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Sample records for bradyrhizobium japonicum nod

  1. Plant recognition of Bradyrhizobium japonicum nod factors. Final report, September 15, 1992--March 14, 1997

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    Stacey, G.

    1998-01-01

    This grant had three objectives: (1) isolate and identify the unique nod factor metabolites made by different wild-type B. japonicum strains; (2) investigate the biological activity of these unique nod factors, especially as it relates to host range; and (3) initiate studies to define the mechanism of plant recognition of the nod factors. This report summarizes the results of this research.

  2. Expressão dos genes nodC, nodW e nopP em Bradyrhizobium japonicum estirpe CPAC 15 avaliada por RT-qPCR Expression of nodC, nodW and nopP genes in Bradyrhizobium japonicum CPAC 15 strain evaluated by RT-qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Bortolan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a expressão, por RT-qPCR, dos genes de nodulação nodC e nodW e do gene nopP da estirpe CPAC 15, que provavelmente atuam na infecção das raízes da soja. Foram realizados dois experimentos. No primeiro, a expressão dos genes foi avaliada nas células após a incubação com genisteína por 15 min, 1, 4 e 8 horas. Os resultados revelaram que os três genes apresentaram maior expressão imediatamente após o contato com o indutor (15 min. No segundo experimento, a bactéria foi cultivada na presença de indutores (genisteína ou exsudatos de sementes de soja por 48 horas. A expressão dos três genes foi maior na presença de genisteína, com valores de expressão para nodC, nodW e nopP superiores ao controle. Os resultados obtidos confirmam a funcionalidade dos três genes na estirpe CPAC 15, com ênfase para o nopP, cuja funcionalidade em Bradyrhizobium japonicum foi descrita pela primeira vez.The objective of this work was to evaluate, by RT-qPCR, the expression of the nodC and nodW nodulation genes and of the nopP gene of the CPAC 15 strain, which probably play a role in the infection of soybean roots. Two experiments were done. In the first, the gene expression was evaluated in cells after incubation with genistein for 15 min, 1, 4 and 8 hours. Results showed that the three genes showed higher expression immediately after contact with the inducer (15 min. In the second experiment, the bacterium was grown in the presence of inducers (genistein or soybean seed exudates for 48 hours. The expression of the three genes was greater when induced by genistein, and the expression of nodC, nodW and nopP had higher values than the control. The results confirm the functionality of the three genes in the CPAC 15 strain, with an emphasis on the nopP, whose functionality in Bradyrhizobium japonicum was described for the first time.

  3. Co-inoculation effects of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-inoculation effects of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Azospirillum sp. on competitive nodulation and rhizosphere eubacterial community structures of soybean under rhizobia-established soil conditions.

  4. Identification of pH tolerant Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum were isolated from the root nodules of soybean cultivar PK 472 collected from Adaptive Trial Centre, Bundi, India. All the isolates were authenticated through plant assay test in germination pouches. Growth of the isolated strains on different pH levels was observed and three strains ...

  5. Bradyrhizobium elkanii nod regulon: insights through genomic analysis

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    Luciane M. P. Passaglia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A successful symbiotic relationship between soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] and Bradyrhizobium species requires expression of the bacterial structural nod genes that encode for the synthesis of lipochitooligosaccharide nodulation signal molecules, known as Nod factors (NFs. Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA 110 possesses a wide nodulation gene repertoire that allows NF assembly and modification, with transcription of the nodYABCSUIJnolMNOnodZ operon depending upon specific activators, i.e., products of regulatory nod genes that are responsive to signaling molecules such as flavonoid compounds exuded by host plant roots. Central to this regulatory circuit of nod gene expression are NodD proteins, members of the LysR-type regulator family. In this study, publicly available Bradyrhizobium elkanii sequenced genomes were compared with the closely related B. diazoefficiens USDA 110 reference genome to determine the similarities between those genomes, especially with regards to the nod operon and nod regulon. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a correlation between functional mechanisms and key elements that play an essential role in the regulation of nod gene expression. These analyses also revealed new genomic features that had not been clearly explored before, some of which were unique for some B. elkanii genomes.

  6. Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum induced by genistein on soybean stressed by water deficit

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    Napoles, M. C.; Guevara, E.; Montero, F.; Roosi, A.; Ferreira, A.

    2009-07-01

    Abstract The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a crop mainly grown under rain fed conditions although irrigation is increasingly being used. Water deficiency is the main factor limiting seed production. The symbiosis process is also negatively affected by water stress. The isoflavone genistein have been recognized as a powerful inducer of Nod factors production by Bradyrhizobium and its addition to inocula has been shown to increase nodule number and promote soybean nitrogen (N) fixation at low temperatures. This study looks for answers about the possible role of genistein in countering the stress on nodulation produced by water deficit in soybeans. Bradyrhizobium japonicum SEMIA 5079 was grown in culture media induced or not induced with genistein. Inocula were applied to plants growing at different moisture levels. The effect of the treatments on nodulation and N content was evaluated. An improved response to drought stress was observed when the bacteria were grown in presence of genistein as a Nod factors inducer. Nodulation values under moisture stress differed from 8.9 nodules plant{sup -}1 with genistein at 10 {mu}M to 1.8 nodules plant{sup -}1 when no inducer was used. Genistein reduced the negative effect on nodulation caused by water deficiency. (Author) 43 refs.

  7. Application of earthworm humus and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in Glycine max (L.) Merrill

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Gómez Machado; Marta Travieso Torres; Luis Antonio Tamayo López; Yoannia Gretel Pupo Blanco

    2017-01-01

    The experiment was developed in the Granma University's productive area, with the objective of evaluating the alone and combined earthworm humus application effect with Bradyrhizobium japonicum on G7R-315 variety soybean cultivation. Six treatments were evaluated: T1 Control, T2 B. japonicum, T3 earthworm humus (6 t ha-1), T4 B. japonicum + earthworm humus (6 t ha-1), T5 earthworm humus (8 t ha-1), T6 B. japonicum + earthworm humus (8 t ha-1) on a brown soil. A randomized block design was use...

  8. Growth and nitrogen dynamics of glycine max inoculated with bradyrhizobium japonicum and exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.; Hamid, N.; Jawaid, F.

    2010-01-01

    Seeds of Glycine max (soybean) were inoculated with N-fixing bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum and grown in growth chamber to investigate interactive effects of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and plants Nitrogen status on root and shoot length and biomass, nodule formation and Nitrogen concentration. Plants were grown with CO/sub 2/ at 3500 and 1000 ppm with or without Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation. Root and shoot length and dry mass of Glycine max increased significantly with CO/sub 2/ enrichment provided with Bradyrhizobium japonicum as compared to deficient Nitrogen fixing bacterium. While ambient and enriched CO/sub 2/ levels resulted in increased Nitrogen concentration of Glycine max shoot and root which is inoculated with N-fixing bacterium. Nodule formation was also enhanced in plants supplied with Bradyrhizobium japonicum as compared to plants which is Bradyrhizobium japonicum deficient at both CO/sub 2/ concentrations. (author)

  9. [AUXINS AND CYTOKININES SYNTHESIS BY BRADYRHIZOBIUM JAPONICUM UNDER FLAVONOIDS INFLUENCE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, N O

    2015-01-01

    Research the ability of different by effectiveness symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soybean bacteria Bradyrhizobium japonicum to the synthesis of phytohormones-stimulators auxins and cytokinins for the actions of plant flavonoids genistein and naringenin. Extracellular phytohormonal compound isolated from the supernatant culture liquid of the soybean rhizobia by redistribution of phytohormones in two phases solvent immiscible with each other. Auxins and cytokinins were determined by thin layer spectra densitometry chromatography. Shown the ability of symbiotic diastrophic soybean strains to synthesize auxins (4-1067 mg/g of absolutely dry biomass) and cytokinins (141-1554 mg/g of absolutely dry biomass). Cultivation soybean rhizobia in the presence of flavonoid compounds genistein and naringenin leads to the narrowing of the range and reducing the number of phytohormones: unchecked synthesis of indole-3-carboxylic acid, indole-3-carbinol, indole-3-acetic acid hydrazide and zeatin. Depressing effect of flavonoids on the phytohormones in soybean rhizobia synthesis is probably due to changes in metabolism microsymbiotic bacteria that are not aimed at the synthesis of secondary metabolites and to launch effective nodulating mechanisms, and also the concentration of flavonoid compounds in the nutrient medium.

  10. Bioakumulasi Logam Berat oleh Beberapa Galur Bradyrhizobium japonicum

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    ADE NOOR SYAMSUDIN

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal utilization in industry and agriculture have caused an environmental problem to existing life. Bioaccumulation is made up by a concentration of certain chemical compounds in living tissues. The objective of this research was to reveal the ability of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs of heavy metal Bradyrhizobium japonicum tolerant strains in accumulating heavy metals. The strains used were BDG 10, KDR 10, and KDR 15. The ability of each strains on heavy metal accumulation of Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cd were quantitatively determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The result showed that each strains has its own capacity to accumulate heavy metals. Accumulation of Cu (0.100, Pb (0.320, and Cd (0.048 ppm/mg dry weight by KDR 10 seem higher than BDG 10 and KDR 15. The highest accumulation of Zn and Ni was shown by KDR 15 in which the value were 0.360 and 0.165 ppm/mg dry weight, respectively and the least accumulation of all heavy metal studied was shown by BDG 10.

  11. Application of earthworm humus and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in Glycine max (L. Merrill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gómez Machado

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was developed in the Granma University's productive area, with the objective of evaluating the alone and combined earthworm humus application effect with Bradyrhizobium japonicum on G7R-315 variety soybean cultivation. Six treatments were evaluated: T1 Control, T2 B. japonicum, T3 earthworm humus (6 t ha-1, T4 B. japonicum + earthworm humus (6 t ha-1, T5 earthworm humus (8 t ha-1, T6 B. japonicum + earthworm humus (8 t ha-1 on a brown soil. A randomized block design was used with three replicas. The evaluated variables were: number per plant leguminous; weigh from 100 seeds and agricultural yield. The data obtained were processed by double classification variance analysis, applied a Turkey's multivariate statistical analysis. It was found that treatments that included the earthworm humus, the evaluated variables shown superior significantly results and it differed of the control treatment and to the aloneB. japonicum application.

  12. Oxygen-dependent catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebo, L A; Nielsen, S V; Jochimsen, B U

    1991-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Examination of this catabolism in strain 110 by in vivo experiments has revealed an enzymatic activity catalyzing the degradation of IAA and 5-hydroxy-indole-3-acetic acid. The activity requires...

  13. Soybean Lectin Enhances Biofilm Formation by Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the Absence of Plants

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    Julieta Pérez-Giménez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean lectin (SBL purified from soybean seeds by affinity chromatography strongly bound to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 cell surface. This lectin enhanced biofilm formation by B. japonicum in a concentration-dependent manner. Presence of galactose during biofilm formation had different effects in the presence or absence of SBL. Biofilms were completely inhibited in the presence of both SBL and galactose, while in the absence of SBL, galactose was less inhibitory. SBL was very stable, since its agglutinating activity of B. japonicum cells as well as of human group A+ erythrocytes was resistant to preincubation for one week at 60°C. Hence, we propose that plant remnants might constitute a source of this lectin, which might remain active in soil and thus favor B. japonicum biofilm formation in the interval between soybean crop seasons.

  14. Co-inoculation effects of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Edition

    2013-05-15

    . 2851. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Bacterial strains, media and growth conditions. Two B. japonicum strains of CB 1809 and USDA 110 those currently used in rhizobial inoculants production for soybean at the. Department ...

  15. Identification and use of actinomycetes for enhanced nodulation of soybean co-inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, A K; Klubek, B; Varsa, E C

    2003-08-01

    The utilization of actinomycetes as potential soybean (Glycine max (L.)) co-inoculants was evaluated. Soil samples from Carbondale and Belleville, Ill., were used to inoculate pre-germinated soybean plants to determine antibiotic sensitivity in the native Bradyrhizobium japonicum population. Sensitivity was in the order kanamycin > tetracycline > oxytetracycline > rifampicin > neomycin. Antagonism by five actinomycete cultures toward seven test strains of B. japonicum was also assessed. The ranking average inhibition (across all seven B. japonicum strains) by these actino mycetes was Streptomyces kanamyceticus = Streptomyces coeruleoprunus > Streptomyces rimosus > Streptomyces sp. > Amy colatopsis mediterranei. Ten antibiotic combinations were used to isolate antibiotic-resistant mutants of B. japonicum I-110 and 3I1B-110 via successive cycles of mutation. Eighty-one antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated and tested for symbiotic competency; nine of which were selected for further characterization in a greenhouse pot study. Few differences in nodule number were caused by these treatments. Nodule occupancy varied from 0% to 18.3% when antibiotic-resistant strains of B. japonicum were used as the sole inoculants. However, when three mutant strains of B. japonicum were co-inoculated with S. kanamyceticus, significant increases in nodule occupancy (up to 55%) occurred. Increases in shoot nitrogen composition (27.1%-40.9%) were also caused by co-inoculation with S. kanamyceticus.

  16. Catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid and 4- and 5-chloroindole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Egsgaard, H; Van Onckelen, H

    1995-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid. Indoleacetic acid (IAA), 4-chloro-IAA (4-Cl-IAA), and 5-Cl-IAA were metabolized to different extents by strains 61A24 and 110. Metabolites were isolated and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatogr...

  17. Survival and Competitiveness of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Strains 20 Years after Introduction into Field Locations in Poland.

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    Narożna, Dorota; Pudełko, Krzysztof; Króliczak, Joanna; Golińska, Barbara; Sugawara, Masayuki; Mądrzak, Cezary J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-08-15

    It was previously demonstrated that there are no indigenous strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum forming nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with soybean plants in arable field soils in Poland. However, bacteria currently classified within this species are present (together with Bradyrhizobium canariense) as indigenous populations of strains specific for nodulation of legumes in the Genisteae tribe. These rhizobia, infecting legumes such as lupins, are well established in Polish soils. The studies described here were based on soybean nodulation field experiments, established at the Poznań University of Life Sciences Experiment Station in Gorzyń, Poland, and initiated in the spring of 1994. Long-term research was then conducted in order to study the relation between B. japonicum USDA 110 and USDA 123, introduced together into the same location, where no soybean rhizobia were earlier detected, and nodulation and competitive success were followed over time. Here we report the extra-long-term saprophytic survival of B. japonicum strains nodulating soybeans that were introduced as inoculants 20 years earlier and where soybeans were not grown for the next 17 years. The strains remained viable and symbiotically competent, and molecular and immunochemical methods showed that the strains were undistinguishable from the original inoculum strains USDA 110 and USDA 123. We also show that the strains had balanced numbers and their mobility in soil was low. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the extra-long-term persistence of soybean-nodulating strains introduced into Polish soils and the first analyzing the long-term competitive relations of USDA 110 and USDA 123 after the two strains, neither of which was native, were introduced into the environment almost 2 decades ago. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA-membrane associations.

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    Zhang, Weimin; Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F

    2006-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, proline induces tight membrane binding of the PutA flavoenzyme and transforms PutA from a transcriptional repressor to a membrane-associated proline catabolic enzyme. In other gram-negative bacteria such as Bradyrhizobium japonicum, PutA lacks DNA binding activity and functions only as a proline catabolic enzyme. Here, we characterize the membrane binding properties of PutA from B. japonicum (BjPutA) to address whether proline regulates BjPutA-lipid binding similar to Escherichia coli PutA (EcPutA). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) kinetic measurements of BjPutA-lipid binding show BjPutA forms a complex with lipids in the absence and presence of proline with similar dissociation constant (K(D)) values of 2.5 and 1.7nM, respectively. SPR experiments using differently charged lipid bilayers indicate BjPutA selectively binds negatively charged lipids, which contrasts with the charge independent membrane binding of EcPutA. Analysis of BjPutA-lipid binding by isothermal titration calorimetry at 25 degrees C revealed an endothermic binding reaction that is entropically driven. This work shows that BjPutA-membrane associations vary significantly from EcPutA.

  19. (Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  20. [Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Soybean Symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum Strain USDA6T

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    Nobukazu Uchiike

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA6T was determined. The genome of USDA6T is a single circular chromosome of 9,207,384 bp. The genome size is similar to that of the genome of another soybean symbiont, B. japonicum USDA110 (9,105,828 bp. Comparison of the whole-genome sequences of USDA6T and USDA110 showed colinearity of major regions in the two genomes, although a large inversion exists between them. A significantly high level of sequence conservation was detected in three regions on each genome. The gene constitution and nucleotide sequence features in these three regions indicate that they may have been derived from a symbiosis island. An ancestral, large symbiosis island, approximately 860 kb in total size, appears to have been split into these three regions by unknown large-scale genome rearrangements. The two integration events responsible for this appear to have taken place independently, but through comparable mechanisms, in both genomes.

  2. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB Gene Encodes a Diheme Ferric Reductase ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria. PMID:21705608

  3. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB gene encodes a diheme ferric reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K; O'Brian, Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria.

  4. Mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from soils by Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Manabu; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Shimomura, Yumi; Morimoto, Sho; Tago, Kanako; Wang, Yong; Hayakawa, Chihiro; Uetake, Yusuke; Sánchez, Cristina; Eda, Shima; Hayatsu, Masahito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2013-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas that is also capable of destroying the ozone layer. Agricultural soil is the largest source of N2O (ref. ). Soybean is a globally important leguminous crop, and hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) that can also produce N2O (ref. ). In agricultural soil, N2O is emitted from fertilizer and soil nitrogen. In soybean ecosystems, N2O is also emitted from the degradation of the root nodules. Organic nitrogen inside the nodules is mineralized to NH4+, followed by nitrification and denitrification that produce N2O. N2O is then emitted into the atmosphere or is further reduced to N2 by N2O reductase (N2OR), which is encoded by the nosZ gene. Pure culture and vermiculite pot experiments showed lower N2O emission by nosZ+ strains and nosZ++ strains (mutants with increased N2OR activity) of Bradyrhizobium japonicum than by nosZ- strains. A pot experiment using soil confirmed these results. Although enhancing N2OR activity has been suggested as a N2O mitigation option, this has never been tested in the field. Here, we show that post-harvest N2O emission from soybean ecosystems due to degradation of nodules can be mitigated by inoculation of nosZ+ and non-genetically modified organism nosZ++ strains of B. japonicum at a field scale.

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional and physiological responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to paraquat-mediated oxidative stress.

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    Donati, Andrew J; Jeon, Jeong-Min; Sangurdekar, Dipen; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2011-06-01

    The rhizobial bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum functions as a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the soybean plant (Glycine max). Plants are capable of producing an oxidative burst, a rapid proliferation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as a defense mechanism against pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. Therefore, B. japonicum must be able to resist such a defense mechanism to initiate nodulation. In this study, paraquat, a known superoxide radical-inducing agent, was used to investigate this response. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles were created for both prolonged exposure (PE) and fulminant shock (FS) conditions. These profiles revealed that 190 and 86 genes were up- and downregulated for the former condition, and that 299 and 105 genes were up- and downregulated for the latter condition, respectively (>2.0-fold; P < 0.05). Many genes within putative operons for F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, chemotaxis, transport, and ribosomal proteins were upregulated during PE. The transcriptional profile for the FS condition strangely resembled that of a bacteroid condition, including the FixK(2) transcription factor and most of its response elements. However, genes encoding canonical ROS scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were not detected, suggesting constitutive expression of those genes by endogenous ROS. Various physiological tests, including exopolysaccharide (EPS), cellular protein, and motility characterization, were performed to corroborate the gene expression data. The results suggest that B. japonicum responds to tolerable oxidative stress during PE through enhanced motility, increased translational activity, and EPS production, in addition to the expression of genes involved in global stress responses, such as chaperones and sigma factors.

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  7. Produtividade da soja em resposta à aplicação de Molibdênio e inoculação com Bradyrhizobium japonicum Soybean yield in response to Molybdenum and Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloir Paulo Gris

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A soja em simbiose com Bradyrhizobium japonicum é capaz de ter a sua exigência de N satisfeita com a fixação biológica de N2 (FBN. Entretanto, a FBN é afetada pela deficiência Mo, visto que este nutriente faz parte da enzima nitrogenase responsável pelo processo. Foi realizado um experimento, em condição de campo, em Latossolo Vermelho eutroférrico, no município de Palotina, PR, com o objetivo de avaliar o tratamento de sementes com Mo, inoculação de B. japonicum e adubação foliar de Mo na produtividade da soja. Os tratamentos foram quatro doses de Mo (0, 40, 80 e 160 g ha-1 aplicadas em adubação foliar e tratamento com aplicação nas sementes de 40 g ha-1 de Mo, combinados com e sem inoculação com B. japonicum. Não foram observados efeitos estatísticos significativos do tratamento de sementes com Mo, inoculação de B. japonicum e adubação foliar de Mo na produtividade da soja. Não foram obtidas diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos, obtendo-se tendência apra ganho de produtividade apenas com aplicação foliar de 80 g ha-1 de Mo e tratamento de sementes com 40 g ha-1.Soybean in symbiosis with Bradyrhizobium japonicum is able to satisfy its nitrogen (N2 demand with biological nitrogen fixation (BNF. However, BNF can be affected by molybdenium deficiency because this micronutrient is part of the nitrogenase enzyme responsible for the process. An experiment was conducted under field conditions on a Red Latosol (Oxisol in Palotina, state of Paraná, Brazil. The effects of seed treatments with Mo, B. japonicum inoculation as well as foliar Mo fertilization on soybean yield were evaluated. Four Mo rates (0, 40, 80 and 160 g ha-1 were applied as foliar fertilizer in two Mo application forms (without Mo, seed treatment with Mo 40 g ha-1 combined with and without B. japonicum inoculation. There were no significant effects of the seed treatments with Mo, inoculation with B. japonicum and foliar Mo fertilization on

  8. Functional characterization of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum modA and modB genes involved in molybdenum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María J; Tresierra-Ayala, Alvaro; Talbi, Chouhra; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2006-01-01

    A modABC gene cluster that encodes an ABC-type, high-affinity molybdate transporter from Bradyrhizobium japonicum has been isolated and characterized. B. japonicum modA and modB mutant strains were unable to grow aerobically or anaerobically with nitrate as nitrogen source or as respiratory substrate, respectively, and lacked nitrate reductase activity. The nitrogen-fixing ability of the mod mutants in symbiotic association with soybean plants grown in a Mo-deficient mineral solution was severely impaired. Addition of molybdate to the bacterial growth medium or to the plant mineral solution fully restored the wild-type phenotype. Because the amount of molybdate required for suppression of the mutant phenotype either under free-living or under symbiotic conditions was dependent on sulphate concentration, it is likely that a sulphate transporter is also involved in Mo uptake in B. japonicum. The promoter region of the modABC genes has been characterized by primer extension. Reverse transcription and expression of a transcriptional fusion, P(modA)-lacZ, was detected only in a B. japonicum modA mutant grown in a medium without molybdate supplementation. These findings indicate that transcription of the B. japonicum modABC genes is repressed by molybdate.

  9. Crystal structure of the bifunctional proline utilization A flavoenzyme from Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; White, Tommi A.; Krishnan, Navasona; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Hura, Greg L.; Tan, Anmin; Henzl, Michael T.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J. (UNL); (LBNL); (UMC)

    2010-04-26

    The bifunctional proline catabolic flavoenzyme, proline utilization A (PutA), catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate via the sequential activities of FAD-dependent proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and NAD{sup +}-dependent {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains. Although structures for some of the domains of PutA are known, a structure for the full-length protein has not previously been solved. Here we report the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, along with data from small-angle x-ray scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and steady-state and rapid-reaction kinetics. PutA forms a ring-shaped tetramer in solution having a diameter of 150 {angstrom}. Within each protomer, the PRODH and P5CDH active sites face each other at a distance of 41 {angstrom} and are connected by a large, irregularly shaped cavity. Kinetics measurements show that glutamate production occurs without a lag phase, suggesting that the intermediate, {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, is preferably transferred to the P5CDH domain rather than released into the bulk medium. The structural and kinetic data imply that the cavity serves both as a microscopic vessel for the hydrolysis of {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate semialdehyde and a protected conduit for the transport of glutamate semialdehyde to the P5CDH active site.

  10. A new nitrilase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110. Gene cloning, biochemical characterization and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dunming; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Yang, Yan; Rios, Beatriz E; Gallagher, D Travis; Smith, N Natasha; Biehl, Edward R; Hua, Ling

    2008-02-01

    A nitrilase gene blr3397 from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein was purified to give a nitrilase with a single band of about 34.5kD on SDS-PAGE. The molecular weight of the holoenzyme was about 340kD as determined by light scattering analysis, suggesting that nitrilase blr3397 self-aggregated to an active form with the native structure being a decamer. The V(max) and K(m) for phenylacetonitrile were 3.15U/mg and 4.36mM, respectively. The catalytic constant k(cat) and specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) were 111min(-1) and 2.6x10(4)min(-1)M(-1). This nitrilase is most active toward the hydrolysis of hydrocinnamonitrile among the tested substrates (4.3 times that of phenylacetonitrile). The nitrilase blr3397 shows higher activity towards the hydrolysis of aliphatic nitriles than that for the aromatic counterparts, and can be characterized as an aliphatic nitrilase in terms of activity. This nitrilase also possesses distinct features from the nitrilase bll6402 of the same microbe.

  11. Mutualistic co-evolution of type III effector genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Kimbrel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved.

  12. Three crystal forms of the bifunctional enzyme proline utilization A (PutA) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuermann, Jonathan P.; White, Tommi A.; Srivastava, Dhiraj; Karr, Dale B.; Tanner, John J.

    2008-01-01

    The first diffraction-quality crystals of a PutA protein are reported. One of the three crystal forms described here exhibits pseudo-merohedral twinning. Removal of the N-terminal histidine tag aided the crystallization of another form. Proline utilization A proteins (PutAs) are large (1000–1300 residues) membrane-associated bifunctional flavoenzymes that catalyze the two-step oxidation of proline to glutamate by the sequential action of proline dehydrogenase and Δ 1 -pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase domains. Here, the first successful crystallization efforts for a PutA protein are described. Three crystal forms of PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum are reported: apparent tetragonal, hexagonal and centered monoclinic. The apparent tetragonal and hexagonal crystals were grown in the presence of PEG 3350 and sodium formate near pH 7. The apparent tetragonal form diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and exhibited pseudo-merohedral twinning such that the true space group is P2 1 2 1 2 1 with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The hexagonal form diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6 2 22 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Centered monoclinic crystals were grown in ammonium sulfate, diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and had two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Removing the histidine tag was important in order to obtain the C2 crystal form

  13. Three crystal forms of the bifunctional enzyme proline utilization A (PutA) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuermann, Jonathan P; White, Tommi A; Srivastava, Dhiraj; Karr, Dale B; Tanner, John J

    2008-10-01

    Proline utilization A proteins (PutAs) are large (1000-1300 residues) membrane-associated bifunctional flavoenzymes that catalyze the two-step oxidation of proline to glutamate by the sequential action of proline dehydrogenase and Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase domains. Here, the first successful crystallization efforts for a PutA protein are described. Three crystal forms of PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum are reported: apparent tetragonal, hexagonal and centered monoclinic. The apparent tetragonal and hexagonal crystals were grown in the presence of PEG 3350 and sodium formate near pH 7. The apparent tetragonal form diffracted to 2.7 A resolution and exhibited pseudo-merohedral twinning such that the true space group is P2(1)2(1)2(1) with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The hexagonal form diffracted to 2.3 A resolution and belonged to space group P6(2)22 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Centered monoclinic crystals were grown in ammonium sulfate, diffracted to 2.3 A resolution and had two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Removing the histidine tag was important in order to obtain the C2 crystal form.

  14. Inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum enhances the organic and fatty acids content of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís R; Pereira, Maria J; Azevedo, Jessica; Mulas, Rebeca; Velazquez, Encarna; González-Andrés, Fernando; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2013-12-15

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is one of the most important food crops for human and animal consumption, providing oil and protein at relatively low cost. The least expensive source of nitrogen for soybean is the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by the symbiotic association with soil bacteria, belonging mainly to the genus Bradyrhizobium. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the inoculation of G. max with Bradyrhizobium japonicum on the metabolite profile and antioxidant potential of its seeds. Phenolic compounds, sterols, triterpenes, organic acids, fatty acids and volatiles profiles were characterised by different chromatographic techniques. The antioxidant activity was evaluated against DPPH, superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Inoculation with B. japonicum induced changes in the profiles of primary and secondary metabolites of G. max seeds, without affecting their antioxidant capacity. The increase of organic and fatty acids and volatiles suggest a positive effect of the inoculation process. These findings indicate that the inoculation with nodulating B. japonicum is a beneficial agricultural practice, increasing the content of bioactive metabolites in G. max seeds owing to the establishment of symbiosis between plant and microorganism, with direct effects on seed quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An L-glucitol oxidizing dehydrogenase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 for production of D-sorbose with enzymatic or electrochemical cofactor regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauer, Sabrina; Wang, Zhijie; Otten, Harm

    2014-01-01

    A gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110, annotated as a ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH), had 87 % sequence identity (97 % positives) to the N-terminal 31 amino acids of an L-glucitol dehydrogenase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DSMZ 14322. The 729-bp long RDH gene coded for a protein consistin...

  16. Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Trichoderma spp. in the control of root rot disease of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ehteshamul-Haque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Seed treatment of soybean with Bndyrhizobium japonicum, Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride, T. hamatum, T. koningii and T. pseudokoningii significantly controlled the infection of 30-day-old seedlingsby Maerophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium spp. In 60-day-old plants Trichoderma spp.. and B. japonicum inhibited the grouth of R. solani and Fusarium spp., whereas the use of B. japonicum (TAL-102 with T. harzianum. T. viride, T. koningii and T. pseudokoningii controlled the infection by M. phaseolina. Greater grain yield was recorded when B. japonium (TAI-102 was used with T. hamatum.

  17. Genome-Wide Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to Paraquat-Mediated Oxidative Stress▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Andrew J.; Jeon, Jeong-Min; Sangurdekar, Dipen; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2011-01-01

    The rhizobial bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum functions as a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the soybean plant (Glycine max). Plants are capable of producing an oxidative burst, a rapid proliferation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as a defense mechanism against pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. Therefore, B. japonicum must be able to resist such a defense mechanism to initiate nodulation. In this study, paraquat, a known superoxide radical-inducing agent, was used to investigate this response. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles were created for both prolonged exposure (PE) and fulminant shock (FS) conditions. These profiles revealed that 190 and 86 genes were up- and downregulated for the former condition, and that 299 and 105 genes were up- and downregulated for the latter condition, respectively (>2.0-fold; P < 0.05). Many genes within putative operons for F0F1-ATP synthase, chemotaxis, transport, and ribosomal proteins were upregulated during PE. The transcriptional profile for the FS condition strangely resembled that of a bacteroid condition, including the FixK2 transcription factor and most of its response elements. However, genes encoding canonical ROS scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were not detected, suggesting constitutive expression of those genes by endogenous ROS. Various physiological tests, including exopolysaccharide (EPS), cellular protein, and motility characterization, were performed to corroborate the gene expression data. The results suggest that B. japonicum responds to tolerable oxidative stress during PE through enhanced motility, increased translational activity, and EPS production, in addition to the expression of genes involved in global stress responses, such as chaperones and sigma factors. PMID:21498770

  18. Genetic divergence of bradyrhizobium strains nodulating soybeans as revealed by multilocus sequence analysis of genes inside and outside the symbiosis island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing Xing; Guo, Hui Juan; Wang, Rui; Sui, Xin Hua; Zhang, Yan Ming; Wang, En Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-05-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium has been considered to be a taxonomically difficult group. In this study, phylogenetics and evolutionary genetics analyses were used to investigate divergence levels among Bradyrhizobium strains nodulating soybeans in China. Eleven genospecies were identified by sequence analysis of three phylogenetic and taxonomic markers (SMc00019, thrA, and truA). This was also supported by analyses of eight genes outside the symbiosis island ("off-island" genes; SMc00019, thrA, truA, fabB, glyA, phyR, exoN, and hsfA). However, seven genes inside the symbiosis island ("island" genes; nifA, nifH, nodC, nodV, fixA, trpD, and rhcC2) showed contrasting lower levels of nucleotide diversity and recombination rates than did off-island genes. Island genes had significantly incongruent gene phylogenies compared to the species tree. Four phylogenetic clusters were observed in island genes, and the epidemic cluster IV (harbored by Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens, Bradyrhizobium huanghuaihaiense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, Bradyrhizobium daqingense, Bradyrhizobium sp. I, Bradyrhizobium sp. III, and Bradyrhizobium sp. IV) was not found in Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium sp. II, or Bradyrhizobium elkanii. The gene flow level of island genes among genospecies is discussed in the context of the divergence level of off-island genes.

  19. Evaluation of symbiotic performance of some mutant lines of soybean inoculated with two bradyrhizobium japonicum strains using 15N technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Mir-Ali, N.; Al-Nabulsi, I.

    2002-11-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the symbiotic performance of two soybean varieties and some of their mutants (that were obtained as a result of a previous mutation breeding program) with two bradyrhizobium japonicum strains (RG and FA3) using 15 N isotopic dilution method. Random amplified polymorphic DNA technique (RAPD) was used to study the genetic relationships among the soybean genotypes and to make sure that the two rhizobial strains are different. The 25 random primers used discriminated the different soybean genotypes and the dendrogram resultants from shared polymorphic fragments put each variety and its mutants in two separate clusters asserting that the mutants and their mother lines are different. Both strains of B. japonicum were able to form effective nodules on all soybean plants. However, number of nodules, dry matter yield and N-uptake from the available sources by soybeans were affected by both plant genotype and rhizobial strains. N 2 -fixation was affected to a large extent by different strain and plant genotype combinations. Percentage of fixed N 2 (N dfa) ranged between 35 and 49%; whereas, the actual amounts of fixed N 2 were between 105 and 210 mg N/pot. Amounts of N 2 -fixed by FA3 strain were higher than of RG in both soybean varieties, whereas, the latter strain showed higher performance in the mutant lines. The results showed that total plant N estimation may not be a sufficient indicator for high N 2 -fixation. the results also showed that it is very important to determine both the amount of nitrogen derived from N 2 -fixation and N derived from soil for evaluating the symbiotic performance ability. Moreover, the performance of symbiotic N 2 -fixation in soybean was shown to depend on both plant genotype and rhizobial strain and the amount of N 2 -fixation can be increased by combining the best plant genotypes and the most adapted strain. (author)

  20. Phylogeny of nodulation and nitrogen-fixation genes in Bradyrhizobium: supporting evidence for the theory of monophyletic origin, and spread and maintenance by both horizontal and vertical transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Pâmela; Hungria, Mariangela

    2011-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium are capable of establishing symbiotic relationships with a broad range of plants belonging to the three subfamilies of the family Leguminosae (=Fabaceae), with the formation of specialized structures on the roots called nodules, where fixation of atmospheric nitrogen takes place. Symbiosis is under the control of finely tuned expression of common and host-specific nodulation genes and also of genes related to the assembly and activity of the nitrogenase, which, in Bradyrhizobium strains investigated so far, are clustered in a symbiotic island. Information about the diversity of these genes is essential to improve our current poor understanding of their origin, spread and maintenance and, in this study, we provide information on 40 Bradyrhizobium strains, mostly of tropical origin. For the nodulation trait, common (nodA), Bradyrhizobium-specific (nodY/K) and host-specific (nodZ) nodulation genes were studied, whereas for fixation ability, the diversity of nifH was investigated. In general, clustering of strains in all nod and nifH trees was similar and the Bradyrhizobium group could be clearly separated from other rhizobial genera. However, the congruence of nod and nif genes with ribosomal and housekeeping genes was low. nodA and nodY/K were not detected in three strains by amplification or hybridization with probes using Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii type strains, indicating the high diversity of these genes or that strains other than photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium must have alternative mechanisms to initiate the process of nodulation. For a large group of strains, the high diversity of nod genes (with an emphasis on nodZ), the low relationship between nod genes and the host legume, and some evidence of horizontal gene transfer might indicate strategies to increase host range. On the other hand, in a group of five symbionts of Acacia mearnsii, the high congruence between nod and ribosomal

  1. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-09-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Comparative analyses of codon and amino acid usage in symbiotic island and core genome in nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Pan, Archana; Paul, Sandip; Dutta, Chitra

    2005-10-01

    Genes involved in the symbiotic interactions between the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, and its leguminous host are mostly clustered in a symbiotic island (SI), acquired by the bacterium through a process of horizontal transfer. A comparative analysis of the codon and amino acid usage in core and SI genes/proteins of B. japonicum has been carried out in the present study. The mutational bias, translational selection, and gene length are found to be the major sources of variation in synonymous codon usage in the core genome as well as in SI, the strength of translational selection being higher in core genes than in SI. In core proteins, hydrophobicity is the main source of variation in amino acid usage, expressivity and aromaticity being the second and third important sources. But in SI proteins, aromaticity is the chief source of variation, followed by expressivity and hydrophobicity. In SI proteins, both the mean molecular weight and mean aromaticity of individual proteins exhibit significant positive correlation with gene expressivity, which violate the cost-minimization hypothesis. Investigation of nucleotide substitution patterns in B. japonicum and Mesorhizobium loti orthologous genes reveals that both synonymous and non-synonymous sites of highly expressed genes are more conserved than their lowly expressed counterparts and this conservation is more pronounced in the genes present in core genome than in SI.

  3. Effects of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum waaL (rfaL) Gene on Hydrophobicity, Motility, Stress Tolerance, and Symbiotic Relationship with Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jun-Gu; Jeon, Han-Eul; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2015-07-23

    We cloned and sequenced the waaL (rfaL) gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which infects soybean and forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean roots. waaL has been extensively studied in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis of enteric bacteria, but little is known about its function in (brady)rhizobial LPS architecture. To characterize its role as O-antigen ligase in the LPS biosynthesis pathway, we constructed a waaL knock-out mutant and its complemented strain named JS015 and CS015, respectively. LPS analysis showed that an LPS structure of JS015 is deficient in O-antigen as compared to that of the wild type and complemented strain CS015, suggesting that WaaL ligates the O-antigen to lipid A-core oligosaccharide to form a complete LPS. JS015 also revealed increased cell surface hydrophobicity, but it showed decreased motility in soft agar plates. In addition to the alteration in cell surface properties, disruption of the waaL gene caused increased sensitivity of JS015 to hydrogen peroxide, osmotic pressure, and novobiocin. Specifically, plant tests revealed that JS015 failed to nodulate the host plant soybean, indicating that the rhizobial waaL gene is responsible for the establishment of a symbiotic relationship between soybean and B. japonicum.

  4. Isoliquiritigenin, a strong nod gene- and glyceollin resistance-inducing flavonoid from soybean root exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kape, R; Parniske, M; Brandt, S; Werner, D

    1992-01-01

    Isoflavonoid signal molecules from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seed and root exudate induce the transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. In this study, a new compound with symbiotic activity was isolated from soybean root exudate. The isolated 2',4',4-trihydroxychalcone (isoliquiritigenin) is characterized by its strong inducing activity for the nod genes of B. japonicum. These genes are already induced at concentrations 1 order of magnitude below those required of the previously described isoflavonoid inducers genistein and daidzein. Isoliquiritigenin is also a potent inducer of glyceollin resistance in B. japonicum, which renders this bacterium insensitive to potentially bactericidal concentrations of glyceollin, the phytoalexin of G. max. No chemotactic effect of isoliquiritigenin was observed. The highly efficient induction of nod genes and glyceollin resistance by isoliquiritigenin suggests the ecological significance of this compound, although it is not a major flavonoid constituent of the soybean root exudate in quantitative terms. PMID:1622242

  5. Synthetic Lethality of the bfr and mbfA Genes Reveals a Functional Relationship between Iron Storage and Iron Export in Managing Stress Responses in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Sankari

    Full Text Available An mbfA mutant of Bradyrhizobium japonicum defective in iron export is sensitive to short term exposure to high levels iron or H2O2. Here, we found that the mbfA strain grown in elevated iron media (100 μM became resistant to those treatments, suggesting a stress response adaptation. The bfr gene encodes the iron storage protein bacterioferritin, and its expression is derepressed by iron. An mbfA bfr double mutant showed a loss of stress adaptation, and had a severe growth phenotype in high iron media. Moreover, a bfrup allele in which bfr is constitutively derepressed conferred stress tolerance on an mbfA mutant without elevating the iron content in the growth media. The intracellular iron content of the mbfA bfr double mutant was substantially higher than that found in the wild type, even when grown in relatively low iron media (5 μM. Under that condition, iron-responsive gene expression was aberrant in the mbfA bfr strain. Moreover, the double mutant was sensitive to the iron-activated antibiotic streptonigrin. We conclude that MbfA and Bfr work in concert to manage iron and oxidative stresses. In addition, the need for iron detoxification is not limited to extreme environments, but is also required for normal cellular function.

  6. Application of AM Fungi with Bradyrhizobium japonicum in improving growth, nutrient uptake and yield of Vigna radiata L. under saline soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Kadian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted under polyhouse conditions, to evaluate the effect of two different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (G. mosseae and A. laevis in combination with Bradyrhizobium japonicum on growth and nutrition of mungbean plant grown under different salt stress levels (4 dS m−1, 8dS m−1 and 12 dS m−1. It was found that under saline conditions, mycorrhizal fungi protect the host plant against the detrimental effect of salinity. The AM inoculated plants showed positive effects on plant growth, dry biomass production, chlorophyll content, mineral uptake, electrolyte leakage, proline, protein content and yield of mungbean plants in comparison to non-mycorrhizal ones but the extent of response varied with the increasing level of salinity. In general, the reduction in Na uptake along with associated increase in P, N, K, electrolyte leakage and high proline content were also found to be better in inoculated ones. The overall results demonstrate that the co-inoculation of microbes with AM fungi promotes salinity tolerance by enhancing nutrient acquisition especially phosphorus (P, producing plant growth hormones, improving rhizospheric and condition of soil by altering the physiological and biochemical properties of the mungbean plant.

  7. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  8. Análisis de la interacción soya-cepa (Bradyrhizobium japonicum x ambiente, en oxisoles de la Orinoquia colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia Rubén

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    La Orinoquia colombiana y en particular las sabanas de la altillanura, representa una vasta región con ventajas comparativas y competitivas para la producción de soya. La especie se asocia con bacterias del género Bradyrhizobium para suplir, parcial o totalmente, los requerimientos de nitrógeno. Esta asociación es variable y de alta especificidad huésped-rizobio. La investigación tuvo como propósito determinar la interacción existente entre variedades de soya, cepas del género Bradyrhizobium japonicum y ambiente, en oxisoles de la Orinoquia colombiana, para potenciar el efecto de la fijación biológica del nitrógeno (FBN, en la productividad del cultivo. Se evaluaron las variedades Soyica P-34, Orinoquia 3, C. Libertad 4, C. Taluma 5, C. Superior 6 y C. Sabana 7, con las cepas de B. japonicum ICA J-01, J-96, J-98, mezcla de J-01+J-96 y un control con fertilización con nitrógeno de 150 Kg h-1, en ocho de la Orinoquia. La interacción variedad-cepa-ambiente para la variable rendimiento de grano fue determinada mediante los modelos AMMI (Additive main effects and multiplicative interaction y SREG (Sites regression. El rendimiento de grano varió a través de los ambientes, y estuvo influenciado por el tipo de cepa y variedad de soya. Los biplot generados por los modelos AMMI y SREG permitieron identificar la localidad C.I. Libertad 2008A como el ambiente más discriminante y representativo. El ordenamiento de las variedades x cepa y la identificación de mega-ambientes fueron más consistentes con el modelo SREG (r=0.97, ≤ 0,01. En general, las variedades presentaron una respuesta positiva a las cepas J96, mezcla de J-01+J-96 y J98, y una respuesta negativa con J-01 y aplicación de N. Las variedades más estables productivas fueron C. Superior 6 y Orinoquia 3 con la cepa J96. En la interacción, se observó una consistente asociación (r=0

  9. Sobrevivência de Bradyrhizobium japonicum em sementes de soja tratadas com fungicidas e os efeitos sobre a nodulação e a produtividade da cultura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Rejane Costa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fim de garantir patamares mais elevados de fixação biológica de nitrogênio (FBN e a sanidade das sementes de soja, o objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a influência da aplicação de diferentes fungicidas na sobrevivência de bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio em sementes de soja e seus efeitos na nodulação das plantas e no rendimento de grãos da cultura. As avaliações de sobrevivência foram realizadas por meio do número mais provável-NMP (processo direto e indireto. Foram conduzidos ensaios sob condições de casa de vegetação, em vasos com terra não esterilizada e estudo a campo, num Latossolo Vermelho Distrófico. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que as estirpes de rizóbio podem ser afetadas por determinados fungicidas aplicados às sementes de soja. No estudo conduzido sob condições controladas de casa de vegetação com terra de mata nativa, verificou-se um efeito negativo da aplicação dos fungicidas, promovendo redução no número e na matéria seca dos nódulos. Na avaliação a campo, em solos com população estabelecida de Bradyrhizobium japonicum/ B. elkanii, a nodulação e o rendimento de grãos da soja não foram afetados pelos diferentes fungicidas avaliados.

  10. Characterization of a bifunctional PutA homologue from Bradyrhizobium japonicum and identification of an active site residue that modulates proline reduction of the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F

    2005-06-28

    PutA is a bifunctional flavoenzyme in bacteria that catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of proline to glutamate. In certain prokaryotes such as Escherichia coli, PutA is also a transcriptional repressor of the proline utilization (put) genes and thus is trifunctional. In this work, we have begun to assess differences between bifunctional and trifunctional PutA enzymes by examining the PutA protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum (BjPutA). Primary structure analysis of BjPutA shows it lacks the DNA-binding domain of E. coli PutA (EcPutA). Consistent with this prediction, purified BjPutA does not exhibit DNA-binding activity in native gel mobility shift assays with promoter regions of the putA gene from B. japonicum. The catalytic and redox properties of BjPutA were characterized and a reduction potential (E(m)) value of -0.132 V (pH 7.5) was determined for the bound FAD/FADH(2) couple in BjPutA that is significantly more negative ( approximately 55 mV) than the E(m) for EcPutA-bound FAD. The more negative E(m) value thermodynamically limits proline reduction of the FAD cofactor in BjPutA. In the presence of phospholipids, reduction of BjPutA is stimulated, suggesting lipids influence the FAD redox environment. Accordingly, an E(m) value of -0.114 V (pH 7.5) was determined for BjPutA-bound FAD in the presence of polar lipids. The molecular basis for the lower reduction potential of FAD in BjPutA relative to EcPutA was explored by site-directed mutagenesis. Amino acid sequence alignment between BjPutA and EcPutA indicates only one difference in active site residues near the isoalloxazine ring of FAD: Val402 in EcPutA is substituted at the analogous position in BjPutA with Ala310. Replacement of A310 by Val in the BjPutA mutant A310V raised the reduction potential of bound FAD relative to wild-type BjPutA to an E(m) value of -0.09 V (pH 7.5). The >40-mV positive shift in the potential of the BjPutA mutant A310V suggests that the corresponding Val residue in Ec

  11. Differences in ureide and amino acid content of water stressed soybean inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and B. elkanii Alterações na concentração de ureídos e aminoácidos em soja sob estresse hídrico com inoculação de Bradyrhizobium japonicum e B. elkanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucrecia Gerosa Ramos

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the response to water stress of a drought sensitive soybean cultivar inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum (strain CB1809, Semia 586 and B. elkanii (strain 29W, Semia 5019. CB1809 nodulated plants produced a significantly higher root fraction (19% than 29W (14.6%. Plants inoculated with CB1809 produced less nodules and accumulated more nitrogen than those inoculated with 29W. In general, low amounts of ureides in nodules were found in watered plants inoculated with either CB1809 or 29W strains, but those levels were five-fold increased in stressed plants inoculated with CB1809. Nodules formed by strain CB1809 had aspartate and glutamate as major amino acids, while those formed by 29W had glutamate, asparagine and alanine. In nodules of plants inoculated with CB1809 aspartate showed the highest accumulation (5 µmol g-1; in stressed plants this amino acid reached a value of 26 µmol g-1, and asparagine was not detected. Nodules formed by the strain 29W accumulated 1 µmol g-1 of aspartate, whether plants were stressed or not. Asparagine was the major amino acid found in nodules from watered plants (6 µmol g-1 and the amount of this amino acid was six-fold increased when plants were water stressed.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a resposta da soja, com inoculação de Bradyrhizobium japonicum (estirpe CB1809, Semia 586 ou B. elkanii (estirpe 29W, Semia 5019, ao estresse hídrico. Plantas com inoculação da estirpe CB1809 produziram maior fração de raízes (19% do que aquelas com inoculação de 29W (14,6%. As plantas com inoculação de CB1809 produziram menos nódulos e acumularam mais nitrogênio do que aquelas com inoculação de 29W. Em geral, baixos teores de ureídos nos nódulos foram encontrados em plantas irrigadas, com inoculação de CB1809 ou 29W, mas esses valores aumentaram cinco vezes em plantas com CB1809, sob estresse hídrico. Os nódulos formados pela estirpe CB1809 produziram

  12. Phylogenies of symbiotic genes of Bradyrhizobium symbionts of legumes of economic and environmental importance in Brazil support the definition of the new symbiovars pachyrhizi and sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Menna, Pâmela; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Hungria, Mariangela

    2017-07-01

    Bradyrhizobium comprises most tropical symbiotic nitrogen-fixing strains, but the correlation between symbiotic and core genes with host specificity is still unclear. In this study, the phylogenies of the nodY/K and nifH genes of 45 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from legumes of economic and environmental importance in Brazil (Arachis hypogaea, Acacia auriculiformis, Glycine max, Lespedeza striata, Lupinus albus, Stylosanthes sp. and Vigna unguiculata) were compared to 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and genetic diversity by rep-PCR. In the 16S rRNA tree, strains were distributed into two superclades-B. japonicum and B. elkanii-with several strains being very similar within each clade. The rep-PCR analysis also revealed high intra-species diversity. Clustering of strains in the nodY/K and nifH trees was identical: 39 strains isolated from soybean grouped with Bradyrhizobium type species symbionts of soybean, whereas five others occupied isolated positions. Only one strain isolated from Stylosanthes sp. showed similar nodY/K and nifH sequences to soybean strains, and it also nodulated soybean. Twenty-one representative strains of the 16S rRNA phylogram were selected and taxonomically classified using a concatenated glnII-recA phylogeny; nodC sequences were also compared and revealed the same clusters as observed in the nodY/K and nifH phylograms. The analyses of symbiotic genes indicated that a large group of strains from the B. elkanii superclade comprised the novel symbiovar sojae, whereas for another group, including B. pachyrhizi, the symbiovar pachyrhizi could be proposed. Other potential new symbiovars were also detected. The co-evolution hypotheses is discussed and it is suggested that nodY/K analysis would be useful for investigating the symbiotic diversity of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Cowpea and peanut in southern Africa are nodulated by diverse Bradyrhizobium strains harboring nodulation genes that belong to the large pantropical clade common in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Emma T; Stepkowski, Tomasz; Przymusiak, Anna; Botha, Wilhelm J; Law, Ian J

    2008-09-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) in southern Africa are nodulated by a genetically diverse group of Bradyrhizobium strains. To determine the identity of these bacteria, a collection of 22 isolates originating from the root nodules of both hosts in Botswana and South Africa was investigated using the combined sequences for the core genome genes rrs, recA, and glnII. These data separated the majority of the isolates into one of three unique lineages that most likely represent novel Bradyrhizobium species. Some isolates were also conspecific with B. yuanmingense and with B. elkanii, although none grouped with B. japonicum, B. canariense or B. liaoningense. To study the evolution of nodulation genes in these bacteria, the common nodulation gene, nodA, and host-specific nodulation genes, nodZ, noeE, and noeI, were analyzed. The nodA phylogeny showed that the cowpea and peanut Bradyrhizobium isolates represent various locally adapted groups or ecotypes that form part of Clade III of the seven known BradyrhizobiumnodA clades. This large and highly diverse clade comprises all strains from sub-Saharan Africa, as well as some originating from the Americas, Australia, Indonesia, China and Japan. Some similar groupings were supported by the other nodulation genes, although the overall phylogenies for the nodulation genes were incongruent with that inferred from the core genome genes, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer significantly influences the evolution of cowpea and peanut root-nodule bacteria. Furthermore, identification of the nodZ, noeI, and noeE genes in the isolates tested indicates that African Bradyrhizobium species may produce highly decorated nodulation factors, which potentially represent an important adaptation enabling nodulation of a great variety of legumes inhabiting the African continent.

  14. Evaluation of early nodulation and Nitrogen fixation a number of Bradyrhizobium Japonicum strains to increase nitrogen fixation ability of soybean cultivars ars by using the A-value (N-15) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piervali-Bieranvand, N.; Teimori, S.; Khorasani, A.

    2004-01-01

    To date significant contribution of atmospheric N fixation to soybean nutrition and growth, is approved. Nevertheless several studies have demonstrated that effectiveness of soybean -rhizobium symbiosis is medium compared with other legumes. The time course study of biological nitrogen fixation in soybean under field conditions has been shown that soybean has limited initial fixation and fixes substantially atmospheric nitrogen just during the reproductive periods (R1 until R 5).So there is the possibility of enhancing nitrogen fixation in soybean during vegetation growth. This could be done by improving inoculation methods or breeding for early nodulation. Hence, the present study was conducted to examine the effect of some Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains on early nodulation and biological nitrogen fixation three soybean cultivars by using a-value method. The experiment, was a factorial on randomized complete block design with three replications under proper glass house condition. Treatments were harvesting times(one , two and three weeks after flowering, respectively.)soybean cultivars(Chippewa, M 112 and clay )and Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains(J 1, J 3 and J 43). Ninety-plastic pots were filled with 1.5 kg of a compound of sand and soil(1:3). Rhizobial inoculation was performed by mixing 10 ml of a suspension(Yeast extract Manitol Broth) containing about 9X10 8 cells per ml to the soil of mixing pots were kept weed-free and watered with demineralized water as well as have received every two weeks 5 ml of a solution containing all the necessary nutrients except nitrogen. For measuring biological nitrogen fixation using a-value approach, two solutions of N-15 enriched ammonium sulfate containing 10.16 and %2 N-15 atom excess in amount of 5 and 25 mg N/Kg soil were mixed with soils in each pot containing fixing and reference plants, respectively. A non-nodulation isoline of soybean C v. M 129 for the all cultivars was used as a reference crop. First harvest was

  15. Microevolution of symbiotic Bradyrhizobium populations associated with soybeans in east North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Bromfield, E S P; Rodrigue, N; Cloutier, S; Tambong, J T

    2012-01-01

    Microevolution and origins of Bradyrhizobium populations associated with soybeans at two field sites (A and B, 280 km apart in Canada) with contrasting histories of inoculation was investigated using probabilistic analyses of six core (housekeeping) gene sequences. These analyses supported division of 220 isolates in five lineages corresponding either to B. japonicum groups 1 and 1a or to one of three novel lineages within the genus Bradyrhizobium. None of the isolates from site A and about 20% from site B (the only site with a recent inoculation history) were attributed to inoculation sources. The data suggest that most isolates were of indigenous origin based on sequence analysis of 148 isolates of soybean-nodulating bacteria from native legumes (Amphicarpaea bracteata and Desmodium canadense). Isolates from D. canadense clustered with B. japonicum group 1, whereas those from A. bracteata were placed in two novel lineages encountered at soybean field sites. One of these novel lineages predominated at soybean sites and exhibited a significant clonal expansion likely reflecting selection by the plant host. Homologous recombination events detected in the 35 sequence types from soybean sites had an effect on genetic diversification that was approximately equal to mutation. Interlineage transfer of core genes was infrequent and mostly attributable to gyrB that had a history of frequent recombination. Symbiotic gene sequences (nodC and nifH) of isolates from soybean sites and native legumes clustered in two lineages corresponding to B. japonicum and B. elkani with the inheritance of these genes appearing predominantly by vertical transmission. The data suggest that soybean-nodulating bacteria associated with native legumes represent a novel source of ecologically adapted bacteria for soybean inoculation. PMID:23301163

  16. Temperature-Dependent Expression of NodC and Community Structure of Soybean-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiro, Sokichi; Kuranaga, Chika; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Saeki, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the physiological responses of bradyrhizobia and competition for the nodulation of soybean at different temperatures, we investigated the expression of the nodC gene at 20, 25, and 30°C and the abilities of bacteria to nodulate soybean in microcosms at day/night cultivation temperatures of 23/18°C, 28/23°C, and 33/28°C for 16/8 h. We tested five Bradyrhizobium USDA strains: B. diazoefficiens USDA 110(T) and 122, B. japonicum USDA 123, and B. elkanii USDA 31 and 76(T). The expression of nodC was up-regulated by increasing culture temperatures in USDA 110(T), 122, 31, and 76(T), but was down-regulated in USDA 123. The proportions of USDA 110(T) and 122 within the community were the greatest at 28/23°C. The population of USDA 31 increased, whereas that of USDA 123 decreased with increasing cultivation temperatures. On the other hand, infection by USDA 76(T) was not detected, and low numbers of USDA 76(T) nodules confirmed its poor nodulation ability. These results indicate that the competitiveness of and infection by USDA 110(T), 122, 123, and 31 for soybean nodulation depend on cultivation temperatures, and suggest that the temperature dependence of nodC expression affects the bradyrhizobial community structure.

  17. The symbiotic biofilm of Sinorhizobium fredii SMH12, necessary for successful colonization and symbiosis of Glycine max cv Osumi, is regulated by Quorum Sensing systems and inducing flavonoids via NodD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pérez-Montaño

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface components, especially exopolysaccharides, in combination with bacterial Quorum Sensing signals are crucial for the formation of biofilms in most species studied so far. Biofilm formation allows soil bacteria to colonize their surrounding habitat and survive common environmental stresses such as desiccation and nutrient limitation. This mode of life is often essential for survival in bacteria of the genera Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium. The role of biofilm formation in symbiosis has been investigated in detail for Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. However, for S. fredii this process has not been studied. In this work we have demonstrated that biofilm formation is crucial for an optimal root colonization and symbiosis between S. fredii SMH12 and Glycine max cv Osumi. In this bacterium, nod-gene inducing flavonoids and the NodD1 protein are required for the transition of the biofilm structure from monolayer to microcolony. Quorum Sensing systems are also required for the full development of both types of biofilms. In fact, both the nodD1 mutant and the lactonase strain (the lactonase enzyme prevents AHL accumulation are defective in soybean root colonization. The impairment of the lactonase strain in its colonization ability leads to a decrease in the symbiotic parameters. Interestingly, NodD1 together with flavonoids activates certain quorum sensing systems implicit in the development of the symbiotic biofilm. Thus, S. fredii SMH12 by means of a unique key molecule, the flavonoid, efficiently forms biofilm, colonizes the legume roots and activates the synthesis of Nod factors, required for successfully symbiosis.

  18. Nodulation and N2 fixation effectiveness of Bradyrhizobium strains in symbiosis with Adzuki Bean, Vigna angularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Delić

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In pot experiment, one isolate Knj from a Serbian soil, four strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and three strains of Bradyrhizobium spp. were examined for the effect on adzuki bean nodulation and effectiveness in symbiotic N2 fixation. All the tested strains produced root nodules in adzuki bean. Strains of B. japonicum showed high potential of N2 fixation, particularly 525 and 542. B. japonicum strains resulted 65-71% shoot dry weight and 99-138% total N content of uninoculated control with full N content (100%. No significant difference was found between the plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium spp. strains and uninoculated control plants without N (40-42 and 42% shoot dry weight, respectively, which indicated symbiotic N2 fixation inactivity of the Bradyrhizobium spp. strains. Knj strain had the middle position (56% shoot dry weight. These data showed that B. japonicum 525 and 542 strains could be used in further investigations in order to apply them as inoculants in microbiological N fertilizers.

  19. Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain ORS285 Is Capable of Forming Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules on Soybeans (Glycine max)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Eric; Xu, Lei; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gargani, Daniel; Gully, Djamel

    2013-01-01

    The ability of photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium strains ORS285 and ORS278 to nodulate soybeans was investigated. While the nod gene-deficient ORS278 strain induced bumps only on soybean roots, the nod gene-containing ORS285 strain formed nitrogen-fixing nodules. However, symbiotic efficiencies differed drastically depending on both the soybean genotype used and the culture conditions tested. PMID:23354704

  20. The tep1 gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti coding for a putative transmembrane efflux protein and N-acetyl glucosamine affect nod gene expression and nodulation of alfalfa plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto María

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soil bacteria collectively known as Rhizobium, characterized by their ability to establish beneficial symbiosis with legumes, share several common characteristics with pathogenic bacteria when infecting the host plant. Recently, it was demonstrated that a fadD mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti is altered in the control of swarming, a type of co-ordinated movement previously associated with pathogenicity, and is also impaired in nodulation efficiency on alfalfa roots. In the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris, a fadD homolog (rpfB forms part of a cluster of genes involved in the regulation of pathogenicity factors. In this work, we have investigated the role in swarming and symbiosis of SMc02161, a S. meliloti fadD-linked gene. Results The SMc02161 locus in S. meliloti shows similarities with members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS of transporters. A S. meliloti null-mutant shows increased sensitivity to chloramphenicol. This indication led us to rename the locus tep1 for transmembrane efflux protein. The lack of tep1 does not affect the appearance of swarming motility. Interestingly, nodule formation efficiency on alfalfa plants is improved in the tep1 mutant during the first days of the interaction though nod gene expression is lower than in the wild type strain. Curiously, a nodC mutation or the addition of N-acetyl glucosamine to the wild type strain lead to similar reductions in nod gene expression as in the tep1 mutant. Moreover, aminosugar precursors of Nod factors inhibit nodulation. Conclusion tep1 putatively encodes a transmembrane protein which can confer chloramphenicol resistance in S. meliloti by expelling the antibiotic outside the bacteria. The improved nodulation of alfalfa but reduced nod gene expression observed in the tep1 mutant suggests that Tep1 transports compounds which influence nodulation. In contrast to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, we show that in S. meliloti there is no feedback regulation

  1. Multidimensional cluster stability analysis from a Brazilian Bradyrhizobium sp. RFLP/PCR data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milagre, S. T.; Maciel, C. D.; Shinoda, A. A.; Hungria, M.; Almeida, J. R. B.

