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Sample records for brady scientist mentor

  1. Memories of John N. Brady: scientist, mentor and friend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Friends and colleagues remember John N. Brady, Ph.D., Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, who died much too young at the age of 57 on April 27, 2009 of colon cancer. John grew up in Illinois and received his Ph.D. with Dr. Richard Consigli at Kansas State University studying the molecular structure of polyomavirus. In 1984 John came to the National Institutes of Health as a Staff Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Norman Salzman, Laboratory of Biology of Viruses NIAID, where he was among the first to analyze SV40 transcription using in vitro transcription systems and to analyze regulatory sequences for SV40 late transcription. He then trained with Dr. George Khoury in the Laboratory of Molecular Virology NCI, where he identified SV40 T-antigen as a transcriptional activator protein. His research interests grew to focus on the human retroviruses: human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, analyzing how interactions between these viruses and the host cell influence viral gene regulation, viral pathogenesis and viral transformation. His research also impacted the fields of eukaryotic gene regulation and tumor suppressor proteins. John is survived by his wife, Laraine, and two sons, Matt and Kevin.

  2. Yelavarthy Nayudamma: Scientist, Leader, and Mentor Extraordinary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 10. Yelavarthy Nayudamma: Scientist, Leader, and Mentor Extraordinary. J Raghava Rao T Ramasami. General Article Volume 19 Issue 10 October 2014 pp 887-899 ...

  3. Susan Lindquist: Visionary scientist and peerless mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Brooke J

    2017-01-02

    The science universe is dimmer after one of our brightest stars, Susan Lee Lindquist, was taken by cancer on October 27, 2016. Sue was an innovative, creative, out-of-the-box scientific thinker. She had unique biological intuition-an instinct for both the way things worked and the right questions to ask to uncover new research insights. Her wide-ranging career began with the study of protein folding and molecular chaperones, and she went on to show that protein folding can have profound and unexpected biological effects on such diverse processes as cancer, evolution, and neurodegenerative disease. As Sue's laboratory manager, I would like to offer a ground-floor perspective on what made her an exceptional scientist, mentor, and leader. She created a harmonious, collegial environment where collaborative synergy fueled meaningful progress that will impact science for decades to come. © 2017 Bevis.

  4. CURE Scholar Spotlight - Dr. Brady

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donita C. Brady, a Research Associate Senior at the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University, is investigating the role that copper plays in cell growth and tumor biology. Inspired by her mentor Christopher Counter, a cancer biolog

  5. Mentoring Among Scientists: Implications of Interpersonal Relationships within a Formal Mentoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan D. Maughan

    2006-11-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influences a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.

  6. Creating Tomorrow's Scientists: Models of Community Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AWIS, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a project supported by the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) that is designed to foster and develop liaisons between scientists and young women. Includes sections on the context of the project, design and methods, and project descriptions. (DDR)

  7. The mentoring of male and female scientists during their doctoral studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, Laura Ann

    The mentoring relationships of male and female scientists during their doctoral studies were examined. Male and female biologists, chemists, engineers and physicists were compared regarding the importance of doctoral students receiving career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring from their doctoral chairperson and student colleagues. Scientists' satisfaction with their chairperson and colleagues as providers of these mentoring functions was also investigated. In addition, scientists identified individuals other than their chairperson and colleagues who were positive influencers on their professional development as scientists and those who hindered their development. A reliable instrument, "The Survey of Accomplished Scientists' Doctoral Experiences," was developed to assess career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring of doctoral chairpersons and student colleagues based on the review of literature, interviews with scientists and two pilot studies. Surveys were mailed to a total of 400 men and women scientists with earned doctorates, of which 209 were completed and returned. The findings reveal that female scientists considered the doctoral chairperson furnishing career enhancing mentoring more important than did the men, while both were in accordance with the importance of them providing psychosocial mentoring. In addition, female scientists were not as satisfied as men with their chairperson providing most of the career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring functions. For doctoral student colleagues, female scientists, when compared to men, indicated that they considered student colleagues more important in providing career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring. However, male and female scientists were equally satisfied with their colleagues as providers of these mentoring functions. Lastly, the majority of male scientists indicated that professors served as a positive influencer, while women revealed that spouses and friends positively influenced their professional

