus, and sartorius) to evaluate reflex amp...

  17. Expression of gp120 in mice evokes anxiety behavior: Co-occurrence with increased dendritic spines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachis, Alessia; Forcelli, Patrick; Masliah, Eliezer; Campbell, Lee; Mocchetti, Italo

    2016-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection of the brain produces cognitive and motor disorders. In addition, HIV positive individuals exhibit behavioral alterations, such as apathy, and a decrease in spontaneity or emotional responses, typically seen in anxiety disorders. Anxiety can lead to psychological stress, which has been shown to influence HIV disease progression. These considerations underscore the importance of determining if anxiety in HIV is purely psychosocial, or if by contrast, there are the molecular cascades associated directly with HIV infection that may mediate anxiety. The present study had two goals: (1) to determine if chronic exposure to viral proteins would induce anxiety-like behavior in an animal model and (2) to determine if this exposure results in anatomical abnormalities that could explain increased anxiety. We have used gp120 transgenic mice, which display behavior and molecular deficiencies similar to HIV positive subjects with cognitive and motor impairments. In comparison to wild type mice, 6months old gp120 transgenic mice demonstrated an anxiety like behavior measured by open field, light/dark transition task, and prepulse inhibition tests. Moreover, gp120 transgenic mice have an increased number of spines in the amygdala, as well as higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tissue plasminogen activator when compared to age-matched wild type. Our data support the hypothesis that HIV, through gp120, may cause structural changes in the amygdala that lead to maladaptive responses to anxiety. PMID:26845379

  18. The effects of physical activity on brain structure

    OpenAIRE

    AdamThomas; PeterABandettini

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic activity is a powerful stimulus for improving mental health and for generating structural changes in the brain. We review the literature documenting these structural changes and explore exactly where in the brain these changes occur as well as the underlying substrates of the changes including neural, glial, and vasculature components. Aerobic activity has been shown to produce different types of changes in the brain. The presence of novel experiences or learning is an especially imp...

  19. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Rashed-Al-Mahfuz; Md. Rabiul Islam; Keikichi Hirose; Md. Khademul Islam Molla

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component.

  20. Finer discrimination of brain activation with local multivariate distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The organization of human brain function is diverse on different spatial scales.Various cognitive states are alwavs represented as distinct activity patterns across the specific brain region on fine scales.Conventional univariate analysis of functional MRI data seeks to determine how a particular cognitive state is encoded in brain activity by analyzing each voxel separately without considering the fine-scale patterns information contained in the local brain regions.In this paper,a local multivariate distance mapping(LMDM)technique is proposed to detect the brain activation and to map the fine-scale brain activity patterns.LMDM directly represents the local brain activity with the patterns across multiple voxels rather than individual voxels,and it employs the multivariate distance between different patterns to discriminate the brain state on fine scales.Experiments with simulated and real fMRI data demonstrate that LMDM technique can dramatically increase the sensitivity of the detection for the fine-scale brain activity pettems which contain the subtle information of the experimental conditions.

  1. Multichannel biomagnetic system for study of electrical activity in the brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Hoenig, E; Reichenberger, H; Abraham-Fuchs, K; Moshage, W; Oppelt, A; Stefan, H; Weikl, A; Wirth, A

    1990-09-01

    The authors designed a multichannel system for noninvasive measurement of the extremely weak magnetic fields generated by the brain and the heart. It uses a flat array of 37 superconducting magnetic field-sensing coils connected to sophisticated superconducting quantum interference devices. To prevent interference from external electromagnetic fields, the system is operated inside a shielded room. Complete sets of coherent data, even from spontaneous events, can be recorded. System performance was evaluated with phantom measurements and evoked-response studies. A spatial resolution of a few millimeters and a temporal resolution of a millisecond were obtained. First results in patients with partial epilepsy and investigations of the cardiac conductive pathway indicate that biomagnetism is now ready for a systematic clinical evaluation. Interpretation of measurements was facilitated by highlighting biomagnetically localized electrical activity in three-dimensional digital magnetic resonance images. PMID:2389043

  2. Potential Moderators of Physical Activity on Brain Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina L. Leckie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related cognitive decline is linked to numerous molecular, structural, and functional changes in the brain. However, physical activity is a promising method of reducing unfavorable age-related changes. Physical activity exerts its effects on the brain through many molecular pathways, some of which are regulated by genetic variants in humans. In this paper, we highlight genes including apolipoprotein E (APOE, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT along with dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, as potential moderators of the effect of physical activity on brain health. There are a growing number of studies indicating that physical activity might mitigate the genetic risks for disease and brain dysfunction and that the combination of greater amounts of DHA intake with physical activity might promote better brain function than either treatment alone. Understanding whether genes or other lifestyles moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive health is necessary for delineating the pathways by which brain health can be enhanced and for grasping the individual variation in the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on the brain and cognition. There is a need for future research to continue to assess the factors that moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive function.

  3. Brain activity and fatigue during prolonged exercise in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Tino Hoffmann

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that fatigue due to hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in the heat is in part related to alterations in frontal cortical brain activity. The electroencephalographic activity (EEG) of the frontal cortex of the brain was measured in seven cyclists [maximal O2 uptake (VO2max) 4...

  4. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. PMID:23785166

  5. Hypoxia-ischemia or excitotoxin-induced tissue plasminogen activator- dependent gelatinase activation in mice neonate brain microvessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla L Omouendze

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day-old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1 genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O₂. Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c. injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo. Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA⁻/⁻ and enhanced in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice. In PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1⁻/⁻ and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL. In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have

  6. Activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors inhibits regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreflex

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinose, Tomoko K.; Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S.; Scislo, Tadeusz J.

    2012-01-01

    Previously we have shown that adenosine operating via the A1 receptor subtype may inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the baroreflex arc within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and differentially increase renal (RSNA), preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA>RSNA≥LSNA). Since the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex and the arterial baroreflex are mediated via similar medullary pathways, and glutamate is a primary transmitter in both pathways, it i...

  7. A different pattern of lateralised brain activity during processing of loved faces in men and women: a MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedt, Hannes O; Beier, Klaus M; Lueschow, Andreas; Pauls, Alfred; Weber, Joachim E

    2014-12-01

    Viewing personally familiar and loved faces evokes a distinct pattern of brain activity as demonstrated by research employing imaging and electrophysiological methods. The aim of the current investigation was to study the perception of loved faces combined with recalling past emotional experiences using whole-head magnetoencephalograpy (MEG). Twenty-eight participants (fourteen female) viewed photographs of their romantic partner as well as of two long-term friends while imagining a positive emotional encounter with the respective person. Face-stimuli evoked a slow and sustained shift of magnetic activity from 300ms post-stimulus onwards which differentiated loved from friends' faces in female participants and left-sided sensors only. This late-latency evoked magnetic field resembled (as its magnetic counterpart) ERP-modulations by affective content and memory, most notably the late positive potential (LPP). We discuss our findings in the light of studies suggesting greater responsiveness to affective cues in women as well as sex differences in autobiographical and emotional memory. PMID:25312880

  8. Neural stem cells secrete factors facilitating brain regeneration upon constitutive Raf-Erk activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel; Choi, Young-Jin; Sun, Woong; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular Raf-Erk signaling pathway is activated during neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, and neuronal and astrocytic differentiation. A key question is how this signal can evoke multiple and even opposing NSC behaviors. We show here, using a constitutively active Raf (ca-Raf), that Raf-Erk activation in NSCs induces neuronal differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. By contrast, it causes NSC proliferation and the formation of astrocytes in an extrinsic autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, treatment of NSCs with medium (CM) conditioned in ca-Raf-transduced NSCs (Raf-CM; RCM) became activated to form proliferating astrocytes resembling radial glial cells (RGCs) or adult-type NSCs. Infusion of Raf-CM into injured mouse brains caused expansion of the NSC population in the subventricular zone, followed by the formation of new neurons that migrated to the damaged site. Our study shows an example how molecular mechanisms dissecting NSC behaviors can be utilized to develop regenerative therapies in brain disorders. PMID:27554447

  9. Network-dependent modulation of brain activity during sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, T.; Kan, S.; Koike, T.; Misaki, M; Konishi, S.; Miyauchi, S; Miyahsita, Y.; Masuda, N.

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity dynamically changes even during sleep. A line of neuroimaging studies has reported changes in functional connectivity and regional activity across different sleep stages such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, it remains unclear whether and how the large-scale network activity of human brains changes within a given sleep stage. Here, we investigated modulation of network activity within sleep stages by applying the pairwise maximum entropy mod...

  10. Electrically evoked itch in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Akihiko; Handwerker, Hermann; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Schmelz, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We compared itch sensations and axon reflex flare induced by transcutaneous electrical (0.08-8 ms, 2-200 Hz) and chemical (histamine iontophoresis; 100 microC) stimulation. Stimuli were applied to non-lesional volar wrist skin in 20 healthy human subjects and 10 patients with atopic dermatitis. Intensity of evoked itch and pain sensations were rated on a numerical rating scale (NRS) of 0 (no sensation) to 10 (the maximum sensation imaginable). The axon reflex erythema was measured by laser Doppler imager and areas of alloknesis (itch evoked by light brushing) and hyperknesis (itch evoked by pricking) were assessed psychophysically. Electrical stimulation was most effective for stimulus durations >or=2 ms and frequencies >or=50 Hz. It evoked pure itch as threshold sensation in 80% of the subjects that was perceived with a delay of approximately 1 s. Itch intensities of up to 7/10 were not accompanied by an axon reflex flare. In contrast, histamine provoked a massive increase of axon reflex erythema and maximum itch ratings of 3.1+/-0.2. The extention of alloknesis areas (2.3+/-0.5 cm) evoked by electrical stimulation clearly exceeded those induced by histamine (0.7+/-0.3 cm). Healthy subjects and patients with atopic dermatitis did not differ significantly in their response to either stimulation. We conclude that C-fiber activation underlies the electrically evoked itch sensation. The low electrical thresholds and the absence of an axon reflex flare suggest that these fibers are not identical with the previously described mechano-insensitive histamine responsive C fibers, but represent a separate peripheral neuronal system for the induction of itch. PMID:15621375

  11. Deviation of somatosensory evoked potential and lateral dominance of spike activity in iron-induced epileptic cortex of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hattori,Yukio

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available A chronic epileptic focus was induced by a microinjection of ferric chloride solution into the sensorimotor cortex of rats. Two types of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs were recorded from the cortex near the injection site. In animals showing an initial positive-negative biphasic SEP, spikes appeared in electrocorticograms (ECoGs more frequently on the side ipsilateral to the injection site than on the contralateral side, whereas in animals showing an initial negative monophasic SEP, spikes appeared more frequently on the contralateral side.

  12. The effects of cyclic dicarboxylic acids on spontaneous and amino acid-evoked activity of rat cortical neurones.

    OpenAIRE

    Birley, S.; Collins, J F; Perkins, M. N.; Stone, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 A series of cyclic dicarboxylic acids were applied by microiontophoresis to neurones in the cerebral cortex of rats anaesthetized with urethane. The object was to examine effects on spontaneous firing rates and any ability to antagonize responses to excitatory amino acids. 2 At relatively low ejecting currents (10-25 nA) cis-2,3-piperidine dicarboxylic acid (cis-2,3-PDA) had no effect on spontaneous firing but selectively antagonized the excitation evoked by n-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) with...

  13. Whitening of Background Brain Activity via Parametric Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal Kamel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signal subspace techniques have been recently suggested for the extraction of the visual evoked potential signals from brain background colored noise. The majority of these techniques assume the background noise as white, and for colored noise, it is suggested to be whitened, without further elaboration on how this might be done. In this paper, we investigate the whitening capabilities of two parametric techniques: a direct one based on Levinson solution of Yule-Walker equations, called AR Yule-Walker, and an indirect one based on the least-squares solution of forward-backward linear prediction (FBLP equations, called AR-FBLP. The whitening effect of the two algorithms is investigated with real background electroencephalogram (EEG colored noise and compared in time and frequency domains.

  14. Metabolic dysfunction in the brain: implications of astrocyte activation

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Luz Albarracin

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the central nervous system (CNS). They participate in different processes such as maintaining the blood–brain barrier and ion homeostasis, uptake and turnover of neurotransmitters, and formation of synapses. In addition, astrocytes also respond to brain insults to prevent the damage. For instance, astrocyte activation plays a central role in the cellular response to brain insults like trauma, infections, stroke, tumorigenesis, and neurodegeneration....

  15. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation activates specific regions in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive ther...

  16. Intrinsic Brain Activity in Altered States of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, M.; Phillips, C.; Tshibanda, L.; Vanhaudenhuyse, A.; Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.T.; Moonen, G.; Hustinx, R.; Maquet, P.; Laureys, S.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain–behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positron emission tomography studies showed that states of extremely low or high brain activity are often associated with unconsciousness. However, this relationship is not absolute, and the precise link between global brain metabolism and awareness remains yet difficult to assert. In contrast, voxel-based analyses identified a systematic impairment of associative frontoparieto–cingulate areas in altered states of consciousness, such as sleep, anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, epileptic loss of consciousness, and somnambulism. In parallel, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified structured patterns of slow neuronal oscillations in the resting human brain. Similar coherent blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) systemwide patterns can also be found, in particular in the default-mode network, in several states of unconsciousness, such as coma, anesthesia, and slow-wave sleep. The latter results suggest that slow coherent spontaneous BOLD fluctuations cannot be exclusively a reflection of conscious mental activity, but may reflect default brain connectivity shaping brain areas of most likely interactions in a way that transcends levels of consciousness, and whose functional significance remains largely in the dark. PMID:18591474

  17. Mapping human brain activity in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazziotta, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    A wide range of structural and functional techniques now exists to map the human brain in health and disease. These approaches span the gamut from external tomographic imaging devices (positron-emission tomography, single photon-emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography), to surface detectors (electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, transcranial magnetic stimulation), to measurements made directly on the brain's surface or beneath it (intrinsic sign...

  18. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: Functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Bock

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behaviour. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method in 8 day old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A pups together with parents and siblings (control, (B separation of the litter from the parents, (C individual separation from parents and siblings, (D individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C, where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D maternal vocalizations reactivated brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other

  19. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able to...

  20. Active microwave computed brain tomography: the response to a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, H; Broquetas, A; Jofre, L

    1991-02-01

    The potential application of active microwave techniques to brain imaging is studied by numerical simulations and experimentally using a recently developed cylindrical microwave scanner. The potential advantages and limitations of this method in static and dynamic brain imaging are presented and compared with other imaging techniques. PMID:2062119

  1. Schizotypal perceptual aberrations of time: correlation between score, behavior and brain activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Arzy

    Full Text Available A fundamental trait of the human self is its continuum experience of space and time. Perceptual aberrations of this spatial and temporal continuity is a major characteristic of schizophrenia spectrum disturbances--including schizophrenia, schizotypal personality disorder and schizotypy. We have previously found the classical Perceptual Aberration Scale (PAS scores, related to body and space, to be positively correlated with both behavior and temporo-parietal activation in healthy participants performing a task involving self-projection in space. However, not much is known about the relationship between temporal perceptual aberration, behavior and brain activity. To this aim, we composed a temporal Perceptual Aberration Scale (tPAS similar to the traditional PAS. Testing on 170 participants suggested similar performance for PAS and tPAS. We then correlated tPAS and PAS scores to participants' performance and neural activity in a task of self-projection in time. tPAS scores correlated positively with reaction times across task conditions, as did PAS scores. Evoked potential mapping and electrical neuroimaging showed self-projection in time to recruit a network of brain regions at the left anterior temporal cortex, right temporo-parietal junction, and occipito-temporal cortex, and duration of activation in this network positively correlated with tPAS and PAS scores. These data demonstrate that schizotypal perceptual aberrations of both time and space, as reflected by tPAS and PAS scores, are positively correlated with performance and brain activation during self-projection in time in healthy individuals along the schizophrenia spectrum.

  2. 基于稳态视觉诱发电位的脑-机接口研究%An Research on Brain-computer Interfaces Based on the Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑军

    2011-01-01

    A Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials ( SSVEP) based Brain-Computer Interfaces system whose stimuli frequency produced by a Liquid Crystal Displays (LED) is achieved. In order to extract the Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials(SSVEP) , the Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) and the method based on Mallat wavelet and AR model to offline analysis of the electroencephalogram are used. Analysis results show that these two methods both can extract the SSVEP signal with a high accuracy , and the FFT is more suitable for the brain-computer interface system, so it achieves a online test of the SSVEPBCIs based on FFT.%实现了一个以液晶显示器(LED)产生刺激频率的稳态视觉诱发电位(SSVEP)脑-机接口系统(BCIs).为了从脑电中提取出稳态视觉诱发电位(SSVEP)信号,运用基于快速傅里叶变换(FFT)的方法和基于Mallat小波及AR模型分析法这两种处理方法对脑电信号进行离线分析.实验结果表明,用这两种方法提取SSVEP信号都可以达到很高的准确率;而基于FFT的方法更适用于脑-机接口系统.因此用基于FFT的方法完成了这个SSVEPBCIs的在线实验.

  3. Spatial heterogeneity analysis of brain activation in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many brain diseases it can be qualitatively observed that spatial patterns in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation maps appear more (diffusively distributed than in healthy controls. However, measures that can quantitatively characterize this spatial distributiveness in individual subjects are lacking. In this study, we propose a number of spatial heterogeneity measures to characterize brain activation maps. The proposed methods focus on different aspects of heterogeneity, including the shape (compactness, complexity in the distribution of activated regions (fractal dimension and co-occurrence matrix, and gappiness between activated regions (lacunarity. To this end, functional MRI derived activation maps of a language and a motor task were obtained in language impaired children with (Rolandic epilepsy and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Group analysis of the activation maps revealed no significant differences between patients and controls for both tasks. However, for the language task the activation maps in patients appeared more heterogeneous than in controls. Lacunarity was the best measure to discriminate activation patterns of patients from controls (sensitivity 74%, specificity 70% and illustrates the increased irregularity of gaps between activated regions in patients. The combination of heterogeneity measures and a support vector machine approach yielded further increase in sensitivity and specificity to 78% and 80%, respectively. This illustrates that activation distributions in impaired brains can be complex and more heterogeneous than in normal brains and cannot be captured fully by a single quantity. In conclusion, heterogeneity analysis has potential to robustly characterize the increased distributiveness of brain activation in individual patients.

  4. Сhanges of brain bioelectric activity by diabetic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly P. Omelchenko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the analysis of brain bioelectric activity by diabetic encephalopathy. Paid attention to the establishment of EEG parameters and patients psychological characteristics interrelation.

  5. Imaging of brain activity by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain function is associated with regional energy metabolism and blood flow increase. Such brain activity is visualized by using external scintigraphy. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the currently available most superior technique, allowing three-dimensional imaging of subtle blood flow. In this article, imaging methods and application of PET are discussed in terms of the following items: (1) measurement of cerebral glucose consumption, (2) PET in persons with visual impairment, (3) association between brain function and regional cerebral blood flow, (4) measurement of cerebral blood flow, (5) method for decreasing noise in PET imaging, (6) anatomic standardization of PET images, and (7) speech load and regional cerebral activity images. (N.K.)

  6. Contributions of Glycogen to Astrocytic Energetics during Brain Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Nancy F Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 mol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net g...

  7. Spatiotemporal psychopathology I: No rest for the brain's resting state activity in depression? Spatiotemporal psychopathology of depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-15

    Despite intense neurobiological investigation in psychiatric disorders like major depressive disorder (MDD), the basic disturbance that underlies the psychopathological symptoms of MDD remains, nevertheless, unclear. Neuroimaging has focused mainly on the brain's extrinsic activity, specifically task-evoked or stimulus-induced activity, as related to the various sensorimotor, affective, cognitive, and social functions. Recently, the focus has shifted to the brain's intrinsic activity, otherwise known as its resting state activity. While various abnormalities have been observed during this activity, their meaning and significance for depression, along with its various psychopathological symptoms, are yet to be defined. Based on findings in healthy brain resting state activity and its particular spatial and temporal structure - defined in a functional and physiological sense rather than anatomical and structural - I claim that the various depressive symptoms are spatiotemporal disturbances of the resting state activity and its spatiotemporal structure. This is supported by recent findings that link ruminations and increased self-focus in depression to abnormal spatial organization of resting state activity. Analogously, affective and cognitive symptoms like anhedonia, suicidal ideation, and thought disorder can be traced to an increased focus on the past, increased past-focus as basic temporal disturbance o the resting state. Based on these findings, I conclude that the various depressive symptoms must be conceived as spatiotemporal disturbances of the brain's resting state's activity and its spatiotemporal structure. Importantly, this entails a new form of psychopathology, "Spatiotemporal Psychopathology" that directly links the brain and psyche, therefore having major diagnostic and therapeutic implications for clinical practice. PMID:26048657

  8. Interleukin 6 modulates acetylcholinesterase activity of brain neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classically, radiation injuries results in a peripheral inflammatory process, and we have previously observed an early systemic interleukin 6 (IL-6) release following whole-body irradiation. Besides, we have demonstrated an early decrease of rat or primate brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity a gamma exposure. The object of the present study is to find possible IL-6 systemic effects on the brain AChE activity. We show that, though intravenous (i.v.) or intra-cerebro-ventricular (ICV) injection of IL-6 can induce a drop in rat brain AChE activity, this cytokine induces only a slight decrease of the AChE release in cultured brain cells. (author)

  9. The effects of physical activity on brain structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eThomas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic activity is a powerful stimulus for improving mental health and for generating structural changes in the brain. We review the literature documenting these structural changes and explore exactly where in the brain these changes occur as well as the underlying substrates of the changes including neural, glial, and vasculature components. Aerobic activity has been shown to produce different types of changes in the brain. The presence of novel experiences or learning is an especially important component in how these changes are manifest. We also discuss the distinct time courses of structural brain changes with both aerobic activity and learning as well as how these effects might differ in diseased and elderly groups.

  10. TRANSLATION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY INTO SLEEP

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) play a role in sleep regulation in health and disease. Hypothalamic and cerebral cortical levels of TNF mRNA or TNF protein have diurnal variations with higher levels associated with greater sleep propensity. Sleep loss is associated with enhanced brain TNF. Central or systemic TNF injections enhance sleep. Inhibition of TNF using the soluble TNF receptor, or anti-TNF antibodies, or a TNF siRNA reduces spontaneous sleep. Mice lacking the T...

  11. Brain Activity Monitoring for Assessing Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Johanna Rodríguez Carrillo; Jovani Alberto Jiménez Builes; Fabio Paternò

    2015-01-01

    Satisfaction is a dimension of usability for which quantitative metrics cannot be calculated during user interactions. Measurement is subjective and depends on the ability to interpret questionnaires and on the memory of the user. This paper represents an attempt to develop an automatic quantitative metric of satisfaction, developed using a Brain Computer Interface to monitor the mental states (Attention/Meditation) of users. Based on these results, we are able to establish a correlation betw...

  12. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincis, Roberto; Lagier, Samuel; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2015-07-14

    Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging. PMID:26146075

  13. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Vincis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging.

  14. Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity in the Initial Screening of Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neil, Brian; Prichep, Leslie S.; Naunheim, Roseanne; Chabot, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of emergency department (ED) visits for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the United States exceeds 1,000,000 cases/year with the vast majority classified as mild (mTBI). Using existing computed tomography (CT) decision rules for selecting patients to be referred for CT, such as the New Orleans Criteria (NOC), approximately 70% of those scanned are found to have a negative CT. This study investigates the use of quantified brain electrical activity to assess its possi...

  15. Extension of non-invasive EEG into the kHz range for evoked thalamocortical activity by means of very low noise amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafast electroencephalographic signals, having frequencies above 500 Hz, can be observed in somatosensory evoked potential measurements. Usually, these recordings have a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) because weak signals are overlaid by intrinsic noise of much higher amplitude like that generated by biological sources and the amplifier. As an example, recordings at the scalp taken during electrical stimulation of the median nerve show a 600 Hz burst with submicro-volt amplitudes which can be extracted from noise by the use of massive averaging and digital signal processing only. We have investigated this signal by means of a very low noise amplifier made in-house (minimal voltage noise 2.7 nV Hz−1/2, FET inputs). We examined how the SNR of the data is altered by the bandwidth and the use of amplifiers with different intrinsic amplifier noise levels of 12 and 4.8 nV Hz−1/2, respectively. By analyzing different frequency contributions of the signal, we found an extremely weak 1 kHz component superimposed onto the well-known 600 Hz burst. Previously such high-frequency electroencephalogram responses around 1 kHz have only been observed by deep brain electrodes implanted for tremor therapy of Parkinson patients. For the non-invasive measurement of such signals, we recommend that amplifier noise should not exceed 4 nV Hz−1/2. (note)

  16. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Vincis; Samuel Lagier; Dimitri Van De Ville; Ivan Rodriguez; Alan Carleton

    2015-01-01

    Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independ...

  17. Activation of NF-κB mediates astrocyte swelling and brain edema in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Tong, Xiao Y; Ruiz-Cordero, Roberto; Bregy, Amade; Bethea, John R; Bramlett, Helen M; Norenberg, Michael D

    2014-07-15

    Brain edema and associated increased intracranial pressure are major consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While astrocyte swelling (cytotoxic edema) represents a major component of the brain edema in the early phase of TBI, its mechanisms are unclear. One factor known to be activated by trauma is nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Because this factor has been implicated in the mechanism of cell swelling/brain edema in other neurological conditions, we examined whether NF-κB might also be involved in the mediation of post-traumatic astrocyte swelling/brain edema. Here we show an increase in NF-κB activation in cultured astrocytes at 1 and 3 h after trauma (fluid percussion injury, FPI), and that BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB, significantly blocked the trauma-induced astrocyte swelling. Increased activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase and the Na(+), K(+), 2Cl(-) cotransporter were also observed in cultured astrocytes after trauma, and BAY 11-7082 reduced these effects. We also examined the role of NF-κB in the mechanism of cell swelling by using astrocyte cultures derived from transgenic (Tg) mice with a functional inactivation of astrocytic NF-κB. Exposure of cultured astrocytes from wild-type mice to in vitro trauma (3 h) caused a significant increase in cell swelling. By contrast, traumatized astrocyte cultures derived from NF-κB Tg mice showed no swelling. We also found increased astrocytic NF-κB activation and brain water content in rats after FPI, while BAY 11-7082 significantly reduced such effects. Our findings strongly suggest that activation of astrocytic NF-κB represents a key element in the process by which cytotoxic brain edema occurs after TBI. PMID:24471369

  18. Brain Activity Monitoring for Assessing Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Johanna Rodríguez Carrillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Satisfaction is a dimension of usability for which quantitative metrics cannot be calculated during user interactions. Measurement is subjective and depends on the ability to interpret questionnaires and on the memory of the user. This paper represents an attempt to develop an automatic quantitative metric of satisfaction, developed using a Brain Computer Interface to monitor the mental states (Attention/Meditation of users. Based on these results, we are able to establish a correlation between the state of Attention and the users' level of satisfaction.

  19. Human brain activity with functional NIR optical imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we reviewed the applications of functional near infrared optical imager in human brain activity. Optical imaging results of brain activity, including memory for new association, emotional thinking, mental arithmetic, pattern recognition ' where's Waldo?, occipital cortex in visual stimulation, and motor cortex in finger tapping, are demonstrated. It is shown that the NIR optical method opens up new fields of study of the human population, in adults under conditions of simulated or real stress that may have important effects upon functional performance. It makes practical and affordable for large populations the complex technology of measuring brain function. It is portable and low cost. In cognitive tasks subjects could report orally. The temporal resolution could be millisecond or less in theory. NIR method will have good prospects in exploring human brain secret.

  20. Regional organisation of brain activity during paradoxical sleep (PS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, P; Ruby, P; Schwartz, S; Laureys, S; Albouy, G; Dang-Vu, T; Desseilles, M; Boly, M; Melchior, G; Peigneux, P

    2004-07-01

    Human brain function is regionally organised during paradoxical sleep (PS) in a very different way than during wakefulness or slow wave sleep. The important activity in the pons and in the limbic/paralimbic areas constitutes the key feature of the functional neuroanatomy of PS, together with a relative quiescence of prefrontal and parietal associative cortices. Two questions are still outstanding. What neurocognitive and neurophysiological mechanisms may explain this original organization of brain function during PS? How the pattern of regional brain function may relate to dream content? Although some clues are already available, the experimental answer to both questions is still pending. PMID:15493545

  1. Brain activation during word identification and word recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry L.; Ostergaard, Arne L.; Law, Ian;

    1998-01-01

    subjects performed the word identification (reading) and recognition memory tasks used previously by Ostergaard. The results are the direct comparisons of the two tasks and the effects of stimulus degradation on blood flow patterns during the tasks. Clear differences between word identification and word...... dramatically alter the degree to which word priming shows a dissociation from word recognition; i.e., effects of a number of factors on priming paralleled their effects on recognition memory tests when the words were degraded at test. In the present study, cerebral blood flow changes were measured while...... recognition were observed: the latter task evoked considerably more prefrontal activity and stronger cerebellar activation. Stimulus degradation was associated with focal increases in bilateral fusiform regions within the occipital lobe. No task, degradation, or item repetition effects were demonstrated in...

  2. Principal tools for exploring the brain and mapping its activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electro-encephalography (EEG), magneto-encephalography (MEG), scanner, positron computed tomography, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and NMR imaging are the main methods used to explore human brain and to do a mapping of its activity. These methods are described into details (principle, visualization, uses, advantages, disadvantages). They can be useful to detect the possible anomalies of the human brain. (O.M.)

  3. Synchronous brain activity across individuals inderlies shared psychological perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Lahnakoski, Juha M.; Glerean, Enrico; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Hyönä, Jukka; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2014-01-01

    For successful communication, we need to understand the external world consistently with others. This task requires sufficiently similar cognitive schemas or psychological perspectives that act as filters to guide the selection, interpretation and storage of sensory information, perceptual objects and events. Here we show that when individuals adopt a similar psychological perspective during natural viewing, their brain activity becomes synchronized in specific brain regions. We measured brai...

  4. Distributed patterns of brain activity that lead to forgetting

    OpenAIRE

    Ilke eOztekin; David eBadre

    2011-01-01

    HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE Distributed patterns of brain activity that lead to forgetting Ilke Öztekin1* and David Badre2,3 1 Department of Psychology, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey 2 Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA 3 Brown Institute for Brain Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA Proactive interference (PI), in which irrelevant information from prior learning disrupts memory performance, is widely...

  5. Glutamate Release by Primary Brain Tumors Induces Epileptic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Campbell, Susan L.; Haas, Brian R.; Montana, Vedrana; Robel, Stefanie; Ogunrinu, Toyin; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common and poorly understood co-morbidity for individuals with primary brain tumors. To investigate peritumoral seizure etiology, we implanted patient-derived glioma cells into scid mice. Within 14–18 days, glioma-bearing animals developed spontaneous, recurring abnormal EEG events consistent with epileptic activity that progressed over time. Acute brain slices from these animals showed significant glutamate release from the tumor mediated by the system xc − cystine/g...

  6. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic reso...