    2009-05-01

    The taxonomy of the N2-fixing bacteria belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium is still poorly refined, mainly due to conflicting results obtained by the analysis of the phenotypic and genotypic properties. This paper presents an application of a method aiming at the identification of possible new clusters within a Brazilian collection of 119 Bradyrhizobium strains showing phenotypic characteristics of B. japonicum and B. elkanii. The stability was studied as a function of the number of restriction enzymes used in the RFLP-PCR analysis of three ribosomal regions with three restriction enzymes per region. The method proposed here uses clustering algorithms with distances calculated by average-linkage clustering. Introducing perturbations using sub-sampling techniques makes the stability analysis. The method showed efficacy in the grouping of the species B. japonicum and B. elkanii. Furthermore, two new clusters were clearly defined, indicating possible new species, and sub-clusters within each detected cluster.

  2. Identification of pH tolerant Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    grown soybean plants (cv. PK 472) collected from Adaptive Trial. Center (ATC), Bundi (Rajasthan). Serial dilution agar plate method as described in Somasegaran and Hoben (1994) was employed with 20E medium (Werner et al., 1975), for the purpose of isolation. Isolates were streak purified on the same medium and the ...

  3. Bradyrhizobium neotropicale sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Centrolobium paraense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, Jerri E; Baraúna, Alexandre C; da Silva, Krisle; De Meyer, Sofie E; Farias, Eliane N C; Kaminski, Paulo E; da Costa, Ismaele B; Ardley, Julie K; Willems, Anne; Camacho, Natália N; Dourado, Fernanda dos S; O'Hara, Graham

    2014-12-01

    Root nodule bacteria were isolated from Centrolobium paraense Tul. grown in soils from the Amazon region, State of Roraima (Brazil). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of seven strains (BR 10247(T), BR 10296, BR 10297, BR 10298, BR 10299, BR 10300 and BR 10301) placed them in the genus Bradyrhizobium with the closest neighbours being the type strains of Bradyrhizobium paxllaeri (98.8 % similarity), Bradyrhizobium icense (98.8 %), Bradyrhizobium lablabi (98.7 %), Bradyrhizobium jicamae (98.6 %), Bradyrhizobium elkanii (98.6 %), Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi (98.6 %) and Bradyrhizobium retamae (98.3 %). This high similarity, however, was not confirmed by the intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) 16S-23S rRNA region sequence analysis nor by multi-locus sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analyses of five housekeeping genes (dnaK, glnII, gyrB, recA and rpoB) revealed Bradyrhizobium iriomotense EK05(T) ( = LMG 24129(T)) to be the most closely related type strain (95.7 % sequence similarity or less). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles [major components being C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (18 : 1ω6c/18 : 1ω7c)], DNA G+C content, slow growth rate and carbon compound utilization patterns, supported the placement of the novel strains in the genus Bradyrhizobium. Results of DNA-DNA relatedness studies and physiological data (especially carbon source utilization) differentiated the strains from the closest recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Symbiosis-related genes for nodulation (nodC) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) placed the novel species in a new branch within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Based on the current data, these seven strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium neotropicale sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BR 10247(T) ( = HAMBI 3599(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  4. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  5. Bradyrhizobium centrolobii and Bradyrhizobium macuxiense sp. nov. isolated from Centrolobium paraense grown in soil of Amazonia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Daniele C; Passos, Samuel R; Simões-Araujo, Jean L; Baraúna, Alexandre C; da Silva, Krisle; Parma, Marcia M; Melo, Itamar S; De Meyer, Sofie E; O'Hara, Graham; Zilli, Jerri E

    2017-07-01

    Thirteen Gram-negative, aerobic, motile with polar flagella, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from root nodules of Centrolobium paraense Tul. grown in soils from the Amazon region of Brazil. Growth of strains was observed at temperature range 20-36 °C (optimal 28 °C), pH ranges 5-11 (optimal 6.0-7.0), and 0.1-0.5%NaCl (optimal 0.1-0.3%). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene placed the strains into two groups within Bradyrhizobium. Closest neighbouring species (98.8%) for group I was B. neotropicale while for group II were 12 species with more than 99% of similarity. Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) with dnaK, glnII, recA, and rpoB confirmed B. neotropicale BR 10247 T as the closest type strain for the group I and B. elkanii USDA 76 T and B. pachyrhizi PAC 48 T for group II. Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) differentiated group I from the B. neotropicale BR 10247 T (79.6%) and group II from B. elkanii USDA 76 T and B. pachyrhizi PAC 48 T (88.1% and 87.9%, respectively). Fatty acid profiles [majority C 16:0 and Summed feature 8 (18:1ω6c/18:1ω7c) for both groups], DNA G + C content, and carbon compound utilization supported the placement of the novel strains in the genus Bradyrhizobium. Gene nodC and nifH of the new strains have in general low similarity with other Bradyrhizobium species. Both groups nodulated plants from the tribes Crotalarieae, Dalbergiae, Genisteae, and Phaseoleae. Based on the presented data, two novel species which the names Bradyrhizobium centrolobii and Bradyrhizobium macuxiense are proposed, with BR 10245 T (=HAMBI 3597 T ) and BR 10303 T (=HAMBI 3602 T ) as the respective-type strains.

  6. [Queries related to the technology of soybean seed inoculation with Bradyrhizobium spp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of exploiting symbiotic nitrogen fixation, soybean crops are inoculated with selected strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens or Bradyrhizobium elkanii (collectively referred to as Bradyrhizobium spp.). The most common method of inoculation used is seed inoculation, whether performed immediately before sowing or using preinoculated seeds or pretreated seeds by the professional seed treatment. The methodology of inoculation should not only cover the seeds with living rhizobia, but must also optimize the chances of these rhizobia to infect the roots and nodulate. To this end, inoculated rhizobia must be in such an amount and condition that would allow them to overcome the competition exerted by the rhizobia of the allochthonous population of the soil, which are usually less effective for nitrogen fixation and thus dilute the effect of inoculation on yield. This optimization requires solving some queries related to the current knowledge of seed inoculation, which are addressed in this article. I conclude that the aspects that require further research are the adhesion and survival of rhizobia on seeds, the release of rhizobia once the seeds are deposited in the soil, and the movement of rhizobia from the vicinity of the seeds to the infection sites in the roots. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensibilidade de estirpes de Bradyrhizobium ao glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Josemar Seminoti Jacques

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A aplicação do glyphosate sobre a soja resistente a este herbicida pode causar prejuízos à simbiose com o rizóbio. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a sensibilidade ao herbicida glyphosate de três estirpes de Bradyrhizobium recomendadas para a produção de inoculantes de sementes de soja no Brasil. Avaliou-se o efeito das concentrações de 0,0; 5,4; 10,8; 21,6 e 43,2 µg L-1 do ingrediente ativo do glyphosate [N-(fosfonometil glicina] no meio YM líquido sobre o crescimento de B. japonicum (estirpe SEMIA 5079 e de B. elkanii (estirpe SEMIA 5019 e estirpe SEMIA 587, por meio de leituras das densidades óticas e geração de curvas de crescimento. As reduções de crescimento na presença da menor concentração do glyphosate foram de 18% para SEMIA 5079, 29% para SEMIA 5019 e de 35% para SEMIA 587, sendo, de modo geral, quanto maior a concentração do herbicida no meio de cultura maior a inibição do crescimen­to. As estirpes apresentaram sensibilidade diferencial somente às concentrações mais baixas do glyphosate; nesse caso, foi possível determinar a seguinte ordem de sensibilidade: SEMIA 587 > SEMIA 5019 > SEMIA 5079. Essa sensibilidade diferencial é dependente da concentração do herbicida, pois na presença de 43,2 µg L-1 todas as estirpes tiveram seu crescimento severamente reduzido, não havendo diferença entre elas.

  8. Bradyrhizobium manausense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Vigna unguiculata grown in Brazilian Amazonian rainforest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Flavia V; De Meyer, Sofie E; Simões-Araújo, Jean L; Barbé, Tatiane da Costa; Xavier, Gustavo R; O'Hara, Graham; Ardley, Julie K; Rumjanek, Norma G; Willems, Anne; Zilli, Jerri E

    2014-07-01

    Root nodule bacteria were trapped within cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) in soils with different cultivation histories collected from the Amazonian rainforest in northern Brazil. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of six strains (BR 3351(T), BR 3307, BR 3310, BR 3315, BR 3323 BR and BR 3361) isolated from cowpea nodules showed that they formed a distinct group within the genus Bradyrhizobium, which was separate from previously identified type strains. Phylogenetic analyses of three housekeeping genes (glnII, recA and rpoB) revealed that Bradyrhizobium huanghuaihaiense CCBAU 23303(T) was the most closely related type strain (96% sequence similarity or lower). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles (predominant fatty acids being C16 : 0 and summed feature 8), the slow growth rate and carbon compound utilization patterns supported the assignment of the strains to the genus Bradyrhizobium. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, antibiotic resistance and physiological tests differentiated these novel strains from the most closely related species of the genus Bradyrhizobium with validly published names. Symbiosis-related genes for nodulation (nodC) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) grouped the novel strains of the genus Bradyrhizobium together with Bradyrhizobium iriomotense strain EK05(T), with 94% and 96% sequence similarity, respectively. Based on these data, these six strains represent a novel species for which the name Brabyrhizobium manausense sp. nov. (BR 3351(T) = HAMBI 3596(T)), is proposed. © 2014 IUMS.

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Schistosoma japonicum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum Schistosoma japonicum Platyhelminthes Schistosoma_japonicum_L.png Schistosoma_jap...onicum_NL.png Schistosoma_japonicum_S.png Schistosoma_japonicum_NS.png http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+jap...onicum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+jap...onicum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=132 ...

  10. Bradyrhizobium kavangense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of traditional Namibian pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasse Grönemeyer, Jann; Hurek, T; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Eight strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region, Namibia, were previously characterized and identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To clarify their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. In phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence the novel group was most closely related to Bradyrhizobium iriomotense EK05T and Bradyrhizobium ingae BR 10250T, and to 'Bradyrhizobium arachidis' CCBAU 051107 in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK sequences placed the strains in a lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. The species status was validated by results of DNA-DNA hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH and nodC genes placed the novel strains in a group with 'B. arachidis' CCBAU 051107. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain 14-3T induces effective nodules on Vigna subterranea, Vigna unguiculata, Arachis hypogaea and Lablab purpureus. Based on the data presented, it is concluded that the strains represent a novel species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, for which the name Bradyrhizobium kavangense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 14-3T [ = DSM 100299T = LMG 28790T = NTCCM 0012T (Windhoek)]. The DNA G+C content of strain 14-3T is 63.8 mol% (Tm).

  11. Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacterium from root nodules of soybeans in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiumei; Cloutier, Sylvie; Tambong, James T; Bromfield, Eden S P

    2014-09-01

    Sixteen strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of Glycine max grown in Ottawa, Canada, were previously characterized and placed in a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To verify their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences that were 99.79 % similar to the closest relative, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense LMG 18230(T). Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated atpD, glnII, recA, gyrB, rpoB and dnaK genes divided the 16 strains into three multilocus sequence types that were placed in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium consistent with results of DNA-DNA hybridization. Based on analysis of symbiosis gene sequences (nodC and nifH), all novel strains were placed in a phylogenetic group with five species of the genus Bradyrhizobium that nodulate soybeans. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon and nitrogen source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain OO99(T) elicits effective nodules on Glycine max, Glycine soja and Macroptilium atropurpureum, partially effective nodules on Desmodium canadense and Vigna unguiculata, and ineffective nodules on Amphicarpaea bracteata and Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov. is proposed, with OO99(T) ( = LMG 26739(T) = HAMBI 3284(T)) as the type strain. The DNA G+C content is 62.6 mol%. © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada as represented by the Minister of AAFC.

  12. Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacterium from root nodules of soybeans in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiumei; Cloutier, Sylvie; Tambong, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of Glycine max grown in Ottawa, Canada, were previously characterized and placed in a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To verify their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences that were 99.79 % similar to the closest relative, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense LMG 18230T. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated atpD, glnII, recA, gyrB, rpoB and dnaK genes divided the 16 strains into three multilocus sequence types that were placed in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium consistent with results of DNA–DNA hybridization. Based on analysis of symbiosis gene sequences (nodC and nifH), all novel strains were placed in a phylogenetic group with five species of the genus Bradyrhizobium that nodulate soybeans. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon and nitrogen source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain OO99T elicits effective nodules on Glycine max, Glycine soja and Macroptilium atropurpureum, partially effective nodules on Desmodium canadense and Vigna unguiculata, and ineffective nodules on Amphicarpaea bracteata and Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov. is proposed, with OO99T ( = LMG 26739T = HAMBI 3284T) as the type strain. The DNA G+C content is 62.6 mol%. PMID:24969302

  13. Colony Dimorphism in Bradyrhizobium Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester-Bradley, Rosemary; Thornton, Philip; Jones, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Ten isolates of Bradyrhizobium spp. which form two colony types were studied; the isolates originated from a range of legume species. The two colony types differed in the amount of gum formed or size or both, depending on the strain. Whole 7-day-old colonies of each type were subcultured to determine the proportion of cells which had changed to the other type. An iterative computerized procedure was used to determine the rate of switching per generation between the two types and to predict proportions reached at equilibrium for each strain. The predicted proportions of the wetter (more gummy) or larger colony type at equilibrium differed significantly between strains, ranging from 0.9999 (strain CIAT 2383) to 0.0216 (strain CIAT 2469), because some strains switched faster from dry to wet (or small to large) and others switched faster from wet to dry (or large to small). Predicted equilibrium was reached after about 140 generations in strain USDA 76. In all but one strain (CIAT 3030) the growth rate of the wetter colony type was greater than or similar to that of the drier type. The mean difference in generation time between the two colony types was 0.37 h. Doubling times calculated for either colony type after 7 days of growth on the agar surface ranged from 6.0 to 7.3 h. The formation of two persistent colony types by one strain (clonal or colony dimorphism) may be a common phenomenon among Bradyrhizobium strains. Images PMID:16347599

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] MARVYVSTVVNARNDRVWARVRDFNGLPNWHPAIAESRIEGGEPSDKIGCVRDFRLRNGDRIREKLLGLSDYDMFCTYSILESPMGVENYVATLRLTPVTDGDQTFMEWTAEFDCAPERETELVNNIGGGVFQGGFDALKRVFGG

  15. Bradyrhizobium namibiense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of Lablab purpureus, hyacinth bean, in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Bünger, Wiebke; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2017-10-16

    Four strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet) from Namibia were previously identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To confirm their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized by taking a polyphasic approach. The type strain possessed 16S rRNA gene sequences identical to Bradyrhizobium paxllaeri LMTR 21 T and Bradyrhizobiumicense LMTR 13 T , the full-length sequences were identical to those retrieved from SAMN05230119 and SAMN05230120, respectively. However, the intergenic spacer sequences of the novel group showed identities of less than 93.1 % to described Bradyrhizobium species and were placed in a well-supported separate lineage in the phylogenetic tree. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated housekeeping genes, recA, glnII, gyrB, dnaK, atpD and rpoB, corroborated that the novel strains belonged to a lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, with highest sequence identities to Bradyrhizobiumjicamae and B. paxllaeri (below 93 %). The species status was validated by results of DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values of genome sequences. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests, including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance, could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis of nodC and nifH genes placed the novel strains in a group with B. paxllaeri and B.lablabi. Novel strain 5-10 T induces effective nodules on Lablab purpureus, Vigna subterranea, Vigna unguiculata and Arachis hypogaea. Based on our results, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium namibiense sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain 5-10 T [LMG 28789, DSM 100300, NTCCM0017 (Windhoek)].

  16. Evolution of Bradyrhizobium-Aeschynomene mutualism: living testimony of the ancient world or highly evolved state?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Fukushima, Shohei; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2012-12-01

    Until recently it had been well established that the initial step in legume-rhizobia symbioses was flavonoid and Nod factor (NF) signaling. However, NF-independent symbiosis is now known to occur between Bradyrhizobium and some species of Aeschynomene. Since its discovery, this unusual symbiotic system has attracted attention, and efforts have been devoted to revealing the NF-independent symbiotic mechanism, although the molecular mechanisms of nodule initiation still remain to be elucidated. NF-independent symbiosis is also interesting from the perspective of the evolution of legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this mini-review, we discuss the current literature on the NF-independent symbiotic system in terms of phylogeny of the partners, infection, bacteroid differentiation, nodule structure, photosynthesis, endophytic features and model host plant. We also discuss NF-independent symbiosis, which is generally regarded to be more primitive than NF-dependent symbiosis, because the bacteria invade host plants via 'crack entry'. We propose three possible scenarios concerning the evolution of NF-independent symbiosis, which do not exclude the possibility that the NF-independent system evolved from NF-dependent interactions. Finally, we examine an interesting question on Bradyrhizobium-Aeschynomene mutualism, which is how do they initiate symbiosis without NF. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses of symbiotic and non-symbiotic bradyrhizobia with A. indica may be crucial to address the question, because of the very narrow phylogeny of natural endosymbionts without nod genes compared with other legume-rhizobia symbioses.

  17. Bradyrhizobium strain and the {sup 15}N natural abundance quantification of biological N{sub 2} fixation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Ana Paula [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Agropecuarias (CCTA). Dept. de Producao Vegetal; Morais, Rafael Fiusa de; Urquiaga, Segundo; Boddey, Robert Michael; Alves, Bruno Jose Rodrigues [EMBRAPA Agrobiologia, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: bruno@cnpab.embrapa.br

    2008-09-15

    In commercial plantations of soybean in both the Southern and the Cerrado regions, contributions from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) are generally proportionately high. When using the {sup 15}N natural abundance technique to quantify BNF inputs, it is essential to determine, with accuracy, the {sup 15}N abundance of the N derived from BNF (the 'B' value). This study aimed to determine the effect of four recommended strains of Bradyrhizobium spp. (two B. japonicum and two B. elkanii) on the 'B' value of soybean grown in pots in an open field using an equation based on the determination of {delta}{sup 15}N natural abundance in a non-labelled soil, and estimate of the contribution of BNF derived from the use of {sup 15}N-isotope dilution in soils enriched with {sup 15}N. To evaluate N{sub 2} fixation by soybean, three non-N{sub 2}-fixing reference crops were grown under the same conditions. Regardless of Bradyrhizobium strain, no differences were observed in dry matter, nodule weight and total N between labelled and non-labelled soil. The N{sub 2} fixation of the soybeans grown in the two soil conditions were similar. The mean 'B' values of the soybeans inoculated with the B. japonicum strains were -1.84 per mille and -0.50 per mille, while those inoculated with B. elkanii were -3.67 per mille and -1.0 per mille, for the shoot tissue and the whole plant, respectively. Finally, the 'B' value for the soybean crop varied considerably in function of the inoculated Bradyrhizobium strain, being most important when only the shoot tissue was utilised to estimate the proportion of N in the plant derived from N{sub 2} fixation. (author)

  18. Genetic diversity and evolution of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Erythrophleum fordii, an evergreen tree indigenous to the southern subtropical region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Wang, Rui; Lu, Jun Kun; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-10-01

    The nodulation of Erythrophleum fordii has been recorded recently, but its microsymbionts have never been studied. To investigate the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with this leguminous evergreen tree, root nodules were collected from the southern subtropical region of China. A total of 166 bacterial isolates were obtained from the nodules and characterized. In a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ribosomal intergenic sequences, the isolates were classified into 22 types within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS), and the housekeeping genes recA and glnII classified the isolates into four groups: the Bradyrhizobium elkanii and Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi groups, comprising the dominant symbionts, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, and an unclassified group comprising the minor symbionts. The nodC and nifH phylogenetic trees defined five or six lineages among the isolates, which was largely consistent with the definition of genomic species. The phylogenetic results and evolutionary analysis demonstrated that mutation and vertical transmission of genes were the principal processes for the divergent evolution of Bradyrhizobium species associated with E. fordii, while lateral transfer and recombination of housekeeping and symbiotic genes were rare. The distribution of the dominant rhizobial populations was affected by soil pH and effective phosphorus. This is the first report to characterize E. fordii rhizobia. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. European Origin of Bradyrhizobium Populations Infecting Lupins and Serradella in Soils of Western Australia and South Africa† ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępkowski, Tomasz; Moulin, Lionel; Krzyżańska, Agnieszka; McInnes, Alison; Law, Ian J.; Howieson, John

    2005-01-01

    We applied a multilocus phylogenetic approach to elucidate the origin of serradella and lupin Bradyrhizobium strains that persist in soils of Western Australia and South Africa. The selected strains belonged to different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR clusters that were distinct from RAPD clusters of applied inoculant strains. Phylogenetic analyses were performed with nodulation genes (nodA, nodZ, nolL, noeI), housekeeping genes (dnaK, recA, glnII, atpD), and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer sequences. Housekeeping gene phylogenies revealed that all serradella and Lupinus cosentinii isolates from Western Australia and three of five South African narrow-leaf lupin strains were intermingled with the strains of Bradyrhizobium canariense, forming a well supported branch on each of the trees. All nodA gene sequences of the lupin and serradella bradyrhizobia formed a single branch, referred to as clade II, together with the sequences of other lupin and serradella strains. Similar patterns were detected in nodZ and nolL trees. In contrast, nodA sequences of the strains isolated from native Australian legumes formed either a new branch called clade IV or belonged to clade I or III, whereas their nonsymbiotic genes grouped outside the B. canariense branch. These data suggest that the lupin and serradella strains, including the strains from uncultivated L. cosentinii plants, are descendants of strains that most likely were brought from Europe accidentally with lupin and serradella seeds. The observed dominance of B. canariense strains may be related to this species' adaptation to acid soils common in Western Australia and South Africa and, presumably, to their intrinsic ability to compete for nodulation of lupins and serradella. PMID:16269740

  20. European origin of Bradyrhizobium populations infecting lupins and serradella in soils of Western Australia and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepkowski, Tomasz; Moulin, Lionel; Krzyzańska, Agnieszka; McInnes, Alison; Law, Ian J; Howieson, John

    2005-11-01

    We applied a multilocus phylogenetic approach to elucidate the origin of serradella and lupin Bradyrhizobium strains that persist in soils of Western Australia and South Africa. The selected strains belonged to different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR clusters that were distinct from RAPD clusters of applied inoculant strains. Phylogenetic analyses were performed with nodulation genes (nodA, nodZ, nolL, noeI), housekeeping genes (dnaK, recA, glnII, atpD), and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer sequences. Housekeeping gene phylogenies revealed that all serradella and Lupinus cosentinii isolates from Western Australia and three of five South African narrow-leaf lupin strains were intermingled with the strains of Bradyrhizobium canariense, forming a well supported branch on each of the trees. All nodA gene sequences of the lupin and serradella bradyrhizobia formed a single branch, referred to as clade II, together with the sequences of other lupin and serradella strains. Similar patterns were detected in nodZ and nolL trees. In contrast, nodA sequences of the strains isolated from native Australian legumes formed either a new branch called clade IV or belonged to clade I or III, whereas their nonsymbiotic genes grouped outside the B. canariense branch. These data suggest that the lupin and serradella strains, including the strains from uncultivated L. cosentinii plants, are descendants of strains that most likely were brought from Europe accidentally with lupin and serradella seeds. The observed dominance of B. canariense strains may be related to this species' adaptation to acid soils common in Western Australia and South Africa and, presumably, to their intrinsic ability to compete for nodulation of lupins and serradella.

  1. Preliminary Analysis of Soybean Gene Expression Response to a Bradyrhizobium japonicum Type III Secretion System Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant pathogens deliver proteinaceous effector molecules into their host via complex secretion systems, such as the type III secretion system (T3SS). Some of these T3SS effectors have been shown to function as suppressors of host defense responses. The role of the T3SS during plant interactions wit...

  2. Efeitos de diferentes formulações comerciais de glyphosate sobre estirpes de Bradyrhizobium Effects of different glyphosate commercial formulations on Bradyrhizobium strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Santos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar efeitos de formulações comerciais de glyphosate sobre estirpes de Bradyrhizobium, em condições de laboratório. As formulações foram aplicadas na concentração de 43,2 µg L-1 do equivalente ácido. As bactérias foram inoculadas em meio de cultura à base de manitol e extrato de levedura (YM. O efeito do herbicida no crescimento das estirpes de Bradyrhizobium foi avaliado mediante leitura da densidade ótica em espectrofotômetro. Avaliou-se o crescimento das estirpes de B. japonicum SEMIA 5079 e de B. elkanii SEMIA 5019 e SEMIA 587 sob efeito de nove formulações de glyphosate: Zapp Qi®, Roundup®, Roundup Multiação®, Roundup Transorb®, Roundup WG®, Trop®, Agrisato®, glyphosate técnico [padrão de N-(phosphonomethyl glycina] e controle sem adição de herbicida (testemunha para as estirpes. Foram utilizadas seis repetições. Confeccionaram-se curvas de crescimento para cada estirpe. Pelos resultados, pôde-se observar que todas as formulações de glyphosate causaram efeitos diferenciados sobre as estirpes de Bradyrhizobium SEMIA 5019, SEMIA 5079 e SEMIA 587. Constatou-se que a formulação Zapp Qi foi a menos tóxica às estirpes de Bradyrhizobium avaliadas. A maior toxicidade foi observada para Roundup Transorb, que provocou reduções no crescimento acima de 94% para todas as estirpes de Bradyrhizobium estudadas. Não se observou correlação entre o tipo de sal - isopropilamina, amônio ou potássico, presentes na formulação herbicida - e o grau de inibição no crescimento das estirpes. SEMIA 587 foi a estirpe menos tolerante à maioria das formulações testadas, porém SEMIA 5019 foi a mais sensível ao glyphosate padrão, sem adição de sais ou de outros aditivos.This work aimed to evaluate the effects of glyphosate commercial formulations on Bradyrhizobium strains under laboratory conditions. The formulations were applied in the concentration of 43.2 µg L-1 of the a.e. and

  3. Nodulation Characterization and Proteomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium liaoningense CCBAU05525 in Response to Water-Soluble Humic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong Guo; Xu, Yuan Yuan; Jiang, Feng; Li, Bao Zhen; Yang, Jin Shui; Wang, En Tao; Yuan, Hong Li

    2015-06-08

    The lignite biodegradation procedure to produce water-soluble humic materials (WSHM) with a Penicillium stain was established by previous studies in our laboratory. This study researched the effects of WSHM on the growth of Bradyrhizobium liaoningense CCBAU05525 and its nodulation on soybean. Results showed that WSHM enhanced the cell density of CCBAU05525 in culture, and increased the nodule number, nodule fresh weight and nitrogenase activity of the inoculated soybean plants. Then the chemical compounds of WSHM were analyzed and flavonoid analogues were identified in WSHM through tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-py-GC/MS analysis. Protein expression profiles and nod gene expression of CCBAU05525 in response to WSHM or genistein were compared to illustrate the working mechanism of WSHM. The differently expressed proteins in response to WSHM were involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, signaling, energy production and some transmembrane transports. WSHM was found more effective than genistein in inducing the nod gene expression. These results demonstrated that WSHM stimulated cell metabolism and nutrient transport, which resulted in increased cell density of CCBAU05525 and prepared the bacteria for better bacteroid development. Furthermore, WSHM had similar but superior functions to flavone in inducing nod gene and nitrogen fixation related proteins expression in CCBAU05525.

  4. Induced systemic resistance and symbiotic performance of peanut plants challenged with fungal pathogens and co-inoculated with the biocontrol agent Bacillus sp. CHEP5 and Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA6144.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, María Soledad; Tonelli, María Laura; Ibáñez, Fernando; Morla, Federico; Cerioni, Guillermo; Del Carmen Tordable, María; Fabra, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Synergism between beneficial rhizobacteria and fungal pathogens is poorly understood. Therefore, evaluation of co-inoculation of bacteria that promote plant growth by different mechanisms in pathogen challenged plants would contribute to increase the knowledge about how plants manage interactions with different microorganisms. The goals of this work were a) to elucidate, in greenhouse experiments, the effect of co-inoculation of peanut with Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA6144 and the biocontrol agent Bacillus sp. CHEP5 on growth and symbiotic performance of Sclerotium rolfsii challenged plants, and b) to evaluate field performance of these bacteria in co-inoculated peanut plants. The capacity of Bacillus sp. CHEP5 to induce systemic resistance against S. rolfsii was not affected by the inoculation of Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA6144. This microsymbiont, protected peanut plants from the S. rolfsii detrimental effect, reducing the stem wilt incidence. However, disease incidence in plants inoculated with the isogenic mutant Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA6144 V2 (unable to produce Nod factors) was as high as in pathogen challenged plants. Therefore, Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA6144 Nod factors play a role in the systemic resistance against S. rolfsii. Bacillus sp. CHEP5 enhanced Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA6144 root surface colonization and improved its symbiotic behavior, even in S. rolfsii challenged plants. Results of field trials confirmed the Bacillus sp. CHEP5 ability to protect against fungal pathogens and to improve the yield of extra-large peanut seeds from 2.15% (in Río Cuarto) to 16.69% (in Las Vertientes), indicating that co-inoculation of beneficial rhizobacteria could be a useful strategy for the peanut production under sustainable agriculture system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Bradyrhizobium neotropicale sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Centrolobium paraense

    OpenAIRE

    Zilli, Jerri E; Baraúna, Alexandre C; da Silva, Krisle; De Meyer, Sofie; Farias, Eliane NC; Kaminski, Paulo E; da Costa, Ismaele B; Ardley, Julie K; Willems, Anne; Camacho, Natalia N; Dourado, Fernanda dos S; O'Hara, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria were isolated from Centrolobium paraense Tul. grown in soils from the Amazon region, State of Roraima (Brazil). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of seven strains (BR 10247(T), BR 10296, BR 10297, BR 10298, BR 10299, BR 10300 and BR 10301) placed them in the genus Bradyrhizobium with the closest neighbours being the type strains of Bradyrhizobium paxllaeri (98.8 % similarity), Bradyrhizobium icense (98.8 %), Bradyrhizobium lablabi (98.7 %), Bradyrhizobium jicamae (98.6 %), ...

  6. Pectolinarigenin - A Flavonoid Compound from Cirsium Japonicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    /tjpr.v13i2.9. Original Research Article. Pectolinarigenin - A Flavonoid Compound from Cirsium. Japonicum with Potential Anti-proliferation Activity in MCF-. 7 Breast Cancer Cell. Mingqian Lu. 1,2,3. , Qingzhi Kong. 1,4. *, Xinhua Xu. 2,3.

  7. Occurrence of H2-Uptake Hydrogenases in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) and Their Expression in Nodules of Lupinus spp. and Ornithopus compressus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Jesús; Villa, Ana; Chamber, Manuel; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-four strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) from worldwide collections were screened by a colony hybridization method for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to the structural genes of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum hydrogenase. Twelve strains exhibited strong colony hybridization signals, and subsequent Southern blot hybridization experiments showed that they fell into two different groups on the basis of the pattern of EcoRI fragments containing the homology to the hup probe. All strains in the first group (UPM860, UPM861, and 750) expressed uptake hydrogenase activity in symbiosis with Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, Lupinus luteus, and Ornithopus compressus, but both the rate of H2 uptake by bacteroids and the relative efficiency of N2 fixation (RE = 1 - [H2 evolved in air/acetylene reduced]) by nodules were markedly affected by the legume host. L. angustifolius was the less permissive host for hydrogenase expression in symbiosis with the three strains (average RE = 0.76), and O. compressus was the more permissive (average RE = 1.0). None of the strains in the second group expressed hydrogenase activity in lupine nodules, and only one exhibited low H2-uptake activity in symbiosis with O. compressus. The inability of these putative Hup+ strains to induce hydrogenase activity in lupine nodules is discussed on the basis of the legume host effect. Among the 42 strains showing no homology to the B. japonicum hup-specific probe in the colony hybridization assay, 10 were examined in symbiosis with L. angustifolius. The average RE for these strains was 0.51. However, one strain, IM43B, exhibited high RE values (higher than 0.80) and high levels of hydrogenase activity in symbiosis with L. angustifolius, L. albus, and L. luteus. In Southern blot hybridization experiments, no homology was detected between the B. japonicum hup-specific DNA probe and total DNA from vegetative cells or bacteroids from strain IM43B even under low stringency hybridization

  8. African origin of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc) in Ghanaian and South African soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puozaa, Doris K; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids secreted by legumes play a major role as signal molecules for attracting compatible rhizobia. The aim of this study was to assess and understand the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) landraces of different seedcoat colours using restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Seedcoat pigmentation of landraces had effect on the diversity of microsymbionts of Bambara groundnut. Even when planted together in one hole, nodulating bradyrhizobia clustered differently. For example, 16S rDNA-RFLP typing of rhizobial samples TUTVSBLM.I, TUTVSCRM.I and TUTVSRDM.I originating respectively from Black, Cream and Red landraces that were co-planted in the same hole at Manga in the Sudano-sahelian savanna, as well as TUTVSCRK.I and TUTVSRDK.I respectively from Cream and Red landraces co-planted at Kpalisogu in the Guinea savanna, revealed different 16S rDNA- RFLP types. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA, glnII, recA and atpD sequences showed that Vigna subterranea was nodulated specifically by a diverse group of Bradyrhizobium species (e.g. Bradyrhizobium vignae, and a novel group of Bradyrhizobium spp.) in soils from Ghana and South Africa. The recA gene phylogeny showed incongruency with the other housekeeping genes, indicating the possibility of lateral gene transfer and/or recombination events. The grouping of isolates according to symbiotic gene (nifH and nodD) phylogenies revealed inter- and intra-specific symbiotic plasmid transfer and different evolutionary history. The results also showed that a cropping history and physico-chemical environment of soils increased bradyrhizobial diversity in Ghana and South Africa.

  9. African origin of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc in Ghanaian and South African soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris K Puozaa

    Full Text Available Flavonoids secreted by legumes play a major role as signal molecules for attracting compatible rhizobia. The aim of this study was to assess and understand the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc. landraces of different seedcoat colours using restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Seedcoat pigmentation of landraces had effect on the diversity of microsymbionts of Bambara groundnut. Even when planted together in one hole, nodulating bradyrhizobia clustered differently. For example, 16S rDNA-RFLP typing of rhizobial samples TUTVSBLM.I, TUTVSCRM.I and TUTVSRDM.I originating respectively from Black, Cream and Red landraces that were co-planted in the same hole at Manga in the Sudano-sahelian savanna, as well as TUTVSCRK.I and TUTVSRDK.I respectively from Cream and Red landraces co-planted at Kpalisogu in the Guinea savanna, revealed different 16S rDNA- RFLP types. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA, glnII, recA and atpD sequences showed that Vigna subterranea was nodulated specifically by a diverse group of Bradyrhizobium species (e.g. Bradyrhizobium vignae, and a novel group of Bradyrhizobium spp. in soils from Ghana and South Africa. The recA gene phylogeny showed incongruency with the other housekeeping genes, indicating the possibility of lateral gene transfer and/or recombination events. The grouping of isolates according to symbiotic gene (nifH and nodD phylogenies revealed inter- and intra-specific symbiotic plasmid transfer and different evolutionary history. The results also showed that a cropping history and physico-chemical environment of soils increased bradyrhizobial diversity in Ghana and South Africa.

  10. NOD1 and NOD2 receptors in mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala): Inductive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stimulation with NOD1- and NOD2-specific ligands, i.e. iE-DAP and MDP, activated NOD1 and NOD2 receptor signalling in vivo and in vitro resulting in significant ( < 0.05) induction of downstream signalling molecule RICK, and the effector molecules IL-1, IL-8 and IFN- in the treated group as compared to their controls.

  11. DMPD: Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031249 Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Le Bour...w Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. PubmedID 18031249 Title Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and hum...an inflammatory disorders. Authors Le Bourhis L, Benko S

  12. Differences in crystallization of two LinB variants from Sphingobium japonicum UT26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtjarik, Oksana; Chaloupkova, Radka; Rezacova, Pavlina; Kuty, Michal; Damborsky, Jiri; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana

    2013-03-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases are microbial enzymes that convert a broad range of halogenated aliphatic compounds to their corresponding alcohols by the hydrolytic mechanism. These enzymes play an important role in the biodegradation of various environmental pollutants. Haloalkane dehalogenase LinB isolated from a soil bacterium Sphingobium japonicum UT26 has a relatively broad substrate specificity and can be applied in bioremediation and biosensing of environmental pollutants. The LinB variants presented here, LinB32 and LinB70, were constructed with the goal of studying the effect of mutations on enzyme functionality. In the case of LinB32 (L117W), the introduced mutation leads to blocking of the main tunnel connecting the deeply buried active site with the surrounding solvent. The other variant, LinB70 (L44I, H107Q), has the second halide-binding site in a position analogous to that in the related haloalkane dehalogenase DbeA from Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94. Both LinB variants were successfully crystallized and full data sets were collected for native enzymes as well as their complexes with the substrates 1,2-dibromoethane (LinB32) and 1-bromobutane (LinB70) to resolutions ranging from 1.6 to 2.8 Å. The two mutants crystallize differently from each other, which suggests that the mutations, although deep inside the molecule, can still affect the protein crystallizability.

  13. Differences in crystallization of two LinB variants from Sphingobium japonicum UT26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtjarik, Oksana; Chaloupkova, Radka; Rezacova, Pavlina; Kuty, Michal; Damborsky, Jiri; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases are microbial enzymes that convert a broad range of halogenated aliphatic compounds to their corresponding alcohols by the hydrolytic mechanism. These enzymes play an important role in the biodegradation of various environmental pollutants. Haloalkane dehalogenase LinB isolated from a soil bacterium Sphingobium japonicum UT26 has a relatively broad substrate specificity and can be applied in bioremediation and biosensing of environmental pollutants. The LinB variants presented here, LinB32 and LinB70, were constructed with the goal of studying the effect of mutations on enzyme functionality. In the case of LinB32 (L117W), the introduced mutation leads to blocking of the main tunnel connecting the deeply buried active site with the surrounding solvent. The other variant, LinB70 (L44I, H107Q), has the second halide-binding site in a position analogous to that in the related haloalkane dehalogenase DbeA from Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94. Both LinB variants were successfully crystallized and full data sets were collected for native enzymes as well as their complexes with the substrates 1,2-dibromoethane (LinB32) and 1-bromobutane (LinB70) to resolutions ranging from 1.6 to 2.8 Å. The two mutants crystallize differently from each other, which suggests that the mutations, although deep inside the molecule, can still affect the protein crystallizability. PMID:23519805

  14. Symbiotic Hydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Vigna) Increases Nitrogen Content in Vigna unguiculata Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginsky, Cecilia; Brito, Belén; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Vigna) mutants in which hydrogenase (hup) activity was affected were constructed and analyzed. Vigna unguiculata plants inoculated with the Bradyrhizobium sp. (Vigna) hup mutant showed reduced nitrogenase activity and also a significant decrease in nitrogen content, suggesting a relevant contribution of hydrogenase activity to plant yield. PMID:16269797

  15. Symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus assayed on serradella plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysława Deryło

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus nodule isolates were compared to the standard slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strain USDA 3045. Lupine nodules isolates showed typical characteristics for bradyrhizobial strains and nodulated small seed legume, serradella (Ornithopus sativus, in tube test. We observed a permanent physiological segregation of the effective (Fix' and ineffective (Fix- symbiotic phenotype for all tested bradyrhizobial strains during the growth of serradella in plant tube test. The ultrastructural differences between Fix* and Fix serradella nodules were observed. Rapid and visible nodulation as well as easy assay of the reduction of acetylene make serradella a convenient system for studies of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strains in laboratory conditions.

  16. Achieving Consensus Through Professionalized Head Nods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    2014-01-01

    of nodding in a particular professional-client setting, namely, hair salon interactions. My interest specifically lies in the frequent occurrence of synchronized head nods during the “service-assessment sequence,” where both service provider and customer inspect and determine whether the completed work...... is adequate. I pursue mechanisms of synchronized head nods by revealing exactly how participants collaborate in producing a nod, and how their verbal actions may at times be designed accordingly. In doing so, the study provides insight into what consensus may look like at service encounters in Japan......While the interactional functions of head nodding in everyday Japanese conversation have been frequently studied, a discourse on head nodding as a professional communicative practice has yet to be explored. With the method of multimodal conversation analysis, the current study examines the role...

  17. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of nodding syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nodding syndrome (repetitive nodding and progressive generalized seizures) is assuming epidemic proportions in South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. Objective: To describe clinical and epidemiological features of nodding syndrome in southern Sudan based on preliminary investigations conducted in 2001 ...

  18. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  19. Effect of Inoculating Bradyrhizobium on Phosphorus Use Efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    irrigation during the 2014/15 cropping season to evaluate the effect of inoculating Bradyrhizobium on P uptake and P use ... of organic and inorganic P. Increase in productivity of wheat by 30-40% was due to inorganic P ... determined from the phosphorus content of the respective parts after multiplying with the grain and ...

  20. Response of Soybean to Inoculation with Bradyrhizobium spp. in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is an important crop in Ethiopia. However, its productivity is constrained by a number of factors among which soil salinity is one the major problems. Therefore, field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to examine the effectiveness of exotic and locally isolated Bradyrhizobium spp.

  1. Effect of inoculating Bradyrhizobium on phosphorus use efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At a soil pH value of above 7.0, inorganic phosphorus (P) is highly susceptible to precipitation as insoluble form that is unavailable to plants. Hence, a field experiment was conducted at Metehara Sugar Estate under irrigation during the 2014/15 cropping season to evaluate the effect of inoculating Bradyrhizobium on P ...

  2. Nodding Syndrome: challenges for a bizarre condition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-01

    Feb 1, 2011 ... Nodding syndrome in Kediba County, Western Equatoria State in 2010 Southern. Sudan Medical Journal 2011; 4 (1):3-6. Sejvar J, Foltz J, Dowell S. Nodding disease in Uganda – new clues, persistent. 2. enigma. Scientific Seminar Series Presentation, CDC, 2010. Winkler AS, Friedrich K, König R, Meindl ...

  3. Differences in crystallization of two LinB variants from Sphingobium japonicum UT26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtjarik, Oksana; Chaloupkova, Radka; Rezacova, Pavlina; Kuty, Michal; Damborsky, Jiri; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    To study enzyme functionality, two haloalkane dehalogenase variants LinB32 and LinB70 carrying single-point and double-point mutations were constructed and crystallized in different crystallization conditions. Both LinB variants and their complexes with halogenated substrates diffracted to resolutions ranging from 1.6 to 2.8 Å. Haloalkane dehalogenases are microbial enzymes that convert a broad range of halogenated aliphatic compounds to their corresponding alcohols by the hydrolytic mechanism. These enzymes play an important role in the biodegradation of various environmental pollutants. Haloalkane dehalogenase LinB isolated from a soil bacterium Sphingobium japonicum UT26 has a relatively broad substrate specificity and can be applied in bioremediation and biosensing of environmental pollutants. The LinB variants presented here, LinB32 and LinB70, were constructed with the goal of studying the effect of mutations on enzyme functionality. In the case of LinB32 (L117W), the introduced mutation leads to blocking of the main tunnel connecting the deeply buried active site with the surrounding solvent. The other variant, LinB70 (L44I, H107Q), has the second halide-binding site in a position analogous to that in the related haloalkane dehalogenase DbeA from Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94. Both LinB variants were successfully crystallized and full data sets were collected for native enzymes as well as their complexes with the substrates 1,2-dibromoethane (LinB32) and 1-bromobutane (LinB70) to resolutions ranging from 1.6 to 2.8 Å. The two mutants crystallize differently from each other, which suggests that the mutations, although deep inside the molecule, can still affect the protein crystallizability

  4. NOD2 and inflammation: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negroni A

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anna Negroni,1 Maria Pierdomenico,2 Salvatore Cucchiara,2 Laura Stronati3 1Division of Health Protection Technologies, Territorial and Production Systems Sustainability Department, ENEA, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Pediatrics and Infantile Neuropsychiatry, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Cellular Biotechnology and Hematology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD protein, NOD2, belonging to the intracellular NOD-like receptor family, detects conserved motifs in bacterial peptidoglycan and promotes their clearance through activation of a proinflammatory transcriptional program and other innate immune pathways, including autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress. An inactive form due to mutations or a constitutive high expression of NOD2 is associated with several inflammatory diseases, suggesting that balanced NOD2 signaling is critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent developments about the pathway and mechanisms of regulation of NOD2 and illustrate the principal functions of the gene, with particular emphasis on its central role in maintaining the equilibrium between intestinal microbiota and host immune responses to control inflammation. Furthermore, we survey recent studies illustrating the role of NOD2 in several inflammatory diseases, in particular, inflammatory bowel disease, of which it is the main susceptibility gene. Keywords: innate immunity, intestinal homeostasis, ER stress, autophagy, inflammatory bowel disease, extraintestinal disease

  5. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streng, Arend; op den Camp, Rik; Bisseling, Ton

    2011-01-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor.1 Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomycorrhizal symbiosis (Fig. 1). This suggests that rhizobium co-opted the evolutionary far more ancient mycorrhizal signaling pathway in order to establish an endosymbiotic interaction with legumes.2 As arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum can establish a symbiosis with the vast majority of land plants, it is most probable that this signaling cascade is wide spread in the plant kingdom.3 However, Nod factor perception generally is considered to be unique to legumes. Two recent breakthroughs on the evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling demonstrate that this is not the case.4,5 The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factor signaling. PMID:21904113

  6. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  7. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  8. Non-symbiotic Bradyrhizobium ecotypes dominate North American forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanInsberghe, David; Maas, Kendra R; Cardenas, Erick; Strachan, Cameron R; Hallam, Steven J; Mohn, William W

    2015-11-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium has served as a model system for studying host-microbe symbiotic interactions and nitrogen fixation due to its importance in agricultural productivity and global nitrogen cycling. In this study, we identify a bacterial group affiliated with this genus that dominates the microbial communities of coniferous forest soils from six distinct ecozones across North America. Representative isolates from this group were obtained and characterized. Using quantitative population genomics, we show that forest soil populations of Bradyrhizobium represent ecotypes incapable of nodulating legume root hairs or fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Instead, these populations appear to be free living and have a greater potential for metabolizing aromatic carbon sources than their close symbiotic relatives. In addition, we identify fine-scaled differentiation between populations inhabiting neighboring soil layers that illustrate how diversity within Bradyrhizobium is structured by habitat similarity. These findings reconcile incongruent observations about this widely studied and important group of bacteria and highlight the value of ecological context to interpretations of microbial diversity and taxonomy. These results further suggest that the influence of this genus likely extends well beyond facilitating agriculture, especially as forest ecosystems are large and integral components of the biosphere. In addition, this study demonstrates how focusing research on economically important microorganisms can bias our understanding of the natural world.

  9. NOD1 and NOD2 receptors in mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala): Inductive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-06-04

    Jun 4, 2013 ... D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid; IκB, inhibitor of NF-κB; Iκκ, IκB kinase; LRR, leucine-rich repeat; MDP, muramyl dipeptide;. NF-κB, nuclear factor κB; NLR, NOD-like receptor; NOD, nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain; PAMP, pathogen- associated molecular pattern; PBL, peripheral blood ...

  10. NOD1 and NOD2 receptors in mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala): Inductive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-06-04

    Jun 4, 2013 ... their products and play a key role in inducing innate immunity. This report describes the role of NOD1 and NOD2 receptors signalling in innate immunity in the Indian major carp, mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala). Tissue-specific ...... The innate immune system is the only defence weapon of invertebrates and a ...

  11. [Preservation of live eggs of Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Wei-ming; Xie, Shu-ying; Wang, Qin; Jiang, Wei-sheng; Hu, Ren-mei; Ge, Jun; Zeng, Xiao-jun

    2015-10-01

    To observe the preservation time and activity of miracidium hatching from schistosome eggs preserved in different solutions, so as to obtain the optimal preservation conditions and then provide quality control products for field application. The rectum stool of rabbits infected with Schistosoma japonicum was collected and the coarse fecal residue was removed with a series of sample sieves of 80, 100, 160 and 200 meshes respectively, and then the schistosome eggs were concentrated with the sample sieve of 260 meshes. The concentrated eggs were preserved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 1.2% sodium chloride solution, phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS, PH 7.2), 1.0% sucrose solution, and Mili-Q water, respectively, and then were conserved in a 4 °C refrigerator and 15 °C constant temperature incubator, respectively. The preserved eggs were hatched in different time (7-day interval) , the vitality and quantity of the miracidia were observed, and the hatching rates were calculated. Under the condition of 4 °C, the hatching rates of eggs dropped to 0 in 1.0% sucrose solution and 1.2% sodium chloride solution at the 49th and 126th day, respectively, and the hatching rates of eggs in the 0.9% sodium chloride solution and PBS solution dropped to 10% at the 112th day, and the activity of miracidium was weakened since 140th. In the Mili-Q water, the hatching rate dropped less than 10% at the 196th day and the activity of miracidia was weakened since the 280th day. Under the condition of 15 °C, the hatching rate of eggs in different solutions gradually dropped to 0 from the 49th day to 105th day. The eggs preserved in Mili-Q water at the temperature of 4 °C can be used as the positive reference for hatching tests within 196 days.

  12. MDP-NOD2 stimulation induces HNP-1 secretion, which contributes to NOD2 antibacterial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesus K; Barnich, Nicolas; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2010-05-01

    Human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP-1) is a defensin with antibacterial activity secreted by various cells as a component of the innate immune host defense. NOD2 is a cytoplasmic protein that recognizes bacterial derived muramyl dipeptide, and is involved in bacterial clearance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between antibacterial activity of NOD2 and HNP-1 expression in epithelial cell lines. Gentamicin protection assay using Salmonella typhimurium was performed in Caco-2 cells. The mRNA level was determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and defensin expression was assessed by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappaB activation was assessed using pIV luciferase and Renilla plasmids. A NOD2 mutant was generated by site-directed mutagenesis. Among the defensins tested, only HNP-1 expression is induced in colonic epithelial model HCT116 cells after MDP-LD stimulation. HNP-1 secretion is significantly increased after MDP-LD stimulation in the cell supernatant of intestinal epithelial cells expressing endogenous NOD2, but not in cells that lack endogenous NOD2 expression. HNP-1 is required for NOD2-dependent NF-kappaB activation after MDP-LD stimulation since hnp-1 siRNA transfection abrogated the response to MDP-LD stimulation. The antibacterial function of NOD2 against S. typhimurium was impaired when expression of HNP-1 was blocked by siRNA. HNP-1 secretion depends on NOD2 stimulation by MDP-LD and contributes to antibacterial activity in intestinal epithelial cells expressing endogenous NOD2, but not NOD2 3020insC mutant associated with increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease.

  13. Steroidal constituents of ganoderma applanatum and ganodermaneo-japonicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan; Kuo; Lin

    1998-11-01

    From the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma applanatum a new lanostanoid (1) and six known ergosteroids were isolated. Two known lanostanoids and five known steroids were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma neo-japonicum. The new lanostanoid was characterized as 24zeta-methyl-5alpha-lanosta-25-one (1).

  14. [Content of rare earth elements in wild Hypericum japonicum Thunb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhen-Lin; Rui, Yu-Kui; Tian, Zhi-Huan

    2009-06-01

    Rare earth elements are important nutritional elements for human health, and today more and more attention has been paid to the effective components in Chinese traditional medicine, especially to rare earth elements. Fifteen rare earth elements in wild hypericum japonicum Thunb were analyzed by the methods of ICP-MS. The results showed that the concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Tm, Lu and Y ranged from 6 ng x g(-1) x DW to 14 522 ng x g(-1) x DW, and among them the concentrations of La, Ce and Nd were higher than 2 000 ng x g(-1) x DW. Compared with the concentration of rare earth elements in rice, corn, wheat and barley, the total concentration of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb was much higher, which could be the mechanism of curative effect of hypericum japonicum Thunb on liverish diseases. The character of elements and the content of rare earth elements in soil should be responsible for the difference, but the distributive mechanism of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb should be further studied.

  15. In vitro propagation of katsura tree ( Cercidiphyllum japonicum Sieb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum Sieb. Et Zucc) is a long-lived, deciduous, wind-pollinated tree with dimorphic leaves. It is valued as an ornamental or a shade tree for landscape and a commercially valuable tree. Conventional propagation through seeds and cutting is not sufficient to satisfy the progressive demand.

  16. Regulation of Nod factor biosynthesis by alternative NodD proteins at distinct stages of symbiosis provides additional compatibility scrutiny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Simon; Sullivan, John T; Kawaharada, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-01

    The Lotus japonicus symbiont Mesorhizobium loti R7A encodes two copies of nodD and here we identify striking differences in Nod factor biosynthesis gene induction by NodD1 and NodD2 both in vitro and in planta. We demonstrate that induction of Nod factor biosynthesis genes is preferentially...... of nodD that provides the host plant with another level of compatibility scrutiny at the stage of infection thread development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  17. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Conclusion: Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome.

  18. NOD3: Single dish reduction software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Peter; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Schmidt, Philip

    2017-11-01

    NOD3 processes and analyzes maps from single-dish observations affected by scanning effects from clouds, receiver instabilities, or radio-frequency interference. Its “basket-weaving” tool combines orthogonally scanned maps into a final map that is almost free of scanning effects. A restoration tool for dual-beam observations reduces the noise by a factor of about two compared to the NOD2 version. Combining single-dish with interferometer data in the map plane ensures the full recovery of the total flux density.

  19. The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility genes NOD1 and NOD2 have conserved anti-bacterial roles in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan H. Oehlers

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, in the form of Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, is a debilitating chronic immune disorder of the intestine. A complex etiology resulting from dysfunctional interactions between the intestinal immune system and its microflora, influenced by host genetic susceptibility, makes disease modeling challenging. Mutations in NOD2 have the highest disease-specific risk association for CD, and a related gene, NOD1, is associated with UC. NOD1 and NOD2 encode intracellular bacterial sensor proteins acting as innate immune triggers, and represent promising therapeutic targets. The zebrafish has the potential to aid in modeling genetic and environmental aspects of IBD pathogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of the Nod signaling components in the zebrafish larval intestine. The nod1 and nod2 genes are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and neutrophils together with the Nod signaling pathway genes ripk2, a20, aamp, cd147, centaurin b1, erbin and grim-19. Using a zebrafish embryo Salmonella infection model, morpholino-mediated depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 reduced the ability of embryos to control systemic infection. Depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 decreased expression of dual oxidase in the intestinal epithelium and impaired the ability of larvae to reduce intracellular bacterial burden. This work highlights the potential use of zebrafish larvae in the study of components of IBD pathogenesis.

  20. Vigna mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants sampled in different agronomical-ecological-climatic regions of India are nodulated by Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; N'Zoue, Angèle; Moulin, Lionel; Depret, Géraldine; Laguerre, Gisèle

    2009-10-01

    Vigna mungo, Vigna radiata and Vigna unguiculata are important legume crops cultivated in India, but little is known about the genetic resources in native rhizobia that nodulate these species. To identify these bacteria, a core collection of 76 slow-growing isolates was built from root nodules of V. mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants grown at different sites within three agro-ecological-climatic regions of India. The genetic diversity of the bacterial collection was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) region, and the symbiotic genes nifH and nodC. One rDNA IGS type grouped 91% of isolates, but more diversity was found at the symbiotic loci (17 symbiotic genotypes). Overall, no host plant specificity was shown, the three host plant species sharing common bradyrhizobial genotypes that represented 62% of the collection. Similarly, the predominant genotypes were found at most sampling sites and in all agro-ecological-climatic regions. Phylogenies inferred from IGS sequencing and multi-locus sequence analysis of the dnaK, glnII and recA genes indicated that all isolates but one were clustered with the Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense species. The nifH phylogeny also grouped the different nif haplotypes within a cluster including B. yuanmingense, except for one infrequent nif haplotype which formed a new lineage within the Bradyrhizobium genus. These results may reflect a long history of co-evolution between B. yuanmingense and Vigna spp. in India, while intra-species polymorphism detected in the symbiotic loci may be linked with the long history of diversification of B. yuanmingense coinciding with that of its host legumes.

  1. Reply to Noddings, Darwall, Wren, and Fullinwider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Michael

    2010-01-01

    I respond to Noddings with further clarification of the notion of empathy and also argue that previous care ethics has put too much of an exclusive emphasis on relationships. I respond to Darwall by pointing out some implausible implications of his own and Kantian views about respect and by showing how a sentimentalist approach can avoid those…

  2. Detection of Extracellular Enzyme Activities in Ganoderma neo-japonicum

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Park, Ha-Na; Cho, Doo-Hyun; Yoo, Young-Bok; Park, Seung-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Ganoderma to produce extracellular enzymes, including β-glucosidase, cellulase, avicelase, pectinase, xylanase, protease, amylase, and ligninase was tested in chromogenic media. β-glucosidase showed the highest activity, among the eight tested enzymes. In particular, Ganoderma neo-japonicum showed significantly stronger activity for β-glucosidase than that of the other enzymes. Two Ganoderma lucidum isolates showed moderate activity for avicelase; however, Ganoderma neo-japonic...

  3. Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of groundnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Chimwamurombe, Percy; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Seven strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region, Namibia, were previously characterized and identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To corroborate their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences with Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T being the most closely related type strain in the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, and Bradyrhizobium daqingense CCBAU 15774T in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK placed the strains in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, most closely related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T. The species status was validated by results of DNA–DNA hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH genes placed the novel strains in a group with nifH of ‘Bradyrhizobium arachidis’ CCBAU 051107 that also nodulates peanuts. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain 58 2-1T induced effective nodules on V. subterranea, Vigna unguiculata and A. hypogaea, and some strains on Lablab purpureus. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov. is proposed, with 58 2-1T [ = DSM 100298T = LMG 28792T = NTCCM0016T (Windhoek)] as the type strain. The DNA G+C content of strain 58 2-1T was 64.7 mol% (T m).

  4. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  5. Schistosoma japonicum-associated morbidity and its mechanisms among children and young adults in the Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents results from a longitudinal study in Schistosoma japonicum infected children, adolescents and young adults, carried out in the Philippines. The aim of this thesis was to describe nutritional morbidity and hepatic fibrosis in the context of S. japonicum infection and reinfection

  6. Differential pulmonic NK and NKT cell responses in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hefei; Qin, Wenjuan; Yang, Quan; Xie, Hongyan; Qu, Jiale; Wang, Mei; Chen, Daixiong; Wang, Fang; Dong, Nuo; Chen, Longhua; Huang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) and natural killer T cells (NKT cells) play a role in anti-infection, anti-tumor, transplantation immunity, and autoimmune regulation. However, the role of NK and NKT cells during Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) infection has not been widely reported, especially regarding lung infections. The aim of this study was to research the NK and NKT cell response to S. japonicum infection in the lungs of mice. Using immunofluorescent histological analysis, NK and NKT cells were found near pulmonary granulomas. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that the percentage and number of pulmonic NK cells in S. japonicum-infected mice were significantly increased (P cell number of NKT cells were decreased compared to those of normal mice (P NKT cells was increased after infection (P NKT cells (P cells (P NKT cells significantly increased (P NKT cells (P NKT cell activation during S. japonicum infection.

  7. Nod2 mediates susceptibility to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Meinzer

    Full Text Available Nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (NOD2 is a component of the innate immunity known to be involved in the homeostasis of Peyer patches (PPs in mice. However, little is known about its role during gut infection in vivo. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis, adenolymphitis and septicaemia which is able to invade its host through PPs. We investigated the role of Nod2 during Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Death was delayed in Nod2 deleted and Crohn's disease associated Nod2 mutated mice orogastrically inoculated with Y. pseudotuberculosis. In PPs, the local immune response was characterized by a higher KC level and a more intense infiltration by neutrophils and macrophages. The apoptotic and bacterial cell counts were decreased. Finally, Nod2 deleted mice had a lower systemic bacterial dissemination and less damage of the haematopoeitic organs. This resistance phenotype was lost in case of intraperitoneal infection. We concluded that Nod2 contributes to the susceptibility to Y. pseudotuberculosis in mice.

  8. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  9. Cloning and characterisation of Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong You

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes depend for growth and development on host hormonal signals, which may include the insulin signalling pathway. We cloned and assessed the function of two insulin receptors from Schistosoma japonicum in order to shed light on their role in schistosome biology.We isolated, from S. japonicum, insulin receptors 1 (SjIR-1 and 2 (SjIR-2 sharing close sequence identity to their S. mansoni homologues (SmIR-1 and SmIR-2. SjIR-1 is located on the tegument basal membrane and the internal epithelium of adult worms, whereas SjIR-2 is located in the parenchyma of males and the vitelline tissue of females. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SjIR-2 and SmIR-2 are close to Echinococcus multilocularis insulin receptor (EmIR, suggesting that SjIR-2, SmIR-2 and EmIR share similar roles in growth and development in the three taxa. Structure homology modelling recovered the conserved structure between the SjIRs and Homo sapiens IR (HIR implying a common predicted binding mechanism in the ligand domain and the same downstream signal transduction processing in the tyrosine kinase domain as in HIR. Two-hybrid analysis was used to confirm that the ligand domains of SjIR-1 and SjIR-2 contain the insulin binding site. Incubation of adult worms in vitro, both with a specific insulin receptor inhibitor and anti-SjIRs antibodies, resulted in a significant decrease in worm glucose levels, suggesting again the same function for SjIRs in regulating glucose uptake as described for mammalian cells.Adult worms of S. japonicum possess insulin receptors that can specifically bind to insulin, indicating that the parasite can utilize host insulin for development and growth by sharing the same pathway as mammalian cells in regulating glucose uptake. A complete understanding of the role of SjIRs in the biology of S. japonicum may result in their use as new targets for drug and vaccine development against schistosomiasis.

  10. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelas, J I; Mesa, S; Mongiardini, E J; Jendrossek, D; Lodeiro, A R

    2016-07-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4 Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2 IMPORTANCE: In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve polymer

  11. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil from Farfugium japonicum flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Oh, Tae-Heon; Kim, Byeong Jin; Kim, Sang-Suk; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activities of hydrodistilled essential oil from Farfugium japonicum were investigated for the first time. The chemical constituents of the essential oil were further analyzed by GC-MS and included 1-undecene (22.43%), 1-nonene (19.83%), beta-caryophyllene (12.26%), alpha-copaene (3.70%), gamma-curcumene (2.86%), germacrene D (2.69%), and 1-decene (2.08%). The effects of the essential oil on nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages were also examined. The results indicate that the F. japonicum essential oil is an effective inhibitor of LPS-induced NO and PGE(2) production in RAW 264.7 cells. These inhibitory effects of the F. japonicum essential oil were accompanied by dose-dependent decreases in the iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression. In order to determine whether F. japonicum essential oil can safely be applied to human skin, the cytotoxic effects of F. japonicum essential oil were determined by colorimetric MTT assays in human dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte HaCaT cells. F. japonicum essential oil exhibited low cytotoxicity at 100 mug/mL. Based on these results, we suggest that F. japonicum essential oil may be considered a potential anti-inflammatory candidate for topical application.