  8. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  9. Making a Life in the Life Sciences and the Role of Mentoring for Female Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Kaplan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of sex differences in intellectual capabilities remains scant and, rather than revealing genetic origin, it is complicated by the influence of social circumstances. Some inequities persist, and although these have been decreasing in recent decades, therefore, it remains a major task for policy makers and educators to assist in setting up programs, including mentoring opportunities, that are directed at alleviating such inequities. This paper outlines some historical circumstances in science and suggests that mentoring has to be understood in a wide systemic framework. The freedom to think and act and follow research ideas through is intrinsically rewarding to society and to the individual. For female scientists, it is a freedom that has yet to be fully developed and mentoring is just one way in which such a process can be legitimized. The paper outlines how institutions can best do this, and how this might work in practice for the individual, and argues that science needs to have its own code of mentoring.

  10. Making a life in the life sciences and the role of mentoring for female scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gisela

    2010-06-01

    Evidence of sex differences in intellectual capabilities remains scant and, rather than revealing genetic origin, it is complicated by the influence of social circumstances. Some inequities persist, and although these have been decreasing in recent decades, therefore, it remains a major task for policy makers and educators to assist in setting up programs, including mentoring opportunities, that are directed at alleviating such inequities. This paper outlines some historical circumstances in science and suggests that mentoring has to be understood in a wide systemic framework. The freedom to think and act and follow research ideas through is intrinsically rewarding to society and to the individual. For female scientists, it is a freedom that has yet to be fully developed and mentoring is just one way in which such a process can be legitimized. The paper outlines how institutions can best do this, and how this might work in practice for the individual, and argues that science needs to have its own code of mentoring. 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Steps towards equal gender representation: TANDEMplusIDEA - an international mentoring and personal development scheme for female scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefli, Bettina; Breuer, Elke

    2010-05-01

    TANDEMplusIDEA was a European mentoring programme conducted by the technical universities RWTH Aachen, Imperial College London, ETH Zurich and TU Delft between 2007 and 2010 to achieve more gender equality in science. Given the continuing underrepresentation of women in science and technology and the well-known structural and systematic disadvantages in male-dominated scientific cultures, the main goal of this programme was to promote excellent female scientists through a high-level professional and personal development programme. Based on the mentoring concept of the RWTH Aachen, TANDEMplusIDEA was the first mentoring programme for female scientists realized in international cooperation. As a pilot scheme funded by the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission, the scientific evaluation was an essential part of the programme, in particular in view of the development of a best practice model for international mentoring. The participants of this programme were female scientists at an early stage of their academic career (postdoc or assistant professor) covering a wide range of science disciplines, including geosciences. This transdisciplinarity as well as the international dimension of the programme have been identified by the participants as one of the keys of success of the programme. In particular, the peer-mentoring across discipline boarders proved to have been an invaluable component of the development programme. This presentation will highlight some of the main findings of the scientific evaluation of the programme and focus on some additional personal insights from the participants.

  12. Persistence of African American Men in Science: Exploring the Influence of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Breonte Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The scant literature on persistence of African American males in science typically takes a deficits-based approach to encapsulate the myriad reasons this population is so often underrepresented. Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate have, individually, been found to be related to the persistence of African American students. However,…

  13. Persistence of African American Men in Science: Exploring the Influence of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Breonte Stephan

    The scant literature on persistence of African American males in science typically takes a deficits-based approach to encapsulate the myriad reasons this population is so often underrepresented. Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate have, individually, been found to be related to the persistence of African American students. However, the unified impact of these three variables on the persistence of African American students with science interests has not been evaluated, and the relationship between the variables, the students' gender, and markers of academic achievement have not been previously investigated. The current study takes a strengths-based approach to evaluating the relationship between Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus climate with a population of African American students with science interests who were studying at six Minority Serving Institutions and Predominantly White Institutions in the Southern United States. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the impact of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate on Intention to Persist of African American males. The results indicate that Scientist Identity predicts Intention to Persist, and that gender, academic performance, and institution type moderate the relationship between Scientist Identity and Intention to Persist. These results lend credence to the emerging notion that, for African American men studying science, generating a greater depth and breadth of understanding of the factors that lead to persistence will aid in the development of best practices for supporting persistence among this perpetually underrepresented population.