  7. Deep Brain Stimulation Alleviates Parkinsonian Bradykinesia by Regularizing Pallidal Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dorval, Alan D.; Kuncel, Alexis M.; Birdno, Merrill J.; Turner, Dennis A.; Grill, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia can alleviate the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease although the therapeutic mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that DBS relieves symptoms by minimizing pathologically disordered neuronal activity in the basal ganglia. In human participants with parkinsonism and clinically effective deep brain leads, regular (i.e., periodic) high-frequency stimulation was replaced with irregular (i.e., aperiodic) stimulation at the same mean frequency ...

  8. A contribution to the study of spontaneous and evoked electrical activities of the adult rabbit hypothalamus and application of digital analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spontaneous and evoked electrical activities of the hypothalamus were studied in 18 adult rabbits chronically implanted with electrodes. The graphic study of the EEG was completed by digital analyses of the signal considered as a random process and processed both by statistical analysis in order to know the distribution function of the signal amplitude and harmonic analysis allowing classification of power density spectra by the calculation of the autocorrelation function and its Fourier transform. Absolute values and percentage of energy distribution were obtained from 0 to 40 Hz for each frequency rate (0.25 Hz) and in various frequency bands (0-3, 3-6, 7-9, 9-15, 15-20, 20-30 and 30-40 Hz). The experimental methods (electrode implantation, data acquisition and processing) are described: 240 sequences corresponding to stable physiological states were analyzed after analogical-digital conversion (sampling rate: 10 ms, period of integration: 20 s). Whatever the state of vigilance, the hypothalamus had a fairly homogeneous function different from the spontaneous electrical activity of the cortex. The signal characteristics both in amplitude and frequency allowed to distinguish the hypothalamic areas studied (supra-optic area, mammillary body, postero-lateral hypothalamus). The results were reproducible and verified the information supplied by visual examination of the EEG. Following light stimulus, the evoked potentials were collected in the hypothalamus; there should therefore be convergence, yet since the answers are unstable and long latent, the neuronal paths followed by the impulse must not be direct. (author)

  9. Brain Responses Differ to Faces of Mothers and Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsalidou, Marie; Barbeau, Emmanuel J.; Bayless, Sarah J.; Taylor, Margot J.

    2010-01-01

    We encounter many faces each day but relatively few are personally familiar. Once faces are familiar, they evoke semantic and social information known about the person. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate differential brain activity to familiar and non-familiar faces; however, brain responses related to personally familiar faces have been more rarely…

  10. A Quantitative Model of the GIRK1/2 Channel Reveals That Its Basal and Evoked Activities Are Controlled by Unequal Stoichiometry of Gα and Gβγ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Yakubovich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available G protein-gated K+ channels (GIRK; Kir3, activated by Gβγ subunits derived from Gi/o proteins, regulate heartbeat and neuronal excitability and plasticity. Both neurotransmitter-evoked (Ievoked and neurotransmitter-independent basal (Ibasal GIRK activities are physiologically important, but mechanisms of Ibasal and its relation to Ievoked are unclear. We have previously shown for heterologously expressed neuronal GIRK1/2, and now show for native GIRK in hippocampal neurons, that Ibasal and Ievoked are interrelated: the extent of activation by neurotransmitter (activation index, Ra is inversely related to Ibasal. To unveil the underlying mechanisms, we have developed a quantitative model of GIRK1/2 function. We characterized single-channel and macroscopic GIRK1/2 currents, and surface densities of GIRK1/2 and Gβγ expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Based on experimental results, we constructed a mathematical model of GIRK1/2 activity under steady-state conditions before and after activation by neurotransmitter. Our model accurately recapitulates Ibasal and Ievoked in Xenopus oocytes, HEK293 cells and hippocampal neurons; correctly predicts the dose-dependent activation of GIRK1/2 by coexpressed Gβγ and fully accounts for the inverse Ibasal-Ra correlation. Modeling indicates that, under all conditions and at different channel expression levels, between 3 and 4 Gβγ dimers are available for each GIRK1/2 channel. In contrast, available Gαi/o decreases from ~2 to less than one Gα per channel as GIRK1/2's density increases. The persistent Gβγ/channel (but not Gα/channel ratio support a strong association of GIRK1/2 with Gβγ, consistent with recruitment to the cell surface of Gβγ, but not Gα, by GIRK1/2. Our analysis suggests a maximal stoichiometry of 4 Gβγ but only 2 Gαi/o per one GIRK1/2 channel. The unique, unequal association of GIRK1/2 with G protein subunits, and the cooperative nature of GIRK gating by Gβγ, underlie the complex

  11. Synchronous brain activity across individuals underlies shared psychological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnakoski, Juha M; Glerean, Enrico; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hyönä, Jukka; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2014-10-15

    For successful communication, we need to understand the external world consistently with others. This task requires sufficiently similar cognitive schemas or psychological perspectives that act as filters to guide the selection, interpretation and storage of sensory information, perceptual objects and events. Here we show that when individuals adopt a similar psychological perspective during natural viewing, their brain activity becomes synchronized in specific brain regions. We measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) from 33 healthy participants who viewed a 10-min movie twice, assuming once a 'social' (detective) and once a 'non-social' (interior decorator) perspective to the movie events. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to derive multisubject voxelwise similarity measures (inter-subject correlations; ISCs) of functional MRI data. We used k-nearest-neighbor and support vector machine classifiers as well as a Mantel test on the ISC matrices to reveal brain areas wherein ISC predicted the participants' current perspective. ISC was stronger in several brain regions--most robustly in the parahippocampal gyrus, posterior parietal cortex and lateral occipital cortex--when the participants viewed the movie with similar rather than different perspectives. Synchronization was not explained by differences in visual sampling of the movies, as estimated by eye gaze. We propose that synchronous brain activity across individuals adopting similar psychological perspectives could be an important neural mechanism supporting shared understanding of the environment. PMID:24936687

  12. Acupuncture inhibits cue-induced heroin craving and brain activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinghui Cai; Xiaoge Song; Chuanfu Li; Chunsheng Xu; Xiliang Li; Qi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Previous research using functional MRI has shown that specific brain regions associated with drug dependence and cue-elicited heroin craving are activated by environmental cues.Craving is an important trigger of heroin relapse,and acupuncture may inhibit craving.In this study,we performed functional MRI in heroin addicts and control subjects.We compared differences in brain activation between the two groups during heroin cue exposure,heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point(ST36)without twirling of the needle,and heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point with twirling of the needle.Heroin cue exposure elicited significant activation in craving-related brain regions mainly in the frontal lobes and callosal gyri.Acupuncture without twirling did not significantly affect the range of brain activation induced by heroin cue exposure,but significantly changed the extent of the activation in the heroin addicts group.Acupuncture at the Zusanli.point with twirling of the needle significantly decreased both the range and extent of activation induced by heroin cue exposure compared with heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture without twirling of the needle.These experimental findings indicate that presentation of heroin cues can induce activation in craving-related brain regions,which are involved in reward,learning and memory,cognition and emotion.Acupuncture at the Zusanli point can rapidly suppress the activation of specific brain regions related to craving,supporting its potential as an intervention for drug craving.

  13. To what extent can dry and water-based EEG electrodes replace conductive gel ones?: A Steady State Visual Evoked Potential Brain-Computer Interface Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, V.; Garcia Molina, G.; Peuscher, J

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances in the field of skin electrodes and on-body sensors indicate a possibility of having an alternative to the traditionally used conductive gel electrodes for measuring electrical signals of the brain (electroencephalogram, EEG). This paper evaluates whether water-based and dry contact electrode solutions can replace the gel ones. The quality of the obtained signal by three headsets, each using 8 electrodes of a different type, is estimated onthe steady state visual...

  14. Clinicophysiological study of multi-modality evoked potentials and computed tomographic findings in persistent vegetative state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR), short latency somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and visual evoked potential (VEP) of patients in the persistent vegetative state (PVS) are reported, and the correlations between the electrophysiological findings and the CT scan findings with the three clinical grades of the PVS (transitional, incomplete and complete vegetative syndromes) are discussed. Twenty two patients in a vegetative state caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (3), hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (5), cerbral infarction (6), head injury (3), cerebral anoxia (4) and brain tumor (1). Each evoked response was evaluated for the presense or absence of abnormalities and assigned a grade ranked I to III. Briefly an evoked response was assigned a grade I, II, III if it satisfied the respective criteria of normal, moderately abnormal and severely abnormal or absent electrical activity. On the other hand CT scan findings in the PVS were evaluated for abnormal low density areas, ventricular dilatation and enlargement of the sulci and cisterns indicative of atrophy of the brain parenchym. SSEP and VEP were better correlated with the clinical grade than ABR, and upper brainstem atrophy and abnormal low density area in CT scan findings were more valuable as an index to expresses the clinical features than ventricular dilatation. On the basis of these results, it is concluded that studies of ABR, SSEP and VEP associated with CT scan findings in the PVS could be a useful diagnostic aid to evaluate the lesions of these patients. (author)

  15. The role of calcium, calcium-activated K+ channels, and tyrosine/kinase in psoralen-evoked responses in human melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isoldi M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 8-Methoxy psoralen (8-MOP exerts a short-term (24 h mitogenic action, and a long-term (48-72 h anti-proliferative and melanogenic action on two human melanoma cell lines, SK-Mel 28 and C32TG. An increase of intracellular calcium concentration was observed by spectrofluorometry immediately after the addition of 0.1 mM 8-MOP to both cell lines, previously incubated with calcium probe fluo-3 AM (5 µM. The intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA/AM (1 µM blocked both early (mitogenic and late (anti-proliferative and melanogenic 8-MOP effects on both cell lines, thus revealing the importance of the calcium signal in both short- and long-term 8-MOP-evoked responses. Long-term biological assays with 5 and 10 mM tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, an inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels did not affect the responses to psoralen; however, in 24-h assays 10 mM TEA blocked the proliferative peak, indicating a modulation of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels by 8-MOP. No alteration of cAMP basal levels or forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels was promoted by 8-MOP in SK-Mel 28 cells, as determined by radioimmunoassay. However, in C32TG cells forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels were further increased in the presence of 8-MOP. In addition, assays with 1 µM protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitors, Ro 31-8220 and KN-93, respectively, excluded the participation of these kinases in the responses evoked by 8-MOP. Western blot with antibodies anti-phosphotyrosine indicated a 92% increase of the phosphorylated state of a 43-kDa band, suggesting that the phosphorylation of this protein is a component of the cascade that leads to the increase of tyrosinase activity.

  16. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574316

  17. BRAIN EVOKED POTENTIAL CHANGES OF SHORT TIME METAMFETAMINE ABUSERS%短期甲基苯丙胺类物质滥用者的脑诱发电位变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田艳; 徐四清; 项沫; 雷国奎

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the brain evoked potential changes in short time methamphetamine abusers. Methods: Auditory evoked potential ( AEP), visual evoked potential ( VEP ),somatoform evoked potential ( SEP), and event related potential P300 were recorded in methamphetamine abusers who had used methamphetamine for no more than twelve months (n = 73 )and non -methamphetamine use controls ( n = 30). Results: In methamphetamine user group, the P1, N1 N2, P2 incubations of AEP ,the P1 incubation of VEP, and the N2 incubation of SEP were significantly longer than those in the control group(P <0. 01 or P <0. 05). But,the N1 incubation of SEP was significantly shorter than that in the control group(P <0. 05). The amplitudes of P2, N1 -P2, P2 -N2 of AEP, P2, N1 -P2,P2 - N2 of VEP ,and P2 ,P2 - N2 of SEP,were significantly lower than those in the control group( P <0. 01 or P < 0. 05 ). There was no significant difference in the N1, P2, N2, and P3 incubations and the amplitudes between methamphetamine and control groups. No significant differences in the N1, P2 incubations,and the P2 amplitude of non - target P300 were observed between groups ( P > 0. 05 ) either.Conclusion:Short time methamphetamine abuse affects AEP, VEP, SEP but not P300. Duration of methamphetamine use is related to the degree of the cognitive impairment of methamphetamine users.%目的:探讨短期滥用甲基苯丙胺类物质者的脑诱发电位变化.方法:对73例滥用时间≤12个月的甲基苯丙胺类物质者行听觉诱发电位AEP、视觉诱发电位VEP、体感诱发电位SEP及事件相关电位P300检测,并以30例正常人作对照.结果:短期滥用甲基苯丙胺类物质者AEP的P1、N1、P2、N2潜伏期;VEP的P1潜伏期;SEP的N2潜伏期均长于正常对照组(P<0.01或P<0.05);SEP的N1潜伏期短于正常对照组(P<0.05).AEP的P2、N1-P2、P2-N2波幅;VEP的P2、N1-P2、P2-N2波幅;SEP的P2、P2-N2波幅均低于正常对照组(P<0.01或P<0.05).P300

  18. 正常成人处于"气功态"和"催眠态"时的脑诱发电位实验%Experiment of brain evoked potentials in "Qigong state" and "hypnosis" of normal adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶明毅; 张明岛; 陈兴时

    2005-01-01

    态和气功入静态相比波幅降低[(2.01±1.28),(2.71±1.83),(2.73±1.34)μV,P<0.05];催眠状态下视觉诱发电位(P2,P3)波幅与正常态以及气功态相比降低[(3.47±2.69),(4.76±2.78),(4.30±2.64)μV;(1.68±0.95),(1.18±1.08),(2.01±1.48)μV,P<0.05].结论:处于催眠状态时,感觉诱发电位出现低波幅,而气功入静态和正常态未出现此种改变,说明催眠诱导对大脑生理过程的影响与气功发功所产生的影响存在差别.在气功界被广泛认同的"气功态"即"催眠态"这一假说不能为上述实验结果所证实.%BACKGROUND: Since the diagnostic unit is established in "mental disorder due to Qigong", it has been lack of comparative analysis of experimental observation on whether Qigong exercise affects physiological state in central nerve system, on what the difference are between Qigong and hypnotic induction in the effects on central system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes in brain evoked potentials in "normal state", "Qigong meditation" and "hypnosis" so as to analyze the difference between Qigong release and hypnotic induction in cerebral physiological effects in normal adults.DESIGN: Brain evoked potential experiment was designed, in which, normal adults were employed.SETTING: Shanghai Mental Health Center.PARTICIPANTS: They were staffs, interns and volunteers in Shanghai Mental Health Center, of either gender, at any age and with any educational background, totally 52 people.METHODS: ① American Nicolet Spirit evoked brain electrophysiological meter was used. The electrodes were attached according to 10/20 system on Cz, C3, C4, Pz and Fz of scalp. Verbal or fixation inductive hypnosis was applied. Hypnosis lasted 20 to 30 minutes, in which, the induction lasted 10to 15 minutes. The experimental observation were performed when the receptors were determined to be in hypnosis. ② The Qigong meditation was co-performed by the Qigong masters from Shanghai Qigong Institute or Qigong folk masters

  19. What kind of noise is brain noise? Anomalous scaling behavior of the resting brain activity fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eFraiman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity, often referred as brain noise, is getting increasing attention in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. Despite important efforts, much of the statistical properties of such fluctuations remain largely unknown. This work scrutinize these fluctuations looking at specific statistical properties which are relevant to clarify its dynamical origins. Here, three statistical features which clearly differentiate brain data from naive expectations for random processes are uncovered: First, the variance of the fMRI mean signal as a function of the number of averaged voxels remains constant across a wide range of observed clusters sizes. Second, the anomalous behavior of the variance is originated by bursts of synchronized activity across regions, regardless of their widely different sizes. Finally, the correlation length (i.e., the length at which the correlation strength between two regions vanishes as well as mutual information diverges with the cluster's size considered, such that arbitrarily large clusters exhibit the same collective dynamics than smaller ones. These three properties are known to be exclusive of complex systems exhibiting critical dynamics, where the spatio-temporal dynamics show these peculiar type of fluctuations. Thus, these findings are fully consistent with previous reports of brain critical dynamics, and are relevant for the interpretation of the role of fluctuations and variability in brain function in health and disease.

  20. Interactions between occlusion and human brain function activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, C; Morokuma, M; Yoneyama, Y; Matsuda, R; Lee, J S

    2013-02-01

    There are few review articles in the area of human research that focus on the interactions between occlusion and brain function. This systematic review discusses the effect of occlusion on the health of the entire body with a focus on brain function. Available relevant articles in English from 1999 to 2011 were assessed in an online database and as hard copies in libraries. The selected 19 articles were classified into the following five categories: chewing and tongue movements, clenching and grinding, occlusal splints and occlusal interference, prosthetic rehabilitation, and pain and stimulation. The relationships between the brain activity observed in the motor and sensory cortices and movements of the oral and maxillofacial area, such as those produced by gum chewing, tapping and clenching, were investigated. It was found that the sensorimotor cortex was also affected by the placement of the occlusal interference devices, splints and implant prostheses. Brain activity may change depending on the strength of the movements in the oral and maxillofacial area. Therefore, mastication and other movements stimulate the activity in the cerebral cortex and may be helpful in preventing degradation of a brain function. However, these findings must be verified by evidence gathered from more subjects. PMID:22624951

  1. Rapid stimulus-evoked astrocyte Ca2+ elevations and hemodynamic responses in mouse somatosensory cortex in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Barbara Lykke; Brazhe, Alexey; Jessen, Sanne Barsballe;

    2013-01-01

    Increased neuron and astrocyte activity triggers increased brain blood flow, but controversy exists over whether stimulation-induced changes in astrocyte activity are rapid and widespread enough to contribute to brain blood flow control. Here, we provide evidence for stimulus-evoked Ca(2......+) elevations with rapid onset and short duration in a large proportion of cortical astrocytes in the adult mouse somatosensory cortex. Our improved detection of the fast Ca(2+) signals is due to a signal-enhancing analysis of the Ca(2+) activity. The rapid stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) increases identified in...... astrocyte somas, processes, and end-feet preceded local vasodilatation. Fast Ca(2+) responses in both neurons and astrocytes correlated with synaptic activity, but only the astrocytic responses correlated with the hemodynamic shifts. These data establish that a large proportion of cortical astrocytes have...

  2. Brain Activation during Sentence Comprehension among Good and Poor Readers

    OpenAIRE

    Meyler, Ann; Keller, Timothy A.; Cherkassky, Vladimir L.; Lee, Donghoon; Hoeft, Fumiko; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Just, Marcel Adam

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to increase current understanding of the neuro-psychological basis of poor reading ability by using fMRI to examine brain activation during a visual sentence comprehension task among good and poor readers in the third (n = 32) and fifth (n = 35) grades. Reading ability, age, and the combination of both factors made unique contributions to cortical activation. The main finding was of parietotemporal underactivation (less activation than controls) among poor readers at the 2 g...

  3. Physical Activity, Brain Plasticity, and Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Weinstein, Andrea M.; Lopez, Oscar L.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we summarize the epidemiological, cross-sectional, and interventional studies examining the association between physical activity and brain volume, function, and risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The epidemiological literature provides compelling evidence that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with a reduced risk of dementia in late life. In addition, randomized interventions using neuroimaging tools have reported that participation in physical activity increases ...

  4. The effects of trypsin on rat brain astrocyte activation

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Fereidoni; Farzaneh Sabouni; Ali Moghimi; Shirin Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Background Astrocytes are cells within the central nervous system which are activated in a wide spectrum of infections, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In pathologic states, they produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide (NO), and sometimes they induce apoptosis. Their protease-activated receptors (PARs) can be activated by proteases, e.g. thrombin and trypsin, which are important in brain inflammation. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of di...

  5. Brain activation studies with PET and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of PET and functional MRI in brain activation studies is reviewed. 3D-PET images obtained repeatedly after intravenous injection of about 370 MBq of H215O can detect a faint blood flow change in the brain. Functional MRI can also detect the blood flow change in the brain due to blood oxygen level-dependent effect. Echo-planar imaging is popular in MRI with 1.5 or 3 T. Images are analyzed by statistical parametric mapping with correction of cerebral regions, anatomical normalization and statistics. PET data give the blood flow change by the H215O incorporation into the brain and MRI data, by the scarce tissue oxygen consumption despite the change. Actual images during the cognition task-performance and of frequent artifacts are given. PET is suitable for studies of brain functions like sensibility and emotion and functional MRI, like cortex functions and clinical practices in identification of functional regions prior to surgery and evaluation of functional recovery of damaged brain. (K.H.)

  6. Brain activation during micturition in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Bertil F.M.; Sturms, Leontien M.; Holstege, Gert

    1998-01-01

    Experiments in the cat have led to a concept of how the CNS controls micturition. In a previous study this concept was tested in a PET study in male volunteers, It was demonstrated that specific brainstem and forebrain areas are activated during micturition, It was unfortunate that this study did no

  7. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.; Mørup, Morten

    2007-01-01

    evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure of...

  8. Intrinsic Brain Activity in Altered States of Consciousness: How Conscious Is the Default Mode of Brain Function?

    OpenAIRE

    Boly, M; Phillips, C.; Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A.; Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.T.; Moonen, G.; Hustinx, R.; Maquet, P; Laureys, S.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain–behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positro...

  9. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB perm...

  10. Brain monoamine oxidase A activity predicts trait aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-05-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), an enzyme that breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, Mendelian Inheritance in Men database number 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in vivo in healthy nonsmoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the multidimensional personality questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions, the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than one-third of the variability. Because trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  11. Brain-Computer Interface Based on Motor Imagery: the Most Relevant Sources of Electrical Brain Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Húsek, Dušan; Snášel, V.; Bobrov, P.; Mokienko, O.; Tintěra, J.; Rydlo, J.

    Cham: Springer, 2014 - (Snášel, V.; Krömer, P.; Köppen, M.; Schaefer, G.), s. 153-163. (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing. 223). ISBN 978-3-319-00929-2. ISSN 2194-5357. [Online World Conference on Soft Computing in Industrial Applications /17./. Anywhere on Earth, 10.12.2012-21.12.2012)] Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0070; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Image and Signal Processing * Brain-Computer Interface * Independent Component Analysis * EEG Pattern Classification * fMRI * Motor Image ry * Pattern Recognition Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://dap.vsb.cz/wsc17conf/brain-computer-interface-based-on-motor- image ry---the-most-relevant-sources-of-electrical-brain-activity

  12. Comparison of brain activation to purposefully activate a tool in healthy subjects and brain tumor patients using fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the functional organization of the human brain involved in tool-manipulation. Blood Oxygen Level Dependent was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging in seventeen right-handed healthy volunteers and two brain tumor patients during two tool-manipulation tasks: simulated tightening a bolt with a screwdriver (Simulation), and tightening a bolt with a screwdriver (Real). Subjects performed the experiment without watching the tasks. Bilateral pre-supplementary motor areas, bilateral cerebellar posterior lobes, right ventral premotor area, right calcarine sulcus, and cerebellar vermis were activated during Real but not during Simulation tasks in healthy volunteers. In addition, brain tumor patients activated the prefrontal areas. Our results suggest that the human brain mechanisms for tool-manipulation have a neural-network comprised of presupplementary motor area, ventral premotor area, and bilateral cerebellar posterior lobes. In the patients with brain dusfurction diee to tumors, activation at the prefrontal area provided function compensation without motor paralysis. (author)

  13. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia. PMID:26231574

  14. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  15. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  16. Smart Moves: Powering up the Brain with Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Marcus; Wilson, Donna

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards emphasize higher-order thinking, problem solving, and the creation, retention, and application of knowledge. Achieving these standards creates greater cognitive demands on students. Recent research suggests that active play and regular exercise have a positive effect on brain regions associated with executive…

  17. Alcohol dependence and anxiety increase error-related brain activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Bruijn, E.R. de; Lankveld, C.A. van; Hulstijn, W.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Verkes, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Detection of errors is crucial for efficient goal-directed behaviour. The ability to monitor behaviour is found to be diminished in patients with substance dependence, as reflected in decreased error-related brain activity, i.e. error-related negativity (ERN). The ERN is also decreased in othe

  18. Alcohol dependence and anxiety increase error-related brain activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de; Lankveld, C.A.A. van; Hulstijn, W.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Verkes, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Detection of errors is crucial for efficient goal-directed behaviour. The ability to monitor behaviour is found to be diminished in patients with substance dependence, as reflected in decreased error-related brain activity, i.e. error-related negativity (ERN). The ERN is also decreased in other

  19. Towards a fourth spatial dimension of brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Peters, James F

    2016-06-01

    Current advances in neurosciences deal with the functional architecture of the central nervous system, paving the way for general theories that improve our understanding of brain activity. From topology, a strong concept comes into play in understanding brain functions, namely, the 4D space of a "hypersphere's torus", undetectable by observers living in a 3D world. The torus may be compared with a video game with biplanes in aerial combat: when a biplane flies off one edge of gaming display, it does not crash but rather it comes back from the opposite edge of the screen. Our thoughts exhibit similar behaviour, i.e. the unique ability to connect past, present and future events in a single, coherent picture as if we were allowed to watch the three screens of past-present-future "glued" together in a mental kaleidoscope. Here we hypothesize that brain functions are embedded in a imperceptible fourth spatial dimension and propose a method to empirically assess its presence. Neuroimaging fMRI series can be evaluated, looking for the topological hallmark of the presence of a fourth dimension. Indeed, there is a typical feature which reveal the existence of a functional hypersphere: the simultaneous activation of areas opposite each other on the 3D cortical surface. Our suggestion-substantiated by recent findings-that brain activity takes place on a closed, donut-like trajectory helps to solve long-standing mysteries concerning our psychological activities, such as mind-wandering, memory retrieval, consciousness and dreaming state. PMID:27275375

  20. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  1. Altered brain activity for phonological manipulation in dyslexic Japanese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hisako; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Seki, Ayumi; Koeda, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Masumi

    2013-01-01

    Because of unique linguistic characteristics, the prevalence rate of developmental dyslexia is relatively low in the Japanese language. Paradoxically, Japanese children have serious difficulty analysing phonological processes when they have dyslexia. Neurobiological deficits in Japanese dyslexia remain unclear and need to be identified, and may lead to better understanding of the commonality and diversity in the disorder among different linguistic systems. The present study investigated brain activity that underlies deficits in phonological awareness in Japanese dyslexic children using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed and conducted a phonological manipulation task to extract phonological processing skills and to minimize the influence of auditory working memory on healthy adults, typically developing children, and dyslexic children. Current experiments revealed that several brain regions participated in manipulating the phonological information including left inferior and middle frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, and bilateral basal ganglia. Moreover, dyslexic children showed altered activity in two brain regions. They showed hyperactivity in the basal ganglia compared with the two other groups, which reflects inefficient phonological processing. Hypoactivity in the left superior temporal gyrus was also found, suggesting difficulty in composing and processing phonological information. The altered brain activity shares similarity with those of dyslexic children in countries speaking alphabetical languages, but disparity also occurs between these two populations. These are initial findings concerning the neurobiological impairments in dyslexic Japanese children. PMID:24052613

  2. Unsupervised feature learning improves prediction of human brain activity in response to natural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Güçlü

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Encoding and decoding in functional magnetic resonance imaging has recently emerged as an area of research to noninvasively characterize the relationship between stimulus features and human brain activity. To overcome the challenge of formalizing what stimulus features should modulate single voxel responses, we introduce a general approach for making directly testable predictions of single voxel responses to statistically adapted representations of ecologically valid stimuli. These representations are learned from unlabeled data without supervision. Our approach is validated using a parsimonious computational model of (i how early visual cortical representations are adapted to statistical regularities in natural images and (ii how populations of these representations are pooled by single voxels. This computational model is used to predict single voxel responses to natural images and identify natural images from stimulus-evoked multiple voxel responses. We show that statistically adapted low-level sparse and invariant representations of natural images better span the space of early visual cortical representations and can be more effectively exploited in stimulus identification than hand-designed Gabor wavelets. Our results demonstrate the potential of our approach to better probe unknown cortical representations.

  3. The effects of hyperammonemia in learning and brain metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Natalia; Fidalgo, Camino; Felipo, Vicente; Arias, Jorge L

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia is thought to be central in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. However, the specific relation of ammonia with brain energy depletions and learning has not been studied. Our work attempts to reproduce an increase in rat cerebral ammonia level, study the hyperamonemic animals' performance of two learning tasks, an allocentric (ALLO) and a cue guided (CG) task, and elucidate the contribution of hyperammonemia to the differential energy requirements of the brain limbic system regions involved in these tasks. To assess these goals, four groups of animals were used: a control (CHA) CG group (n = 10), a CHA ALLO group (n = 9), a hyperammonemia (HA) CG group (n = 7), and HA ALLO group (n = 8). Oxidative metabolism of the target brain regions were assessed by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (C.O.). The behavioural results revealed that the hyperammonemic rats were not able to reach the behavioural criterion in either of the two tasks, in contrast to the CHA groups. The metabolic brain consumption revealed increased C.O. activity in the anterodorsal thalamus when comparing the HA ALLO group with the CHA ALLO group. Significant differences between animals trained in the CG task were observed in the prelimbic, infralimbic, parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices, the anterolateral and anteromedial striatum, and the basolateral and central amygdala. Our findings may provide fresh insights to reveal how the differential damage to the brain limbic structures involved in these tasks differs according to the degree of task difficulty. PMID:24415107

  4. Direct-current Stimulation and Multi-electrode Array Recording of Seizure-like Activity in Mice Brain Slice Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Wei-Jen; Chang, Wei-Pang; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) induces suppressive effects on drug-resistant seizures. To perform effective actions, the stimulation parameters (e.g., orientation, field strength, and stimulation duration) need to be examined in mice brain slice preparations. Testing and arranging the orientation of the electrode relative to the position of the mice brain slice are feasible. The present method preserves the thalamocingulate pathway to evaluate the effect of DCS on anterior cingulate cortex seizure-like activities. The results of the multichannel array recordings indicated that cathodal DCS significantly decreased the amplitude of the stimulation-evoked responses and duration of 4-aminopyridine and bicuculline-induced seizure-like activity. This study also found that cathodal DCS applications at 15 min caused long-term depression in the thalamocingulate pathway. The present study investigates the effects of DCS on thalamocingulate synaptic plasticity and acute seizure-like activities. The current procedure can test the optimal stimulation parameters including orientation, field strength, and stimulation duration in an in vitro mouse model. Also, the method can evaluate the effects of DCS on cortical seizure-like activities at both the cellular and network levels. PMID:27341682

  5. Stress-restress evokes sustained iNOS activity and altered GABA levels and NMDA receptors in rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Brian H; Oosthuizen, Frasia; Brand, Linda;

    2004-01-01

    RATIONALE: Stress-related glucocorticoid and glutamate release have been implicated in hippocampal atrophy evident in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Glutamatergic mechanisms activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS), while gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) may inhibit both...... glutamatergic and nitrergic transmission. Animal studies support a role for NOS in stress. OBJECTIVES: We have studied the role of NOS and glucocorticoids, as well as inhibitory and excitatory transmitters, in a putative animal model of PTSD that emphasizes repeated trauma. METHODS: Hippocampal NOS activity, N......-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor binding characteristics and GABA levels were studied in Sprague-Dawley rats 21 days after exposure to a stress-restress paradigm, using radiometric analysis, radioligand studies and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis with electrochemical detection, respectively...