  12. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  13. Antibacterial action of new antibacterial peptides, Nod1 and Nod2, isolated from Nordotis discus discus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Kim, Jin-Young; Lee, Jong-Kook; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2012-07-11

    Abalone is a valuable seafood in the aquaculture industry worldwide as it is rich in protein. However, to date, research on the functional proteins of abalone is lacking. Herein, we report two peptides with antibacterial activity from Nordotis discus discus . The purification of peptides was performed by solvent extraction, ultrafiltration, and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the isolated antibacterial peptides, named as Nod1 and Nod2, were identified by Edman degradation and did not show any similarity to other proteins and peptides in databases based on results of BLAST homology analysis. Molecular masses of Nod1 and Nod2 were 6145.06 and 6360.07 Da, respectively, as determined by mass spectrometric analysis. The two peptides displayed pH-dependent antibacterial activity against various bacteria that was more potent at pH 5.4 than pH 7.4, but they did not inhibit fungal growth at either pH levels. Their antibacterial activity was due to membranolytic action, which was assayed by SYTOX-green uptake. In addition, both peptides were virtually noncytolytic for human erythrocytes and mammalian cells.

  14. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in the absence of Nod factors: two possible scenarios with or without the T3SS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Shin; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teulet, Albin; Thouin, Julien; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gully, Djamel; Arrighi, Jean-François; Furuta, Noriyuki; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Nouwen, Nico; Teaumroong, Neung; Giraud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of alternative Nod factor (NF)-independent symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia was first demonstrated in some Aeschynomene species that are nodulated by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia lacking the canonical nodABC genes. In this study, we revealed that a large diversity of non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, including B. elkanii, was also able to induce nodules on the NF-independent Aeschynomene species, A. indica. Using cytological analysis of the nodules and the nitrogenase enzyme activity as markers, a gradient in the symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobial strains and A. indica could be distinguished. This ranged from strains that induced nodules that were only infected intercellularly to rhizobial strains that formed nodules in which the host cells were invaded intracellularly and that displayed a weak nitrogenase activity. In all non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, the type III secretion system (T3SS) appears required to trigger nodule organogenesis. In contrast, genome sequence analysis revealed that apart from a few exceptions, like the Bradyrhizobium ORS285 strain, photosynthetic bradyrhizobia strains lack a T3SS. Furthermore, analysis of the symbiotic properties of an ORS285 T3SS mutant revealed that the T3SS could have a positive or negative role for the interaction with NF-dependent Aeschynomene species, but that it is dispensable for the interaction with all NF-independent Aeschynomene species tested. Taken together, these data indicate that two NF-independent symbiotic processes are possible between legumes and rhizobia: one dependent on a T3SS and one using a so far unknown mechanism.

  15. Disseminated peritoneal Schistosoma japonicum: a case report and review of the pathological manifestations of the helminth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlWaheeb, Salah; AlMurshed, Maryam; Dashti, Fareed; Hira Parsotam R; AlSarrafd, Lamia

    2007-01-01

    Schistosomiasis (also known as bilharzia, bilharziasis, bilharziosis or snail fever) is a human disease syndrome caused by infection from one of several species of parasitic trematodes of the genus Schistosoma. The three main species infecting humans are S haematobium, S japonicum, and S mansoni. S japonicum is most common in the far east, mostly in China and the Philippines. We present an unusual case of S japonicum in a 32-year-old Filipino woman who had schistosomal ova studding the peritoneal cavity and forming a mass in the right iliac fossa. (author)

  16. OBTAINING AND ACTIVITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES BASED ON THE EXOPOLYSACCHARIDE OF DIAZOTROPHIC STRAIN Bradyrhizobium japonicum 36 AND AgNO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Rasulov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to obtain silver nanoparticles and to study of its antibacterial activity against pathogenic cultures Escherichia coli ATCC11229 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538. Obtained complex was characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Colloid solutions of the complex absorbed radiation in the visible regions of 420–460 nm, which confirmed the formation of silver nanoparticles. The size of synthesized SNP varied from 6 to 50 nm. There has been confirmed presence in them of atomic silver. Obtained compound possessed antibacterial activity against pathogens, such as Escherichia coli ATCC11229 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538.

  17. Stereotypes on Nodding syndrome: responses of health workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To identify stereotypes and negative attitudes held by primary care health workers about nodding syndrome. Method: Of one hundred health workers invited by the Uganda Ministry of Health for training on nodding syndrome from the three most affected districts of Pader, Lamwo and Kitgum forty were interviewed ...

  18. NOD1 gene polymorphisms in relation to aggressive periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, B.G.; Fiebig, A.; Nothnagel, M.; Jepsen, S.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Franke, A.; Jervoe-Storm, P.M.; Schenck, K.; van der Velden, U.; Schreiber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: NOD proteins are part of innate immunity mechanisms. They play a role in epithelial barrier functions and inflammatory responses to bacteria. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOD1 gene have proven to be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asthma. Objective:

  19. Stereotypes on Nodding syndrome: responses of health workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Overall, four broad categories of negative stereotypes were identified; Nodding syndrome is 1) an incurable disease, 2) is associated with evil spirits and curses, 3) is disabling, making the patient a burden to society and 4) is a fatal illness. Conclusion: Primary health care workers who lead the care of patients with nodding ...

  20. A specific indel marker for the Philippines Schistosoma japonicum revealed by analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Chen, Fen; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Blair, David; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, near-complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences for Schistosoma japonicum from different regions in the Philippines and Japan were amplified and sequenced. Comparisons among S. japonicum from the Philippines, Japan, and China revealed a geographically based length difference in mt genomes, but the mt genomic organization and gene arrangement were the same. Sequence differences among samples from the Philippines and all samples from the three endemic areas were 0.57-2.12 and 0.76-3.85 %, respectively. The most variable part of the mt genome was the non-coding region. In the coding portion of the genome, protein-coding genes varied more than rRNA genes and tRNAs. The near-complete mt genome sequences for Philippine specimens were identical in length (14,091 bp) which was 4 bp longer than those of S. japonicum samples from Japan and China. This indel provides a unique genetic marker for S. japonicum samples from the Philippines. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated amino acids of 12 protein-coding genes showed that samples of S. japonicum clustered according to their geographical origins. The identified mitochondrial indel marker will be useful for tracing the source of S. japonicum infection in humans and animals in Southeast Asia.

  1. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE delays NOD2 expression and affects NOD2/RIPK2 interactions in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Marian C Aldhous

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD: NOD2 is the strongest individual genetic determinant and smoking the best-characterised environmental factor. Carriage of NOD2 mutations predispose to small-intestinal, stricturing CD, a phenotype also associated with smoking. We hypothesised that cigarette smoke extract (CSE altered NOD2 expression and function in intestinal epithelial cells.Intestinal epithelial cell-lines (SW480, HT29, HCT116 were stimulated with CSE and nicotine (to mimic smoking ±TNFα (to mimic inflammation. NOD2 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting; NOD2-RIPK2 interactions by co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP; nuclear NFκB-p65 by ELISA; NFκB activity by luciferase reporter assays and chemokines (CCL20, IL8 in culture supernatants by ELISA. In SW480 and HT29 cells the TNFα-induced NOD2 expression at 4 hours was reduced by CSE (p = 0.0226, a response that was dose-dependent (p = 0.003 and time-dependent (p = 0.0004. Similar effects of CSE on NOD2 expression were seen in cultured ileal biopsies from healthy individuals. In SW480 cells CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB-p65 translocation at 15 minutes post-stimulation, upstream of NOD2. Levels of the NOD2-RIPK2 complex were no different at 8 hours post-stimulation with combinations of CSE, nicotine and TNFα, but at 18 hours it was increased in cells stimulated with TNFα+CSE but decreased with TNFα alone (p = 0.0330; CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB activity (p = 0.0014 at the same time-point. At 24 hours, basal CCL20 and IL8 (p<0.001 for both and TNFα-induced CCL20 (p = 0.0330 production were decreased by CSE. CSE also reduced NOD2 expression, CCL20 and IL8 production seen with MDP-stimulation of SW480 cells pre-treated with combinations of TNFα and CSE.CSE delayed TNFα-induced NOD2 mRNA expression and was associated with abnormal NOD2/RIPK2 interaction, reduced NFκB activity and decreased chemokine

  2. Phenotyping of Nod1/2 double deficient mice and characterization of Nod1/2 in systemic inflammation and associated renal disease

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    Ingrid Stroo

    2012-10-01

    It is indispensable to thoroughly characterize each animal model in order to distinguish between primary and secondary effects of genetic changes. The present study analyzed Nod1 and Nod2 double deficient (Nod1/2 DKO mice under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Nod1 and Nod2 are members of the Nucleotide-binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat containing Receptor (NLR family. Several inflammatory disorders, such as Crohn's disease and asthma, are linked to genetic changes in either Nod1 or Nod2. These associations suggest that Nod1 and Nod2 play important roles in regulating the immune system. Three-month-old wildtype (Wt and Nod1/2 DKO mice were sacrificed, body and organ weight were determined, and blood was drawn. Except for lower liver weight in Nod1/2 DKO mice, no differences were found in body/organ weight between both strains. Leukocyte count and composition was comparable. No significant changes in analyzed plasma biochemical markers were found. Additionally, intestinal and vascular permeability was determined. Nod1/2 DKO mice show increased susceptibility for intestinal permeability while vascular permeability was not affected. Next we induced septic shock and organ damage by administering LPS+PGN intraperitoneally to Wt and Nod1/2 DKO mice and sacrificed animals after 2 and 24 hours. The systemic inflammatory and metabolic response was comparable between both strains. However, renal response was different as indicated by partly preserved kidney function and tubular epithelial cell damage in Nod1/2 DKO at 24 hours. Remarkably, renal inflammatory mediators Tnfα, KC and Il-10 were significantly increased in Nod1/2 DKO compared with Wt mice at 2 hours. Systematic analysis of Nod1/2 DKO mice revealed a possible role of Nod1/2 in the development of renal disease during systemic inflammation.

  3. MyD88-, but not Nod1- and/or Nod2-deficient mice, show increased susceptibility to polymicrobial sepsis due to impaired local inflammatory response.

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    Fabiane Sônego

    Full Text Available Pathogen recognition and triggering of the inflammatory response following infection in mammals depend mainly on Toll-like and Nod-like receptors. Here, we evaluated the role of Nod1, Nod2 and MyD88-dependent signaling in the chemokine production and neutrophil recruitment to the infectious site during sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in C57Bl/6 mice. We demonstrate that Nod1 and Nod2 are not involved in the release of chemokines and recruitment of neutrophils to the infectious site during CLP-induced septic peritonitis because these events were similar in wild-type, Nod1-, Nod2-, Nod1/Nod2- and Rip2-deficient mice. Consequently, the local and systemic bacterial loads were not altered. Accordingly, neither Nod1 nor Nod2 was involved in the production of the circulating cytokines and in the accumulation of leukocytes in the lungs. By contrast, we showed that MyD88-dependent signaling is crucial for the establishment of the local inflammatory response during CLP-induced sepsis. MyD88-deficient mice were susceptible to sepsis because of an impaired local production of chemokines and defective neutrophil recruitment to the infection site. Altogether, these data show that Nod1, Nod2 and Rip2 are not required for local chemokine production and neutrophil recruitment during CLP-induced sepsis, and they reinforce the importance of MyD88-dependent signaling for initiation of a protective host response.

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium elkanii Strain UASWS1016, a Potential Symbiotic Biofertilizer for Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien; Schulz, Torsten; Lefort, François

    2016-10-06

    Bradyrhizobium elkanii UASWS1016 has been isolated from a wet oxidation sewage plant in Italy. Fully equipped for ammonia assimilation, heavy metal resistances, and aromatic compounds degradation, it carries a large type IV secretion system, specific of plant-associated microbes. Deprived of toxins, it could be considered for agricultural and environmental uses. Copyright © 2016 Crovadore et al.

  5. Release of extracellular vesicles containing small RNAs from the eggs of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shanli; Wang, Sai; Lin, Yu; Jiang, Pengyue; Cui, Xiaobin; Wang, Xinye; Zhang, Yuanbin; Pan, Weiqing

    2016-11-08

    Schistosoma japonicum is a parasitic flatworm that causes human schistosomiasis. Secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a key role in pathogen-host interfaces. Previous studies have shown that S. japonicum adult worms can release microRNA (miRNA)-containing EVs, which can transfer their cargo to mammalian cells and regulate gene expression in recipient cells. Tissue-trapped eggs are generally considered the major contributor to the severe pathology of schistosomiasis; however, the interactions between the host and parasite in this critical stage remain largely unknown. The culture medium for S. japonicum eggs in vitro was used to isolate EVs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis was used to confirm that vesicles produced by the eggs were EVs based on size and morphology. Total RNA extracted from EVs was analyzed by Solexa technology to determine the miRNA profile. The in vitro internalization of the EVs by mammalian cells was analyzed by confocal microscopy. The presence of EVs associated miRNAs in the primary hepatocytes of infected mice was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). EVs were isolated from the culture medium of in vitro cultivated S. japonicum eggs. TEM analysis confirmed that nanosized vesicles were present in the culture medium. RNA-seq analysis showed that the egg-derived EVs contained small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) populations including miRNAs, suggesting a potential role in host manipulation. This study further showed that Hepa1-6, a murine liver cell line, internalized the purified EVs and their cargo miRNAs that were detectable in the primary hepatocytes of mice infected with S. japonicum. Schistosoma japonicum eggs can release miRNA-containing EVs, and the EVs can transfer their cargo to recipient cells in vitro. These results demonstrate the regulatory potential of S. japonicum egg EVs at the parasite-host interface.

  6. Release of extracellular vesicles containing small RNAs from the eggs of Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanli Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosoma japonicum is a parasitic flatworm that causes human schistosomiasis. Secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs play a key role in pathogen-host interfaces. Previous studies have shown that S. japonicum adult worms can release microRNA (miRNA-containing EVs, which can transfer their cargo to mammalian cells and regulate gene expression in recipient cells. Tissue-trapped eggs are generally considered the major contributor to the severe pathology of schistosomiasis; however, the interactions between the host and parasite in this critical stage remain largely unknown. Methods The culture medium for S. japonicum eggs in vitro was used to isolate EVs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis was used to confirm that vesicles produced by the eggs were EVs based on size and morphology. Total RNA extracted from EVs was analyzed by Solexa technology to determine the miRNA profile. The in vitro internalization of the EVs by mammalian cells was analyzed by confocal microscopy. The presence of EVs associated miRNAs in the primary hepatocytes of infected mice was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Results EVs were isolated from the culture medium of in vitro cultivated S. japonicum eggs. TEM analysis confirmed that nanosized vesicles were present in the culture medium. RNA-seq analysis showed that the egg-derived EVs contained small non-coding RNA (sncRNA populations including miRNAs, suggesting a potential role in host manipulation. This study further showed that Hepa1-6, a murine liver cell line, internalized the purified EVs and their cargo miRNAs that were detectable in the primary hepatocytes of mice infected with S. japonicum. Conclusions Schistosoma japonicum eggs can release miRNA-containing EVs, and the EVs can transfer their cargo to recipient cells in vitro. These results demonstrate the regulatory potential of S. japonicum egg EVs at the parasite-host interface.

  7. The Very Long Chain Fatty Acid (C26:25OH Linked to the Lipid A Is Important for the Fitness of the Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium Strain ORS278 and the Establishment of a Successful Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes

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    Nicolas Busset

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In rhizobium strains, the lipid A is modified by the addition of a very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA shown to play an important role in rigidification of the outer membrane, thereby facilitating their dual life cycle, outside and inside the plant. In Bradyrhizobium strains, the lipid A is more complex with the presence of at least two VLCFAs, one covalently linked to a hopanoid molecule, but the importance of these modifications is not well-understood. In this study, we identified a cluster of VLCFA genes in the photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium strain ORS278, which nodulates Aeschynomene plants in a Nod factor-independent process. We tried to mutate the different genes of the VLCFA gene cluster to prevent the synthesis of the VLCFAs, but only one mutant in the lpxXL gene encoding an acyltransferase was obtained. Structural analysis of the lipid A showed that LpxXL is involved in the transfer of the C26:25OH VLCFA to the lipid A but not in the one of the C30:29OH VLCFA which harbors the hopanoid molecule. Despite maintaining the second VLCFA, the ability of the mutant to cope with various stresses (low pH, high temperature, high osmolarity, and antimicrobial peptides and to establish an efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiosis was drastically reduced. In parallel, we investigated whether the BRADO0045 gene, which encodes a putative acyltransferase displaying a weak identity with the apo-lipoprotein N-acyltransferase Lnt, could be involved in the transfer of the C30:29OH VLCFA to the lipid A. Although the mutant exhibited phenotypes similar to the lpxXL mutant, no difference in the lipid A structure was observed from that in the wild-type strain, indicating that this gene is not involved in the modification of lipid A. Our results advance our knowledge of the biosynthesis pathway and the role of VLCFAs-modified lipid A in free-living and symbiotic states of Bradyrhizobium strains.

  8. Caring to Care: Applying Noddings' Philosophy to Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Hirsh, David A; Monie, Daphne; Weil, Henry; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-12-01

    The authors argue that Nel Noddings' philosophy, "an ethic of caring," may illuminate how students learn to be caring physicians from their experience of being in a caring, reciprocal relationship with teaching faculty. In her philosophy, Noddings acknowledges two important contextual continuities: duration and space, which the authors speculate exist within longitudinal integrated clerkships. In this Perspective, the authors highlight core features of Noddings' philosophy and explore its applicability to medical education. They apply Noddings' philosophy to a subset of data from a previously published longitudinal case study to explore its "goodness of fit" with the experience of eight students in the 2012 cohort of the Columbia-Bassett longitudinal integrated clerkship. In line with Noddings' philosophy, the authors' supplementary analysis suggests that students (1) recognized caring when they talked about "being known" by teaching faculty who "cared for" and "trusted" them; (2) responded to caring by demonstrating enthusiasm, action, and responsibility toward patients; and (3) acknowledged that duration and space facilitated caring relations with teaching faculty. The authors discuss how Noddings' philosophy provides a useful conceptual framework to apply to medical education design and to future research on caring-oriented clinical training, such as longitudinal integrated clerkships.

  9. Bradyrhizobium vignae sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing symbiont isolated from effective nodules of Vigna and Arachis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Hurek, Thomas; Bünger, Wiebke; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Twenty one strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region of Namibia, were previously characterized as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To verify their taxonomic position, the strains were further analysed using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequences were most similar to Bradyrhizobium manausense BR 3351T, with Bradyrhizobium ganzhouense RITF806T being the most closely related type strain in the phylogenetic analysis, and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK placed the strains in a highly supported lineage distinct from species of the genus Bradyrhizobium with validly published names; they were most closely related to Bradyrhizobium subterraneum 58 2-1T. The status of the species was validated by results of DNA-DNA hybridization. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests, including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance, could be used to differentiate representative strains of species of the genus Bradyrhizobium with validly published names. Novel strain 7-2T induced effective nodules on Vigna subterranea, Vigna unguiculata, Arachis hypogaea and on Lablab purpureus. The DNA G+C content of strain 7-2T was 65.4 mol% (Tm). Based on the data presented, we conclude that these strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium vignae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain 7-2T [LMG 28791T, DSMZ 100297T, NTCCM0018T (Windhoek)] as the type strain.

  10. Transmission dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum in the lakes and marshlands of China.

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    Darren J Gray

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum is a major public health concern in China, with over one million people infected and another 40 million living in areas at risk of infection. Unlike the disease caused by S. mansoni and S. haematobium, schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonosis, involving a number of different mammalian species as reservoir hosts. As a result of a number of published reports from China, it has long been considered that bovines, particularly water buffaloes, play a major role in human S. japonicum transmission there, and a drug-based intervention study (1998-2003 around the Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province provided proof of concept that water buffaloes are, indeed, major reservoirs of human infection in this setting.In this study we incorporated recently obtained epidemiological information to model the steady-state S. japonicum transmission as well as the impact of the removal of S. japonicum transmission attributable to water buffaloes on human infection rates across six different endemic scenarios within three villages in the Dongting (Hunan and Poyang (Jiangxi lakes of southern China. Similar results were obtained for all scenarios. Steady-state S. japonicum infection rates remained constant and human prevalence and incidence were predicted to fall considerably over time. The model showed that the contribution of S. japonicum water buffalo transmission to human infection ranged from 39.1% to 99.1% and predicted that the removal of water buffalo transmission would reduce parasite reproductive rates below 1. This indicates that without the contribution of water buffaloes, S. japonicum transmission is interrupted and unsustainable. These scenarios are generalizable to other endemic villages in the lake and marshland areas of China where a similar cycle of snail infection and infection/reinfection of humans and bovines occurs.Along with previous epidemiological data, our findings strongly support water buffaloes as an important component of the

  11. Cross-sectional associations between intensity of animal and human infection with Schistosoma japonicum in Western Samar province, Philippines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGarvey, Stephen T.; Carabin, Hélène; Batalong, Ernesto Jr.

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the association between the intensity of animal infection with Schistosoma japonicum and human infection in Western Samar province, the Philippines......To estimate the association between the intensity of animal infection with Schistosoma japonicum and human infection in Western Samar province, the Philippines...

  12. Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki revisited: Domestication study and antioxidant properties of its basidiocarps and mycelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee-Cheat; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Phan, Chia-Wei; Tan, Yee-Shin; Raman, Jegadeesh; Anuar, Azliza Mad; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom cultivation benefits humankind as it deliberately encourages wild mushrooms to be commercially propagated while recycling agricultural wastes. Ganoderma neo-japonicum is a rare polypore mushroom found growing on decaying Schizostachyum brachycladium (a tropical bamboo) clumps in Malaysia. The Malaysian indigenous tribes including the Temuans and Temiars use the basidiocarps of G. neo-japonicum to treat various ailments including diabetes. In this study, the domestication of G. neo-japonicum in artificial logs of different agricultural residues was investigated. Sawdust promoted the mycelia spawn colonisation in the shortest period of 38 ± 0.5 days. However, only sawdust and bamboo dust supported the primodia formation. Complex medium supported mycelium growth in submerged cultures and 27.11 ± 0.43 g/L of mycelia was obtained after 2 weeks of cultivation at 28 °C and 200 rpm. Antioxidant potential in mushroom may be influenced by different cultivation and extraction methods. The different extracts from the wild and cultivated basidiocarps as well as mycelia were then tested for their antioxidant properties. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of mycelia and basidiocarps tested had varying levels of antioxidant activities. To conclude, domestication of wild G. neo-japonicum using agroresidues may ensure a continuous supply of G. neo-japonicum for its medicinal use while ensuring the conservation of this rare species. PMID:26213331

  13. Novel real-time PCr for detection of Schistosoma japonicum in stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lier, T; Simonsen, G S; Haaheim, H; Hjelmevoll, S O; Vennervald, B J; Johansen, M V

    2006-03-01

    Chemotherapy has been used on a large scale in countries where the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is endemic. This has led to a lower intensity of infections and consequently lower diagnostic values of commonly used diagnostic tests like serology and Kato-Katz stool smear. We designed a novel real-time PCR method for detection of S. japonicum in stool samples. Further, we evaluated different versions of an inexpensive, non-commercial extraction method, ROSE, as well as the commercial QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit. PCR primer sequences were designed targeting the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase I gene. Bovine serum albumin was added to the DNA extracts and SYBR Green was used for detection. The PCR method was evaluated with non-infected stool samples spiked with S. japonicum eggs. It demonstrated high sensitivity, even in samples containing a single egg. The two extraction methods were equally effective. The PCR was specific for S. japonicum when tested against other Schistosoma species, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm and Taenia sp. We conclude that this novel real-time PCR, in combination with either ROSE or QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit extraction, is a sensitive and specific tool for diagnosing S. japonicum in human stool samples.

  14. An insight into the genetic variation of Schistosoma japonicum in mainland China using DNA microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Jaya; Qian, Bao Zhen; Mcvean, Gilean; Webster, Joanne P

    2005-03-01

    This study presents the first microsatellite investigation into the level of genetic variation among Schistosoma japonicum from different geographical origins. S. japonicum isolates were obtained from seven endemic provinces across mainland China: Zhejiang (Jiashan County), Anhui (Guichi County), Jiangxi (Yongxiu County), Hubei (Wuhan County), Hunan (Yueyang area), Sichuan 1 (Maoshan County), Sichuan 2 (Tianquan County), Yunnan (Dali County), and also one province in the Philippines (Sorsogon). DNA from 20 individuals from each origin were screened against 11 recently isolated and characterized S. japonicum microsatellites, and a set of nine loci were selected based on their polymorphic information content. High levels of polymorphism were obtained between and within population samples, with Chinese and Philippine strains appearing to follow different lineages, and with distinct branching between provinces. Moreover, across mainland China, genotype clustering appeared to be related to habitat type and/or intermediate host morph. These results highlight the suitability of microsatellites for population genetic studies of S. japonicum and suggest that there may be different strains of S. japonicum circulating in mainland China.

  15. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qi; Yuan, Xiongying; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Changning; Lv, Zhiyue; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES) proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  16. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Liao

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  17. Bacterial peptidoglycan stimulates adipocyte lipolysis via NOD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chi

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with inflammation that can drive metabolic defects such as hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Specific metabolites can contribute to inflammation, but nutrient intake and obesity are also associated with altered bacterial load in metabolic tissues (i.e. metabolic endotoxemia. These bacterial cues can contribute to obesity-induced inflammation. The specific bacterial components and host receptors that underpin altered metabolic responses are emerging. We previously showed that Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 activation with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN caused insulin resistance in mice. We now show that PGN induces cell-autonomous lipolysis in adipocytes via NOD1. Specific bacterial PGN motifs stimulated lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT explants from WT, but not NOD1⁻/⁻mice. NOD1-activating PGN stimulated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK,protein kinase A (PKA, and NF-κB in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The NOD1-mediated lipolysis response was partially reduced by inhibition of ERK1/2 or PKA alone, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. NOD1-stimulated lipolysis was partially dependent on NF-κB and was completely suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 and PKA simultaneously or hormone sensitive lipase (HSL. Our results demonstrate that bacterial PGN stimulates lipolysis in adipocytes by engaging a stress kinase, PKA, NF-κB-dependent lipolytic program. Bacterial NOD1 activation is positioned as a component of metabolic endotoxemia that can contribute to hyperlipidemia, systemic inflammation and insulin resistance by acting directly on adipocytes.

  18. Eficiência simbiótica de estirpes de Bradyrhizobium isoladas de solo do Cerrado em caupi Symbiotic efficiency of cowpea Bradyrhizobium strains in Cerrado soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerri Édson Zilli

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as relações filogenéticas de estirpes de Bradyrhizobium e a contribuição destas estirpes para a fixação biológica de nitrogênio em caupi, em solos do Cerrado. Na avaliação da relação filogenética, o gene 16S rDNA de cada uma das estirpes foi amplificado e seqüenciado, e para a análise da eficiência simbiótica, determinou-se: N total, matéria seca das plantas, massa de nódulos e redução de acetileno, em casa de vegetação, e ocupação nodular, em experimento de campo. A maioria das estirpes estudadas pertence a B. elkanii e, pelo menos dez das estirpes, independentemente da espécie, apresentaram bom desempenho quanto à fixação biológica de N2. As estirpes BR3262, BR3280 (caracterizadas como B. elkanii e BR3267, BR3287 e BR3288 (Bradyrhizobium sp. mostram-se como inoculantes potenciais para o caupi, em razão do bom desempenho tanto na eficiência simbiótica quanto na ocupação nodular.The obejctive of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships of Bradyrhizobium strains, and the contribution of these strains to cowpea biological nitrogen fixation in Cerrado soils. To elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among strains, their 16S rDNA gene was extracted, amplified and sequenced. In order to evaluate the symbiotic efficiency, total N, plant dry matter, nodular mass and acetylene reduction in a greenhouse experiment, and nodular occupation, in a field experiment, were determined. Most part of the strains belonge to B. elkanii, and at least ten of the analyzed strains, independently of the species, presented high capacity to fix N2. The strains BR3262, BR3280 (characterized as B. elkanii, BR3267, BR3287 and BR3288 (Bradyrhizobium sp. exhibit a potential as inoculant for cowpea, due to their high biological nitrogen fixation.

  19. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection in Carabao from Samar Province, the Philippines: implications for transmission and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Gordon

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum is endemic in the Philippines, China and Indonesia, and infects more than 40 mammalian host species, all of which can act as reservoirs of infection. In China, water buffaloes have been shown to be major reservoirs of human infection. However, in the Philippines, carabao have not been considered important reservoir hosts for S. japonicum due to the low prevalence and infection intensities reported, the only exception being a qPCR-based study indicating 51% of carabao were S. japonicum-positive. However, the low prevalence found for the same animals when using conventional copro-parasitological techniques means that there is still confusion about the role of carabao in the transmission of schistosomiasis japonicum. To address this inconsistency, and to shed light on the potential role of carabao in the transmission of S. japonicum in the Philippines, we undertook a pilot survey, collecting fecal samples from animals in Western Samar Province and we used a combination of molecular and copro-parasitological techniques to determine the prevalence and intensity of S. japonicum. We found a high prevalence of S. japonicum in the carabao using a validated real-time PCR (qPCR and a copro-parasitological tool, the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation (FEA-SD technique. A much lower prevalence of S. japonicum was recorded for the same fecal samples using conventional PCR, the Kato-Katz technique and miracidial hatching. These results suggest that, due to their low diagnostic sensitivity, traditional copro-parasitological techniques underestimate infection in carabao. The use of FEA-SD and qPCR provides a more accurate diagnosis. Based on these findings, the role of bovines in the transmission of S. japonicum appears to be more important in the Philippines than previously recognized, and this may have significant implications for the future control of schistosomiasis there, particularly as, in contrast with previous surveys, we found

  20. High Prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum Infection in Carabao from Samar Province, the Philippines: Implications for Transmission and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Catherine A.; Acosta, Luz P.; Gray, Darren J.; Olveda, Remigo M.; Jarilla, Blanca; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Ross, Allen G.; McManus, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is endemic in the Philippines, China and Indonesia, and infects more than 40 mammalian host species, all of which can act as reservoirs of infection. In China, water buffaloes have been shown to be major reservoirs of human infection. However, in the Philippines, carabao have not been considered important reservoir hosts for S. japonicum due to the low prevalence and infection intensities reported, the only exception being a qPCR-based study indicating 51% of carabao were S. japonicum-positive. However, the low prevalence found for the same animals when using conventional copro-parasitological techniques means that there is still confusion about the role of carabao in the transmission of schistosomiasis japonicum. To address this inconsistency, and to shed light on the potential role of carabao in the transmission of S. japonicum in the Philippines, we undertook a pilot survey, collecting fecal samples from animals in Western Samar Province and we used a combination of molecular and copro-parasitological techniques to determine the prevalence and intensity of S. japonicum. We found a high prevalence of S. japonicum in the carabao using a validated real-time PCR (qPCR) and a copro-parasitological tool, the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation (FEA-SD) technique. A much lower prevalence of S. japonicum was recorded for the same fecal samples using conventional PCR, the Kato-Katz technique and miracidial hatching. These results suggest that, due to their low diagnostic sensitivity, traditional copro-parasitological techniques underestimate infection in carabao. The use of FEA-SD and qPCR provides a more accurate diagnosis. Based on these findings, the role of bovines in the transmission of S. japonicum appears to be more important in the Philippines than previously recognized, and this may have significant implications for the future control of schistosomiasis there, particularly as, in contrast with previous surveys, we found an unprecedented

  1. Low endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharides isolated from Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Azospirillum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaniecka, Iwona; Zdzisinska, Barbara; Kandefer-Szerszen, Martyna; Choma, Adam

    2010-12-01

    The endotoxic activities of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from different strains of rhizobia and rhizobacteria (Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Azospirillum) were compared to those of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium LPS. The biological activity of all the examined preparations, measured as Limulus lysate gelation, production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and nitrogen oxide (NO) induction in human myelomonocytic cells (line THP-1), was considerably lower than that of the reference enterobacterial endotoxin. Among the rhizobial lipopolysaccharides, the activities of Mesorhizobium huakuii and Azospirillum lipoferum LPSs were higher than those of the LPS preparations from five strains of Bradyrhizobium. The weak endotoxic activity of the examined preparations was correlated with differences in lipid A structure compared to Salmonella. © 2010 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Functional Roles of NOD1 in Odontoblasts on Dental Pulp Innate Immunity

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    Yuki Hosokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries-related pathogens are first recognized by odontoblasts and induce inflammatory events that develop to pulpitis. Generally, initial sensing of microbial pathogens is mediated by pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD; however, little is known about NODs in odontoblasts. In this study, the levels of NODs expressed in rat odontoblastic cell line, KN-3, were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of chemokines in NOD-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells were analyzed by real-time PCR and ELISA. The signal transduction pathway activated with NOD-specific ligand was assessed by blocking assay with specific inhibitors and reporter assay. In KN-3 cells, the expression level of NOD1 was stronger than that of NOD2 and the production of chemokines, such as CINC-1, CINC-2, CCL20, and MCP-1, was upregulated by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand, but not with NOD2-specific ligand. CINC-2 and CCL20 production by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand was reduced by p38 MAPK and AP-1 signaling inhibitors. Furthermore, the reporter assay demonstrated AP-1 activation in NOD1-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells. These findings indicated that NOD1 expressed in odontoblasts functions to upregulate the chemokines expression via p38-AP-1 signaling pathway and suggested that NOD1 may play important roles in the initiation and progression of pulpitis.

  3. Functional Roles of NOD1 in Odontoblasts on Dental Pulp Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Yuki; Hirao, Kouji; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Washio, Ayako; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Takegawa, Daisuke; Kitamura, Chiaki; Matsuo, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Caries-related pathogens are first recognized by odontoblasts and induce inflammatory events that develop to pulpitis. Generally, initial sensing of microbial pathogens is mediated by pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD); however, little is known about NODs in odontoblasts. In this study, the levels of NODs expressed in rat odontoblastic cell line, KN-3, were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of chemokines in NOD-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells were analyzed by real-time PCR and ELISA. The signal transduction pathway activated with NOD-specific ligand was assessed by blocking assay with specific inhibitors and reporter assay. In KN-3 cells, the expression level of NOD1 was stronger than that of NOD2 and the production of chemokines, such as CINC-1, CINC-2, CCL20, and MCP-1, was upregulated by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand, but not with NOD2-specific ligand. CINC-2 and CCL20 production by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand was reduced by p38 MAPK and AP-1 signaling inhibitors. Furthermore, the reporter assay demonstrated AP-1 activation in NOD1-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells. These findings indicated that NOD1 expressed in odontoblasts functions to upregulate the chemokines expression via p38-AP-1 signaling pathway and suggested that NOD1 may play important roles in the initiation and progression of pulpitis.

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis NOD1 and NOD2 receptors and their functional role in in-vitro cellular immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Brahma

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors (NLRs are innate immune receptors that recognize bacterial cell wall components and initiate host immune response. Structure and function of NLRs have been well studied in human and mice, but little information exists on genetic composition and role of these receptors in innate immune system of water buffalo--a species known for its exceptional disease resistance. Here, a comparative study on the functional domains of NOD1 and NOD2 was performed across different species. The NOD mediated in-vitro cellular responses were studied in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells, resident macrophages, mammary epithelial, and fibroblast cells. Buffalo NOD1 (buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed conserved domain architectures as found in other mammals. The domains of buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed analogy in secondary and tertiary conformations. Constitutive expressions of NODs were ubiquitous in different tissues. Following treatment with NOD agonists, peripheral lymphocytes showed an IFN-γ response along-with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages and mammary epithelial cells showed NOD mediated in-vitro immune response through NF-κB dependent pathway. Fibroblasts showed pro-inflammatory cytokine response following agonist treatment. Our study demonstrates that both immune and non-immune cells could generate NOD-mediated responses to pathogens though the type and magnitude of response depend on the cell types. The structural basis of ligand recognition by buffalo NODs and knowledge of immune response by different cell types could be useful for development of non-infective innate immune modulators and next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  5. SjTPdb: integrated transcriptome and proteome database and analysis platform for Schistosoma japonicum

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    Wang Zhi-Qin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosoma japonicum is one of the three major blood fluke species, the etiological agents of schistosomiasis which remains a serious public health problem with an estimated 200 million people infected in 76 countries. In recent years, enormous amounts of both transcriptomic and proteomic data of schistosomes have become available, providing information on gene expression profiles for developmental stages and tissues of S. japonicum. Here, we establish a public searchable database, termed SjTPdb, with integrated transcriptomic and proteomic data of S. japonicum, to enable more efficient access and utility of these data and to facilitate the study of schistosome biology, physiology and evolution. Description All the available ESTs, EST clusters, and the proteomic dataset of S. japonicum are deposited in SjTPdb. The core of the database is the 8,420 S. japonicum proteins translated from the EST clusters, which are well annotated for sequence similarity, structural features, functional ontology, genomic variations and expression patterns across developmental stages and tissues including the tegument and eggshell of this flatworm. The data can be queried by simple text search, BLAST search, search based on developmental stage of the life cycle, and an integrated search for more specific information. A PHP-based web interface allows users to browse and query SjTPdb, and moreover to switch to external databases by the following embedded links. Conclusion SjTPdb is the first schistosome database with detailed annotations for schistosome proteins. It is also the first integrated database of both transcriptome and proteome of S. japonicum, providing a comprehensive data resource and research platform to facilitate functional genomics of schistosome. SjTPdb is available from URL: http://function.chgc.sh.cn/sj-proteome/index.htm.

  6. Cytokine mRNA profiles in pigs exposed prenatally and postnatally to Schistosoma japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Techau, Michala E.; Johansen, Maria V.; Aasted, Bent

    2007-01-01

    of septal fibrosis were significantly higher in the postnatal group compared to the prenatal group (P prenatally infected animals compared to the control...... group (P prenatal group showed higher levels of TGF-beta 1 in the liver compared with the postnatally infected group (P control group (P prenatally exposed pigs.......The pig is a natural host for Schistosoma japonicum and a useful animal model of human infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the differences between the cytokine profiles in prenatally or postnatally S. japonicum exposed pigs. Seven prenatally exposed pigs, 7 postnatally exposed...

  7. Complete genome sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yuri L; Yura, Kei; Shindo, Miyuki; Kusakabe, Rie; Hayashi, Keiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Lampreys are eel-like jawless fishes evolutionarily positioned between invertebrates and vertebrates, and have been used as model organisms to explore vertebrate evolution. In this study we determined the complete genome sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the Japanese river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum, using next-generation sequencers. The sequence was 16,272 bp in length. The gene content and order were identical to those of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, which has been the reference among lamprey species. However, the sequence similarity was less than 90%, suggesting the need for the whole-genome sequencing of L. japonicum.

  8. Phylogenetic clustering of Bradyrhizobium symbionts on legumes indigenous to North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppell, Jonathan H; Parker, Matthew A

    2012-08-01

    To analyse determinants of biogeographic structure in members of the genus Bradyrhizobium, isolates were obtained from 41 legume genera, originating from North American sites spanning 48.5 ° of latitude (Alaska to Panama). Sequencing of portions of six gene loci (3674 bp) in 203 isolates showed that there was only a weak trend towards higher nucleotide diversity in tropical regions. Phylogenetic relationships for nifD, in the symbiosis island region of the Bradyrhizobium chromosome, conflicted substantially with a tree inferred for five housekeeping gene loci. For both nifD and housekeeping gene trees, bacteria from each region were significantly more similar, on average, than would be expected if the source location was permuted at random on the tree. Within-region permutation tests also showed that bacteria clustered significantly on particular host plant clades at all levels in the phylogeny of legumes (from genus up to subfamily). Nevertheless, some bacterial groups were dispersed across multiple regions and were associated with diverse legume host lineages. These results indicate that migration, horizontal gene transfer and host interactions have all influenced the geographical divergence of Bradyrhizobium populations on a continental scale.

  9. Residual effects of successive exposure of soybean Bradyrhizobium strains to aluminium on solid defined medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo Rubens José

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of these studies was to investigate whether residual toxic effects of exposing soybean root nodule bacteria to Al in a solid defined media (SDM alter tolerance to Al, survival, sensitivity to antibiotics, N2 fixation effectiveness and genetic diversity of Bradyrhizobium strains. After being exposed four times to Al, strains showed variation in Al tolerance but there was no evidence of change in their original Al tolerance, sensitivity to the antibiotics or genetic diversity. Exposure of Bradyrhizobium strains to SDM plus Al did not alter biological N2 fixation effectiveness of five strains. Strain SEMIA 587 showed a reduction in its N2 fixation effectiveness but it seems that it was just a superficial toxic effect because one single passage through the plant eliminated this effect. Residual Al did not cause increases in Al tolerance and reductions in the survival and N2 fixation effectiveness of Bradyrhizobium strains USDA 143, SEMIA 586, SEMIA 5019, SEMIA 5039 and SEMIA 5073. It also did not alter the resistance to antibiotics of strains USDA 143, SEMIA 5039 and SEMIA 5073, and the genetic diversity of the strains SEMIA 587 and SEMIA 5019.

  10. Tolerância de Bradyrhizobium sp. de mimosoideae à acidez em meio de cultura Tolerance of mimosoideae Bradyrhizobium sp. strains to acidity in culture media

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    Walter Quadros Ribeiro Júnior

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizados testes em meio de cultivo acidificado para avaliar a tolerância de 59 estirpes de Bradyrhizobium sp. isolados de Mimosoideae. As culturas, por via de regra, apresentaram crescimento rápido e alcalinização do meio. Das estirpes testadas, dez apresentaram crescimento em meio com valor de pH 4,6 (três, crescimento rápido; um, médio e seis, lento. Destas, oito não induziram alteração visual na cor do indicador bromotimol-azul incluído no meio. A estirpe SMS-513, uma entre essas oito, promoveu acidificação no meio com valor de pH 6,2, sendo considerada tolerante à acidez. Algumas estirpes cresceram em meio de cultura acidificado, somente com alta concentração inicial de células.Fifty-nine Bradyrhizobium sp. strains isolated from Mimosoideae subfamily of Leguminosae were tested on acidified agar medium. Most strains were found to be fast growing and alcalinized the medium. Ten strains grew on pH 4.6; out of them, three were fast growing, six were slow growing and one was intermediate. Eight of the tested strains did not induce visual changes in the bromothymol-blue indicator. The strain SMS-513 acidified the medium with pH 6.2, and was considered acid tolerant.

  11. Initiation of autoimmune diabetes in NOD/Lt mice is MHC class I-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serreze, D V; Chapman, H D; Varnum, D S; Gerling, I; Leiter, E H; Shultz, L D

    1997-04-15

    MHC class II alleles clearly contribute a primary genetic component of susceptibility to autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. However, IDDM does not occur in NOD mice made MHC class I-deficient by a functionally inactivated beta2-microglobulin allele (beta2m(null)). In the present study the beta2m(null) mutation was used to examine the relative contributions of MHC class I and class II-dependent T cell responses for initiating autoimmune pancreatic beta cell destruction in NOD mice. Splenocytes from diabetic NOD donors transferred IDDM to both lymphocyte-deficient NOD-scid (class I+) and NOD-scid.beta2m(null) mice (class I-). In contrast, splenocytes from young prediabetic NOD donors only transferred IDDM to class I+, but not class I- NOD-scid recipients. However, splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors did transfer IDDM to NOD-scid.beta2m(null) recipients previously engrafted with class I+, but not class I-, pancreatic islets. CD4+ T cell lines reactive against some syngeneic class I+ targets could be isolated from NOD.beta2m(null) mice. However, NOD.beta2m(null) T cells underwent activation-driven deletion when transferred into class I+ NOD-scid recipients. Hence, the class I autoreactive T cells present in NOD.beta2m(null) donors did not elicit IDDM when transferred into class I+ NOD-scid recipients. Collectively, these results show that autoimmune IDDM in NOD mice is initiated by MHC class I-dependent T cell responses, but this leads to the subsequent activation of additional T cell populations that can mediate pancreatic beta cell destruction in a MHC class I-independent manner.

  12. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

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    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  13. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

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    McManus Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae, juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately. Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis.

  14. NOD2 mutations and colorectal cancer - Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquinho, Diogo; Freire, Paulo; Sofia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Due to the overwhelming burden of colorectal cancer (CRC), great effort has been placed on identifying genetic mutations that contribute to disease development and progression. One of the most studied polymorphisms that could potentially increase susceptibility to CRC involves the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization-domain containing 2 (NOD2) gene. There is growing evidence that the biological activity of NOD2 is far greater than previously thought and a link with intestinal microbiota and mucosal immunity is increasingly sought after. In fact, microbial composition may be an important contributor not only to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) but also to CRC. Recent studies have showed that deficient NOD2 function confers a communicable risk of colitis and CRC. Despite the evidence from experimental models, population-based studies that tried to link certain NOD2 polymorphisms and an increase in CRC risk have been described as conflicting. Significant geographic discrepancies in the frequency of such polymorphisms and different interpretations of the results may have limited the conclusions of those studies. Since being first associated to IBD and CRC, our understanding of the role of this gene has come a long way, and it is tempting to postulate that it may contribute to identify individuals with susceptible genetic background that may benefit from early CRC screening programs or in predicting response to current therapeutic tools. The aim of this review is to clarify the status quo of NOD2 mutations as genetic risk factors to chronic inflammation and ultimately to CRC. The use of NOD2 as a predictor of certain phenotypic characteristics of the disease will be analyzed as well. PMID:27152134

  15. DMPD: Role of Nods in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17379560 Role of Nods in bacterial infection. Bourhis LL, Werts C. Microbes Infect.... 2007 Apr;9(5):629-36. Epub 2007 Jan 27. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Role of Nods in bacterial infection.... PubmedID 17379560 Title Role of Nods in bacterial infection. Authors Bourhis LL, Werts C. Publication M

  16. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  18. DMPD: Sensing of bacteria: NOD a lonely job. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17161646 Sensing of bacteria: NOD a lonely job. Kufer TA, Sansonetti PJ. Curr Opin ...Microbiol. 2007 Feb;10(1):62-9. Epub 2006 Dec 11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Sensing of bacteria: NOD a lonely job.... PubmedID 17161646 Title Sensing of bacteria: NOD a lonely job. Authors Kufer TA, Sansonetti

  19. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in Medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It

  20. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It

  1. Nodding syndrome: 2015 International Conference Report and Gulu Accord

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    P.S. Spencer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nodding syndrome is a pediatric epileptic encephalopathy of apparent environmental origin that was first described in Tanzania, with recent epidemics in South Sudan and Uganda. Following a brief description of the medical geography, setting and case definition of this progressive brain disorder, we report recent advances relating to etiology, diagnosis and treatment described in papers given at the 2nd International Conference on Nodding Syndrome held in July 2015 in Gulu, Uganda. The target audience for this report includes: anthropologists, entomologists, epileptologists, health care workers, helminthologists, medical researchers, neuroepidemiologists, neurologists, neuroscientists, neuropathologists, nurses, nutritional scientists, primary health care physicians, psychiatrists, public health practitioners, toxicologists, and virologists.

  2. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Bradyrhizobium elkanii type strain USDA 76T, isolated from Glycine max (L.) Merr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA 76T (INSCD = ARAG00000000), the type strain for Bradyrhizobium elkanii, is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen-fixing root nodule of Glycine max (L. Merr) grown in the USA. Because of its significance as a ...

  3. The induction of species-specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of rats to ultra-violet attenuated cercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, N.A.; Webbe, G.; Hinchcliffe, P.

    1987-01-01

    Single percutaneous immunizations of Fischer rats with 1000 ultra-violet attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae induced 52-88% resistance to challenge 4 weeks later. Increasing this to 3 immunizations induced 90% resistance to challenge, and this level of protection remained undiminished for up to 40 weeks after vaccination. Rats vaccinated with gamma-irradiated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to challenge with S. mansoni but not S. japonicum. Similarly rats vaccinated with u.v.-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae were not resistant to heterologous challenge. Thus irradiated vaccines are species-specific in both permissive and non-permissive hosts. (author)

  4. Biology and Control of Snail Intermediate Host of Schistosoma japonicum in The People's Republic of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Z.J.; Ge, J; Dai, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum is a severe parasitic disease in The People's Republic of China and imposed considerable burden on human and domestic animal health and socioeconomic development. The significant achievement in schistosomiasis control has been made in last 60years...

  5. Taurine drinking ameliorates hepatic granuloma and fibrosis in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Rong Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In schistosomiasis, egg-induced hepatic granuloma formation is a cytokine-mediated, predominantly CD4+ Th2 immune response that can give rise to hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis is the main cause of increased morbidity and mortality in humans with schistosome infection. Taurine has various physiological functions and hepatoprotective properties as well as anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. However, little is known about the role of taurine in schistosome egg-induced granuloma formation and fibrosis. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of taurine as preventative treatment for Schistosoma japonicum infection. Mice infected with S. japonicum cercariae were supplied with taurine drinking water (1% w/v for 4 weeks starting at 4 weeks post-infection. Taurine supplementation significantly improved the liver pathologic findings, reduced the serum levels of aminotransferases and area of hepatic granuloma, and prevented fibrosis progression. In addition, taurine decreased the expression of the granulomatous and fibrogenic mediators transforming growth factor β1, tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1α and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker glucose-regulated protein 78. Thus, taurine can significantly attenuate S. japonicum egg-induced hepatic granuloma and fibrosis, which may depend in part on the downregulation of some relevant cytokine/chemokines and reducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Keywords: Schistosomiasis, Schistosoma japonicum, Granuloma, Fibrosis, Taurine

  6. Genome-wide identification of Schistosoma japonicum microRNAs using a deep-sequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent and serious parasitic diseases worldwide. Schistosoma japonicum is one of important pathogens of this disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of non-coding RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation in animals. Genome-wide identification of miRNAs in a given organism is a critical step to facilitating our understanding of genome organization, genome biology, evolution, and posttranscriptional regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two small RNA libraries prepared from different stages of the life cycle of S. japonicum, immature schistosomula and mature pairing adults, through a deep DNA sequencing approach, which yielded approximately 12 million high-quality short sequence reads containing a total of approximately 2 million non-redundant tags. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we identified 176 new S. japonicum miRNAs, of which some exhibited a differential pattern of expression between the two stages. Although 21 S. japonicum miRNAs are orthologs of known miRNAs within the metazoans, some nucleotides at many positions of Schistosoma miRNAs, such as miR-8, let-7, miR-10, miR-31, miR-92, miR-124, and miR-125, are indeed significantly distinct from other bilaterian orthologs. In addition, both miR-71 and some miR-2 family members in tandem are found to be clustered in a reversal direction model on two genomic loci, and two pairs of novel S. japonicum miRNAs were derived from sense and antisense DNA strands at the same genomic loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The collection of S. japonicum miRNAs could be used as a new platform to study the genomic structure, gene regulation and networks, evolutionary processes, development, and host-parasite interactions. Some S. japonicum miRNAs and their clusters could represent the ancestral forms of the conserved orthologues and a model for the genesis of novel miRNAs.

  7. Nested-PCR assay for detection of Schistosoma japonicum infection in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; He, Chuan-Chuan; Liu, Jin-Ming; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Fu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhu, Chuan-Gang; Liu, Yi-Ping; Tong, Lai-Bao; Zhou, De-Bao; Zha, Li; Hong, Yang; Jin, Ya-Mei; Lin, Jiao-Jiao

    2017-04-13

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a common zoonosis. Domestic animals are the primary source of infection and play an important role in disease transmission. The prevalence and infectivity of this disease in domestic animals in China have significantly decreased and, for this reason, diagnostics with a higher sensitivity have become increasingly necessary. It was reported that polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods could be used to detect schistosome infection in humans and animals and presented a high sensitivity and specificity. The present study aimed to develop a PCR-based method for detection of Schistosoma japonicum infection in domestic animals. A specific nested-PCR assay was developed to detect S. japonicum infection in domestic animals via amplification of a 231-bp DNA fragment of retrotransposon SjR2. The developed assay was first used in sera and dry blood filter paper (DBFP) from goats and buffaloes at different time points of infection. Then, 78 DBFPs from 39 artificially-infected bovines at 14 and 28 days post-infection and 42 DBFPs from schistosome-negative bovines from the city of Huangshan in the Anhui province were used to evaluate the diagnostic validity. Furthermore, this assay was used to detect S. japonicum infection in domestic animals in Dongzhi and Wangjiang counties. The expected PCR product was detected in eggs and adult worms of S. japonicum and blood samples from S. japonicum-infected goats and water buffaloes, but not from Fasciola and Haemonchus contortus worms. The nested-PCR assay could detect the target S. japonicum DNA in DBFPs from goats and buffaloes after day 3 post-infection. The sensitivity in buffaloes at 14 and 28 days post-infection was 92.30% (36/39) and 100% (39/39), respectively. The specificity was 97.60% (41/42). The positivity rates in Dongzhi and Wangjiang counties were 6.00% and 8.00% in bovines and 22.00% and 16.67% in goats, respectively. The positivity rates in goats in both counties were higher than those

  8. The innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; Ariyananda, Lushanti De Zoysa; Melnyk, James E; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian Nod2 is an intracellular protein that is implicated in the innate immune response to the bacterial cell wall and is associated with the development of Crohn's disease, Blau syndrome, and gastrointestinal cancers. Nod2 is required for an immune response to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an immunostimulatory fragment of bacterial cell wall, but it is not known whether MDP binds directly to Nod2. We report the expression and purification of human Nod2 from insect cells. Using novel MDP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), we provide the first biochemical evidence for a direct, high-affinity interaction between Nod2 and MDP.

  9. [Construction of phage display cDNA library from adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Jia, Ren-chu; Liu, Jin-ming; Yuan, Chun-xiu; Shi, Yao-jun; Lu, Ke; Fu, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Huan; Cai, You-min; Lin, Jiao-jiao

    2007-10-01

    To screen protective antigen genes and construct the T7 phage display library from adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNA was extracted from adult worms of S. japonicum by Trizol reagent anti mRNA was isolated from the total RNA. The ds cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription using random primer. Directional EcoR I/ Hind III linkers were ligated into the ends of ds cDNA and the ds cDNA was digested with EcoR I anti Hind III, which resulted in ds cDNA with EcoR I and Hind III adhering ends. The digested ds cDNA fragments longer than 300 bp in length were fractionated and ligated into T7 Select 10-3b vector. After packaging in citro, the T7 Select 10-3b vector was transformed into BLT5403 to construct the T7 phage display cDNA library. Plaque assay and PCR were used to evaluate the library. Seven known objective genes of S. japonicum were screened by PCR to detect the representation of the library. Primary library capacity was 4.98 x 10(6) pfu, and the titer of amplified library was 3.85 x 10(11) pfu/mL. The PCR identification result of 96 clones picked at random showed that recombination rate was 93.8%, in which 95.6% inserted cDNA fragments were longer than 300 bp in length. All the seven known objective genes of S. japonicum were amplified from the library. The T7 phage display library from adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum was constructed.

  10. Nodding syndrome in Mundri county, South Sudan: Environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nodding Syndrome is a seizure disorder of children in Mundri County, Western Equatoria, South Sudan. The disorder is reported to be spreading in South Sudan and northern Uganda. Objective: To describe environmental, nutritional, infectious, and other factors that existed before and during the de novo 1991 ...

  11. Coupling of Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL: static case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez T, A.M.; Ovando C, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the joining of the programs Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL, developed in the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) and in the Electrical Research Institute (IIE) respectively is described. The first one allows to study the neutronic of a nuclear reactor and the second one allows to carry out the analysis of hot channel of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Nod1 D is a program that it solves by nodal methods type finite element those diffusion equations in multigroup, and it is the static part of Nod Kin that it solves the diffusion equation in their time dependent part. For another side HOTCHANNEL is based on a mathematical model constituted by four conservation equations (two of mass conservation, one of motion quantity and one of energy), which are solved applying one discretization in implicit finite differences. Both programs have been verified in independent form using diverse test problems. In this work the modifications that were necessary to carry out to both for obtaining a coupled program that it provides the axial distribution of the neutron flux, the power, the burnup and the void fraction, among others parameters as much as neutronic as thermal hydraulics are described. Those are also mentioned limitations, advantages and disadvantages of the final product to which has been designated Nod1 D-HotChn. Diverse results for the Cycle 1 of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 reactor of the Nucleo electric central comparing them with those obtained directly with the CoreMasterPresto code are provided. (Author)

  12. Investigation into the Nodding syndrome in Witto Payam, Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-01

    Feb 1, 2011 ... and to suggest possible causes and ways the condition may be transmitted. We also interviewed five parents ... have been contaminated, childhood vaccinations or large or small flies which had invaded the areas of ... in children with learning disability, autism, etc. The link between nodding and mental ...

  13. Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Hanan

    2013-01-01

    In this short essay I express my own deep sympathy with Nel Noddings's ethic of care and applaud her stubborn resistance in "Happiness and Education" to what John Dewey would have called false dualisms, such as those between intelligence and emotion, theory and practice, or vocation and academic studies.However, I question whether…

  14. Proposed guidelines for the management of nodding syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Medical, nutritional and rehabilitation needs, nursing, psychiatric disorders and social support;. 1. Classify patients as: high or low medical risks or needs. 2. Decide type and where care should be provided. Low medical risk and needs; Community based care and prevention: Nodding syndrome patients need long term.

  15. Letter to the editors Nodding syndrome (NS) and Onchocerca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are recent published information suggesting associations between Nodding Syndrome (NS) with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) VGKC antibodies and serum leiomidin-1 antibody cross reacting with Onchocerca Volvulus (OV). These findings suggest a neuro-inflammatory cause of NS and they are important findings in the ...

  16. Human LT-alpha-mediated resistance to autoimmune diabetes is induced in NOD, but not NOD-scid, mice and abrogated by IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, S; Satoh, J; Takahashi, K; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Miyazaki, J; Toyota, T

    2001-01-01

    Systemic administration of human lymphotoxin-alpha (hLT-alpha) made NOD mice resistant not only to spontaneous autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus but also to cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced diabetes and diabetes transfer by diabetic NOD spleen cells (triple resistance). In this study we analyzed the mechanisms of hLT-alpha-induced resistance, focusing on (1) hLT-alpha-induced resistance in the pancreatic beta cell, (2) CY-resistant suppressor cells, (3) suppression of induction or function of effector cells for beta cell destruction, or (4) others. To examine the first possibility in vitro, a NOD-derived beta cell line (MIN6N) was pretreated with hLT-alpha and then mixed with diabetic NOD spleen cells and MIN6N cell viability was measured. Treatment with hLT-alpha did not protect MIN6N cells but rather enhanced cytotoxicity. Next NOD-scid mice were pretreated with hLT-alpha and then transferred with diabetic NOD spleen. All the recipients developed diabetes. These results excluded the first possibility. The second possibility was also excluded by a cotransfer experiment, in which diabetic NOD spleen cells were cotransferred to NOD-scid mice with nontreated or hLT-alpha-treated nondiabetic NOD spleens. There was no significant difference in diabetes incidence between the two groups. To observe the third possibility, spleen cells of hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice were transferred to NOD-scid mice. Diabetes developed in the recipients, although the onset of diabetes was slightly delayed. Finally, hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice developed diabetes 1 week after daily IL-12 treatment. In summary, hLT-alpha administration made NOD mice resistant to effector cells for beta cell destruction. This resistance was induced in NOD, but not in NOD-scid, mice, indicating that lymphocytes were obligatory for the resistance. However, it was not mediated by transferable suppressor cells. Because effector cells were present in hLT-alpha-treated NOD spleen and

  17. Genetic diversity of nodulating and non-nodulating rhizobia associated with wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) in different ecoregions of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li Juan; Wang, Hai Qing; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2011-06-01

    A total of 99 bacterial isolates that originated from root nodules of Glycine soja were characterized with restriction analyses of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (ITS), and sequence analyses of 16S rRNA, rpoB, atpD, recA and nodC genes. When tested for nodulation of G. soja, 72 of the isolates were effective symbionts, and these belonged to five species: Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and Sinorhizobium fredii. All of these, except some B. yuanmingense strains, also formed effective nodules on the domesticated soybean Glycine max. The remaining 27 isolates did not nodulate either host, but were identified as Rhizobium. Phylogeny nodC in the G. soja symbionts suggested that this symbiosis gene was mainly maintained by vertical gene transfer. Different nodC sublineages and rrs-ITS clusters reflected the geographic origins of isolates in this study. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Muramyl peptides activate innate immunity conjointly via YB1 and NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Alexander G; Lathe, Richard; Shepelyakovskaya, Anna O; Gartseva, Alexandra; Brovko, Feodor A; Guryanova, Svetlana; Alekseeva, Ludmila; Meshcheryakova, Elena A; Ivanov, Vadim T

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial cell wall muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and glucosaminyl-MDP (GMDP) are potent activators of innate immunity. Two receptor targets, NOD2 and YB1, have been reported; we investigated potential overlap of NOD2 and YB1 pathways. Separate knockdown of NOD2 and YB1 demonstrates that both contribute to GMDP induction of NF-κB expression, a marker of innate immunity, although excess YB1 led to induction in the absence of NOD2. YB1 and NOD2 co-migrated on sucrose gradient centrifugation, and GMDP addition led to the formation of higher molecular mass complexes containing both YB1 and NOD2. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated a direct interaction between YB1 and NOD2, a major recombinant fragment of NOD2 (NACHT-LRR) bound to YB1, and complex formation was stimulated by GMDP. We also report subcellular colocalization of NOD2 and YB1. Although YB1 may have other binding partners in addition to NOD2, maximal innate immunity activation by muramyl peptides is mediated via an interaction between YB1 and NOD2.