  14. Mentoring the next generation of physician-scientists in Japan: a cross-sectional survey of mentees in six academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakushima, Ken; Mishina, Hiroki; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sada, Kenei; Koizumi, Junji; Sugioka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naoto; Nishimura, Masaharu; Mori, Junichiro; Makino, Hirofumi; Feldman, Mitchell D

    2015-03-19

    Physician-scientists play key roles in biomedical research across the globe, yet prior studies have found that it is increasingly difficult to recruit and retain physician-scientists in research careers. Access to quality research mentorship may help to ameliorate this problem in the U.S., but there is virtually no information on mentoring in academic medicine in Japan. We conducted a survey to determine the availability and quality of mentoring relationships for trainee physician-scientists in Japan. We surveyed 1700 physician-scientists in post-graduate research training programs in 6 academic medical centers in Japan about mentorship characteristics, mentee perceptions of the mentoring relationship, and attitudes about career development. A total of 683 potential physician-scientist mentees completed the survey. Most reported that they had a departmental mentor (91%) with whom they met at least once a month; 48% reported that they were very satisfied with the mentoring available to them. Mentoring pairs were usually initiated by the mentor (85% of the time); respondents identified translational research skills (55%) and grant writing (50%) as unmet needs. Mentoring concerning long-term career planning was significantly associated with the intention to pursue research careers, however this was also identified by some mentees as an unmet need (35% desired assistance; 15% reported receiving it). More emphasis and formal training in career mentorship may help to support Japanese physician-scientist mentees to develop a sense of self-efficacy to pursue and stay in research careers.

  15. Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Brewerton

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature contains a wide variety of definitions. The Oxford English dictionary – as you might expect – gives a classical definition: mentor. 1. a. With initial capital: The name of the Ithacan noble whose disguise the goddess Athene assumed in order to act as the guide and adviser of the young Telemachus: allusively, one who fulfils the office which the supposed Mentor fulfilled towards Telemachus. b. Hence, as common noun: An experienced and trusted counsellor. [1989

  16. John P. Craig, MD, MPH. Physician-Scientist, Educator, and Mentor. 1923-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseeb, M A; Imperato, Pascal James

    2017-10-01

    John P. Craig (1923-2016) was an eminent physician-scientist, gifted educator, and greatly valued mentor. Born in West Liberty, Ohio on 29 November 1923, he attended Oberlin College, and received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine. This was followed by an internship at Yale University Medical Center, and then service in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a battalion surgeon, preventive medicine officer, and epidemiologist. While in Korea, he conducted important investigations of hemorrhagic fever among American troops. His observations led to the recognition of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, now called Korean hemorrhagic fever. He also identified a new Hanta virus. Craig received his Master of Public Health degree magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Public Health. He then worked with Nobel Laureate, Max Theiler, at the Rockefeller Foundation. Soon afterwards, he joined the faculty of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, where he established a new research laboratory. Over the years, his research focused on diphtheria infections and cholera. He became internationally respected for his work on cholera, and specifically on cholera toxin and its relationship to vascular permeability. He served for over 6 years as the Chair of the Cholera Panel of the U.S.-Japan Cooperative Program, and in this position set the direction for future research. The author of over 100 articles published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature, he also gave numerous presentations at national and international scientific meetings on a wide range of microbial diseases. Craig was highly regarded by colleagues and students as a superb teacher. He was a leader in initiating patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) exercises for medical students. He also led curricular reform in the medical school in the 1990s whose purpose was to reduce lecture hours and