  6. In-vivo imaging of stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Li, Yang-Guo

    2011-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOS) promises a noninvasive method for high resolution examination of retinal function. Using freshly isolated animal retinas, we have conducted a series of experiments to test fast IOSs which have time courses comparable to electrophysiological kinetics. In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo imaging of fast IOSs correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog (Rana Pipiens). A rapid (68,000 lines/s) line-scan confocal ophthalmoscope was constructed to achieve high-speed (200 frames/s) near infared (NIR) recording of fast IOSs. By rejecting out-of-focus background light, the line-scan confocal imager provided enough resolution to differentiate individual photoreceptors in vivo. With visible light stimulation, NIR confocal images disclosed transient IOSs with time courses comparable to retinal ERG kinetics. High-resolution IOS images revealed both positive (increasing) and negative (decreasing) light responses, with sub-cellular complexity, in the activated retina.

  7. Xanthine oxidase activity regulates human embryonic brain cells growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevorkian G. A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidase (XO; EC1.1.3.22 in cellular proliferation and differentiation has been suggested by the numerous investigations. We have proposed that XO might have undoubtedly important role during the development, maturation as well as the death of human embryos brain cells. Methods. Human abortion material was utilized for the cultivation of brain cells (E90. XO activity was measured by the formation of uric acid in tissue. Cell death was detected by the utility of Trypan Blue dye. Results. Allopurinol suppressed the XO activity in the brain tissue (0.12 ± 0.02; 0.20 ± 0.03 resp., p < 0.05. On day 12th the number of cells in the culture treated with the Allopurinol at the early stage of development was higher in comparison with the Control (2350.1 ± 199.0 vs 2123 ± 96 and higher in comparison with the late period of treatment (1479.6 ± 103.8, p < < 0.05. In all groups, the number of the dead cells was less than in Control, indicating the protective nature of Allopurinol as an inhibitor of XO. Conclusions. Allopurinol initiates cells proliferation in case of the early treatment of the human brain derived cell culture whereas at the late stages it has an opposite effect.

  8. Motor evoked potential polyphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Fahmida A.; Pawley, Adam D.; Ceronie, Bryan; Nashef, Lina; Robert D C Elwes; Richardson, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We compared the motor evoked potential (MEP) phases using transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), their relatives, and healthy controls, hypothesizing that patients and their unaffected relatives may share a subtle pathophysiologic abnormality. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we investigated 23 patients with IGE, 34 first-degree relatives, and 30 matched healthy controls. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was performed to produ...

  9. Relationship between changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity and brain edema after brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity and brain edema after injury in rats.   Methods: The brain injury models were made by using a free-falling body. The treatment model was induced by means of injecting AP5 into lateral ventricle before brain injury; water contents in brain cortex were measured with dry-wet method; and NMDA receptor activity was detected with a radio ligand binding assay.   Results: The water contents began to increase at 30 minutes and reached the peak at 6 hours after brain injury. The maximal binding (Bmax) of NMDA receptor increased significantly at 15 minutes and reached the peak at 30 minutes, then decreased gradually and had the lowest value 6 hours after brain injury. Followed the treatment with AP5, NMDA receptor activity in the injured brain showed a normal value; and the water contents were lower than that of AP5-free injury group 24 hours after brain injury.   Conclusions: It suggests that excessive activation of NMDA receptor may be one of the most important factors to induce the secondary cerebral impairments, and AP5 may protect the brain from edema after brain injury.

  10. Selecting and evoking innovators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The practical undertaking of selecting users to work as innovators and of evoking their creative potential is crucial, but underexposed in the literature on user involvement in design. This paper reports findings from a recent case of user-driven innovation, the FEEDBACK-project, where the author...... theories of learning we try to explain how our way of working with selection and evoking of innovators has contributed to this positive result and how our approach to user-driven innovation can be regarded as a way to combine democracy and creativity in design.......The practical undertaking of selecting users to work as innovators and of evoking their creative potential is crucial, but underexposed in the literature on user involvement in design. This paper reports findings from a recent case of user-driven innovation, the FEEDBACK-project, where the authors...... prepared for and conducted selection of and collaboration with innovators. The outcome was successful in the sense that the innovators produced excellent foundation for conceptual interaction design by creating mock-ups and explanations incarnating their preferences, attitudes and habits. By referring to...

  11. Brain activation study during urine withhold by 99Tcm-HMPAO SPECT brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Lose of urinary continence control is related with the pathological process of many brain damages. The aim of this study was to identify cerebral activation areas during withholding urine in healthy subjects with cerebral perfusion agent [99Tcm-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO)]. Methods: Fifteen right-handed healthy male volunteers (age ranged 24 to 45 years old) was recruited. All had two brain perfusion SPECT scans (15 volunteers with 30 scans). One was at resting state with empty bladder and the other was at urine withholding state with full bladder. The images were analyzed by neurological statistical image analysis software (NEUROSTAT) and was displayed on Z-score images at a significance threshold of P<0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: As compared with resting, the urine withholding state showed a significant increase cerebral perfusion in bilateral inferior frontal gyri, the right superior and middle temporal gyri, with the most significant in the right inferior frontal gyms. Conclusions: Although the control of urinary continence in healthy men was associated with bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the right superior and middle temporal gyri, the results showed that the right inferior frontal gyms might also be important. Moreover, the combination of brain perfusion SPECT and NEUROSTAT was a rather easy method for further understanding the mechanism of urinary control in brain and could be popularized as a research tool for clinical use. (authors)

  12. Inhibitory effects of heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation on perception and brain activity related to Aβ-fibre activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustamov, Nabi; Tessier, Jessica; Provencher, Benjamin; Lehmann, Alexandre; Piché, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) inhibits pain and pain processes through cerebral and cerebrospinal mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether HNCS inhibits non-nociceptive processes, which needs to be clarified for a better understanding of HNCS analgesia. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of HNCS on perception and scalp somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). Seventeen healthy volunteers participated in two counter-balanced sessions, including non-nociceptive (selective Aβ-fibre activation) or nociceptive electrical stimulation, combined with HNCS. HNCS was produced by a 20-min cold pressor test (left hand) adjusted individually to produce moderate pain (mean ± SEM: 42.5 ± 5.3 on a 0-100 scale, where 0 is no pain and 100 the worst pain imaginable). Non-nociceptive electrical stimulation was adjusted individually at 80% of pain threshold and produced a tactile sensation in every subject. Nociceptive electrical stimulation was adjusted individually at 120% of RIII-reflex threshold and produced moderate pain (45.3 ± 4.5). Shock sensation was significantly decreased by HNCS compared with baseline for non-nociceptive (P < 0.001) and nociceptive (P < 0.001) stimulation. SEP peak-to-peak amplitude at Cz was significantly decreased by HNCS for non-nociceptive (P < 0.01) and nociceptive (P < 0.05) stimulation. These results indicate that perception and brain activity related to Aβ-fibre activation are inhibited by HNCS. The mechanisms of this effect remain to be investigated to clarify whether it involves inhibition of spinal wide-dynamic-range neurons by diffuse noxious inhibitory controls, supraspinal processes or both. PMID:27086672

  13. Estrogen modulation of the ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction via DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence suggests that male rats are protected against the hypotensive and myocardial depressant effects of ethanol compared with females. We investigated whether E2 modifies the myocardial and oxidative effects of ethanol in male rats. Conscious male rats received ethanol (0.5, 1 or 1.5 g/kg i.v.) 30-min after E2 (1 μg/kg i.v.) or its vehicle (saline), and hearts were collected at the conclusion of hemodynamic measurements for ex vivo molecular studies. Ethanol had no effect in vehicle-treated rats, but it caused dose-related reductions in LV developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of rise in LV pressure (dP/dtmax) and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in E2-pretreated rats. These effects were associated with elevated (i) indices of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts, and (iii) phosphorylated death-associated protein kinase-3 (DAPK3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). Enhanced myocardial anti-oxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) activities were also demonstrated. In conclusion, E2 promotes ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in male rats. The present findings highlight the risk of developing myocardial dysfunction in men who consume alcohol while receiving E2 for specific medical conditions. - Highlights: • Ethanol lowers blood pressure and causes LV dysfunction in E2-treated rats. • E2/ethanol aggravates cardiac oxidative state via of DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation. • E2/ethanol causes a feedback increase in cardiac HO-1, catalase and ALDH2. • Alcohol might increase risk of myocardial dysfunction in men treated with E2

  14. Estrogen modulation of the ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction via DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation in male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M., E-mail: mahelm@hotmail.com; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A., E-mail: abdelrahmana@ecu.edu

    2015-09-15

    Evidence suggests that male rats are protected against the hypotensive and myocardial depressant effects of ethanol compared with females. We investigated whether E{sub 2} modifies the myocardial and oxidative effects of ethanol in male rats. Conscious male rats received ethanol (0.5, 1 or 1.5 g/kg i.v.) 30-min after E{sub 2} (1 μg/kg i.v.) or its vehicle (saline), and hearts were collected at the conclusion of hemodynamic measurements for ex vivo molecular studies. Ethanol had no effect in vehicle-treated rats, but it caused dose-related reductions in LV developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of rise in LV pressure (dP/dt{sub max}) and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in E{sub 2}-pretreated rats. These effects were associated with elevated (i) indices of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts, and (iii) phosphorylated death-associated protein kinase-3 (DAPK3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). Enhanced myocardial anti-oxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) activities were also demonstrated. In conclusion, E{sub 2} promotes ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in male rats. The present findings highlight the risk of developing myocardial dysfunction in men who consume alcohol while receiving E{sub 2} for specific medical conditions. - Highlights: • Ethanol lowers blood pressure and causes LV dysfunction in E{sub 2}-treated rats. • E{sub 2}/ethanol aggravates cardiac oxidative state via of DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation. • E{sub 2}/ethanol causes a feedback increase in cardiac HO-1, catalase and ALDH2. • Alcohol might increase risk of myocardial dysfunction in men treated with E{sub 2}.

  15. MRI Brain Activation During Instruction of Dyslexic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten children with dyslexia and 11 normal readers performed tasks of phoneme mapping (assigning sounds to letters and morpheme mapping (relating suffixed words to their roots during fMRI scanning, before and after 28 hours of comprehensive reading instruction, in a study of the effects of reading instruction on brain activation in children with dyslexia at University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

  16. Baseline brain activity fluctuations predict somatosensory perception in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Boly, M; Balteau, E.; Schnakers, C; Degueldre, C.; Moonen, G.; Luxen, A.; Phillips, C.; Peigneux, P; Maquet, P; Laureys, S.

    2007-01-01

    In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means of thulium–yttrium/aluminum–garnet laser and event-related functional MRI, we tested whether variability in perception of identical stimuli relates to differences in prestimulus, baseline brain activity. Results indicate a positive relationship between conscious perception of low-intensity so...

  17. Anatomical Atlas-Guided Diffuse Optical Tomography of Brain Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Custo, Anna; Boas, David A.; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Dan, Ippeita; Mesquita, Rickson; Fischl, Bruce; Grimson, W. Eric L.; Wells, Williams

    2009-01-01

    We describe a neuro imaging protocol that utilizes an anatomical atlas of the human head to guide Diffuse optical tomography of human brain activation. The protocol is demonstrated by imaging the hemodynamic response to median nerve stimulation in three healthy subjects, and comparing the images obtained using a head atlas with the images obtained using the subject-specific head anatomy. The results indicate that using the head atlas anatomy it is possible to reconstruct the location of the b...

  18. Working Memory Updating Function Training Influenced Brain Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Renlai; Fu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that working memory could be improved by training. We recruited healthy adult participants and used adaptive running working memory training tasks with a double-blind design, combined with the event-related potentials (ERPs) approach, to explore the influence of updating function training on brain activity. Participants in the training group underwent training for 20 days. Compared with the control group, the training group's accuracy (ACC) in the two-back working ...

  19. Regional distribution of SGLT activity in rat brain in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Amy S.; Hirayama, Bruce A.; Timbol, Gerald; Liu, Jie; Diez-Sampedro, Ana; Kepe, Vladimir; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Wright, Ernest M.; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2012-01-01

    Na+-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) mRNAs have been detected in many organs of the body, but, apart from kidney and intestine, transporter expression, localization, and functional activity, as well as physiological significance, remain elusive. Using a SGLT-specific molecular imaging probe, α-methyl-4-deoxy-4-[18F]fluoro-d-glucopyranoside (Me-4-FDG) with ex vivo autoradiography and immunohistochemistry, we mapped in vivo the regional distribution of functional SGLTs in rat brain. Since Me-4-FDG ...

  20. Suppressive Effects of Resveratrol Treatment on The Intrinsic Evoked Excitability of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Meftahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has a wide range of desirable biological actions. Despite a growing body of evidence indicating that resveratrol induces changes in neuronal function, little effort, if any, has been made to investigate the cellular effect of resveratrol treatment on intrinsic neuronal properties. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed to examine the acute effects of resveratrol (100 μM on the intrinsic evoked responses of rat Cornu Ammonis (CA1 pyramidal neurons in brain slices, using whole cell patch clamp recording under current clamp conditions. Results: Findings showed that resveratrol treatment caused dramatic changes in evoked responses of pyramidal neurons. Its treatment induced a significant (P<0.05 increase in the after hyperpolarization amplitude of the first evoked action potential. Resveratrol-treated cells displayed a significantly broader action potential (AP when compared with either control or vehicle-treated groups. In addition, the mean instantaneous firing frequency between the first two action potentials was significantly lower in resveratrol-treated neurons. It also caused a significant reduction in the time to maximum decay of AP. The rheobase current and the utilization time were both significantly greater following resveratrol treatment. Neurons exhibited a significantly depolarized voltage threshold when exposed to resveratrol. Conclusion: Results provide direct electrophysiological evidence for the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on pyramidal neurons, at least in part, by reducing the evoked neural activity.

  1. Individual Variability in Brain Activity: A Nuisance or an Opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Grafton, Scott T; Miller, Michael B

    2008-12-01

    Functional imaging research has been heavily influenced by results based on population-level inference. However, group average results may belie the unique patterns of activity present in the individual that ordinarily are considered random noise. Recent advances in the evolution of MRI hardware have led to significant improvements in the stability and reproducibility of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) measurements. These enhancements provide a unique opportunity for closer examination of individual patterns of brain activity. Three objectives can be accomplished by considering brain scans at the individual level; (1) Mapping functional anatomy at a fine grained analysis; (2) Determining if an individual scan is normative with respect to a reference population; and (3) Understanding the sources of intersubject variability in brain activity. In this review, we detail these objectives, briefly discuss their histories and present recent trends in the analyses of individual variability. Finally, we emphasize the unique opportunities and challenges for understanding individual differences through international collaboration among Pacific Rim investigators. PMID:19777073

  2. Early oxygen-utilization and brain activity in preterm infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Tataranno

    Full Text Available The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2 and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE, and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT per minute (SAT rate, the interval in seconds (i.e. time between SATs (ISI and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004 and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006. cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008 and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007. Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Jeremy

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale brain activity is a tough challenge. One reason for this is the presence of an incredible amount of complexity arising from having roughly 100 billion neurons connected via 100 trillion synapses. Because of the extremely high number of degrees of freedom in the nervous system, the question of how the brain manages to properly function and remain stable, yet also be adaptable, must be posed. Neuroscientists have identified many ways the nervous system makes this possible, of which synaptic plasticity is possibly the most notable one. On the other hand, it is vital to understand how the nervous system also loses stability, resulting in neuropathological diseases such as epilepsy, a disease which affects 1% of the population. In the following work, we seek to answer some of these questions from two different perspectives. The first uses mean-field theory applied to neuronal populations, where the variables of interest are the percentages of active excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a network, to consider how the nervous system responds to external stimuli, self-organizes and generates epileptiform activity. The second method uses statistical field theory, in the framework of single neurons on a lattice, to study the concept of criticality, an idea borrowed from physics which posits that in some regime the brain operates in a collectively stable or marginally stable manner. This will be examined in two different neuronal networks with self-organized criticality serving as the overarching theme for the union of both perspectives. One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is the question of to what extent certain details are significant to the functioning of the brain. These details give rise to various spatiotemporal properties that at the smallest of scales explain the interaction of single neurons and synapses and at the largest of scales describe, for example, behaviors and sensations. In what follows, we will shed some

  4. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  5. Altered baseline brain activity in experts measured by amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF: a resting state fMRI study using expertise model of acupuncturists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao Dong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that expertise modulates evoked brain activity in response to specific stimuli. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate how expertise influences the resting brain. Among these studies, most focused on the connectivity features within/across regions, i.e. connectivity patterns/strength. However, little concern has been given to a more fundamental issue whether or not expertise modulates baseline brain activity. We investigated this question using amplitude of low-frequency (<0.08Hz fluctuation (ALFF as the metric of brain activity and a novel expertise model, i.e. acupuncturists, due to their robust proficiency in tactile perception and emotion regulation. After the psychophysical and behavioral expertise screening procedure, 23 acupuncturists and 23 matched non-acupuncturists (NA were enrolled. Our results explicated higher ALFF for acupuncturists in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC and the contralateral hand representation of the primary somatosensory area (SI (corrected for multiple comparisons. Additionally, ALFF of VMPFC was negatively correlated with the outcomes of the emotion regulation task (corrected for multiple comparisons. We suggest that our study may reveal a novel connection between the neuroplasticity mechanism and resting state activity, which would upgrade our understanding of the central mechanism of learning. Furthermore, by showing that expertise can affect the baseline brain activity as indicated by ALFF, our findings may have profound implication for functional neuroimaging studies especially those involving expert models, in that difference in baseline brain activity may either smear the spatial pattern of activations for task data or introduce biased results into connectivity-based analysis for resting data.

  6. Further investigation of the spontaneous and evoked activity of the primary neurons of statoreceptors (and other receptors) of the labyrinth of the bullfrog before, during and after an extended period of weightlessness, including alternative intervals of artificial gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Vestibular neuron activity was examined by studying nerve stimulation and evoked response. A cooling element, applied to the nerve consisted of a silver hook through which a coolant fluid flowed. Temperature changes were recorded via microtermistors on an eight channel brush recorder, together with response. Diffusion of the cooling effect was measured, recovery time was assessed, and the nerve was then studied hystologically and ultrastructurally. Problems in frog preparation were discussed along with problems in maintaining healthy specimens and bacteria controlled aquaria.

  7. Is the auditory evoked P2 response a biomarker of learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Kelly L; Ross, Bernhard; Inoue, Kayo; McClannahan, Katrina; Collet, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Even though auditory training exercises for humans have been shown to improve certain perceptual skills of individuals with and without hearing loss, there is a lack of knowledge pertaining to which aspects of training are responsible for the perceptual gains, and which aspects of perception are changed. To better define how auditory training impacts brain and behavior, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have been used to determine the time course and coincidence of cortical modulations associated with different types of training. Here we focus on P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked responses (AEP), as there are consistent reports of gains in P2 amplitude following various types of auditory training experiences; including music and speech-sound training. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if the auditory evoked P2 response is a biomarker of learning. To do this, we taught native English speakers to identify a new pre-voiced temporal cue that is not used phonemically in the English language so that coinciding changes in evoked neural activity could be characterized. To differentiate possible effects of repeated stimulus exposure and a button-pushing task from learning itself, we examined modulations in brain activity in a group of participants who learned to identify the pre-voicing contrast and compared it to participants, matched in time, and stimulus exposure, that did not. The main finding was that the amplitude of the P2 auditory evoked response increased across repeated EEG sessions for all groups, regardless of any change in perceptual performance. What's more, these effects are retained for months. Changes in P2 amplitude were attributed to changes in neural activity associated with the acquisition process and not the learned outcome itself. A further finding was the expression of a late negativity (LN) wave 600-900 ms post-stimulus onset, post-training exclusively for the group that learned to identify the pre-voiced contrast

  8. Is the auditory evoked P2 response a biomarker of learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eTremblay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though auditory training exercises for humans have been shown to improve certain perceptual skills of individuals with and without hearing loss, there is a lack of knowledge pertaining to which aspects of training are responsible for the perceptual gains, and which aspects of perception are changed. To better define how auditory training impacts brain and behavior, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography have been used to determine the time course and coincidence of cortical modulations associated with different types of training. Here we focus on P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked responses (AEP, as there are consistent reports of gains in P2 amplitude following various types of auditory training experiences; including music and speech-sound training. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if the auditory evoked P2 response is a biomarker of learning. To do this, we taught native English speakers to identify a new pre-voiced temporal cue that is not used phonemically in the English language so that coinciding changes in evoked neural activity could be characterized. To differentiate possible effects of repeated stimulus exposure and a button-pushing task from learning itself, we examined modulations in brain activity in a group of participants who learned to identify the pre-voicing contrast and compared it to participants, matched in time, and stimulus exposure, that did not. The main finding was that the amplitude of the P2 auditory evoked response increased across repeated EEG sessions for all groups, regardless of any change in perceptual performance. What’s more, these effects were retained for months. Changes in P2 amplitude were attributed to changes in neural activity associated with the acquisition process and not the learned outcome itself. A further finding was the expression of a late negativity (LN wave 600-900 ms post-stimulus onset, post-training, exclusively for the group that learned to identify the pre

  9. The influence of active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) on cisplatin-evoked chemotherapeutic and side effects in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP) (a widely used platinum-containing anticancer drug) is nephrotoxic and has a low percentage of tolerance in patients during chemotherapy. The active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is an extract of Basidiomycotina marketed as a supplement for cancer patients due to its nutrients and fibre content and its ability to strengthen and optimize the capacity of the immune system. The possibility that AHCC could reduce the side effects of cisplatin was assessed in the tumor-bearing BALB/cA mice on the basis of the ability to ameliorate the cisplatin-induced body weight loss, anorexia, nephrotoxicity and hematopoietic toxicity. Although cisplatin (8 mg/kg body weight) reduced the size and weight of the solid tumors, supplementation with AHCC significantly enhanced cisplatin-induced antitumor effect in both the size (p < 0.05) and weight (p < 0.05). Food intake in the cisplatin-treated mice were decreased following commencement of treatment and this remained low compared with the cisplatin-untreated group (control) throughout the experiment period. Supplementation with AHCC increased the food intake in the cisplatin-treated mice. The blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine concentrations, and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to serum creatinine were significantly increased in the cisplatin alone treated group compared to the control group. Their increased levels were mitigated by supplementation with AHCC (100 mg/kg body weight) in the cisplatin-treated group. AHCC was also able to modulate the suppression of bone marrow due to cisplatin and the improvement was statistically significant. The histopathological examination of the kidney revealed the presence of cisplatin-induced damage and this was modulated by AHCC treatment. The potential for AHCC to ameliorate the cisplatin-evoked toxicity as well as the chemotherapeutic effect could have beneficial economic implications for patients undergoing chemotherapy with

  10. Activation of the sigma receptor 1 modulates AMPA receptor-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei-Lei; Deng, Qin-Qin; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-09-22

    Sigma receptor (σR), a unique receptor family, is classified into three subtypes: σR1, σR2 and σR3. It was previously shown that σR1 activation induced by 1μM SKF10047 (SKF) suppressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses of rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and the suppression was mediated by a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. In the present work, using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we further demonstrate that SKF of higher dosage (50μM) significantly suppressed AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) of retinal ON-type GCs (ON GCs), and the effect was reversed by the σR1 antagonist BD1047, suggesting the involvement of σR1. The SKF (50μM) effect was unlikely due to a change in glutamate release from bipolar cells, as suggested by the unaltered paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of AMPAR-mediated EPSCs of ON GCs. SKF (50μM) did not change L-EPSCs of ON GCs when the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT5823 was intracellularly infused. Calcium imaging further revealed that SKF (50μM) did not change intracellular calcium concentration in GCs and persisted to suppress L-EPSCs when intracellular calcium was chelated by BAPTA. The SKF (50μM) effect was intact when protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatidylinostiol (PI)-PLC signaling pathways were both blocked. We conclude that the SKF (50μM) effect is Ca(2+)-independent, PKG-dependent, but not involving PKA, PI-PLC pathways. PMID:27373906

  11. The role of brain biogenic amines in the control of pituitary-adrenocortical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maickel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    It was found that pretreatment of animals with desmethyl imipramine antagonized the reserpine-induced sedation without preventing the decline in brain amines or the hypersecretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The antagonism of reserpine-induced ACTH hypersecretion by the monoamine oxidose (MAO) inhibitor pargyline (MO 911, N-methyl-N-benzyl-2-propynylamine) was studied. Evidence is presented that this antagonism is related to the level of brain biogenic amines maintained during the course of action of the drug. Pretreatment with MAO inhibitors does not affect the ACTH hypersecretion evoked by exposure to cold or chlorpromazine, lending further support to the hypothesis that reserpine-induced ACTH hypersecretion is related to brain amine changes.

  12. Immature pattern of brain activity in Rett syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J B; Friberg, L; Lou, H;

    1990-01-01

    Seven girls with Rett syndrome, a progressive degenerative encephalopathy affecting girls, were studied with single photon emission computed tomography and compared with an aged-matched control group of nine normal children. Global cerebral blood flow was significantly lower in Rett syndrome (54 vs...... 69 mL/100 g per minute), and the flows in prefrontal and temporoparietal association regions of the telencephalon were markedly reduced, whereas the primary sensorimotor regions were relatively spared. The flow distribution in Rett syndrome is very similar to the distribution of brain metabolic...... activity in infants of a few months of age. The abnormal regional cerebral blood flow distribution most likely reflects the widespread functional disturbances in the brain of patients with Rett syndrome, whereas computed tomographic and neuropathologic examination only reveal slight changes when compared...

  13. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-Tc SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-Tc SQUID-based MEG systems.

  14. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  15. Estimating direction in brain-behavior interactions: Proactive and reactive brain states in driving

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Javier O.; Brooks, Justin; Kerick, Scott; Johnson, Tony,; Mullen, Tim; Vettel, Jean M.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional neuroimaging analyses have revealed the computational specificity of localized brain regions, exploiting the power of the subtraction technique in fMRI and event-related potential analyses in EEG. Moving beyond this convention, many researchers have begun exploring network-based neurodynamics and coordination between brain regions as a function of behavioral parameters or environmental statistics; however, most approaches average evoked activity across the experimental session to...

  16. Classification of types of stuttering symptoms based on brain activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jiang

    Full Text Available Among the non-fluencies seen in speech, some are more typical (MT of stuttering speakers, whereas others are less typical (LT and are common to both stuttering and fluent speakers. No neuroimaging work has evaluated the neural basis for grouping these symptom types. Another long-debated issue is which type (LT, MT whole-word repetitions (WWR should be placed in. In this study, a sentence completion task was performed by twenty stuttering patients who were scanned using an event-related design. This task elicited stuttering in these patients. Each stuttered trial from each patient was sorted into the MT or LT types with WWR put aside. Pattern classification was employed to train a patient-specific single trial model to automatically classify each trial as MT or LT using the corresponding fMRI data. This model was then validated by using test data that were independent of the training data. In a subsequent analysis, the classification model, just established, was used to determine which type the WWR should be placed in. The results showed that the LT and the MT could be separated with high accuracy based on their brain activity. The brain regions that made most contribution to the separation of the types were: the left inferior frontal cortex and bilateral precuneus, both of which showed higher activity in the MT than in the LT; and the left putamen and right cerebellum which showed the opposite activity pattern. The results also showed that the brain activity for WWR was more similar to that of the LT and fluent speech than to that of the MT. These findings provide a neurological basis for separating the MT and the LT types, and support the widely-used MT/LT symptom grouping scheme. In addition, WWR play a similar role as the LT, and thus should be placed in the LT type.

  17. The Effects of Physical Activity, Education, and Body Mass Index on the Aging Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, April J.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Becker, James T.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Hua, Xue; Dinov, Ivo D.; Stein, Jason L; Rosano, Caterina; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Normal human aging is accompanied by progressive brain tissue loss and cognitive decline; however, several factors are thought to influence brain aging. We applied tensor-based morphometry to high-resolution brain MRI scans to determine whether educational level or physical activity was associated with brain tissue volumes in the elderly, particularly in regions susceptible to age-related atrophy. We mapped the 3D profile of brain volume differences in 226 healthy elderly subjects (130F/96M; ...

  18. Brain Activity Associated with Emoticons: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe that brain activities associated with emoticons by using fMRI. In communication over a computer network, we use abstract faces such as computer graphics (CG) avatars and emoticons. These faces convey users' emotions and enrich their communications. However, the manner in which these faces influence the mental process is as yet unknown. The human brain may perceive the abstract face in an entirely different manner, depending on its level of reality. We conducted an experiment using fMRI in order to investigate the effects of emoticons. The results show that right inferior frontal gyrus, which associated with nonverbal communication, is activated by emoticons. Since the emoticons were created to reflect the real human facial expressions as accurately as possible, we believed that they would activate the right fusiform gyrus. However, this region was not found to be activated during the experiment. This finding is useful in understanding how abstract faces affect our behaviors and decision-making in communication over a computer network.

  19. Baseline brain activity fluctuations predict somatosensory perception in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, M.; Balteau, E.; Schnakers, C.; Degueldre, C.; Moonen, G.; Luxen, A.; Phillips, C.; Peigneux, P.; Maquet, P.; Laureys, S.

    2007-01-01

    In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means of thulium–yttrium/aluminum–garnet laser and event-related functional MRI, we tested whether variability in perception of identical stimuli relates to differences in prestimulus, baseline brain activity. Results indicate a positive relationship between conscious perception of low-intensity somatosensory stimuli and immediately preceding levels of baseline activity in medial thalamus and the lateral frontoparietal network, respectively, which are thought to relate to vigilance and “external monitoring.” Conversely, there was a negative correlation between subsequent reporting of conscious perception and baseline activity in a set of regions encompassing posterior cingulate/precuneus and temporoparietal cortices, possibly relating to introspection and self-oriented processes. At nociceptive levels of stimulation, pain-intensity ratings positively correlated with baseline fluctuations in anterior cingulate cortex in an area known to be involved in the affective dimension of pain. These results suggest that baseline brain-activity fluctuations may profoundly modify our conscious perception of the external world. PMID:17616583

  20. The sequential structure of brain activation predicts skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John R; Bothell, Daniel; Fincham, Jon M; Moon, Jungaa

    2016-01-29

    In an fMRI study, participants were trained to play a complex video game. They were scanned early and then again after substantial practice. While better players showed greater activation in one region (right dorsal striatum) their relative skill was better diagnosed by considering the sequential structure of whole brain activation. Using a cognitive model that played this game, we extracted a characterization of the mental states that are involved in playing a game and the statistical structure of the transitions among these states. There was a strong correspondence between this measure of sequential structure and the skill of different players. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, it was possible to recognize, with relatively high accuracy, the cognitive states participants were in during particular scans. We used the sequential structure of these activation-recognized states to predict the skill of individual players. These findings indicate that important features about information-processing strategies can be identified from a model-based analysis of the sequential structure of brain activation. PMID:26707716

  1. Relationships between Electrically Evoked Potentials and Loudness Growth in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Benjamin; Brown, Carolyn; Abbas, Paul; Etler, Christine; O’Brien, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implantation has motivated efforts to ensure that sounds presented at equal levels to each ear are perceived as equally loud. Psychophysical loudness balancing is not always practical, especially with pediatric users. Electrophysiological potentials -- electrically evoked auditory brain stem response (EABR) and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) measures -- may provide a means of approximating loudness balance. It was hypothesized that stimuli evoking equa...