  19. Coupling of Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL: static case; Acoplamiento de Nod1D y HOTCHANNEL: caso estatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez T, A.M. [IPN-ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ovando C, R. [IIE-Gcia. de Energia Nuclear, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: rovando@iie.org.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work the joining of the programs Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL, developed in the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) and in the Electrical Research Institute (IIE) respectively is described. The first one allows to study the neutronic of a nuclear reactor and the second one allows to carry out the analysis of hot channel of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Nod1 D is a program that it solves by nodal methods type finite element those diffusion equations in multigroup, and it is the static part of Nod Kin that it solves the diffusion equation in their time dependent part. For another side HOTCHANNEL is based on a mathematical model constituted by four conservation equations (two of mass conservation, one of motion quantity and one of energy), which are solved applying one discretization in implicit finite differences. Both programs have been verified in independent form using diverse test problems. In this work the modifications that were necessary to carry out to both for obtaining a coupled program that it provides the axial distribution of the neutron flux, the power, the burnup and the void fraction, among others parameters as much as neutronic as thermal hydraulics are described. Those are also mentioned limitations, advantages and disadvantages of the final product to which has been designated Nod1 D-HotChn. Diverse results for the Cycle 1 of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 reactor of the Nucleo electric central comparing them with those obtained directly with the CoreMasterPresto code are provided. (Author)

  20. Sobrevivência de Bradyrhizobium e Azorhizobium em misturas de solo contaminadas com metais pesados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Matsuda

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Estudos foram realizados no Departamento de Ciência do Solo da Universidade Federal de Lavras (MG, no período de novembro/1999 a janeiro/2000, com o objetivo de avaliar a sobrevivência de estirpe e isolados de rizóbio em solo contaminado com metais pesados e verificar a relação entre tolerância do rizóbio a metais pesados em meio de cultura e sua sobrevivência em solo contaminado. Foram utilizados os dois microrganismos mais tolerantes [BR-4406 (estirpe recomendada para Enterolobium spp. e UFLA-01-457 (isolado de solo contaminado, ambos pertencentes ao gênero Bradyrhizobium ] e os dois mais sensíveis (UFLA-01-486 e UFLA-01-510, isolados de solo contaminado, pertencentes ao gênero Azorhizobium , todos selecionados de um grupo de 60estirpes/isolados em estudos prévios deste laboratório, em meio de cultura suplementado com metais pesados.Empregaram-se misturas de um Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro (LE que continham 0, 15 e 45% (v/v de um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo plíntico contaminado com Zn, Cd, Pb e Cu. As misturas de solo contaminado foram inoculadas com 20mL de cultura em YM na fase log das estirpes mencionadas, as quais foram testadas separadamente com três repetições. A avaliação do número de células viáveis no solo, realizada aos 0, 7, 14, 21 e 28dias de incubação, pelo método das diluições sucessivas e inoculação em placas com meio YMA, revelou comportamento diferenciado entre os organismos estudados. O número médio de células que sobreviveram ao final de 28 dias de incubação foi de (em UFCg-1de solo: 10(10,36, 10(10,29 e 10(9,70, para Bradyrhizobium, e 10(9,36, 10(7,54 e 0, para Azorhizobium em misturas de 0, 15 e 45% de solo contaminado, respectivamente. Portanto, houve maior sobrevivência de Bradyrhizobium do que de Azorhizobium , indicando maior tolerância a metais pesados do primeiro gênero.Como Bradyrhizobium foi também mais tolerante "in vitro", os resultados indicam haver relação entre o

  1. Characterization of Rabbit Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain 1 (NOD1 and the Role of NOD1 Signaling Pathway during Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjiao Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 is the most prominent of all NOD-like receptors, which in the mammalian innate immune system, serve as intracellular receptors for pathogens and endogenous molecules during tissue injury. From rabbit kidney cells, we cloned rabbit NOD1 (rNOD1 and identified an N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain, a central NACHT domain, and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domains. rNOD1 was expressed in all tested tissues; infection with Escherichia coli induced significantly higher expression in the spleen, liver, and kidney compared to other tissues. The overexpression of rNOD1 induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines Il1b, Il6, Il8, Ifn-γ, and Tnf and defensins, including Defb124, Defb125, Defb128, Defb135, and Np5 via activation of the nuclear factor (NF-κB pathway. Overexpression of rNOD1 inhibited the growth of E. coli, whereas knockdown of rNOD1 or inhibition of the NF-κB pathway promoted the growth of E. coli. rNOD1 colocalized with LC3, upregulated autophagy pathway protein LC3-II, and increased autolysosome formation in RK-13 cells infected with E. coli. In summary, our results explain the primary signaling pathway and antibacterial ability of rNOD1, as well as the induction of autophagy that it mediates. Such findings suggest that NOD1 could contribute to therapeutic strategies such as targets of new vaccine adjuvants or drugs.

  2. Assessment of Trichogramma japonicum and T. chilonis as Potential Biological Control Agents of Yellow Stem Borer in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Trichogramma wasps were assessed for their effectiveness against yellow stem borer Scirpophaga incertulas. A laboratory cage test with T. japonicum and T. chilonis showed that both species parasitized yellow stem borer egg masses at 60.0% ± 9.13% and 40.7% ± 7.11%, respectively, with egg parasitism rates of 15.8% ± 22.2% for T. japonicum and 2.8% ± 5.0% for T. chilonis. Once the host eggs were parasitized, emergence rates were high for both species (95.7% ± 0.12% for T. japonicum and 100% for T. chilonis. In paddy field trials, the two Trichogramma species were released at three densities (50,000/ha, 100,000/ha and 200,000/ha in Southwestern China. Egg mass parasitism was 9% ± 7.7% for T. japonicum and 15% ± 14.1% for T. chilonis, and again only a relatively small fraction of eggs was successfully parasitized. No clear conclusion could be drawn on the most efficient release rate as no significant differences were found among the three release rates. A comparison of field-collected T. japonicum with T. japonicum and T. chilonis mass reared on Corcyra cephalonica showed significantly larger body size and ovipositor length in field-collected wasps, suggesting potentially higher effectiveness on yellow stem borer eggs after at least one generation on the target host. Factors contributing to the low field parasitism rates are discussed.

  3. Resilience of the intestinal microbiota following pathogenic bacterial infection is independent of innate immunity mediated by NOD1 or NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Susan J; Geddes, Kaoru; Maisonneuve, Charles; Streutker, Catherine J; Philpott, Dana J

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune receptors, NOD1 and NOD2, are key regulators of intestinal homeostasis. NOD2 deficiency is linked to increased risk for Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease characterized by chronic inflammatory pathology and dysbiosis within resident microbial communities. However, the relationship between NOD protein-regulated immune functions and dysbiosis remains unclear. We hypothesized that the relationship between NOD1 or NOD2 deficiency and altered community structure during chronic disease may arise via NOD-dependent impairment of community resilience over time. Using the Salmonella ΔaroA model of chronic colitis with littermate mice to control for environmental influences on the microbiota, we show that NOD proteins exert a relatively minor impact on the chronic inflammatory environment and do not significantly contribute to bacterial abundance or community resilience following infection. Rather, temporal shifts in relative abundance of targeted bacterial groups correlated with inflammatory phenotype driven by presence of the pathogen and the ensuing complex immune response. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacterial RuBisCO is required for efficient Bradyrhizobium/Aeschynomene symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Gourion

    Full Text Available Rhizobia and legume plants establish symbiotic associations resulting in the formation of organs specialized in nitrogen fixation. In such organs, termed nodules, bacteria differentiate into bacteroids which convert atmospheric nitrogen and supply the plant with organic nitrogen. As a counterpart, bacteroids receive carbon substrates from the plant. This rather simple model of metabolite exchange underlies symbiosis but does not describe the complexity of bacteroids' central metabolism. A previous study using the tropical symbiotic model Aeschynomene indica/photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278 suggested a role of the bacterial Calvin cycle during the symbiotic process. Herein we investigated the role of two RuBisCO gene clusters of Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278 during symbiosis. Using gene reporter fusion strains, we showed that cbbL1 but not the paralogous cbbL2 is expressed during symbiosis. Congruently, CbbL1 was detected in bacteroids by proteome analysis. The importance of CbbL1 for symbiotic nitrogen fixation was proven by a reverse genetic approach. Interestingly, despite its symbiotic nitrogen fixation defect, the cbbL1 mutant was not affected in nitrogen fixation activity under free living state. This study demonstrates a critical role for bacterial RuBisCO during a rhizobia/legume symbiotic interaction.

  5. Schistosoma japonicum: An ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Y.E.; Jiang, C.F.; Han, J.J.; Li, Y.L.; Ruppel, A.

    1990-01-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease

  6. Altered metabolic signature in pre-diabetic NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Madsen

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism proceeding seroconversion in children progressing to Type 1 diabetes has previously been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that non-obese diabetic (NOD mice show a similarly altered metabolic profile compared to C57BL/6 mice. Blood samples from NOD and C57BL/6 female mice was collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 weeks and the metabolite content was analyzed using GC-MS. Based on the data of 89 identified metabolites OPLS-DA analysis was employed to determine the most discriminative metabolites. In silico analysis of potential involved metabolic enzymes was performed using the dbSNP data base. Already at 0 weeks NOD mice displayed a unique metabolic signature compared to C57BL/6. A shift in the metabolism was observed for both strains the first weeks of life, a pattern that stabilized after 5 weeks of age. Multivariate analysis revealed the most discriminative metabolites, which included inosine and glutamic acid. In silico analysis of the genes in the involved metabolic pathways revealed several SNPs in either regulatory or coding regions, some in previously defined insulin dependent diabetes (Idd regions. Our result shows that NOD mice display an altered metabolic profile that is partly resembling the previously observation made in children progressing to Type 1 diabetes. The level of glutamic acid was one of the most discriminative metabolites in addition to several metabolites in the TCA cycle and nucleic acid components. The in silico analysis indicated that the genes responsible for this reside within previously defined Idd regions.

  7. Repeated Schistosoma japonicum infection following treatment in two cohorts: evidence for host susceptibility to helminthiasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Carlton

    Full Text Available In light of multinational efforts to reduce helminthiasis, we evaluated whether there exist high-risk subpopulations for helminth infection. Such individuals are not only at risk of morbidity, but may be important parasite reservoirs and appropriate targets for disease control interventions.We followed two longitudinal cohorts in Sichuan, China to determine whether there exist persistent human reservoirs for the water-borne helminth, Schistosoma japonicum, in areas where treatment is ongoing. Participants were tested for S. japonicum infection at enrollment and two follow-up points. All infections were promptly treated with praziquantel. We estimated the ratio of the observed to expected proportion of the population with two consecutive infections at follow-up. The expected proportion was estimated using a prevalence-based model and, as highly exposed individuals may be most likely to be repeatedly infected, a second model that accounted for exposure using a data adaptive, machine learning algorithm. Using the prevalence-based model, there were 1.5 and 5.8 times more individuals with two consecutive infections than expected in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.001 in both cohorts. When we accounted for exposure, the ratio was 1.3 (p = 0.013 and 2.1 (p<0.001 in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively.We found clustering of infections within a limited number of hosts that was not fully explained by host exposure. This suggests some hosts may be particularly susceptible to S. japonicum infection, or that uncured infections persist despite treatment. We propose an explanatory model that suggests that as cercarial exposure declines, so too does the size of the vulnerable subpopulation. In low-prevalence settings, interventions targeting individuals with a history of S. japonicum infection may efficiently advance disease control efforts.

  8. Characterization Analysis of Schistosoma japonicum Plasma Membrane Repair Relative Gene Myoferlin.

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    Yanian Xiong

    Full Text Available Myoferlin is a member of the ferlin family of proteins, which are involved in plasma membrane repair, and has been identified as one of the tegument proteins of Schistosoma japonicum. The tegument proteins are potential candidates for vaccines and new drug targets. In this study, myoferlin of S. japonicum (SjMF was cloned, expressed and characterized, the potential of SjMF recombinant protein (rSjMF as a vaccine candidate was evaluated, and the effect of praziquantel on SjMF was detected by Real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence showed that this protein was mainly distributed on the surface of worms at different stages. Sequence analysis revealed that the SjMF open reading frame was conserved at all stages of the S. japonicum life cycle. And SjMF transcription was upregulated in 42-day-old worms, and was significantly higher in female worms. Western blotting revealed that rSjMF showed strong immunogenicity. The cytokine profile and IgG isotype analysis demonstrated that rSjMF plus ISA206 immunization induced a mixed T helper (Th1/Th2 response. Purified rSjMF emulsified with ISA206 adjuvant significantly reduced worm burden from 21.8% to 23.21% and liver egg number from42.58% to 28.35%. Besides, SjMF transcription was downregulated when worms were exposed to low-dose praziquantel (PZQ and upregulated when PZQ was degraded, accompanied by recovery of damaged tegument. When worms were exposed to high-dose PZQ, SjMF transcription was downregulated all the time and the damaged tegument did not recover. These findings indicated that SjMF is a potential vaccine against S. japonicum and provides the basis for further investigations into the biological function of SjMF.

  9. Rhizobium NodB protein involved in nodulation signal synthesis is a chitooligosaccharide deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M; Röhrig, H; Schmidt, J; Wieneke, U; Schell, J

    1993-01-15

    The common nodulation genes nodABC are conserved in all rhizobia and are involved in synthesis of a lipooligosaccharide signal molecule. This bacterial signal consists of a chitooligosaccharide backbone, which carries at the nonreducing end a fatty acyl chain. The modified chitooligosaccharide molecule triggers development of nodules on the roots of the leguminous host plant. To elucidate the specific role of the NodB protein in nodulation factor synthesis, we have purified recombinant NodB and determined its biochemical role by direct assays. Our data show that the NodB protein of Rhizobium meliloti deacetylates the nonreducing N-acetylglucosamine residue of chitooligosaccharides. The monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine is not deacetylated by NodB. In the pathway of Nod factor synthesis, deacetylation at the nonreducing end of the oligosaccharide backbone may be a necessary requirement for attachment of the fatty acyl chain.

  10. Postnatal hematopoiesis and gut microbiota in NOD mice deviate from C57BL/6 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate...... from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1-4 in NOD mice. Furthermore......, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface...

  11. Kerentanan Schistosoma japonicum terhadap Praziquantel di Napu dan Lindu, Sulawesi Tengah Indonesia

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    Anis Nurwidayati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis in Indonesia are found in Napu, Lindu and Bada highland, Central Sulawesi. This disease was caused by Trematode worm, Schistosoma japonicum. Schistosomiasis still a public health problem which its prevalence increase every year. The large scale treatment by mass chemotherapy using praziquantel was done to reduce the prevalence of schistosomiasis since 1980’s. The objective of this research was to identify the development of resistance in Schistosoma japonicum to praziquantel in endemic areas. Field study was conducted in endemic areas Napu and Lindu in April –November 2011. All of the 80 stool-positive subjects in Napu and 60 stool-positive subjects in Lindu, were treated with a single dose of 60 mg/kg of praziquantel. On three, six, nine, and 12 weeks after treatment, all of the subjects were examined again using the same stool examination. The results showed that on three weeks examination after treatment, stool-negative results were found in all subjects which represents a 100% parasitological cure rate. All stool samples were re-examined six, nine, and 12 weeks after the first treatment and no stool-positive subjects were found. The results indicate that there was no evidence for reduced susceptibility of S.japonicum to praziquantel despite its extensive use in the endemic areas of Napu and Lindu for more than 20 years.

  12. Comparative analysis of codon usage pattern and its influencing factors in Schistosoma japonicum and Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Gulshana A; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-12-20

    Schistosoma japonicum and Ascaris suum are considered as the major parasites of human which cause various life threatening diseases such as schistomiasis and ascariasis. The codon usage bias (CUB) is known as the phenomenon of more usage of a specific codon than the other synonymous codons for an amino acid. The factors that influence the codon usage bias are mutation pressure, natural selection, gene expression, gene length, GC content, RNA stability, recombination rates, codon position etc. Here we had used various bioinformatic tools and statistical analyses to understand the compositional features, expression level and codon usage bias in the genes of these two species.After estimating the effective number of codon (ENC) in both the species, codon usage bias was found to be low and gene expression was high. The nucleobase A and T were used most often than C and G. From neutrality plot and correspondence analysis it was found that both natural selection and mutation pressure played an important role in shaping the codon usage pattern of both species. Moreover, natural selection played a major role while mutation pressure played a minor role in shaping the codon usage bias in S. japonicum and A.suum. This is the first report on the codon usage biology in S. japonicum and A.suum, and the factors influencing their codon usage bias. These results are expected to be useful for genetic engineering and evolutionary studies.

  13. Taurine drinking ameliorates hepatic granuloma and fibrosis in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-Rong; Ni, Xian-Qiang; Huang, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2016-04-01

    In schistosomiasis, egg-induced hepatic granuloma formation is a cytokine-mediated, predominantly CD4(+) Th2 immune response that can give rise to hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis is the main cause of increased morbidity and mortality in humans with schistosome infection. Taurine has various physiological functions and hepatoprotective properties as well as anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. However, little is known about the role of taurine in schistosome egg-induced granuloma formation and fibrosis. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of taurine as preventative treatment for Schistosoma japonicum infection. Mice infected with S. japonicum cercariae were supplied with taurine drinking water (1% w/v) for 4 weeks starting at 4 weeks post-infection. Taurine supplementation significantly improved the liver pathologic findings, reduced the serum levels of aminotransferases and area of hepatic granuloma, and prevented fibrosis progression. In addition, taurine decreased the expression of the granulomatous and fibrogenic mediators transforming growth factor β1, tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1α and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α as well as the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker glucose-regulated protein 78. Thus, taurine can significantly attenuate S. japonicum egg-induced hepatic granuloma and fibrosis, which may depend in part on the downregulation of some relevant cytokine/chemokines and reducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

  14. New perspectives on host-parasite interplay by comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Schistosoma japonicum.

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    Feng Liu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with an estimated 200 million people infected in 76 countries. Here we isolated ~ 8,400 potential protein-encoding cDNA contigs from Schistosoma japonicum after sequencing circa 84,000 expressed sequence tags. In tandem, we undertook a high-throughput proteomics approach to characterize the protein expression profiles of a number of developmental stages (cercariae, hepatic schistosomula, female and male adults, eggs, and miracidia and tissues at the host-parasite interface (eggshell and tegument by interrogating the protein database deduced from the contigs. Comparative analysis of these transcriptomic and proteomic data, the latter including 3,260 proteins with putative identities, revealed differential expression of genes among the various developmental stages and sexes of S. japonicum and localization of putative secretory and membrane antigens, enzymes, and other gene products on the adult tegument and eggshell, many of which displayed genetic polymorphisms. Numerous S. japonicum genes exhibited high levels of identity with those of their mammalian hosts, whereas many others appeared to be conserved only across the genus Schistosoma or Phylum Platyhelminthes. These findings are expected to provide new insights into the pathophysiology of schistosomiasis and for the development of improved interventions for disease control and will facilitate a more fundamental understanding of schistosome biology, evolution, and the host-parasite interplay.

  15. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum and Fasciola gigantica in bovines from Northern Samar, the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Catherine A; Acosta, Luz P; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Jiz, Mario; Olveda, Remigio M; Ross, Allen G; Gray, Darren J; Williams, Gail M; Harn, Donald; Li, Yuesheng; McManus, Donald P

    2015-02-01

    The cause of zoonotic schistosomiasis in the Philippines is Schistosoma japonicum, which infects up to 46 mammalian hosts, including humans and bovines. In China, water buffaloes have been identified as major reservoir hosts for schistosomiasis japonica, contributing up to 75% of human transmission. In the Philippines, water buffaloes (carabao; Bubalus bubalis carabanesis) have, historically, been considered unimportant reservoirs. We therefore revisited the possible role of bovines in schistosome transmission in the Philippines, using the recently described formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation (FEA-SD) technique and a qPCR assay to examine fecal samples from 153 bovines (both carabao and cattle) from six barangays in Northern Samar. A high prevalence of S. japonicum was found using qPCR and FEA-SD in both cattle (87.50% and 77.08%, respectively) and carabao (80.00% and 55.24%, respectively). The average daily egg output for each bovine was calculated at 195,000. High prevalence and infection intensity of F. gigantica was also found in the bovines by qPCR and FEA-SD (95.33% and 96.00%, respectively). The identification of bovines as major reservoir hosts for S. japonicum transmission suggests that bovine treatment and/or vaccination, as one becomes available, should be included in any future control program that aims to reduce the disease burden due to schistosomiasis in the Philippines.

  16. High prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum and Fasciola gigantica in bovines from Northern Samar, the Philippines.

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    Catherine A Gordon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cause of zoonotic schistosomiasis in the Philippines is Schistosoma japonicum, which infects up to 46 mammalian hosts, including humans and bovines. In China, water buffaloes have been identified as major reservoir hosts for schistosomiasis japonica, contributing up to 75% of human transmission. In the Philippines, water buffaloes (carabao; Bubalus bubalis carabanesis have, historically, been considered unimportant reservoirs. We therefore revisited the possible role of bovines in schistosome transmission in the Philippines, using the recently described formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation (FEA-SD technique and a qPCR assay to examine fecal samples from 153 bovines (both carabao and cattle from six barangays in Northern Samar. A high prevalence of S. japonicum was found using qPCR and FEA-SD in both cattle (87.50% and 77.08%, respectively and carabao (80.00% and 55.24%, respectively. The average daily egg output for each bovine was calculated at 195,000. High prevalence and infection intensity of F. gigantica was also found in the bovines by qPCR and FEA-SD (95.33% and 96.00%, respectively. The identification of bovines as major reservoir hosts for S. japonicum transmission suggests that bovine treatment and/or vaccination, as one becomes available, should be included in any future control program that aims to reduce the disease burden due to schistosomiasis in the Philippines.

  17. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  18. NOD2 Receptor is Expressed in Platelets and Enhances Platelet Activation and Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si; Zhang, Shenghui; Hu, Liang; Zhai, Lili; Xue, Ruyi; Ye, Jianqin; Chen, Leilei; Cheng, Guanjun; Mruk, Jozef; Kunapuli, Satya P.; Ding, Zhongren

    2015-01-01

    Background Pattern recognition receptor NOD2 (nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2) is well investigated in immunity, its expression and function in platelets has never been explored. Method and Results Using RT-PCR and Western blot we show that both human and mouse platelets express NOD2, and its agonist MDP induced NOD2 activation as evidenced by receptor dimerization. NOD2 activation potentiates platelet aggregation and secretion induced by low concentration of thrombin or collagen, as well as clot retraction. These potentiating effects of MDP were not seen in platelets from NOD2-deficient mice. Plasma from septic patients also potentiates platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen NOD2-dependently. Using intravital microscopy, we found that MDP administration accelerated in vivo thrombosis in FeCl3-injured mesenteric arteriole thrombosis mouse model. Platelet depletion and transfusion experiments confirmed that NOD2 from platelets contributes to the in vivo thrombosis in mice. NOD2 activation also accelerates platelet-dependent hemostasis. We further found that platelets express RIP2 (receptor-interacting protein 2), and provided evidences suggesting that MAPK and NO/sGC/cGMP/PGK pathways downstream of RIP2 mediate the role of NOD2 in platelets. Finally, MDP stimulates proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β maturation and accumulation in human and mouse platelets NOD2-dependently. Conclusions NOD2 is expressed in platelets and functions in platelet activation and arterial thrombosis, possibly during infection. To our knowledge, this is the first study on NOD-like receptors in platelets which links thrombotic events to inflammation. PMID:25825396

  19. Backchannel Head Nods in Danish First Meeting Encounters with a Humanoid Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsager, Anders; Segato, Nicolaj; Rehm, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Head nods have been shown to play an important role for communication management in human communication, e.g. as a non-verbal feedback signal from the listener. Based on a study with virtual agents, which showed that the use of head nods helps eliciting more verbal input from the user, we...... investigate the use of head nods in communications between a user and a humanoid robot (Nao) that they meet for the first time. Contrary to the virtual agent case, the robot elicited less talking from the user when it was using head nods as a feedback signal. A follow-up experiment revealed that the physical...

  20. The Cofilin Phosphatase Slingshot Homolog 1 (SSH1) Links NOD1 Signaling to Actin Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Bielig, Harald; Lautz, Katja; Braun, Peter R.; Menning, Maureen; Machuy, Nikolaus; Brügmann, Christine; Barisic, Sandra; Eisler, Stephan A.; Andree, Maria; Zurek, Birte; Kashkar, Hamid; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Hausser, Angelika; Meyer, Thomas F.; Kufer, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary NOD1 was one of the first NLR-family members shown to act as an important intracellular pattern-recognition molecule mediating antimicrobial activities in mammals. It has been demonstrated that perturbation of F-actin and RhoGTPase activity affects NOD1 and NOD2 signaling, however, the effectors of this process remained elusive. By using a multilayered high-throughput druggable genome wide siRNA screening approach to discover novel components specific for the NOD1 pathway, we i...

  1. NOD2 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction in Mice

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    Xiang Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction (MI is multifactorial, activation of innate immune system to induce inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiological process in MI. NOD2, one member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR family, plays an important role in the innate immune response. This study was to examine the role of NOD2 during MI. Methods: MI was induced by permanent ligation of the left coronary artery in wild type and NOD2-/- mice and cardiac fibroblasts were isolated. Results: NOD2 expression was significantly increased in myocardium in post-MI mice. NOD2 deficiency improved cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after MI as evidenced by echocardiographic analysis, reduced the levels of cytokines, inflammatory cell infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activity. In vitro, we further found that NOD2 activation induced the activation of MAPK signaling pathways, production of proinflammatory mediators and MMP-9 activity in cardiac fibroblasts. Conclusions: Our studies demonstrate that NOD2 is a critical component of a signal transduction pathway that links cardiac injury by exacerbation of inflammation and MMP-9 activity. Pharmacological targeting of NOD2-mediated signaling pathways may provide a novel approach to treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Implication of NOD1 and NOD2 for the differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

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    Hyung-Sik Kim

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs are known to trigger an innate immune response against microbial infection. Although studies suggest that activation of TLRs modulate the function of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, little is known about the role of NLRs on the MSC function. In this study, we investigated whether NOD1 and NOD2 regulate the functions of human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs. The genes of TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 were expressed in hUCB-MSCs. Stimulation with each agonist (Pam(3CSK(4 for TLR2, LPS for TLR4, Tri-DAP for NOD1, and MDP for NOD2 led to IL-8 production in hUCB-MSC, suggesting the expressed receptors are functional in hUCB-MSC. CCK-8 assay revealed that none of agonist influenced proliferation of hUCB-MSCs. We next examined whether TLR and NLR agonists affect osteogenic-, adipogenic-, and chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs. Pam(3CSK(4 and Tri-DAP strongly enhanced osteogenic differentiation and ERK phosphorylation in hUCB-MSCs, and LPS and MDP also slightly did. Treatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor restored osteogenic differentiation enhanced by Pam(3CSK(4. Tri-DAP and MDP inhibited adipogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs, but Pam(3CSK(4 and LPS did not. On chondrogenic differentiation, all TLR and NLR agonists could promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs with difference in the ability. Our findings suggest that NOD1 and NOD2 as well as TLRs are involved in regulating the differentiation of MSCs.

  3. MHC II-, but not MHC II+, hepatic Stellate cells contribute to liver fibrosis of mice in infection with Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun-Lei; Kong, De-Long; Liu, Jin-Feng; Lu, Zhong-Kui; Guo, Hong-Fei; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Jing-Fan; Liu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Yong

    2017-07-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are considered as the main effector cells in vitamin A metabolism and liver fibrosis, as well as in hepatic immune regulation. Recently, researches have revealed that HSCs have plasticity and heterogeneity, which depend on their lobular location and whether liver is normal or injured. This research aimed to explore the biological characteristics and heterogeneity of HSCs in mice with Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) infection, and determine the subpopulation of HSCs in pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis caused by S. japonicum infection. Results revealed that HSCs significantly increased the expressions of MHC II and fibrogenic genes after S. japonicum infection, and could be classified into MHC II + HSCs and MHC II - HSCs subsets. Both two HSCs populations suppressed the proliferation of activated CD4 + T cells, whereas only MHC II - HSCs displayed a myofibroblast-like phenotype. In response to IFN-γ, HSCs up-regulated the expressions of MHC II and CIITA, while down-regulated the expression of fibrogenic gene Col1. In addition, praziquantel treatment decreased the expressions of fibrogenic genes in MHC II - HSCs. These results confirmed that HSCs from S. japonicum-infected mice have heterogeneity. The MHC II - α-SMA + HSCs were major subsets of HSCs contributing to liver fibrosis and could be considered as a potential target of praziquantel anti-fibrosis treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The Absence of NOD1 Enhances Killing of Aspergillus fumigatus Through Modulation of Dectin-1 Expression

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    Mark S. Gresnigt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the major life-threatening infections for which severely immunocompromised patients are at risk is invasive aspergillosis (IA. Despite the current treatment options, the increasing antifungal resistance and poor outcome highlight the need for novel therapeutic strategies to improve outcome of patients with IA. In the current study, we investigated whether and how the intracellular pattern recognition receptor NOD1 is involved in host defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. When exploring the role of NOD1 in an experimental mouse model, we found that Nod1−/− mice were protected against IA and demonstrated reduced fungal outgrowth in the lungs. We found that macrophages derived from bone marrow of Nod1−/− mice were more efficiently inducing reactive oxygen species and cytokines in response to Aspergillus. Most strikingly, these cells were highly potent in killing A. fumigatus compared with wild-type cells. In line, human macrophages in which NOD1 was silenced demonstrated augmented Aspergillus killing and NOD1 stimulation decreased fungal killing. The differentially altered killing capacity of NOD1 silencing versus NOD1 activation was associated with alterations in dectin-1 expression, with activation of NOD1 reducing dectin-1 expression. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that Nod1−/− mice have elevated dectin-1 expression in the lung and bone marrow, and silencing of NOD1 gene expression in human macrophages increases dectin-1 expression. The enhanced dectin-1 expression may be the mechanism of enhanced fungal killing of Nod1−/− cells and human cells in which NOD1 was silenced, since blockade of dectin-1 reversed the augmented killing in these cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that NOD1 receptor plays an inhibitory role in the host defense against Aspergillus. This provides a rationale to develop novel immunotherapeutic strategies for treatment of aspergillosis that target the NOD1 receptor, to enhance the

  5. Respostas antioxidativas em nódulos de caupi inoculado com bradyrhizobium

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    Rayssa Dias Batista

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available O nitrogênio é considerado elemento essencial para as plantas, pois está presente na composição das mais importantes biomoléculas. As plantas podem obter esse nitrogênio através do processo de fixação biológica pela simbiose entre a planta e as bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio. A fixação biológica do nitrogênio pode ser afetada por fatores bióticos e abióticos que provocam estresse oxidativo na planta. O sistema antioxidativo enzimático envolve enzimas, como por exemplo dismutase de superóxido (SOD, catalase (CAT, peroxidase de fenóis (POX, que conferem proteção oxidativa às plantas. Desta forma, objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o metabolismo antioxidativo em nódulos de plantas de feijão-caupi inoculadas com Bradyrhizobium sp. (estirpe BR 3267. Os resultados mostraram que a inoculação com Bradyrhizobiumsp. foi efetiva e resultou em baixo acúmulo de amônia e diminuição do estresse oxidativo. Concluiu-se que a inoculação de caupi comBradyrhizobium sp. foi efetiva em estimular as enzimas envolvidas no processo oxidativo (SOD, POX e CAT. Estas enzimas foram eficientes na remoção das espécies reativas de oxigênio e promoveram proteção oxidativa para plantas de caupi.

  6. Floral organ MADS-box genes in Cercidiphyllum japonicum (Cercidiphyllaceae: Implications for systematic evolution and bracts definition.

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    Yupei Jin

    Full Text Available The dioecious relic Cercidiphyllum japonicum is one of two species of the sole genus Cercidiphyllum, with a tight inflorescence lacking an apparent perianth structure. In addition, its systematic place has been much debated and, so far researches have mainly focused on its morphology and chloroplast genes. In our investigation, we identified 10 floral organ identity genes, including four A-class, three B-class, two C-class and one D-class. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all ten genes are grouped with Saxifragales plants, which confirmed the phylogenetic place of C. japonicum. Expression patterns of those genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, with some variations that did not completely coincide with the ABCDE model, suggesting some subfunctionalization. As well, our research supported the idea that thebract actually is perianth according to our morphological and molecular analyses in Cercidiphyllum japonicum.

  7. Disease-causing mutations in the XIAP BIR2 domain impair NOD2-dependent immune signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune Busk; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Speckmann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    that the RIPK2 binding site in XIAP overlaps with the BIR2 IBM-binding pocket and find that a bivalent Smac mimetic compound (SMC) potently antagonises XIAP function downstream of NOD2 to limit signalling. These findings suggest that impaired immune signalling in response to NOD1/2 stimulation is a general...

  8. A role of lipophilic peptidoglycan-related molecules in induction of Nod1-mediated immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, A.; Yang, K.; Fujimoto, Y.; Masumoto, J.; Breukink, E.J.; Nuñez, G.; Fukase, K.; Inohara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Nod1 is an intracellular protein that is involved in recognition of bacterial molecules and whose genetic variation has been linked to several inflammatory diseases. Previous studies suggested that the recognition core of Nod1 stimulatory molecules is -D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (iE-DAP),

  9. NOD2/CARD15 genotype and common gastrointestinal diseases in 43 600 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, S.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. NOD2/CARD15 is involved in the innate immune response and three polymorphisms in this gene (Arg702Trp rs2066844, Gly908Arg rs2066845 and Leu1007fsinsC rs5743293) have been associated with risk of the rare Crohn's disease. We tested the hypothesis that polymorphisms in NOD2/CARD15 asso...

  10. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, P S; Palmer, V S; Jilek-Aall, L

    2013-06-01

    Repetitive involuntary head nodding was first reported in the 1960s in the Wapogoro tribe of Tanzania. We describe the natural history of head nodding in the Wapogoro tribe, with special reference to the earliest reported dates of onset. We analyzed clinical data from 150 historical patients seen between 1960 and 1971. Head nodding with or without grand mal convulsions was present in 33/150 (∼20%) cases, was mostly familial and equally distributed by gender. Age at onset of head nodding ranged from 2-22 years (mean: ∼10 years) in the period 1934-1962. Head nodding preceded onset of grand mal convulsions by up to 12 months, and motor and psychomotor deficits indicative of brain damage developed with time. Fourteen of the 33 cases died at 13-39 years of age (mean: ∼20 years) while nineteen aged 16-28 years (mean: ∼16 years) were still alive. Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome. Reported to have existed in this population for at least 80 years, Nodding Syndrome is a progressive seizure disorder that leads to generalized convulsions (kifafa), brain damage and death.

  11. Expression and function of NOD-like receptors by human term gestation-associated tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Aled H; Bevan, Ryan J; Spencer-Harty, Samantha; Scott, Louis M; Jones, Ruth H; Thornton, Catherine A

    2017-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors or NOD-like receptors (NLRs) have been implicated in several disease pathologies associated with inflammation. Since local and systemic inflammation is a hallmark of both term and preterm labour, a role for NLRs at the materno-fetal interface has been postulated. Gene expression and immunolocalisation of NLR family members in human placenta, choriodecidua, and amnion were examined. Tissue explants were used to examine the response to activators of NOD1 (Tri-DAP), NOD2 (MDP) and NLRP3 (nigericin). Cell/tissue-free supernatants were examined for the production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 using specific ELISAs. Expression of transcripts for NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRC4, NLRX1, NLRP1 and NAIP and protein expression of NOD1, NOD2 and NLRP3 were a broad feature of all term gestation-associated tissues. Production of cytokines was increased significantly in response to all ligands in placenta and choriodecidua, except for MDP-induced IL-10. Similarly, there was a significant in the amnion except for MDP induced IL-1β and IL-10 response to either agonist. IL-1β production was dependent on caspase-1 regardless of agonist used or tissue examined. Term human gestation-associated tissues express functional NLRs which likely play a role in both sterile and pathogen-driven inflammatory responses at the materno-fetal interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nod2 suppresses Borrelia burgdorferi mediated murine Lyme arthritis and carditis through the induction of tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Petnicki-Ocwieja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The internalization of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, by phagocytes is essential for an effective activation of the immune response to this pathogen. The intracellular, cytosolic receptor Nod2 has been shown to play varying roles in either enhancing or attenuating inflammation in response to different infectious agents. We examined the role of Nod2 in responses to B. burgdorferi. In vitro stimulation of Nod2 deficient bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM resulted in decreased induction of multiple cytokines, interferons and interferon regulated genes compared with wild-type cells. However, B. burgdorferi infection of Nod2 deficient mice resulted in increased rather than decreased arthritis and carditis compared to control mice. We explored multiple potential mechanisms for the paradoxical response in in vivo versus in vitro systems and found that prolonged stimulation with a Nod2 ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP, resulted in tolerance to stimulation by B. burgdorferi. This tolerance was lost with stimulation of Nod2 deficient cells that cannot respond to MDP. Cytokine patterns in the tolerance model closely paralleled cytokine profiles in infected Nod2 deficient mice. We propose a model where Nod2 has an enhancing role in activating inflammation in early infection, but moderates inflammation after prolonged exposure to the organism through induction of tolerance.

  13. It’s all about perception : nod factor perception inside nodules of Medicago truncatula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.G.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Legumes are unique in that they are able to establish a mutual symbiotic interaction with nitrogen fixing soil bacteria generally referred to as rhizobia. This interaction starts off in the root epidermis where the bacterial signal molecule, the Nod factor, is perceived by the plant (Nod factor

  14. Altered fractalkine cleavage potentially promotes local inflammation in NOD salivary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, Manon E.; van Helden-Meeuwsen, Cornelia G.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Versnel, Marjan A.

    2008-01-01

    In the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome, lymphocytic infiltration is preceded by an accumulation of dendritic cells in the submandibular glands (SMGs). NOD mice also exhibit an increased frequency of mature, fractalkine receptor (CX3C chemokine receptor [CX3CR]1) expressing

  15. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ΔmsbB Triggers Exacerbated Inflammation in Nod2 Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Anne-Kathrin; Steck, Natalie; Schultz, Dorothee; Zähringer, Ulrich; Lipinski, Simone; Rosenstiel, Philip; Geddes, Kaoru; Philpott, Dana J.; Heine, Holger; Grassl, Guntram A.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes intestinal inflammation characterized by edema, neutrophil influx and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. A major bacterial factor inducing pro-inflammatory host responses is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB possesses a modified lipid A, has reduced virulence in mice, and is being considered as a potential anti-cancer vaccine strain. The lack of a late myristoyl transferase, encoded by MsbB leads to attenuated TLR4 stimulation. However, whether other host receptor pathways are also altered remains unclear. Nod1 and Nod2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan. They play important roles in the host's immune response to enteric pathogens and in immune homeostasis. Here, we investigated how deletion of msbB affects Salmonella's interaction with Nod1 and Nod2. S. Typhimurium Δ msbB-induced inflammation was significantly exacerbated in Nod2−/− mice compared to C57Bl/6 mice. In addition, S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB maintained robust intestinal colonization in Nod2−/− mice from day 2 to day 7 p.i., whereas colonization levels significantly decreased in C57Bl/6 mice during this time. Similarly, infection of Nod1−/− and Nod1/Nod2 double-knockout mice revealed that both Nod1 and Nod2 play a protective role in S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB-induced colitis. To elucidate why S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB, but not wild-type S. Typhimurium, induced an exacerbated inflammatory response in Nod2−/− mice, we used HEK293 cells which were transiently transfected with pathogen recognition receptors. Stimulation of TLR2-transfected cells with S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB resulted in increased IL-8 production compared to wild-type S. Typhimurium. Our results indicate that S. Typhimurium ΔmsbB triggers exacerbated colitis in the absence of Nod1 and/or Nod2, which is likely due to increased TLR2 stimulation. How bacteria with “genetically detoxified” LPS

  16. DMPD: The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15476921 The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. P...of Toll-like receptors and Nod proteins in bacterial infection. PubmedID 15476921 Title The role of Toll-like receptors and Nod prote...ins in bacterial infection. Authors Philpott DJ, Girardi

  17. Comparative Analysis of Proteome-Wide Lysine Acetylation in Juvenile and Adult Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a devastating parasitic disease caused by tremotodes of the genus Schistosoma. Eggs produced by sexually mature schistosomes are the causative agents of for pathogenesis and transmission. Elucidating the molecular mechanism of schistosome development and sexual maturation would facilitate the prevention and control of schistosomiasis. Acetylation of lysine is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification playing keys role in many biological processes including development in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. To investigate the impacts of lysine acetylation on Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum development and sexual maturation, we used immunoaffinity-based acetyllysine peptide enrichment combined with mass spectrometry (MS, to perform the first comparative analysis of proteome-wide lysine acetylation in both female and male, juvenile (18 days post infection, 18 dpi and adult (28 dpi schistosome samples. In total, we identified 874 unique acetylated sites in 494 acetylated proteins. The four samples shared 47 acetylated sites and 46 proteins. More acetylated sites and proteins shared by both females and males were identified in 28 dpi adults (189 and 143, respectively than in 18 dpi schistosomula (76 and 59, respectively. More stage-unique acetylated sites and proteins were also identified in 28 dpi adults (494 and 210, respectively than in 18 dpi schistosomula (73 and 44, respectively. Functional annotation showed that in different developmental stages and genders, a number of proteins involving in muscle movement, glycometabolism, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, environmental stress resistance, antioxidation, etc., displayed distinct acetylation profiles, which was in accordance with the changes of their biological functions during schistosome development, suggesting that lysine acetylation modification exerted important regulatory roles in schistosome development. Taken together, our data provided the first

  18. Differential Secondary Reconstitution of In Vivo-Selected Human SCID-Repopulating Cells in NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/γ chainnull Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanbao Cai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Humanized bone-marrow xenograft models that can monitor the long-term impact of gene-therapy strategies will help facilitate evaluation of clinical utility. The ability of the murine bone-marrow microenvironment in NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/γ chainnull mice to support long-term engraftment of MGMTP140K-transduced human-hematopoietic cells following alkylator-mediated in vivo selection was investigated. Mice were transplanted with MGMTP140K-transduced CD34+ cells and transduced cells selected in vivo. At 4 months after transplantation, levels of human-cell engraftment, and MGMTP140K-transduced cells in the bone marrow of NOD/SCID versus NSG mice varied slightly in vehicle- and drug-treated mice. In secondary transplants, although equal numbers of MGMTP140K-transduced human cells were transplanted, engraftment was significantly higher in NOD/SCID/γ chainnull mice compared to NOD/SCID mice at 2 months after transplantation. These data indicate that reconstitution of NOD/SCID/γ chainnull mice with human-hematopoietic cells represents a more promising model in which to test for genotoxicity and efficacy of strategies that focus on manipulation of long-term repopulating cells of human origin.

  19. Brucella abortus 2308ΔNodVΔNodW double-mutant is highly attenuated and confers protection against wild-type challenge in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuli; Zhang, Jinliang; Yang, Guangli; Yuan, Baodong; Huang, Jie; Han, Jincheng; Xi, Li; Xiao, Yanren; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Hui

    2017-05-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution, which causes animal and human disease. However, the current Brucella abortus (B. abortus) vaccines (S19 and RB51) have several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Moreover, S19 cannot allow serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. We constructed double deletion (ΔNodVΔNodW) mutant from virulent B. abortus 2308 (S2308) by deleting the genes encoding two-component regulatory system (TCS) in chromosome II in S2308.2308ΔNodVΔNodW was significantly reduced survival in murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and BALB/c mice. Moreover, the inoculated mice showed no splenomegaly. The mutant induced high protective immunity in BALB/c mice against challenge with S2308, and elicited an anti-Brucella-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response and induced the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Moreover, NODV and NODW antigens would allow the serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. These results suggest that 2308ΔNodVΔNodW mutant is a potential live attenuated vaccine candidate and can be used effectively against bovine brucellosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. LysM domains of Medicago truncatula NFP protein involved in Nod factor perception. Glycosylation state, molecular modeling and docking of chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Lonneke; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie; Imberty, Anne

    2006-09-01

    The establishment of the symbiosis between legume plants and rhizobial bacteria depends on the production of rhizobial lipo-chitooligosaccharidic signals (the Nod factors) that are specifically recognized by roots of the host plant. In Medicago truncatula, specific recognition of Sinorhizobium meliloti and its Nod factors requires the NFP (Nod factor perception) gene, which encodes a putative serine/threonine receptor-like kinase (RLK). The extracellular region of this protein contains three tandem lysin motifs (LysMs), a short peptide domain that is implicated in peptidoglycan or chitin binding in various bacterial or eukaryotic proteins, respectively. We report here the homology modeling of the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP based on the structure of a LysM domain of the Escherichia coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosidase D (MltD). Expression of NFP in a homologous system (M. truncatula roots) revealed that the protein is highly N-glycosylated, probably with both high-mannose and complex glycans. Surface analysis and docking calculations performed on the models of the three domains were used to predict the most favored binding modes for chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors. A convergent model can be proposed where the sulfated, O-acetylated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod factor of S. meliloti binds in similar orientation to the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP. N-glycosylation is not expected to interfere with Nod factor binding in this orientation.

  1. The dual role of scavenger receptor class A in development of diabetes in autoimmune NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Shimizu

    Full Text Available Human type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the autoreactive destruction of pancreatic β cells by T cells. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells and macrophages are required to activate and suppress antigen-specific T cells. It has been suggested that antigen uptake from live cells by dendritic cells via scavenger receptor class A (SR-A may be important. However, the role of SR-A in autoimmune disease is unknown. In this study, SR-A-/- nonobese diabetic (NOD mice showed significant attenuation of insulitis, lower levels of insulin autoantibodies, and suppression of diabetes development compared with NOD mice. We also found that diabetes progression in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with low-dose polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C was significantly accelerated compared with that in disease-resistant NOD mice treated with low-dose poly(I:C. In addition, injection of high-dose poly(I: C to mimic an acute RNA virus infection significantly accelerated diabetes development in young SR-A-/- NOD mice compared with untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. Pathogenic cells including CD4+CD25+ activated T cells were increased more in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with poly(I:C than in untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggested that viral infection might accelerate diabetes development even in diabetes-resistant subjects. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that diabetes progression was suppressed in SR-A-/- NOD mice and that acceleration of diabetes development could be induced in young mice by poly(I:C treatment even in SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggest that SR-A on antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells may play an unfavorable role in the steady state and a protective role in a mild infection. Our findings imply that SR-A may be an important target for improving therapeutic strategies for type 1 diabetes.

  2. Clinical diagnostic value of viable Schistosoma japonicum eggs detected in host tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Kongzhen; Li, Yuesheng; Driguez, Patrick; Zeng, Qingren; Yu, Xinlin; Sun, Hui; Cai, Liting; He, Yongkang; Wang, Wenyang; McManus, Donald P

    2017-04-04

    Schistosomiasis, one of the neglected tropical diseases, is endemic in more than 70 countries. However, the clinical diagnosis of patients with a low degree of infection is an unsolved technical problem. In areas endemic for schistosomiasis japonica, proctoscopy detection of eggs has been one method used for clinical diagnosis. However, it is often a challenge to find typical live eggs and it is difficult to distinguish live eggs from large numbers of partially degraded and/or completely degraded eggs within colon biopsy tissue. To address this problem, we tested six different morphological and biochemical/molecular markers (ALP; morphological characteristics of egg; CalS (calcified substance); AOS (antioxidase); SDHG (succinic dehydrogenase) and SjR2 mRNA (retrotransposons 2 of S.japonicum genome mRNA)), including four new markers (CalS; AOS; SDHG and SjR2 mRNA.), to determine the viability of S. japonicum eggs deposited in human and mouse colon tissues. Our ultimate aim is to obtain a new method that is more sensitive, practical and accurate to clinically diagnose schistosomiasis. Tissue samples were collected from mice at six different time points during S. japonicum infection with or without treatment with praziquantel (PZQ). Four new biochemical or molecular markers were used for the detection of egg viability from mouse liver and intestinal samples: CalS; AOS; SDHG and SjR2 mRNA. Subsequently, all markers were employed for the detection and analysis of eggs deposited in biopsy materials from patients with suspected schistosomiasis japonica for clinical evaluation. Microscopic examination of the egg morphology, worm burden in vivo and ALP (alkaline phosphatase) levels were used as a reference standard to evaluate the sensitivity and reliability of four new markers detecting egg viability. The results of the study showed that the morphology of S. japonicum eggs deposited in tissues of hosts with schistosomiasis, especially cases with chronic schistosomiasis, is

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ator ... [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... Length = 225 ... Query: 42 ... ILIVEDDQETRNLVARYLRENSFNVGMAANGREMDR...YISQNRVDLIVLDLMLPGEDGLSL 101 ... ILIVEDDQETRNLVARYLRENSFNVGMAANGREMDR...YISQNRVDLIVLDLMLPGEDGLSL Sbjct: 1 ... ILIVEDDQETRNLVARYLRENSFNVGMAANGREMDRYISQNRVDLIVLDLMLPGEDGLSL

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y protein ... [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... Length = 108 ... Query: 208 DIAILHRASRFIDQN...LGRNDLSVATICREIGVSRSVLYRVFAPLAGVADYIRGRRLEAIH 267 ... DIAILHRASRFIDQNLGRND...LSVATICREIGVSRSVLYRVFAPLAGVADYIRGRRLEAIH Sbjct: 1 ... DIAILHRASRFIDQNLGRNDLSVATICREIGVSRSVLYRVFAPLAGVADYIRGRRLEAIH 60 ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... Length = 337 ... Query: 6 ... KVPVTVVTGFLGSGKTTLIQHLLANPNGKKLAVLVNEFGSEGVDGQILKSCADA...NCPEEN 65 ... KVPVTVVTGFLGSGKTTLIQHLLANPNGKKLAVLVNEFGSEGVDGQILKSCADA...NCPEEN Sbjct: 1 ... KVPVTVVTGFLGSGKTTLIQHLLANPNGKKLAVLVNEFGSEGVDGQILKSCADANCPEEN 60 ... Query: 1

  6. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijmen J Hommes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/- and wild-type (Wt alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39, an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303 via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2.

  7. The induction of specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of mice to ultraviolet attenuated cercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, N.A.; Bickle, Q.D.; Webbe, G.

    1985-01-01

    Mice can be partially protected against Schistosoma japonicum by prior exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-attenuated infections which fail to survive to the adult stage and produce no overt pathology in the host. Optimum resistance was induced by parasites exposed to 40 seconds of UV, significantly lower levels of resistance being stimulated by both shorter and longer exposures. No consistent relationship between the degree of resistance induced and the number of irradiated cercariae given could be demonstrated and equivocal results were obtained when comparing the efficacy of single and multiple vaccinations. Vaccinations with UV-attenuated cercariae given intraperitoneally (i.p.) were as efficacious as those given percutaneously but mice were as or more resistant to challenges given by the i.p. route, the possible reasons are discussed. There was no observed delay in the migration of the challenge, vaccinated mice being as resistant when perfused 6 or 3.5 weeks after challenge. Vaccination was species specific since mice exposed to either UV-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae or gamma-attenuated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to homologous but not heterologous challenge. (author)

  8. The temperature--dependent expression of GST of Schistosoma japonicum (Philippine strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Z H; Song, G C; Xu, Y X; Liu, S X

    1993-03-01

    Obtained from pSj5, the cDNA gene encoding GST antigen of Schistosoma japonicum (Philippine strain) was ligated with efficient temperature-dependent PBV220 vector which was constructed in CAPM, and then introduced into host bacterium-DH5 alpha (E. coli) by transformation. Transformants were selected by ampicillin and recombinant clones were identified by restriction mapping. The result showed that recombinant clone 43 was the one carrying recombinant plasmid PBV 220 with the correct insertion of the gene fragment. The GST expression ability of clone 43 was investigated by GST enzymic activity assay and SDS-PAGE. A relatively high level of GST enzymic activity was expressed by this clone under the temperature-dependent condition, that is, cultured at 30 degrees C and expressed at 42 degrees C. A more strongly stained 26 kDa protein band was identified by SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that GST of S. japonicum (Philippine strain) could be expressed not only by IPTG induction, but also by the temperature-dependent method.

  9. Changes in NK and NKT cells in mesenteric lymph nodes after a Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xueping; Xie, Hongyan; Chen, Dianhui; Yu, Xiuxue; Wu, Fan; Li, Lu; Wu, Changyou; Huang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    The mesenteric lymph node (MLN) is the main draining lymph node in mouse enterocoelia, which contains many types of immune cells. Among these cells, natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells belong to innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which have potent activities for controlling a variety of pathogenic infections. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum for 5-7 weeks. Lymphocytes were isolated from the MLN to detect changes in the phenotype and function of NK and NKT cells using a fluorescence activating cell sorter (FACS). These results demonstrated that a S. japonicum infection could significantly increase the percentage of NK cells in the mouse MLN, (P cell number of both NK and NKT cells. In addition, we found that NK and NKT cells from infected mice expressed higher levels of CD69 compared to normal mice (P NKT cell activation. Moreover, we found that the expression of CD4 was increased in infected MLN NK cells (P NKT cells of infected mice after phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin stimulation (P NKT cells might play roles in modulating the classical T cell response. Finally, our results indicated that the expression of CD94 was decreased in NK cells, suggesting that the downregulation of CD94 expression might served as a mechanism in NK cell activation.

  10. Spatial distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infections in the Dongting Lake Region, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Raso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to spatially model the effect of demographic, reservoir hosts and environmental factors on human Schistosoma japonicum infection prevalence in the Dongting Lake area of Hunan Province, China and to determine the potential of each indicator in targeting schistosomiasis control.Cross-sectional serological, coprological and demographic data were obtained from the 2004 nationwide periodic epidemiologic survey for Hunan Province. Environmental data were downloaded from the USGS EROS data centre. Bayesian geostatistical models were employed for spatial analysis of the infection prevalence among study participants. A total of 47,139 participants from 47 administrative villages were selected. Age, sex and occupation of residents and the presence of infected buffaloes and environmental factors, i.e. NDVI, distance to the lake and endemic type of setting, were significantly associated with S. japonicum infection prevalence. After taking into account spatial correlation, however, only demographic factors (age, sex and occupation and the presence of infected buffaloes remained significant indicators.Long established demographic factors, as well presence of host reservoirs rather than environmental factors are driving human transmission. Findings of this work can be used for epidemiologic surveillance and for the future planning of interventions in the Dongting Lake area of Hunan Province.

  11. NOD2 Suppresses Colorectal Tumorigenesis via Downregulation of the TLR Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Nashir Udden

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although NOD2 is the major inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility gene, its role in colorectal tumorigenesis is poorly defined. Here, we show that Nod2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to experimental colorectal tumorigenesis independent of gut microbial dysbiosis. Interestingly, the expression of inflammatory genes and the activation of inflammatory pathways, including NF-κB, ERK, and STAT3 are significantly higher in Nod2−/− mouse colons during colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis, but not at homeostasis. Consistent with higher inflammation, there is greater proliferation of epithelial cells in hyperplastic regions of Nod2−/− colons. In vitro studies demonstrate that, while NOD2 activates the NF-κB and MAPK pathways in response to MDP, it inhibits TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB and MAPK. Notably, NOD2-mediated downregulation of NF-κB and MAPK is associated with the induction of IRF4. Taken together, NOD2 plays a critical role in the suppression of inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon via downregulation of the TLR signaling pathways.

  12. Islet-specific T cell clones transfer diabetes to nonobese diabetic (NOD) F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, J D; Pike, B; McDuffie, M; Haskins, K

    1994-09-15

    To investigate diabetes resistance to T cell-mediated disease transfer, we administered islet-specific T cell clones to the F1 progeny of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice that were crossed with various nondiabetes-prone inbred mouse strains. We investigated four diabetogenic CD4+ T cell clones and all induced insulitis and full development of diabetes in (SWR x NOD)F1, (SJL x NOD)F1, and (C57BL/6 x NOD)F1 mice. In contrast, (BALB/c x NOD)F1 and (CBA x NOD)F1 mice were susceptible to disease transfer by some T cell clones but not others, and (C57/L x NOD)F1 mice seemed to be resistant to both insulitis and disease transfer by all of the clones tested. Disease induced by the T cell clones in susceptible F1 strains was age dependent and could only be observed in recipients younger than 13 days old. Full or partial disease resistance did not correlate with the presence or absence of I-E, different levels of Ag expression in islet cells, or differences in APC function. The results from this study suggest that there may be multiple factors contributing to susceptibility of F1 mice to T cell clone-mediated induction of diabetes, including non-MHC-related genetic background, the immunologic maturity of the recipient, and individual characteristics of the T cell clones.

  13. The effect of colostrum on pigs pre-natally or post-natally exposed to Schistosoma japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Techau, M.E.; Johansen, M.V.; Lind, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Pre-natal infection of Schistosoma japonicum in pigs may prove to be a useful model in shedding light on human pre-natal schistosomiasis. This study describes the effects of immune colostrum on worm burdens, tissue egg counts, liver pathology and crude worm or egg antigen-specific IgG and Ig...

  14. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome.

  15. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1) accelerates type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan-Ying, E-mail: biozyy@163.com [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Huang, Xin-Yuan [College of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan 432000 (China); Chen, Zheng-Wang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 is over-expressed in the blood of NOD mice suffering from insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 increases blood glucose levels and triggers type 1 diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 accelerates insulitis, while its antibody prevents insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 enhances the levels of nitric oxide in the pancreases of NOD mice. -- Abstract: A large body of experimental evidence suggests that cytokines trigger pancreatic {beta}-cell death in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1), a specific marker for activated macrophages, is accumulated in the pancreatic islets of pre-diabetic BB rats. In the present study, we demonstrate that daintain/AIF-1 is released into blood and the levels of daintain/AIF-1 in the blood of type 1 diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice suffering from insulitis are significantly higher than that in healthy NOD mice. When injected intravenously into NOD mice, daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation, increases the concentrations of blood glucose, impairs insulin expression, up-regulates nitric oxide (NO) production in pancreases and accelerates diabetes in NOD mice, while the antibody against daintain/AIF-1 delays or prevents insulitis in NOD mice. These results imply daintain/AIF-1 triggers type 1 diabetes probably via arousing immune cells activation and induction of NO production in pancreas of NOD mice.

  16. Identification and characterization of microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in Schistosoma japonicum

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    Wang Heng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs such as small interfering RNA (siRNA, microRNA and other small RNA transcripts are derived from distinct loci in the genome and play critical roles in RNA-mediated gene silencing mechanisms in plants and metazoa. They are approximately 22 nucleotides long; regulate mRNA stability through perfect or imperfect match to the targets. The biological activities of sncRNAs have been related to many biological events, from resistance to microbe infections to cellular differentiation. The development of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma japonicum parasite includes multiple steps of morphological alterations and biological differentiations, which provide a unique model for studies on the functions of small RNAs. Characterization of the genome-wide transcription of the sncRNAs will be a major step in understanding of the parasite biology. The objective of this study is to investigate the transcriptional profile and potential function of the small non-coding RNAs in the development of S. japanicum. Results The endogenous siRNAs were found mainly derived from transposable elements (TE or transposons and the natural antisense transcripts (NAT. In contrast to other organisms, the TE-derived siRNAs in S. japonicum were more predominant than other sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs. Further, there were distinct length and 3'end variations in the sncRNAs, which were associated with the developmental differentiation of the parasite. Among the identified miRNA transcripts, there were 38 unique to S. japonicum and 16 that belonged to 13 miRNA families are common to other metazoan lineages. These miRNAs were either ubiquitously expressed, or they exhibited specific expression patterns related to the developmental stages or sex. Genes that encoded miRNAs are mainly located in clusters within the genome of S. japonicum. However, genes within one cluster could be differentially transcribed, which suggested

  17. Are NOD2 polymorphisms linked to a specific disease endophenotype of Crohn's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Brix, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    ) protein and on the importance of established adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) in ileal mucosa. To date, there are several reports pointing to the implications of NOD2 polymorphisms in epithelial and immunological responses against microbes, but the pathological significance of NOD2 mutations in CD...... is not yet clarified. The enhanced number of pathogenic E. coli in the ileal mucosa of CD as compared to healthy controls may result from a genetically based failure in one of the intestinal bacteria sensing systems, like NOD2, making the ileal epithelium more prone to colonization with microbes harboring...

  18. Bayesian spatio-temporal modeling of Schistosoma japonicum prevalence data in the absence of a diagnostic 'gold' standard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spatial modeling is increasingly utilized to elucidate relationships between demographic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors, and infectious disease prevalence data. However, there is a paucity of studies focusing on spatio-temporal modeling that take into account the uncertainty of diagnostic techniques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained Schistosoma japonicum prevalence data, based on a standardized indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA, from annual reports from 114 schistosome-endemic villages in Dangtu County, southeastern part of the People's Republic of China, for the period 1995 to 2004. Environmental data were extracted from satellite images. Socioeconomic data were available from village registries. We used Bayesian spatio-temporal models, accounting for the sensitivity and specificity of the IHA test via an equation derived from the law of total probability, to relate the observed with the 'true' prevalence. The risk of S. japonicum was positively associated with the mean land surface temperature, and negatively correlated with the mean normalized difference vegetation index and distance to the nearest water body. There was no significant association between S. japonicum and socioeconomic status of the villages surveyed. The spatial correlation structures of the observed S. japonicum seroprevalence and the estimated infection prevalence differed from one year to another. Variance estimates based on a model adjusted for the diagnostic error were larger than unadjusted models. The generated prediction map for 2005 showed that most of the former and current infections occur in close proximity to the Yangtze River. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Bayesian spatial-temporal modeling incorporating diagnostic uncertainty is a suitable approach for risk mapping S. japonicum prevalence data. The Yangtze River and its tributaries govern schistosomiasis transmission in Dangtu County, but spatial correlation needs to be taken

  19. Bayesian spatio-temporal modeling of Schistosoma japonicum prevalence data in the absence of a diagnostic 'gold' standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Vounatsou, Penelope; Chen, Zhao; Utzinger, Jürg; Yang, Kun; Steinmann, Peter; Wu, Xiao-Hua

    2008-06-11

    Spatial modeling is increasingly utilized to elucidate relationships between demographic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors, and infectious disease prevalence data. However, there is a paucity of studies focusing on spatio-temporal modeling that take into account the uncertainty of diagnostic techniques. We obtained Schistosoma japonicum prevalence data, based on a standardized indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), from annual reports from 114 schistosome-endemic villages in Dangtu County, southeastern part of the People's Republic of China, for the period 1995 to 2004. Environmental data were extracted from satellite images. Socioeconomic data were available from village registries. We used Bayesian spatio-temporal models, accounting for the sensitivity and specificity of the IHA test via an equation derived from the law of total probability, to relate the observed with the 'true' prevalence. The risk of S. japonicum was positively associated with the mean land surface temperature, and negatively correlated with the mean normalized difference vegetation index and distance to the nearest water body. There was no significant association between S. japonicum and socioeconomic status of the villages surveyed. The spatial correlation structures of the observed S. japonicum seroprevalence and the estimated infection prevalence differed from one year to another. Variance estimates based on a model adjusted for the diagnostic error were larger than unadjusted models. The generated prediction map for 2005 showed that most of the former and current infections occur in close proximity to the Yangtze River. Bayesian spatial-temporal modeling incorporating diagnostic uncertainty is a suitable approach for risk mapping S. japonicum prevalence data. The Yangtze River and its tributaries govern schistosomiasis transmission in Dangtu County, but spatial correlation needs to be taken into consideration when making risk prediction at small scales.