  2. Cortical activity in the left and right hemispheres during language-related brain functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Larsen, B

    1980-01-01

    The blood flow to a given brain region increases as the level of neural activity is augmented. Hence mapping of variations in regional cerebral blood flow affords a means of imaging the activity of various brain regions during various types of brain work. The paper summarizes the patterns of...... auditory feedback (absent in his case) is not a prerequisite for speaking....

  3. Assessment of D-methionine protecting cisplatin-induced otolith toxicity by vestibular-evoked myogenic potential tests, ATPase activities and oxidative state in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wu-Chia; Chang, Chih-Ming; Liao, Li-Jen; Wang, Chi-Te; Young, Yi-Ho; Chang, Yih-Leong; Cheng, Po-Wen

    2015-01-01

    To date, inadequate study has been devoted to the toxic vestibular effects caused by cisplatin. In addition, no electrophysiological examination has been conducted to assess cisplatin-induced otolith toxicity. The purposes of this study are thus two-fold: 1) to determine whether cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and ocular VEMPs are practical electrophysiological methods of testing for cisplatin-induced otolith toxicity and 2) to examine if D-methionine (D-met) pre-injection would protect the otolith organs against cisplatin-induced changes in enzyme activities and/or oxidative status. Guinea pigs were intraperitoneally treated once daily with the following injections for seven consecutive days: sterile 0.9% saline control, cisplatin (5 mg/kg) only, D-met (300 mg/kg) only, or a combination of d-met (300 mg/kg) and cisplatin (5 mg/kg), respectively, with a 30 minute window in between. Each animal underwent the oVEMP and cVEMP tests before and after treatment. The changes in the biochemistry of the otolith organs, including membranous Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels and nitric oxide (NO) levels, were also evaluated. In the cisplatin-only treated guinea pigs, the mean amplitudes of the oVEMP tests were significantly (ppigs receiving both D-met and cisplatin, the amplitudes of their oVEMP tests were significantly larger (p<0.05) than those of the cisplatin-only group, but smaller (p<0.05) than those of the saline control or D-met-only group. However, no significant difference of the amplitudes of cVEMP tests was noted among the four groups. In comparison with the other three groups, the cisplatin-only group had the lowest (ps<0.05) mean Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, and the highest (ps<0.05) LPO and NO levels. The oVEMP tests were feasible for the evaluation of cisplatin-related otolith dysfunction. D-Met attenuated the reduced ATPase activities and increased oxidative stress induced by cisplatin

  4. Altered intrinsic regional spontaneous brain activity in patients with optic neuritis: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yi Shao,1,* Feng-Qin Cai,2,* Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Xin Huang,1,3 Ying Zhang,1 Pei-Hong Hu,1 Chong-Gang Pei,1 Fu-Qing Zhou,2 Xian-Jun Zeng2 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 3Department of Ophthalmology, First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang, Jiujiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To investigate the underlying regional homogeneity (ReHo in brain-activity deficit in patients with optic neuritis (ON and its relationship with behavioral performance.Materials and methods: In total, twelve patients with ON (four males and eight females and twelve (four males and eight females age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The ReHo method was used to assess the local features of spontaneous brain activity. Correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the observed mean ReHo values of the different brain areas and the visual evoked potential (VEP in patients with ON.Results: Compared with the healthy controls, patients with ON showed lower ReHo in the left cerebellum, posterior lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, right insula, right superior temporal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus, and higher ReHo in the cluster of the left fusiform gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule. Meanwhile, we found that the VEP amplitude of the right eye in patients with ON showed a positive correlation with the ReHo signal value of the left cerebellum posterior lobe (r=0.701, P=0.011, the right superior frontal gyrus (r=0.731, P=0.007, and the left fusiform gyrus (r=0.644, P=0.024. We also found that the VEP latency of the right eye in ON showed a positive correlation with the ReHo signal value of the right insula (r=0.595, P=0

  5. Biological role of sialosyl transferase activity in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this dissertation is to obtain new evidence that will support or refute the existence of an ecto sialosyltransferse activity (STase) that has been described in the synaptic plasma membrane (SPM). This STase has been proposed to transfer sialic acid (NANA) to endogenous SPM gangliosides. Preparations of rat brain synaptosomes were assayed for STase by incubation with CMP-(14C)NANA, and measuring radioactivity transferred to the endogenous gangliosides. The activity was found to be 0.84 pmoles NANA transferred per mg protein per hour. The product specificity for STase was determined by the incorporation of label into individual ganglioside species. Subfractions were produced from rat brain that were enriched in Golgi membranes, synaptosomes, and SPM as judged by EM morphology and marker enzymes. The Golgi fraction had over 3 fold greater STase activity than synaptosomes, while SPM were enriched 2.5 fold over the synaptosomes from which they came. The labeling pattern of endogenous gangliosides was quite different by the Golgi STase. An unknown compound in the ganglioside extracts was specifically labeled, but gangliosides were not labeled with specificity by the Golgi transferase. The synaptosomal and SPM labeling patterns were identical and were characterized by GD3 specificity. Therefore the STase of SPM is not due to Golgi contamination. Intact neurons were assayed for STase by the use of brain cortical slices. Slices incubated that labeled CMP-NANA (available for cell surface reactions) produced the GD3-specific labeling pattern. These results suggest that the GD3-specific sialosyltransferase is a cell surface ecto-enzyme

  6. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Physiological high frequency activities (HFA are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections, or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response and N80 (late response of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20 and HFA(SEP(N80 and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1 and HFA(CCEP(N2. HFA(SEP(N20 showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1 had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1 and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions.

  7. Relationships between parameters of gallbladder motility and brain electrical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Marfiyan, Olena M; Zukow, Walery; Popovych, Milentyna V; Ganyk, Lyubov M; Kit, Yevgen I; Ivanyts’ka, Oksana M; Kyjenko, Valeriy M

    2016-01-01

    Marfiyan Olena M, Zukow Walery, Popovych Milentyna V, Ganyk Lyubov M, Kit Yevgen I, Ivanyts’ka Oksana M, Kyjenko Valeriy M. Relationships between parameters of gallbladder motility and brain electrical activity. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(8):11-20. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.59271 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3728 https://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/sedno-webapp/works/740334     The journal has had 7 ...

  8. Brain areas activated by uncertain reward-based decision-making in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zongjun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Shien; Li, Yuhuan; Sun, Bo; Gao, Zhenbo

    2013-01-01

    Reward-based decision-making has been found to activate several brain areas, including the ventrolateral prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and mesolimbic dopaminergic system. In this study, we observed brain areas activated under three degrees of uncertainty in a reward-based decision-making task (certain, risky, and ambiguous). The tasks were presented using a brain function audiovisual stimulation system. We conducted brain scans of 15 healt...

  9. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S. [Unite de Neurobiologie Integrative du Systeme Cholinergique, URA CNRS 2182, Institut Pasteur, Departement de Neuroscience, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 place du general Leclerc, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiklund, A. [Section of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity {beta}2-containing nicotinic receptors ({beta}2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the {beta}2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and {beta}2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, {beta}2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via {alpha}7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on {beta}2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  10. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity β2-containing nicotinic receptors (β2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the β2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and β2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, β2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via α7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on β2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  11. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  12. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces. PMID:26259098

  13. The effects of trypsin on rat brain astrocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Fereidoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are cells within the central nervous system which are activated in a wide spectrum of infections, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In pathologic states, they produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide (NO, and sometimes they induce apoptosis. Their protease-activated receptors (PARs can be activated by proteases, e.g. thrombin and trypsin, which are important in brain inflammation. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of trypsin (1 to 100U/ml on cultured astrocytes.In the present study, two-day rat infants' brains were isolated and homogenized after meninges removal, then cultivated in DMEM + 10% FBS medium. 10 days later, astrocytes were harvested and recultivated for more purification (up to 95%, using Immunocytochemistry method, in order to be employed for tests. They were affected by different concentrations of trypsin (1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 U/ml. To reveal the inflammation progress, NO concentrations (the Griess test were assessed after 24 and 48 hours.The results showed that trypsin concentration up to 20 U/ml caused a significant increase in NO, in a dose-dependent manner, on cultured astrocytes (P < 0.001. Trypsin 20 U/ml increased NO production fivefold the control group (P < 0.001. At higher concentrations than 20 U/ml, NO production diminished (P < 0.001. At 100 U/ml, NO production was less than the control group (P < 0.001.Inflammatory effects of trypsin 5-20 U/ml are probably due to the stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors and the increasing of the activation of NF-κB, PKC, MAPKs. Stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors causes an increase in iNOS activation which in turn leads to NO production. However, higher trypsin concentration possibly made astrocyte apoptosis; therefore, NO production diminished. These assumptions need to be further investigated.

  14. Mind maps in service of the mental brain activity

    OpenAIRE

    JOSIPOVIĆ JELIĆ, ŽELJKA; Demarin, Vida; Šoljan, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Tony Buzan is the creator of the mind maps who based his mnemonic techniques of brain mapping on the terms of awareness and wide brain functionality as well as on the ability of memorizing, reading and creativity. He conceived the idea that regular practice improves brain functions but he also introduced radiant thinking and mental literacy. One of the last enormous neuroscience ventures is to clarify the brain complexity and mind and to get a complete insight into the mental brain acti...

  15. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh S.Pillai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sense of ‘Presence’ (evolving from ‘telepresence’ has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it’s an experience of an 'Evoked Reality’ (illusion of reality that triggers an ‘Evoked Presence’ (sense of presence in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between Evoked Reality and Evoked Presence, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of Evoked Reality and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call ‘reality’.

  16. Natural image classification driven by human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dai; Peng, Hanyang; Wang, Jinqiao; Tang, Ming; Xue, Rong; Zuo, Zhentao

    2016-03-01

    Natural image classification has been a hot topic in computer vision and pattern recognition research field. Since the performance of an image classification system can be improved by feature selection, many image feature selection methods have been developed. However, the existing supervised feature selection methods are typically driven by the class label information that are identical for different samples from the same class, ignoring with-in class image variability and therefore degrading the feature selection performance. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method, driven by human brain activity signals collected using fMRI technique when human subjects were viewing natural images of different categories. The fMRI signals associated with subjects viewing different images encode the human perception of natural images, and therefore may capture image variability within- and cross- categories. We then select image features with the guidance of fMRI signals from brain regions with active response to image viewing. Particularly, bag of words features based on GIST descriptor are extracted from natural images for classification, and a sparse regression base feature selection method is adapted to select image features that can best predict fMRI signals. Finally, a classification model is built on the select image features to classify images without fMRI signals. The validation experiments for classifying images from 4 categories of two subjects have demonstrated that our method could achieve much better classification performance than the classifiers built on image feature selected by traditional feature selection methods.

  17. Integrated Brain Circuits: Astrocytic Networks Modulate Neuronal Activity and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halassa, Michael M.; Haydon, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion of research on roles of neuron-astrocyte interactions in the control of brain function. We highlight recent studies performed on the tripartite synapse, the structure consisting of pre- and postsynaptic elements of the synapse and an associated astrocytic process. Astrocytes respond to neuronal activity and neuro-transmitters, through the activation of metabotropic receptors, and can release the gliotransmitters ATP, D-serine, and glutamate, which act on neurons. Astrocyte-derived ATP modulates synaptic transmission, either directly or through its metabolic product adenosine. D-serine modulates NMDA receptor function, whereas glia-derived glutamate can play important roles in relapse following withdrawal from drugs of abuse. Cell type–specific molecular genetics has allowed a new level of examination of the function of astrocytes in brain function and has revealed an important role of these glial cells that is mediated by adenosine accumulation in the control of sleep and in cognitive impairments that follow sleep deprivation. PMID:20148679

  18. Targeted training modifies oscillatory brain activity in schizophrenia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvetan G. Popov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of both domain-specific and broader cognitive remediation protocols have been reported for neural activity and overt performance in schizophrenia (SZ. Progress is limited by insufficient knowledge of relevant neural mechanisms. Addressing neuronal signal resolution in the auditory system as a mechanism contributing to cognitive function and dysfunction in schizophrenia, the present study compared effects of two neuroplasticity-based training protocols targeting auditory–verbal or facial affect discrimination accuracy and a standard rehabilitation protocol on magnetoencephalographic (MEG oscillatory brain activity in an auditory paired-click task. SZ were randomly assigned to either 20 daily 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks of auditory–verbal training (N = 19, similarly intense facial affect discrimination training (N = 19, or 4 weeks of treatment as usual (TAU, N = 19. Pre-training, the 57 SZ showed smaller click-induced posterior alpha power modulation than did 28 healthy comparison participants, replicating Popov et al. (2011b. Abnormally small alpha decrease 300–800 ms around S2 improved more after targeted auditory–verbal training than after facial affect training or TAU. The improvement in oscillatory brain dynamics with training correlated with improvement on a measure of verbal learning. Results replicate previously reported effects of neuroplasticity-based psychological training on oscillatory correlates of auditory stimulus differentiation, encoding, and updating and indicate specificity of cortical training effects.

  19. Multi-dimensional dynamics of human electromagnetic brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo eKida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency, which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  20. The Dynamic Functional Capacity Theory: Music Evoked Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Klineburger, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    The music-evoked emotion literature implicates many brain regions involved in emotional processing but is currently lacking a model that specifically explains how they temporally and dynamically interact to produce intensely pleasurable emotions. A conceptual model, The Dynamic Functional Capacity Theory (DFCT), is proposed that provides a foundation for the further understanding of how brain regions interact to produce intense intensely pleasurable emotions. The DFCT claims th...

  1. Rivalry of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions: Dehydration attenuates olfactory disgust and its neural correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Lea; Friedrich, Hergen; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay; Morishima, Yosuke; Landis, Basile Nicolas; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Neural correlates have been described for emotions evoked by states of homeostatic imbalance (e.g. thirst, hunger, and breathlessness) and for emotions induced by external sensory stimulation (such as fear and disgust). However, the neurobiological mechanisms of their interaction, when they are experienced simultaneously, are still unknown. We investigated the interaction on the neurobiological and the perceptional level using subjective ratings, serum parameters, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a situation of emotional rivalry, when both a homeostatic and a sensory-evoked emotion were experienced at the same time. Twenty highly dehydrated male subjects rated a disgusting odor as significantly less repulsive when they were thirsty. On the neurobiological level, we found that this reduction in subjective disgust during thirst was accompanied by a significantly reduced neural activity in the insular cortex, a brain area known to be considerably involved in processing of disgust. Furthermore, during the experience of disgust in the satiated condition, we observed a significant functional connectivity between brain areas responding to the disgusting odor, which was absent during the stimulation in the thirsty condition. These results suggest interference of conflicting emotions: an acute homeostatic imbalance can attenuate the experience of another emotion evoked by the sensory perception of a potentially harmful external agent. This finding offers novel insights with regard to the behavioral relevance of biologically different types of emotions, indicating that some types of emotions are more imperative for behavior than others. As a general principle, this modulatory effect during the conflict of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions may function to safeguard survival. PMID:25818686

  2. Qualitative and quantitative measurement of brain activity associated with visual sexual arousal in males and females: 3.0 tesIa functional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study utilized 3.0 Tesla functional MR imaging to identify and quantify the activated brain regions associated with visually evoked sexual arousal, and also to discriminate the gender differences between the cortical activation patterns in response to sexual stimuli. A total of 24 healthy, right-handed volunteers, 14 males (mean age: 24) and 10 females (mean age: 23), with normal heterosexual function underwent functional MRI on a 3.0T MR scanner (Forte, Isole technique, Korea). The sexual stimulation consisted of a 1-minute rest with black screen, followed by a 3- minute stimulation by an erotic video film, and concluded with a 1-minute rest. The fMRI data was obtained from 20 slices (5 mm slice thickness, no gap) parallel to the AC-PC (anterior commissure and posterior commissure) line on the sagittal plane, giving a total of 2,100 images. The brain activation maps and the resulting quantification were analyzed by the statistical parametric mapping program, SPM 99. The mean-activated images were obtained from each individual activation map using one sampled t-test. The FALBA program, which is a new algorithm based on the pixel differentiation method, was used to identify and quantify the brain activation and lateralization indices with respect to the functional and anatomical terms. In both male and female volunteers, significant brain activation showed in the limbic areas of the parahippocampal gyrus, septal area, cingulate gyrus and thalamus. It is interesting to note that the septal areas gave a relatively lower activation ratio with high brain activities. On the contrary, the putamen, insula cortex, and corpus callosum gave a higher activation ratio with low brain activities. In particular, brain activation in the septal area, which was not reported in the previous fMRI studies under 1.5 Tesla, represents a distinct finding of this study using 3.0T MR scanner. The overall lateralization index of activation shows left predominance (LI= 35.3%) in

  3. Qualitative and quantitative measurement of brain activity associated with visual sexual arousal in males and females: 3.0 tesIa functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Joong; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Eun, Sung Jong; Cho, Seong Hoon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Park, Kwang Sung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-01

    The present study utilized 3.0 Tesla functional MR imaging to identify and quantify the activated brain regions associated with visually evoked sexual arousal, and also to discriminate the gender differences between the cortical activation patterns in response to sexual stimuli. A total of 24 healthy, right-handed volunteers, 14 males (mean age: 24) and 10 females (mean age: 23), with normal heterosexual function underwent functional MRI on a 3.0T MR scanner (Forte, Isole technique, Korea). The sexual stimulation consisted of a 1-minute rest with black screen, followed by a 3- minute stimulation by an erotic video film, and concluded with a 1-minute rest. The fMRI data was obtained from 20 slices (5 mm slice thickness, no gap) parallel to the AC-PC (anterior commissure and posterior commissure) line on the sagittal plane, giving a total of 2,100 images. The brain activation maps and the resulting quantification were analyzed by the statistical parametric mapping program, SPM 99. The mean-activated images were obtained from each individual activation map using one sampled t-test. The FALBA program, which is a new algorithm based on the pixel differentiation method, was used to identify and quantify the brain activation and lateralization indices with respect to the functional and anatomical terms. In both male and female volunteers, significant brain activation showed in the limbic areas of the parahippocampal gyrus, septal area, cingulate gyrus and thalamus. It is interesting to note that the septal areas gave a relatively lower activation ratio with high brain activities. On the contrary, the putamen, insula cortex, and corpus callosum gave a higher activation ratio with low brain activities. In particular, brain activation in the septal area, which was not reported in the previous fMRI studies under 1.5 Tesla, represents a distinct finding of this study using 3.0T MR scanner. The overall lateralization index of activation shows left predominance (LI= 35.3%) in

  4. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  5. Comparison of evoked vs. spontaneous tics in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (tic doloureux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello-Lammens Matthew

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 53-year old woman with tic doloureaux, affecting her right maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve (V2, could elicit shooting pains by slightly tapping her teeth when off medication. The pains, which she normally rated as > 6/10 on a visual analog scale (VAS, were electric shock-like in nature. She had no other spontaneous or ongoing background pain affecting the region. Based on her ability to elicit these tics, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed while she produced brief shocks every 2 minutes on cue (evoked pain over a 20 min period. In addition, she had 1–2 spontaneous shocks manifested between these evoked pains over the course of functional image acquisition. Increased fMRI activation for both evoked and spontaneous tics was observed throughout cortical and subcortical structures commonly observed in experimental pain studies with healthy subjects; including the primary somatosensory cortex, insula, anterior cingulate, and thalamus. Spontaneous tics produced more decrease in signals in a number of regions including the posterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, suggesting that regions known to be involved in expectation/anticipation may have been activated for the evoked, but not spontaneous, tics. In this patient there were large increases in activation observed in the frontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex and the basal ganglia. Spontaneous tics showed increased activation in classic aversion circuitry that may contribute to increased levels of anxiety. We believe that this is the first report of functional imaging of brain changes in tic-doloureaux.

  6. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  7. Noninvasive transcranial focused ultrasonic-magnetic stimulation for modulating brain oscillatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi; Chen, Yudong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    A novel technique, transcranial focused ultrasonic-magnetic stimulation (tFUMS), has been developed for noninvasive brain modulation in vivo. tFUMS has a higher spatial resolution (stimulation on the neuromodulation. The results demonstrate that tFUMS can modulate brain oscillatory activities by stimulating brain tissues.

  8. Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy to Understand Brain "Activation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslow, Morris H.; Guilfoyle, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Upon stimulation, areas of the brain associated with specific cognitive processing tasks may undergo observable physiological changes, and measures of such changes have been used to create brain maps for visualization of stimulated areas in task-related brain "activation" studies. These perturbations usually continue throughout the period of the…

  9. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Inge; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2015-02-15

    An important function of eating is ingesting energy. Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three stimuli in two motivational states (hunger and satiety) while their brain responses were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a randomized crossover design. Stimuli were solutions of sucralose (sweet, no energy), maltodextrin (non-sweet, energy) and sucralose+maltodextrin (sweet, energy). We found no main effect of energy content and no interaction between energy content and sweetness. However, there was an interaction between hunger state and energy content in the median cingulate (bilaterally), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula and thalamus. This indicates that the anterior insula and thalamus, areas in which hunger state and taste of a stimulus are integrated, also integrate hunger state with caloric content of a taste stimulus. Furthermore, in the median cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, tasting energy resulted in more activation during satiety compared to hunger. This finding indicates that these areas, which are known to be involved in processes that require approach and avoidance, are also involved in guiding ingestive behavior. In conclusion, our results suggest that energy sensing is a hunger state dependent process, in which the median cingulate, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula and thalamus play a central role by integrating hunger state with stimulus relevance. PMID:25449847

  10. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    OpenAIRE

    Rashed-Al-Mahfuz, Md.; Islam, Md. Rabiul; Hirose, Keikichi; Molla, Md. Khademul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional bra...

  11. Mapping Social Behavior-Induced Brain Activation at Cellular Resolution in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsoo Kim; Kannan Umadevi Venkataraju; Kith Pradhan; Carolin Mende; Julian Taranda; Srinivas C. Turaga; Ignacio Arganda-Carreras; Lydia Ng; Michael J. Hawrylycz; Kathleen S. Rockland; H. Sebastian Seung; Pavel Osten

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP-positive neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference bra...

  12. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    OpenAIRE

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J.; van Dijk; Postma, T.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activity compared to healthy controls and that particularly global slowing correlates with neurocognitive dysfunction. Patient and methods Resting state MEG recordings were obtained from 17 LGG patients...

  13. Microglia protect against brain injury and their selective elimination dysregulates neuronal network activity after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Szalay, Gergely; Martinecz, Bernadett; Lénárt, Nikolett; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Orsolits, Barbara; Judák, Linda; Császár, Eszter; Fekete, Rebeka; West, Brian L.; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Dénes, Ádám

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the main immune cells of the brain and contribute to common brain diseases. However, it is unclear how microglia influence neuronal activity and survival in the injured brain in vivo. Here we develop a precisely controlled model of brain injury induced by cerebral ischaemia combined with fast in vivo two-photon calcium imaging and selective microglial manipulation. We show that selective elimination of microglia leads to a striking, 60% increase in infarct size, which is reverse...

  14. Acute moderate exercise enhances compensatory brain activation in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Kazuki; Dan, Ippeita; Suwabe, Kazuya; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Yamada, Yuhki; Akahori, Mitsuya; Byun, Kyeongho; Kato, Morimasa; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-11-01

    A growing number of reports state that regular exercise enhances brain function in older adults. Recently a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study revealed that an acute bout of moderate exercise enhanced activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) associated with Stroop interference in young adults. Whether this acute effect is also applicable to older adults was examined. Sixteen older adults performed a color-word matching Stroop task before and after 10 minutes of exercise on a cycle ergometer at a moderate intensity. Cortical hemodynamics of the prefrontal area was monitored with a fNIRS during the Stroop task. We analyzed Stroop interference (incongruent-neutral) as Stroop performance. Though activation for Stroop interference was found in the bilateral prefrontal area before the acute bout of exercise, activation of the right frontopolar area (R-FPA) was enhanced after exercise. In the majority of participants, this coincided with improved performance reflected in Stroop interference results. Thus, an acute bout of moderate exercise improved Stroop performance in older adults, and this was associated with contralateral compensatory activation. PMID:22300952

  15. An attempt to assess animal pain using brain activity

    OpenAIRE

    van Oostrom, H.

    2008-01-01

    Pain is an emotionally unpleasant sensory experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage. Due to its complexity it is difficult to objectively assess pain and absence thereof (i.e. analgesia). This is especially true in animals, since animals lack the ability to verbally report pain. This thesis describes several studies using a specific approach, the recording of somatosensory evoked potentials from vertex (Vx-SEPs), to study pain, pain perc...

  16. Baseline and cognition activated brain SPECT imaging in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities through the semiquantitative analysis of the baseline and cognition activated rCBF imaging in unmedicated depressed patients. Methods: 27 depressed patients unmedicated by anti-depressants were enrolled. The diagnosis (depression of moderate degree with somatization) was confirmed by the ICD-10 criteria. 15 age matched normal controls were studied under identical conditions. Baseline and cognition activated 99mTc-ECD SPECT were performed on 21 of the 27 patients with depression and 13 of the 15 normal controls. Baseline 99mTc-ECD SPECT alone were performed on the rest 6 patients with depression and 2 normal controls. The cognitive activation is achieved by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). 1110 MBq of 99mTc-ECD was administered by intravenous bolus injection 5 minutes after the onset of the WCST. Semi-quantitative analysis was conducted with the 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th slices of the transaxial imaging. rCBF ratios of every ROI were calculated using the average tissue activity in the region divided by the maximum activity in the cerebellum. Results: 1) The baseline rCBF of left frontal (0.720) and left temporal lobe (0.720) were decreased significantly in depressed patients comparing with those of the control subjects. 2) The activated rCBF of left frontal lobe (0.719) and left temporal lobe (0.690), left parietal lobe (0.701) were decreased evidently than those of the controls. Conclusions: 1) Hypoperfusions of left frontal and left temporal cortexes were identified in patients with depression. 2) The hypoperfusion of left frontal and left temporal cortexes may be the cause of cognition disorder and depressed mood in patients with depression. 3) Cognition activated brain perfusion imaging is helpful for making a more accurate diagnosis of depression

  17. Rapid Eye Movement and Sleep Twitches Can Enhance Brain Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somia Gul

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement sleep, or REM, is one of the five stages of sleep that most people experience nightly. It is characterized by quick, random movements of the eyes and paralysis of the muscles. We have conducted a survey based on questions related to sleeping habits and pattern of their dream. Purpose of this survey is to prove a hypothesis that says ‘rapid eye movement or sleep twitches can enhance your brain activity’. We have selected normal or healthy subjects related to different ages, gender and professions. Questionnaires were filled by these subjects and we found that mostly people experience sleep twitches and they wake up with active state of mind. We also asked their level of alertness during day time and we found that subjects are alert mostly.

  18. Recovery of brain and plasma cholinesterase activities in ducklings exposed to organophosphorus pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to dicrotophos and fenthion. Recovery rates of brain ChE did not differ between ducklings administered a single oral dose vs. a 2-week dietary dose of these organophosphates. Exposure to the organophosphates, followed by recovery of brain ChE, did not significantly affect the degree of brain ChE inhibition or the recovery of ChE activity at a subsequent exposure. Recovery of brain ChE activity followed the general model Y = a + b(logX) with rapid recovery to about 50% of normal, followed by a slower rate of recovery until normal ChE activity levels were attained. Fenthion and dicrotophos-inhibited brain ChE were only slightly reactivated in vitro by pyridine-2-aldoxime methiodide, which suggested that spontaneous reactivation was not a primary method of recovery of ChE activity. Recovery of brain ChE activity can be modeled for interpretation of sublethal inhibition of brain ChE activities in wild birds following environmental applications of organophosphates. Plasma ChE activity is inferior to brain ChE activity for environmental monitoring, because of its rapid recovery and large degree of variation among individuals.

  19. Is Brain Activity during Action Observation Modulated by the Perceived Fairness of the Actor?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etzel, Joset A; Valchev, Nikola; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Perceiving other people's actions triggers activity in premotor and parietal areas, brain areas also involved in executing and sensing our own actions. Paralleling this phenomenon, observing emotional states (including pain) in others is associated with activity in the same brain areas as activated

  20. Coupling BCI and cortical stimulation for brain-state-dependent stimulation: methods for spectral estimation in the presence of stimulation after-effects

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Armin; Murguialday, Ander R.; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Birbaumer, Niels; Bogdan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Brain-state-dependent stimulation (BSDS) combines brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and cortical stimulation into one paradigm that allows the online decoding for example of movement intention from brain signals while simultaneously applying stimulation. If the BCI decoding is performed by spectral features, stimulation after-effects such as artefacts and evoked activity present a challenge for a successful implementation of BSDS because they can impair the detection of targeted brain states. ...

  1. Coupling BCI and cortical stimulation for brain-state-dependent stimulation: Methods for spectral estimation in the presence of stimulation after-effects

    OpenAIRE

    Armin Walter; Ander Ramos Murguialday; Niels Birbaumer; Martin Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Brain-state-dependent stimulation combines brain-computer interfaces (BCI) and cortical stimulation into one paradigm that allows the online decoding for example of movement intention from brain signals while simultaneously applying stimulation. If the BCI decoding is performed by spectral features, stimulation after-effects such as artefacts and evoked activity present a challenge for a successful implementation of brain-state-dependent stimulation because they can impair the detection of ta...