  20. Bradyrhizobium Populations Occur in Deep Soil under the Leguminous Tree Acacia albida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Nicolas C.; Dreyfus, Bernard L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil cores were drilled under the leguminous tree Acacia albida growing in two different ecoclimatic zones of West Africa: the Sahelian area (100 to 500 mm of annual rainfall) and the Sudano-Guinean area (1,000 to 1,500 mm of annual rainfall). Soil samples were collected at different depths from the surface down to the water table level and analyzed for the presence of rhizobia able to nodulate A. albida. In both areas, population densities of rhizobia were substantially greater near the water table than near the surface. In the Sahelian area, rhizobia were present as deep as 34 m at a concentration of 1.3 × 103/g of soil. In the Sudano-Guinean area, population densities at 0.5 to 4.5 m depth were higher than in the Sahelian area and, at several depths, comparable to that of temperate soils supporting legume crops (104 rhizobia per g of soil). Surface and deep soil isolates from all four sites were found to be slow-growing rhizobia (Bradyrhizobium sp.). The proportion of effective isolates was almost the same within surface and deep soils. PMID:16348745

  1. Identification of Bradyrhizobium elkanii Genes Involved in Incompatibility with Vigna radiata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien P. Nguyen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a root nodule symbiosis between a leguminous plant and a rhizobium requires complex molecular interactions between the two partners. Compatible interactions lead to the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules, however, some legumes exhibit incompatibility with specific rhizobial strains and restrict nodulation by the strains. Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA61 is incompatible with mung bean (Vigna radiata cv. KPS1 and soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 allele. Here, we explored genetic loci in USDA61 that determine incompatibility with V. radiata KPS1. We identified five novel B. elkanii genes that contribute to this incompatibility. Four of these genes also control incompatibility with soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 allele, suggesting that a common mechanism underlies nodulation restriction in both legumes. The fifth gene encodes a hypothetical protein that contains a tts box in its promoter region. The tts box is conserved in genes encoding the type III secretion system (T3SS, which is known for its delivery of virulence effectors by pathogenic bacteria. These findings revealed both common and unique genes that are involved in the incompatibility of B. elkanii with mung bean and soybean. Of particular interest is the novel T3SS-related gene, which causes incompatibility specifically with mung bean cv. KPS1.

  2. A RIPK2 inhibitor delays NOD signalling events yet prevents inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nachbur, Ueli; Stafford, Che A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors recognize antigens including bacterial peptidoglycans and initiate immune responses by triggering the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through activating NF-κB and MAP kinases. Receptor interacting protein kinase 2...

  3. Mefloquine in combination with hemin causes severe damage to adult Schistosoma japonicum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Qiao, Chunhua; Xue, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2014-03-01

    In order to explore the interaction of mefloquine with hemin against adult Schistosoma japonicum in vitro, the 50% and 95% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC95) of mefloquine and hemin against schistosomes, some factors, such as other iron providing agents, iron chelaters, zinc protoporphyrin-IX, and biological relevant reductants, that might impact on antischistosomal activity induced by interaction of mefloquine with hemin, and preliminary analysis of chemical interaction of both compounds were undertaken. The LC50 and LC95 of mefloquine and hemin alone against schistosomes were determined to be 6.5μg/ml and 7.8μg/ml as well as 232μg/ml and 355μg/ml, respectively. The LC50 and LC95 of mefloquine in the presence of hemin 100μg/ml was 0.24μg/ml and 0.59μg/ml, respectively. On the other hand the LC50 and LC95 of hemin in the presence of mefloquine 1μg/ml was 23.2μg/ml and 77.2μg/ml, respectively. Meanwhile, mefloquine/hemin combinations showed potential synergistic effects against adult S. japonicum, with combination index (CI) values mefloquine exhibited no toxic effect against schistosomes. On the other hand, addition of iron chelators (deferiprone, desferrioxamine mesylate, or 2,2'-bipyridine) to the medium containing mefloquine-hemin resulted in no protective effect on the worms. Furthermore, biological reductants like glutathione, vitamine C or cysteine showed no apparent worm protection effect from toxic mefloquine-hemin even at higher concentrations (242.3-614.6μg/ml, i.e., 6.4-17.8-fold higher than the concentration of hemin). Chemical interaction of mefloquine with hemin was studied in 40% DMSO-Tris buffer solution. Both UV-Vis spectrum and mass spectrum demonstrated the strong interaction of mefloquine with hemin, which resulted in a reduction of hemin color and emergence of an adduct formed by mefloquine and hemin. The results confirm that mefloquine combined with hemin exhibits potential synergistic effect against adult S. japonicum in vitro

  4. Chrysoeriol and Luteolin Released from Alfalfa Seeds Induce nod Genes in Rhizobium meliloti1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Maxwell, Carl A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed and root exudates induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The flavone luteolin previously was isolated from alfalfa seeds by other workers and identified as the first nod gene inducer for R. meliloti. Our recent study of `Moapa 69' alfalfa root exudates found no luteolin but did identify three other nod gene inducers: 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone. The goal of the current study was to identify and quantify nod gene-inducing flavonoids that may influence Rhizobium populations around a germinating alfalfa seed. Aqueous rinses of Moapa 69 alfalfa seeds were collected and assayed for induction of a nodABC-lacZ fusion in R. meliloti. During the first 4 hours of imbibition, total nod gene-inducing activity was released from seeds at 100-fold higher rates than from roots of 72-hour-old seedlings. Five flavonoids were purified and identified by spectroscopic analyses (ultraviolet/visible absorbance, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy) and comparison with authentic standards. Two very active nod gene-inducing flavonoids, chrysoeriol (3′-methoxyluteolin) and luteolin, were identified in seed rinses. Luteolin required a higher concentration (18 nanomolar) than chrysoeriol (5 nanomolar) for half-maximum induction of nodABC-lacZ in R. meliloti, and both were less active than 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone (2 nanomolar) from root exudates. Seeds exuded three other luteolin derivatives: luteolin-7-O-glucoside, 5-methoxyluteolin, and 3′,5-dimethoxyluteolin. Their combined quantities were 24-fold greater than that of luteolin plus chrysoeriol. Most nod gene-inducing activity of these luteolin derivatives apparently is associated with degradation to luteolin and chrysoeriol. However, their presence in large quantities suggests that they may contribute significantly to nod gene-inducing activity in the

  5. How Alfalfa Root Hairs Discriminate between Nod Factors and Oligochitin Elicitors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felle, Hubert H.; Kondorosi, Éva; Kondorosi, Ádam; Schultze, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Using ion-selective microelectrodes, the problem of how signals coming from symbiotic partners or from potential microbial intruders are distinguished was investigated on root hairs of alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The Nod factor, NodRm-IV(C16:2,S), was used to trigger the symbiotic signal and (GlcNAc)8 was selected from (GlcNAc)4-8, to elicit defense-related reactions. To both compounds, root hairs responded with initial transient depolarizations and alkalinizations, which were followed by a hyperpolarization and external acidification in the presence of (GlcNAc)8. We propose that alfalfa recognizes tetrameric Nod factors and N-acetylchitooligosaccharides (n = 4–8) with separate perception sites: (a) (GlcNAc)4 and (GlcNAc)6 reduced the depolarization response to (GlcNAc)8, but not to NodRm-IV(C16:2,S); and (b) depolarization and external alkalization were enhanced when NodRm-IV(C16:2,S) and (GlcNAc)8 were added jointly without preincubation. We suggest further that changes in cytosolic pH and Ca2+ are key events in the transduction, as well as in the discrimination of signals leading to symbiotic responses or defense-related reactions. To (GlcNAc)8, cells responded with a cytosolic acidification, and they responded to NodRm-IV(C16:2,S) with a sustained alkalinization. When both agents were added jointly, the cytosol first alkalized and then acidified. (GlcNAc)8 and NodRm-IV(C16:2,S) transiently increased cytosolic Ca2+ activity, whereby the response to (GlcNAc)8 exceeded the one to NodRm-IV(C16:2,S) by at least a factor of two. PMID:11080312

  6. NOD2/CARD15 mutations and the risk of reoperation in patients with Crohns disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínek, L; Kupka, T; Simova, J; Klvaňa, P; Bojková, M; Uvírová, M; Dítě, P; Dvorackova, J; Hoch, J; Zonca, P

    2015-06-01

    Three NOD2/CARD15 gene variants (3020insC, R702W, G908R) have been identified as genetic risk factors for Crohns disease patients. However the diagnostic and therapeutic relevance for clinical practice remains limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between these variants, the risk of reoperation and disease phenotype. In 76 Crohns disease patients (41 female, 35 male) with a minimum 5 year follow-up, three polymorphisms of the NOD2/CARD15 gene (R702W, G908R, 3020insC) were tested. Detailed clinical and medical history including surgical procedures and reoperations were obtained by reviewing the medical charts and completed prospectively. Association between the need for reoperation, disease phenotypes and gene variants were analyzed. 24 patients (32%) showed at least one NOD2/CARD15 mutation. 25 patients (33%) required reoperation, 51 (67%) represented the control group. The expected trend that patients with NOD2/CARD15 variants have a higher frequency of reoperations was not confirmed to a level of statistical significance (p=0.2688). Two of the four patients (50%) with the 3020insC variant required further surgery. We did not confirm any association between NOD2/CARD15 mutations and age at diagnosis (p=0.4356), behavior (p=0.6610), or localization (p=0.4747) according to the Montreal classification. NOD2/CARD15 polymorphisms did not significantly affect the reoperation rate. Homozygosity for the 3020insC variant in the NOD2/CARD15 gene is associated with a high risk of reoperation. NOD2/CARD15 gene variants are not significantly associated with specific disease phenotypes.

  7. Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium are inversely correlated and related to agricultural practices in long-term field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna eZhalnina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural land management, such as fertilization, liming, and tillage affects soil properties, including pH, organic matter content, nitrification rates, and the microbial community. Three different study sites were used to identify microorganisms that correlate with agricultural land use and to determine which factors regulate the relative abundance of the microbial signatures of the agricultural land-use. The three sites included in this study are the Broadbalk Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK, the Everglades Agricultural Area, Florida, USA and the Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan, USA. The effects of agricultural management on the abundance and diversity of bacteria and archaea were determined using high throughput, barcoded 16S rRNA sequencing. In addition, the relative abundance of these organisms was correlated with soil features. Two groups of microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle were highly correlated with land use at all three sites. The ammonia oxidizing-archaea, dominated by Ca. Nitrososphaera, were positively correlated with agriculture while a ubiquitous group of soil bacteria closely related to the diazotrophic symbiont, Bradyrhizobium, was negatively correlated with agricultural management. Analysis of successional plots showed that the abundance of ammonia oxidizing-archaea declined and the abundance of bradyrhizobia increased with time away from agriculture. This observation suggests that the effect of agriculture on the relative abundance of these genera is reversible. Soil pH and NH3 concentrations were positively correlated with archaeal abundance but negatively correlated with the abundance of Bradyrhizobium. The high correlations of Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium abundances with agricultural management at three long-term experiments with different edaphoclimatic conditions allowed us to suggest these two genera as signature microorganisms for agricultural land use.

  8. NOD2 gene variants confer risk for secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüngst, Christoph; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Reichert, Matthias C; Zimmer, Vincent; Weber, Susanne N; Ofner-Ziegenfuß, Lisa; Voigtländer, Torsten; Spindelböck, Walter; Fickert, Peter; Kirchner, Gabriele I; Lammert, Frank; Lankisch, Tim O; Krawczyk, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SC-CIP) is a progressive cholestatic disease of unknown aetiology characterized by chronic biliary infections. Hence we hypothesized that common NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain containing 2) gene variants, known risk factors for Crohn's disease and bacterial translocation in liver cirrhosis, increase the odds of developing SC-CIP. Screening of 4,641 endoscopic retrograde cholangiography procedures identified 17 patients with SC-CIP, who were then genotyped for the three common NOD2 mutations (Cohort 1, discovery cohort). To validate the association, we subsequently tested these NOD2 variants in 29 patients from SC-CIP cohorts of three additional medical centers (Cohort 2, replication cohort). In Cohort 1, the NOD2 variants were present in 5 of 17 SC-CIP patients (29.4%), which is twice the frequency of the general population. These results were replicated in Cohort 2 with 8 patients (27.6%) showing NOD2 mutations. In contrast, polymorphisms of hepatocanalicular transporter genes did not have major impact on SC-CIP risk. This first study on genetic susceptibility in SC-CIP patients shows an extraordinary high frequency of NOD2 variation, pointing to a critical role of inherited impaired anti-bacterial defense in the development of this devastating biliary disease.

  9. Immunization of pigs against infection with Schistosoma japonicum using ultraviolet-attenuated cercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Y.-E.; Jiang, C.-F.; Han, J.-J.; Li, Y.-L.

    1993-01-01

    Since pigs are important in the zoonotic transmission of schistosomiasis japonica in China, a veterinary vaccine might contribute to the control of the disease in humans. Pigs were immunized with three doses each of 10 000 cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum attenuated with ultraviolet light (400 μWatt.min/cm 2 ). The experiment was performed with portable irradiation equipment in a rural area of the Hubei Province (P.R. China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given 2.5 or 6 months after the last immunization, and age-matched naive pigs were challenged as a control. Immunized pigs developed about 90% resistance against the challenge. The liver egg load of these animals was reduced by over 90%. Less than 0.01% of the immunizing cercariae developed to adult parasites and the vaccination had no apparent adverse influence on the pig's health. (Author)

  10. [Study on the subcloning, expression and immunoprotection with Schistosoma japonicum CAI gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiu-ju; Yuan, Shi-shan; Yi, Xin-yuan; Zeng, Xian-fang; Zhang, Shun-ke; Tang, Lian-fei; Cai, Chun; Zhang, Jie; McReynolds, Larry

    2003-01-01

    To subclone and express the new gene of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) CAI and evaluate the immunoprotective effect of the recombinant molecule. The cDNA of SjCAI gene was subcloned into expression vector pGEX-5X-3 to form recombinants which were then used to transform to E. coli strain ER 2566. Expression was induced by IPTG. The mice were vaccinated with the expressed protein and the immunoprotective effect was tested. Fusion protein of SjGST-CAI was highly expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. The worm reduction rate and the liver egg reduction rate in vaccination group of SjGST-CAI were 29.87% and 63.71%, respectively. SjCAI gene can be highly expressed in E. coli after subcloning into pGEX-5X-3 vector and the expressed fusion protein can induce immunoprotective effect against Sj in mice.

  11. Quinone oxidoreductase 2 is involved in haustorium development of the parasitic plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Juliane K; Yoshida, Satoko; Shirasu, Ken

    2017-07-03

    The family Orobanchaceae includes many parasitic plant species. Parasitic plants invade host vascular tissues and form organs called haustoria, which are used to obtain water and nutrients. Haustorium formation is initiated by host-derived chemicals including quinones and flavonoids. Two types of quinone oxidoreductase (QR) are involved in signal transduction leading to haustorium formation; QR1 mediates single-electron transfers and QR2 mediates 2-electron transfers. In the facultative parasite Triphysaria versicolor, QR1 is involved in haustorium induction signaling, while this role is played by QR2 in the model plant Phtheirospermum japonicum. Our results suggest that there is functional diversification in haustorium signaling molecules among different species of the Orobanchaceae.

  12. China's new strategy to block Schistosoma japonicum transmission: experiences and impact beyond schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long-De; Guo, Jia-Gang; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Hong-Gen; Wang, Tian-Ping; Zhu, Shao-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Hai; Steinmann, Peter; Yang, Guo-Jing; Wang, Shi-Ping; Wu, Zhong-Dao; Wang, Li-Ying; Hao, Yang; Bergquist, Robert; Utzinger, Jürg; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2009-12-01

    Despite sustained efforts for its control made over the past 50+ years, the re-emergence of schistosomiasis in China was noted around the turn of the new millennium. Consequently, a new integrated strategy was proposed to stop the contamination of schistosome eggs to the environment, which emphasizes health education, access to clean water and adequate sanitation, mechanization of agriculture and fencing of water buffaloes, along with chemotherapy. Validation of this integrated control strategy in four pilot counties in the provinces of Anhui, Hubei, Hunan and Jiangxi revealed significant reductions in the rate of Schistosoma japonicum infection in humans and intermediate host snails. Importantly, this strategy showed an impact on diseases beyond schistosomiasis, signified by concomitant reductions in the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections. In view of China's new integrated strategy for transmission control of schistosomiasis showing an ancillary benefit on other helminthic diseases, we encourage others to investigate the scope and limits of integrated control of neglected tropical diseases.

  13. Treatment for Schistosoma japonicum, reduction of intestinal parasite load, and cognitive test score improvements in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeamama, Amara E; McGarvey, Stephen T; Hogan, Joseph; Lapane, Kate L; Bellinger, David C; Acosta, Luz P; Leenstra, Tjalling; Olveda, Remigio M; Kurtis, Jonathan D; Friedman, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether treatment of intestinal parasitic infections improves cognitive function in school-aged children, we examined changes in cognitive testscores over 18 months in relation to: (i) treatment-related Schistosoma japonicum intensity decline, (ii) spontaneous reduction of single soil-transmitted helminth (STH) species, and (iii) ≥2 STH infections among 253 S. japonicum-infected children. Helminth infections were assessed at baseline and quarterly by the Kato-Katz method. S. japonicum infection was treated at baseline using praziquantel. An intensity-based indicator of lower vs. no change/higher infection was defined separately for each helminth species and joint intensity declines of ≥2 STH species. In addition, S. japonicum infection-free duration was defined in four categories based on time of schistosome re-infection: >18 (i.e. cured), >12 to ≤18, 6 to ≤12 and ≤6 (persistently infected) months. There was no baseline treatment for STHs but their intensity varied possibly due to spontaneous infection clearance/acquisition. Four cognitive tests were administered at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months following S. japonicum treatment: learning and memory domains of Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML), verbal fluency (VF), and Philippine nonverbal intelligence test (PNIT). Linear regression models were used to relate changes in respective infections to test performance with adjustment for sociodemographic confounders and coincident helminth infections. Children cured (β = 5.8; P = 0.02) and those schistosome-free for >12 months (β = 1.5; P = 0.03) scored higher in WRAML memory and VF tests compared to persistently infected children independent of STH infections. A decline vs. no change/increase of any individual STH species (β:11.5-14.5; all PSTH (β = 13.1; P = 0.01) species were associated with higher scores in WRAML learning test independent of schistosome infection. Hookworm and Trichuris trichiura

  14. Haustorial Hairs Are Specialized Root Hairs That Support Parasitism in the Facultative Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Songkui; Wakatake, Takanori; Hashimoto, Kei; Saucet, Simon B; Toyooka, Kiminori; Yoshida, Satoko; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A haustorium is the unique organ that invades host tissues and establishes vascular connections. Haustorium formation is a key event in parasitism, but its underlying molecular basis is largely unknown. Here, we use Phtheirospermum japonicum, a facultative root parasite in the Orobanchaceae, as a model parasitic plant. We performed a forward genetic screen to identify mutants with altered haustorial morphologies. The development of the haustorium in P. japonicum is induced by host-derived compounds such as 2,6-dimethoxy-p-benzoquinone. After receiving the signal, the parasite root starts to swell to develop a haustorium, and haustorial hairs proliferate to densely cover the haustorium surface. We isolated mutants that show defects in haustorial hair formation and named them haustorial hair defective (hhd) mutants. The hhd mutants are also defective in root hair formation, indicating that haustorial hair formation is controlled by the root hair development program. The internal structures of the haustoria in the hhd mutants are similar to those of the wild type, indicating that the haustorial hairs are not essential for host invasion. However, all the hhd mutants form fewer haustoria than the wild type upon infection of the host roots. The number of haustoria is restored when the host and parasite roots are forced to grow closely together, suggesting that the haustorial hairs play a role in stabilizing the host-parasite association. Thus, our study provides genetic evidence for the regulation and function of haustorial hairs in the parasitic plant. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Identification of differentially expressed genes in Oncomelania hupensis chronically infected with Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Qin Ping; Nie, Pin; Jiang, Ming Sen; Song, Jian

    2012-04-01

    Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum. The schistosome-snail interaction is biomedically important. To identify differentially expressed transcripts in O. hupensis chronically infected with S. japonicum, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to construct a cDNA library in each direction for transcripts that are more abundantly enriched in head-foot part of the infected O. hupensis and for those that are more abundantly enriched in the uninfected, as head-foot part contains hemocytes and hemolymph which are associated with the snail internal defense system. After differential screening, 39 transcripts were identified, including nine and 30 transcripts enriched in infected and uninfected snails, respectively. Some of the transcripts have similar homology to available sequences in current databases, including transposase, caveolin-like protein, pancreatic trypsin inhibitor-like protein, prosaposin, glutathione s-transferase (GST), and several hypothetical proteins, while most of the transcripts do not match with any sequences in available databases. The identified transcripts were involved functionally in cell growth, metabolism, signal transduction, and immune responses. Two forward library transcripts and 11 reverse library transcripts were selected for real-time PCR, and 10 of them were confirmed to be consistent with the SSH results. It is intriguing to continue functional studies for some genes such as pancreatic trypsin inhibitor; a hypothetical protein (HS576367) related to calcium ion binding; GST; and several unknown proteins (HS576353 and HS576355). These identified differentially expressed genes may be key targets for understanding the molecular mechanism of co-existence during which the snail is unable to rid itself of the schistosome in chronic infection stage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice by transferring in vitro antigen-pulsed syngeneic dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaccio, G; Nicoletti, F; Pisanti, F A

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of antigen-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) transfer on the development of diabetes, 5-week-old female NOD mice received a single iv injection of splenic syngeneic DC from euglycemic NOD mice pulsed in vitro with human y globulin (HGG). Eleven of 12 mice were protected from the d...... exogenous IL-4 and IL-10 exert antidiabetogenic effect in NOD mice and early blockade of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha prevents NOD mouse diabetes, these phenomena may be causally related to the antidiabetogenic effect of HGG-pulsed DC treatment....... the development of diabetes up to the age of 25 weeks, and the insulitis score was significantly reduced. In contrast, NOD mice receiving unpulsed splenic DCs showed histological signs of insulitis and course of type 1 diabetes similar to untreated NOD mice. Treatment with HGG-pulsed DC was associated...

  17. A Proteomic and Lipidomic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens Membranes Under Microaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tookmanian, E. M.; Neubauer, C.; Newman, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Hopanoids are a class of sterol-like molecules found in modern bacterial membranes. Remarkably, they can leave behind carbon skeletons (hopanes) that persist for millions of years. Previously, hopanes were thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria, and thus, indirectly, the evolution of oxygen. As our understanding of the biosynthetic pathway of hopanoids has improved, we have learned that oxygen is not required for hopanoid biosynthesis and that many different bacteria have the genetic potential to synthesize hopanoids. These facts motivate a deeper understanding of the distribution and role(s) of hopanoids in bacteria. Bioinformatic approaches revealed that a subgroup of bacteria that synthesize hopanoids have symbiotic relationships with plants. These symbioses often take the form of root nodules, which have a unique microenvironment including microaerobic conditions to promote nitrogen fixation. We utilized the legume symbiont Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens to investigate the molecular composition of membranes through lipidomic and proteomic studies. A B. diazoefficiens mutant lacking the C-2 hopanoid methylase (ΔhpnP) was previously shown to have a growth defect compared to wildtype under microaerobic conditions, whereas a mutant unable to synthesize C35 hopanoids (ΔhpnH) failed to grow entirely. Because these different hopanoid classes impact the fitness of this organism under nodule-like growth conditions, we sought to determine how these classes affect the rest of the membrane. Here, we present how the presence or absence of specific hopanoid classes alters the membrane proteome and lipidome of B. diazoefficiens; this information provides clues regarding their cellular function. By constraining the roles hopanoids play in modern niches, we hope to identify conserved biochemical functions that will advance our interpretations of the hopane rock record.

  18. Roles for GTP-binding proteins in Vigna unguiculata responding to Nod factors or chitin elicitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.N.; Irving, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    μNod factors are lipo-chito-oligosaccharides secreted by Rhizobium to initiate deformation of legume root hairs and other changes such as increases in intracellular calcium in responsive root hairs. We studied the effects of Nod factors and G-protein modulators on root hair deformation and found significant deformation of root hairs after 30 min exposure to the compounds. Since G-proteins have been implicated in the root hair response to Nod factors in vivo, we examined the GTP-binding profiles of root microsomal membrane fractions isolated from the nodulation competent zone of the legume Vigna unguiculata. GTP competitively binds to microsomal membrane fractions labelled with [ 35 S]GTPγS with a high affinity, yielding a two-site displacement curve with displacement constants (K i ) of 0.58 μM and 0.16 μM. Competition with either ATP or GDP revealed a one-site displacement curve with K i of 4.14 and 11.7 μM respectively. To test if exposure to Nod factors affect the GTP-binding profile, we isolated microsomal membrane fractions from roots pretreated with either NodNGR[S] (from Rhizobium sp. NGR234) or the four-sugar, tetracetylchitotetraose (TACT) backbone of Nod factors. Pretreatment with NodNGR[S] results in an increased affinity for GTP of several hundred-fold. Roots pretreated with TACT also showed a similar but slightly smaller increase in affinity for GTP. To begin identification of possible candidates microsomal proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and GTP-binding proteins were probed with [ 35 S]GTPγS. Microsomal membrane factions isolated from roots pretreated with NodNGR[S] revealed two proteins (27 kDa and 25 kDa) with a higher affinity for GTPγS. Western blotting of the microsomal membrane preparation with anti-Rac antibodies also showed changes in Rac associated signal in microsomal membranes prepared from either NodNGR[S] or TACT pretreated roots. These results provide further support for a role for small, monomeric G-proteins in the Nod factor

  19. A key role for the endothelium in NOD1 mediated vascular inflammation: comparison to TLR4 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Gatheral

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which pathogens induce vascular inflammation and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets in sepsis and related conditions. The intracellular receptor NOD1 recognises peptidoglycan which features in the cell wall of gram negative and some gram positive bacteria. NOD1 engagement generates an inflammatory response via activation of NFκB and MAPK pathways. We have previously shown that stimulation of NOD1 directly activates blood vessels and causes experimental shock in vivo. In this study we have used an ex vivo vessel-organ culture model to characterise the relative contribution of the endothelium in the response of blood vessels to NOD1 agonists. In addition we present the novel finding that NOD1 directly activates human blood vessels. Using human cultured cells we confirm that endothelial cells respond more avidly to NOD1 agonists than vascular smooth muscle cells. Accordingly we have sought to pharmacologically differentiate NOD1 and TLR4 mediated signalling pathways in human endothelial cells, focussing on TAK1, NFκB and p38 MAPK. In addition we profile novel inhibitors of RIP2 and NOD1 itself, which specifically inhibit NOD1 ligand induced inflammatory signalling in the vasculature. This paper is the first to demonstrate activation of whole human artery by NOD1 stimulation and the relative importance of the endothelium in the sensing of NOD1 ligands by vessels. This data supports the potential utility of NOD1 and RIP2 as therapeutic targets in human disease where vascular inflammation is a clinical feature, such as in sepsis and septic shock.

  20. Critical role of IFN-gamma in CFA-mediated protection of NOD mice from diabetes development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiko; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Kato, Takako; Kanagawa, Edith M; Kanagawa, Osami

    2009-11-01

    IFN-gamma signaling-deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop diabetes with similar kinetics to those of wild-type NOD mice. However, the immunization of IFN-gamma signaling-deficient NOD mice with CFA failed to induce long-term protection, whereas wild-type NOD mice receiving CFA remained diabetes-free. CFA also failed to protect IFN-gamma receptor-deficient (IFN-gammaR(-/-)) NOD mice from the autoimmune rejection of transplanted islets, as it does in diabetic NOD mice, and from disease transfer by spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice. These data clearly show that the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma is necessary for the CFA-mediated protection of NOD mice from diabetes. There is no difference in the T(h)1/T(h)17 balance between IFN-gammaR(-/-) NOD and wild-type NOD mice. There is also no difference in the total numbers and percentages of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lymph node CD4(+) T-cell populations between IFN-gammaR(-/-) NOD and wild-type NOD mice. However, pathogenic T cells lacking IFN-gammaR are resistant to the suppressive effect of Treg cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, it is likely that CFA-mediated protection against diabetes development depends on a change in the balance between Treg cells and pathogenic T cells, and IFN-gamma signaling seems to control the susceptibility of pathogenic T cells to the inhibitory activity of Treg cells.

  1. Activation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 by human cytomegalovirus initiates innate immune responses and restricts virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kapoor

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 is an important innate immune sensor of bacterial pathogens. Its induction results in activation of the classic NF-κB pathway and alternative pathways including type I IFN and autophagy. Although the importance of NOD2 in recognizing RNA viruses has recently been identified, its role in sensing DNA viruses has not been studied. We report that infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV results in significant induction of NOD2 expression, beginning as early as 2 hours post infection and increasing steadily 24 hours post infection and afterwards. Infection with human herpesvirus 1 and 2 does not induce NOD2 expression. While the HCMV-encoded glycoprotein B is not required for NOD2 induction, a replication competent virion is necessary. Lentivirus-based NOD2 knockdown in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs and U373 glioma cells leads to enhanced HCMV replication along with decreased levels of interferon beta (IFN-β and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL8. NOD2 induction in HCMV-infected cells activates downstream NF-κB and interferon pathways supported by reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB and pIRF3 in NOD2 knockdown HFFs. Stable overexpression of NOD2 in HFFs restricts HCMV replication in association with increased levels of IFN-β and IL8. Similarly, transient overexpression of NOD2 in U373 cells or its downstream kinase, RIPK2, results in decreased HCMV replication and enhanced cytokine responses. However, overexpression of a mutant NOD2, 3020insC, associated with severe Crohn's disease, results in enhanced HCMV replication and decreased levels of IFN-β in U373 cells. These results show for the first time that NOD2 plays a significant role in HCMV replication and may provide a model for studies of HCMV recognition by the host cell and HCMV colitis in Crohn's disease.

  2. Role of Nod1 in mucosal dendritic cells during Salmonella pathogenicity island 1-independent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourhis, Lionel; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Selvanantham, Thirumahal; Travassos, Leonardo H; Geddes, Kaoru; Fritz, Jörg H; Viala, Jérôme; Tedin, Karsten; Girardin, Stephen E; Philpott, Dana J

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in immunology have highlighted the critical function of pattern-recognition molecules (PRMs) in generating the innate immune response to effectively target pathogens. Nod1 and Nod2 are intracellular PRMs that detect peptidoglycan motifs from the cell walls of bacteria once they gain access to the cytosol. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteric intracellular pathogen that causes a severe disease in the mouse model. This pathogen resides within vacuoles inside the cell, but the question of whether cytosolic PRMs such as Nod1 and Nod2 could have an impact on the course of S. Typhimurium infection in vivo has not been addressed. Here, we show that deficiency in the PRM Nod1, but not Nod2, resulted in increased susceptibility toward a mutant strain of S. Typhimurium that targets directly lamina propria dendritic cells (DCs) for its entry into the host. Using this bacterium and bone marrow chimeras, we uncovered a surprising role for Nod1 in myeloid cells controlling bacterial infection at the level of the intestinal lamina propria. Indeed, DCs deficient for Nod1 exhibited impaired clearance of the bacteria, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to increased organ colonization and decreased host survival after oral infection. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a key role for Nod1 in the host response to an enteric bacterial pathogen through the modulation of intestinal lamina propria DCs.

  3. Segregation of nod-containing and nod-deficient bradyrhizobia as endosymbionts of Arachis hypogaea and as endophytes of Oryza sativa in intercropped fields of Bengal Basin, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Sohini; Sarkar, Monolina; Ganguly, Pritha; Uddin, Md Raihan; Mandal, Sukhendu; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2016-09-01

    Bradyrhizobial invasion in dalbergoid legumes like Arachis hypogaea and endophytic bacterial invasions in non-legumes like Oryza sativa occur through epidermal cracks. Here, we show that there is no overlap between the bradyrhizobial consortia that endosymbiotically and endophytically colonise these plants. To minimise contrast due to phylogeographic isolation, strains were collected from Arachis/Oryza intercropped fields and a total of 17 bradyrhizobia from Arachis (WBAH) and 13 from Oryza (WBOS) were investigated. 16SrRNA and concatenated dnaK-glnII-recA phylogeny clustered the nodABC-positive WBAH and nodABC-deficient WBOS strains in two distinct clades. The in-field segregation is reproducible under controlled conditions which limits the factors that influence their competitive exclusion. While WBAH renodulated Arachis successfully, WBOS nodulated in an inefficient manner. Thus, Arachis, like other Aeschynomene legumes support nod-independent symbiosis that was ineffectual in natural fields. In Oryza, WBOS recolonised endophytically and promoted its growth. WBAH however caused severe chlorosis that was completely overcome when coinfected with WBOS. This explains the exclusive recovery of WBOS in Oryza in natural fields and suggests Nod-factors to have a role in counterselection of WBAH. Finally, canonical soxY1 and thiosulphate oxidation could only be detected in WBOS indicating loss of metabolic traits in WBAH with adaptation of symbiotic lifestyle. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of the major inducers of the Rhizobium nodA promoter from Vicia sativa root exudate and their activity with different nodD genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, S. A.; Schripsema, J.; Wijffelman, C. A.; van Brussel, A. A.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Root exudate of Vicia sativa contains 7 inducers for the nodA promoter of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae. Six of these inducers are flavanones. One inducer was identified as 3,5,7,3'-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone, and a second inducer most likely is 7,3'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone. The

  5. Isojacareubin from the Chinese Herb Hypericum japonicum: Potent Antibacterial and Synergistic Effects on Clinical Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Guo-Ying; An, Jing; Han, Jun; Zhang, Yun-Ling; Wang, Gen-Chun; Hao, Xiao-Yan; Bian, Zhong-Qi

    2012-01-01

    Through bioassay-guided fractionation of the extracts from the aerial parts of the Chinese herb Hypericum japonicum Thunb. Murray, Isojacareubin (ISJ) was characterized as a potent antibacterial compound against the clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The broth microdilution assay was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of ISJ alone. The results showed t...

  6. Soil nitrogen availability and bradyrhizobium spp. inoculation influence the utilization of nitrogen resources in legume-cereal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ababio, R.C.; Kessel, C. van; Ennin, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    Mixed farming systems are practiced in low latitude localities where the land tenure is inflexible and the soil is usually marginal. Two experiments were designed to evaluate Nitrogen (N) resource utilization in such systems as practiced in moist savanna and forest-savanna transitional agroecologies of West Africa. Two cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and two maize (Zea mays) cultivars of peanut (Arachis hypogea) and Sorghum sp. were used in the other as monocropped and mixed cropped treatments. Plants were provided with fertilizer N treatment at the rates of 0, 5, 10 and 35 mg N kg 1 of soil as 15 N-labeled ammonium sulphate. Legume components of inoculated treatments received a mixture of three serologically-distinct strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. recommended for each legume species. Results showed that mixed cropped legumes responded to Bradyrhizobium inoculation and utilized significantly (P<0.05) higher amounts of nitrogen from the atmosphere when compared with monocropped legumes. The inoculation response was influenced by legume-cereal combination, plant cultivars, and soil available nitrogen. The results indicate that in soils of given N availability status, selection of appropriate legume-cereal cultivar combinations will be a useful management practice for enhancing BNF for the benefit of resource poor farmers (author)

  7. Practical application of methanol-mediated mutualistic symbiosis between Methylobacterium species and a roof greening moss, Racomitrium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Akio; Takai, Yuichiro; Suzukawa, Ikko; Akita, Motomu; Murase, Haruhiko; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2012-01-01

    Bryophytes, or mosses, are considered the most maintenance-free materials for roof greening. Racomitrium species are most often used due to their high tolerance to desiccation. Because they grow slowly, a technology for forcing their growth is desired. We succeeded in the efficient production of R. japonicum in liquid culture. The structure of the microbial community is crucial to stabilize the culture. A culture-independent technique revealed that the cultures contain methylotrophic bacteria. Using yeast cells that fluoresce in the presence of methanol, methanol emission from the moss was confirmed, suggesting that it is an important carbon and energy source for the bacteria. We isolated Methylobacterium species from the liquid culture and studied their characteristics. The isolates were able to strongly promote the growth of some mosses including R. japonicum and seed plants, but the plant-microbe combination was important, since growth promotion was not uniform across species. One of the isolates, strain 22A, was cultivated with R. japonicum in liquid culture and in a field experiment, resulting in strong growth promotion. Mutualistic symbiosis can thus be utilized for industrial moss production.

  8. Practical application of methanol-mediated mutualistic symbiosis between Methylobacterium species and a roof greening moss, Racomitrium japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Tani

    Full Text Available Bryophytes, or mosses, are considered the most maintenance-free materials for roof greening. Racomitrium species are most often used due to their high tolerance to desiccation. Because they grow slowly, a technology for forcing their growth is desired. We succeeded in the efficient production of R. japonicum in liquid culture. The structure of the microbial community is crucial to stabilize the culture. A culture-independent technique revealed that the cultures contain methylotrophic bacteria. Using yeast cells that fluoresce in the presence of methanol, methanol emission from the moss was confirmed, suggesting that it is an important carbon and energy source for the bacteria. We isolated Methylobacterium species from the liquid culture and studied their characteristics. The isolates were able to strongly promote the growth of some mosses including R. japonicum and seed plants, but the plant-microbe combination was important, since growth promotion was not uniform across species. One of the isolates, strain 22A, was cultivated with R. japonicum in liquid culture and in a field experiment, resulting in strong growth promotion. Mutualistic symbiosis can thus be utilized for industrial moss production.

  9. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Juliane K; Wakatake, Takanori; Yoshida, Satoko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  11. Peanut plant growth and yield as influenced by co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium and some rhizo-microorganisms under sandy loam soil conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Sh.F. Badawi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of tested rhizomicrobial isolates (Serratia marcescens and Trichoderma harzianum along with a strain of root nodule bacteria (Bradyrhizobium spp. to exhibit some PGP-properties was evaluated in vitro conditions. The main PGP-properties, namely the ability to solubilize-P and production of IAA, as well as production of siderophores and HCN were examined. Additionally, field trials were conducted on sandy loam soil at El-Tahrir Province during two successive summer seasons to study the effect of co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium either individually or together with S. marcescens and/or T. harzianum on nodulation, some plant growth characters, peanut yield and its yield components. The in vitro experiment revealed that all of the tested microorganisms were apparently able to trigger PGP-properties. Phosphate solubilization was the common feature of the employed microorganisms. However, T. harzianum appeared to be superior to other microorganisms, and Bradyrhizobium displayed the lowest capacity. The ability of the microorganisms to produce indole compounds showed that S. marcescens was more effective in IAA production and followed by Bradyrhizobium. Capacity of S. marcescens and T. harzianum to excrete ferric-specific ligands (siderophores and HCN was detected, while Bradyrhizobium failed to produce such compounds. Results of field trials showed that the uninoculated peanut had the least nodulation status, N2-ase activity and all vegetative growth characters in both studied seasons. Bacterization of peanut seeds with bradyrhizobia exerted considerable improvement in number and mass of root nodules, increased the rate of acetylene reduction and all growth characters in comparison to the uninoculated control. The synergy inoculation between bradyrhizobia and any of the tested microorganisms led to further increases of all mentioned characters and strengthened the stimulating effect of the bacterial inoculation. However, the promotive

  12. Computational studies on receptor-ligand interactions between novel buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) variants and muramyl dipeptide (MDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Biswajit; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Mishra, Purusottam; De, Bidhan Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Maharana, Jitendra; Vats, Ashutosh; Ahlawat, Sonika; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), a member of intracellular NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family, recognizes the bacterial peptidoglycan, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and initiates host immune response. The precise ligand recognition mechanism of NOD2 has remained elusive, although studies have suggested leucine rich repeat (LRR) region of NOD2 as the possible binding site of MDP. In this study, we identified multiple transcripts of NOD2 gene in buffalo (buNOD2) and at least five LRR variants (buNOD2-LRRW (wild type), buNOD2-LRRV1-V4) were found to be expressed in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The newly identified buNOD2 transcripts were shorter in lengths as a result of exon-skipping and frame-shift mutations. Among the variants, buNOD2-LRRW, V1, and V3 were expressed more frequently in the animals studied. A comparative receptor-ligand interaction study through modeling of variants, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation revealed that the binding affinity of buNOD2-LRRW towards MDP was greater than that of the shorter variants. The absence of a LRR segment in the buNOD2 variants had probably affected their affinity toward MDP. Notwithstanding a high homology among the variants, the amino acid residues that interact with MDP were located on different LRR motifs. The binding free energy calculation revealed that the amino acids Arg850(LRR4) and Glu932(LRR7) of buNOD2-LRRW, Lys810(LRR3) of buNOD2-LRRV1, and Lys830(LRR3) of buNOD2-LRRV3 largely contributed towards MDP recognition. The knowledge of MDP recognition and binding modes on buNOD2 variants could be useful to understand the regulation of NOD-mediated immune response as well as to develop next generation anti-inflammatory compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Concurrent synthesis and release of nod-gene-inducing flavonoids from alfalfa roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, C.A.; Phillips, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4',7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4',7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4'-dihydroxy-2'-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with [U- 14 C]-L-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor L-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained 14 C. In the presence of AOPP, 14 C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. The release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth

  14. Hematopoietic stem cells from NOD mice exhibit autonomous behavior and a competitive advantage in allogeneic recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Paula M; Rezzoug, Francine; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Fugier-Vivier, Isabelle; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Huang, Yiming; Tanner, Michael K; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2005-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be cured by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from disease-resistant donors. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a number of features that distinguish them as bone marrow transplant recipients that must be understood prior to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance. In the present studies, we characterized NOD HSCs, comparing their engraftment characteristics to HSCs from disease-resistant strains. Strikingly, NOD HSCs are significantly enhanced in engraftment potential compared with HSCs from disease-resistant donors. Unlike HSCs from disease-resistant strains, they do not require graft-facilitating cells to engraft in allogeneic recipients. Additionally, they exhibit a competitive advantage when coadministered with increasing numbers of syngeneic HSCs, produce significantly more spleen colony-forming units (CFU-Ss) in vivo in allogeneic recipients, and more granulocyte macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) in vitro compared with HSCs from disease-resistant controls. NOD HSCs also exhibit significantly enhanced chemotaxis to a stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) gradient and adhere significantly better on primary stroma. This enhanced engraftment potential maps to the insulin-dependent diabetes locus 9 (Idd9) locus, and as such the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family as well as ski/sno genes may be involved in the mechanism underlying the autonomy of NOD HSCs. These findings may have important implications to understand the evolution of autoimmune disease and impact on potential strategies for cure.

  15. MDP-Induced selective tolerance to TLR4 ligands: impairment in NOD2 mutant Crohn's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantó, Elisabet; Moga, Esther; Ricart, Elena; Garcia-Bosch, Orlando; Garcia-Planella, Esther; Juarez, Candido; Vidal, Silvia

    2009-11-01

    Pathogen infection is a complex process in which several pathogen-recognition receptor (PRR) pathways are activated to induce proinflammatory mediators. The activation of multiple PRRs suggests an interaction between Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD) signaling pathways. To understand the modulation induced by NOD2 signals on successive responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), we examined how muramyl dipeptide (MDP) pretreatment reprograms the MDP+LPS (lipopolysaccharide) response of monocytes from human peripheral blood. Preexposure to bacterial MDP components induced selective tolerance to a subsequent NOD2+TLR4 stimulation. MDP pretreatment inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleuken 10 (IL10), whereas IL6 and IL8 remained unaffected. MDP-induced tolerance was independent of receptor downregulation but was associated with reduced levels of phosphorylated TAK1 and abrogated phosphorylation of the downstream MAPK.Since Nod2 mutations have been associated with susceptibility to develop Crohn's disease (CD), we compared the MDP-induced tolerance in healthy donors and CD patients with compound heterozygous Nod2 mutations (Mut-Nod2) expressing variant NOD2 proteins. MDP-induced tolerance in Mut-Nod2 patients reduced IL10 but not TNFalpha production. In contrast with healthy donors, a p38-independent TNFalpha production was observed during the kinetics of the MDP+LPS response in Mut-Nod2 patients. Our findings suggest that the selective tolerance induced by MDP in healthy donors was related to the modulation of a convergent nub of NOD2 and TLR4 signaling pathways. This MDP-induced tolerance was impaired in Mut-Nod2 CD patients, resulting in a p38-independent TNFalpha production and an imbalance between pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines that could be partly responsible for the pathogenesis of CD.

  16. Influence of Schistosoma japonicum programmed cell death protein 10 on the growth and development of schistosomula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan Ru; Huang, Wen Ling; Tang, Chun Lian; Liu, Rong; Zhao, Qin Ping; Ming, Zhen Ping; Dong, Hui Fen

    2018-01-18

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum is among the most serious endemic zoonoses in China. To study interactions between schistosomula, the pre-adult juvenile stage, and hosts, it is important to study the functions of key genes involved in schistosomula growth and development. Programmed cell death protein 10 (pcdp10) is an important apoptosis-related gene with various biological functions. This study described the molecular characterization of S. japonicum PCDP10 (SjPCDP10) and evaluated its functions in schistosomula. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot were used to detect Sjpcdp10 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, at different developmental stages. Immunolocalization was performed to determine SjPCDP10 expression in the parasite. RNA interference (RNAi) experiments were used to assess gene functions associated with SjPCDP10 in schistosomula growth and development. Real-time qPCR revealed that Sjpcdp10 was expressed during all investigated developmental stages and upregulated during schistosomula growth and development. Histochemical localization showed that SjPCDP10 was mainly distributed in the teguments of schistosomula in all investigated stages and part of the parenchymal area of 14-, 18-, and 21-day-old schistosomula. Following Sjpcdp10 knockdown by RNAi, the lengths, widths, areas, and volumes of schistosomula were significantly lower than those in the control group. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the body surfaces of schistosomula subjected to RNAi were seriously damaged, with few tegumental spines and sensory papillae. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the teguments of Sjpcdp10-knockdown schistosomula were incomplete, the number of layers was reduced, and the thickness decreased significantly as compared with those in the control group. Furthermore, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling results showed that the rate of apoptosis in Sjpcdp10-knockdown

  17. Real-time PCR diagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum in low transmission areas of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pei; Gordon, Catherine A; Williams, Gail M; Li, Yuesheng; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Junjian; Gray, Darren J; Ross, Allen G; Harn, Donald; McManus, Donald P

    2018-01-31

    Schistosomiasis in the People's Republic of China (PRC) can be traced back to antiquity. In the past 60 years, the Chinese government has made great efforts to control this persistent disease with elimination slated by 2020 through the implementation of a comprehensive control strategy. This strategy aims to reduce the role of bovines and humans as sources of infection as a pre-requisite for elimination through transmission interruption. The goal of elimination will be achievable only by the implementation of a sustainable surveillance and control system, with sensitive diagnosis a key feature so that the true disease burden is not underestimated. Currently used diagnostics lack the necessary sensitivity to accurately determine the prevalence of Schistosoma japonicum infection in areas with low infection intensities. It is of critical importance to find and treat people and to identify animals with low-level infections if the National Control Programme for China is to achieve schistosomiasis elimination. We evaluated a real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay using 633 human stool samples collected from five villages in Hunan, Anhui, Hubei, and Jiangxi provinces, and 182 bovine (70 cattle and 112 buffalo) stool samples obtained from four villages in Hunan, Anhui, and Jiangxi provinces in the PRC. All stool samples were subjected to the miracidium hatching test (MHT, a diagnostic procedure used in the National Schistosomiasis Control Programme) and the qPCR assay. Samples positive by MHT were subjected to either the Kato-Katz technique for humans, or the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation-digestion (FEA-SD) procedure for bovines, to determine infection intensities. The qPCR assay exhibited a high level of sensitivity in the detection of S. japonicum infections. With both the human and bovine samples, a significantly higher prevalence was determined using the qPCR assay (11.06% humans, 24.73% bovines) than with the MHT (0.93% humans, 7.69% bovines). The

  18. Molecular detection of Schistosoma japonicum in infected snails and mouse faeces using a real-time PCR assay with FRET hybridisation probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan; Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Janwan, Penchome; Sanpool, Oranuch; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2011-11-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) hybridisation probes combined with melting curve analysis was developed to detect Schistosoma japonicum in experimentally infected snails and in faecal samples of infected mice. This procedure is based on melting curve analysis of a hybrid between an amplicon from the S. japonicum internal transcribed spacer region 2 sequence, which is a 192-bp S. japonicum-specific sequence, and fluorophore-labelled specific probes. Real-time FRET PCR could detect as little as a single cercaria artificially introduced into a pool of 10 non-infected snails and a single egg inoculated in 100 mg of non-infected mouse faeces. All S. japonicum-infected snails and all faecal samples from infected mice were positive. Non-infected snails, non-infected mouse faeces and genomic DNA from other parasites were negative. This assay is rapid and has potential for epidemiological S. japonicum surveys in snails, intermediate hosts and faecal samples of final hosts.

  19. The NFP locus of Medicago truncatula controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction upstream of a rapid calcium flux and root hair deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Besma Ben; Shaw, Sidney L; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Maillet, Fabienne; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas; Long, Sharon R; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2003-05-01

    Establishment of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis depends on a molecular dialogue, in which rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors act as symbiotic signals, playing a key role in the control of specificity of infection and nodule formation. Using nodulation-defective (Nod-) mutants of Medicago truncatula to study the mechanisms controlling Nod factor perception and signalling, we have previously identified five genes that control components of a Nod factor-activated signal transduction pathway. Characterisation of a new M. truncatula Nod- mutant led to the identification of the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) locus. The nfp mutant has a novel phenotype among Nod- mutants of M. truncatula, as it does not respond to Nod factors by any of the responses tested. The nfp mutant thus shows no rapid calcium flux, the earliest detectable Nod factor response of wild-type plants, and no root hair deformation. The nfp mutant is also deficient in Nod factor-induced calcium spiking and early nodulin gene expression. While certain genes controlling Nod factor signal transduction also control the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, the nfp mutant shows a wild-type mycorrhizal phenotype. These data indicate that the NFP locus controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction, upstream of previously identified genes and specific to nodulation.

  20. Prevention or early cure of type 1 diabetes by intranasal administration of gliadin in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funda, David; Fundova, Petra; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2014-01-01

    gluten-free diets prevent T1D in animal models. Herewith we investigated whether intranasal (i.n.) administration of gliadin or gluten may arrest the diabetogenic process. I.n. administration of gliadin to 4-week-old NOD mice significantly reduced the diabetes incidence. Similarly, the insulitis...... was lowered. Intranasal gliadin also rescued a fraction of prediabetic 13-week-old NOD mice from progressing to clinical onset of diabetes compared to OVA-treated controls. Vaccination with i.n. gliadin led to an induction of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells and even more significant induction of γδ T cells in mucosal...

  1. Crosses of NOD mice with the related NON strain. A polygenic model for IDDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleer, M A; Reifsnyder, P; Palmer, S M; Prochazka, M; Love, J M; Copeman, J B; Powell, E E; Rodrigues, N R; Prins, J B; Serreze, D V

    1995-10-01

    Chromosome locations of non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes contributing to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in mice have been determined by outcrossing NOD mice to other inbred strains congenic for the NOD MHC haplotype (H2g7). At least nine non-MHC IDDM susceptibility genes (Idd) were previously identified at first backcross (BC1) after outcross of NOD to C57BL/10.H2g7 congenic mice (B10.H2g7). We investigated whether the same set of Idd loci segregated with IDDM susceptibility after outcross of NOD to NON.H2g7 congenic mice. Since the outcrosses to NON.H2g7 and B10.H2g7 were performed in the same vivarium, direct comparisons were made of the chromosomal locations and relative strengths of Idd alleles in diabetic progeny from the two different outcrosses. In comparison with the NOD x B10.H2g7 outcross, the NOD x NON.H2g7 outcross produced significantly higher IDDM frequencies in F1, F2, and BC1 generations. The high F2 diabetes frequency allowed evaluation of the effects of homozygous expression of both the susceptibility and the resistance allele at Idd loci. This analysis demonstrated that no single non-MHC Idd locus was essential for the onset of diabetes in this cross. After outcross to NON.H2g7, Idd4 (chromosome [Chr] 11), Idd5 (Chr 1), and Idd8 (Chr 14) did not segregate with IDDM in either the BC1 or the F2 generation. Diabetogenic NOD-derived alleles at Idd2 (Chr 9), Idd3 (Chr 3), and Idd10 (Chr 3) were segregating in the BC1. An NON-derived allele contributing to susceptibility on Chr 7 (Idd7) was also detected. Dominant traits, detectable only in the F2 cross, were encoded by Chr 4 (Idd9) and two newly mapped loci on Chr 13 (Idd14) and 5 (Idd15). A third dominant trait was encoded by Chr 6 (possibly Idd6), but here, in contrast to Idd9, Idd14, and Idd15, the NON allele was diabetogenic. Stepwise logistic regression analysis of the BC1 and F2 data confirmed that the ability to identify certainty of the non-MHC Idd loci was

  2. Helminth Protein Vaccine Induced Follicular T Helper Cell for Enhancement of Humoral Immunity against Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein vaccines combined with adjuvants have been widely used to induce immune responses, especially the humoral immune response, against molecular targets including parasites. Follicular T helper (Tfh cells are the specialized providers of B-cell help, however, the induction of Tfh cells in protein vaccination has been rarely studied. Here, we report that the Schistosoma japonicum recombinant protein (SjGST-32 combined with tacrolimus (FK506 augmented the induction of Tfh cells, which expressed the canonical markers CXCR5, BCL6, and IL-21, and enhanced the humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the expression of IL-21R on germinal center (GC B cells and memory B cells increased in immunized mice, which indicated that IL-21 from the induced Tfh cells interacted with IL-21R for activation of B cells and maintenance of long-lived humoral immunity. Our results suggest that helminth protein vaccine combined with FK506 induces Tfh cell for stimulating humoral immune responses and inducing long-lived humoral immunity.

  3. Draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain BR 3267, an elite strain recommended for cowpea inoculation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Luiz Simões-Araújo

    Full Text Available Abstract The strain BR 3267 is a nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacteria isolated from soil of semi-arid area of Brazilian Northeast using cowpea as the trap plant. This strain is used as commercial inoculant for cowpea and presents high efficient in nitrogen fixation as consequence of its adaptation potential to semi-arid conditions. We report here the draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain BR 3267, an elite bacterium used as inoculant for cowpea. Whole genome sequencing of BR 3267 using Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology has 55 scaffolds with a total genome size of 7,904,309 bp and C+G 63%. Annotation was added by the RAST prokaryotic genome annotation service and has shown 7314 coding sequences and 52 RNA genes.

  4. Draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium manausense strain BR 3351T, an effective symbiont isolated from Amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões-Araújo, Jean Luiz; Rumjanek, Norma Gouvêa; Xavier, Gustavo Ribeiro; Zilli, Jerri Édson

    The strain BR 3351 T (Bradyrhizobium manausense) was obtained from nodules of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) growing in soil collected from Amazon rainforest. Furthermore, it was observed that the strain has high capacity to fix nitrogen symbiotically in symbioses with cowpea. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain BR 3351 T . The information presented will be important for comparative analysis of nodulation and nitrogen fixation for diazotrophic bacteria. A draft genome with 9,145,311bp and 62.9% of GC content was assembled in 127 scaffolds using 100bp pair-end Illumina MiSeq system. The RAST annotation identified 8603 coding sequences, 51 RNAs genes, classified in 504 subsystems. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium manausense strain BR 3351T, an effective symbiont isolated from Amazon rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Luiz Simões-Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The strain BR 3351T (Bradyrhizobium manausense was obtained from nodules of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp growing in soil collected from Amazon rainforest. Furthermore, it was observed that the strain has high capacity to fix nitrogen symbiotically in symbioses with cowpea. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain BR 3351T. The information presented will be important for comparative analysis of nodulation and nitrogen fixation for diazotrophic bacteria. A draft genome with 9,145,311 bp and 62.9% of GC content was assembled in 127 scaffolds using 100 bp pair-end Illumina MiSeq system. The RAST annotation identified 8603 coding sequences, 51 RNAs genes, classified in 504 subsystems.

  6. Altered Expression of Somatostatin Receptors in Pancreatic Islets from NOD Mice Cultured at Different Glucose Concentrations In Vitro and in Islets Transplanted to Diabetic NOD Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ludvigsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin acts via five receptors (sst1-5. We investigated if the changes in pancreatic islet sst expression in diabetic NOD mice compared to normoglycemic mice are a consequence of hyperglycemia or the ongoing immune reaction in the pancreas. Pancreatic islets were isolated from NOD mice precultured for 5 days and further cultured for 3 days at high or low glucose before examined. Islets were also isolated from NOD mice and transplanted to normal or diabetic mice in a number not sufficient to cure hyperglycemia. After three days, the transplants were removed and stained for sst1-5 and islet hormones. Overall, changes in sst islet cell expression were more common in islets cultured in high glucose concentration in vitro as compared to the islet transplantation in vivo to diabetic mice. The beta and PP cells exhibited more frequent changes in sst expression, while the alpha and delta cells were relatively unaffected by the high glucose condition. Our findings suggest that the glucose level may alter sst expressed in islets cells; however, immune mechanisms may counteract such changes in islet sst expression.

  7. Homology-based annotation of non-coding RNAs in the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santana Clara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomes are trematode parasites of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are considered the most important of the human helminth parasites in terms of morbidity and mortality. Draft genome sequences are now available for Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA plays a crucial role in gene expression regulation, cellular function and defense, homeostasis, and pathogenesis. The genome-wide annotation of ncRNAs is a non-trivial task unless well-annotated genomes of closely related species are already available. Results A homology search for structured ncRNA in the genome of S. mansoni resulted in 23 types of ncRNAs with conserved primary and secondary structure. Among these, we identified rRNA, snRNA, SL RNA, SRP, tRNAs and RNase P, and also possibly MRP and 7SK RNAs. In addition, we confirmed five miRNAs that have recently been reported in S. japonicum and found two additional homologs of known miRNAs. The tRNA complement of S. mansoni is comparable to that of the free-living planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, although for some amino acids differences of more than a factor of two are observed: Leu, Ser, and His are overrepresented, while Cys, Meth, and Ile are underrepresented in S. mansoni. On the other hand, the number of tRNAs in the genome of S. japonicum is reduced by more than a factor of four. Both schistosomes have a complete set of minor spliceosomal snRNAs. Several ncRNAs that are expected to exist in the S. mansoni genome were not found, among them the telomerase RNA, vault RNAs, and Y RNAs. Conclusion The ncRNA sequences and structures presented here represent the most complete dataset of ncRNA from any lophotrochozoan reported so far. This data set provides an important reference for further analysis of the genomes of schistosomes and indeed eukaryotic genomes at large.

  8. Correlative and dynamic imaging of the hatching biology of Schistosoma japonicum from eggs prepared by high pressure freezing.

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    Malcolm K Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosome eggs must traverse tissues of the intestine or bladder to escape the human host and further the life cycle. Escape from host tissues is facilitated by secretion of immuno-reactive molecules by eggs and the formation of an intense strong granulomatous response by the host which acts to exclude the egg into gut or bladder lumens. Schistosome eggs hatch on contact with freshwater, but the mechanisms of activation and hatching are poorly understood. In view of the lack of knowledge of the behaviour of egg hatching in schistosomes, we undertook a detailed dynamic and correlative study of the hatching biology of Schistosoma japonicum. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hatching eggs of S. japonicum were studied using correlative light and electron microscopy (EM. The hatching behaviour was recorded by video microscopy. EM preparative methods incorporating high pressure freezing and cryo-substitution were used to investigate ultrastructural features of the miracidium and extra-embryonic envelopes in pre-activated and activated eggs, and immediately after eggshell rupture. Lectin cytochemistry was performed on egg tissues to investigate subcellular location of specific carbohydrate groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The hatching of S. japonicum eggs is a striking phenomenon, whereby the larva is liberated explosively while still encapsulated within its sub-shell envelopes. The major alterations that occur in the egg during activation are scission of the outer envelope-eggshell boundary, autolysis of the cellular inner envelope, and likely hydration of abundant complex and simple polysaccharides in the lacunal space between the miracidial larva and surrounding envelopes. These observations on hatching provide insight into the dynamic activity of the eggs and the biology of schistosomes within the host.

  9. Nod factors alter the microtubule cytoskeleton in Medicago truncatula root hairs to allow root hair reorientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Timmers, A.C.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is an important part of the tip-growth machinery in legume root hairs. Here we report the effect of Nod factor (NF) on MTs in root hairs of Medicago truncatula. In tip-growing hairs, the ones that typically curl around rhizobia, NF caused a subtle shortening of the

  10. Development of Spontaneous Autoimmune Peripheral Polyneuropathy in B7-2–Deficient Nod Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Benoît; Rhee, Lesley; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Hsin, Honor; Montag, Anthony; Soliven, Betty; Arcella, Jennifer; Girvin, Ann M.; Miller, Stephen D.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have documented the central role of T cell costimulation in autoimmunity. Here we show that the autoimmune diabetes-prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, deficient in B7-2 costimulation, is protected from diabetes but develops a spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy. All the female and one third of the male mice exhibited limb paralysis with histologic and electrophysiologic evidence of severe demyelination in the peripheral nerves beginning at 20 wk of age. No central nervous system lesions were apparent. The peripheral nerve tissue was infiltrated with dendritic cells, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells. Finally, CD4+ T cells isolated from affected animals induced the disease in NOD.SCID mice. Thus, the B7-2–deficient NOD mouse constitutes the first model of a spontaneous autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, which has many similarities to the human disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). This model demonstrates that NOD mice have “cryptic” autoimmune defects that can polarize toward the nervous tissue after the selective disruption of CD28/B7-2 costimulatory pathway. PMID:11535635

  11. A Nod to disease vectors: mitigation of pathogen sensing by arthropod saliva

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sakhon, O. S.; Severo, M. S.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Pedra, J. H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, OCT 2013 (2013), a308 ISSN 1664-302X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : nod-like receptors * inflammasome * vector-borne pathogens * vector-borne diseases * arthropod saliva * salivary proteins Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.941, year: 2013

  12. Nod1 signaling overcomes resistance of S. pneumoniae to opsonophagocytic killing.

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    Elena S Lysenko

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Airway infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp leads to recruitment of neutrophils but limited bacterial killing by these cells. Co-colonization by Sp and a Gram-negative species, Haemophilus influenzae (Hi, provides sufficient stimulus to induce neutrophil and complement-mediated clearance of Sp from the mucosal surface in a murine model. Products from Hi, but not Sp, also promote killing of Sp by ex vivo neutrophil-enriched peritoneal exudate cells. Here we identify the stimulus from Hi as its peptidoglycan. Enhancement of opsonophagocytic killing was facilitated by signaling through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-1 (Nod1, which is involved in recognition of gamma-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (meso-DAP contained in cell walls of Hi but not Sp. Neutrophils from mice treated with Hi or compounds containing meso-DAP, including synthetic peptidoglycan fragments, showed increased Sp killing in a Nod1-dependent manner. Moreover, Nod1(-/- mice showed reduced Hi-induced clearance of Sp during co-colonization. These observations offer insight into mechanisms of microbial competition and demonstrate the importance of Nod1 in neutrophil-mediated clearance of bacteria in vivo.

  13. Prevention of early cure of type 1 diabetes by intranasal administration of gliadin in NOD mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Funda, David P.; Fundová, Petra; Hansen, A. K.; Buschard, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2014) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1640; GA MZd(CZ) NS10340 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : gliadin * diabetes * diabetes 1 type * NOD mice Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  14. Are NOD2 polymorphisms linked to a specific disease endophenotype of Crohn's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2011-01-01

    The complex and yet unknown etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) might consist of various disease endophenotypes, each of which represent their own pathogenesis. This review focuses on the disease endophenotype linked to polymorphisms in the nucleotide‐binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD...

  15. An exploration of caregiver burden for children with nodding syndrome (lucluc) in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakigudde, Janet; Mutamba, Byamah Brian; Bazeyo, William; Musisi, Seggane; James, Okello

    2016-07-22

    Caregivers of patients with chronic illnesses are often uncompensated for work that is physically demanding, time consuming and emotionally and economically draining. This is particularly true for caregivers of children with nodding syndrome, an emergent neurological disorder of unknown etiology in resource poor settings in Africa. We aimed to explore perceptions of caregivers regarding challenges that a typical caregiver faces when caring for a child with nodding syndrome. We used a qualitative exploratory study design with focus group discussions and in-depth interviews to collect data. We analyzed data using the qualitative analysis software package of NVivo and thematic query building. Emergent themes centered on burden of care with emotional agony as the most prominent. Subthemes reflecting the burden of care giving included child and caregiver safety concerns, burnout, social isolation and rejection, and homicidal ideation. Caregivers also complained of physical and financial constraints associated with the care of children with nodding syndrome. The findings point to a high burden of care for caregivers of children with nodding syndrome and suggests the need to incorporate community-based psychosocial and mental health care services for the caregivers of affected children into the national health system response.

  16. Prior Knowledge Facilitates Mutual Gaze Convergence and Head Nodding Synchrony in Face-to-face Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thepsoonthorn, C; Yokozuka, T; Miura, S; Ogawa, K; Miyake, Y

    2016-12-02

    As prior knowledge is claimed to be an essential key to achieve effective education, we are interested in exploring whether prior knowledge enhances communication effectiveness. To demonstrate the effects of prior knowledge, mutual gaze convergence and head nodding synchrony are observed as indicators of communication effectiveness. We conducted an experiment on lecture task between lecturer and student under 2 conditions: prior knowledge and non-prior knowledge. The students in prior knowledge condition were provided the basic information about the lecture content and were assessed their understanding by the experimenter before starting the lecture while the students in non-prior knowledge had none. The result shows that the interaction in prior knowledge condition establishes significantly higher mutual gaze convergence (t(15.03) = 6.72, p < 0.0001; α = 0.05, n = 20) and head nodding synchrony (t(16.67) = 1.83, p = 0.04; α = 0.05, n = 19) compared to non-prior knowledge condition. This study reveals that prior knowledge facilitates mutual gaze convergence and head nodding synchrony. Furthermore, the interaction with and without prior knowledge can be evaluated by measuring or observing mutual gaze convergence and head nodding synchrony.

  17. Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2012-01-01

    , a glycopeptide antibiotic specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, could influence immune homeostasis and the development of diabetic symptoms in the NOD mouse model for diabetes. Methods: Accordingly, one group of mice received vancomycin from birth until weaning (day 28), while another group...

  18. For Whom the Bell Tolls (and Nods): Spit-acular Saliva

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaw, D.K.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Pedra, J. H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2016), s. 40-50 E-ISSN 2196-3045 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-borne diseases * tick saliva * innate immune signaling * toll-like receptor (TLR) * nod-like receptor (NLR) Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  19. The Ubiquitin Ligase XIAP Recruits LUBAC for NOD2 Signaling in Inflammation and Innate Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune Busk; Nachbur, Ueli; Yabal, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors constitute a first line of defense against invading bacteria. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) is implicated in the control of bacterial infections, and mutations in XIAP are causally linked to immunodeficiency in X-linked l...

  20. Nod factor signaling genes and their function in the early stages of Rhizobium infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, R.; Fedorova, E.; Bisseling, T.

    2005-01-01

    A lipochitosaccharide-based signal molecule that is secreted by Rhizobium, named Nod factor (NF), induces root nodule formation in legumes. This molecule is also essential for the establishment of bacterial infection. Genetic analyses in the legume species Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula

  1. Effect of early-life gut mucosal compromise on disease progression in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Katja M.; Hansen, Camilla HF; Krych, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Disease expression in spontaneous nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice depends on environmental stimuli such as stress, diet, and gut microbiota composition. We evaluated a brief, early-life gut intervention in which pups were weaned to low-dose dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). We hypothesized that the mucu...

  2. MRI findings in people with epilepsy and nodding syndrome in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Onchocerciasis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. The debate on a potential causal relationship between Onchocerca volvulus and epilepsy has taken a new direction in the light of the most recent epidemic of nodding syndrome. Objective: To document MRI changes in people with different ...

  3. Immobilization of Rhizobial Exopolysaccharides and Nod Factors Provides a Novel Platform for Interaction with Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Christian Toftegaard

    if LysM-RLKs from the model legumes L. japonicus and M. truncatula were able to bind Nod factors from rhizobia that they do not naturally form symbiosis with. These data could be useful in exploring the exact nature of the symbiosis. For this experiment proof of concept was obtained, but further work...

  4. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. [Komipharm International Co. Ltd., 3188, Seongnam-dong, Jungwon-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 462-827 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C.S. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, H.S., E-mail: hsjun@gachon.ac.kr [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  5. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K.; Kim, S.; Choi, C.S.; Jun, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  6. Concurrent Synthesis and Release of nod-Gene-Inducing Flavonoids from Alfalfa Roots 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Carl A.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with [U-14C]-l-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor l-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained 14C. In the presence of AOPP, 14C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. Experiments with excised cotyledons, hypocotyls, and roots incubated in solution showed that the flavonoids could be synthesized in and released from each organ. However, the ratio of the three flavonoids in exudates from intact plants was most similar to the ratio recently synthesized and released from excised roots. A portion of recently synthesized flavonoid aglycones was found conjugated, presumably as glycosides, in root extracts and may have been involved in the release process. Data from root extracts showed that formononetin, an isoflavonoid which does not induce nod genes, was present in conjugated and aglycone forms but was not released by normal intact roots. In contrast, roots stressed with CuCl2 did release the aglycone formononetin. Thus, the release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth. The synthesis and specific concurrent release of flavonoid nod-gene inducers in this study is consistent with

  7. Direct bacterial killing in vitro by recombinant Nod2 is compromised by Crohn's disease-associated mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent-Herve Perez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A homeostatic relationship with the intestinal microflora is increasingly appreciated as essential for human health and wellbeing. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR domain of Nod2, a bacterial recognition protein, are associated with development of the inflammatory bowel disorder, Crohn's disease. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying disruption of intestinal symbiosis in patients carrying Nod2 mutations.In this study, using purified recombinant LRR domains, we demonstrate that Nod2 is a direct antimicrobial agent and this activity is generally deficient in proteins carrying Crohn's-associated mutations. Wild-type, but not Crohn's-associated, Nod2 LRR domains directly interacted with bacteria in vitro, altered their metabolism and disrupted the integrity of the plasma membrane. Antibiotic activity was also expressed by the LRR domains of Nod1 and other pattern recognition receptors suggesting that the LRR domain is a conserved anti-microbial motif supporting innate cellular immunity.The lack of anti-bacterial activity demonstrated with Crohn's-associated Nod2 mutations in vitro, supports the hypothesis that a deficiency in direct bacterial killing contributes to the association of Nod2 polymorphisms with the disease.

  8. 17β-Estradiol and progesterone decrease MDP induced NOD2 expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Gang; He, Xian-Jing; Wang, Jian-Fa; Yang, Bin; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Dong-Bo; He, Qian-Yu; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Rui

    2017-06-01

    During the periparturient period, many neuroendocrine changes develop in cows. Periparturient hormone fluxes may adversely affect mammary gland immunity and mastitis susceptibility. 17β-Estradiol (E 2 ) and progesterone (P 4 ) have been reported to function on immune regulation, and their concentration fluctuates dramatically during the perinatal period. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) mediate numerous aspects of innate immunity in humans and experimental animals. This study aimed to explore the effects of E 2 and P 4 on NOD2 expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). BMECs were isolated and purified from bovine mammary tissue and treated with E 2 /P 4 and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). After these treatments, the mRNA levels of NOD2, receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP) 2, interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) respectively, and the protein levels of NOD2 were analyzed by western blotting. The results showed that E 2 and P 4 decreased MDP-induced transcriptional expression of NOD2 and the downstream molecules. Moreover, E 2 reduced MDP-induced NOD2 protein expression levels. Our study suggests that down-regulation of NOD2 by E 2 and P 4 may be one of the reasons for mastitis susceptibility in periparturient dairy cows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. From sensing to shaping microbiota: insights into the role of NOD2 in intestinal homeostasis and progression of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Iyshwarya; Gao, Nan

    2017-07-01

    NOD2 was the first susceptibility gene identified for Crohn's disease (CD), one of the major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The field of NOD2 research has opened up many questions critical to understanding the complexities of microbiota-host interactions. In addition to sensing its specific bacterial components as a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor, NOD2 also appears to shape the colonization of intestinal microbiota. Activated NOD2 triggers downstream signaling cascades exampled by the NF-κB pathway to induce antimicrobial activities, however, defective or loss of NOD2 functions incur a similarly activated inflammatory response. Additional studies have identified the involvement of NOD2 in protection against non-microbiota-related intestinal damages as well as extraintestinal infections. We survey recent molecular and genetic studies of NOD2-mediated bacterial sensing and immunological modulation, and integrate evidence to suggest a highly reciprocal but still poorly understood cross talk between enteric microbiota and host cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Leukotriene B4 Enhances NOD2-Dependent Innate Response against Influenza Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Le Bel

    Full Text Available Leukotriene B4 (LTB4, a central mediator of inflammation, is well known for its chemoattractant properties on effectors cells of the immune system. LTB4 also has the ability to control microbial infection by improving host innate defenses through the release of antimicrobial peptides and modulation of intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs expression in response to agonist challenge. In this report, we provide evidences that LTB4 acts on nucleotide-binging oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 pathway to enhance immune response against influenza A infection. Infected mice receiving LTB4 show improved survival, lung architecture and reduced lung viral loads as compared to placebo-treated animals. NOD2 and its downstream adaptor protein IPS-1 have been found to be essential for LTB4-mediated effects against IAV infection, as absence of NOD2 or IPS-1 diminished its capacity to control viral infection. Treatment of IAV-infected mice with LTB4 induces an increased activation of IPS-1-IRF3 axis leading to an enhanced production of IFNβ in lungs of infected mice. LTB4 also has the ability to act on the RICK-NF-κB axis since administration of LTB4 to mice challenged with MDP markedly increases the secretion of IL-6 and TNFα in lungs of mice. TAK1 appears to be essential to the action of LTB4 on NOD2 pathway since pretreatment of MEFs with TAK1 inhibitor prior stimulation with IAV or MDP strongly abrogated the potentiating effects of LTB4 on both IFNβ and cytokine secretion. Together, our results demonstrate that LTB4, through its ability to activate TAK1, potentiates both IPS-1 and RICK axis of the NOD2 pathway to improve host innate responses.

  11. Studies concerning the photoreceptor pigments of stentor coeruleus and blepharisma japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dax, T.G.

    2000-05-01

    In the presence of 1,8-bis-(dimethylamino)-naphthalene, solutions of 3-O-benzyl hypericin and 3,4-di-O-benzyl hypericin in aromatic solvents like benzene or toluene have shown to be photoreactive, whereas in the dark no reactions occurred. 3-O-benzyl hypericin was found to enter a photorearrangement reaction leading to a product species, whose structural details could be elicited by UV/VIS, NMR, and mass spectroscopy together with spectrophotometric titrations. Investigation results led to a 11-phenyl-11H-benz{4,10}anthra{2,1,9,8-nopqa}pleiadene skeleton forming the backbone of the photoproduct. This fundamental system is the more of interest since it highly resembles the parent compound of the blepharismins, the photoreceptor pigments of Blepharisma japonicum. In analogy to blepharismin C, which can be converted photochemically into oxyblepharismin C and further on into stentorin by treatment with acid, the photoproduct could be transformed into hypericin upon irradiation and additional acidic work up. As the photoproduct incorporates several equilibrium systems, computer aided calculations were executed to achieve an idea about the relative stability of the photoproduct's various isomeric forms. The described photoreaction represents a possible route for the total synthesis of blepharismins and oxyblepharismins. Furthermore, it could shed some light on the biogenesis of these photosensing pigments. Irradiation of 3,4-di-O-benzyl hypericin in benzene solution together with a large excess of 1,8-bis-(dimethylamino)-naphthalene produced a species exhibiting a tremendous absorption band in the near IR. By means of EPR spectroscopy it could be stated that this primary photoproduct was of radical nature. The product was examined by means of UV/VIS, NMR, IR and mass spectroscopy. (author)

  12. Vigna unguiculata is nodulated in Spain by endosymbionts of Genisteae legumes and by a new symbiovar (vignae) of the genus Bradyrhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Ana; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2014-10-01

    Vigna unguiculata was introduced into Europe from its distribution centre in Africa, and it is currently being cultivated in Mediterranean regions with adequate edapho-climatic conditions where the slow growing rhizobia nodulating this legume have not yet been studied. Previous studies based on rrs gene and ITS region analyses have shown that Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense and B. elkanii nodulated V. unguiculata in Africa, but these two species were not found in this study. Using the same phylogenetic markers it was shown that V. unguiculata, a legume from the tribe Phaseolae, was nodulated in Spain by two species of group I, B. cytisi and B. canariense, which are common endosymbionts of Genisteae in both Europe and Africa. These species have not been found to date in V. unguiculata nodules in its African distribution centres. All strains from Bradyrhizobium group I isolated in Spain belonged to the symbiovar genistearum, which is found at present only in Genisteae legumes in both Africa and Europe. V. unguiculata was also nodulated in Spain by a strain from Bradyrhizobium group II that belonged to a novel symbiovar (vignae). Some African V. unguiculata-nodulating strains also belonged to this proposed new symbiovar. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. [Construction of platform of Schistosoma japonicum infection real-time monitoring and early warning along Yangtze River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, You; Huan, Hua-Min; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Qing-Dong; Wu, Rong-Feng; Jiang, Jian; Gao, Kai-Min; Xu, Qin-Lan

    2013-12-01

    To construct a platform for Schistosoma japonicum infection real-time monitoring and early warning in marshlands along the Yangtze River. The data of the status of Oncomelania hupensis snails, schistosomiasis endemic situation, marshland environment status, and other basic information were collected and analyzed comprehensively in marshlands along the Yangtze River in Jiangsu Province, and a schistosomiasis endemic situation electronic map was established. Through the GPS and 3G technology, the short messaging service (SMS) alerts were sent to the fishermen when they entered the areas of different schistosomiasis endemic levels in real-time. The SMS alerts reminded the fishermen to adopt the suitable interventions to reduce or avoid the schistosome infection. In addition, the data of moving track of mobile phones of fishermen, and the examination and treatment of schistosomiasis at each monitoring point were collected and analyzed comprehensively and then systematic analysis reports of schistosomiasis situation prediction, early warning, related evaluation, etc. were created in real-time. The platform for Schistosoma japonicum infection real-time monitoring and early warning in marshlands along the Yangtze River has a certain application value for schistosomiasis prevention and control work of Jiangsu Province and even whole country.

  14. Detection of the circulating antigen 14-3-3 protein of Schistosoma japonicum by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis remains a major public health concern that afflicts millions of people worldwide. Low levels of Schistosoma infection require more sensitive diagnostic methods. In this study, a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA was developed for detecting the signal transduction protein 14-3-3, a circulating antigen of Schistosoma japonicum. Results The detection limit of 14-3-3-TRFIA was 0.78 ng/ml, with a linear measurement range from 0.78 to 800 ng/ml. The average intra-assay and inter-assay variability of this TRFIA was 8.9% and 12.2% respectively, and the mean recovery rate ranged from 92.1% to 115.5%. Within the first 21 days post-infection in rabbits, the positive rates of the 14-3-3-TRFIA were distinctly higher compared to ELISA. All these findings illustrate that 14-3-3-TRFIA has a higher detection efficacy and is a good early diagnostic method for active Schistosoma infection. Conclusions A sandwich TRFIA for detecting the circulating antigen 14-3-3 of S. japonicum has been developed, and has demonstrated to be a good potential diagnostic method for schistosomiasis.

  15. Haustorial Hairs Are Specialized Root Hairs That Support Parasitism in the Facultative Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kei; Toyooka, Kiminori

    2016-01-01

    A haustorium is the unique organ that invades host tissues and establishes vascular connections. Haustorium formation is a key event in parasitism, but its underlying molecular basis is largely unknown. Here, we use Phtheirospermum japonicum, a facultative root parasite in the Orobanchaceae, as a model parasitic plant. We performed a forward genetic screen to identify mutants with altered haustorial morphologies. The development of the haustorium in P. japonicum is induced by host-derived compounds such as 2,6-dimethoxy-p-benzoquinone. After receiving the signal, the parasite root starts to swell to develop a haustorium, and haustorial hairs proliferate to densely cover the haustorium surface. We isolated mutants that show defects in haustorial hair formation and named them haustorial hair defective (hhd) mutants. The hhd mutants are also defective in root hair formation, indicating that haustorial hair formation is controlled by the root hair development program. The internal structures of the haustoria in the hhd mutants are similar to those of the wild type, indicating that the haustorial hairs are not essential for host invasion. However, all the hhd mutants form fewer haustoria than the wild type upon infection of the host roots. The number of haustoria is restored when the host and parasite roots are forced to grow closely together, suggesting that the haustorial hairs play a role in stabilizing the host-parasite association. Thus, our study provides genetic evidence for the regulation and function of haustorial hairs in the parasitic plant. PMID:26712864

  16. Upregulated Expression of Cytotoxicity-Related Genes in IFN-γ Knockout Mice with Schistosoma japonicum Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotang Du

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that IFN-γ is important to the development of acquired resistance against murine schistosomiasis. However, the in vivo role of this immunoregulatory cytokine in helminth infection needs to be further investigated. In this study, parasite burden and host immune response were observed in IFN-γ knockout mice (IFNg KO infected with Schistosoma japonicum for 6 weeks. The results suggested that deficiency in IFN-γ led to decreased egg burden in mice, with low schistosome-specific IgG antibody response and enhanced activation of T cells during acute infection. Microarray and qRT-PCR data analyses showed significant upregulation of some cytotoxicity-related genes, including those from the granzyme family, tumor necrosis factor, Fas Ligand, and chemokines, in the spleen cells of IFNg KO mice. Furthermore, CD8+ cells instead of NK cells of IFNg KO mice exhibited increased transcription of cytotoxic genes compared with WT mice. Additionally, Schistosoma japonicum-specific egg antigen immunization also could activate CD8+ T cells to upregulate the expression of cytotoxic genes in IFNg KO mice. Our data suggest that IFN-γ is not always a positive regulator of immune responses. In certain situations, the disruption of IFN-γ signaling may up-regulate the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune responses to the parasite.

  17. Cloning the genes and DNA binding properties of high mobility group B1 (HMGB1) proteins from the human blood flukes Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Oliveira, F.M.B.; Da Silva, I.C.dA.; Rumjanek, F.D.; Dias-Neto, E.; Guimaraes, P.E.M.; Verjovski-Almeida, S.; Štros, Michal; Fantappié, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 377, - (2006), s. 33-45 ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : HMGB1 * Schistosoma mansoni * Schistosoma japonicum Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2006

  18. Influência do pH do meio de cultivo e da turfa no comportamento de estirpes de Bradyrhizobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Miguel

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A acidez dos solos representa um problema que afeta grandes áreas agrícolas pelo mundo, principalmente nos trópicos, onde fósforo e nitrogênio também são limitantes. No caso do nitrogênio, a fixação biológica torna-se uma das alternativas mais viáveis do ponto de vista ecológico e econômico, por diminuir o uso e o impacto causado pelos fertilizantes nitrogenados. Neste trabalho, foram realizados dois experimentos in vitro e um em casa de vegetação com quatro estirpes de Bradyrhizobium (Br 4406, Br 29, SEMIA 587 e INPA 03-11B, no Departamento de Ciência do Solo (UFLA, de julho de 1998 a julho de 1999, para verificar o efeito de três valores de pH (5,0; 6,0; 6,9 no crescimento destas em meio de cultura YM, na sua simbiose com soja, assim como na sua sobrevivência em inoculantes produzidos com turfa. No primeiro experimento, as estirpes de Bradyrhizobium tiveram um comportamento diferenciado em meio líquido, obtendo melhor desempenho em pH 6,0, tanto em número de unidades formadoras de colônias quanto em produção de exopolissacarídeos. +No segundo experimento, o número de nódulos, a atividade da nitrogenase (Nase, as massas secas de nódulos, raízes e parte aérea de plantas de soja, de modo geral, não foram influenciados pelos valores de pH de cultivo das estirpes no inoculante. Entretanto, a estirpe INPA 03 - 11B mostrou-se efetiva, apresentando número de nódulos e atividade de Nase semelhantes aos de Br 29 e SEMIA 587, que são recomendadas como estirpes inoculantes, devendo, assim, ser indicada para testes de eficiência em campo. No terceiro experimento, com exceção da Br 29, que atingiu maior sobrevivência de células em pH 6,0, as outras estirpes tiveram sobrevivência semelhante neste valor de pH e em pH 6,9. O melhor desempenho das estirpes de Bradyrhizobium em pH 6,0 no meio de cultura e em turfa demonstrou a possibilidade do uso de inoculantes corrigidos para esse valor de pH, como modo de pr

  19. Lactase persistence, NOD2 status and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection associations to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elguezabal Natalia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD, which includes both Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, is caused by a complex interplay involving genetic predisposition, environmental factors and an infectious agent. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is a promising pathogen candidate since it produces a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants that resembles CD in humans. MAP is a ubiquitous microorganism, although its presence in the food chain, especially in milk from infected animals, is what made us think that there could be an association between lactase persistence (LP and IBD. The LCT mutation has brought adaptation to dairy farming which in turn would have increased exposure of the population to infection by MAP. NOD2 gene mutations are highly associated to CD. Methods In our study, CD and UC patients and controls from the North of Spain were genotyped for the lactase gene (LCT and for three NOD-2 variants, R702W, G908R and Cins1007fs. MAP PCR was carried out in order to assess MAP infection status and these results were correlated with LCT and NOD2 genotypes. Results As for LP, no association was found with IBD, although UC patients were less likely to present the T/T−13910 variant compared to controls, showing a higher C-allele frequency and a tendency to lactase non-persistence (LNP. NOD2 mutations were associated to CD being the per-allele risk higher for the Cins1007fs variant. MAP infection was more extended among the healthy controls (45.2% compared to CD patients (21.38% and UC patients (19.04% and this was attributed to therapy. The Asturian CD cohort presented higher levels of MAP prevalence (38.6% compared to the Basque CD cohort (15.5%, differences also attributed to therapy. No interaction was found between MAP infection and LCT or NOD2 status. Conclusions We conclude that LP is not significantly associated with IBD, but that MAP infection and NOD2 do show not mutually

  20. NOD2/CARD15 genotype, cardiovascular disease and cancer in 43 600 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, S.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    Yazdanyar S, Nordestgaard BG (Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, University of Copenhagen; and Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, University of Copenhagen; Herlev, Denmark). NOD2/CARD15 genotype, cardiovascular disease and cancer in 43 600 individuals from the gene......Yazdanyar S, Nordestgaard BG (Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, University of Copenhagen; and Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, University of Copenhagen; Herlev, Denmark). NOD2/CARD15 genotype, cardiovascular disease and cancer in 43 600 individuals from...

  1. Pathogen sensing pathways in human embryonic stem cell derived-endothelial cells: role of NOD1 receptors.

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    Daniel M Reed

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC, as well as other stem cell derived endothelial cells, have a range of applications in cardiovascular research and disease treatment. Endothelial cells sense Gram-negative bacteria via the pattern recognition receptors (PRR Toll-like receptor (TLR-4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein (NOD-1. These pathways are important in terms of sensing infection, but TLR4 is also associated with vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Here, we have compared TLR4 and NOD1 responses in hESC-EC with those of endothelial cells derived from other stem cells and with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. HUVEC, endothelial cells derived from blood progenitors (blood outgrowth endothelial cells; BOEC, and from induced pluripotent stem cells all displayed both a TLR4 and NOD1 response. However, hESC-EC had no TLR4 function, but did have functional NOD1 receptors. In vivo conditioning in nude rats did not confer TLR4 expression in hESC-EC. Despite having no TLR4 function, hESC-EC sensed Gram-negative bacteria, a response that was found to be mediated by NOD1 and the associated RIP2 signalling pathways. Thus, hESC-EC are TLR4 deficient but respond to bacteria via NOD1. This data suggests that hESC-EC may be protected from unwanted TLR4-mediated vascular inflammation, thus offering a potential therapeutic advantage.

  2. NOD1 cooperates with TLR2 to enhance T cell receptor-mediated activation in CD8 T cells.

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    Blandine C Mercier

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, like Toll-like receptors (TLR and NOD-like receptors (NLR, are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR. This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions.

  3. Therapeutic effect of Schistosoma japonicum cystatin on bacterial sepsis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Wang, Shushu; Zhan, Bin; He, Wenxin; Chu, Liang; Qiu, Dapeng; Li, Nan; Wan, Yongkun; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Xingzhi; Fang, Qiang; Shen, Jilong; Yang, Xiaodi

    2017-05-08

    Sepsis is a life-threatening complication of an infection and remains one of the leading causes of mortality in surgical patients. Bacteremia induces excessive inflammatory responses that result in multiple organ damage. Chronic helminth infection and helminth-derived materials have been found to immunomodulate host immune system to reduce inflammation against some allergic or inflammatory diseases. Schistosoma japonicum cystatin (Sj-Cys) is a cysteine protease inhibitor that induces regulatory T-cells and a potential immunomodulatory. The effect of Sj-Cys on reducing sepsis inflammation and mortality was investigated. Sepsis was induced in BALB/c mice using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), followed by intraperitoneal injection of different doses (10, 25 or 50 μg) of recombinant Sj-Cys (rSj-Cys). The therapeutic effect of rSj-Cys on sepsis was evaluated by observing the survival rates of mice for 96 h after CLP and the pathological injury of liver, kidney and lung by measuring the levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in sera and the tissue sections pathology, and the expression of MyD88 in liver, kidney and lung tissues. The immunological mechanism was investigated by examining pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β) and IL-10 and TGF-β1 in mice sera and in culture of macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). rSj-Cys treatment provided significant therapeutic effects on CLP-induced sepsis in mice demonstrated with increased survival rates, alleviated overall disease severity and tissue injury of liver, kidney and lung. The rSj-Cys conferred therapeutic efficacy was associated with upregualted IL-10 and TGF-β1 cytokines and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β. MyD88 expression in liver, kidney and lung tissues of rSj-Cys-treated mice was reduced. In vitro assay with macrophages also showed that rSj-Cys inhibited the release of pro

  4. Postnatal events in intestinal gene expression and splenic cell composition is altered in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov

    2013-01-01

    , cellular composition in spleen and liver. At PND1 and 2, the number of Ly-6G and CD11b positive cells in NOD mice was significantly (p=0.05) higher as compared to C57/bl6. Furthermore, gene expression analyses of liver, spleen and intestine showed differences between the two mouse strains in the early...... microbiota seems to play an important role in the development and control of T1D. We hypothesized that NOD mice in the perinatal period respond differently than mice not prone to develop T1D (C57/Bl6), and we investigated the differences in postnatal expression of genes in gut, spleen, liver and pancreas...... postnatal expression of Cxcl2 and the antibacterial lectin encoding RegIIIγ gene. Additionally histopathology findings of the liver showed significant differences of granulocyte infiltration between the two groups in the same period. Our findings suggest that very early postnatal microbiota dependent events...

  5. Postnatal events in intestinal gene expression and splenic cell composition is altered in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that colonisation pattern of the gut in the early postnatal period is highly correlated with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have recently shown that colonization in SPF mice accelerates gut maturation and that at postnatal day (PND) 1, in comparison with germ...... free mice, certain chemokines, including Cxcl2 encoding macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and involved in attraction of neutrophils was downregulated in the gut epithelium. The non-obese diabetes (NOD) mouse is widely used as a model for studying the pathogenesis of T1D. The neonatal gut...... microbiota seems to play an important role in the development and control of T1D. We hypothesized that NOD mice in the perinatal period respond differently than mice not prone to develop T1D (C57/Bl6), and we investigated the differences in postnatal expression of genes in gut, spleen, liver and pancreas...

  6. Physical growth, puberty and hormones in adolescents with Nodding Syndrome; a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piloya-Were, Theresa; Odongkara-Mpora, Beatrice; Namusoke, Hanifa; Idro, Richard

    2014-11-28

    Nodding syndrome is an epidemic symptomatic generalized epilepsy syndrome of unknown cause in Eastern Africa. Some patients have extreme short stature. We hypothesized that growth failure in nodding syndrome is associated with specific endocrine dysfunctions. In this pilot study, we examined the relationship between serum hormone levels and stature, bone age and sexual development. We recruited ten consecutive children, 13 years or older, with World Health Organization defined nodding syndrome and assessed physical growth, bone age, development of secondary sexual characteristics and serum hormone levels. Two children with incomplete results were excluded. Of the eight remaining, two had severe stunting (height for age Z [HAZ] scorebone age was delayed by a median 3(range 0-4) years. Serum growth hormone levels were normal in all eight but the two patients with severe stunting and one with moderate stunting had low levels of Somatomedin C (Insulin like Growth Factor [IGF1]) and/or IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), mediators of growth hormone function. A linear relationship was observed between serum IGF1 level and HAZ score. With the exception of one child, all were either pre-pubertal or in early puberty (Tanner stages 1 and 2) and in the seven, levels of the gonadotrophins (luteinising and follicle stimulating hormone) and the sex hormones (testosterone/oestrogen) were all within pre-pubertal ranges or ranges of early puberty. Thyroid function, prolactin, adrenal, and parathyroid hormone levels were all normal. Patients with nodding syndrome may have dysfunctions in the pituitary growth hormone and pituitary gonadal axes that manifest as stunted growth, delayed bone age and puberty. Studies are required to determine if such endocrine dysfunction is a primary manifestation of the disease or a secondary consequence of chronic ill health and malnutrition and if so, whether targeted interventions can improve outcome.

  7. NODULATION OF YELLOW LUPIN (Lupinus luteus L. DEPENDING ON THE FORECROP, SEED INOCULATION WITH Bradyrhizobium lupini AND GENISTEIN

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    Janusz PRUSIŃSKI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A strict two-factor field ‘Mister’ yellow lupin experiment was made in a split-plot design in poor rye complex soil (soil valuation class IVb at the Experiment Station of the Faculty of Agriculture and Biotechnology, the University of Technology and Life Sciences at Mochełek over 2008-2011. The experiment design covered 2 factors: growing yellow lupin after intercrops of ‘Bardena’ white mustard and ‘Pastar’ winter rye as well as seed inoculation with Bradyrhizobium lupini with or without genistein added. Growing intercrops in the poor rye complex soil considerably decreased neither the Nmin content in early spring nor the size of nodulation in yellow lupin. After lupin harvest, slightly more Nmin was noted for the treatments where intercrops were applied, especially rye in the 0-30 cm layer. The weather pattern, especially moisture conditions, pointed to a special sensitivity of nodulation to water deficit or excess in the rhizosphere. The method of preparing seeds for sowing did not play a greater role in developing the Nmin content in both soil profile layers analysed. White mustard showed a negative effect on the dry weight of nodules and the total N content in the plants and the seeds of yellow lupin as well as created the least favourable conditions for the survival and the capacity for symbiosis by symbiotic bacteria remaining in soil after lupin harvest. The state of yellow lupin plant nitrogen nutrition did not depend on the experimental factors.

  8. Mitigation of soil N2O emission by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Itakura, Manabu; Shimomura, Yumi; Wang, Yong; Yamamoto, Akinori; Tago, Kanako; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    Agricultural soil is the largest source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. Soybean is an important leguminous crop worldwide. Soybean hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules. In soybean ecosystems, N2O emissions often increase during decomposition of the root nodules. Our previous study showed that N2O reductase can be used to mitigate N2O emission from soybean fields during nodule decomposition by inoculation with nosZ++ strains [mutants with increased N2O reductase (N2OR) activity] of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. Here, we show that N2O emission can be reduced at the field scale by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous nosZ+ strains of B. diazoefficiens USDA110 group isolated from Japanese agricultural fields. Our results also suggested that nodule nitrogen is the main source of N2O production during nodule decomposition. Isolating nosZ+ strains from local soybean fields would be more applicable and feasible for many soybean-producing countries than generating mutants.

  9. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

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    Martina Lardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean, tartaric acid (mungbean, hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro and catechol (cowpea were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi. Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions.

  10. Dynamic Tracking Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Tropism following Smoke Inhalation Injury in NOD/SCID Mice

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    MeiJuan Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple preclinical evidences have supported the potential value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for treatment of acute lung injury (ALI. However, few studies focus on the dynamic tropism of MSCs in animals with acute lung injury. In this study, we track systemically transplanted human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs in NOD/SCID mice with smoke inhalation injury (SII through bioluminescence imaging (BLI. The results showed that hBMSCs systemically delivered into healthy NOD/SCID mouse initially reside in the lungs and then partially translocate to the abdomen after 24 h. Compared with the uninjured control group treated with hBMSCs, higher numbers of hBMSCs were found in the lungs of the SII NOD/SCID mice. In both the uninjured and SII mice, the BLI signals in the lungs steadily decreased over time and disappeared by 5 days after treatment. hBMSCs significantly attenuated lung injury, elevated the levels of KGF, decreased the levels of TNF-α in BALF, and inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration in the mice with SII. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that more systemically infused hBMSCs localized to the lungs in mice with SII. hBMSC xenografts repaired smoke inhalation-induced lung injury in mice. This repair was maybe due to the effect of anti-inflammatory and secreting KGF of hMSCs but not associated with the differentiation of the hBMSCs into alveolar epithelial cells.

  11. Beside the point: Mothers' head nodding and shaking gestures during parent-child play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Maria; Vallotton, Claire D; Harris, Paul L

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the context for children's social learning and language acquisition requires consideration of caregivers' multi-modal (speech, gesture) messages. Though young children can interpret both manual and head gestures, little research has examined the communicative input that children receive via parents' head gestures. We longitudinally examined the frequency and communicative functions of mothers' head nodding and head shaking gestures during laboratory play sessions for 32 mother-child dyads, when the children were 14, 20, and 30 months of age. The majority of mothers produced head nods more frequently than head shakes. Both gestures contributed to mothers' verbal attempts at behavior regulation and dialog. Mothers' head nods primarily conveyed agreement with, and attentiveness to, children's utterances, and accompanied affirmative statements and yes/no questions. Mothers' head shakes primarily conveyed prohibitions and statements with negations. Changes over time appeared to reflect corresponding developmental changes in social and communicative dimensions of caregiver-child interaction. Directions for future research are discussed regarding the role of head gesture input in socialization and in supporting language development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recombinase polymerase amplification combined with a lateral flow dipstick for rapid and visual detection of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kui; Xing, Weiwei; Yu, Xinling; Fu, Wenliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zou, Minji; Luo, Zhihong; Xu, Donggang

    2016-08-31

    With the continuous decline in prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma japonicum infection in China, more accurate and sensitive methods suitable for field detection become much needed for schistosomiasis control. Here, a novel rapid and visual detection method based on the combination of recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and lateral flow dipstick (LFD) was developed to detect S. japonicum DNA in fecal samples. The LFD-RPA assay targeting SjR2 could detect 5 fg S. japonicum DNA, which was identical to qPCR and real-time RPA assay, and showed no cross-reaction with other parasites. The detection could be finished within 15-20 min at a wide temperature range (25-45 °C), and the results could be visualized by naked eye. The diagnostic validity of LFD-RPA assay was further assessed with 14 fecal samples of infected patients diagnosed by Kato-Katz method and 31 fecal samples of healthy persons, and compared with that of Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELSIA) and Indirect Hemagglutination Assay (IHA). The LFD-RPA assay showed 92.68 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity and excellent diagnostic agreement with the gold standard Kato-Katz test (k = 0.947, Z = 6.36, P < 0.001), whereas ELISA showed 85.71 % sensitivity, 93.55 % specificity, and substantial diagnostic agreement (k = 0.793, Z = 5.31, P < 0.001), and IHA showed 78.57 % sensitivity, 83.87 % specificity, and moderate diagnostic agreement (k = 0.600, Z = 4.05, P < 0.001), indicating that the LFD-RPA was much better than the traditional methods. The LFD-RPA assay established by us is a sensitive, specific, rapid and convenient method for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis, and shows a great potency in field application.

  13. Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial strains isolated from Desmodium incanum DC in Argentina: Phylogeny, biodiversity and symbiotic ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniutti, María Antonieta; Fornasero, Laura Viviana; Albicoro, Francisco Javier; Martini, María Carla; Draghi, Walter; Alvarez, Florencia; Lagares, Antonio; Pensiero, José Francisco; Del Papa, María Florencia

    2017-07-01

    Desmodium spp. are leguminous plants belonging to the tribe Desmodieae of the subfamily Papilionoideae. They are widely distributed in temperated and subtropical regions and are used as forage plants, for biological control, and in traditional folk medicine. The genus includes pioneer species that resist the xerothermic environment and grow in arid, barren sites. Desmodium species that form nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia play an important role in sustainable agriculture. In Argentina, 23 native species of this genus have been found, including Desmodium incanum. In this study, a total of 64 D. incanum-nodulating rhizobia were obtained from root nodules of four Argentinean plant populations. Rhizobia showed different abiotic-stress tolerances and a remarkable genetic diversity using PCR fingerprinting, with more than 30 different amplification profiles. None of the isolates were found at more than one site, thus indicating a high level of rhizobial diversity associated with D. incanum in Argentinean soils. In selected isolates, 16S rDNA sequencing and whole-cell extract MALDI TOF analysis revealed the presence of isolates related to Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, Bradyrhizobium denitrificans and Rhizobium tropici species. In addition, the nodC gene studied in the selected isolates showed different allelic variants. Isolates were phenotypically characterized by assaying their growth under different abiotic stresses. Some of the local isolates were remarkably tolerant to high temperatures, extreme pH and salinity, which are all stressors commonly found in Argentinean soils. One of the isolates showed high tolerance to temperature and extreme pH, and produced higher aerial plant dry weights compared to other inoculated treatments. These results indicated that local isolates could be efficiently used for D. incanum inoculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Different expression of NOD2 in decidual stromal cells between normal and unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion women during first trimester gestation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chunfeng; Fu, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Shining; Li, Yiyang; Du, Meirong; Zhang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    The NOD2 gene, encoding intracellular paternal recognition receptor (PRR) also called caspase activation and recruitment domain 15 (CARD15), is mutated in Crohn’s disease, an autoimmune-disorder. Unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA) involved in complex auto-immune disorder. However, little is known about the expression of NOD2 protein at maternal-fetal interface with URSA patients. Our aim was to compare the expression levels of NOD2 in the decidual stromal cells (DSCs) from pati...

  15. A Novel NOD2/CARD15 Haplotype Conferring Risk for Crohn Disease in Ashkenazi Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Kazuhito; Taylor, Kent D.; Lin, Ying-chao; Hang, Tieu; Wang, Dai; Tang, Yong-Ming; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Targan, Stephan R.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Yang, Huiying

    2003-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) exhibits a 2–4-fold increased frequency in Jews as compared with other ethnic/racial groups. Three coding variants of the NOD2/CARD15 have been reported as independent disease-predisposing mutations (DPMs), but these were found in only 30%–40% of patients with CD and could not account for all the linkage between CD and the IBD1 locus. The aim of the present study was to explore whether additional DPMs at the IBD1 locus exist in the high-risk Jewish group. Sixty-four Ashkenazi Jewish and 147 non-Jewish white families were studied. Six microsatellite markers spanning IBD1 were genotyped for linkage analysis in subgroups stratified on NOD2/CARD15 DPM status. SNPs in NOD2/CARD15 (R702W, G908R, 1007fs, and S268P) were then genotyped in family and independent case-control samples. On the basis of initial results, sequencing was done on NOD2/CARD15-translated regions in 12 Jewish individuals. Subsequently, a new NOD2/CARD15 variant was genotyped and analyzed. After excluding the influence of the three DPMs, significant linkage of IBD1 to CD in Jews remained with two peaks at D16S403 (mean allele sharing [MAS] = 0.70] and D16S411 (MAS = 0.59). Further, we observed an increased frequency of a haplotype carrying only the 268S variant in Jewish patients (OR = 3.13, P=.0023) but not in non-Jews, suggesting the existence of a Jewish-specific additional disease-predisposing factor on this haplotype. Sequencing of this haplotype revealed a new variant (IVS8+158; JW1). The 268S-JW1 combination exhibited a further increased risk (OR = 5.75, P=.0005) and the highest population-attributable risk (15.1%) for CD among reported DPMs in Jews. In Ashkenazi Jews, unrecognized population-specific predisposing factor(s) exist on the 268S-JW1 haplotype at the IBD1 locus. This factor may contribute to the higher risk for CD in Ashkenazi Jews as compared with non-Jews. PMID:12577202

  16. DISTRIBUSI HABITAT Oncomelania hupensis lindoensis, KEONG PERANTARA Schistosoma japonicum DI DATARAN TINGGI LINDU, KABUPATEN SIGI, SULAWESI TENGAH

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    Triwibowo Ambar Garjito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncomelania hupensis lindoensissnail and its habitat has an important role in the transmission of schistosomiasis in Central Sulawesi, particularly in three isolated areas, Lindu valley, Napu valley and Bada valley. In a part of Schistosomiasis life cycle, inside the snail, Schistosoma japonicummiracidia will undergo a series of stages as sporocyst and cercaria. People are infected by cercaria, the infective stage of S. japonicum.This study were conducted to reconfirm the distribution of O. h. lindoensishabitats in Lindu valley area. The snails were searched and collected in the suspected habitat using ring-sample and man per minute methods by skilled staffs from VBDRU Donggala and Schistosomasis laboratory plus trained local people in the collections. Data on the distribution of snail habitats were recorded by using GPS. Snails and vegetation in the habitats were collected for further analysis in the laboratory. A total of 129 snail habitat were recorded in Lindu valley, consisting of 135 old foci and 1 new focus. In this area, a total of 61 foci are still active of snail habitats. Foci are distributed in several types of habitat, i.e. abandon rice fields, ditches, springs, dry farming, shrubs and forest. Each type habitat has a relative similar vegetation species. The infection rates of O. h. lindoensiswith cercariae in Anca, Tomado dan Puroo villages were 5.27%, 3.19% and 7.58% respectively. These results indicate that the Schistosomiasis transmission is still going on in Lindu valley.Keywords : Distribution, Oncomelania hupensis lindoensis, Habitat, Schistosomiasis, Lindu Valley, Sulawesi TengahAbstrakKeberadaan keong Oncomelania hupensis lindoensis dan habitatnya mempunyai peranan penting terhadap terjadinya penularan Skistosomiasis di Sulawesi Tengah, khususnya di 3 daerah endemis yang cukup terisolasi, yaitu Dataran tinggi Lindu, Dataran Tinggi Napu dan Dataran Tinggi Bada. Di dalam keong tersebut, mirasidium Schistosoma

  17. Exosomes Derived from Dendritic Cells Treated with Schistosoma japonicum Soluble Egg Antigen Attenuate DSS-Induced Colitis

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    Lifu Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–150 nm small membrane vesicles that are released into the extracellular medium via cells that function as a mode of intercellular communication. Dendritic cell (DC-derived exosomes modulate immune responses and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. Moreover, Schistosoma japonicum eggs show modulatory effects in a mouse model of colitis. Therefore, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from DCs treated with S. japonicum soluble eggs antigen (SEA; SEA-treated DC exosomes would be useful for treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Exosomes were purified from the supernatant of DCs treated or untreated with SEA and identified via transmission electron microscopy, western blotting and NanoSight. Acute colitis was induced via the administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS in drinking water (5.0%, wt/vol. Treatment with exosomes was conducted via intraperitoneal injection (i.p.; 50 μg per mouse from day 0 to day 6. Clinical scores were calculated based on weight loss, stool type, and bleeding. Colon length was measured as an indirect marker of inflammation, and colon macroscopic characteristics were determined. Body weight loss and the disease activity index of DSS-induced colitis mice decreased significantly following treatment with SEA-treated DC exosomes. Moreover, the colon lengths of SEA-treated DC exosomes treated colitis mice improved, and their mean colon macroscopic scores decreased. In addition, histologic examinations and histological scores showed that SEA-treated DC exosomes prevented colon damage in acute DSS-induced colitis mice. These results indicate that SEA-treated DC exosomes attenuate the severity of acute DSS-induced colitis mice more effectively than DC exosomes. The current work suggests that SEA-treated DC exosomes may be useful as a new approach to treat IBD.

  18. Action mechanism of 6, 6'-dihydroxythiobinupharidine from Nuphar japonicum, which showed anti-MRSA and anti-VRE activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Shinya; Nishiyama, Eri; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Nao; Taniguchi, Shoko; Ogawa, Wakano; Hatano, Tsutomu; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Kuroda, Teruo

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE), cause serious infections at clinical sites, for which the development of new drugs is necessary. We screened candidates for new antibiotics and investigated its action mechanism. An antimicrobial compound was isolated from an extract of Nuphar japonicum. Its chemical structure was determined by NMR, MS, and optical rotation. We measured its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the microdilution method. The effects of the compound on DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV were investigated with DNA supercoiling, decatenation, and cleavage assay. We isolated and identified 6,6'-dihydroxythiobinupharidine as the antimicrobial compound. The MIC of this compound was 1-4 μg/mL against various MRSA and VRE strains. We also demonstrated that this compound inhibited DNA topoisomerase IV (IC50 was 10-15 μM), but not DNA gyrase in S. aureus, both of which are known to be the targets of quinolone antibiotics and necessary for DNA replication. However, this compound only exhibited slight cross-resistance to norfloxacin-resistant S. aureus, which indicated that DTBN might inhibit other targets besides topoisomerase IV. These results suggest that 6,6'-dihydroxythiobinupharidine may be a potent candidate or seed for novel antibacterial agents. DTBN from N. japonicum showed anti-MRSA and anti-VRE activities. DTBN might be involved in the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase IV. DTBN might be useful as a seed compound. The information on the inhibition mechanism of DTBN will be useful for the modification of DTBN towards developing novel anti-MRSA and anti-VRE drug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Schistosoma japonicum egg specific protein SjE16.7 recruits neutrophils and induces inflammatory hepatic granuloma initiation.

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    Chenyun Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are known to play a major role in the egg granulomatous lesions caused by Schistosoma japonicum, but the precise mechanism by which eggs recruit or active neutrophil is unknown. Here we report S. japonicum egg specific EF-hand protein-SjE16.7 is a potent neutrophil recruiter and initiates the egg associated inflammatory granuloma in schistosomiasis. We show that the expression of SjE16.7 at level of both mRNA and protein is restricted to the egg stage. It locates in the miracidium and subshell area of the egg and can be secreted by the egg. The antigenic properties of SjE16.7 strongly suggest a role for SjE16.7 as an egg-derived molecule involved in host-parasite interactions. To study SjE16.7 functions in vivo, we challenged murine air pouch with recombinant SjE16.7. The results showed SjE16.7 trigged more inflammatory cell infiltration than vehicle or control protein. Using peritoneal exudate neutrophils from mice, we found that SjE16.7 significantly induced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, and the observed phenotypes were associated with enhanced Rac GTPase activation in SjE16.7 treated cells. Finally, in vivo hepatic granuloma formation model showed SjE16.7 coupled beads recruited more inflammatory cell infiltration than control beads. Our findings suggest SjE16.7 is an important pathogenic factor derived from egg. By recruiting neutrophils and inducing local inflammation, SjE16.7 facilitates eggs to be excreted through gut tissues and also initiates pathology in the liver; therefore SjE16.7 is a possible target for the prevention and treatment of schistosomiasis.

  20. The nature and combination of subunits used in epitope-based Schistosoma japonicum vaccine formulations affect their efficacy

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    Liu Feng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in endemic countries and is caused by infections with any one of three primary schistosome species. Although there are no vaccines available to date, this strategy appears feasible since natural immunity develops in individuals suffering from repeated infection during a lifetime. Since vaccinations resulting in both Th1- and Th2-type responses have been shown to contribute to protective immunity, a vaccine formulation with the capacity for stimulating multiple arms of the immune response will likely be the most effective. Previously we developed partially protective, single Th- and B cell-epitope-based peptide-DNA dual vaccines (PDDV (T3-PDDV and B3-PDDV, respectively capable of eliciting immune responses against the Schistosoma japonicum 22.6 kDa tegument antigen (Sj22.6 and a 62 kDa fragment of myosin (Sj62, respectively. Results In this study, we developed PDDV cocktails containing multiple epitopes of S. japonicum from Sj22.6, Sj62 and Sj97 antigens by predicting cytotoxic, helper, and B-cell epitopes, and evaluated vaccine potential in vivo. Results showed that mice immunized with a single-epitope PDDV elicited either Tc, Th, or B cell responses, respectively, and mice immunized with either the T3- or B3- single-epitope PDDV formulation were partially protected against infection. However, mice immunized with a multicomponent (3 PDDV components formulation elicited variable immune responses that were less immunoprotective than single-epitope PDDV formulations. Conclusions Our data show that combining these different antigens did not result in a more effective vaccine formulation when compared to each component administered individually, and further suggest that immune interference resulting from immunizations with antigenically distinct vaccine targets may be an important consideration in the development of multicomponent vaccine preparations.

  1. Distinct genetic diversity of Oncomelania hupensis, intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in mainland China as revealed by ITS sequences.

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    Qin Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, which causes schistosomiasis endemic in the Far East, and especially in mainland China. O. hupensis largely determines the parasite's geographical range. How O. hupensis's genetic diversity is distributed geographically in mainland China has never been well examined with DNA sequence data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigate the genetic variation among O. hupensis from different geographical origins using the combined complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. 165 O. hupensis isolates were obtained in 29 localities from 7 provinces across mainland China: lake/marshland and hill regions in Anhui, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Jiangsu provinces, located along the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, and mountainous regions in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. Phylogenetic and haplotype network analyses showed distinct genetic diversity and no shared haplotypes between populations from lake/marshland regions of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and populations from mountainous regions of Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. The genetic distance between these two groups is up to 0.81 based on Fst, and branch time was estimated as 2-6 Ma. As revealed in the phylogenetic tree, snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces were also clustered separately. Geographical separation appears to be an important factor accounting for the diversification of the two groups of O. hupensis in mainland China, and probably for the separate clades between snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. In lake/marshland and hill regions along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, three clades were identified in the phylogenetic tree, but without any obvious clustering of snails from different provinces. CONCLUSIONS: O. hupensis in mainland China may have considerable genetic diversity, and a more

  2. Cyclosporine A Impairs Nucleotide Binding Oligomerization Domain (Nod1)-Mediated Innate Antibacterial Renal Defenses in Mice and Human Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourneur, Emilie; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Chassin, Cécilia; Bens, Marcelle; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Charles, Nicolas; Pellefigues, Christophe; Aloulou, Meryem; Hertig, Alexandre; Monteiro, Renato C.; Girardin, Stephen E.; Philpott, Dana J.; Rondeau, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Acute pyelonephritis (APN), which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1), neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs), also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by CsA may

  3. Cyclosporine A impairs nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (Nod1-mediated innate antibacterial renal defenses in mice and human transplant recipients.

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    Emilie Tourneur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pyelonephritis (APN, which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1, neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs, also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by Cs

  4. Bradyrhizobium inoculation and nitrogen fertilization on cowpea grown in different soils = Inoculação com Bradyrhizobium e adubação nitrogenada em feijão-caupi cultivado em diferentes solos

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    Kelter Carvalho dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF can be limited by the high availability of nitrogen (N. The soil clay fraction and organic matter content control the availability of N, and it is possible that these attributes affect the symbiotic fixation in soils fertilized with N. Based in that assumption, the objective with this study was to evaluate the effect of N fertilization on biological fixation in cowpea grown in five soils, with wide variation in their physical, chemical and and mineralogical attributes, representative of the growing areas of savannah of Roraima. The experiment was carried out in polyethylene pots in randomized blocks design with factorial arrangement 5x5, 5 soils (LAdx; LVd; PAdx; PVAd; RYve, 4 doses of nitrogen (0, 20,40, 80 kg ha-1 in inoculated plants and a control (without inoculation and nitrogen fertilization, with 4 replications. The seeds of BRS Guariba were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium strain BR 3262. The variables studied were: number, size and mass of the pod, root dry mass, nodule number and dry weight of nodules. The BNF provided an increase in the variables studied in all soils. N levels in inoculated plants provided significant increases varying between soil classes, 3–18% for yield components and 8-70% for the other variables. Nitrogen fertilization affects nodulation in cowpea, being restrictive in some soils. = A fixação biológica do nitrogênio (FBN pode ser limitada pela alta disponibilidade de nitrogênio (N. A fração argila e o teor de matéria orgânica do solo controlam a disponibilidade do N, sendo possível que esses atributos venham a interferir na fixação simbiótica em solos adubados com N. Com base nesse pressuposto, objetivou-se com o presente trabalho avaliar o efeito da adubação nitrogenada na fixação biológica do N em feijão-caupi cultivado em cinco solos, com ampla variação nos seus atributos físicos, químicos e mineralógicos, representativos das áreas de cultivo da Savana

  5. Influência da antibiose exercida por actinomicetos às estirpes de Bradyrhizobium SPP., na nodulação da soja Influence of antibiosis produced by actinomycetes on strains of Bradyrhizobium SPP. on soybean nodulation

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    João Carlos Pereira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o espectro antibiótico de actinomicetos provenientes de solos de Cerrados e a sua influência na nodulação da soja. As estirpes BR 29, BR 33, BR 40, BR 85, BR 86, BR 96, 47/587, 3B-7 e 4A-5 de Bradyrhizobium spp. apresentaram comportamento diferenciado em relação à resistência natural aos antibióticos produzidos por 204 actinomicetos. As estirpes BR 29 e BR 96 foram sensíveis a 5,2 e 9,9% dos antibióticos produzidos, respectivamente, enquanto a BR 33 apresentou sensibilidade a 20,3%. O antagonismo exercido pelos actinomicetos exclusivamente à BR 29 e BR 33 foi de 1,6 e 5,7%, respectivamente. Esse efeito não foi observado nas estirpes BR 40 e BR 96. Inoculações simples e em mistura das estirpes na presença de actinomicetos influenciaram a nodulação da soja. A co-inoculação da BR 33 e BR 29 com o isolado 370 reduziu o percentual de ocorrência média, nos nódulos, da BR 29, de 94,1% para 83,7%, com conseqüente aumento da BR 33 de 6,7% para 17,2%. Os resultados evidenciam a importância de estudos ecológicos desses microrganismos, visando avaliar o seu papel no estabelecimento de uma nodulação eficiente.The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibiotic spectrum of actinomycetes from Cerrado soils and their influence on soybean nodulation. Strains BR 29, BR 33, BR 40, BR 85, BR 86, BR 96, 47/587, 3B-7 and 4A-5 of Bradyrhizobium spp. were characterized by their natural resistence to antibiotics produced by 204 actinomycete isolates. The strains BR 29 and BR 96 of B. elkanii were sensitive to 5.2% and 9.9% the products of actinomycete isolates, respectively, while BR 33 was sensitive up to 20.3%. The antagonistic effects caused by actinomycete exclusively to BR 29 and BR 33 were 1.6% and 5.7% respectively. This effect was not observed for strains BR 40 and BR 96. Single and multistrains inoculations in the presence or absence of actinomycetes affected soybean nodulation. On double

  6. Compatibilidade do tratamento de sementes de feijão-caupi com fungicidas e inoculação com estirpes de Bradyrhizobium

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    Manoel Luiz da Silva Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a compatibilidade do tratamento de sementes com fungicidas e a inoculação com estirpes de Bradyrhizobium em feijão-caupi. Em laboratório, avaliou-se a sobrevivência de células nas sementes da cultivar BRS Guariba, tratadas ou não com fungicidas (fludioxonil, carbendazim, carbendazim + thiram e carboxin + thiram e inoculadas ou não com Bradyrhizobium (estirpes UFLA3-84, BR 3267, INPA3-11B e BR 3262. Em casa de vegetação, conduziu-se experimento em vasos de Leonard, com os mesmos tratamentos. Foram avaliados: massa de matéria seca da parte aérea, além de número e massa de nódulos 25 dias após a emergência das plantas. No campo, dois experimentos foram conduzidos, tendo-se utilizado a estirpe BR 3262, com aplicação de fungicidas nas sementes: um em área de primeiro cultivo e outro em área cultivada anteriormente com culturas anuais. Avaliaram-se, aos 35 dias, o número de nódulos, a massa de nódulos secos e a massa de matéria seca da parte aérea, e, na colheita, a produtividade de grãos. Os fungicidas não tiveram efeito significativo sobre a sobrevivência de Bradyrhizobium, a nodulação das plantas e o rendimento de grãos, que, em média, foi superior a 1.200 kg ha-1. O tratamento de sementes de feijão-caupi com fungicidas é compatível com a inoculação das estirpes avaliadas.

  7. ANÁLISIS DE LA PRESENCIA NATURAL DE MICORRIZAS EN CULTIVOS DE ALGODÓN (Gossypium barbadense L.) INOCULADOS CON Bacillus megaterium Y/O Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia, Claudia; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Zúñiga, Doris; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).

    2015-01-01

    Para el proceso de optimización de protocolos se probaron diferentes modificaciones del proceso de tinción propuesto por Phillips & Hayman para permitir la identificación de estructuras intra- radicales derivadas de la interacción planta-hongo; para ello, se extrajeron las raíces de cultivos de algodón (Gossypium barbadense L.) inoculados con Bacillus megaterium (B), Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense (Br) y la interacción de ambos (I), además los controles positivo, con nitrato de potasio, (N+)...

  8. Casein hydrolysate diet controls intestinal T cell activation, free radical production and microbial colonisation in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, R; Asghar, M N; Toivonen, R; Lauren, L; Söderström, M; Toivola, D M; van Tol, E A F; Hänninen, A

    2013-08-01

    Dietary and microbial factors and the gut immune system are important in autoimmune diabetes. We evaluated inflammatory activity in the whole gut in prediabetic NOD mice using ex vivo imaging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), and correlated this with the above-mentioned factors. NOD mice were fed a normal diet or an anti-diabetogenic casein hydrolysate (CH) diet. RONS activity was detected by chemiluminescence imaging of the whole gut. Proinflammatory and T cell cytokines were studied in the gut and islets, and dietary effects on gut microbiota and short-chain fatty acids were determined. Prediabetic NOD mice displayed high RONS activity in the epithelial cells of the distal small intestine, in conjunction with a proinflammatory cytokine profile. RONS production was effectively reduced by the CH diet, which also controlled (1) the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and colonisation-dependent RegIIIγ (also known as Reg3g) in ileum; (2) intestinal T cell activation; and (3) islet cytokines. The CH diet diminished microbial colonisation, increased the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, and reduced lactic acid and butyric acid production in the gut. Epithelial RONS production and proinflammatory T cell activation appears in the ileum of NOD mice after weaning to normal laboratory chow, but not after weaning to an anti-diabetogenic CH diet. Our data suggest a link between dietary factors, microbial colonisation and mucosal immune activation in NOD mice.

  9. DNA Detection of Schistosoma japonicum: Diagnostic Validity of a LAMP Assay for Low-Intensity Infection and Effects of Chemotherapy in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jing; Guan, Zhi-Xun; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Yan-Yan; Cao, Yun; Zhang, Hui-Qin; Zhu, Xing-Quan; He, Yong-Kang; Xia, Chao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis has decreased significantly in prevalence and intensity of infection in China, thus more accurate and sensitive methods are desperately needed for the further control of schistosomiasis. The present work aimed to assess the utility of the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection of light intensity infection or false-negative patients and patients post-treatment, targeting the highly repetitive retrotransposon SjR2 of Schistosoma japonicum. Methodo...