  2. Brain Na+, K+-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-01-01

    Na+/K+ pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5’-triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K+ with the exit of Na+ from cells, being the responsible for Na+/K+ equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na+, K+-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca2+ mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na+, K+-ATPase involvement in signaling pathways

  3. Application of brain stem evoked potential monitoring in microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm%面肌痉挛显微血管减压术中脑干听觉诱发电位监测的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岚; 贾靖; 周同亮; 付桂香; 张黎; 袁越; 于炎冰

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)监测在显微血管减压术(MVD)治疗面肌痉挛手术中的应用.方法 回顾性分析90例面肌痉挛患者在MVD术中进行BAEP监测的临床资料.结果 MVD手术操作过程均可引起BAEP改变,包括:BAEP的Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ波绝对潜伏期明显延长(P<0.01),Ⅰ~Ⅲ、Ⅲ~Ⅴ、Ⅰ~Ⅴ波间期明显延长(P<0.01),Ⅲ波、Ⅴ波波幅明显降低(P<0.01);有16例术中Ⅴ波绝对潜伏期延长超过1ms,Ⅰ波波幅也有明显降低(P<0.01),但术后无听力障碍;手术结束时Ⅲ~Ⅴ波间期及16例的Ⅰ、Ⅴ波波幅恢复较快.2例术后患侧听力丧失的患者中,1例术中Ⅴ波波幅逐渐降低至消失,另1例术中未监测到Ⅴ波波形.结论 MVD手术操作过程均可引起BAEP改变;Ⅴ波绝对潜伏期延迟超过1ms者相对多见,但无听力受损;Ⅴ波波幅下降程度可为术中神经功能受损提供客观指标,以采取相应措施减少听力并发症的发生.%Objective To study the application of brain stem evoked potential(BAEP) monitoring in microvascular decompression (MVD) for treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS).Method The clinical data of 90 patients of HFS treated by MVD under introperative monitoring of BAEP were evaluated retrospectively.Results Changes of BAEP were monitored in all MVD procedures.The changes included elongation of obsolute latency of Ⅰ ,Ⅲ,Ⅴ waves(P<0.01); elongation of inter-wave period of Ⅰ~Ⅲ,Ⅲ~Ⅴ,Ⅰ~Ⅴ waves (P<0.01); decrease of the amplitude of Ⅲ,Ⅴ waves(P<0.01).But there was no change in the amplitude of Ⅰ wave.The elongation of the obsolute latency of Ⅴ wave (≥ 1 ms) and decrease of the amplitude of Ⅰ waves (P<0.01) were observed in 16 patients,but there was no auditory dysfunction in these patients.The inter-wave periods of Ⅲ~Ⅴ waves of all patients and the amplitudes of Ⅰ,Ⅴ waves of those 16 patients were returned to normal levels quickly at the end of

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in arterial baroreceptor pathways: implications for activity-dependent plasticity at baroafferent synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica L; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion, their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius. Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn nodose ganglion neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways. PMID:19054281

  5. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  6. Demonstration of brain noise on human EEG signals in perception of bistable images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Kurovskaya, Maria K.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-03-01

    In this report we studied human brain activity in the case of bistable visual perception. We proposed a new approach for quantitative characterization of this activity based on analysis of EEG oscillatory patterns and evoked potentials. Accordingly to theoretical background, obtained experimental EEG data and results of its analysis we studied a characteristics of brain activity during decision-making. Also we have shown that decisionmaking process has the special patterns on the EEG data.

  7. P2X7 receptor activation in rat brain cultured astrocytes increases the biosynthetic release of cysteinyl leukotrienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballerini, P; Ciccarelli, R; Caciagli, F; Rathbone, M P; Werstiuk, E S; Traversa, U; Buccella, S; Giuliani, P; Jang, S; Nargi, E; Visini, D; Santavenere, C; Di Iorio, P

    2005-01-01

    Astrocytes have been recognized as important elements in controlling inflammatory as well as immune processes in the central nervous system (CNS). Recently, glial cells have been shown to produce cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) which are known lipid mediators of inflammation and whose extracellular concentrations rise under different pathological conditions in the brain. In the same conditions also extracellular concentrations of ATP dramatically increase reaching levels able to activate P2X7 ionotropic receptors for which an emerging role in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration has been claimed. RTPCR analysis showed that primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes express P2X7 receptors. Application of the selective P2X7 agonist benzoyl benzoly ATP (BzATP) markedly increased [Ca2+]i which was mediated by a calcium influx from the extracellular milieu. The P2X7 antagonist, oATP, suppressed the BzATP-induced calcium increase. Consistent with the evidence that increased calcium levels activate the leukotriene biosynthetic pathway, challenge of astrocytes with either the calcium ionophore A23187 or BzATP significantly increased CysLT production and the cell pre-treatment with EGTA abolished these effects. Again the P2X7 antagonist prevented the BzATP-mediated CysLT efflux, whereas the astrocyte pretreatment with MK-571, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, was ineffective. The astrocyte pre-treatment with a cocktail of inhibitors of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins reduced the BzATP-mediated CysLT production confirming that ABC transporters are involved in the release of CysLTs. The astrocyte P2X7- evoked rise of CysLT efflux was abolished in the presence of MK-886, an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) whose expression, along with that of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) was reported by Northern Blot analysis. The stimulation of P2X7 induced an up-regulation of FLAPmRNA that was reduced by the antagonist oATP. These data suggest that in rat brain cultured

  8. Extracellular alkaline-acid pH shifts evoked by iontophoresis of glutamate and aspartate in turtle cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    1991-01-01

    The effect of glutamate and aspartate iontophoresis on extracellular pH was investigated in the turtle cerebellum in vitro. Both amino acids produced a rapid alkaline transient, typically followed by a prolonged acidification. These responses could be evoked in all layers of the cerebellum. Transition from bicarbonate to N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid-buffered media amplified the pH shifts. Similar alkaline-acid transients could be evoked in the molecular layer by electrical stimulation of the parallel fibers or the ipsilateral peduncle, or by superfusion of glutamate or aspartate. However, no alkaline shifts were evoked in the granular layer by either parallel fiber or peduncle stimulation. In contrast, the iontophoretically induced alkaline shifts were largest in the granular layer. Compared with the stimulus-evoked alkalinizations, the iontophoretic alkaline shifts were relatively insensitive to Mn2+ or Cd2+. These data suggest that the activity-dependent alkalinization of brain extracellular space is generated by a bicarbonate-independent mechanism related to excitatory synaptic transmission. The results are consistent with a flux of hydrogen ions through cationic channels, but do not support a direct role for voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. In view of the sensitivity of ion channels to changes in external pH, and the magnitude of the amino acid-induced pH shifts, these results indicate that extracellular pH could play an important modulatory role in excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:1711651

  9. Multistability in Large Scale Models of Brain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Golos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noise driven exploration of a brain network's dynamic repertoire has been hypothesized to be causally involved in cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration. The dynamic repertoire crucially depends on the network's capacity to store patterns, as well as their stability. Here we systematically explore the capacity of networks derived from human connectomes to store attractor states, as well as various network mechanisms to control the brain's dynamic repertoire. Using a deterministic graded response Hopfield model with connectome-based interactions, we reconstruct the system's attractor space through a uniform sampling of the initial conditions. Large fixed-point attractor sets are obtained in the low temperature condition, with a bigger number of attractors than ever reported so far. Different variants of the initial model, including (i a uniform activation threshold or (ii a global negative feedback, produce a similarly robust multistability in a limited parameter range. A numerical analysis of the distribution of the attractors identifies spatially-segregated components, with a centro-medial core and several well-delineated regional patches. Those different modes share similarity with the fMRI independent components observed in the "resting state" condition. We demonstrate non-stationary behavior in noise-driven generalizations of the models, with different meta-stable attractors visited along the same time course. Only the model with a global dynamic density control is found to display robust and long-lasting non-stationarity with no tendency toward either overactivity or extinction. The best fit with empirical signals is observed at the edge of multistability, a parameter region that also corresponds to the highest entropy of the attractors.

  10. Localisation of brain functions : stimuling brain activity and source reconstruction for classification/

    OpenAIRE

    Noirhomme, Quentin

    2006-01-01

    A key issue in understanding how the brain functions is the ability to correlate functional information with anatomical localisation. Functional information can be provided by a variety of techniques like positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). All these methods provide different, but complementary, information about the functional areas of the brain. ...

  11. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Is Associated with Brain Volumetric Measurements in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Klaren, Rachel E; Hubbard, Elizabeth A.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Little is known about physical activity and its association with volumes of whole brain gray matter and white matter and deep gray matter structures in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose. This study examined the association between levels of physical activity and brain volumetric measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. Method. 39 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and underwent a brain MRI. Normalized GM volume (NGMV), normalized WM v...

  12. Brain activity during driving with distraction: an immersive fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Tom A Schweizer; Karen Kan; Yuwen Hung; Fred Tam; Gary Naglie; Simon Graham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Non-invasive measurements of brain activity have an important role to play in understanding driving ability. The current study aimed to identify the neural underpinnings of human driving behavior by visualizing the areas of the brain involved in driving under different levels of demand, such as driving while distracted or making left turns at busy intersections. Materials and Methods: To capture brain activity during driving, we placed a driving simulator with a fully functio...

  13. Blood-Brain Barrier Active Efflux Transporters: ATP-Binding Cassette Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Potschka, Heidrun

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to brain homeostasis by protecting the brain from potentially harmful endogenous and exogenous substances. BBB active drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family are increasingly recognized as important determinants of drug distribution to, and elimination from, the CNS. The ABC efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has been demonstrated as a key element of the BBB that can actively transport a huge variety of lip...

  14. The Energy Landscape of Neurophysiological Activity Implicit in Brain Network Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Shi; Cieslak, Matthew; Baird, Benjamin; Muldoon, Sarah F.; Grafton, Scott T; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Danielle S Bassett

    2016-01-01

    A critical mystery in neuroscience lies in determining how anatomical structure impacts the complex functional dynamics of human thought. How does large-scale brain circuitry constrain states of neuronal activity and transitions between those states? We address these questions using a maximum entropy model of brain dynamics informed by white matter tractography. We demonstrate that the most probable brain states -- characterized by minimal energy -- display common activation profiles across b...

  15. Time-invariant person-specific frequency templates in human brain activity

    OpenAIRE

    Doron, Itai; Hulata, Eyal; Baruchi, Itay; Towle, Vernon L.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2006-01-01

    The various human brain tasks are performed at different locations and time scales. Yet, we discovered the existence of time-invariant (above an essential time scale) partitioning of the brain activity into personal state-specific frequency bands. For that, we perform temporal and ensemble averaging of best wavelet packet bases from multi-electrode EEG recordings. These personal frequency-bands provide new templates for quantitative analyses of brain function, e.g., normal vs. epileptic activ...

  16. Visual image reconstruction from human brain activity: A modular decoding approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain activity represents our perceptual experience. But the potential for reading out perceptual contents from human brain activity has not been fully explored. In this study, we demonstrate constraint-free reconstruction of visual images perceived by a subject, from the brain activity pattern. We reconstructed visual images by combining local image bases with multiple scales, whose contrasts were independently decoded from fMRI activity by automatically selecting relevant voxels and exploiting their correlated patterns. Binary-contrast, 10 x 10-patch images (2100 possible states), were accurately reconstructed without any image prior by measuring brain activity only for several hundred random images. The results suggest that our approach provides an effective means to read out complex perceptual states from brain activity while discovering information representation in multi-voxel patterns.

  17. Enhancing Physical Activity and Brain Reorganization after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet H. Carr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that, if reorganization of brain function is to be optimal after stroke, there needs to be a reorganisation of the methods used in physical rehabilitation and the time spent in specific task practice, strength and endurance training, and aerobic exercise. Frequency and intensity of rehabilitation need to be increased so that patients can gain the energy levels and vigour necessary for participation in physical activity both during rehabilitation and after discharge. It is evident that many patients are discharged from inpatient rehabilitation severely deconditioned, meaning that their energy levels are too low for active participation in daily life. Physicians, therapists, and nursing staff responsible for rehabilitation practice should address this issue not only during inpatient rehabilitation but also after discharge by promoting and supporting community-based exercise opportunities. During inpatient rehabilitation, group sessions should be frequent and need to include specific aerobic training. Physiotherapy must take advantage of the training aids available, including exercise equipment such as treadmills, and of new developments in computerised feedback systems, robotics, and electromechanical trainers. For illustrative purposes, this paper focuses on the role of physiotherapists, but the necessary changes in practice and in attitude will require cooperation from many others.

  18. Brain Activity while Reading Sentences with Kanji Characters Expressing Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe the brain activity associated with kanji characters expressing emotion, which are places at the end of a sentence. Japanese people use a special kanji character in brackets at the end of sentences in text messages such as those sent through e-mail and messenger tools. Such kanji characters plays a role to expresses the sender's emotion (such as fun, laughter, sadness, tears), like emoticons. It is a very simple and effective way to convey the senders' emotions and his/her thoughts to the receiver. In this research, we investigate the effects of emotional kanji characters by using an fMRI study. The experimental results show that both the right and left inferior frontal gyrus, which have been implicated on verbal and nonverbal information, were activated. We found that we detect a sentence with an emotional kanji character as the verbal and nonverval information, and a sentence with emotional kanji characters enrich communication between the sender and the reciever.

  19. 3-Hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase activity is increased in the brains of Huntington disease victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An excess of the tryptophan metabolite quinolinic acid in the brain has been hypothetically related to the pathogenesis of Huntington disease. Quinolinate's immediate biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase, has now been detected in human brain tissue. The activity of 3-hydroxyanthranilate oxygenase is increased in Huntington disease brains as compared to control brains. The increment is particularly pronounced in the striatum, which is known to exhibit the most prominent nerve-cell loss in Huntington disease. Thus, the Huntington disease brain has a disproportionately high capability to produce the endogenous excitotoxin quinolinic acid. This finding may be of relevance for clinical, neuropathologic, and biochemical features associated with Huntington disease

  20. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle R Dalenberg

    Full Text Available In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively. After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  1. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores. PMID:25521352

  2. Effects of sevoflurane on adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity in brain of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on c adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE) activity in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of rats, and to examine the role of cAMP in sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods: Fourty SD rats were delaminately designed and allocated randomly to 5 groups inhaling 1.5% sevoflurane i.e., no recovery (recovery group, n=8) and one hour after righting reflexrecovery (aware group, n=8). The brain tissues were rapidly dissected into cerebrocortex and hippocampus and brain stem.Then the adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity were assessed. Results: So far as the activity of AC is concerned, compared with the control group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem brain stem of induction group and anesthesia group, the cerebrocortex, and hippocampus in the recovery group were significantly increased; compared with those in the anesthesia group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of aware group were significantly decreased (P<0.05); For the activity of PDE, compared with the control group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem in the induction group and anesthesia group was significantly decreased, compared with that in anesthesia group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of recovery group and aware group was significantly increased (P<0.05). Conclusion: cAMP may play an important role in sevoflurane anesthesia. (authors)

  3. Spatial Rotation and Recognizing Emotions: Gender Related Differences in Brain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2008-01-01

    In three experiments, gender and ability (performance and emotional intelligence) related differences in brain activity--assessed with EEG methodology--while respondents were solving a spatial rotation tasks and identifying emotions in faces were investigated. The most robust gender related difference in brain activity was observed in the lower-2…

  4. Sex Differences in Brain Activity Related to General and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated gender differences in resting EEG (in three individually determined narrow [alpha] frequency bands) related to the level of general and emotional intelligence. Brain activity of males decreased with the level of general intelligence, whereas an opposite pattern of brain activity was observed in females. This difference was…

  5. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit; Effets d'une irradiation gamma globale non letale sur les activites electroencephalograpiques spontanees et evoquees du lapin adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [French] 'L'ensemble des methodes experimentales decrites (preparation des animaux, mise au point d'une technique physiologique precise, dosimetrie, traitement de l'information biologique) a permis de suivre, pendant 15 jours, chez le lapin soumis a une irradiation gamma globale non letale de 400 rads, les modifications des activites electroencephaliques spontanees et evoquees. De facon constante, on note des troubles du comportement, des modifications de la vigilance et de l'activite electrique spontanee du neo-cortex et de l'hippocampe, ainsi qu'une augmentation de l'excitabilite corticale, l'apparition d'elements de la serie

  6. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián Ponce-Alvarez; He, Biyu J.; Patric Hagmann; Gustavo Deco

    2015-01-01

    How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic reso...

  7. Brain-specific transcriptional regulator T-brain-1 controls brain wiring and neuronal activity in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Tzyy-Nan eHuang; Yi-Ping eHsueh

    2015-01-01

    T-brain-1 (TBR1) is a brain-specific T-box transcription factor. In 1995, Tbr1 was first identified from a subtractive hybridization that compared mouse embryonic and adult telencephalons. Previous studies of Tbr1–/– mice have indicated critical roles for TBR1 in the development of the cerebral cortex, amygdala and olfactory bulb. Neuronal migration and axonal projection are two important developmental features controlled by TBR1. Recently, recurrent de novo disruptive mutations in the TBR1 g...

  8. Time-Course Analysis of the Neuroanatomical Correlates of Sexual Arousal Evoked by Erotic Video Stimuli in Healthy Males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Gwang Won; Baek, Han Su; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    To assess the dynamic activations of the key brain areas associated with the time-course of the sexual arousal evoked by visual sexual stimuli in healthy male subjects. Fourteen right-handed heterosexual male volunteers participated in this study. Alternatively combined rest period and erotic video visual stimulation were used according to the standard block design. In order to illustrate and quantify the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions, the activation period was divided into three different stages as the EARLY, MID and LATE stages. For the group result (p < 0.05), when comparing the MID stage with the EARLY stage, a significant increase of the brain activation was observed in the areas that included the inferior frontal gyrus, the supplementary motor area, the hippocampus, the head of the caudate nucleus, the midbrain, the superior occipital gyrus and the fusiform gyrus. At the same time, when comparing the EARLY stage with the MID stage, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the pons, the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the lingual gyrus and the cuneus yielded significantly increased activations. When comparing the LATE stage with the MID stage, all the above mentioned brain regions showed elevated activations except the hippocampus. Our results illustrate the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions across the three stages of visual sexual arousal.

  9. Time-Course Analysis of the Neuroanatomical Correlates of Sexual Arousal Evoked by Erotic Video Stimuli in Healthy Males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the dynamic activations of the key brain areas associated with the time-course of the sexual arousal evoked by visual sexual stimuli in healthy male subjects. Fourteen right-handed heterosexual male volunteers participated in this study. Alternatively combined rest period and erotic video visual stimulation were used according to the standard block design. In order to illustrate and quantify the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions, the activation period was divided into three different stages as the EARLY, MID and LATE stages. For the group result (p < 0.05), when comparing the MID stage with the EARLY stage, a significant increase of the brain activation was observed in the areas that included the inferior frontal gyrus, the supplementary motor area, the hippocampus, the head of the caudate nucleus, the midbrain, the superior occipital gyrus and the fusiform gyrus. At the same time, when comparing the EARLY stage with the MID stage, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the pons, the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the lingual gyrus and the cuneus yielded significantly increased activations. When comparing the LATE stage with the MID stage, all the above mentioned brain regions showed elevated activations except the hippocampus. Our results illustrate the spatiotemporal activation patterns of the key brain regions across the three stages of visual sexual arousal

  10. Is Brain Activity during Action Observation Modulated by the Perceived Fairness of the Actor?

    OpenAIRE

    Etzel, Joset A.; Nikola Valchev; Valeria Gazzola; Christian Keysers

    2016-01-01

    Perceiving other people's actions triggers activity in premotor and parietal areas, brain areas also involved in executing and sensing our own actions. Paralleling this phenomenon, observing emotional states (including pain) in others is associated with activity in the same brain areas as activated when experiencing similar emotions directly. This emotion perception associated activity has been shown to be affected by the perceived fairness of the actor, and in-group membership more generally...

  11. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity.

  12. Inflammatory transcription factors as activation markers and functional readouts in immune-to-brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Immune-to-brain communication pathways involve humoral mediators, including cytokines, central modulation by neuronal afferents and immune cell trafficking to the brain. During systemic inflammation these pathways contribute to mediating brain-controlled sickness symptoms including fever. Experimentally, activation of these signaling pathways can be mimicked and studied when injecting animals with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). One central component of the brain inflammatory response, which leads, for example, to fever induction, is transcriptional activation of brain cells via cytokines and PAMPS. We and others have studied the spatiotemporal activation and the physiological significance of transcription factors for the induction of inflammation within the brain and the manifestation of fever. Evidence has revealed a role of nuclear factor (NF)κB in the initiation, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 in the maintenance and NF-interleukin (IL)6 in the maintenance or even termination of brain-inflammation and fever. Moreover, psychological stressors, such as exposure to a novel environment, leads to increased body core temperature and genomic NF-IL6-activation, suggesting a potential use of NF-IL6-immunohistochemistry as a multimodal brain cell activation marker and a role for NF-IL6 for differential brain activity. In addition, the nutritional status, as reflected by circulating levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin, influence immune-to-brain communication and age-dependent changes in LPS-induced fever. Overall, transcription factors remain therapeutically important targets for the treatment of brain-inflammation and fever induction during infectious/non-infectious inflammatory and psychological stress. However, the exact physiological role and significance of these transcription factors requires to be further investigated. PMID:26348582

  13. Material and physical model for evaluation of deep brain activity contribution to EEG recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Li, Xiaoping; Wu, Tiecheng; Li, Zhe; Xie, Wenwen

    2015-12-01

    Deep brain activity is conventionally recorded with surgical implantation of electrodes. During the neurosurgery, brain tissue damage and the consequent side effects to patients are inevitably incurred. In order to eliminate undesired risks, we propose that deep brain activity should be measured using the noninvasive scalp electroencephalography (EEG) technique. However, the deeper the neuronal activity is located, the noisier the corresponding scalp EEG signals are. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate whether deep brain activity could be observed from EEG recordings. In the experiment, a three-layer cylindrical head model was constructed to mimic a human head. A single dipole source (sine wave, 10 Hz, altering amplitudes) was embedded inside the model to simulate neuronal activity. When the dipole source was activated, surface potential was measured via electrodes attached on the top surface of the model and raw data were recorded for signal analysis. Results show that the dipole source activity positioned at 66 mm depth in the model, equivalent to the depth of deep brain structures, is clearly observed from surface potential recordings. Therefore, it is highly possible that deep brain activity could be observed from EEG recordings and deep brain activity could be measured using the noninvasive scalp EEG technique.

  14. Resting brain activity varies with dream recall frequency between subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Nicolas, Alain; Daltrozzo, Jérôme; Redouté, Jérôme; Costes, Nicolas; Ruby, Perrine

    2014-06-01

    Dreaming is still poorly understood. Notably, its cerebral underpinning remains unclear. Neuropsychological studies have shown that lesions in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and/or the white matter of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) lead to the global cessation of dream reports, suggesting that these regions of the default mode network have key roles in the dreaming process (forebrain 'dream-on' hypothesis). To test this hypothesis, we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using [(15)O]H2O positron emission tomography in healthy subjects with high and low dream recall frequencies (DRFs) during wakefulness (rest) and sleep (rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, N2, and N3). Compared with Low recallers (0.5 ± 0.3 dream recall per week in average), High recallers (5.2 ± 1.4) showed higher rCBF in the TPJ during REM sleep, N3, and wakefulness, and in the MPFC during REM sleep and wakefulness. We demonstrate that the resting states of High recallers and Low recallers differ during sleep and wakefulness. It coheres with previous ERP results and confirms that a high/low DRF is associated with a specific functional organization of the brain. These results support the forebrain 'dream-on' hypothesis and suggest that TPJ and MPFC are not only involved in dream recall during wakefulness but also have a role in dreaming during sleep (production and/or encoding). Increased activity in the TPJ and MPFC might promote the mental imagery and/or memory encoding of dreams. Notably, increased activity in TPJ might facilitate attention orienting toward external stimuli and promote intrasleep wakefulness, facilitating the encoding of the dreams in memory. PMID:24549103

  15. Individual Human Brain Areas Can Be Identified from Their Characteristic Spectral Activation Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Anne; Gross, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The human brain can be parcellated into diverse anatomical areas. We investigated whether rhythmic brain activity in these areas is characteristic and can be used for automatic classification. To this end, resting-state MEG data of 22 healthy adults was analysed. Power spectra of 1-s long data segments for atlas-defined brain areas were clustered into spectral profiles ("fingerprints"), using k-means and Gaussian mixture (GM) modelling. We demonstrate that individual areas can be identified from these spectral profiles with high accuracy. Our results suggest that each brain area engages in different spectral modes that are characteristic for individual areas. Clustering of brain areas according to similarity of spectral profiles reveals well-known brain networks. Furthermore, we demonstrate task-specific modulations of auditory spectral profiles during auditory processing. These findings have important implications for the classification of regional spectral activity and allow for novel approaches in neuroimaging and neurostimulation in health and disease. PMID:27355236

  16. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain

    OpenAIRE

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S.; Rooney, William D; Scharf, Bruce A.; Backus, W. Walter; Izrailtyan, Igor; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Volkow, Nora D.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third-trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (∼100%). Inasmuch as brain...

  17. Decoding cognitive states and motor intentions from intracranial EEG: How promising is high-frequency brain activity for brain-machine interfaces?

    OpenAIRE

    Jerbi, Karim; Combrisson, Etienne; Dalal, Sarang,; Vidal, Juan; Hamame, Carlos,; Bertrand, Olivier; Berthoz, Alain; Kahane, Philippe; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We provide a brief overview of our recent research into decoding cognitive states and motor intentions from intracranial EEG using high-frequency brain activity for brain-machine interfaces. Appears in: Korczyn AD et al. Epilepsy, cognition, and neuropsychiatry (Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind, part 2), Epilepsy Behav (in press), doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.03.012

  18. Individual human brain areas can be identified from their characteristic spectral activation fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Keitel, Anne; Gross, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The human brain can be parcellated into diverse anatomical areas. We investigated whether rhythmic brain activity in these areas is characteristic and can be used for automatic classification. To this end, resting-state MEG data of 22 healthy adults was analysed. Power spectra of 1-s long data segments for atlas-defined brain areas were clustered into spectral profiles (“fingerprints”), using k-means and Gaussian mixture (GM) modelling. We demonstrate that individual areas can be identified f...

  19. The effect of Quinpirol and Sulpiride on the brain activity waves in conscious and aneasthetized rat

    OpenAIRE

    Komaki AR; Alaie H

    1998-01-01

    Brain's waves are produced by spontaneous activity of neurons. These waves are changed by neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). Concentration of these neurotransmitters can be changed by various drugs and total power of brain waves also increase or decrease by these drugs. In this research effect of Quinpirol and Sulpiride on the brain waves was investigated. Male wistar rats (weight 190-230) were aneasthetized with thiopental and two holes were made into the frontal and...

  20. Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activity during memory-encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Brandt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying hemispheric specialization of memory are not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI can be used to develop and test models of hemispheric specialization. In particular for memory tasks however, the interpretation of fMRI results is often hampered by the low reliability of the data. In the present study we therefore analyzed the test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation related to an implicit memory encoding task, with a particular focus on brain activity of the medial temporal lobe (MTL. Fifteen healthy subjects were scanned with fMRI on two sessions (average retest interval 35 days using a commonly applied novelty encoding paradigm contrasting known and unknown stimuli. To assess brain lateralization, we used three different stimuli classes that differed in their verbalizability (words, scenes, fractals. Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation was assessed by an intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC, describing the stability of inter-individual differences in the brain activation magnitude over time. We found as expected a left-lateralized brain activation network for the words paradigm, a bilateral network for the scenes paradigm, and predominantly right-hemispheric brain activation for the fractals paradigm. Although these networks were consistently activated in both sessions on the group level, across-subject reliabilities were only poor to fair (ICCs ≤ 0.45. Overall, the highest ICC values were obtained for the scenes paradigm, but only in strongly activated brain regions. In particular the reliability of brain activity of the MTL was poor for all paradigms. In conclusion, for novelty encoding paradigms the interpretation of fMRI results on a single subject level is hampered by its low reliability. More studies are needed to optimize the retest reliability of fMRI activation for memory tasks.

  1. Brain activity during driving with distraction: an immersive fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A Schweizer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-invasive measurements of brain activity have an important role to play in understanding driving ability. The current study aimed to identify the neural underpinnings of human driving behavior by visualizing the areas of the brain involved in driving under different levels of demand, such as driving while distracted or making left turns at busy intersections. Methods: To capture brain activity during driving, we placed a driving simulator with a fully functional steering wheel and pedals in a 3.0 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI system. To identify the brain areas involved while performing different real-world driving maneuvers, participants completed tasks ranging from simple (right turns to more complex (left turns at busy intersections. To assess the effects of driving while distracted, participants were asked to perform an auditory task while driving analogous to speaking on a hands-free device and driving. Results: A widely distributed brain network was identified, especially when making left turns at busy intersections compared to more simple driving tasks. During distracted driving, brain activation shifted dramatically from the posterior, visual and spatial areas to the prefrontal cortex. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the distracted brain sacrificed areas in the posterior brain important for visual attention and alertness to recruit enough brain resources to perform a secondary, cognitive task. The present findings offer important new insights into the scientific understanding of the neuro-cognitive mechanisms of driving behavior and lay down an important foundation for future clinical research.

  2. Muscle synergies evoked by microstimulation are preferentially encoded during behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Alexander Overduin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical microstimulation studies provide some of the most direct evidence for the neural representation of muscle synergies. These synergies, i.e. coordinated activations of groups of muscles, have been proposed as building blocks for the construction of motor behaviors by the nervous system. Intraspinal or intracortical microstimulation has been shown to evoke muscle patterns that can be resolved into a small set of synergies similar to those seen in natural behavior. However, questions remain about the validity of microstimulation as a probe of neural function, particularly given the relatively long trains of supratheshold stimuli used in these studies. Here, we examined whether muscle synergies evoked during intracortical microstimulation in two rhesus macaques were similarly encoded by nearby motor cortical units during a purely voluntary behavior involving object reach, grasp, and carry movements. At each microstimulation site we identified the synergy most strongly evoked among those extracted from muscle patterns evoked over all microstimulation sites. For each cortical unit recorded at the same microstimulation site, we then identified the synergy most strongly encoded among those extracted from muscle patterns recorded during the voluntary behavior. We found that the synergy most strongly evoked at an intracortical microstimulation site matched the synergy most strongly encoded by proximal units more often than expected by chance. These results suggest a common neural substrate for microstimulation-evoked motor responses and for the generation of muscle patterns during natural behaviors.

  3. Auditory Evoked Potential Response and Hearing Loss: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Paulraj, M. P; Subramaniam, Kamalraj; Yaccob, Sazali Bin; Adom, Abdul H. Bin; Hema, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoacusis is the most prevalent sensory disability in the world and consequently, it can lead to impede speech in human beings. One best approach to tackle this issue is to conduct early and effective hearing screening test using Electroencephalogram (EEG). EEG based hearing threshold level determination is most suitable for persons who lack verbal communication and behavioral response to sound stimulation. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a type of EEG signal emanated from the brain scalp...

  4. Somatosensory evoked potentials and outcome in perinatal asphyxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, N A; Graham, M.; Levene, M I

    1992-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) can be measured in the term newborn infant and given an index of function in the areas of the brain most likely to be damaged in perinatal asphyxia. We studied the median nerve SEP in 30 asphyxiated term infants over the course of their encephalopathy and until discharge from the neonatal unit. Three types of response were noted: normal waveform, abnormal waveform, or absence of cortical response. Follow up of the survivors was undertaken at a mean age of...

  5. Binding of thrombin-activated platelets to a fibrin scaffold through α(IIbβ₃ evokes phosphatidylserine exposure on their cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available Recently, by employing intra-vital confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that platelets expose phosphatidylserine (PS and fibrin accumulate only in the center of the thrombus but not in its periphery. To address the question how exposure of platelet anionic phospholipids is regulated within the thrombus, an in-vitro experiment using diluted platelet-rich plasma was employed, in which the fibrin network was formed in the presence of platelets, and PS exposure on the platelet surface was analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Almost all platelets exposed PS after treatment with tissue factor, thrombin or ionomycin. Argatroban abrogated fibrin network formation in all samples, however, platelet PS exposure was inhibited only in tissue factor- and thrombin-treated samples but not in ionomycin-treated samples. FK633, an α(IIbβ₃ antagonist, and cytochalasin B impaired platelet binding to the fibrin scaffold and significantly reduced PS exposure evoked by thrombin. Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide abrogated not only fibrin network formation, but also PS exposure on platelets without suppressing platelet binding to fibrin/fibrinogen. These results suggest that outside-in signals in platelets generated by their binding to the rigid fibrin network are essential for PS exposure after thrombin treatment.