  10. DNA detection of Schistosoma japonicum: diagnostic validity of a LAMP assay for low-intensity infection and effects of chemotherapy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Guan, Zhi-Xun; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Yan-Yan; Cao, Yun; Zhang, Hui-Qin; Zhu, Xing-Quan; He, Yong-Kang; Xia, Chao-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Schistosomiasis has decreased significantly in prevalence and intensity of infection in China, thus more accurate and sensitive methods are desperately needed for the further control of schistosomiasis. The present work aimed to assess the utility of the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection of light intensity infection or false-negative patients and patients post-treatment, targeting the highly repetitive retrotransposon SjR2 of Schistosoma japonicum. LAMP was first assessed in rabbits with low intensity infection (EPGLAMP. Meanwhile, 42 sera from healthy individuals in a non-endemic area, and 60 sera from "healthy" residents who were identified as being negative for feces examination and immuno-methods in an endemic area were also examined. The results showed that LAMP could detect S. japonicum DNA in sera from rabbits at 3rd day post-infection. Following administration of praziquantel, the S. japonicum DNA in rabbit sera became negative at 10 weeks post-treatment. Of 110 sera from patients, LAMP showed 95.5% sensitivity, and even for 41 patients with less than 10 EPG, the sensitivity of LAMP still reached to 95.1%. For 47 patients after treatment, the negative conversion rate of S. japonicum DNA in patient sera increased from 23.4%, 61.7% to 83.0% at 3 months, 6 months and 9 months post-treatment, respectively. No false-positive result was obtained for 42 human sera from non-endemic area, while for the 60 "healthy" individuals from endemic area, 10 (16.7%) individuals were positive by LAMP, which suggested that these individuals might be false-negative patients. The present study demonstrated that the LAMP assay is sensitive, specific, and affordable, which would help reduce schistosomiasis transmission through targeted treatment of individuals, particularly for those with negative stool examinations who may yet remain infected. The LAMP assay may provide a potential tool to support schistosomiasis control and elimination strategies.

  11. Synthesis, Bioactivity Evaluation, and Toxicity Assessment of Novel Salicylanilide Ester Derivatives as Cercaricides against Schistosoma japonicum and Molluscicides against Oncomelania hupensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weisi; Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Yufen; Li, Shizhu; Duan, Liping

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel salicylanilide ester derivatives were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for cercaricidal potential against Schistosoma japonicum and molluscicidal potential against Oncomelania hupensis. Four derivatives exhibited remarkable cercaricidal activity superior to that of niclosamide. Among them, the most active compound, 4-chloro-2-((2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)carbamoyl)phenyl 4-methoxybenzoate (compound 4c), showed a marked minimum effective cercaricidal concentration as low as 0.43 μM and significant molluscicidal activity, with a 50% lethal concentration (LC50) of 0.206 g/m(2). Particularly, compound 4c displayed 88-fold decreased fish toxicity on Danio rerio and 44-fold reduced cytotoxicity on human kidney HEK293 cells in comparison with the toxicity of niclosamide. The results indicated that 4c could serve as a promising drug candidate, with environmental safety properties, against Schistosoma japonicum at transmission stages. The preliminary molecular mechanism of target compounds in Schistosoma japonicum cercariae was also investigated. Salicylanilide ester derivatives exhibited an inhibitory effect on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) but no effect on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and a strong and significant correlation between NOS inhibitory efficacy and cercaricidal activity was observed. In addition, 4c could downregulate the expression of NOS in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that NOS was probably one of the drug targets of salicylanilide esters. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. [Effects of catalase on the engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells in NOD/SCID mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming; Hu, Lin-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effect of catalase (CAT) on engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) by co-transplanting umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC) with over-expressed CAT and human HSC into NOD/SCID mice. The UC-MSC cultured in vitro were transfected by the retrovirus containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-CAT genes respectively. MSC-GFP and MSC-GFP-CAT cell lines were sorted by flow cytometry. Co-culture and co-transplant experiments were performed to detect the effects of CAT on expansion and engraftment of human HSC. The percentage of GFP(+) cells were approximately 97.6% and 96.8% after sorting. The mRNA expression of CAT in MSC-GFP-CAT was 23.9-fold higher than that in UC-MSC. The activity of CAT in UC-MSC, MSC-GFP, MSC-GFP-CAT cells were 19.5, 20.3 and 74.1 Unit respectively. There was no significant differences in the percentage of CD34(+) cells between 3 groups in co-culture experiment. And the percentage of human CD45(+) cells in NOD/SCID mice were (3.22 ± 3.1)%, (4.26 ± 3.56)% and (7.37 ± 4.51)% respectively. MSC-GFP-CAT significantly improves the engraftment of human HSC in NOD/SCID mice, whereas co-culture with the MSC-GFP-CAT can not promote the expansion of HSC in vitro.

  13. Exposure to bisphenol A, but not phthalates, increases spontaneous diabetes type 1 development in NOD mice

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    Johanna Bodin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells due to a genetic predisposition and can be triggered by environmental factors. We have previously shown that bisphenol A (BPA accelerates the spontaneous development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Here, we hypothesized that oral exposure to a mixture of the endocrine disruptors BPA and phthalates, relevant for human exposure, would accelerate diabetes development compared to BPA alone. NOD mice were exposed to BPA (1 mg/l, a mixture of phthalates (DEHP 1 mg/l, DBP 0.2 mg/l, BBP 10 mg/l and DiBP 20 mg/l or a combination of BPA and the phthalate mixture through drinking water from conception and throughout life. Previous observations that BPA exposure increased the prevalence of diabetes and insulitis and decreased the number of tissue resident macrophages in pancreas were confirmed, and extended by demonstrating that BPA exposure also impaired the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages. None of these effects were observed after phthalate exposure alone. The phthalate exposure in combination with BPA seemed to dampen the BPA effects on macrophage number and function as well as diabetes development, but not insulitis development. Exposure to BPA alone or in combination with phthalates decreased cytokine release (TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ, IL-4 from in vitro stimulated splenocytes and lymph node cells, indicating systemic changes in immune function. In conclusion, exposure to BPA, but not to phthalates or mixed exposure to BPA and phthalates, accelerated diabetes development in NOD mice, apparently in part via systemic immune alterations including decreased macrophage function.

  14. Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors in rheumatic diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, William J

    2012-02-01

    The past 10 years have seen the description of families of receptors that drive proinflammatory cytokine production in infection and tissue injury. Two major classes have been examined in the context of inflammatory joint disease--the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs). TLRs such as TLR2 and TLR4 are being implicated in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, lyme arthritis and osteoarthritis. Nalp3 has been identified as a key NLR for IL-1beta production and has been shown to have a particular role in gout. These findings present new therapeutic opportunities, possibly allowing for the replacement of biologics with small molecule inhibitors.

  15. Effect of early-life gut mucosal compromise on disease progression in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Katja M.; Hansen, Camilla HF; Krych, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Disease expression in spontaneous nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice depends on environmental stimuli such as stress, diet, and gut microbiota composition. We evaluated a brief, early-life gut intervention in which pups were weaned to low-dose dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). We hypothesized that the mucus...... of the microbiota during weeks 4 through 6 led to increased cecal length and weight and, in week 13, a tendency toward decreased colon length, with increased leakage of LPS to the blood. We conclude that mucus reduction and subsequent increased host–bacterial contact did not affect overall disease progression...

  16. Penetrance of NOD2/CARD15 genetic variants in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    In case-control studies of Europeans, heterozygosity for Arg702Trp(rs2066844), Gly908Arg(rs2066845) and Leu1007fsinsC(rs5743293) on the NOD2/CARD15 gene is associated with a 2-fold greater risk of Crohn disease, whereas homozygosity or compound heterozygosity is associated with a 17-fold greater ...... risk. However, the importance of these genetic variants if identified in particular individuals within the general population is unknown. We undertook this study to estimate the penetrance of these variants in the general population....

  17. Penetrance of NOD2/CARD15 genetic variants in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    In case-control studies of Europeans, heterozygosity for Arg702Trp(rs2066844), Gly908Arg(rs2066845) and Leu1007fsinsC(rs5743293) on the NOD2/CARD15 gene is associated with a 2-fold greater risk of Crohn disease, whereas homozygosity or compound heterozygosity is associated with a 17-fold greater...... risk. However, the importance of these genetic variants if identified in particular individuals within the general population is unknown. We undertook this study to estimate the penetrance of these variants in the general population....

  18. Are NOD2 polymorphisms linked to a specific disease endophenotype of Crohn's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Brix, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The complex and yet unknown etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) might consist of various disease endophenotypes, each of which represent their own pathogenesis. This review focuses on the disease endophenotype linked to polymorphisms in the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2...... specific properties such as AIEC. Increasing the focus on defining subgroups of patients with similar disease initiations, mechanisms of action, and manifestations in CD may be pivotal for the development and implementation of future individualized treatment strategies of benefit for the single patient...

  19. A Proteomic Approach of Bradyrhizobium/Aeschynomene Root and Stem Symbioses Reveals the Importance of the fixA Locus for Symbiosis

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    Nathanael Delmotte

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are soil bacteria that are able to form symbiosis with plant hosts of the legume family. These associations result in the formation of organs, called nodules in which bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen to the benefit of the plant. Most of our knowledge on the metabolism and the physiology of the bacteria during symbiosis derives from studying roots nodules of terrestrial plants. Here we used a proteomics approach to investigate the bacterial physiology of photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278 during the symbiotic process with the semi aquatical plant Aeschynomene indica that forms root and stem nodules. We analyzed the proteomes of bacteria extracted from each type of nodule. First, we analyzed the bacteroid proteome at two different time points and found only minor variation between the bacterial proteomes of 2-week- and 3-week-old nodules. High conservation of the bacteroid proteome was also found when comparing stem nodules and root nodules. Among the stem nodule specific proteins were those related to the phototrophic ability of Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278. Furthermore, we compared our data with those obtained during an extensive genetic screen previously published. The symbiotic role of four candidate genes which corresponding proteins were found massively produced in the nodules but not identified during this screening was examined. Mutant analysis suggested that in addition to the EtfAB system, the fixA locus is required for symbiotic efficiency.

  20. Induction of the nodA promoter of Rhizobium leguminosarum Sym plasmid pRL1JI by plant flavanones and flavones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, S. A.; Wijffelman, C. A.; Spaink, H. P.; van Brussel, A. A.; Okker, R. J.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1987-01-01

    An expression vector containing the Rhizobium leguminosarum nodA promoter cloned in front of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene was used to characterize the properties of the R. leguminosarum nodA gene-inducing compound(s) present in sterile root exudate of the host plant Vicia sativa L. subsp. nigra

  1. Effect of dietary gluten on dendritic cells and innate immune subsets in BALB/c and NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Larsen

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is known to play an important role in oral tolerance to dietary antigens. This is important in development of celiac disease (CD but may also be important in type 1 diabetes (T1D, and could potentially explain the reduced incidence of T1D in mice receiving a gluten-free (GF diet. The direct in vivo effect of gluten on innate cells, and particularly dendritic cells (DC is not sufficiently clarified. Therefore, we wished to investigate the innate cell populations of spontaneous diabetic NOD mice and healthy BALB/c mice kept on a GF or a standard (STD gluten containing diet. We studied, by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, if dietary gluten induces changes in the activation of DCs and distribution of selected innate cells in lymphoid, pancreatic and intestinal tissues in BALB/c and NOD mice. We found that a GF diet increased the percentage of macrophages in BALB/c spleen and of CD11c+ DCs in BALB/c and NOD spleen. Strictly gluten-free (SGF diet increased the percentage of CD103+ DCs in BALB/c mice and decreased percentages of CD11b+ DCs in mesenteric and pancreatic lymph nodes in BALB/c mice. SGF diet in BALB/c mice also decreased DC expression of CD40, CCR7 and MHC-II in pancreatic lymph nodes. In conclusion, GF diet changes the composition of the innate immune system in BALB/c and NOD mice and increases expression of DC activation markers in NOD mice. These results contribute to the explanation of the low diabetes incidence in GF NOD mice. This mechanism may be important in development of type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  2. Effector and naturally occurring regulatory T cells display no abnormalities in activation induced cell death in NOD mice.

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    Ayelet Kaminitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disturbed peripheral negative regulation might contribute to evolution of autoimmune insulitis in type 1 diabetes. This study evaluates the sensitivity of naïve/effector (Teff and regulatory T cells (Treg to activation-induced cell death mediated by Fas cross-linking in NOD and wild-type mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both effector (CD25(-, FoxP3(- and suppressor (CD25(+, FoxP3(+ CD4(+ T cells are negatively regulated by Fas cross-linking in mixed splenocyte populations of NOD, wild type mice and FoxP3-GFP trangeneess. Proliferation rates and sensitivity to Fas cross-linking are dissociated in Treg cells: fast cycling induced by IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation improve Treg resistance to Fas-ligand (FasL in both strains. The effector and suppressor CD4(+ subsets display balanced sensitivity to negative regulation under baseline conditions, IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation, indicating that stimulation does not perturb immune homeostasis in NOD mice. Effective autocrine apoptosis of diabetogenic cells was evident from delayed onset and reduced incidence of adoptive disease transfer into NOD.SCID by CD4(+CD25(- T cells decorated with FasL protein. Treg resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis retain suppressive activity in vitro. The only detectable differential response was reduced Teff proliferation and upregulation of CD25 following CD3-activation in NOD mice. CONCLUSION: These data document negative regulation of effector and suppressor cells by Fas cross-linking and dissociation between sensitivity to apoptosis and proliferation in stimulated Treg. There is no evidence that perturbed AICD in NOD mice initiates or promotes autoimmune insulitis.

  3. ‘You sit in fear’: understanding perceptions of nodding syndrome in post-conflict northern Uganda

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    Kristine Buchmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nodding syndrome, a disabling epidemic epileptic encephalopathy, has affected an estimated 1,834 children in northern Uganda, with reports of as many as 3,000. Etiology is unknown and children are being treated symptomatically but inconsistently with anti-epileptic drugs. Design: This qualitative study comprised 10 semi-structured interviews with caregivers of affected children and five focus group discussions with 23 participants; relatives, teachers, and religious leaders. Data collection and participant observation were carried out from July to September 2012 in Kitgum and Pader districts. The material was coded through inductive thematic analysis. Results: Nodding syndrome has brought signs of discrimination in school admission procedures, founded in a fear of transmission. The suffering and loss caused by nodding syndrome is collective, and participants felt that nodding syndrome was viewed as a threat to the Acholi only, and that interventions had therefore been delayed. Multiple theories of causation exist, most commonly that the disease is caused by chemicals from bombs or that food aid distributed in IDP camps had expired or been poisoned.A feeling of uncertainty was present in all focus group discussions, fueled by the fact that results of investigations were not being shared with the communities. It was especially agonizing that CDC results had been given to the Ugandan government in 2010 but not to the public. The definitive fear is that the disease will be the end of the Acholi. Conclusions: This study provided insight into the perceptions of communities affected by an unknown emerging disease. Families of affected children are grieving not only their child's illness; it is a loss of social value and of lineage. The loss and suffering involved with nodding syndrome should be seen in the context of the wider suffering of a society disrupted by violent conflict. The memory of war is omnipresent and is also how nodding

  4. CP-25 Alleviates Experimental Sjögren's Syndrome Features in NOD/Ltj Mice and Modulates T Lymphocyte Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fang; Xu, Shixia; Zhang, Pengying; Chen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Yujing; Wang, Chun; Gao, Mei; Si, Min; Wang, Xinming; Heinrich, Korner; Wu, Huaxun; Wei, Wei

    2018-04-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune illness of the moisture-producing glands such as salivary glands that is characterized by various immune abnormalities. The aetiology of pSS remains unclear and there is no curative agent. In this study, we investigated the putative therapeutic effects on a NOD/Ltj mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome-like disorders of an ester derivative of paeoniflorin, Paeoniflorin-6'O-benzene (termed CP-25). Our study showed that CP-25 alleviated effectively clinical manifestations in NOD/Ltj mice resulting for example in increased salivary flow and reduced histopathological scores. Furthermore, CP-25 decreased lymphocyte viability in NOD/Ltj mice and attenuated the infiltration of Th1 cells and Th2 cells into the salivary glands of NOD/Ltj mice. In the spleen on NOD/Ltj mice, CP-25 skewed the ratio of Th17 and regulatory T cells towards regulatory T cells. After treatment, concentrations of anti-La/SSB and IgG antibodies were reduced and the titer of the inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17A in the serum on NOD/Ltj mice was alleviated. Thus, we define CP-25 as a novel compound that is a potent therapeutic agent for pSS by modulating T lymphocyte subsets. Future studies will validate the use of CP-25 as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pSS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Corrigendum to "Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Josefsen, Knud; Tanassi, Julia T.

    2017-01-01

    In the article titled “Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration” [1], there was an error in the peptide sequences in Section . Gliadin Peptides, which should be corrected as follows: The sequences H-LQLQPFPQPELPYPQPELPYPQPELPYPQPQPF-OHY......In the article titled “Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration” [1], there was an error in the peptide sequences in Section . Gliadin Peptides, which should be corrected as follows: The sequences H......-LQLQPFPQPELPYPQPELPYPQPELPYPQPQPF-OHY and H-LGQQQPFPPQQPYPQPQPF-OHY should be corrected to H-LQLQPFPQPELPYPQPELPYPQPELPYPQPQPF-OH and H-LGQQQPFPPQQPYPQPQPF-OH....

  6. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

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    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-κB signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-κB was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-κB inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  7. Variation in NOD2 augments Th2- and Th17 responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Enevold, Christian; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the gene for the nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain (NOD) 2 have been associated with Crohn's disease but not multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we investigate the effect of three polymorphisms in the NOD2 gene (rs5743277, rs2066842 and rs5743291) on cytokine production and CD4+ T....... Seven of 29 (24%) patients were heterozygous, and five of these (71%) exhibited increased MBP-induced CD4+ T cell proliferation versus four of 22 (18%), who were homozygous for the major allele (p...

  8. Effect of dietary gluten on dendritic cells and innate immune subsets in BALB/c and NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Weile, Christian; Antvorskov, Julie Christine

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is known to play an important role in oral tolerance to dietary antigens. This is important in development of celiac disease (CD) but may also be important in type 1 diabetes (T1D), and could potentially explain the reduced incidence of T1D in mice receiving a gluten...... in BALB/c mice also decreased DC expression of CD40, CCR7 and MHC-II in pancreatic lymph nodes. In conclusion, GF diet changes the composition of the innate immune system in BALB/c and NOD mice and increases expression of DC activation markers in NOD mice. These results contribute to the explanation...

  9. Further studies on mefloquine and praziquantel alone or interaction of both drugs against Schistosoma japonicum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Xue, Jian; Zhang, Hao-bing

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to further understand and analyze the interaction of mefloquine with praziquantel against adult Schistosoma japonicum in vitro. Mice infected with S. japonicum cercariae for 35-37 days were sacrificed, and adult schistosomes were collected by perfusion. Schistosomes were placed to each of 12 wells of a Falcon plate and maintained in RPMI 1640 supplemented by 10% calf serum. For determination of 50% and 95% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC95) of the two drugs in vitro, schistosomes were exposed to mefloquine at concentrations of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 10 μg/mL or praziquantel at concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 10, and 30 μg/mL. The plate was incubated at 37°C in 95% air + 5% CO₂ for 72 h. According to the half-life of oral mefloquine and praziquantel in mice, mefloquine combined with praziquantel simultaneously, mefloquine administered within 1 h after praziquantel and praziquantel administered within 17 h after mefloquine were used to evaluate the effect of mefloquine in combination with praziquantel against S. japonicum in vitro. The results showed that the LC50 and LC95 of mefloquine calculated by the Bliss method were 6.17 μg/mL (95% confidence limits, 5.84-6.517 μg/mL) and 8.703 μg/mL (95% confidence limits, 7.632-9.797 μg/mL), respectively. As to praziquantel, no worm death was seen when schistosomes were exposed to praziquantel at concentrations of 0.005-0.2 μg/mL for 72 h. While in the worms exposed to praziquantel 1, 10, and 30 μg/mL, strong spasmodic contractions of the worm body and vesiculation along the worm surface were observed, but 48-75% of the schistosomes survived the exposure in 72-h incubation. Meanwhile, the number of dead worms that emerged in each group was not proportion to the increasing concentrations. Therefore, it is not appropriate to calculate the LC50 and LC95 of praziquantel. For evaluation of the interaction with the two drugs, praziquantel 0.1 or 0.2

  10. [Preliminary observation on the effect of mefloquine against egg granuloma formation in the liver of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Chao-Wei

    2013-04-01

    To explore whether mefloquine possesses the effect on granuloma formation induced by Schistosoma japonicum eggs. Seventeen out of twenty-eight mice infected with 20 S. japonicum cercariae for 35 days were treated orally with mefloquine at a single dose of 200 mg/kg, and groups of 2-3 mice were sacrificed at various intervals post-treatment. The livers removed from each group of mice were fixed in 10% formaldehyde. While the remained 11 untreated mice divided into 6 groups (1-2 mice per group) were sacrificed at the same time periods as groups of mice treated with mefloquine, and their livers served as untreated corresponding controls. The granulomas with single egg in the center were counted and their diameters were measured using an ocular micrometer. The liver tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), Foot's or Mallory's methods for observation on histopathological alteration of egg granulomas, and on the appearance of reticular and collagen fibers within the granulomas. After infected mice were treated with mefloquine for 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days, i.e., 38, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days post-infection, the mean diameters of granuloma with single egg measured in the liver tissues section were (161 +/- 19), (175 +/- 13), (195 +/- 9), (171 +/- 40), (180 +/- 13), and (145 +/- 25) microm, respectively, and each of them was significantly lower than that of its corresponding control group of (189 +/- 18), (197 +/- 11), (211 +/- 12), (208 +/- 19), (203 +/- 16), and (207 +/- 36) microm (P mefloquine, the eosinophil-predominant inflammatory cells around the egg granuloma were sustained to 14-21 d post treatment (49-56 d post infection), which was significantly different from the corresponding control groups that all the eggs were surrounded by fibroblasts at 42 d post infection. Up to 28-35 d post treatment (63-70 d post infection), the boundary of egg granulomas distributed in the liver tissues of mefloquine treated groups was nearer in comparison

  11. NOD2/CARD15 mutations in Polish and Bosnian populations with and without Crohn's disease: prevalence and genotype-phenotype analysis

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    Nermin N Salkic

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Data on prevalence and phenotypic consequences of nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain 2/caspase recruitment domains 15 (NOD2/CARD15 variants in Crohn's disease (CD population in Poland and Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H are nonexistent. We aimed to determine the prevalence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations and their association with disease phenotype in Polish and Bosnian patients with CD and in healthy controls. We prospectively recruited 86 CD patients and 83 controls in Poland and 30 CD patients and 30 controls in B&H, 229 in total. We determined the prevalence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations and their association with the disease phenotype according to Montreal classification. Participants were genotyped for Leu1007fsinsC and Gly908Arg mutations. At least one CD-associated allele was found in 29/86 (33.7% of Polish CD patients and in 9/83 (10.8% of healthy controls (p<0.001. In both CD patients and controls in Bosnian sample, at least one NOD2 mutation was found in equal number of patients (3/30; 10% with all of the NOD2 mutation positive CD patients being homozygous, while controls being heterozygous. In Polish sample, perianal disease was less frequent in CD patients with any NOD2 mutation (1/21; 4.8% compared to those without (11/41; 26.8%; p=0.046. Higher percentage of patients with NOD2 mutations had history of CD related surgery when compared with those without mutations (66.7% vs. 43.3%; p=0.05. The risk for CD is increased in patients with NOD2 mutations (Poland and especially in the presence of homozygous NOD2 mutations (Poland and Bosnia. The presence of variant NOD2 alleles is associated with increased need for surgery and reduced occurrence of perianal disease.

  12. Identification of MDP (muramyl dipeptide)-binding key domains in NOD2 (nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-2) receptor of Labeo rohita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharana, Jitendra; Swain, Banikalyan; Sahoo, Bikash R; Dikhit, Manas R; Basu, Madhubanti; Mahapatra, Abhijit S; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Samanta, Mrinal

    2013-08-01

    In lower eukaryotes-like fish, innate immunity contributed by various pattern recognition receptor (PRR) plays an essential role in protection against diseases. Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-2 is a cytoplasmic PRR that recognizes MDP (muramyl dipeptide) of the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as ligand and activates signalling to induce innate immunity. Hypothesizing a similar NOD2 signalling pathway of higher eukaryotes, the peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) of rohu (Labeo rohita) was stimulated with MDP. The data of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed MDP-mediated inductive expression of NOD2 and its down-stream molecule RICK/RIP2 (receptor-interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-2). This observation suggested the existence of MDP-binding sites in rohu NOD2 (rNOD2). To investigate it, 3D model of ligand-binding leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region of rNOD2 (rNOD2-LRR) was constructed following ab initio and threading approaches in I-TASSER web server. Structural refinement of the model was performed by energy minimization, and MD (molecular dynamics) simulation was performed in GROMACS (Groningen Machine for Chemical Simulations). The refined model of rNOD2-LRR was validated through SAVES, ProSA, ProQ, WHAT IF and MolProbity servers, and molecular docking with MDP was carried out in GOLD 4.1. The result of docking identified LRR3-7 comprising Lys820, Phe821, Asn822, Arg847, Gly849, Trp877, Trp901 and Trp931 as MDP-binding critical amino acids in rNOD2. This is the first study in fish to provide an insight into the 3D structure of NOD2-LRR region and its important motifs that are expected to be engaged in MDP binding and innate immunity.

  13. Change in land use alters the diversity and composition of Bradyrhizobium communities and led to the introduction of Rhizobium etli into the tropical rain forest of Los Tuxtlas (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel-Hernández, Marco A; Lloret, Lourdes; López-López, Aline; Martínez, Julio; Barois, Isabelle; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-05-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria of the Bradyrhizobium genus are major symbionts of legume plants in American tropical forests, but little is known about the effects of deforestation and change in land use on their diversity and community structure. Forest clearing is followed by cropping of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and maize as intercropped plants in Los Tuxtlas tropical forest of Mexico. The identity of bean-nodulating rhizobia in this area is not known. Using promiscuous trap plants, bradyrhizobia were isolated from soil samples collected in Los Tuxtlas undisturbed forest, and in areas where forest was cleared and land was used as crop fields or as pastures, or where secondary forests were established. Rhizobia were also trapped by using bean plants. Bradyrhizobium strains were classified into genospecies by dnaK sequence analysis supported by recA, glnII and 16S-23S rDNA IGS loci analyses. A total of 29 genospecies were identified, 24 of which did not correspond to any described taxa. A reduction in Bradyrhizobium diversity was observed when forest was turned to crop fields or pastures. Diversity seemed to recover to primary forest levels in secondary forests that derived from abandoned crop fields or pastures. The shifts in diversity were not related to soil characteristics but seemingly to the density of nodulating legumes present at each land use system (LUS). Bradyrhizobium community composition in soils was dependent on land use; however, similarities were observed between crop fields and pastures but not among forest and secondary forest. Most Bradyrhizobium genospecies present in forest were not recovered or become rare in the other LUS. Rhizobium etli was found as the dominant bean-nodulating rhizobia present in crop fields and pastures, and evidence was found that this species was introduced in Los Tuxtlas forest.

  14. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki: a potential cytotoxic agent against breast cancer cells

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    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Raman, Jegadeesh; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd; John, Priscilla A; Vikineswary, Sabaratnam

    2013-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are an important class of nanomaterial for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. AgNPs have been used as antimicrobial and disinfectant agents due their detrimental effect on target cells. The aim of our study was to determine the cytotoxic effects of biologically synthesized AgNPs using hot aqueous extracts of the mycelia of Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Methods We developed a green method for the synthesis of water-soluble AgNPs by treating silver ions with hot aqueous extract of the mycelia of G. neo-japonicum. The formation of AgNPs was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the toxicity of synthesized AgNPs was evaluated using a series of assays: such as cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, reactive oxygen species generation, caspase 3, DNA laddering, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Results The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy results showed a strong resonance centered on the surface of AgNPs at 420 nm. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the synthesized AgNPs were single-crystalline, corresponding with the result of transmission electron microscopy. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with various concentrations of AgNPs (1–10 μg/mL) for 24 hours revealed that AgNPs could inhibit cell viability and induce membrane leakage in a dose-dependent manner. Cells exposed to AgNPs showed increased reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radical production. Furthermore, the apoptotic effects of AgNPs were confirmed by activation of caspase 3 and DNA nuclear fragmentation. Conclusion The results indicate that AgNPs possess cytotoxic effects with apoptotic features and suggest that the reactive oxygen species generated by

  15. Penicillin resistance compromises Nod1-dependent proinflammatory activity and virulence fitness of neisseria meningitidis.

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    Zarantonelli, Maria Leticia; Skoczynska, Anna; Antignac, Aude; El Ghachi, Meriem; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Szatanik, Marek; Mulet, Céline; Werts, Catherine; Peduto, Lucie; d'Andon, Martine Fanton; Thouron, Françoise; Nato, Faridabano; Lebourhis, Lionel; Philpott, Dana J; Girardin, Stephen E; Vives, Francina Langa; Sansonetti, Philippe; Eberl, Gérard; Pedron, Thierry; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Boneca, Ivo G

    2013-06-12

    Neisseria meningitidis is a life-threatening human bacterial pathogen responsible for pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. Meningococcal strains with reduced susceptibility to penicillin G (Pen(I)) carry a mutated penicillin-binding protein (PBP2) resulting in a modified peptidoglycan structure. Despite their antibiotic resistance, Pen(I) strains have failed to expand clonally. We analyzed the biological consequences of PBP2 alteration among clinical meningococcal strains and found that peptidoglycan modifications of the Pen(I) strain resulted in diminished in vitro Nod1-dependent proinflammatory activity. In an influenza virus-meningococcal sequential mouse model mimicking human disease, wild-type meningococci induced a Nod1-dependent inflammatory response, colonizing the lungs and surviving in the blood. In contrast, isogenic Pen(I) strains were attenuated for such response and were out-competed by meningococci sensitive to penicillin G. Our results suggest that antibiotic resistance imposes a cost to the success of the pathogen and may potentially explain the lack of clonal expansion of Pen(I) strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fungal chitin dampens inflammation through IL-10 induction mediated by NOD2 and TLR9 activation.

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    Jeanette Wagener

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chitin is an essential structural polysaccharide of fungal pathogens and parasites, but its role in human immune responses remains largely unknown. It is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and its derivatives today are widely used for medical and industrial purposes. We analysed the immunological properties of purified chitin particles derived from the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which led to the selective secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. We identified NOD2, TLR9 and the mannose receptor as essential fungal chitin-recognition receptors for the induction of this response. Chitin reduced LPS-induced inflammation in vivo and may therefore contribute to the resolution of the immune response once the pathogen has been defeated. Fungal chitin also induced eosinophilia in vivo, underpinning its ability to induce asthma. Polymorphisms in the identified chitin receptors, NOD2 and TLR9, predispose individuals to inflammatory conditions and dysregulated expression of chitinases and chitinase-like binding proteins, whose activity is essential to generate IL-10-inducing fungal chitin particles in vitro, have also been linked to inflammatory conditions and asthma. Chitin recognition is therefore critical for immune homeostasis and is likely to have a significant role in infectious and allergic disease.

  17. NOD-like receptor signaling and inflammasome-related pathways are highlighted in psoriatic epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari H; Katayama, Shintaro; Skoog, Tiina; Siitonen, H Annika; Vuola, Jyrki; Nuutila, Kristo; Sormunen, Raija; Johnsson, Anna; Linnarsson, Sten; Suomela, Sari; Kankuri, Esko; Kere, Juha; Elomaa, Outi

    2016-03-15

    Psoriatic skin differs distinctly from normal skin by its thickened epidermis. Most gene expression comparisons utilize full-thickness biopsies, with substantial amount of dermis. We assayed the transcriptomes of normal, lesional, and non-lesional psoriatic epidermis, sampled as split-thickness skin grafts, with 5'-end RNA sequencing. We found that psoriatic epidermis contains more mRNA per total RNA than controls, and took this into account in the bioinformatic analysis. The approach highlighted innate immunity-related pathways in psoriasis, including NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling and inflammasome activation. We demonstrated that the NLR signaling genes NOD2, PYCARD, CARD6, and IFI16 are upregulated in psoriatic epidermis, and strengthened these findings by protein expression. Interestingly, PYCARD, the key component of the inflammasome, showed an altered expression pattern in the lesional epidermis. The profiling of non-lesional skin highlighted PSORS4 and mitochondrially encoded transcripts, suggesting that their gene expression is altered already before the development of lesions. Our data suggest that all components needed for the active inflammasome are present in the keratinocytes of psoriatic skin. The characterization of inflammasome pathways provides further opportunities for therapy. Complementing previous transcriptome studies, our approach gives deeper insight into the gene regulation in psoriatic epidermis.

  18. Bradyrhizobium-Lupinus mariae-josephae: a unique symbiosis endemic of a basic soil in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, D.; Sánchez-Cañizares, C.; Navarro, A.; Rey, L.; Imperial, J.; Ruiz-Argüeso, T.

    2012-04-01

    Lupinus mariae-josephae is an intriguing lupine species recently discovered in the Mediterranean region and constitutes an endemism of a small area of Eastern Spain (Valencia province; Pascual, 2004; Mahé et al. 2011). It opens new perspectives for ecological and agronomic interests, as it represents the sole lupine species that preferentially grows in basic soils, while almost all other lupine species occur in acid to neutral soils. The L. mariae-josephae symbionts isolated from soils of calcareous areas of Valencia are extremely slow-growing bacteria belonging to the Bradyrhrizobium genus and showing symbiotic specificity that prevents nodulation of other Lupinus spp. such as L. angustifolius or L. luteus typically thriving in acid soils (Sanchez-Cañizares et al, 2011). Their phylogenetic analysis based on housekeeping and symbiotic genes showed that L. mariae-josephae symbionts belong to an evolutionary lineage that also includes endosymbiotic bacteria from Retama spp. of Northern Algeria basic soils (Boulila et al. 2009). Conversely, this new lineage is phylogenetically distinct from that of endosymbiotic bacteria from other Lupinus spp. native of the Iberian Peninsula, which were nested mainly within B. canariense and B. japonicum lineages. A genomic diversity study of the indigenous bradyrhizobia population of the calcareous areas in Valencia, based on fingerprint and phylogenetic analysis, showed the existence of a large diversity of genotypes, some of which are related to bacteria from the Retama spp. symbiosis in Algeria. This singular genomic divergence of L. mariae-josephae symbiotic bacteria in such a small geographical area fosters attractive studies on the origin, ecology and evolution of both partners of the symbiosis. Furthermore, it is expected that ongoing seed inoculation experiments with selected strains will allow us to extend the extant distribution spots of L. mariae-josephae plants in Valencia area, and also to determine whether the

  19. Pteryxin: a coumarin in Peucedanum japonicum Thunb leaves exerts antiobesity activity through modulation of adipogenic gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugara, Ruwani N; Inafuku, Masashi; Takara, Kensaku; Iwasaki, Hironori; Oku, Hirosuke

    2014-10-01

    Partially purified hexane phase (HP) of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb (PJT) was identified as an antiobesity candidate. However, the compound responsible for the antiobesity activity remained unknown. Thus, in this study we isolated the active compound, to determine the mechanisms related to antiobesity activity in vitro. The HP was fractionated, and the effect on the triacylglycerol (TG) content was evaluated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and HepG2 hepatocytes. On the basis of comprehensive spectroscopic analyses, the structure of the active compound was identified as pteryxin, a known compound in PJT. However, to our knowledge, its biological activities against obesity have not been reported previously. The dose-dependent effect on the TG content, and the gene expressions related to adipogenesis, fatty acid catabolism, energy expenditure, lipolysis, and lipogenesis due to pteryxin (10, 15, and 20 μg/mL) were examined in vitro. Pteryxin dose dependently suppressed TG content in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes (by 52.7%, 53.8%, and 57.4%, respectively; P 0.05) were up-regulated due to pteryxin. Our study demonstrated that pteryxin in PJT plays the key role in regulating the lipid metabolism-related gene network and improving energy production in vitro. Thus, the results suggest pteryxin as a new natural compound to be used as an antiobesity drug in the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel serpin with antithrombin-like activity in Branchiostoma japonicum: implications for the presence of a primitive coagulation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeqing Chao

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors, or serpins, are a group of widely distributed proteins with similar structures that use conformational change to inhibit proteases. Antithrombin (AT is a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily and a major coagulation inhibitor in all vertebrates, but its evolutionary origin remains elusive. In this study we isolated for the first time a cDNA encoding an antithrombin homolog, BjATl, from the protochordate Branchiostoma japonicum. The deduced protein BjATl consisted of 338 amino acids sharing 36.7% to 41.1% identity to known vertebrate ATs. BjATl contains a potential N-linked glycosylation site, two potential heparin binding sites and the reactive center loop with the absolutely conserved sequence Gly-Arg-Ser; all of these are features characteristic of ATs. All three phylogenetic trees constructed using Neighbor-Joining, Maximum-Likelihood and Bayesian-Inference methods also placed BjATl together with ATs. Moreover, BjATl expressed in yeast cells was able to inhibit bovine thrombin activity by forming a SDS-stable BjATl-thrombin complex. It also displays a concentration-dependent inhibition of thrombin that is accelerated by heparin. Furthermore, BjATl was predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum and hind-gut, agreeing with the expression pattern of AT in mammalian species. All these data clearly demonstrate that BjATl is an ortholog of vertebrate ATs, suggesting that a primitive coagulation system emerged in the protochordate.

  1. Simultaneous degradation of organophosphate and organochlorine pesticides by Sphingobium japonicum UT26 with surface-displayed organophosphorus hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Yang, Chao; Liu, Ruihua; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jianli; Song, Cunjiang; Qiao, Chuanling; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2013-04-01

    A genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) capable of simultaneously degrading organophosphate and organochlorine pesticides was constructed for the first time by display of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface of a hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading Sphingobium japonicum UT26. The GEM could potentially be used for removing the two classes of pesticides that may be present in mixtures at contaminated sites. A surface anchor system derived from the truncated ice nucleation protein (INPNC) from Pseudomonas syringae was used to target OPH onto the cell surface of UT26, reducing the potential substrate uptake limitation. The surface localization of INPNC-OPH fusion was verified by cell fractionation, western blot, proteinase accessibility, and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the functionality of the surface-exposed OPH was demonstrated by OPH activity assays. Surface display of INPNC-OPH fusion (82 kDa) neither inhibited cell growth nor affected cell viability. The engineered UT26 could degrade parathion as well as γ-HCH rapidly in minimal salt medium. The removal of parathion and γ-HCH by engineered UT26 in sterile and non-sterile soil was also studied. In both soil samples, a mixture of parathion (100 mg kg(-1)) and γ-HCH (10 mg kg(-1)) could be degraded completely within 15 days. Soil treatment results indicated that the engineered UT26 is a promising multifunctional bacterium that could be used for the bioremediation of multiple pesticide-contaminated environments.

  2. Conservation of gene order and content in the circular chromosomes of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' asiaticus and other rhizbiales

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ is a member of the Rhizobiales, as are the nitrogen fixing Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Whole genome compar...

  3. Comparison of the 'Ca Liberibacter asiaticus' genome adapted for an intracellular lifestyle with other members of the rhizobiales

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ a member of the Rhizobiales, is related to Sinorhizobium meliloti, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Bartonella henselae, an intracellular mammalian pathogen. Whole chromosome comparisons identified at least 52 clust...

  4. An "Ideal" Home for Care: Nel Noddings, Thomas Hill Green, and an Ontological Support for a Phenomenology of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoste, Jordan; Boyd, Dwight

    2009-01-01

    This paper is grounded in a deep appreciation of Nel Noddings' "ethics of care" as an important contribution to moral philosophy and moral education. We seek to offer some philosophical reflections that have the potential to strengthen this important alternative to mainstream ethics and to how moral education might be conceived and practiced…

  5. The neurosurvival factor Humanin inhibits beta cell apoptosis via Stat3 activation and delays and ameliorates diabetes in NOD mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, P. T.; Park, P.; Cobb, L. J.; Paharkova-Vatchkova, V.; Hakimi, M.; Cohen, P.; Lee, K.-W.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of Type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether Humanin, a recently described survival factor for neurons, could improve the survival of beta cells and delay or treat diabetes in the NOD model. Humanin reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation in NIT-1 cells and decreased apoptosis induced by cytokine treatment. Humanin induced Stat3 and ERK phosphorylation over a 24 hour time course. Specific inhibition of Stat3 resulted in nullifying the protective effect of Humanin. Humanin normalized glucose tolerance in diabetic NOD mice treated for 6-weeks and their pancreata revealed decreased lymphocyte infiltration and severity. In addition, Humanin delayed/prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice treated for 20 weeks. In summary, Humanin treatment decreases cytokine-induced apoptosis in beta cells in vitro and improved glucose tolerance and onset of diabetes in NOD mice in vivo. This indicates that Humanin may be useful for islet protection and survival in a spectrum of diabetes-related therapeutics. PMID:19800083

  6. From signal to form: Nod factor as a morhogenetic signal molecule to induce symbiotic responses in legume root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, research is presented which contributes to a better understanding of nod factor (NF) induced signalling in Iegume root hairs, leading to a successful symbiosis. We mainly use root hairs of the model Iegume Medicago truncatula ('barrel medic') as an experimental system. In the

  7. Immune Depletion in Combination with Allogeneic Islets Permanently Restores Tolerance to Self-Antigens in Diabetic NOD Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gagliani

    Full Text Available The destruction of beta cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D results in loss of insulin production and glucose homeostasis. Treatment of non-obese diabetic (NOD mice with immune-depleting/modulating agents (e.g., anti-CD3, murine anti-thymocyte-globulin (mATG can lead to diabetes reversal. However, for preclinical studies with these and other agents seeking to reverse disease at onset, the necessity for exogenous insulin administration is debated. Spontaneously diabetic NOD mice were treated with a short-course of mATG and insulin provided as drug therapy or by way of allogeneic islet implants. Herein we demonstrate that exogenous insulin administration is required to achieve disease reversal with mATG in NOD mice. Unexpectedly, we also observed that provision of insulin by way of allogeneic islet implantation in combination with mATG leads to a pronounced reversal of diabetes as well as restoration of tolerance to self-islets. Expansion/induction of regulatory cells was observed in NOD mice stably cured with mATG and allogeneic islets. These data suggest that transient provision of allogeneic insulin-producing islets might provide a temporary window for immune depletion to be more effective and instilling stable tolerance to endogenous beta cells. These findings support the use of a never before explored approach for preserving beta cell function in patients with recent onset T1D.

  8. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  9. Prevention of diabetes in NOD mice by repeated exposures to a contact allergen inducing a sub-clinical dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup

    2010-01-01

    of contact allergens on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. As the link between contact allergy and diabetes is yet unexplained we also examined the effect of provocation with allergens on Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, since involvement of NKT cells could suggest an innate connection between the two...

  10. Alcohol facilitates CD1d loading, subsequent activation of NKT cells, and reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Buschard (Karsten); A.K. Hansen; K. Jensen (Karen); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); L.F. de Ruiter (Lilian); T.C. Krohn (Thomas); M.R. Hufeldt (Majbritt); F.K. Vogensen (Finn); B. Aasted (Bent); T. Osterbye (Thomas); B.O. Roep (Bart); C.J. de Haar (Colin); E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis (Edward)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Ethanol ('alcohol') is a partly hydrophobic detergent that may affect the accessibility of glycolipids thereby influencing immunological effects of these molecules. Methods: The study included cellular in vitro tests using α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), and in vivo NOD mice

  11. Genetic deletion of the bacterial sensor NOD2 improves murine Crohn’s disease-like ileitis independent of functional dysbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corridoni, D.; Rodriguez-Palacios, A.; Di Stefano, G.; Di Martino, L.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Chang, E. B.; Arseneau, K. O.; Pizarro, T. T.; Cominelli, F.

    2016-11-16

    Although genetic polymorphisms in NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2) have been associated with the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD), little is known regarding the role of wild-type (WT) NOD2 in the gut. To date, most murine studies addressing the role of WT Nod2 have been conducted using healthy (ileitis/colitis-free) mouse strains. Here, we evaluated the effects of Nod2 deletion in a murine model of spontaneous ileitis, i.e., the SAMP1Yit/Fc (SAMP) strain, which closely resembles CD. Remarkably, Nod2 deletion improved both chronic cobblestone ileitis (by 50% assessed, as the % of abnormal mucosa at 24 wks of age), as well as acute dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis. Mechanistically, Th2 cytokine production and Th2-transcription factor activation (i.e., STAT6 phosphorylation) were reduced. Microbiologically, the effects of Nod2 deletion appeared independent of fecal microbiota composition and function, assessed by 16S rRNA and metatranscriptomics. Our findings indicate that pharmacological blockade of NOD2 signaling in humans could improve health in Th2-driven chronic intestinal inflammation.

  12. Fungal Chitin Dampens Inflammation through IL-10 Induction Mediated by NOD2 and TLR9 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Jeanette; Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Lenardon, Megan D.; Köberle, Martin; Vautier, Simon; MacCallum, Donna M.; Biedermann, Tilo; Schaller, Martin; Netea, Mihai G.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Brown, Gordon D.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Chitin is an essential structural polysaccharide of fungal pathogens and parasites, but its role in human immune responses remains largely unknown. It is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and its derivatives today are widely used for medical and industrial purposes. We analysed the immunological properties of purified chitin particles derived from the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which led to the selective secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. We identified NOD2, TLR9 and the mannose receptor as essential fungal chitin-recognition receptors for the induction of this response. Chitin reduced LPS-induced inflammation in vivo and may therefore contribute to the resolution of the immune response once the pathogen has been defeated. Fungal chitin also induced eosinophilia in vivo, underpinning its ability to induce asthma. Polymorphisms in the identified chitin receptors, NOD2 and TLR9, predispose individuals to inflammatory conditions and dysregulated expression of chitinases and chitinase-like binding proteins, whose activity is essential to generate IL-10-inducing fungal chitin particles in vitro, have also been linked to inflammatory conditions and asthma. Chitin recognition is therefore critical for immune homeostasis and is likely to have a significant role in infectious and allergic disease. Authors Summary Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and an essential component of the cell wall of all fungal pathogens. The discovery of human chitinases and chitinase-like binding proteins indicates that fungal chitin is recognised by cells of the human immune system, shaping the immune response towards the invading pathogen. We show that three immune cell receptors– the mannose receptor, NOD2 and TLR9 recognise chitin and act together to mediate an anti-inflammatory response via secretion of the cytokine IL-10. This mechanism may prevent inflammation-based damage

  13. Targeted delivery of antigen to intestinal dendritic cells induces oral tolerance and prevents autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Wu, Jie; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Bohui; Xu, Xiaojun; Zong, Li

    2018-03-15

    The intestinal immune system is an ideal target to induce immune tolerance physiologically. However, the efficiency of oral protein antigen delivery is limited by degradation of the antigen in the gastrointestinal tract and poor uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Gut dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are prone to inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance. In this study, we delivered the antigen heat shock protein 65-6×P277 (H6P) directly to the gut DCs of NOD mice through oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting nanoparticles (NPs), and investigated the ability of this antigen to induce immune tolerance to prevent autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. A targeting NP delivery system was developed to encapsulate H6P, and the ability of this system to protect and facilitate H6P delivery to gut DCs was assessed. NOD mice were immunised with H6P-loaded targeting NPs orally once a week for 7 weeks and the onset of diabetes was assessed by monitoring blood glucose levels. H6P-loaded targeting NPs protected the encapsulated H6P from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract environment and significantly increased the uptake of H6P by DCs in the gut Peyer's patches (4.1 times higher uptake compared with the control H6P solution group). Oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting NPs induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented diabetes in 100% of NOD mice. Immune deviation (T helper [Th]1 to Th2) and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells were found to participate in the induction of immune tolerance. In this study, we successfully induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at delivering antigen to gut DCs using targeting NPs to induce T cell tolerance.

  14. Fracture Healing Is Delayed in Immunodeficient NOD/scid‑IL2Rγcnull Mice.

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    Anna E Rapp

    Full Text Available Following bone fracture, the repair process starts with an inflammatory reaction at the fracture site. Fracture healing is disturbed when the initial inflammation is increased or prolonged, whereby, a balanced inflammatory response is anticipated to be crucial for fracture healing, because it may induce down-stream responses leading to tissue repair. However, the impact of the immune response on fracture healing remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated bone healing in NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice, which exhibit severe defects in innate and adaptive immunity, by biomechanical testing, histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography. We demonstrated that NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice exhibited normal skeletal anatomy and a mild bone phenotype with a slightly reduced bone mass in the trabecular compartment in comparison to immunocompetent Balb/c mice. Fracture healing was impaired in immunodeficient NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice. Callus bone content was unaffected during the early healing stage, whereas it was significantly reduced during the later healing period. Concomitantly, the amount of cartilage was significantly increased, indicating delayed endochondral ossification, most likely due to the decreased osteoclast activity observed in cells isolated from NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice. Our results suggest that--under aseptic, uncomplicated conditions--the immediate immune response after fracture is non-essential for the initiation of bone formation. However, an intact immune system in general is important for successful bone healing, because endochondral ossification is delayed in immunodeficient NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice.

  15. EFEITO DA INOCULAÇÃO COM BRADYRHIZOBIUM SP., NITROGÊNIO E MICRONUTRIENTES NO RENDIMENTO DO GRÃO-DE-BICO

    OpenAIRE

    BRAGA,NELSON RAIMUNDO; VIEIRA,CLIBAS

    1998-01-01

    A cultura do grão-de-bico (Cicer arietinum L.) inexiste comercialmente no Brasil. No presente estudo, num podzólico vermelho-amarelo em Coimbra, microrregião de Viçosa, Minas Gerais, desenvolveram-se dois experimentos com grão-de-bico: um com o cultivar IAC-Marrocos e o outro com o 'IAC Índia-4'. Os tratamentos constituíram um fatorial 24, no qual os fatores foram: Bradyrhizobium sp. (inoculação das sementes ou não), adubação nitrogenada em cobertura (0 ou 30 kg.ha-1 de N), molibdênio em pulv...

  16. [Investigation on prevalence and risk factors of HIV/AIDS andSchistosoma japonicum,Ascaris lumbricoidesandTrichuris trichiurainfections in a rural community of southwestern China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng-Lei, Xiao; Yi-Biao, Zhou; Yan, Shi; Yan, Yang; Jian-Chuan, Gao; Xiu-Xia, Song; Qing-Wu, Jiang

    2016-01-29

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of helminthic infections including Schistosoma japonicum , Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and find out the association among them in a rural community of southwestern China. A community-based cross sectional study was conducted. One town was selected randomly; the infections of S.japonicum , A.lumbricoides and T.trichiura were detected with the modified Kato-Katz thick smear method and HIV infection with the diagnostic Test Kit among all residents. A questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate the related risk factors. Among the participants, the infection rates of HIV, S.japonicum , A.lumbricoides and T.trichiura were 2.33%, 2.05%, 13.47% and 30.59% respectively; 7.08% (31/438) were infected with both A.lumbricoides and T.trichiura ; 0.23% (1/438) were co-infected with HIV and A.lumbricoides , and the same with HIV and T.trichiura. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that sex (male, OR =3.26, 95% CI :0.97, 10.95) and drug abuse ( OR =72.86, 95% CI :18.51, 286.76) were significantly associated with HIV infection. Home toilet was negatively related to A.lumbricoides infection ( OR =0.52, 95% CI :0.27, 0.98) and T.trichiura infection ( OR =0.48, 95% CI :0.28, 0.80). Compared with the people in Villages Four, the people living in Village One were at a higher risk for A.lumbricoides infection ( OR =3.14, 95% CI :1.35, 7.27), and compared with the people living in Village Four, the people living in Village Two and Village Three were more likely to be infected with T.trichiura ( OR =3.73, 95% CI :1.92, 7.26; OR =4.53, 95% CI :2.12, 9.68). The people aged between 11 and 20 years had a higher T.trichiura infection risk than the people aged more than 50 years ( OR = 3.72, 95% CI :1.59, 8.67). There was a significant association between A.lumbricoides and T.trichiura infections ( OR = 3.11, 95% CI :1.63, 5.93). There was no association

  17. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a Determinant for Rice-Endophyte Colonization by Non-Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Songwattana, Pongpan; Greetatorn, Teerana; Okubo, Takashi; Kakizaki, Kaori Chiba; Prakamhang, Janpen; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    Plant associations by bradyrhizobia have been detected not only in leguminous plants, but also in non-leguminous species including rice. Bradyrhizobium sp. SUTN9-2 was isolated from Aeschynomene americana L., which is a leguminous weed found in the rice fields of Thailand. This strain promoted the highest total rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Pathum Thani 1) dry weight among the endophytic bradyrhizobial strains tested, and was, thus, employed for the further characterization of rice-Bradyrhizobium interactions. Some known bacterial genes involved in bacteria-plant interactions were selected. The expression of the type III secretion component (rhcJ), type IV secretion component (virD4), and pectinesterase (peces) genes of the bacterium were up-regulated when the rice root exudate was added to the culture. When SUTN9-2 was inoculated into rice seedlings, the peces, rhcJ, virD4, and exopolysaccharide production (fliP) genes were strongly expressed in the bacterium 6-24 h after the inoculation. The gene for glutathione-S-transferase (gst) was slightly expressed 12 h after the inoculation. In order to determine whether type III secretion system (T3SS) is involved in bradyrhizobial infections in rice plants, wild-type SUTN9-2 and T3SS mutant strains were inoculated into the original host plant (A. americana) and a rice plant (cultivar Pathum Thani 1). The ability of T3SS mutants to invade rice tissues was weaker than that of the wild-type strain; however, their phenotypes in A. americana were not changed by T3SS mutations. These results suggest that T3SS is one of the important determinants modulating rice infection; however, type IV secretion system and peces may also be responsible for the early steps of rice infection.

  18. Nod-like Receptors: Key Molecular Switches in the Conundrum of Cancer

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    Julie Magarian eBlander

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is believed the immune system can contribute to oncogenic transformation especially in settings of chronic inflammation, be activated during immunosurveillance to destroy early neoplastic cells before they undergo malignant outgrowth, and finally, can assist growth of established tumors by preventing clearance, remodeling surrounding tissue, and promoting metastatic events. These seemingly opposing roles of the immune system at the different stages of cancer development must all be mediated by innate signaling mechanisms that regulate the overall state of immune activation. Recently, the cytosolic Nod-like receptor (NLR pathway of innate immunity has gained a lot of attention in the tumor immunology field due to its known involvement in promoting inflammation and immunity, and conversely, in regulating tissue repair processes. In this review, we present all the current evidence for NLR involvement in the different stages of neoplasia to understand how a single molecular pathway can contribute to conflicting immunological interactions with cancer.

  19. Genotyping for NOD2 genetic variants and crohn disease: a metaanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2009-01-01

    important risk factors for Crohn disease. In addition, we used studies for which combined information from all genotypes was available to compare risks in simple heterozygotes, compound heterozygotes, and homozygotes. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched. Seventy-five articles (18 727 cases......BACKGROUND: Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC variants of the NOD2 gene (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2; alias, CARD15) influence the risk of Crohn disease. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to examine whether Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC are equally......-test results: simple heterozygotes vs compound heterozygotes, P risk of Crohn disease was markedly higher for Leu1007fsinsC than for Arg702Trp and Gly908Arg. Combining all...

  20. NOD-Like Receptors: A Tail from Plants to Mammals Through Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontillo, Alessandra; Crovella, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    NOD Like Receptors (NLRs) are the most abundant cytoplasmic immune receptors in plants and animals and they similarly act sensing pathogen invasion and activating immune response. Despite the fact that plant and mammals NLRs share homology.; with some protein structure differences.; for signalling pathway.; divergent evolution of the receptors has been hypothesized. Next generation genome sequencing has contributed to the description of NLRs in phyla others than plants and mammals and leads to new knowledge about NLRs evolution along phylogeny. Full comprehension of NLR-mediated immune response in plant could contribute to the understanding of animal NLRs physiology and/or pathology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Expression and purification of Nod factor receptors - Initial characterization of ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broghammer, Angelique

    . Lipochitooligosaccharides also serve as signals in the mutually beneficial interactions between arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and most land plants. In the model legume Lotus japonicus the Nod factor receptors, LjNFR1 and LjNFR5, two LysM receptor like kinases (LysM-RLK), are responsible for perceiving the rhizobial...... and LjNFR5 ectodomains were glycosylated; 3) LjNFR1 retained its in vitro kinase activity and 4) LjNFR1 and LjNFR5 were localized to the plasma membrane. In depth mass spectroscopy analysis of the N-glycan structure of LjNFR5 resulted in identification of two different glycan structures with identical...

  2. Early life treatment with vancomycin reduces diabetes incidence in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from an uncontrolled T cell mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas. Causal factors include a combination of genetics, early life incidents and the food we eat. The involved adaptive immune response can be down regulated by a regulatory...... treated with the antibiotic vancomycin in four weeks from birth. Diabetes incidence and onset time were compared with a control group and we found that neonate vancomycin treatment attenuates T1D. By changing the gut flora composition in the beginning of life we also demonstrated a disruption....... An interplay that is likely to represent a critical environmental component to diabetes induction. In a period after birth alterations of the early microbial colonization of the gut therefore can be expected to have an immense impact on diabetes progression later in life. In this study neonate NOD mice were...

  3. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  4. An Epidemiologic Investigation of Potential Risk Factors for Nodding Syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Foltz

    Full Text Available Nodding Syndrome (NS, an unexplained illness characterized by spells of head bobbing, has been reported in Sudan and Tanzania, perhaps as early as 1962. Hypothesized causes include sorghum consumption, measles, and onchocerciasis infection. In 2009, a couple thousand cases were reportedly in Northern Uganda.In December 2009, we identified cases in Kitgum District. The case definition included persons who were previously developmentally normal who had nodding. Cases, further defined as 5- to 15-years-old with an additional neurological deficit, were matched to village controls to assess risk factors and test biological specimens. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations.Surveillance identified 224 cases; most (95% were 5-15-years-old (range = 2-27. Cases were reported in Uganda since 1997. The overall prevalence was 12 cases per 1,000 (range by parish = 0·6-46. The case-control investigation (n = 49 case/village control pairs showed no association between NS and previously reported measles; sorghum was consumed by most subjects. Positive onchocerciasis serology [age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR1 = 14·4 (2·7, 78·3], exposure to munitions [AOR1 = 13·9 (1·4, 135·3], and consumption of crushed roots [AOR1 = 5·4 (1·3, 22·1] were more likely in cases. Vitamin B6 deficiency was present in the majority of cases (84% and controls (75%.NS appears to be increasing in Uganda since 2000 with 2009 parish prevalence as high as 46 cases per 1,000 5- to 15-year old children. Our results found no supporting evidence for many proposed NS risk factors, revealed association with onchocerciasis, which for the first time was examined with serologic testing, and raised nutritional deficiencies and toxic exposures as possible etiologies.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 modulates NOD2-induced cytokine release and autophagy.

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    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 are associated with the risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PTPN22 is involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell receptor signaling, but although it is highly expressed in innate immune cells, its function in other signaling pathways is less clear. Here, we study whether loss of PTPN22 controls muramyl-dipeptide (MDP-induced signaling and effects in immune cells. MATERIAL & METHODS: Stable knockdown of PTPN22 was induced in THP-1 cells by shRNA transduction prior to stimulation with the NOD2 ligand MDP. Cells were analyzed for signaling protein activation and mRNA expression by Western blot and quantitative PCR; cytokine secretion was assessed by ELISA, autophagosome induction by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC were obtained from PTPN22 knockout mice or wild-type animals. RESULTS: MDP-treatment induced PTPN22 expression and activity in human and mouse cells. Knockdown of PTPN22 enhanced MDP-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-isoforms p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as well as canonical NF-κB signaling molecules in THP-1 cells and BMDC derived from PTPN22 knockout mice. Loss of PTPN22 enhanced mRNA levels and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in THP-1 cells and PTPN22 knockout BMDC. Additionally, loss of PTPN22 resulted in increased, MDP-mediated autophagy in human and mouse cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that PTPN22 controls NOD2 signaling, and loss of PTPN22 renders monocytes more reactive towards bacterial products, what might explain the association of PTPN22 variants with IBD pathogenesis.

  6. Truth is in the head. A nod and shake compatibility effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Stefania; Greco, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Studies from the embodiment perspective on language processing have shown facilitation or interference effects depending on the compatibility between verbal contents, concrete or abstract, and the motion of various parts of the body. The aim of the present study was to test whether such compatibility effects can be found when a higher cognitive process like truth evaluation is accomplished with head movements. Since nodding is a vertical head gesture typically performed with positive and affirmative responses, and shaking is a horizontal head gesture associated with negative and dissenting contents, faster response times can be expected when true information is evaluated by making a vertical head movement and false information by making a horizontal head movement. Three experiments were designed in order to test this motor compatibility effect. In the first experiment a series of very simple sentences were asked to be evaluated as true or false by dragging them vertically and horizontally with the head. It resulted that truth-value was assessed faster when it was compatible with the direction of the head movement, compared to when it was incompatible. In the second experiment participants were asked to evaluate the same sentences as the first experiment but by moving them with the mouse. In the third experiment, a non-evaluative classification task was given, where sentences concerning animals or objects were to be dragged by vertical and horizontal head movements. In the second and third experiment no compatibility effect was observed. Overall results support the hypothesis of an embodiment effect between the abstract processing of truth evaluation and the direction of the two head movements of nodding and shaking. Cultural aspects, cognitive implications, and the limits of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA detection of Schistosoma japonicum: diagnostic validity of a LAMP assay for low-intensity infection and effects of chemotherapy in humans.

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    Jing Xu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis has decreased significantly in prevalence and intensity of infection in China, thus more accurate and sensitive methods are desperately needed for the further control of schistosomiasis. The present work aimed to assess the utility of the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP for detection of light intensity infection or false-negative patients and patients post-treatment, targeting the highly repetitive retrotransposon SjR2 of Schistosoma japonicum.LAMP was first assessed in rabbits with low intensity infection (EPG<10. Then 110 patient sera from Hunan Province, China, and 47 sera after treatment by praziquantel were used to evaluate the diagnostic validity of LAMP. Meanwhile, 42 sera from healthy individuals in a non-endemic area, and 60 sera from "healthy" residents who were identified as being negative for feces examination and immuno-methods in an endemic area were also examined. The results showed that LAMP could detect S. japonicum DNA in sera from rabbits at 3rd day post-infection. Following administration of praziquantel, the S. japonicum DNA in rabbit sera became negative at 10 weeks post-treatment. Of 110 sera from patients, LAMP showed 95.5% sensitivity, and even for 41 patients with less than 10 EPG, the sensitivity of LAMP still reached to 95.1%. For 47 patients after treatment, the negative conversion rate of S. japonicum DNA in patient sera increased from 23.4%, 61.7% to 83.0% at 3 months, 6 months and 9 months post-treatment, respectively. No false-positive result was obtained for 42 human sera from non-endemic area, while for the 60 "healthy" individuals from endemic area, 10 (16.7% individuals were positive by LAMP, which suggested that these individuals might be false-negative patients.The present study demonstrated that the LAMP assay is sensitive, specific, and affordable, which would help reduce schistosomiasis transmission through targeted treatment of individuals, particularly for those with

  8. Oxadiazole-2-oxides may have other functional targets, in addition to SjTGR, through which they cause mortality in Schistosoma japonicum.