  6. A REVIEW ON INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON BRAIN ACTIVITY USING SIGNAL PROCESSING AND IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K. ADALARASU,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As per clinical neuroscience, listening to music involves many brain activities and its study has advanced greatly in the last thirty years. Research shows that music has significant effect on our body and mind. Music has a positive effect on the hormone system and allows the brain to concentrate more easily and assimilate more information in less time, thereby boosting learning and information intake and thus augmenting cognitive skills. Studies have found that the silence between two musical notes triggers brain cells and neurons which are responsible for the development of sharp memory. Music at different pitches (for example, Madhyamavati, Sankarabarnam raga and so on elicits exceptionally emotions and is capable ofreliably affecting the mood of individuals, which in turn changes the brain activity. This article provides a brief overview of currently available signal processing and imaging techniques to study the influence of different music on human brain activity.

  7. The dynamics of cysteine proteinase activity in brain structures of irrigated rat descendants during ontogenetic development

    OpenAIRE

    Чорна, Валентина Іванівна; Лянна, Ольга Леонідівна

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate the kind of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L activity dependency in brain structures of irradiated rat descendants during ontogenetic development. It was shown that fractional x-ray radiation (25 cGy) of the female rats induced different changes of cathepsin L activity levels and their redistribution in brain structures of female rats’ descendants during postnatal development with the advantages of nonsedimentational activity that had maximum at the 6th da...

  8. Application of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential in the Diagnosis of Children with Post-traumatic Brain Syndrome%脑干听觉诱发电位在儿童脑外伤后综合征诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田明琴; 李国良; 李振光

    2012-01-01

    [Objcctivc]To explore the diagnostic value of brainstcm auditory evoked potential(BAEP) in patients with post-traumatic brain syndromc(PTBS). [Methods! The differences of peak latcncy(PL) of wave I , H and HI and intcrpcak latcncy(IPL) of wave I ~ El and HI ~ V of BAEP in 24 children with PTBS and 24 normal children were compared and analyzed. [Results! There was no significant difference in PL of wave I of BAEP between PTBS group and control group( P >0. 05). PL and IPL of other waves of BEAP prolonged, and there were significant differences between PTBS group and control group( P 0.05).BAEP其他波PL及IPL均延长,与对照组有显著差异(P<0.05).[结论]BAEP筛查有助于PTBS患儿的早期发现.

  9. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Th

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow in psychiatry: The resting and activated brains of schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of regional brain functioning in schizophrenia has been based on behavioral techniques. Although results are sometimes inconsistent, the behavioral observations suggest left hemispheric dysfunction and left hemispheric overreaction. Recent developments in neuroimaging technology make possible major refinements in assessing regional brain function. Both anatomical and physiological information now be used to study regional brain development in psychiatric disorders. This chapter describes the application of one method - the xenon-133 technique for measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) - in studying the resting and activated brains of schizoprenic patients

  11. Alterations in blood-brain barrier ICAM-1 expression and brain microglial activation after λ-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. D.; Campos, C. R.; Mark, K. S.; Davis, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that peripheral inflammatory pain increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and altered tight junction protein expression and the delivery of opioid analgesics to the brain. What remains unknown is which pathways and mediators during peripheral inflammation affect BBB function and structure. The current study investigated effects of λ-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain (CIP) on BBB expression of ICAM-1. We also examined the systemic contribution of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation in the brain to elucidate pathways involved in BBB disruption during CIP. We investigated ICAM-1 RNA and protein expression levels in isolated rat brain microvessels after CIP using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses, screened inflammatory cytokines during the time course of inflammation, assessed white blood cell counts, and probed for BBB and central nervous system stimulation and leukocyte transmigration using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results showed an early increase in ICAM-1 RNA and protein expression after CIP with no change in circulating levels of several proinflammatory cytokines. Changes in ICAM-1 protein expression were noted at 48 h. Immunohistochemistry showed that the induction of ICAM-1 was region specific with increased expression noted in the thalamus and frontal and parietal cortices, which directly correlated with increased expression of activated microglia. The findings of the present study were that CIP induces increased ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression at the BBB and that systemic proinflammatory mediators play no apparent role in the early response (1–6 h); however, brain region-specific increases in micro-glial activation suggest a potential for a central-mediated response. PMID:16199477

  12. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S; Rooney, William D;

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third-trimester ......Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third......-trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (approximately 100%). Inasmuch as brain glucose metabolism is a sensitive marker of brain function, the current findings provide...... influenced by the state of pregnancy. Our findings have clinical implications because they imply that the adverse effects of prenatal cocaine exposure to the newborn child include not only cocaine's deleterious effects to the placental circulation, but also cocaine's direct pharmacological effect to the...

  13. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S; Rooney, William D;

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third-trimester ......Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third......-trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (approximately 100%). Inasmuch as brain glucose metabolism is a sensitive marker of brain function, the current findings provide...... are influenced by the state of pregnancy. Our findings have clinical implications because they imply that the adverse effects of prenatal cocaine exposure to the newborn child include not only cocaine's deleterious effects to the placental circulation, but also cocaine's direct pharmacological effect...

  14. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF INFANTS FED SOY FORMULA: BRAIN DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies of early developmental EEG activity (spontaneous and evoked) have not considered the influence of diet on these processes. However, nutritional status and dietary factors are well known to influence brain development and function. This investigation compared measures of behavioral...

  15. Measurable benefits on brain activity from the practice of educational leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eRequena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Even if behavioural studies relate leisure practices to the preservation of memory in old persons, there is unsubstantial evidence of the import of leisure on brain activity. Aim of this study was to compare the brain activity of elderly retired people who engage in different types of leisure activities. Methods: quasi-experimental study over a sample of 60 elderly, retired subjects distributed into three groups according to the leisure activities they practised: educational leisure (G1, memory games (G2 and card games (G3. Applied measures include the conceptual distinction between free time and leisure, the Test of Organization of Free Time (TOFT measuring 24 clock divisions, and EEG register during 12 word list memorizing. The results show that the type of leisure activity is associated with significant quantitative differences regarding the use of free time. G1 devotes more time to leisure activities than G2 (p = 0.007 and G3 (p = 0.034. G1 rests more actively than the other two groups (p=0.001. The electrical localization of brain activity indicated a reverse tendency of activation according to the bands and groups. Discussion. Engaging in educational leisure activities is a useful practice to protect healthy brain compensation strategies. Future longitudinal research may verify the causal relation between practicing educational leisure activities and functional brain aging.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  17. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EvaHeuberger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983 basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles / bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the skin conductance response and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles / bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  18. Dorsomedial hypothalamus mediates autonomic, neuroendocrine, and locomotor responses evoked from the medial preoptic area

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Joseph L.; Zaretsky, Dmitry V.; Sarkar, Sumit; DiMicco, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that sympathetic responses evoked from the preoptic area in anesthetized rats require activation of neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. Disinhibition of neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus in conscious rats produces physiological and behavioral changes resembling those evoked by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist and neuronal inhibitor, into the medial preoptic area. We tested the hypothesis that all of these effects evoked from the medial p...

  19. Similar itch and nociceptive sensations evoked by punctate cutaneous application of capsaicin, histamine and cowhage

    OpenAIRE

    Sikand, Parul; Shimada, Steven G.; Green, Barry G.; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Itch evoked by cowhage or histamine is reduced or blocked by capsaicin desensitization, suggesting that pruriceptive neurons are capsaicin-sensitive. Topical capsaicin can evoke both nociceptive sensations and itch, whereas intradermal injection of capsaicin evokes only burning pain. To dissociate the pruritic and nociceptive sensory effects caused by the chemical activation of sensory neurons, chemicals were applied in a punctiform manner to the skin of the forearm using individual, heat-ina...

  20. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  1. Noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B; Wit, HP; van Dijk, P

    2000-01-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) and acoustical responses evoked by bandlimited Gaussian noise (noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions; NEOAEs) were measured in three normal-hearing subjects. For the NEOAEs the first- and second-order Wiener kernel and polynomial correlation functions up to t

  2. Pyrethroid insecticides evoke neurotransmitter release from rabbit striatal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the synthetic pyrethroid insecticide fenvalerate ([R,S]-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl[R,S]-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3- methylbutyrate) on neurotransmitter release in rabbit brain slices were investigated. Fenvalerate evoked a calcium-dependent release of [3H]dopamine and [3H]acetylcholine from rabbit striatal slices that was concentration-dependent and specific for the toxic stereoisomer of the insecticide. The release of [3H]dopamine and [3H]acetylcholine by fenvalerate was modulated by D2 dopamine receptor activation and antagonized completely by the sodium channel blocker, tetrodotoxin. These findings are consistent with an action of fenvalerate on the voltage-dependent sodium channels of the presynaptic membrane resulting in membrane depolarization, and the release of dopamine and acetylcholine by a calcium-dependent exocytotic process. In contrast to results obtained in striatal slices, fenvalerate did not elicit the release of [3H]norepinephrine or [3H]acetylcholine from rabbit hippocampal slices indicative of regional differences in sensitivity to type II pyrethroid actions

  3. Brainstem auditory evoked potential testing in Dalmatian dogs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I.P. Palumbo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain stem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP is an electrophysiologic test that detects and records the electrical activity in the auditory system from cochlea to midbrain, generated after an acoustic stimulus applied to the external ear. The aim of this study is to obtain normative data for BAEP in Dalmatian dogs in order to apply this to the evaluation of deafness and other neurologic disorders. BAEP were recorded from 30 Dalmatian dogs for a normative Brazilian study. Mean latencies for waves I, III, and V were 1.14 (±0.09, 2.62 (±0.10, and 3.46 (±0.14 ms, respectively. Mean inter-peak latencies for I-III, III-V, and I-V intervals were 1.48 (±0.17, 0.84 (±0.12, and 2.31 (±0.18 ms, respectively. Unilateral abnormalities were found in 16.7% of animals and bilateral deafness was seen in one dog. The normative data obtained in this paper is compatible with other published data. As far as we know this is the first report of deafness occurrence in Dalmatian dogs in Brazil.

  4. Exploring the motivational brain: effects of implicit power motivation on brain activation in response to facial expressions of emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.; Wirth, Michelle M.; WAUGH, CHRISTIAN E.; Stanton, Steven J.; Meier, Elizabeth A.; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that implicit power motivation (nPower), in interaction with power incentives, influences activation of brain systems mediating motivation. Twelve individuals low (lowest quartile) and 12 individuals high (highest quartile) in nPower, as assessed per content coding of picture stories, were selected from a larger initial participant pool and participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study during which they viewed high-dominance (angry faces), low-...

  5. Human brain activation during sexual stimulation of the penis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadis, [No Value; Holstege, G; Georgiadis, Janniko R.

    2005-01-01

    Penile sensory information is essential for reproduction, but almost nothing is known about how sexually salient inputs from the penis are processed in the brain. We used positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during various stages of male sexual performance. Com

  6. Changes in reward-induced brain activation in opiate addicts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Soelch, C; Chevalley, AF; Kunig, G; Missimer, J; Magyar, S; Mino, A; Schultz, W; Leenders, KL

    2001-01-01

    Many studies indicate a role of the cerebral dopaminergic reward system in addiction. Motivated by these findings, we examined in opiate addicts whether brain regions involved in the reward circuitry also react to human prototypical rewards. We measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with (H2O)

  7. Steroid sulfatase and sulfuryl transferase activities in human brain tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, L.; Bičíková, M.; Mohapl, M.; Hill, M.; Černý, Ivan; Hampl, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 1 (2008), s. 31-39. ISSN 0960-0760 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : dehydroepiandrosterone * steroid sulfatase * steroid sulfuryl transferase * brain Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.827, year: 2008

  8. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van I.; Graaf, de C.; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    An important function of eating is ingesting energy. Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three

  9. Breastfeeding, Brain Activation to Own Infant Cry, and Maternal Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilyoung; Feldman, Ruth; Mayes, Linda C.; Eicher, Virginia; Thompson, Nancy; Leckman, James F.; Swain, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research points to the importance of breastfeeding for promoting close mother-infant contact and social-emotional development. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified brain regions related to maternal behaviors. However, little research has addressed the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the…

  10. Activity-dependent release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor from primary sensory neurons detected by ELISA in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkowiec, A; Katz, D M

    2000-10-01

    To define activity-dependent release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), we developed an in vitro model using primary sensory neurons and a modified ELISA, termed ELISA in situ. Dissociate cultures of nodose-petrosal ganglion cells from newborn rats were grown in wells precoated with anti-BDNF antibody to capture released BDNF, which was subsequently detected using conventional ELISA. Conventional ELISA alone was unable to detect any increase in BDNF concentration above control values following chronic depolarization with 40 mM KCl for 72 hr. However, ELISA in situ demonstrated a highly significant increase in BDNF release, from 65 pg/ml in control to 228 pg/ml in KCl-treated cultures. The efficacy of the in situ assay appears to be related primarily to rapid capture of released BDNF that prevents BDNF binding to the cultured cells. We therefore used this approach to compare BDNF release from cultures exposed for 30 min to either continuous depolarization with elevated KCl or patterned electrical field stimulation (50 biphasic rectangular pulses of 25 msec, at 20 Hz, every 5 sec). Short-term KCl depolarization was completely ineffective at evoking any detectable release of BDNF, whereas patterned electrical stimulation increased extracellular BDNF levels by 20-fold. In addition, the magnitude of BDNF release was dependent on stimulus pattern, with high-frequency bursts being most effective. These data indicate that the optimal stimulus profile for BDNF release resembles that of other neuroactive peptides. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of presynaptic neuronal activity. PMID:11007900

  11. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity is markedly reduced in dominantly-inherited olivopontocerebellar atrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kish, S J; Schut, L; Simmons, J.; Gilbert, J.; Chang, L. J.; Rebbetoy, M

    1988-01-01

    The activity was measured of the acetylcholine catabolising enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in brain after necropsy of seven patients from one established pedigree with dominantly-inherited olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), a cerebellar ataxia disorder in which neuropathological changes are assumed to be primarily restricted to cerebellum, lower brain stem and spinal cord. Mean AChE activity was significantly reduced in cerebral (-51% to 65%) and cerebellar (-47%) cortex with a less sev...

  12. EEG-based local brain activity feedback training—tomographic neurofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Bauer

    2014-01-01

    Along with the development of distributed EEG source modeling methods, basic approaches to local brain activity (LBA-) neurofeedback (NF) have been suggested. Meanwhile several attempts using LORETA and sLORETA have been published. This article specifically reports on “EEG-based LBA-feedback training” developed by Bauer et al. (2011). Local brain activity-feedback has the advantage over other sLORETA-based approaches in the way that feedback is exclusively controlled by EEG-generating sources...

  13. Temporal dynamics of musical emotions examined through intersubject synchrony of brain activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Trost, W.; Frühholz, S.; Cochrane, T.; Cojan, Y.; Vuilleumier, P.

    2015-01-01

    To study emotional reactions to music, it is important to consider the temporal dynamics of both affective responses and underlying brain activity. Here, we investigated emotions induced by music using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a data-driven approach based on intersubject correlations (ISC). This method allowed us to identify moments in the music that produced similar brain activity (i.e. synchrony) among listeners under relatively natural listening conditions. Continu...

  14. Energy landscape and dynamics of brain activity during human bistable perception.

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Masuda, Naoki; Magumi, Fukuda; Kanai, Ryota; Rees, Geraint

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in the structure of parietal and prefrontal cortex predict the stability of bistable visual perception. However, the mechanisms linking such individual differences in brain structures to behavior remain elusive. Here we demonstrate a systematic relationship between the dynamics of brain activity, cortical structure and behavior underpinning bistable perception. Using fMRI inhumans, we find that the activity dynamics during bistable perception are well described as fluct...

  15. Age-Related Shifts in Brain Activity Dynamics during Task Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Jimura, Koji; Braver, Todd S.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive aging studies have suggested that older adults show declines in both sustained and transient cognitive control processes. However, previous neuroimaging studies have primarily focused on age-related change in the magnitude, but not temporal dynamics, of brain activity. The present study compared brain activity dynamics in healthy old and young adults during task switching. A mixed blocked/event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging design enabled separation of transient and ...

  16. Linking human brain local activity fluctuations to structural and functional network architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Baria, A.T.; Mansour, A; Huang, L.; Baliki, M. N.; Cecchi, G. A.; Mesulam, M M; A. V. Apkarian

    2013-01-01

    Activity of cortical local neuronal populations fluctuates continuously, and a large proportion of these fluctuations are shared across populations of neurons. Here we seek organizational rules that link these two phenomena. Using neuronal activity, as identified by functional MRI (fMRI) and for a given voxel or brain region, we derive a single measure of full bandwidth brain-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations by calculating the slope, α, for the log-linear power spectrum. For th...

  17. Glasgow Coma Scale, brain electric activity mapping and Glasgow Outcome Scale after hyperbaric oxygen treatment of severe brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment of severe brain injury.Methods: Fifty-five patients were divided into a treatment group (n = 35 receiving HBO therapy ) and a control group (n = 20 receiving dehydrating, cortical steroid and antibiotic therapy) to observe the alteration of clinic GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale), brain electric activity mapping (BEAM), prognosis and GOS (Glasgow Outcome Scale) before and after hyperbaric oxygen treatment.Results: In the treatment group GCS, BEAM and GOS were improved obviously after 3 courses of treatment,GCS increased from 5.1 to 14.6 ( P < 0.01-0.001 ), the BEAM abnormal rate reduced from 94.3% to 38% (P <0.01-0.001 ), the GOS good-mild disability rate was 83.7%, and the middle-severe disability rate was 26.3%compared with the control group. There was a statistic significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.01-0.001).Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen treatment could improve obviously GCS, BEAM and GOS of severe brain injury patients, and effectively reduce the mortality and morbidity. It is an effective method to treat severe brain injury. two g

  18. BDNF up-regulates evoked GABAergic transmission in developing hippocampus by potentiating presynaptic N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, P; Novara, M; Carabelli, V; Hernández-Guijo, J M; Carbone, E

    2002-12-01

    Chronic application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induces new selective synthesis of non-L-type Ca2+ channels (N, P/Q, R) at the soma of cultured hippocampal neurons. As N- and P/Q-channels support neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus, this suggests that BDNF-treatment may enhance synaptic transmission by increasing the expression of presynaptic Ca2+ channels as well. To address this issue we studied the long-term effects of BDNF on miniature and stimulus-evoked GABAergic transmission in rat embryo hippocampal neurons. We found that BDNF increased the frequency of miniature currents (mIPSCs) by approximately 40%, with little effects on their amplitude. BDNF nearly doubled the size of evoked postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) with a marked increase of paired-pulse depression, which is indicative of a major increase in presynaptic activity. The potentiation of eIPSCs was more relevant during the first two weeks in culture, when GABAergic transmission is depolarizing. BDNF action was mediated by TrkB-receptors and had no effects on: (i) the amplitude and dose-response of GABA-evoked IPSCs and (ii) the number of GABA(A) receptor clusters and the total functioning synapses, suggesting that the neurotrophin unlikely acted postsynaptically. In line with this, BDNF affected the contribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels mediating evoked GABAergic transmission. BDNF drastically increased the fraction of evoked IPSCs supported by N- and P/Q-channels while it decreased the contribution associated with R- and L-types. This selective action resembles the previously observed up-regulatory effects of BDNF on somatic Ca2+ currents in developing hippocampus, suggesting that potentiation of presynaptic N- and P/Q-channel signalling belongs to a manifold mechanism by which BDNF increases the efficiency of stimulus-evoked GABAergic transmission. PMID:12492424

  19. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Swetlana Gutjar; ter Horst, Gert J.; Kees de Graaf; Renken, Remco J.; Gerry Jager

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well ...

  20. Exchange transfusion with fluorocarbon for studying synaptically evoked optical signal in rat cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Y; Fujii, F; Sato, C; Nemoto, M; Tamura, M

    2000-02-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signal is a powerful technique for studying the functional organization of the brain [T. Bonhoeffer, D. S. Kim, D. Malonek, D. Shoham, A. Grinvald, Optical imaging of the layout of functional domains in area 17 and across the area 17/18 border in cat visual cortex, Eur. J. Neurosci. 7 (1995) 1973-1988; M. Hubener, D. Shoham, A. Grinvald, T. Bonhoeffer, Spatial relationships among three columnar systems in cat area 17, J. Neurosci. 17 (1997) 9270-9284; D. Malonek, A. Grinvald, Interactions between electrical activity and cortical microcirculation revealed by imaging spectroscopy: implications for functional brain mapping, Science 272 (1996) 551-554; A. Shmuel, A. Grinvald, Functional organization for direction of motion and its relationship to orientation maps in cat area 18, J. Neurosci. 16 (1996) 6945-6964] [1] [10] [14] [22]. Three components of intrinsic optical signal can be distinguished. Two of these components can be attributed either to changes in blood volume or to changes in oxygen consumption [R.D. Frostig, E.E. Lieke, D.Y. Ts'o, A. Grinvald, Cortical functional architecture and local coupling between neuronal activity and the microcirculation revealed by in vivo high resolution optical imaging of intrinsic signals, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 87 (1990) 6082-6086] [7]. The origin of the third component is not yet clear but the component seems to be based on scattered light [H.U. Dodt, G. D'Arcangelo, E. Pestel, W. Zieglgansberger, The spread of excitation in neocortical columns visualized with infrared-dark field videomicroscopy, NeuroReport 7 (1996) 1553-1558; K. Holthoff, O.W. Witte, Intrinsic optical signals in rat neocortical slices measured with near-infrared dark-field microscopy reveal changes in extracellular space, J. Neurosci. 16 (1996) 2740-2749; B.A. MacVicar, D. Hochman, Imaging of synaptically evoked intrinsic optical signals in hippocampal slices, J. Neurosci. 11 (1991) 1458-1469; L. Trachsel, H.U. Dodt, W

  1. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  2. The brain activity of pain relief during hypnosis and placebo treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kirjanen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Placebo treatment and hypnosis are both examples of top-down regulation and are used to treat pain. However, it is unclear whether hypnosis produces anything more than a placebo effect when measuring brain activity changes. This literature review examines research articles published from 1997 onwards regarding the neurophysiology of pain relief during hypnosis or placebo treatments using functional brain imaging (fMRI or PET. The focus was on acute produced nociceptive pain. There seems to be both similarities and clear differences in the brain activity changes between hypnosis and placebo treatments. These results show that hypnosis is not equal to common placebo in terms of brain activity thus questioning the suggestion that the pain reducing properties of hypnosis are just one form of placebo effect.

  3. Effects of acrylamide and acrylic acid on creatine kinase activity in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro, both acrylamide and acrylic acid inhibited creatine kinase (CK) activity in rat brain homogenates, and acrylic acid was more potent than acrylamide. In vivo, however, when given i.p. 50 mg/kg per day for 8 days to rats, only acrylamide inhibited CK activity in the brain and caused apparent neurological signs. 14C in the brain 24 h after the injection of 14C-labelled chemicals was more than 7 times greater with acrylamide than with acrylic acid. The inhibition of CK activity by acrylamide varied in eight regions of the brain; from 54% in hypothalamus to 27% in cerebellar vermis. The regional difference of CK inhibition, however, did not agree well with either 14C distribution or with the distribution in regions which appear clinically or pathologically vulnerable to acrylamide. (orig.)

  4. Dynamic Multiscale Modes of Resting State Brain Activity Detected by Entropy Field Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Lawrence R; Galinsky, Vitaly L

    2016-09-01

    The ability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to noninvasively measure fluctuations in brain activity in the absence of an applied stimulus offers the possibility of discerning functional networks in the resting state of the brain. However, the reconstruction of brain networks from these signal fluctuations poses a significant challenge because they are generally nonlinear and nongaussian and can overlap in both their spatial and temporal extent. Moreover, because there is no explicit input stimulus, there is no signal model with which to compare the brain responses. A variety of techniques have been devised to address this problem, but the predominant approaches are based on the presupposition of statistical properties of complex brain signal parameters, which are unprovable but facilitate the analysis. In this article, we address this problem with a new method, entropy field decomposition, for estimating structure within spatiotemporal data. This method is based on a general information field-theoretic formulation of Bayesian probability theory incorporating prior coupling information that allows the enumeration of the most probable parameter configurations without the need for unjustified statistical assumptions. This approach facilitates the construction of brain activation modes directly from the spatial-temporal correlation structure of the data. These modes and their associated spatial-temporal correlation structure can then be used to generate space-time activity probability trajectories, called functional connectivity pathways, which provide a characterization of functional brain networks. PMID:27391678

  5. LSD-induced entropic brain activity predicts subsequent personality change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A V; Kaelen, M; Lövdén, M; Nilsson, J; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2016-09-01

    Personality is known to be relatively stable throughout adulthood. Nevertheless, it has been shown that major life events with high personal significance, including experiences engendered by psychedelic drugs, can have an enduring impact on some core facets of personality. In the present, balanced-order, placebo-controlled study, we investigated biological predictors of post-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) changes in personality. Nineteen healthy adults underwent resting state functional MRI scans under LSD (75µg, I.V.) and placebo (saline I.V.). The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) was completed at screening and 2 weeks after LSD/placebo. Scanning sessions consisted of three 7.5-min eyes-closed resting-state scans, one of which involved music listening. A standardized preprocessing pipeline was used to extract measures of sample entropy, which characterizes the predictability of an fMRI time-series. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate drug-induced shifts in brain entropy and their relationship with the observed increases in the personality trait openness at the 2-week follow-up. Overall, LSD had a pronounced global effect on brain entropy, increasing it in both sensory and hierarchically higher networks across multiple time scales. These shifts predicted enduring increases in trait openness. Moreover, the predictive power of the entropy increases was greatest for the music-listening scans and when "ego-dissolution" was reported during the acute experience. These results shed new light on how LSD-induced shifts in brain dynamics and concomitant subjective experience can be predictive of lasting changes in personality. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3203-3213, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27151536

  6. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Wiemer, Julian; Stefan M Schulz; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spider...

  7. Imaging and Quantification of Brain Serotonergic Activity using PET

    OpenAIRE

    Lundquist, Pinelopi

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of using positron emission tomography (PET) to study the biosynthesis and release of serotonin (5HT) at the brain serotonergic neuron. As PET requires probe compounds with specific attributes to enable imaging and quantification of biological processes, emphasis was placed on the evaluation of these attributes. The experiments established that the 5HT transporter radioligand [11C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile, [11C]DASB, ...

  8. MICROGLIA ACTIVATION AS A BIOMARKER FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CesarVBorlongan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has become the signature wound of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Injury may result from a mechanical force, a rapid acceleration-deceleration movement, or a blast wave. A cascade of secondary cell death events ensues after the initial injury. In particular, multiple inflammatory responses accompany TBI. A series of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines spreads to normal brain areas juxtaposed to the core impacted tissue. Among the repertoire of immune cells involved, microglia is a key player in propagating inflammation to tissues neighboring the core site of injury. Neuroprotective drug trials in TBI have failed, likely due to their sole focus on abrogating neuronal cell death and ignoring the microglia response despite these inflammatory cells’ detrimental effects on the brain. Another relevant point to consider is the veracity of results of animal experiments due to deficiencies in experimental design, such as incomplete or inadequate method description, data misinterpretation and reporting may introduce bias and give false-positive results. Thus, scientific publications should follow strict guidelines that include randomization, blinding, sample-size estimation and accurate handling of all data (Landis et al., 2012. A prolonged state of inflammation after brain injury may linger for years and predispose patients to develop other neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. TBI patients display progressive and long-lasting impairments in their physical, cognitive, behavioral, and social performance. Here, we discuss inflammatory mechanisms that accompany TBI in an effort to increase our understanding of the dynamic pathological condition as the disease evolves over time and begin to translate these findings for defining new and existing inflammation-based biomarkers and treatments for TBI.

  9. The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA evokes long-lasting Ca(2+) oscillations in cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Letizia; Losi, Gabriele; Sessolo, Michele; Marcon, Iacopo; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Studies over the last decade provided evidence that in a dynamic interaction with neurons glial cell astrocytes contribut to fundamental phenomena in the brain. Most of the knowledge on this derives, however, from studies monitoring the astrocyte Ca(2+) response to glutamate. Whether astrocytes can similarly respond to other neurotransmitters, including the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, is relatively unexplored. By using confocal and two photon laser-scanning microscopy the astrocyte response to GABA in the mouse somatosensory and temporal cortex was studied. In slices from developing (P15-20) and adult (P30-60) mice, it was found that in a subpopulation of astrocytes GABA evoked somatic Ca(2+) oscillations. This response was mediated by GABAB receptors and involved both Gi/o protein and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 ) signalling pathways. In vivo experiments from young adult mice, revealed that also cortical astrocytes in the living brain exibit GABAB receptor-mediated Ca(2+) elevations. At all astrocytic processes tested, local GABA or Baclofen brief applications induced long-lasting Ca(2+) oscillations, suggesting that all astrocytes have the potential to respond to GABA. Finally, in patch-clamp recordings it was found that Ca(2+) oscillations induced by Baclofen evoked astrocytic glutamate release and slow inward currents (SICs) in pyramidal cells from wild type but not IP3 R2(-/-) mice, in which astrocytic GABAB receptor-mediated Ca(2+) elevations are impaired. These data suggest that cortical astrocytes in the mouse brain can sense the activity of GABAergic interneurons and through their specific recruitment contribut to the distinct role played on the cortical network by the different subsets of GABAergic interneurons. PMID:26496414

  10. Beyond the Hypothesis of Serum Anticholinergic Activity in Alzheimer's Disease: Acetylcholine Neuronal Activity Modulates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Production and Inflammation in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, Mitsugu; Konishi, Kimiko; Hosoi, Misa; Tani, Masayuki; Tomioka, Hiroi; Inamoto, Atsuko; Minami, Sousuke; Izuno, Takuji; Umezawa, Kaori; Horiuchi, Kentaro; Hori, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is characterized by neurodegeneration, especially an acetylcholine (ACh) neuronal deficit with accumulation of β-amyloid protein, which leads to oxygen stress and inflammation. The active oxygen directly damages the neuron by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). The inflammation is due to activation of the microglia, thereby producing cytokines which inhibit the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). As the BDNF acts by neuronal protection, synaptogenesis and neurogenesis, the reduction of BDNF in the brain of AD patients worsens the symptoms of AD. On the other hand, treatment of AD patients with a cholinesterase inhibitor enhances ACh activity and inhibits inflammation. Then the expression of BDNF is restored and neuroprotection reestablished. However, there are several reports which showed controversial results concerning the relationship between BDNF and AD. We speculate that BDNF is related to some neurocognitive process and reflects neuronal activity in other neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders and that in the mild cognitive impairment stage, BDNF and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activities are hyperactivated because of a compensatory mechanism of AD pathology. In contrast, in the mild stage of AD, BDNF and ChAT activity are downregulated. PMID:26138497

  11. Human brain activity patterns beyond the isoelectric line of extreme deep coma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kroeger

    Full Text Available The electroencephalogram (EEG reflects brain electrical activity. A flat (isoelectric EEG, which is usually recorded during very deep coma, is considered to be a turning point between a living brain and a deceased brain. Therefore the isoelectric EEG constitutes, together with evidence of irreversible structural brain damage, one of the criteria for the assessment of brain death. In this study we use EEG recordings for humans on the one hand, and on the other hand double simultaneous intracellular recordings in the cortex and hippocampus, combined with EEG, in cats. They serve to demonstrate that a novel brain phenomenon is observable in both humans and animals during coma that is deeper than the one reflected by the isoelectric EEG, and that this state is characterized by brain activity generated within the hippocampal formation. This new state was induced either by medication applied to postanoxic coma (in human or by application of high doses of anesthesia (isoflurane in animals leading to an EEG activity of quasi-rhythmic sharp waves which henceforth we propose to call ν-complexes (Nu-complexes. Using simultaneous intracellular recordings in vivo in the cortex and hippocampus (especially in the CA3 region we demonstrate that ν-complexes arise in the hippocampus and are subsequently transmitted to the cortex. The genesis of a hippocampal ν-complex depends upon another hippocampal activity, known as ripple activity, which is not overtly detectable at the cortical level. Based on our observations, we propose a scenario of how self-oscillations in hippocampal neurons can lead to a whole brain phenomenon during coma.