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    Song, Li-Jun; Luo, Huan; Fan, Wen-Hua; Wang, Gu-Ping; Yin, Xu-Ren; Shen, Shuang; Wang, Jie; Jin, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Hong; Liu, Qian; Wang, Wen-Long; Feng, Bainian; Yu, Chuan-Xin

    2016-01-20

    Schistosomiasis is one of the world's major public health problems. Besides praziquantel (PZQ), there is currently no other effective treatment against schistosomiasis. The development of new antischistosomal agents to curb the emergence of PZQ resistance should be a high priority. Oxadiazole-2-oxides have been identified as potential antischistosomal reagents, with thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) being one of their molecular targets. To develop novel treatment reagents against Schistosoma japonicum, 30 novel oxadiazole-2-oxides were synthesised and their antischistosomal activities on juvenile and adult S. japonicum were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Their inhibitory activities against S. japonicum thioredoxin glutathione reductase (SjTGR) were also analysed. Most of the oxadiazole-2-oxides showed good juvenile and adult S. japonica killing activities in vitro. However, the antischistosomal effects of these compounds were not positively correlated with either their inhibition of SjTGR, or with nitric oxide (NO) release. Compounds 4a, 4b, 7c, 13, 16 and 20 resulted in 87.7%, 83.1%, 87.1%, 84.6%, 90.8% and 69.5%, respectively, mortality in the adult worms, when used to treat infected mice at schistosomula stage. These mortality rates were similar to or higher than that of artemisinin. Furthermore, compounds 4a and 16 resulted in 66.7% and 69.4% reductions in the worm burdens, respectively, when infected mice were treated at the adult worm stage. These treatment effects were similar to PZQ. No differences in activity of the oxadiazole-2-oxides against female and male adult worms were observed. The toxicity of the oxadiazole-2-oxides on mammalian cells appeared to be similar to, or less than, that of PZQ. The antischistosomal activity of the oxadiazole-2-oxides does not depend on NO production or the inhibition of SjTGR activity. There may be other functional targets of the oxadiazole-2-oxides in S. japonicum. Several of the novel oxadiazole-2-oxides

  9. [Influence of kaempferol on TGF-β1/Smads signal path in liver tissue of mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wen; Zhao, Lei; Li, Hua-rong; Zhang, Shu-ling

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the influence of kaempferol on transforming growth factor(TGF-β1/Smads signal tiransduction in liver tissue of mice with schistosomiasis liver fibrosis. Forty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into a normal control group (8 mice), a praziquantel group (8 mice ), and 4 praziquantel + kaempferol groups with different kaempferol dosages (5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg respectively, 6 mice each group). Besides the normal control group, all the mice in the other 5 groups were infected with Schistosoma japonicum. After the infection for 6 weeks, the praziquantel group and the 4 praziquantel + kaempferol groups were treated with praziquantel 500 mg/(kg.d) for 2 d, then the mice in the praziquantel group were drenched with normal saline for 6 weeks, and those in the 4 praziquantel + kaempferol groups were drenched with kaempferol 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg respectively for 6 weeks. After the treatment, all the animals were sacrificed by the cervical dislocation method, and the area of egg granuloma and the degree of fibrosis in the livers of the mice were observed by HE and Masson staining. The expressions of TGF-β1, Smad2/3, Smad7 proteins were measured by the immunohistochemical method, and the mRNA levels of the 3 proteins were detected by RT-PCR. Compared with the mice in the praziquantel group, the areas of egg granuloma of the liver of the mice in the 4 praziquantel + kaempferol groups were smaller, and the degrees of the hepatic fibrosis of the mice were lesser, and their expressions of Smad2 and Smad3 at protein and their mRNA levels were significantly lower (all P kaempferol can significantly reduce the degrees of hepatic fibrosis and granuloma caused by schistosome eggs after the praziquantel treatment.

  10. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles of Adult Schistosoma japonicum from Different Laboratory Animals and the Natural Host, Water Buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Zhou, Xiaosu; Piao, Xianyu; Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widely distributed parasitic diseases in the world. Schistosoma japonicum, a zoonotic parasite with a wide range of mammalian hosts, is one of the major pathogens of this disease. Although numerous studies on schistosomiasis japonica have been performed using laboratory animal models, systematic comparative analysis of whole-genome expression profiles in parasites from different laboratory animals and nature mammalian hosts is lacking to date. Adult schistosomes were obtained from laboratory animals BALB/c mice, C57BL/6 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and the natural host, water buffaloes. The gene expression profiles of schistosomes from these animals were obtained and compared by genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The results revealed that the gene expression profiles of schistosomes from different laboratory animals and buffaloes were highly consistent (r>0.98) genome-wide. Meanwhile, a total of 450 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in schistosomes which can be clustered into six groups. Pathway analysis revealed that these genes were mainly involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, amino acid, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism. We also identified a group of 1,540 abundantly and stably expressed gene products in adult worms, including a panel of 179 Schistosoma- or Platyhelminthes-specific genes that may be essential for parasitism and may be regarded as novel potential anti-parasite intervention targets for future research. This study provides a comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of schistosomes derived from different laboratory animals and water buffaloes. An expanded number of genes potentially affecting the development of schistosomes in different animals were identified. These findings lay the foundation for schistosomiasis research in different laboratory animals and natural hosts at the transcriptional level and provide a valuable resource for screening anti

  12. Isojacareubin from the Chinese herb Hypericum japonicum: potent antibacterial and synergistic effects on clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Guo-Ying; An, Jing; Han, Jun; Zhang, Yun-Ling; Wang, Gen-Chun; Hao, Xiao-Yan; Bian, Zhong-Qi

    2012-01-01

    Through bioassay-guided fractionation of the extracts from the aerial parts of the Chinese herb Hypericum japonicum Thunb. Murray, Isojacareubin (ISJ) was characterized as a potent antibacterial compound against the clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The broth microdilution assay was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of ISJ alone. The results showed that its MICs/MBCs ranged from 4/16 to 16/64 μg/mL, with the concentrations required to inhibit or kill 50% of the strains (MIC(50)/MBC(50)) at 8/16 μg/mL. Synergistic evaluations of this compound with four conventional antibacterial agents representing different types were performed by the chequerboard and time-kill tests. The chequerboard method showed significant synergy effects when ISJ was combined with Ceftazidime (CAZ), Levofloxacin (LEV) and Ampicillin (AMP), with the values of 50% of the fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI(50)) at 0.25, 0.37 and 0.37, respectively. Combined bactericidal activities were also observed in the time-kill dynamic assay. The results showed the ability of ISJ to reduce MRSA viable counts by log(10)CFU/mL at 24 h of incubation at a concentration of 1 × MIC were 1.5 (LEV, additivity), 0.92 (CAZ, indifference) and 0.82 (AMP, indifference), respectively. These in vitro anti-MRSA activities of ISJ alone and its synergy with conventional antibacterial agents demonstrated that ISJ enhanced their efficacy, which is of potential use for single and combinatory therapy of patients infected with MRSA.

  13. Structural insights into the MDP binding and CARD-CARD interaction in zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD2: a molecular dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharana, Jitendra; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; De, Bidhan Chandra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Behera, Bijay Kumar; De, Sachinandan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD2) is a key component of innate immunity that is highly specific for muramyl dipeptide (MDP)-a peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell wall. MDP recognition by NOD2-leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain activates NF-κB signaling through a protein-protein interaction between caspase activating and recruitment domains (CARDs) of NOD2 and downstream receptor interacting and activating protein kinase 2 (RIP2). Due to the lack of crystal/NMR structures, MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction are poorly understood. Herein, we have predicted the probable MDP and CARD-CARD binding surfaces in zebrafish NOD2 (zNOD2) using various in silico methodologies. The results show that the conserved residues Phe819, Phe871, Trp875, Trp929, Trp899, and Arg845 located at the concave face of zNOD2-LRR confer MDP recognition by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a stable association between the electropositive surface on zNOD2-CARDa and the electronegative surface on zRIP2-CARD reinforced mostly by H-bonds and electrostatic interactions. Importantly, a 3.5 Å salt bridge is observed between Arg60 of zNOD2-CARDa and Asp494 of zRIP2-CARD. Arg11 and Lys53 of zNOD2-CARDa and Ser498 and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD are critical residues for CARD-CARD interaction and NOD2 signaling. The 2.7 Å H-bond between Lys104 of the linker and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD suggests a possible role of the linker for shaping CARD-CARD interaction. These findings are consistent with existing mutagenesis data. We provide first insight into MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction in the zebrafish that will be useful to understand the molecular basis of NOD signaling in a broader perspective. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Dysfunctional Crohn's disease-associated NOD2 polymorphisms cannot be reliably predicted on the basis of RIPK2-binding or membrane association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon eParkhouse

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in NOD2 represent the single greatest genetic risk factor for the development of Crohn's disease. Three different non-synonomous NOD2 polymorphisms - R702W, G908R, L1007fsincC - account for roughly 80 % of all NOD2-associated cases of Crohn's disease and are reported to result in a loss of receptor function in response to muramyl dipeptide stimulation. Loss of NOD2 signalling can result from a failure to detect ligand; alterations in cellular localization; and changes in protein interactions, such as an inability to interact with downstream adaptor protein RIPK2. Using an overexpression system we analysed approximately 50 NOD2 polymorphisms reportedly connected to Crohn's disease to determine if they also displayed loss of function and if this could be related to alterations in protein localization and/or association with RIPK2. Just under half the polymorphisms displayed a significant reduction in signalling capacity following ligand stimulation, with nine of them showing near complete ablation. Only two polymorphisms, R38M and R138Q, lost the ability to interact with RIPK2. However, both these polymorphisms still associated with cellular membranes. In contrast, L248R, W355stop, L550V, N825K, L1007fsinC, L1007P and R1019stopstill bound RIPK2, but showed impaired membrane association and were unable to signal in response to muramyl dipeptide. This highlights the complex contributions of NOD2 polymorphisms to Crohn’s disease and reiterates the importance of both RIPK2-binding and membrane association in NOD2 signalling. Simply ascertaining whether or not NOD2 polymorphisms bind RIPK2 or associate with cellular membranes is not sufficient for determining their signalling competency.

  15. BAFF regulates activation of self-reactive T cells through B-cell dependent mechanisms and mediates protection in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Eliana; Walters, Stacey N; Villanueva, Jeanette E; Richards, James L; Mackay, Charles R; Grey, Shane T

    2014-04-01

    Targeting the BAFF/APRIL system has shown to be effective in preventing T-cell dependent autoimmune disease in the NOD mouse, a spontaneous model of type 1 diabetes. In this study we generated BAFF-deficient NOD mice to examine how BAFF availability would influence T-cell responses in vivo and the development of spontaneous diabetes. BAFF-deficient NOD mice which lack mature B cells, were protected from diabetes and showed delayed rejection of an allogeneic islet graft. Diabetes protection correlated with a failure to expand pathogenic IGRP-reactive CD8(+) T cells, which were maintained in the periphery at correspondingly low levels. Adoptive transfer of IGRP-reactive CD8(+) T cells with B cells into BAFF-deficient NOD mice enhanced IGRP-reactive CD8(+) T-cell expansion. Furthermore, when provoked with cyclophosphamide, or transferred to a secondary lymphopenic host, the latent pool of self-reactive T cells resident in BAFF-deficient NOD mice could elicit beta cell destruction. We conclude that lack of BAFF prevents the procurement of B-cell-dependent help necessary for the emergence of destructive diabetes. Indeed, treatment of NOD mice with the BAFF-blocking compound, BR3-Fc, resulted in a delayed onset and reduced incidence of diabetes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Co-existence of Blau syndrome and NAID? Diagnostic challenges associated with presence of multiple pathogenic variants in NOD2 gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Magdalena; Marjańska, Agata; Bąbol-Pokora, Katarzyna; Urbańczyk, Anna; Grześk, Elżbieta; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kołtan, Sylwia

    2017-07-27

    Pediatric autoinflammatory diseases are rare and still poorly understood conditions resulting from defective genetic control of innate immune system, inter alia from anomalies of NOD2 gene. The product of this gene is Nod2 protein, taking part in maintenance of immune homeostasis. Clinical form of resultant autoinflammatory condition depends on NOD2 genotype; usually patients with NOD2 defects present with Blau syndrome, NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease (NAID) or Crohn's disease. We present the case of a 7-year-old girl with co-existing symptoms of two rare diseases, Blau syndrome and NAID. Overlapping manifestations of two syndromes raised a significant diagnostic challenge, until next-generation molecular test (NGS) identified presence of three pathogenic variants of NOD2 gene: P268S, IVS8 +158 , 1007 fs, and established the ultimate diagnosis. Presence of multiple genetical abnormalities resulted in an ambiguous clinical presentation with overlapping symptoms of Blau syndrome and NAID. Final diagnosis of autoinflammatory disease opened new therapeutic possibilities, including the use of biological treatments.

  17. Mechanisms of Mycobacterium avium-induced resistance against insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice: role of Fas and Th1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, T C; Aguas, A P

    1999-02-01

    NOD mice spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes. One of the manipulations that prevent diabetes in NOD mice is infection with mycobacteria or immunization of mice with mycobacteria-containing adjuvant. Infection of NOD mice with Mycobacterium avium, done before the mice show overt diabetes, results in permanent protection of the animals from diabetes and this protective effect is associated with increased numbers of CD4+ T cells and B220+ B cells. Here, we investigate whether the M. avium-induced protection of NOD mice from diabetes was associated with changes in the expression of Fas (CD95) and FasL by immune cells, as well as alterations in cytotoxic activity, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-4 production and activation of T cells of infected animals. Our data indicate that protection of NOD mice from diabetes is a Th1-type response that is mediated by up-regulation of the Fas-FasL pathway and involves an increase in the cytotoxicity of T cells. These changes are consistent with induction by the infection of regulatory T cells with the ability of triggering deletion or anergy of peripheral self-reactive lymphocytes that cause the autoimmune disease of NOD mice.

  18. Effect of metal stress on photosynthetic pigments in the Cu-hyperaccumulating lichens Cladonia humilis and Stereocaulon japonicum growing in Cu-polluted sites in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Yoshitani, Azusa; Itoh, Kiminori

    2013-11-01

    To understand the ecology and physiology of metal-accumulating lichens growing in Cu-polluted sites, we investigated lichens near temple and shrine buildings with Cu roofs in Japan and found that Stereocaulon japonicum Th. Fr. and Cladonia humilis (With.) J. R. Laundon grow in Cu-polluted sites. Metal concentrations in the lichen samples collected at some of these sites were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). UV-vis absorption spectra of pigments extracted from the lichen samples were measured, and the pigment concentrations were estimated from the spectral data using equations from the literature. Secondary metabolites extracted from the lichen samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a photodiode array detector. We found that S. japonicum and C. humilis are Cu-hyperaccumulating lichens. Differences in pigment concentrations and their absorption spectra were observed between the Cu-polluted and control samples of the 2 lichens. However, no correlation was found between Cu and pigment concentrations. We observed a positive correlation between Al and Fe concentrations and unexpectedly found high negative correlations between Al and pigment concentrations. This suggests that Al stress reduces pigment concentrations. The concentrations of secondary metabolites in C. humilis growing in the Cu-polluted sites agreed with those in C. humilis growing in the control sites. This indicates that the metabolite concentrations are independent of Cu stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral vaccination of mice with recombinant Schistosoma japonicum proteins induces specific anti-parasite antibodies and damage to adult worms after a challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W; Gobert, G N; McManus, D P

    1997-07-01

    Mucosal immunisation by the oral route represents a cheap and simple method for delivering protective antigens to a host against gastrointestinal and respiratory pathogens. In the case of schistosome (bloodfluke) worms, 2 life-cycle stages may be exposed to the host's mucosa; the larval schistosomulum is exposed to the respiratory mucosa and, depending on the species, the egg may come into contact with the intestinal or urinogenital mucosa. Both IgA and some Isotypes of IgG have been implicated in protective immunity against schistosomiasis in humans and in experimental animal models. We have used a novel approach to determine whether schistosome-specific antibodies and protective immunity could be generated in mice by oral administration of bacterial lysates containing recombinant Schistosoma japonicum proteins. The mice produced specific antibodies to paramyosin and GST26, 2 important vaccine candidates for schistosomiasis, but there was no significant reduction in worm burdens in groups of mice immunised with either protein. Significantly, however, transmission electron microscopy revealed damage to the teguments of adult female and male S. japonicum worms obtained from mice vaccinated with recombinant paramyosin; there was also extensive damage to the tegument of male worms recovered from mice vaccinated with recombinant GST26. Our observations that oral vaccination with bacterial lysates containing recombinant proteins induced particular classes and subclasses of circulating antibodies with resultant damage to the surface of adult worms may have important implications for the future development of oral vaccines against a systemic infection such as schistosomiasis.

  20. Enhancement of protective efficacy through adenoviral vectored vaccine priming and protein boosting strategy encoding triosephosphate isomerase (SjTPI) against Schistosoma japonicum in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Xing, Yuntian; Dai, Jianrong; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yinchang

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice. Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt) and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI) were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice. The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China.

  1. Enhancement of protective efficacy through adenoviral vectored vaccine priming and protein boosting strategy encoding triosephosphate isomerase (SjTPI against Schistosoma japonicum in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dai

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice.Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice.The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China.

  2. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... the regulation and function of DMBT1 in intestinal epithelial cells, which form the primary immunological barrier for invading pathogens. We report that intestinal epithelial cells up-regulate DMBT1 upon proinflammatory stimuli (e.g., TNF-alpha, LPS). We demonstrate that DMBT1 is a target gene...... for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...

  3. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...... the regulation and function of DMBT1 in intestinal epithelial cells, which form the primary immunological barrier for invading pathogens. We report that intestinal epithelial cells up-regulate DMBT1 upon proinflammatory stimuli (e.g., TNF-alpha, LPS). We demonstrate that DMBT1 is a target gene...

  4. Flow cytometric gating for spleen monocyte and DC subsets: differences in autoimmune NOD mice and with acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Matthew B; Rahman, M Jubayer; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-05-01

    The role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases is now better understood due to advances in multicolor flow cytometry, gene expression analysis of APC populations, and functional correlation of mouse to human APC populations. A simple but informative nomenclature of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets (cDC1, cDC2, pDC) and monocyte-derived populations incorporates these advances, but accurate subset identification is critical. Ambiguous gating schemes and alterations of cell surface markers in inflammatory condition can make comparing results between studies difficult. Both acute inflammation, such as TLR-ligand stimulation, and chronic inflammation as found in mouse models of autoimmunity can alter DC subset gating. Here, we address these issues using in vivo CpG stimulation as an example of acute inflammation and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of chronic inflammation.We provide a flow cytometric antibody panel and gating scheme that differentiate 2 monocytic and 3DC subsets in the spleen both at steady state and after CpG stimulation. Using this method, we observed differences in the composition of NOD DCs that have been previously reported, and newly identified increases in the number of NOD monocyte-derived DCs. Finally, we established a protocol for DC phosphoflow to measure the phosphorylation state of intracellular proteins, and use it to confirm functional differences in the identified subsets. Therefore, we present optimized methods for distinguishing monocytic and DC populations with and without inflammation and/or autoimmunity associated with NOD mice. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Overexpression of thioredoxin in islets transduced by a lentiviral vector prolongs graft survival in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytwu Huey-Kang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic islet transplantation is considered an appropriate treatment to achieve insulin independence in type I diabetic patients. However, islet isolation and transplantation-induced oxidative stress and autoimmune-mediated destruction are still the major obstacles to the long-term survival of graft islets in this potential therapy. To protect islet grafts from inflammatory damage and prolong their survival, we transduced islets with an antioxidative gene thioredoxin (TRX using a lentiviral vector before transplantation. We hypothesized that the overexpression of TRX in islets would prolong islet graft survival when transplanted into diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Methods Islets were isolated from NOD mice and transduced with lentivirus carrying TRX (Lt-TRX or enhanced green fluorescence protein (Lt-eGFP, respectively. Transduced islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of female diabetic NOD mice, and blood glucose concentration was monitored daily after transplantation. The histology of the islet graft was assessed at the end of the study. The protective effect of TRX on islets was investigated. Results The lentiviral vector effectively transduced islets without altering the glucose-stimulating insulin-secretory function of islets. Overexpression of TRX in islets reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. After transplantation into diabetic NOD mice, euglycemia was maintained for significantly longer in Lt-TRX-transduced islets than in Lt-eGFP-transduced islets; the mean graft survival was 18 vs. 6.5 days (n = 9 and 10, respectively, p Conclusion We successfully transduced the TRX gene into islets and demonstrated that these genetically modified grafts are resistant to inflammatory insult and survived longer in diabetic recipients. Our results further support the concept that the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and antiapoptotic functions of TRX are critical to islet survival after

  6. Preventive effects of andrographolide on the development of diabetes in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice by inducing immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengliang; Gui, Ling; Xu, Yanjiao; Wu, Tao; Liu, Dong

    2013-08-01

    Andrographolide, an active component in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, is a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata because of its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the effect of andrographolide on the development of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of andrographolide on the development of autoimmune diabetes and clarify the underlying mechanism. NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups and administered with water and andrographolide at 50, 100, and 150mg/kg body weight for four weeks. ICR mice were also selected as the control group. Oral glucose tolerance and histopathological insulitis were examined. Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA. The transcriptional profiles of T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt in the pancreatic lymphatic node samples derived from the NOD mice were detected by RT-PCR. After four weeks of oral supplementation, andrographolide significantly inhibited insulitis, delayed the onset, and suppressed the development of diabetes in 30-week-old NOD mice in a dose dependent manner. This protective status was correlated with a substantially decreased production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2, increased IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and a reduced IL-17. Andrographolide also increased GATA3 mRNA expression but decreased T-bet and RORγt mRNA expressions. Our results suggested that andrographolide prevented type 1 diabetes by maintaining Th1/Th2/Th17 homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Toll-like receptor 3 is critical for coxsackievirus B4-induced type 1 diabetes in female NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Kelly D; Thuma, Jean R; Courreges, Maria C; Benencia, Fabian; James, Calvin B L; Malgor, Ramiro; Kantake, Noriko; Mudd, William; Denlinger, Nathan; Nolan, Bret; Wen, Li; Schwartz, Frank L

    2015-02-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVBs) are involved in triggering some cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for this remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), a receptor that recognizes viral double-stranded RNA, is hypothesized to play a role in virus-induced T1DM, although this hypothesis is yet to be substantiated. The objective of this study was to directly investigate the role of TLR3 in CVB-triggered T1DM in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a mouse model of human T1DM that is widely used to study both spontaneous autoimmune and viral-induced T1DM. As such, we infected female wild-type (TLR3(+/+)) and TLR3 knockout (TLR3(-/-)) NOD mice with CVB4 and compared the incidence of diabetes in CVB4-infected mice with that of uninfected counterparts. We also evaluated the islets of uninfected and CVB4-infected wild-type and TLR3 knockout NOD mice by immunohistochemistry and insulitis scoring. TLR3 knockout mice were markedly protected from CVB4-induced diabetes compared with CVB4-infected wild-type mice. CVB4-induced T-lymphocyte-mediated insulitis was also significantly less severe in TLR3 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. No differences in insulitis were observed between uninfected animals, either wild-type or TLR3 knockout mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that TLR3 is 1) critical for CVB4-induced T1DM, and 2) modulates CVB4-induced insulitis in genetically prone NOD mice.

  8. NOD2/CARD15 genotype, cardiovascular disease and cancer in 43,600 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, S; Nordestgaard, B G

    2010-01-01

    The NOD2/CARD15 gene is involved in the innate immune response, and thus in inflammation. Three polymorphisms in this gene (Arg702Trp rs2066844, Gly908Arg rs2066845 and Leu1007fsinsC rs5743293) have been associated with increased risk of the inflammatory bowel disease, the Crohn's disease. We...... tested whether these polymorphisms are also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, in which the innate immune system and inflammation may influence pathogenesis....

  9. The neurosurvival factor Humanin inhibits beta cell apoptosis via Stat3 activation and delays and ameliorates diabetes in NOD mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, P. T.; Park, P.; Cobb, L. J.; Paharkova-Vatchkova, V.; Hakimi, M.; Cohen, P.; Lee, K.-W.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell apoptosis is important in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of Type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether Humanin, a recently described survival factor for neurons, could improve the survival of beta cells and delay or treat diabetes in the NOD model. Humanin reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation in NIT-1 cells and decreased apoptosis induced by cytokine treatment. Humanin induced Stat3 and ERK phosphorylation over a 24 hour time course. Specific inhibition o...

  10. NOD2, RIP2 and IRF5 Play a Critical Role in the Type I Interferon Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaozhao; Fortune, Sarah M.; Coulombe, Francois; Behr, Marcel A.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Kelliher, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    While the recognition of microbial infection often occurs at the cell surface via Toll-like receptors, the cytosol of the cell is also under surveillance for microbial products that breach the cell membrane. An important outcome of cytosolic recognition is the induction of IFNα and IFNβ, which are critical mediators of immunity against both bacteria and viruses. Like many intracellular pathogens, a significant fraction of the transcriptional response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection depends on these type I interferons, but the recognition pathways responsible remain elusive. In this work, we demonstrate that intraphagosomal M. tuberculosis stimulates the cytosolic Nod2 pathway that responds to bacterial peptidoglycan, and this event requires membrane damage that is actively inflicted by the bacterium. Unexpectedly, this recognition triggers the expression of type I interferons in a Tbk1- and Irf5-dependent manner. This response is only partially impaired by the loss of Irf3 and therefore, differs fundamentally from those stimulated by bacterial DNA, which depend entirely on this transcription factor. This difference appears to result from the unusual peptidoglycan produced by mycobacteria, which we show is a uniquely potent agonist of the Nod2/Rip2/Irf5 pathway. Thus, the Nod2 system is specialized to recognize bacteria that actively perturb host membranes and is remarkably sensitive to mycobacteria, perhaps reflecting the strong evolutionary pressure exerted by these pathogens on the mammalian immune system. PMID:19578435

  11. TNF-α-Induced NOD2 and RIP2 Contribute to the Up-Regulation of Cytokines Induced by MDP in Monocytic THP-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobin; Xiao, Zhilin; Xie, Xiumei; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Yuan, Chuang; Yang, Li; Hu, Jinyue

    2017-06-21

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2)-induced signal transduction and cytokine production is regulated by a number of factors. However, the feedback effect of the pro-inflammatory TNF-α on NOD2-induced inflammation is not fully understood. In this study, we found unexpectedly that TNF-α up-regulated NOD2 ligand MDP-induced production of the CXC chemokines, including CXCL1, 2, and 8, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, in a dose-dependent manner at both mRNA and protein levels in monocytic THP-1 cells. Though TNF-α induced the up-regulation of ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20, an important negative regulator for Toll-like receptor- and NOD2-induced inflammatory responses, the over-expression of A20 by gene transfer did not reversed MDP-induced production of cytokines, suggested that A20 did not regulate the functions of NOD2 in THP-1 cells. Meanwhile, we found that TNF-α up-regulated NOD2 and its down-stream adaptor protein RIP2 at both mRNA and protein levels. MDP induced the activation of ERK, JNK, p38 and NF-κB, and TNF-α pre-treatment augmented this activation. The results from pharmacological inhibition assay showed that cytokine production was dependent on MAPK signaling. In addition, we found that the pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with MDP down-regulated the mRNA levels of cytokine induced by MDP re-treatment. MDP pre-treatment up-regulated NOD2, but down-regulated RIP2, and down-regulated NOD2 signal transduction induced by MDP re-stimulation. Taking together, these results suggested that TNF-α is a positive regulator for NOD2 functions via up-regulation of NOD2 and its signal adaptor RIP2, and TNF-α-induced A20 does not regulate MDP-induced inflammatory responses in THP-1 cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-10, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Structures of NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland); Dauter, Zbigniew [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jaskolski, Mariusz, E-mail: mariuszj@amu.edu.pl [Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland); A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Crystal structures of the bacterial α1,6-fucosyltransferase NodZ in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose are presented. Rhizobial NodZ α1,6-fucosyltransferase (α1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5′-diphosphate-β-l-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two α1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of α1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 Å resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme–product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-l-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 Å resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among α1,2-, α1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop

  13. Higher susceptibility of NOD/LtSz-scid Il2rg-/- NSG mice to xenotransplanted lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaji N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nobuhiro Kanaji,1 Akira Tadokoro,1 Kentaro Susaki,1 Saki Yokokura,1 Kiyomi Ohmichi,2 Reiji Haba,2 Naoki Watanabe,1 Shuji Bandoh,1 Tomoya Ishii,1 Hiroaki Dobashi,1 Takuya Matsunaga11Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology, Rheumatology and Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan; 2Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, JapanPurpose: No lung cancer xenograft model using non-obese diabetic (NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice has been reported. The purpose of this study is to select a suitable mouse strain as a xenogenic host for testing tumorigenicity of lung cancer.Materials and methods: We directly compared the susceptibility of four immunodeficient mouse strains, c-nu, C.B-17 scid, NOD-scid, and NOD/LtSz-scid Il2rg-/- (NSG mice, for tumor formation from xenotransplanted lung cancer cell lines. Various numbers (101–105 cells/head of two lung cancer cell lines, A549 and EBC1, were subcutaneously inoculated and tumor sizes were measured every week up to 12 weeks.Results: When 104 EBC1 cells were inoculated, no tumor formation was observed in BALB/c-nu or C.B-17 scid mice. Tumors developed in two of the five NOD-scid mice (40% and in all the five NSG mice (100%. When 103 EBC1 cells were injected, no tumors developed in any strain other than NSG mice, while tumorigenesis was achieved in all the five NSG mice (100%, P=0.0079 within 9 weeks. NSG mice similarly showed higher susceptibility to xenotransplantation of A549 cells. Tumor formation was observed only in NSG mice after inoculation of 103 or fewer A549 cells (40% vs 0% in 15 NSG mice compared with others, respectively, P=0.0169. We confirmed that the engrafted tumors originated from inoculated human lung cancer cells by immunohistochemical staining with human cytokeratin and vimentin.Conclusion: NSG mice may be the most suitable strain for testing tumorigenicity of lung cancer, especially if only a few cells

  14. Early responses to Nod factors and mycorrhizal colonization in a non-nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Luis; Alemán, Emilia; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen

    2006-03-01

    Legumes can acquire nitrogen through a symbiotic interaction with rhizobial bacteria. The initiation of this process is determined by a molecular dialogue between the two partners. Legume roots exude flavonoids that induce the expression of the bacterial nodulation genes, which encode proteins involved in the synthesis and secretion of signals called Nod factors (NFs). NFs signal back to the plant root and trigger several responses, leading to bacterial invasion and nodule formation. Here, we describe the molecular and cellular characterization of a Phaseolus vulgaris non-nodulating mutant (NN-mutant). Root hair cells of the NN-mutant plant respond with swelling and branching when inoculated with Rhizobium etli, albeit without curling induction. Furthermore, neither initiation of cell division in the outer cortex, nor entrapment of bacteria nor infection thread formation was observed. Both the bean wild-type and the NN-mutant responded with elevated intracellular calcium changes in the root hairs. Although the NN-mutant is deficient in early nodulin gene expression when inoculated with R. etli, it can be effectively colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices). Our data indicate that the P. vulgaris NN-mutant is not blocked at the NFs early perception stage, but at later downstream stages between Ca(2+) signaling and early nodulin induction. This supports the idea that both microsymbionts are perceived and trigger different downstream pathways in the host plant.

  15. Endogenous Nod-factor-like signal molecules promote early somatic embryo development in Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia V; Wiweger, Malgorzata; Kenne, Lennart; von Arnold, Sara

    2002-02-01

    Embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are composed of pro-embryogenic masses (PEMs) and somatic embryos of various developmental stages. Auxin is important for PEM formation and proliferation. In this report we show that depletion of auxin blocks PEM development and causes large-scale cell death. Extracts of the media conditioned by embryogenic cultures stimulate development of PEM aggregates in auxin-deficient cultures. Partial characterization of the conditioning factor shows that it is a lipophilic, low-molecular-weight molecule, which is sensitive to chitinase and contains GlcNAc residues. On the basis of this information, we propose that the factor is a lipophilic chitin oligosaccharide (LCO). The amount of LCO correlates to the developmental stages of PEMs and embryos, with the highest level in the media conditioned by developmentally blocked cultures. LCO is not present in nonembryogenic cultures. Cell death, induced by withdrawal of auxin, is suppressed by extra supply of endogenous LCO or Nod factor from Rhizobium sp. NGR234. The effect can be mimicked by a chitotetraose or chitinase from Streptomyces griseus. Taken together, our data suggest that endogenous LCO acts as a signal molecule stimulating PEM and early embryo development in Norway spruce.

  16. Nodding syndrome since 2012: recent progress, challenges and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebunders, R; Post, R; O'Neill, S; Haesaert, G; Opar, B; Lakwo, T; Laudisoit, A; Hendy, A

    2015-02-01

    We aim to review the current epidemiology of nodding syndrome (NS) and discuss relevant gaps in research. NS and convulsive epilepsy of unknown aetiology are clustered within the same villages and families in onchocerciasis-endemic areas. They are therefore potentially different clinical expressions of the same disease. It has been difficult to perform full autopsies on NS patients who die in remote villages. Adequate fixation of tissue immediately after death is critical for the examination of brain tissue. Therefore, post-mortem transsphenoidal brain biopsies, performed immediately after death by trained nurses, will provide the best option for obtaining tissue for analysis. We suspect that certain blackflies in onchocerciasis-endemic areas may transmit a novel pathogen that could cause NS and epilepsy. This is supported by a recent drop in the number of new NS cases coinciding with vector control activities aimed at reducing blackfly populations in northern Uganda. We propose that metagenomic studies of human samples, blackflies and microfilariae are conducted to screen for pathogens, and that a clinical trial is planned to evaluate the impact of larviciding against NS and epilepsy epidemics. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Nod factors, chemical signal exchange between bacteria and leguminous plants in nitrogen fixing symbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promé, J C

    1999-05-01

    The early steps of the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between plant legumes and soil bacteria (rhizobium) are mediated by an exchange of chemical signals between the two partners. Upon gene activation by plant root secretions (flavonoids), bacteria synthesize lipochitooligomers (called Nod Factors, NFs) that induce root hair deformations, cortical cell divisions, allow bacterial entry and produce nodule organogenesis at nano to picomole concentrations. Substitutions occurring on the lipochitooligosaccharide core are essential for recognition and activity. Biosynthesis of these molecules is now fully dissected, by looking at the structural changes in NFs induced by gene mutation or gene transfers. From the biodiversity studies of NFs, it appears that their structures belong with the phylogenetic evolution of plants, rather than that of bacteria, suggesting a coevolution of symbiotic bacteria with their plant receptors. Some preliminary and indirect observations indicate that similar molecules seem to exist in non-legumes plants, in batrachians and fishes beeing possibly involved in their embryogenesis, but they are probably at at a so low concentration that all attempts to detect them directly fail up to now.

  18. Symbiotic Burkholderia Species Show Diverse Arrangements of nif/fix and nod Genes and Lack Typical High-Affinity Cytochrome cbb3 Oxidase Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Briscoe, Leah; Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Agapakis, Christina M; de-Los Santos, Paulina Estrada; Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne; Weinstock, George; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John G; Hirsch, Ann M

    2016-08-01

    Genome analysis of fourteen mimosoid and four papilionoid beta-rhizobia together with fourteen reference alpha-rhizobia for both nodulation (nod) and nitrogen-fixing (nif/fix) genes has shown phylogenetic congruence between 16S rRNA/MLSA (combined 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analysis) and nif/fix genes, indicating a free-living diazotrophic ancestry of the beta-rhizobia. However, deeper genomic analysis revealed a complex symbiosis acquisition history in the beta-rhizobia that clearly separates the mimosoid and papilionoid nodulating groups. Mimosoid-nodulating beta-rhizobia have nod genes tightly clustered in the nodBCIJHASU operon, whereas papilionoid-nodulating Burkholderia have nodUSDABC and nodIJ genes, although their arrangement is not canonical because the nod genes are subdivided by the insertion of nif and other genes. Furthermore, the papilionoid Burkholderia spp. contain duplications of several nod and nif genes. The Burkholderia nifHDKEN and fixABC genes are very closely related to those found in free-living diazotrophs. In contrast, nifA is highly divergent between both groups, but the papilionoid species nifA is more similar to alpha-rhizobia nifA than to other groups. Surprisingly, for all Burkholderia, the fixNOQP and fixGHIS genes required for cbb3 cytochrome oxidase production and assembly are missing. In contrast, symbiotic Cupriavidus strains have fixNOQPGHIS genes, revealing a divergence in the evolution of two distinct electron transport chains required for nitrogen fixation within the beta-rhizobia.

  19. Effect of Trichoderma harzianum biomass and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain NC 92 to control leaf blight disease of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea caused by Rhizoctonia solani in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana Kanjanamaneesathian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Four hundred and sixty two strains of Trichoderma spp. were isolated from 23 soil samples in which groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. and bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. had been planted in Songkhla, Phattalung, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Narathiwat and Yala provinces. These fungi were tested against Rhizoctonia solani, a causal agent of leaf blight of bambara groundnut, using dual culture technique on PDA medium. Among 462 isolates tested, 226 isolates had an ability to overgrow R. solani completely. Further testing found 13 isolates having the ability to parasitize mycelia of R. solani. Among these isolates, ThB-1-54 produced a cellulolytic enzyme on congo-red agar. This isolate was later identified as T. harzianum Rifai. In the field test, applying biomass of the isolate ThB-1-54 cultured on ground mesocarp fiber of oil palm, the combination of the isolate ThB-1-54 on ground mesocarp fiber of oil palm and Bradyrhizobium sp. (strain NC 92, or fungicide (iprodione had no effect on disease severity, yield, or the amount of total nitrogen content in stems or seeds of bambara groundnut plant.

  20. Inoculation of Mimosa latispinosa Lam with the Commercial Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198, and Bradyrhizobium spp. Under Nursery Production Conditions in South-East Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarasin, G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Qit Madagascar Minerals (QMM has planned several actions to reduce the environmental footprint of its mining project located near the city of Fort-Dauphin (Madagascar. One of these actions is the reclamation of a portion of its mined sites. Different symbiotic strains were tested as bio-enhancers for the ecological restoration using Mimosa latispinosa Lam, a native and pioneer shrub. The symbiotic strains tested in nursery were the commercial strain of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM197198, and two local strains of Bradyrhizobium spp., STM1415 and STM1447, inoculated alone or dually with the arbuscular mycorrhiza. Treatments did not significantly increase the plant height and dry mass. However, plants grown in tyndallized soil had better growth than those in unsterilized soil. Results obtained twenty weeks after inoculation suggest that soil tyndallization (heating at 100°C and at atmospheric pressure of 700 kPa during three hours is an effective method for nursery production of high quality seedlings of M. latispinosa.

  1. DROUGHT-INDUCED EFFECTS AND RECOVERY OF NITRATE ASSIMILATION AND NODULE ACTIVITY IN COWPEA PLANTS INOCULATED WITH BRADYRHIZOBIUM SPP. UNDER MODERATE NITRATE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Joaquim Albenísio Gomes da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to establish comparative effects of drought and recovery on the nitrate assimilation and nodule activity related to N2 fixation in cowpea plants [Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp.] previously inoculated with Bradyrhizobium spp. BR-3256 (CB-756 strain in the presence of 5 mol m-3 NO-3. Twenty-eight-day-old nodulated plants were submitted to water deprivation during 4 consecutive days and afterwards resupplied with nutrient solution during 2 days. The water deprivation caused a rapid increase in the nitrate content in root and a marked reduction in leaf nitrate reductase (NR activity. In contrast nodule NR activity was slightly increased by water deprivation. Concomitantly, in nodules of water stressed plants, leghemoglobin and glutamine synthetase (GS activity declined and a progressive reduction in ureide-N concentration in xylem sap was observed. Leaf-NR activity increased rapidly after rehydration while leaf nitrate content declined. In contrast both GS activity and soluble protein content in the nodule continued to decline in rewatered plants. In addition the concentration of leghemoglobin recovered well, while the xylem ureide-N content experienced a slight increase after rehydration. Despite the nitrate assimilation in leaves and the nodule activity had been both severely affected by water stress, the rapid recovery of nitrate reductase activity suggests that the nitrate assimilation process is less sensitive to drought/rehydration cycle when cowpea plants are nodulated in presence of moderate nitrate level.

  2. Symbiotic N2-Fixation Estimated by the 15N Tracer Technique and Growth of Pueraria phaseoloides (Roxb.) Benth. Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium Strain in Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Papa Saliou; Okon, Judith Wase; Begoude, Didier Aime Boyogueno; Araki, Shigeru; Ambang, Zachée; Shibata, Makoto; Funakawa, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    This field experiment was established in Eastern Cameroon to examine the effect of selected rhizobial inoculation on N2-fixation and growth of Pueraria phaseoloides. Treatments consisted of noninoculated and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense S3-4-inoculated Pueraria with three replications each. Ipomoea batatas as a non-N2-fixing reference was interspersed in each Pueraria plot. All the twelve plots received 2 gN/m2 of 15N ammonium sulfate 10% atom excess. At harvest, dry matter yields and the nitrogen derived from atmospheric N2-fixation (%Ndfa) of inoculated Pueraria were significantly (P < 0.05) higher (81% and 10.83%, resp.) than those of noninoculated Pueraria. The inoculation enhanced nodule dry weight 2.44-fold. Consequently, the harvested N significantly (P < 0.05) increased by 83% in inoculated Pueraria, resulting from the increase in N2-fixation and soil N uptake. A loss of 55 to 60% of the N fertilizer was reported, and 36 to 40% of it was immobilized in soil. Here, we demonstrated that both N2-fixing potential of P. phaseoloides and soil N uptake are improved through field inoculations using efficient bradyrhizobial species. In practice, the inoculation contributes to maximize N input in soils by the cover crop's biomass and represent a good strategy to improve soil fertility for subsequent cultivation. PMID:26904363

  3. Type 1 Diabetes Prone NOD Mice Have Diminished Cxcr1 mRNA Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and CD4+ T Lymphocytes.

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    Karine Haurogné

    Full Text Available In humans, CXCR1 and CXCR2 are two homologous proteins that bind ELR+ chemokines. Both receptors play fundamental roles in neutrophil functions such as migration and reactive oxygen species production. Mouse Cxcr1 and Cxcr2 genes are located in an insulin-dependent diabetes genetic susceptibility locus. The non obese diabetic (NOD mouse is a spontaneous well-described animal model for insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. In this disease, insulin deficiency results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T lymphocytes. This slow-progressing disease is dependent on both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we report descriptive data about the Cxcr1 gene in NOD mice. We demonstrate decreased expression of mRNA for Cxcr1 in neutrophils and CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from NOD mice compared to other strains, related to reduced NOD Cxcr1 gene promoter activity. Looking for Cxcr1 protein, we next analyze the membrane proteome of murine neutrophils by mass spectrometry. Although Cxcr2 protein is clearly found in murine neutrophils, we did not find evidence of Cxcr1 peptides using this method. Nevertheless, in view of recently-published experimental data obtained in NOD mice, we argue for possible Cxcr1 involvement in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis.

  4. Species-specific engagement of human nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD)2 and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling upon intracellular bacterial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, M; Seidelin, J B; Eickhardt-Dalbøge, Steffen Robert

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of bacterial peptidoglycan-derived muramyl-dipeptide (MDP) by nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) induces crucial innate immune responses. Most bacteria carry the N-acetylated form of MDP (A-MDP) in their cell membranes, whereas N-glycolyl MDP (G-MDP) is typical for mycobacteria....... Experimental murine studies have reported G-MDP to have a greater NOD2-stimulating capacity than A-MDP. As NOD2 polymorphisms are associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a link has been suggested between mycobacterial infections and CD. Thus, the aim was to investigate if NOD2 responses are dependent upon type...... of MDP and further to determine the role of NOD2 gene variants for the bacterial recognition in CD. The response pattern to A-MDP, G-MDP, Mycobacterium segmatis (expressing mainly G-MDP) and M. segmatisΔnamH (expressing A-MDP), Listeria monocytogenes (LM) (an A-MDP-containing bacteria) and M. avium...

  5. NOD-2 and TLR-4 Signaling Reinforces the Efficacy of Dendritic Cells and Reduces the Dose of TB Drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nargis; Pahari, Susanta; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Aqdas, Mohammad; Agrewala, Javed N

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading killer infectious diseases. TB patients are inflicted with devastating side effects and the toxicity of a lengthy drug regime, accentuating an urgent need to explore newer and safer treatment methods. Recently, an improved understanding of host-pathogen interaction has opened new avenues for TB treatment, including immunotherapy. This has emboldened us to devise a novel strategy to restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis(Mtb) growth by activating dendritic cells (DCs) through the NOD-2 and TLR-4 molecules of innate immunity. Triggered DCs show a robust release of cytokines and nitric oxide, autophagy and improved migration towards the lymph nodes, and consequently impede the intracellular survival of Mtb. Of note, this approach enhanced the efficacy of TB drugs by reducing their dose to a 5-fold lesser concentration than recommended. In vivo administration of ligands of NOD-2 (NOD-2L) and TLR-4 (TLR-4L) substantially increased the pool of effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. Additionally, NOD-2L and TLR-4L, in conjunction with the reduced dose of isoniazid, substantially declined the Mtb burden in the lungs. In the future, adjunct therapy involving NOD-2L, TLR-4L and TB drugs may have enough potential to reduce the dose and duration of treatment of TB patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Diabetes-Resistant NOR Mice Are More Severely Affected by Streptozotocin Compared to the Diabetes-Prone NOD Mice: Correlations with Liver and Kidney GLUT2 Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kahraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonobese Diabetic (NOD mice are susceptible strains for Type 1 diabetes development, and Nonobese Diabetes-Resistant (NOR mice are defined as suitable controls for NOD mice in non-MHC-related research. Diabetes is often accelerated in NOD mice via Streptozotocin (STZ. STZ is taken inside cells via GLUT2 transmembrane carrier proteins, the major glucose transporter isoforms in pancreatic beta cells, liver, kidneys, and the small intestine. We observed severe adverse effects in NOR mice treated with STZ compared to NOD mice that were made diabetic with a similar dose. We suggested that the underlying mechanism could be differential GLUT2 expressions in pancreatic beta cells, yet immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical studies revealed similar GLUT2 expression levels. We also detected GLUT2 expression profiles in NOD and NOR hepatic and renal tissues by western blot analysis and observed considerably higher GLUT2 expression levels in liver and kidney tissues of NOR mice. Although beta cell GLUT2 expression levels are frequently evaluated as a marker predicting STZ sensitivity in animal models, we report here very different diabetic responses to STZ in two different animal strains, in spite of similar initial GLUT2 expressions in beta cells. Furthermore, use of NOR mice in STZ-mediated experimental diabetes settings should be considered accordingly.

  7. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program; Simulacion en 3 dimensiones de un ciclo de 18 meses para un reactor BWR usando el programa Nod3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: nhm@nuclear.inin.mx; Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  8. Characterization of VAMP2 in Schistosoma japonicum and the Evaluation of Protective Efficacy Induced by Recombinant SjVAMP2 in Mice.

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    Qian Han

    Full Text Available The outer-tegument membrane covering the schistosome is believed to maintain via the fusion of membranous vesicles. Fusion of biological membranes is a fundamental process in all eukaryotic cells driven by formation of trans-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complexes through pairing of vesicle associated v-SNAREs (VAMP with complementary t-SNAREs on target membranes. The purpose of this study was to characterize Schistosoma japonicum vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (SjVAMP2 and to investigate its potential as a candidate vaccine against schistosomiasis.The sequence of SjVAMP2 was analyzed, cloned, expressed and characterized. SjVAMP2 is a member of the synaptobrevin superfamily harboring the v-SNARE coiled-coil homology domain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that significantly higher SjVAMP2 levels were observed in 14-, 28- and 42-day-old worms, and SjVAMP2 expression was much higher in 42-day-old female worms than in those male worms. Additionally, the expression of SjVAMP2 was associated with membrane recovery in PZQ-treated worms. Immunostaining assay showed that SjVAMP2 was mainly distributed in the sub-tegument of the worms. Western blotting revealed that rSjVAMP2 showed strong immunogenicity. Purified rSjVAMP2 emulsified with ISA206 adjuvant induced 41.5% and 27.3% reductions in worm burden, and 36.8% and 23.3% reductions in hepatic eggs in two independent trials. Besides, significantly higher rSjVAMP2-specific IgG, IgG1, IgG2a levels were detected in rSjVAMP2-vaccinated mice.Our study indicated that SjVAMP2 is a potential vaccine candidate against S. japonicum and provided the basis for further investigations into the biological function of SjVAMP2.

  9. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism restores peripheral tolerance of noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Racine, Jeremy J; Lin, Qing; Liu, Yuqing; Tang, Shanshan; Qin, Qi; Qi, Tong; Riggs, Arthur D; Zeng, Defu

    2018-03-06

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune diseases are associated with particular MHC haplotypes and expansion of autoreactive T cells. Induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism by hematopoietic cell transplantation effectively reverses autoimmunity in diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, even those with established diabetes. As expected, MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism mediates deletion in the thymus of host-type autoreactive T cells that have T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizing (cross-reacting with) donor-type antigen presenting cells (APCs), which have come to reside in the thymus. However, how MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism tolerizes host autoreactive T cells that recognize only self-MHC-peptide complexes remains unknown. Here, using NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC2.5 or NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC12-4.1 mice that have only noncross-reactive transgenic autoreactive T cells, we show that induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism restores immune tolerance of peripheral noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism results in increased percentages of both donor- and host-type Foxp3 + Treg cells and up-regulated expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) by host-type plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments showed that engraftment of donor-type dendritic cells (DCs) and expansion of donor-type Treg cells are required for tolerizing the noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in the periphery, which are in association with up-regulation of host-type DC expression of PD-L1 and increased percentage of host-type Treg cells. Thus, induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism may establish a peripheral tolerogenic DC and Treg network that actively tolerizes autoreactive T cells, even those with no TCR recognition of the donor APCs. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  10. Alcohol facilitates CD1d loading, subsequent activation of NKT cells, and reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Karsten Buschard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethanol ('alcohol' is a partly hydrophobic detergent that may affect the accessibility of glycolipids thereby influencing immunological effects of these molecules. METHODS: The study included cellular in vitro tests using α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer, and in vivo NOD mice experiments detecting diabetes incidence and performing behavioural and bacterial analyses. RESULTS: Alcohol in concentrations from 0.6% to 2.5% increased IL-2 production from NKT cells stimulated with αGalCer by 60% (p<0.05. CD1d expressed on HeLa cells contained significantly increasing amounts of αGalCer with increasing concentrations of alcohol, suggesting that alcohol facilitated the passive loading of αGalCer to CD1d. NOD mice were found to tolerate 5% ethanol in their drinking water without signs of impairment in liver function. Giving this treatment, the diabetes incidence declined significantly. Higher numbers of CD3+CD49b+ NKT cells were found in spleen and liver of the alcohol treated compared to the control mice (p<0.05, whereas the amount of CD4+Foxp3+ regulator T cells did not differ. Increased concentrations of IFN-γ were detected in 24-hour blood samples of alcohol treated mice. Behavioural studies showed no change in attitude of the ethanol-consuming mice, and bacterial composition of caecum samples was not affected by alcohol, disqualifying these as protective mechanisms. CONCLUSION: Alcohol facilitates the uptake of glycolipids and the stimulation of NKT cells, which are known to counteract Type 1 diabetes development. We propose that this is the acting mechanism by which treatment with alcohol reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice. This is corroborated by epidemiology showing beneficial effect of alcohol to reduce the severity of atherosclerosis and related diseases.

  11. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz (NCI); (Polish)

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition

  12. Combining antigen-based therapy with GABA treatment synergistically prolongs survival of transplanted ß-cells in diabetic NOD mice.

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    Jide Tian

    Full Text Available Antigen-based therapies (ABTs very effectively prevent the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D when given to young nonobese diabetic (NOD mice, however, they have little or no ability to reverse hyperglycemia in newly diabetic NOD mice. More importantly, ABTs have not yet demonstrated an ability to effectively preserve residual ß-cells in individuals newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Accordingly, there is great interest in identifying new treatments that can be combined with ABTs to safely protect ß-cells in diabetic animals. The activation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors (GABA-Rs on immune cells has been shown to prevent T1D, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and rheumatoid arthritis in mouse models. Based on GABA's ability to inhibit different autoimmune diseases and its safety profile, we tested whether the combination of ABT with GABA treatment could prolong the survival of transplanted ß-cells in newly diabetic NOD mice. Newly diabetic NOD mice were untreated, or given GAD/alum (20 or 100 µg and placed on plain drinking water, or water containing GABA (2 or 6 mg/ml. Twenty-eight days later, they received syngenic pancreas grafts and were monitored for the recurrence of hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia reoccurred in the recipients given plain water, GAD monotherapy, GABA monotherapy, GAD (20 µg+GABA (2 mg/ml, GAD (20 µg+GABA (6 mg/ml and GAD (100 µg+GABA (6 mg/ml about 1, 2-3, 3, 2-3, 3-8 and 10-11 weeks post-transplantation, respectively. Thus, combined GABA and ABT treatment had a synergistic effect in a dose-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that co-treatment with GABA (or other GABA-R agonists may provide a new strategy to safely enhance the efficacy of other therapeutics designed to prevent or reverse T1D, as well as other T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  13. Gut microbial markers are associated with diabetes onset, regulatory imbalance, and IFN-γ level in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulated imbalances in the host's immune profile seem to be an important factor in the etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D), and identifying bacterial markers for T1D may therefore be useful in diagnosis and prevention of T1D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the link...... between the early gut microbiota and immune parameters of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in order to select alleged bacterial markers of T1D. Gut microbial composition in feces was analyzed with 454/FLX Titanium (Roche) pyro-sequencing and correlated with diabetes onset age and immune cell populations...

  14. Variants in TRIM22 That Affect NOD2 Signaling Are Associated With Very-Early-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Lee, Cheng Hiang; Peters, Lauren A; Mastropaolo, Lucas A; Thoeni, Cornelia; Elkadri, Abdul; Schwerd, Tobias; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Yongzhong; Hao, Ke; Dinarzo, Antonio; Hoffman, Gabriel; Kidd, Brian A; Murchie, Ryan; Al Adham, Ziad; Guo, Conghui; Kotlarz, Daniel; Cutz, Ernest; Walters, Thomas D; Shouval, Dror S; Curran, Mark; Dobrin, Radu; Brodmerkel, Carrie; Snapper, Scott B; Klein, Christoph; Brumell, John H; Hu, Mingjing; Nanan, Ralph; Snanter-Nanan, Brigitte; Wong, Melanie; Le Deist, Francoise; Haddad, Elie; Roifman, Chaim M; Deslandres, Colette; Griffiths, Anne M; Gaskin, Kevin J; Uhlig, Holm H; Schadt, Eric E; Muise, Aleixo M

    2016-05-01

    Severe forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that develop in very young children can be caused by variants in a single gene. We performed whole-exome sequence (WES) analysis to identify genetic factors that might cause granulomatous colitis and severe perianal disease, with recurrent bacterial and viral infections, in an infant of consanguineous parents. We performed targeted WES analysis of DNA collected from the patient and her parents. We validated our findings by a similar analysis of DNA from 150 patients with very-early-onset IBD not associated with known genetic factors analyzed in Toronto, Oxford, and Munich. We compared gene expression signatures in inflamed vs noninflamed intestinal and rectal tissues collected from patients with treatment-resistant Crohn's disease who participated in a trial of ustekinumab. We performed functional studies of identified variants in primary cells from patients and cell culture. We identified a homozygous variant in the tripartite motif containing 22 gene (TRIM22) of the patient, as well as in 2 patients with a disease similar phenotype. Functional studies showed that the variant disrupted the ability of TRIM22 to regulate nucleotide binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2)-dependent activation of interferon-beta signaling and nuclear factor-κB. Computational studies demonstrated a correlation between the TRIM22-NOD2 network and signaling pathways and genetic factors associated very early onset and adult-onset IBD. TRIM22 is also associated with antiviral and mycobacterial effectors and markers of inflammation, such as fecal calprotectin, C-reactive protein, and Crohn's disease activity index scores. In WES and targeted exome sequence analyses of an infant with severe IBD characterized by granulomatous colitis and severe perianal disease, we identified a homozygous variant of TRIM22 that affects the ability of its product to regulate NOD2. Combined computational and functional studies showed that the TRIM22

  15. Genetic Variability as a Regulator of TLR4 and NOD Signaling in Response to Bacterial Driven DNA Damage Response (DDR and Inflammation: Focus on the Gastrointestinal (GI Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evagelia Spanou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental role of human Toll-like receptors (TLRs and NOD-like receptors (NLRs, the two most studied pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs, is the protection against pathogens and excessive tissue injury. Recent evidence supports the association between TLR/NLR gene mutations and susceptibility to inflammatory, autoimmune, and malignant diseases. PRRs also interfere with several cellular processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, angiogenesis, cell motility and migration, and DNA repair mechanisms. We briefly review the impact of TLR4 and NOD1/NOD2 and their genetic variability in the process of inflammation, tumorigenesis and DNA repair, focusing in the gastrointestinal tract. We also review the available data on new therapeutic strategies utilizing TLR/NLR agonists and antagonists for cancer, allergic diseases, viral infections and vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer.

  16. Genetic Variability as a Regulator of TLR4 and NOD Signaling in Response to Bacterial Driven DNA Damage Response (DDR) and Inflammation: Focus on the Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanou, Evagelia; Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Pateras, Ioannis S; Papalampros, Alexandros; Barbouti, Alexandra; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Sougioultzis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental role of human Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs), the two most studied pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), is the protection against pathogens and excessive tissue injury. Recent evidence supports the association between TLR/NLR gene mutations and susceptibility to inflammatory, autoimmune, and malignant diseases. PRRs also interfere with several cellular processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, angiogenesis, cell motility and migration, and DNA repair mechanisms. We briefly review the impact of TLR4 and NOD1/NOD2 and their genetic variability in the process of inflammation, tumorigenesis and DNA repair, focusing in the gastrointestinal tract. We also review the available data on new therapeutic strategies utilizing TLR/NLR agonists and antagonists for cancer, allergic diseases, viral infections and vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer.

  17. Gluten-free but also gluten-enriched (gluten+) diet prevent diabetes in NOD mice; the gluten enigma in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funda, D.P.; Kaas, A.; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Environmental factors such as nutrition or exposure to infections play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have previously shown that gluten-free, non-purified diet largely prevented diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study we tested...... hypothesis that early introduction of gluten-enriched (gluten+) diet may increase diabetes incidence in NOD mice. METHODS: Standard, gluten-free, gluten+ modified Altromin diets and hydrolysed-casein-based Pregestimil diet were fed to NOD females and diabetes incidence was followed for 310 days. Insulitis...... score and numbers of gut mucosal lymphocytes were determined in non-diabetic animals. RESULTS: A significantly lower diabetes incidence (p diet (5.9%, n = 34) and Pregestimil diet (10%, n = 30) compared to mice on the standard Altromin diet (60.6%, n...

  18. Gluten-free but also gluten-enriched (gluten+) diet prevent diabetes in NOD mice; the gluten enigma in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funda, D.P.; Kaas, A.; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Environmental factors such as nutrition or exposure to infections play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have previously shown that gluten-free, non-purified diet largely prevented diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study we tested...... hypothesis that early introduction of gluten-enriched (gluten+) diet may increase diabetes incidence in NOD mice. METHODS: Standard, gluten-free, gluten+ modified Altromin diets and hydrolysed-casein-based Pregestimil diet were fed to NOD females and diabetes incidence was followed for 310 days. Insulitis...... score and numbers of gut mucosal lymphocytes were determined in non-diabetic animals. RESULTS: A significantly lower diabetes incidence (p gluten-free diet (5.9%, n = 34) and Pregestimil diet (10%, n = 30) compared to mice on the standard Altromin diet (60.6%, n...

  19. Candidate chromosome 1 disease susceptibility genes for Sjogren’s syndrome xerostomia are narrowed by novel NOD.B10 congenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongini, Patricia K. A.; Kramer, Jill M.; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Herschman, Harvey; Esposito, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) is characterized by salivary gland leukocytic infiltrates and impaired salivation (xerostomia). Cox-2 (Ptgs2) is located on chromosome 1 within the span of the Aec2 region. In an attempt to demonstrate that COX-2 drives antibody-dependent hyposalivation, NOD.B10 congenic mice bearing a Cox-2flox gene were generated. A congenic line with non-NOD alleles in Cox-2-flanking genes failed manifest xerostomia. Further backcrossing yielded disease-susceptible NOD.B10 Cox-2flox lines; fine genetic mapping determined that critical Aec2 genes lie within a 1.56 to 2.17 Mb span of DNA downstream of Cox-2. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that susceptible and non-susceptible lines exhibit non-synonymous coding SNPs in 8 protein-encoding genes of this region, thereby better delineating candidate Aec2 alleles needed for SS xerostomia. PMID:24685748

  20. Relation between NOD2 genotype and changes in innate signaling in Crohn’s disease on mRNA and miRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Salem, Mohammad; Boyd, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is associated with an altered innate immune response of pathogenic importance. This altered response can be associated to loss-of-function polymorphisms in the NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2) gene, but also changes in transcriptional and post......-transcriptional regulatory layers, including microRNA activity. Here, we characterized the link between NOD2 genotype and inflammatory-mediated changes in innate signaling by studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional activity in response to NOD2-agonist muramyl dipeptide in monocytes from healthy controls, and Crohn...... variance: a small subset had inflammatory responses almost comparable to wild-type patients on both gene and miR-155 regulatory levels....