  12. Evaluating auditory stream segregation of SAM tone sequences by subjective and objective psychoacoustical tasks, and brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena-Vanessa eDollezal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Auditory stream segregation refers to a segregated percept of signal streams with different acoustic features. Different approaches have been pursued in studies of stream segregation. In psychoacoustics, stream segregation has mostly been investigated with a subjective task asking the subjects to report their percept. Few studies have applied an objective task in which stream segregation is evaluated indirectly by determining thresholds for a percept that depends on whether auditory streams are segregated or not. Furthermore, both perceptual measures and physiological measures of brain activity have been employed but only little is known about their relation. How the results from different tasks and measures are related is evaluated in the present study using examples relying on the ABA- stimulation paradigm that apply the same stimuli. We presented A and B signals that were sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM tones providing purely temporal, spectral or both types of cues to evaluate perceptual stream segregation and its physiological correlate. Which types of cues are most prominent was determined by the choice of carrier and modulation frequencies (fmod of the signals. In the subjective task subjects reported their percept and in the objective task we measured their sensitivity for detecting time-shifts of B signals in an ABA- sequence. As a further measure of processes underlying stream segregation we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. SAM tone parameters were chosen to evoke an integrated (1-stream, a segregated (2-stream or an ambiguous percept by adjusting the fmod difference between A and B tones (∆fmod. The results of both psychoacoustical tasks are significantly correlated. BOLD responses in fMRI depend on ∆fmod between A and B SAM tones. The effect of ∆fmod, however, differs between auditory cortex and frontal regions suggesting differences in representation related to the degree of perceptual ambiguity of

  13. Measurement of Brain Activation During an Upright Stepping Reaction Task Using Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Theodore; Schmidt, Benjamin; Beluk, Nancy; Furman, Joseph; Sparto, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive brain imaging technology that uses light to measure changes in cortical hemoglobin concentrations. FNIRS measurements are recorded through fiber optic cables, which allow the participant to wear the fNIRS sensors while standing upright. Thus, fNIRS technology is well suited to study cortical brain activity during upright balance, stepping, and gait tasks. In this study, fNIRS was used to measure changes in brain activation from the frontal, motor, and premotor brain regions during an upright step task that required subjects to step laterally in response to visual cues that required executive function control. We hypothesized that cognitive processing during complex stepping cues would elicit brain activation of the frontal cortex in areas involved in cognition. Our results show increased prefrontal activation associated with the processing of the stepping cues. Moreover, these results demonstrate the potential to use fNIRS to investigate cognitive processing during cognitively demanding balance and gait studies. Hum Brain Mapp 34:2817–2828, 2013. VC 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23161494

  14. Development of positron tracer for in vivo estimation of brain MAO-B activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the specificity and the measurable range of enzyme activity of this method were found to be much dependent upon the enzymatic properties of substrate-tracer. The measurable range of brain enzyme activity was found to be from zero to the maximum value which was dependent upon two factors; the elimination rate of substratetracer from the brain (Ksub(el)) and the Vsub(max)/Ksub(m) value of substrate. The detectable range of changes in enzyme activity can be made wider by using another substrate as a tracer which has a lower Vsub(max)/Ksub(m) value or larger Ksub(el) value. The specificity can be also favorably designed by selection of substrate with various enzymatic or physico-chemical properties as a tracer. N, N-dimethyl phenylethylamine (DMPEA) was selected as a substrate-tracer for the estimation of brain MAO-B activity. Very high accumulation of radioactivity into mouse brain at 1 min after intravenous injection of 11C-DMPEA, and a long-term retention of radioactivity in the brain were observed. 11C-DMPEA seemed to be metabolized to 11C-dimethylamine by brain MAO, and be trapped by the blood-brain barrier. When various dosage of 1-deprenyl (a specific MAO-B inhibitor) were pretreated, brain radioactivity at 1 hr after injection of 11C-DMPEA significantly decreased in a dosage (1-deprenyl)-dependent way, while pretreatment with clorgyline (a specific MAO-A inhibitor) had no effect. This decrease in radioactivity might be due to the decrease of the production rate of labeled metabolite (11C-dimethylamine) in the brain. The relationship between the radioactivity remaining at 1 hr after injection and MAO-B activity remaining in the brain was quite paralle. 11C-DMPEA seems to be a specific radiotracer for the external detection of alterations in MAO-B activity in the brain with a fair sensitivity. (J.P.N.)

  15. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Botelho Pereira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential is a test used in neurotological examination. It verifies the integrity of vestibular function through a muscular response evoked by an acoustic stimulation which activates the saccular macula. Normal standards in adults have been established, however, there are few published data on the normal responses in children.OBJECTIVE: To establish normal standards for vestibular myogenic responses in children without neurotological complaints.METHODS: This study's design is a cohort with cross-sectional analysis. The sample consisted of 30 subjects, 15 females (50% and 15 males (50%.RESULTS: The age of the subjects ranged between 8 and 13 years, with a mean of 10.2 (± 1.7. P1 peak showed an average latency of 17.26 (± 1.78 ms and a mean amplitude of 49.34 (± 23.07 µV, and the N2 peak showed an average latency of 24.78 (± 2.18 ms and mean amplitude of 66.23 (± 36.18 µV. P1-N2 mean amplitude was 115.6 (± 55.7 µV. There were no statistically significant differences when comparing by gender or by laterality.CONCLUSION: We established normal values of cervical myogenic vestibular responses in children between 8 and 13 years without neurotological complaints.

  16. Why mental arithmetic counts: brain activation during single digit arithmetic predicts high school math scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gavin R; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Do individual differences in the brain mechanisms for arithmetic underlie variability in high school mathematical competence? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we correlated brain responses to single digit calculation with standard scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) math subtest in high school seniors. PSAT math scores, while controlling for PSAT Critical Reading scores, correlated positively with calculation activation in the left supramarginal gyrus and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, brain regions known to be engaged during arithmetic fact retrieval. At the same time, greater activation in the right intraparietal sulcus during calculation, a region established to be involved in numerical quantity processing, was related to lower PSAT math scores. These data reveal that the relative engagement of brain mechanisms associated with procedural versus memory-based calculation of single-digit arithmetic problems is related to high school level mathematical competence, highlighting the fundamental role that mental arithmetic fluency plays in the acquisition of higher-level mathematical competence. PMID:23283330

  17. The Insulin-Mediated Modulation of Visually Evoked Magnetic Fields Is Reduced in Obese Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschritter, Otto; Rogic, Maja; Heni, Martin; Stingl, Katarina; Hallschmid, Manfred; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Hennige, Anita M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named “cerebral insulin resistance”, is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream) in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a “cerebral insulin resistance” in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity. PMID:21589921

  18. RXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDY OF CREATINE KINASE BB ACTIVITY FOR TH E DIAGNOSIS ON BRAIN DAMAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the differential diagnosis o n cerebral concussion and mild cerebral contusion value of the brain type creati n e kinase isoenzyme(CK-BB),and evaluate the seriousness of brain damage and prog nosis of the patients with acute head injury.Methods Chromatographic separating and fluorometric quant ifying technique was used to detect the CK-BB activity in the cerebrospinal flu id(CSF) of 117 patients with acute head injury and 12 patients with increased in tracranial pressure and 20 normal people.Results The CSF-CK-BB activity of the patients with acu te head injury was remarkably higher than that of the normal people and the CSF -CK-BB activity increased with the seriousness of brain damage.There was a clo se relationship between CSF-CK-BB activity and prognosis,and higher activity o f CSF-CK-BB indicated poor prognosis.Conclusion CSF-CK -BB activity could be used as a new index to diagnose brain damage and evaluate the seriousness of brain damage and prognosis.

  19. Platelet activating factor receptor blockade enhances recovery after multifocal brain ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochanek, P.M.; Dutka, A.J.; Kumaroo, K.K.; Hallenbech, J.M.

    1987-12-14

    The authors treated four anesthetized dogs with the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist kadsurenone prior to 60 min of multifocal ischemia induced by air embolism, and measured neuronal recovery, blood flow and autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelet accumulation for 4 h after ischemia. Four anesthetized animals with identical ischemia served as controls. Kadsurenone administered 5 min prior to ischemia and continuously throughout ischemia and recovery significantly enhanced recovery of cortical somatosensory evoked response (CSER) amplitude when compared to controls. They estimated platelet accumulation as /sup 111/In activity (cmp/g tissue) in the injured hemisphere minus that in the non-injured hemisphere. Kadsurenone treated animals did not exhibit significantly altered /sup 111/In labeled platelet accumulation when compared to controls. Beneficial effects of PAF receptor blockade other than those on platelet accumulation may be involved. 20 references, 1 figure.

  20. Platelet activating factor receptor blockade enhances recovery after multifocal brain ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors treated four anesthetized dogs with the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist kadsurenone prior to 60 min of multifocal ischemia induced by air embolism, and measured neuronal recovery, blood flow and autologous 111In-labeled platelet accumulation for 4 h after ischemia. Four anesthetized animals with identical ischemia served as controls. Kadsurenone administered 5 min prior to ischemia and continuously throughout ischemia and recovery significantly enhanced recovery of cortical somatosensory evoked response (CSER) amplitude when compared to controls. They estimated platelet accumulation as 111In activity (cmp/g tissue) in the injured hemisphere minus that in the non-injured hemisphere. Kadsurenone treated animals did not exhibit significantly altered 111In labeled platelet accumulation when compared to controls. Beneficial effects of PAF receptor blockade other than those on platelet accumulation may be involved. 20 references, 1 figure

  1. Modeling the dynamics of human brain activity with recurrent neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Güçlü, Umut; Marcel A J van Gerven

    2016-01-01

    Encoding models are used for predicting brain activity in response to sensory stimuli with the objective of elucidating how sensory information is represented in the brain. Encoding models typically comprise a nonlinear transformation of stimuli to features (feature model) and a linear transformation of features to responses (response model). While there has been extensive work on developing better feature models, the work on developing better response models has been rather limited. Here, we...

  2. Rhythmic alternating patterns of brain activity distinguish rapid eye movement sleep from other states of consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Ho Ming; Horovitz, Silvina G.; Carr, Walter S.; Picchioni, Dante; Coddington, Nate; Fukunaga, Masaki; Xu, Yisheng; Balkin, Thomas J.; Duyn, Jeff H; Braun, Allen R.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep constitutes a distinct “third state” of consciousness, during which levels of brain activity are commensurate with wakefulness, but conscious awareness is radically transformed. To characterize the temporal and spatial features of this paradoxical state, we examined functional interactions between brain regions using fMRI resting-state connectivity methods. Supporting the view that the functional integrity of the default mode network (DMN) reflects “level of con...

  3. The brain activity of pain relief during hypnosis and placebo treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana Kirjanen

    2012-01-01

    Placebo treatment and hypnosis are both examples of top-down regulation and are used to treat pain. However, it is unclear whether hypnosis produces anything more than a placebo effect when measuring brain activity changes. This literature review examines research articles published from 1997 onwards regarding the neurophysiology of pain relief during hypnosis or placebo treatments using functional brain imaging (fMRI or PET). The focus was on acute produced nociceptive pain. There seems to b...

  4. Brain Activation Patterns at Exhaustion in Rats That Differ in Inherent Exercise Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Teresa E.; Leah R Brooks; Gilligan, Lori J.; Burghardt, Paul R.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Monika Fleshner

    2012-01-01

    In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained) exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively). The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA) levels of c-Fos, a mark...

  5. Timing and sequence of brain activity in top-down control of visual-spatial attention.

    OpenAIRE

    Tineke Grent-'t-Jong; Woldorff, Marty G.

    2007-01-01

    Recent brain imaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have implicated a frontal-parietal network in the top-down control of attention. However, little is known about the timing and sequence of activations within this network. To investigate these timing questions, we used event-related electrical brain potentials (ERPs) and a specially designed visual-spatial attentional-cueing paradigm, which were applied as part of a multi-methodological approach that included a cl...

  6. Visual Learning Alters the Spontaneous Activity of the Resting Human Brain: An fNIRS Study

    OpenAIRE

    Haijing Niu; Hao Li; Li Sun; Yongming Su; Jing Huang; Yan Song

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous brain activity that exhibits correlated fluctuations. RSFC has been found to be changed along the developmental course and after learning. Here, we investigated whether and how visual learning modified the resting oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) functional brain connectivity by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We demonstrate that after five days of training on an orientation discrimina...

  7. Detection of short-term activity avalanches in human brain default mode network with ultrafast MR encephalography

    OpenAIRE

    Rajna, Zalán; Kananen, Janne; Keskinarkaus, Anja; Seppänen, Tapio; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies pinpoint visually cued networks of avalanches with MEG/EEG data. Co-activation pattern (CAP) analysis can be used to detect single brain volume activity profiles and hemodynamic fingerprints of neuronal avalanches as sudden high signal activity peaks in classical fMRI data. In this study, we aimed to detect dynamic patterns of brain activity spreads with the use of ultrafast MR encephalography (MREG). MREG achieves 10 Hz whole brain sampling, allowing the estimation of spatial ...

  8. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N;

    2016-01-01

    . Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity....... Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  9. Effect of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated serotonin augmentation on Fos immunoreactivity in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, ME; Sebens, JB; Bosker, FJ; Korf, J

    2002-01-01

    The consequences of pharmacologically evoked augmented serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) release on neuronal activity in the brain, as reflected by the cellular expression of the immediate early gene c-fos, were studied. Wistar rats were treated with saline, the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopra

  10. [Changes in the efferent activity of the scratching generator evoked by external mechanical force applied to a hindlimb in the decerebrate cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigarev, Iu V

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the afferent inflow appeared with application of the external mechanical force to the rhythmically moving hindlimb have been studied for their scratching generator activity in decerebrate adult cats. Phasic relationship between violent hindlimb transference and efferent activity of the scratching generator was opposite to that found earlier during fictitious scratching, which is explained by difference between afferent activity during real scratching movement and passive movement of the hindlimb in the immobilized animal. Maximum redistribution in the relationship between flexor and extensor intensities in response to the stimulation corresponds to maximum rate of the violent hindlimb transference. PMID:1798420

  11. A hyperspectral time resolved DOT system to monitor physiological changes of the human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, F.; Peyrin, F.; Montcel, B.

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a growing area of research in the field of biomedical optics and neurosciences. Over the past 20 years, technical development allowed a more and more accurate detection of the brain activation, both spatially and in the calculation of the variations of chromophores's concentrations such as Hemoglobin, cytochrome c oxidase, etc. In particular, time resolved systems are able to distinguish between superficial layers (skin, skull) and deep layers (brain) allowing the differentiation between the systemic response and the response of the brain. In order to increase the accuracy of the brain's activation detection, we have developed a Hyperspectral Time Resolved DOT system. It is composed of a compact supercontinuum laser within the picosecond range for the source part and of an ICCD camera coupled with an imaging spectrometer for the detection part. This allows a simultaneous detection of the spatial and spectral dimension, as well as the time of flight of photons. Through the information acquired by our system, we've been able to retrieve, to our knowledge, the first spectrum of the physiology of the human brain activity as function as depth. Here we present the instrument and show our first in-vivo results that are demonstrating its capabilities to distinguish between the skin's response and the brain's responses during a cognitive task. We are also focused on the detection of the Fast Optical Signal.

  12. Exercise is brain food: the effects of physical activity on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploughman, Michelle

    2008-07-01

    This commentary reviews selected biomedical and clinical research examining the relationship between physical exercise and cognitive function especially in youth with disability. Youth with physical disability may not benefit from the effects of exercise on cardiovascular fitness and brain health since they are less active than their non-disabled peers. In animal models, physical activity enhances memory and learning, promotes neurogenesis and protects the nervous system from injury and neurodegenerative disease. Neurotrophins, endogenous proteins that support brain plasticity likely mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on the brain. In clinical studies, exercise increases brain volume in areas implicated in executive processing, improves cognition in children with cerebral palsy and enhances phonemic skill in school children with reading difficulty. Studies examining the intensity of exercise required to optimize neurotrophins suggest that moderation is important. Sustained increases in neurotrophin levels occur with prolonged low intensity exercise, while higher intensity exercise, in a rat model of brain injury, elevates the stress hormone, corticosterone. Clearly, moderate physical activity is important for youth whose brains are highly plastic and perhaps even more critical for young people with physical disability. PMID:18781504

  13. Electromagnetic pulse activated brain microglia via the p38 MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long-Long; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Wei-Dong; Li, Hai-Juan; Kang-Chu-Li; Miao, Xia; An, Guang-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Ding, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that electromagnetic pulses (EMP) induced an increase in blood brain barrier permeability and the leakage of albumin from blood into brain tissue. Albumin is known to activate microglia cells. Thus, we hypothesised that microglia activation could occur in the brain after EMP exposure. To test this hypothesis, the morphology and secretory function of microglia cells, including the expression of OX-42 (a marker of microglia activation), and levels of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-1β, and NO were determined in the rat cerebral cortex after EMP exposure. In addition, to examine the signalling pathway of EMP-induced microglia activation, protein and phosphorylated protein levels of p38, JNK and ERK were determined. It was found that the expression of OX-42increased significantly at 1, 6 and 12h (paffect its secretory function both in vivo and in vitro, and the p38 pathway is involved in this process. PMID:26688329

  14. Detecting stable phase structures in EEG signals to classify brain activity amplitude patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusely RUIZ; Guang LI; Walter J. FREEMAN; Eduardo GONZALEZ

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an electrocorticograms (ECoG) signal requires an invasive procedure in which brain activity is recorded from the cortical surface. In contrast, obtaining electroencephalograms (EEG) recordings requires the non-invasive procedure of recording the brain activity from the scalp surface, which allows EEG recordings to be performed more easily on healthy humans. In this work, a technique previously used to study spatial-temporal patterns of brain activity on animal ECoG was adapted for use on EEG. The main issues are centered on solving the problems introduced by the increment on the interelectrode distance and the procedure to detect stable frames. The results showed that spatial patterns of beta and gamma activity can also be extracted from the EEG signal by using stable frames as time markers for feature extraction. This adapted technique makes it possible to take advantage of the cognitive and phenomenological awareness of a normal healthy subject.

  15. Analysis of individual brain activation maps using hierarchical description and multiscale detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors propose a new method for the analysis of brain activation images that aims at detecting activated volumes rather than pixels. The method is based on Poisson process modeling, hierarchical description, and multiscale detection (MSD). Its performances have been assessed using both Monte Carlo simulated images and experimental PET brain activation data. As compared to other methods, the MSD approach shows enhanced sensitivity with a controlled overall type I error, and has the ability to provide an estimate of the spatial limits of the detected signals. It is applicable to any kind of difference image for which the spatial autocorrelation function can be approximated by a stationary Gaussian function

  16. Simulated ischaemia-reperfusion conditions increase xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Virgili, M; Abbondanza, A; Contestabile, A

    1998-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities increased by 87% in rat brain slices after 30 min in vitro ischaemia. A further 41% increase was induced by 30 min simulated reperfusion of ischaemic slices. No conversion from the dehydrogenase to the oxidase activity was observed. The increment of enzyme activity was not due to neosynthesis of the enzyme, since it was not affected by the addition of cycloheximide during the ischaemic incubation. The increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could aggravate the ischaemic brain injury by free radicals production, in particular after reperfusion. PMID:9460697

  17. Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy: the diagnostic value of evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, F; Hollerbach, S; Holstege, A; Schölmerich, J

    1995-01-01

    Brainstem auditory (BAEPs) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) have been shown to be useful in detecting brainstem or cortical dysfunction in neurological diseases and in combination with other methods to diagnose brain death (37,38). These neurophysiological methods are simple and easy to perform. BAEPs and SEPs can even be easily recorded in intensive care units and guarantee a standardized examination. Moreover, these methods require no extensive patient cooperation and are not heavily influenced by learning effects. The role of BAEPs in the evaluation and diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is not clear. BAEPs are obviously strongly influenced by the etiology of liver disease and are normal in viral hepatitis, but prolonged in alcoholic liver disease, Wilson's disease or in hepatic coma (8,12). Unfortunately, BAEPs were not compared to psychometric tests. There was no clear-cut differentiation between various hepatic encephalopathy-gradings. At present, the use of BAEPs in the detection of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy cannot be recommended, whereas in comatose patients BAEPs can be useful as a prognostic marker and for follow-up examinations (12). Recently, Pozessere et al. (12) examined 13 comatose patients with advanced coma stages (Glasgow coma scale 5-10) and recorded unspecific changes in their EEG tracings. In all cases of hepatic coma and in one intoxicated patient they found prolongation of interpeak latencies. In addition, in this small study the interpeak latencies correlated well with the clinical outcome of the patients. Only two studies were performed using SEPs to detect neurophysiological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy (32,33). The design as well as the results of these studies are quite different. Despite the small number of patients (n = 10), the prolongation of late components in 50% of patients with hepatic encephalopathy stage 0 could be a promising result (32). The value of SEPs in detecting subclinical hepatic

  18. C16-Ceramide Analog Combined with Pc 4 Photodynamic Therapy Evokes Enhanced Total Ceramide Accumulation, Promotion of DEVDase Activation in the Absence of Apoptosis, and Augmented Overall Cell Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duska Separovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the failure of single modality approaches, combination therapy for cancer treatment is a promising alternative. Sphingolipid analogs, with or without anticancer drugs, can improve tumor response. C16-pyridinium ceramide analog LCL30, was used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT, an anticancer treatment modality, to test the hypothesis that the combined treatment will trigger changes in the sphingolipid profile and promote cell death. Using SCCVII mouse squamous carcinoma cells, and the silicone phthalocyanine Pc 4 for PDT, we showed that combining PDT with LCL30 (PDT/LCL30 was more effective than individual treatments in raising global ceramide levels, as well as in reducing dihydrosphingosine levels. Unlike LCL30, PDT, alone or combined, increased total dihydroceramide levels. Sphingosine levels were unaffected by LCL30, but were abolished after PDT or the combination. LCL30-triggered rise in sphingosine-1-phosphate was reversed post-PDT or the combination. DEVDase activation was evoked after PDT or LCL30, and was promoted post- PDT/LCL30. Neither mitochondrial depolarization nor apoptosis were observed after any of the treatments. Notably, treatment with the combination resulted in augmented overall cell killing. Our data demonstrate that treatment with PDT/LCL30 leads to enhanced global ceramide levels and DEVDase activation in the absence of apoptosis, and promotion of total cell killing.

  19. Kappa Opioid Receptor Activation Potentiates the Cocaine-Induced Increase in Evoked Dopamine Release Recorded In Vivo in the Mouse Nucleus Accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrich, Jonathan M; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Chavkin, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral stressors increase addiction risk in humans and increase the rewarding valence of drugs of abuse including cocaine, nicotine and ethanol in animal models. Prior studies have established that this potentiation of drug reward was mediated by stress-induced release of the endogenous dynorphin opioids and subsequent kappa opioid receptor (KOR) activation. In this study, we used in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry to test the hypothesis that KOR activation before cocaine administration...

  20. Laser-evoked potentials as a tool for assessing the efficacy of antinociceptive drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truini, A.; Panuccio, G.; Galeotti, F.; Maluccio, M.R.; Sartucci, F.; Avoli, M.; Cruccu, G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) are brain responses to laser radiant heat pulses and reflect the activation of Aδ nociceptors. LEPs are to date the reference standard technique for studying nociceptive pathway function in patients with neuropathic pain. To find out whether LEPs also provide a useful neurophysiological tool for assessing antinociceptive drug efficacy, in this double-blind placebo-controlled study we measured changes induced by the analgesic tramadol on LEPs in 12 healthy subjects. We found that tramadol decreased the amplitude of LEPs, whereas placebo left LEPs unchanged. The opioid antagonist naloxone partially reversed the tramadol-induced LEP amplitude decrease. We conclude that LEPs may be reliably used in clinical practice and research for assessing the efficacy of antinociceptive drugs. PMID:19477145

  1. Brain activation-based sexual orientation in female-to-male transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T-H; Kim, G-W; Kim, S-K; Jeong, G-W

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the sexual orientation in association with brain activation pattern in response to visual erotic stimuli in female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven FtM transsexuals who have had sex-reassignment surgery to alter their natal bodies with the gender-identity disorder were participated. Brain activation for sexual orientation was induced by visual stimuli with female and male erotic nude pictures compared with emotionally-neutral pictures. During viewing the erotic female pictures, the brain areas dominantly activated consist of the superior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, anterior/median cingulate gyri and hypothalamus, whereas during viewing male pictures, the brain areas with predominant activities were the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, angular gyrus, precuneus, superior/middle occipital gyri, cerebellar cortex and vermis. These findings demonstrate that the brain activation patterns induced by viewing male or female erotic pictures show some correlation to the sexual orientation opposite to the genetic sex in FtM transsexuals. This study would be helpful to understand the neural mechanism associated with visual sexual arousal in patients with gender disorder. PMID:26581912

  2. Disturbed spontaneous brain-activity pattern in patients with optic neuritis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,2,* Feng-Qin Cai,3,* Pei-Hong Hu,1 Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Ying Zhang,1 Rong Wei,1 Chong-Gang Pei,1 Fu-Qing Zhou,3 Yi Shao1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 2Department of Ophthalmology, First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang, Jiujiang, 3Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To use the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF technique to investigate the local features of spontaneous brain activity in optic neuritis (ON and their relationship with behavioral performance.Materials and methods: Twelve patients with ON (four male, eight female and twelve age-, sex-, and education status-matched healthy controls (HCs (four male, eight female underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI scans. The ALFF technique was used to assess local features of spontaneous brain activity. Correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the observed mean ALFF values of the different areas and visual evoked potentials (VEPs in patients with ON.Results: Compared with HCs, patients with ON had significantly decreased ALFF values in the posterior and anterior lobes of the right cerebellum, right putamen, right inferior frontal gyrus, right insula, right supramarginal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left medial frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate/medial frontal gyrus, and bilateral precuneus, and significantly increased ALFF values in the posterior lobes of the left and right cerebellum, right inferior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal/fusiform gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, left calcarine fissure, left inferior parietal lobule, and left cuneus. We found negative correlations between the mean ALFF signal

  3. Mitochondrial monoaminoxidase activity and serotonin content in rat brain after whole-body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that γ-irradiation of albino rats with a dose of 30 Gy leads to pronounced phase changes in monoaminoxidase activity and serotonin content in rat brain at early times after whole-body exposure. These is a similar direction of changes in the activity of the enzyme and in the content of the substrate adequate to the latter

  4. Recurrent activity in higher order, modality non-specific brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Hans Olav Christensen; Joensson, Morten; Biermann-Ruben, Katja;

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that the workings of the brain are mainly intrinsically generated recurrent neuronal activity, with sensory inputs as modifiers of such activity in both sensory and higher order modality non-specific regions. This is supported by the demonstration of recurrent neuronal activi...

  5. Visual evoked potentials to an illusory change in brightness: the Craik-Cornsweet-O'Brien effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Steve; Crown, Nik

    2016-07-01

    Can brain electrical activity associated with the Craik-Cornsweet-O'Brien effect (CCOB) be identified in humans? Opposing luminance gradients met in the middle of a square image to create a luminance contrast-defined vertical border. The resulting rectangles on each side of the border were otherwise equiluminant, but appeared to differ in brightness, the CCOB effect. When the contrast gradients were swapped, the participants perceived darker and lighter rectangles trading places. This dynamic CCOB stimulus was reversed 1/s to elicit visual evoked potentials. The CCOB effect was absent in two control conditions. In one, the immediate contrast border, where the gradients met, was replaced by a dark vertical stripe; in the other, the outer segments of both rectangles, where the illusion would otherwise occur, were replaced by dark rectangles, leaving only the contrast-reversing gradients. Visual evoked potential components P1 and N2 were present for the CCOB stimuli, but not the control stimuli. Results are consistent with functional MRI and single unit evidence, suggesting that the brightness of the CCOB effect becomes dissociated from the luminance falling on the eye early in visual processing. These results favor explanations of brightness induction invoking rapid, early amplification of very low spatial-frequency information in the image to approximate natural scenes as opposed to a sluggish brightness adjustment spreading from the contrast border. PMID:27254394

  6. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Arias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE. In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx. We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups.

  7. Dexmedetomidine infusion and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, M; Beric, A; Bekker, A

    2001-10-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring requires information on the effects of anesthetic drugs because these drugs can directly alter evoked potentials, thus interfering with monitoring. We report on our evaluation of the effect of the recently introduced alpha2-adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine, on the somatosensory evoked potentials in two patients undergoing cervico-occipital fusion. Our results suggest that, although dexmedetomidine can affect the later cortical peaks of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), consistent and reproducible potentials can be recorded. PMID:11733664

  8. Concomitant treatment of brain metastasis with Whole Brain Radiotherapy [WBRT] and Temozolomide [TMZ] is active and improves Quality of Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastases (BM) represent one of the most frequent complications related to cancer, and their treatment continues to evolve. We have evaluated the activity, toxicity and the impact on Quality of Life (QoL) of a concomitant treatment with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and Temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with brain metastases from solid tumors in a prospective Simon two stage study. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled and received 30 Gy WBRT with concomitant TMZ (75 mg/m2/day) for ten days, and subsequently TMZ (150 mg/m2/day) for up to six cycles. The primary end points were clinical symptoms and radiologic response. Five patients had a complete response, 21 patients had a partial response, while 18 patients had stable disease. The overall response rate (45%) exceeded the target activity per study design. The median time to progression was 9 months. Median overall survival was 13 months. The most frequent toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (15%) and anemia (13%), and only one patient developed a grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Age, Karnofsky performance status, presence of extracranial metastases and the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) were found to be predictive factors for response in patients. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were dependent on age and on the RPA class. We conclude that this treatment is well tolerated, with an encouraging objective response rate, and a significant improvement in quality of life (p < 0.0001) demonstrated by FACT-G analysis. All patients answered the questionnaires and described themselves as 'independent' and able to act on their own initiatives. Our study found a high level of satisfaction for QoL, this provides useful information to share with patients in discussions regarding chemotherapy treatment of these lesions

  9. Appetitive Cue-Evoked ERK Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Requires NMDA and D1 Dopamine Receptor Activation and Regulates CREB Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschmann, Erin K. Z.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Willis, Cory M.; Foster, Rebecca L.; Chipman, Amanda M.; Thiels, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CS) can modulate reward-seeking behavior. This modulatory effect can be maladaptive and has been implicated in excessive reward seeking and relapse to drug addiction. We previously demonstrated that exposure to an appetitive CS causes an increase in the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic-AMP…

  10. Adaptive integration of local region information to detect fine-scale brain activity patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology, the spatial resolution of fMRI data is continuously growing. This pro- vides us the possibility to detect the fine-scale patterns of brain activities. The es- tablished univariate and multivariate methods to analyze fMRI data mostly focus on detecting the activation blobs without considering the distributed fine-scale pat- terns within the blobs. To improve the sensitivity of the activation detection, in this paper, multivariate statistical method and univariate statistical method are com- bined to discover the fine-grained activity patterns. For one voxel in the brain, a local homogenous region is constructed. Then, time courses from the local ho- mogenous region are integrated with multivariate statistical method. Univariate statistical method is finally used to construct the interests of statistic for that voxel. The approach has explicitly taken into account the structures of both activity pat- terns and existing noise of local brain regions. Therefore, it could highlight the fine-scale activity patterns of the local regions. Experiments with simulated and real fMRI data demonstrate that the proposed method dramatically increases the sensitivity of detection of fine-scale brain activity patterns which contain the subtle information about experimental conditions.

  11. Oxytocin receptor gene and racial ingroup bias in empathy-related brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Siyang; Li, Bingfeng; Ma, Yina; Zhang, Wenxia; Rao, Yi; Han, Shihui

    2015-04-15

    The human brain responds more strongly to racial ingroup than outgroup individuals' pain. This racial ingroup bias varies across individuals and has been attributed to social experiences. What remains unknown is whether the racial ingroup bias in brain activity is associated with a genetic polymorphism. We investigated genetic associations of racial ingroup bias in the brain activity to racial ingroup and outgroup faces that received painful or non-painful stimulations by scanning A/A and G/G homozygous of the oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (OXTR rs53576) using functional MRI. We found that G/G compared to A/A individuals showed stronger activity in the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor area (ACC/SMA) in response to racial ingroup members' pain, whereas A/A relative to G/G individuals exhibited greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in response to racial outgroup members' pain. Moreover, the racial ingroup bias in ACC/SMA activity positively predicted participants' racial ingroup bias in implicit attitudes and NAcc activity to racial outgroup individuals' pain negatively predicted participants' motivations to reduce racial outgroup members' pain. Our results suggest that the two variants of OXTR rs53576 are associated with racial ingroup bias in brain activities that are linked to implicit attitude and altruistic motivation, respectively. PMID:25637390

  12. Altered resting-state brain activity at functional MRI during automatic memory consolidation of fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingyong; Feng, Pan; Chen, Zhencai

    2013-07-26

    Investigations of fear conditioning in rodents and humans have illuminated the neural mechanisms of fear acquisition and extinction. However, the neural mechanism of automatic memory consolidation of fear conditioning is still unclear. To address this question, we measured brain activity following fear acquisition using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). In the current study, we used a marker of fMRI, amplitude of low-frequency (0.01-0.08Hz) fluctuation (ALFF) to quantify the spontaneous brain activity. Brain activity correlated to fear memory consolidation was observed in parahippocampus, insula, and thalamus in resting-state. Furthermore, after acquired fear conditioning, compared with control group some brain areas showed ALFF increased in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the experimental group, whereas some brain areas showed decreased ALFF in striatal regions (caudate, putamen). Moreover, the change of ALFF in vmPFC was positively correlated with the subjective fear ratings. These findings suggest that the parahippocampus, insula, and thalamus are the neural substrates of fear memory consolidation. The difference in activity could be attributed to a homeostatic process in which the vmPFC and ACC were involved in the fear recovery process, and change of ALFF in vmPFC predicts subjective fear ratings. PMID:23726994

  13. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Is Associated with Brain Volumetric Measurements in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaren, Rachel E.; Hubbard, Elizabeth A.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Little is known about physical activity and its association with volumes of whole brain gray matter and white matter and deep gray matter structures in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose. This study examined the association between levels of physical activity and brain volumetric measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. Method. 39 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and underwent a brain MRI. Normalized GM volume (NGMV), normalized WM volume (NWMV), and deep GM structures were calculated from 3D T1-weighted structural brain images. We conducted partial correlations (pr) controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Results. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was significantly associated with NGMV (pr = 0.370, p < 0.05), NWMV (pr = 0.433, p < 0.01), hippocampus (pr = 0.499, p < 0.01), thalamus (pr = 0.380, p < 0.05), caudate (pr = 0.539, p < 0.01), putamen (pr = 0.369, p < 0.05), and pallidum (pr = 0.498, p < 0.01) volumes, when controlling for sex, age, clinical course of MS, and Expanded Disability Status Scale score. There were no associations between sedentary and light physical activity with MRI outcomes. Conclusion. Our results provide the first evidence that MVPA is associated with volumes of whole brain GM and WM and deep GM structures that are involved in motor and cognitive functions in MS. PMID:26146460

  14. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Is Associated with Brain Volumetric Measurements in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Klaren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about physical activity and its association with volumes of whole brain gray matter and white matter and deep gray matter structures in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS. Purpose. This study examined the association between levels of physical activity and brain volumetric measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in MS. Method. 39 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and underwent a brain MRI. Normalized GM volume (NGMV, normalized WM volume (NWMV, and deep GM structures were calculated from 3D T1-weighted structural brain images. We conducted partial correlations (pr controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Results. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA was significantly associated with NGMV (pr=0.370, p<0.05, NWMV (pr=0.433, p<0.01, hippocampus (pr=0.499, p<0.01, thalamus (pr=0.380, p<0.05, caudate (pr=0.539, p<0.01, putamen (pr=0.369, p<0.05, and pallidum (pr=0.498, p<0.01 volumes, when controlling for sex, age, clinical course of MS, and Expanded Disability Status Scale score. There were no associations between sedentary and light physical activity with MRI outcomes. Conclusion. Our results provide the first evidence that MVPA is associated with volumes of whole brain GM and WM and deep GM structures that are involved in motor and cognitive functions in MS.

  15. Brain activation patterns at exhaustion in rats that differ in inherent exercise capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Teresa E; Brooks, Leah R; Gilligan, Lori J; Burghardt, Paul R; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Fleshner, Monika

    2012-01-01

    In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained) exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively). The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA) levels of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the brains of HCR and LCR rats after a single bout of acute treadmill running (7.5-15 minutes, 15° slope, 10 m/min) or after treadmill running to exhaustion (15-51 minutes, 15° slope, initial velocity 10 m/min). During verification of trait differences, HCR rats ran six times farther and three times longer prior to exhaustion than LCR rats. Running to exhaustion significantly increased c-Fos mRNA activation of several brain areas in HCR, but LCR failed to show significant elevations of c-Fos mRNA at exhaustion in the majority of areas examined compared to acutely run controls. Results from these studies suggest that there are differences in central c-Fos mRNA expression, and potential brain activation patterns, between HCR and LCR rats during treadmill running to exhaustion and these differences could be involved in the variation in inherent running capacity between lines. PMID:23028992

  16. Brain activation patterns at exhaustion in rats that differ in inherent exercise capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa E Foley

    Full Text Available In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively. The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA levels of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the brains of HCR and LCR rats after a single bout of acute treadmill running (7.5-15 minutes, 15° slope, 10 m/min or after treadmill running to exhaustion (15-51 minutes, 15° slope, initial velocity 10 m/min. During verification of trait differences, HCR rats ran six times farther and three times longer prior to exhaustion than LCR rats. Running to exhaustion significantly increased c-Fos mRNA activation of several brain areas in HCR, but LCR failed to show significant elevations of c-Fos mRNA at exhaustion in the majority of areas examined compared to acutely run controls. Results from these studies suggest that there are differences in central c-Fos mRNA expression, and potential brain activation patterns, between HCR and LCR rats during treadmill running to exhaustion and these differences could be involved in the variation in inherent running capacity between lines.

  17. Differences between chronological and brain age are related to education and self-reported physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffener, Jason; Habeck, Christian; O'Shea, Deirdre; Razlighi, Qolamreza; Bherer, Louis; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the relationship between education and physical activity and the difference between a physiological prediction of age and chronological age (CA). Cortical and subcortical gray matter regional volumes were calculated from 331 healthy adults (range: 19-79 years). Multivariate analyses identified a covariance pattern of brain volumes best predicting CA (R(2) = 47%). Individual expression of this brain pattern served as a physiologic measure of brain age (BA). The difference between CA and BA was predicted by education and self-report measures of physical activity. Education and the daily number of flights of stairs climbed (FOSC) were the only 2 significant predictors of decreased BA. Effect sizes demonstrated that BA decreased by 0.95 years for each year of education and by 0.58 years for 1 additional FOSC daily. Effects of education and FOSC on regional brain volume were largely driven by temporal and subcortical volumes. These results demonstrate that higher levels of education and daily FOSC are related to larger brain volume than predicted by CA which supports the utility of regional gray matter volume as a biomarker of healthy brain aging. PMID:26973113

  18. Auditory evoked potential measurements in elasmobranchs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Brandon; Mann, David

    2005-04-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEP) were first used to examine hearing in elasmobranchs by Corwin and Bullock in the late 1970s and early 1980s, marking the first time AEPs had been measured in fishes. Results of these experiments identified the regions of the ear and brain in which sound is processed, though no actual hearing thresholds were measured. Those initial experiments provided the ground work for future AEP experiments to measure fish hearing abilities in a manner that is much faster and more convenient than classical conditioning. Data will be presented on recent experiments in which AEPs were used to measure the hearing thresholds of two species of elasmobranchs: the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum, and the yellow stingray, Urobatis jamaicencis. Audiograms were analyzed and compared to previously published audiograms obtained using classical conditioning with results indicating that hearing thresholds were similar for the two methods. These data suggest that AEP testing is a viable option when measuring hearing in elasmobranchs and can increase the speed in which future hearing measurements can be obtained.

  19. An efficient P300-based brain-computer interface for disabled subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Ulrich; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Ebrahimi, Touradj; Diserens, Karin

    2008-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that translates brain-activity into commands for a computer or other devices. In other words, a BCI allows users to act on their environment by using only brain-activity, without using peripheral nerves and muscles. In this paper, we present a BCI that achieves high classification accuracy and high bitrates for both disabled and able-bodied subjects. The system is based on the P300 evoked potential and is tested with five severely dis...

  20. Timing of intervention affects brain electrical activity in children exposed to severe psychosocial neglect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross E Vanderwert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early psychosocial deprivation has profound effects on brain activity in the young child. Previous reports have shown increased power in slow frequencies of the electroencephalogram (EEG, primarily in the theta band, and decreased power in higher alpha and beta band frequencies in infants and children who have experienced institutional care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the consequences of removing infants from institutions and placing them into a foster care intervention on brain electrical activity when children were 8 years of age. We found the intervention was successful for increasing high frequency EEG alpha power, with effects being most pronounced for children placed into foster care before 24 months of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dependence on age of placement for the effects observed on high frequency EEG alpha power suggests a sensitive period after which brain activity in the face of severe psychosocial deprivation is less amenable to recovery.

  1. Patterns of brain activity in normals and schizophrenics with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated the functional interaction among brain areas under baseline and upon activation by a visual task to compare the response of normal subjects from the ones of chronic schizophrenics. Cerebral metabolic images were obtained on twelve healthy volunteers an eighteen schizophrenics with positron emission tomography and 11-C-Deoxyglucose. Correlation coefficients among the relative metabolic values (region of interest divided by the average of whole brain gray matter) of 11 brain regions; frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital left and right lobes, left and right basal ganglia and thalamus were computed for the baseline and for the task. Under baseline, normals showed more functional correlations than schizophrenics. Both groups showed a thalamo-occipital (positive) and thalamo-frontal (negative) interaction. The highest correlations among homologous brain areas were the frontal, occipital and basal ganglia

  2. Hierarchical clustering of brain activity during human nonrapid eye movement sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, Mélanie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Marrelec, Guillaume; Schabus, Manuel; Laureys, Steven; Doyon, Julien; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Maquet, Pierre; Benali, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Consciousness is reduced during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to changes in brain function that are still poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that impaired consciousness during NREM sleep is associated with an increased modularity of brain activity. Cerebral connectivity was quantified in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging times series acquired in 13 healthy volunteers during wakefulness and NREM sleep. The analysis revealed a modification of the hierarchical organization of large-scale networks into smaller independent modules during NREM sleep, independently from EEG markers of the slow oscillation. Such modifications in brain connectivity, possibly driven by sleep ultraslow oscillations, could hinder the brain's ability to integrate information and account for decreased consciousness during NREM sleep. PMID:22451917

  3. Qualitative and quantitative measurement of human brain activity using pixel subtraction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop an automated quantification program, which is called FALBA (Functional and Anatomical Labeling of Brain Activation), and to provide information on the brain centers, brain activity (%) and hemispheric lateralization index on the basis of a brain activation map obtained from functional MR imaging. The 3-dimensional activation MR images were processed by a statistical parametric mapping program (SPM99, The Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, University College London, UK) and MRIcro software (www.micro.com). The 3-dimensional images were first converted into 2-dimensional sectional images, and then overlapped with the corresponding T1-weighted images. Then, the image dataset was extended to -59 mm to 83 mm with a 2 mm slice-gap, giving 73 axial images. By using a pixeI subtraction method, the differences in the R, G, B values between the T1-weighted images and the activation images were extracted, in order to produce black and white (B/W) differentiation images, in which each pixel is represented by 24-bit R, G, B true colors. Subsequently, another pixel differentiation method was applied to two template images, namely one functional and one anatomical index image, in order to generate functional and anatomical differentiation images containing regional brain activation information based on the Brodmann's and anatomical areas, respectively. In addition, the regional brain lateralization indices were automatically determined, in order to evaluate the hemispheric predominance, with the positive (+) and negative (-) indices showing left and right predominance, respectively. The manual counting method currently used is time consuming and has limited accuracy and reliability in the case of the activated cerebrocortical regions. The FALBA program we developed was 240 times faster than the manual counting method: -10 hours for manual accounting and -2.5 minutes for the FALBA program using a Pentium IV processor. Compared with the FALBA program, the manual

  4. Electrical Nerve Stimulation Can Be Used as a Tool in fMRI Studies of Pain- and Tingling-Evoked Activations

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Karen D.; Kwan, Chun L; Crawley, Adrian P.; Mikulis, David J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESES: To determine whether transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) provides adequate, inexpensive and simple means to image innocuous and pain-related activations in the thalamus and cortex.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: High resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to obtain functional data sets on a 1.5T General Electric echospeed scanner (General Electric, Milwaukee) from six axial slices during interleaved periods of rest and TENS at either nonpa...

  5. Is Brain Activity during Action Observation Modulated by the Perceived Fairness of the Actor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joset A Etzel

    Full Text Available Perceiving other people's actions triggers activity in premotor and parietal areas, brain areas also involved in executing and sensing our own actions. Paralleling this phenomenon, observing emotional states (including pain in others is associated with activity in the same brain areas as activated when experiencing similar emotions directly. This emotion perception associated activity has been shown to be affected by the perceived fairness of the actor, and in-group membership more generally. Here, we examine whether action observation associated brain activity is also affected by the perceived social fairness of the actors. Perceived fairness was manipulated using an alternating iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game between the participant and two confederates, one of whom played fairly and the other unfairly. During fMRI scanning the participants watched movies of the confederates performing object-directed hand actions, and then performed hand actions themselves. Mass-univariate analysis showed that observing the actions triggered robust activation in regions associated with action execution, but failed to identify a strong modulation of this activation based on perceived fairness. Multivariate pattern analysis, however, identified clusters potentially carrying information about the perceived fairness of the actor in the middle temporal gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, right middle cingulate cortex, right angular gyrus, and right superioroccipital gyrus. Despite being identified by a whole-brain searchlight analysis (and so without anatomical restriction, these clusters fall into areas frequently associated with action observation. We conclude that brain activity during action observation may be modulated by perceived fairness, but such modulation is subtle; robust activity is associated with observing the actions of both fair and unfair individuals.

  6. Is Brain Activity during Action Observation Modulated by the Perceived Fairness of the Actor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel, Joset A; Valchev, Nikola; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Perceiving other people's actions triggers activity in premotor and parietal areas, brain areas also involved in executing and sensing our own actions. Paralleling this phenomenon, observing emotional states (including pain) in others is associated with activity in the same brain areas as activated when experiencing similar emotions directly. This emotion perception associated activity has been shown to be affected by the perceived fairness of the actor, and in-group membership more generally. Here, we examine whether action observation associated brain activity is also affected by the perceived social fairness of the actors. Perceived fairness was manipulated using an alternating iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game between the participant and two confederates, one of whom played fairly and the other unfairly. During fMRI scanning the participants watched movies of the confederates performing object-directed hand actions, and then performed hand actions themselves. Mass-univariate analysis showed that observing the actions triggered robust activation in regions associated with action execution, but failed to identify a strong modulation of this activation based on perceived fairness. Multivariate pattern analysis, however, identified clusters potentially carrying information about the perceived fairness of the actor in the middle temporal gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, right middle cingulate cortex, right angular gyrus, and right superioroccipital gyrus. Despite being identified by a whole-brain searchlight analysis (and so without anatomical restriction), these clusters fall into areas frequently associated with action observation. We conclude that brain activity during action observation may be modulated by perceived fairness, but such modulation is subtle; robust activity is associated with observing the actions of both fair and unfair individuals. PMID:26820995

  7. Do cholesterol-lowering agents affect brain activity? A comparison of simvastatin, pravastatin, and placebo in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, R. W.; Ashton, C H

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of simvastatin and pravastatin on measures of central nervous system activity were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised crossover study. 2. Twenty-five healthy volunteers sequentially took 40 mg day-1 simvastatin, 40 mg day-1 pravastatin or placebo for 4 weeks, separated by a 4-6 week washout phase. 3. CNS measures included EEG evoked potentials, power spectral analysis, Leeds Sleep Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety Depression (HAD) Scale, and Digit Symb...

  8. Explorative investigation of biomarkers of brain damage and coagulation system activation in clinical stroke differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Undén, Johan; Strandberg, Karin; Malm, Jan;

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A simple and accurate method of differentiating ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is potentially useful to facilitate acute therapeutic management. Blood measurements of biomarkers of brain damage and activation of the coagulation system may potentially serve as novel...... diagnostic tools for stroke subtypes. METHODS: Ninety-seven stroke patients were prospectively investigated in a multicenter design with blood levels of brain biomarkers S100B, neuron specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as well as a coagulation biomarker, activated protein C...... exploratory study indicated that blood levels of biomarkers GFAP and APC-PCI, prior to neuroimaging, may rule out ICH in a mixed stroke population....

  9. Modulation of IκB kinase autophosphorylation and activity following brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENWan-Hua; ZHANGHun-Yi; 等

    2003-01-01

    ATIM:To investigate the effects of different antagonists on the alteration of IκB kinase(IKK)activity in rat hipoocampus folluwing global brain ischemia,METHODS:Using 4-vessel occlusion(4-VO)as brain ischemia model,IKK protein expression was examined by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation,and IKK activity was assayed by in vitro kinase assay.RESULTS:There was no alteration of IKK protein expression following ischemia or ischemia/reperfusion different time points,but IKK activity reached its peak level at ischemia 30min.Pretreatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA)receptor antagonist ketamine,non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX,or NFκB inhibitor PDTC decreased the IKK activity following brain ischemia 30min.The increase in substrate myelin basic protein(MBP)phosphorylation by IKK is associated with an increase in autophosphorylation of IKK,which can also be antagonized by ketamine,DNQX,and PDTC,CONCLUSION:NMDA receptor and non-NMDA receptor mediate the increase of IKK activity following global brain ischemia in rat hippocampus,which contributes to the alterations of expression and activity of downstream factor NF-κB.

  10. The time-course and spatial distribution of brain activity associated with sentence processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2012-04-01

    Sentence comprehension involves a host of highly interrelated processes, including syntactic parsing, semantic composition, and pragmatic inferencing. In neuroimaging, a primary paradigm for examining the brain bases of sentence processing has been to compare brain activity elicited by sentences versus unstructured lists of words. These studies commonly find an effect of increased activity for sentences in the anterior temporal lobes (aTL). Together with neuropsychological data, these findings have motivated the hypothesis that the aTL is engaged in sentence level combinatorics. Combinatoric processing during language comprehension, however, occurs within tens and hundreds of milliseconds, i.e., at a time-scale much faster than the temporal resolution of hemodynamic measures. Here, we examined the time-course of sentence-level processing using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to better understand the temporal profile of activation in this common paradigm and to test a key prediction of the combinatoric hypothesis: because sentences are interpreted incrementally, word-by-word, activity associated with basic linguistic combinatorics should be time-locked to word-presentation. Our results reveal increased anterior temporal activity for sentences compared to word lists beginning approximately 250 ms after word onset. We also observed increased activation in a network of other brain areas, extending across posterior temporal, inferior frontal, and ventral medial areas. These findings confirm a key prediction of the combinatoric hypothesis for the aTL and further elucidate the spatio-temporal characteristics of sentence-level computations in the brain. PMID:22248581

  11. Brain activity in advantageous and disadvantageous situations: implications for reward/punishment sensitivity in different situations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangheng Dong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study modeled win and lose trials in a simple gambling task to examine the effect of entire win-lose situations (WIN, LOSS, or TIE on single win/lose trials and related neural underpinnings. METHODS: The behavior responses and brain activities of 17 participants were recorded by an MRI scanner while they performed a gambling task. Different conditions were compared to determine the effect of the task on the behavior and brain activity of the participants. Correlations between brain activity and behavior were calculated to support the imaging results. RESULTS: In win trials, LOSS caused less intense posterior cingulate activity than TIE. In lose trials, LOSS caused more intense activity in the right superior temporal gyrus, bilateral superior frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate, bilateral insula cortex, and left orbitofrontal cortex than WIN and TIE. CONCLUSIONS: The experiences of the participants in win trials showed great similarity among different win-lose situations. However, the brain activity and behavior responses of the participants in lose trials indicated that they experienced stronger negative emotion in LOSS. The participants also showed an increased desire to win in LOSS than in WIN or TIE conditions.

  12. Regional Brain Activation during Meditation Shows Time and Practice Effects: An Exploratory FMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baron Short

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Meditation involves attentional regulation and may lead to increased activity in brain regions associated with attention such as dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether DLPFC and ACC were activated during meditation. Subjects who meditate were recruited and scanned on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. Subjects meditated for four sessions of 12 min and performed four sessions of a 6 min control task. Individual and group t-maps were generated of overall meditation response versus control response and late meditation response versus early meditation response for each subject and time courses were plotted. For the overall group (n = 13, and using an overall brain analysis, there were no statistically significant regional activations of interest using conservative thresholds. A region of interest analysis of the entire group time courses of DLPFC and ACC were statistically more active throughout meditation in comparison to the control task. Moreover, dividing the cohort into short (n = 8 and long-term (n = 5 practitioners (>10 years revealed that the time courses of long-term practitioners had significantly more consistent and sustained activation in the DLPFC and the ACC during meditation versus control in comparison to short-term practitioners. The regional brain activations in the more practised subjects may correlate with better sustained attention and attentional error monitoring. In summary, brain regions associated with attention vary over the time of a meditation session and may differ between long- and short-term meditation practitioners.

  13. Hierarchical brain networks active in approach and avoidance goal pursuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Martin Spielberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective approach/avoidance goal pursuit is critical for attaining long-term health and well-being. Research on the neural correlates of key goal pursuit processes (e.g., motivation has long been of interest, with lateralization in prefrontal cortex being a particularly fruitful target of investigation. However, this literature has often been limited by a lack of spatial specificity and has not delineated the precise aspects of approach/avoidance motivation involved. Additionally, the relationships among brain regions (i.e., network connectivity vital to goal pursuit remain largely unexplored. Specificity in location, process, and network relationship is vital for moving beyond gross characterizations of function and identifying the precise cortical mechanisms involved in motivation. The present paper integrates research using more spatially specific methodologies (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging with the rich psychological literature on approach/avoidance to propose an integrative network model that takes advantage of the strengths of each of these literatures.

  14. Brain activity modification produced by a single radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation pulse: a new tool for neuropsychiatric treatments. Preliminary fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Alessandro Castagna1 1Department of Neuro-Psycho-Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Purpose: Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation technology with its treatment protocols has shown efficacy in various psychiatric disorders. The aim of this work was to highlight the mechanisms by which these positive effects are achieved. The current study was conducted to determine whether a single 500-millisecond radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC brain stimulation pulse (BSP, applied to the ear, can effect a modification of brain activity that is detectable using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers, six females and four males, underwent fMRI during a simple finger-tapping motor task before and after receiving a single 500-millisecond REAC-BSP. Results: The fMRI results indicate that the average variation in task-induced encephalic activation patterns is lower in subjects following the single REAC pulse. Conclusion: The current report demonstrates that a single REAC-BSP is sufficient to modulate brain activity in awake subjects, able to be measured using fMRI. These initial results open new perspectives into the understanding of the effects of weak and brief radio pulses upon brain activity, and provide the basis for further indepth studies using REAC-BSP and fMRI. Keywords: fMRI, brain stimulation, brain modulation, REAC, neuropsychiatric treatments

  15. NOX Activity in Brain Aging: Exacerbation by High Fat Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; White, Christy L.; Gupta, Sunita; Knight, Alecia G.; Pistell, Paul J.; Ingram, Donald K.; Morrison, Christopher D.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes how age and high fat diet affect the profile of NADPH oxidase (NOX). Specifically, NOX activity and subunit expression were evaluated in the frontal cerebral cortex of 7-, 16-, and 24-month old mice following a 4-month exposure to either Western diet (WD, 41% calories from fat) or very high fat lard diet (VHFD, 60% calories from fat). Data reveal a significant effect of age in on NOX activity, and show that NOX activity was only increased by VHFD, and only in 24-month old...

  16. Electroencephalographic brain dynamics of memory encoding in emotionally arousing context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique eUribe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Emotional content/context enhances declarative memory through modulation of encoding and retrieval mechanisms. At encoding, neurophysiological data have consistently demonstrated the subsequent memory effect in theta and gamma oscillations. Yet, the existing studies were focused on the emotional content effect and let the emotional context effect unexplored. We hypothesized that theta and gamma oscillations show higher evoked/induced activity during the encoding of visual stimuli when delivered in an emotionally arousing context. Twenty-five healthy volunteers underwent evoked potentials recordings using a 21 scalp electrodes montage. They attended to an audiovisual test of emotional declarative memory being randomly assigned to either emotionally arousing or neutral context. Visual stimulus presentation was used as the time-locking event. Grand-averages of the evoked potentials and evoked spectral perturbations were calculated for each volunteer. Evoked potentials showed a higher negative deflection from 80 to 140 ms for the emotional condition. Such effect was observed over central, frontal and prefrontal locations bilaterally. Evoked theta power was higher in left parietal, central, frontal and prefrontal electrodes from -50 to 300 ms in the emotional condition. Evoked gamma power was higher in the emotional condition with a spatial distribution that overlapped at some points with the theta topography. The early theta power increase could be related to expectancy induced by auditory information processing that facilitates visual encoding in emotional contexts. Together, our results suggest that declarative memory enhancement for both emotional content and emotional context are supported by similar neural mechanisms at encoding, and offer new evidence about the brain processing of relevant environmental stimuli.

  17. Simplified methods for in vivo measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity in rodent brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simplified methods for in vivo studies of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rodent brain were evaluated using N-[11C]methylpiperidinyl propionate ([11C]PMP) as an enzyme substrate. Regional mouse brain distributions were determined at 1 min (representing initial brain uptake) and 30 min (representing trapped product) after intravenous [11C]PMP administration. Single time point tissue concentrations (percent injected dose/gram at 30 min), tissue concentration ratios (striatum/cerebellum and striatum/cortex ratios at 30 min), and regional tissue retention fractions (defined as percent injected dose 30 min/percent injected dose 1 min) were evaluated as measures of AChE enzymatic activity in mouse brain. Studies were carried out in control animals and after dosing with phenserine, a selective centrally active AChE inhibitor; neostigmine, a peripheral cholinesterase inhibitor; and a combination of the two drugs. In control and phenserine-treated animals, absolute tissue concentrations and regional retention fractions provide good measures of dose-dependent inhibition of brain AChE; tissue concentration ratios, however, provide erroneous conclusions. Peripheral inhibition of cholinesterases, which changes the blood pharmacokinetics of the radiotracer, diminishes the sensitivity of all measures to detect changes in central inhibition of the enzyme. We conclude that certain simple measures of AChE hydrolysis rates for [11C]PMP are suitable for studies where alterations of the peripheral blood metabolism of the tracer are kept to a minimum

  18. SHIFTING OF ACTIVATION CENTER IN THE BRAIN DURING MUSCLE FATIGUE: AN EXPLANATION OF MINIMAL CENTRAL FATIGUE?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing Z; Lewandowski, Beth; Karakasis, Chris; Yao, Bing; Siemionow, Vlodek; Sahgal, Vinod; Yue, Guang H

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the overall level of cortical activation controlling a voluntary motor task that leads to significant muscle fatigue does not decrease as much as the activation level of the motoneuron pool projecting to the muscle. One possible explanation for this “muscle fatigue>cortical fatigue” phenomenon is that the brain is an organ with built-in redundancies: it has multiple motor centers and parallel pathways, and the center of activation may shift from one locatio...

  19. Differential Brain Activation in Anorexia Nervosa to Fat and Thin Words During a Stroop Task

    OpenAIRE

    Redgrave, Graham W.; Bakker, Arnold; Nicholas T Bello; Caffo, Brian S.; Coughlin, Janelle W.; Guarda, Angela S.; McEntee, Julie E.; Pekar, James J.; Reinblatt, Shauna P; Verduzco, Guillermo; Moran, Timothy H.

    2008-01-01

    We measured brain activation in six anorexia nervosa patients and six healthy controls performing a novel emotional Stroop task using Fat, Thin, and Neutral words, and words made of XXXXs. Reaction times increased in the patient group in Thin and Fat conditions. In the Thin-XXXX contrast, patients showed greater activation than controls at the junction of left insula, frontal and temporal lobes and in left middle and medial frontal gyri. In the Fat-XXXX contrast, controls showed greater activ...

  20. Antioxidant activity of carnosine, homocarnosine, and anserine present in muscle and brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Kohen, R; Yamamoto, Y.; Cundy, K C; Ames, B N

    1988-01-01

    Carnosine, homocarnosine, and anserine are present in high concentrations in the muscle and brain of many animals and humans. However, their exact function is not clear. The antioxidant activity of these compounds has been examined by testing their peroxyl radical-trapping ability at physiological concentrations. Carnosine, homocarnosine, anserine, and other histidine derivatives all showed antioxidant activity. All of these compounds showing peroxyl radical-trapping activity were also electr...