  17. Strengthening the network of mentored, underrepresented minority scientists and leaders to reduce HIV-related health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Madeline Y; Lanier, Yzette A; Willis, Leigh A; Castellanos, Ted; Dominguez, Ken; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Miller, Kim S

    2013-12-01

    We reviewed data for the Minority HIV/AIDS Research Initiative (MARI), which was established in 2003 to support underrepresented minority scientists performing HIV prevention research in highly affected communities. MARI was established at the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control as a program of competitively awarded, mentored grants for early career researchers conducting HIV prevention research in highly affected racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. We have described progress from 2003 to 2013. To date, MARI has mentored 27 scientist leaders using low-cost strategies to enhance the development of effective HIV prevention interventions. These scientists have (1) developed research programs in disproportionately affected communities of color, (2) produced first-authored peer-reviewed scientific and programmatic products (including articles and community-level interventions), and (3) obtained larger, subsequent funding awards for research and programmatic work related to HIV prevention and health disparities work. The MARI program demonstrates how to effectively engage minority scientists to conduct HIV prevention research and reduce racial/ethnic investigator disparities and serves as a model for programs to reduce disparities in other public health areas in which communities of color are disproportionately affected.

  18. Mentoring for young female practitioners and scientists in spatial and environmental planning in Germany - experiences of the joint mentoring program of the Academy for Spatial Research and Planning and the Association for Spatial and Environmental Research

    OpenAIRE

    Weiland, Ulrike; Klee, Andreas; Knieling, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the underrepresentation of women on higher management levels in planning, the Academy for Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) and the Association for Spatial and Environmental Research (FRU) in Germany jointly have elaborated a mentoring program for young female planning practitioners and scientists. This article introduces objectives and elements of the mentoring program being considered a strategic talent development in a network of excellence. Results from ...

  19. Global Science Share: Connecting young scientists from developing countries with science writing mentors to strengthen and widen the international science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collaborative science in which scientists are able to form research questions based on the current body of scientific knowledge and get feedback from colleagues on their ideas and work is essential for pushing science forward. However, not all scientists are able to fully participate in the international science community. Scientists from developing countries can face barriers to communicating with the international community due to, among other issues: fewer scientists in their home country, difficulty in getting language-specific science writing training, fewer established pre-existing international collaborations and networks, and sometimes geographic isolation. These barriers not only result in keeping individual scientists from contributing their ideas, but they also slow down the progress of the scientific enterprise for everyone. Global Science Share (http://globalscienceshare.org/) is a new project, entering its pilot phase in Fall 2012, which will work to reduce this disparity by connecting young scientists and engineers from developing countries seeking to improve their technical writing with other scientists and engineers around the world via online collaborations. Scientist-volunteers act as mentors and are paired up with mentees according to their academic field and writing needs. The mentors give feedback and constructive technical and editorial criticisms on mentees' submitted pieces of writing through a four-step email discussion. Mentees gain technical writing skills, as well as make international connections with other scientists and engineers in fields related to their own. Mentors also benefit by gaining new international scientific colleagues and honing their own writing skills through their critiques. The Global Science Share project will begin its pilot phase by first inviting Mongolian science students to apply as mentees this fall. This abstract will introduce the Global Science Share program, present a progress report from its first

  20. Terrorist Screening and Brady Background Checks for Firearms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krouse, William J

    2005-01-01

    .... For a time, moreover, all Brady background check records for approved firearm transfers were destroyed almost immediately, precluding the opportunity to used the background check system to screen...

  1. Correspondence author: June P, Brady, 87 Teralynn Court Oakland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... Correspondence author: June P, Brady, 87 Teralynn Court. Oakland, California 94619, USA. E mail: june.brady@ucsf.edu. Tel: 1 510 336 0592. Fax: 1 510 336 0592. Background. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life with continued breastfeeding and appropriate complementary foods to age ...

  2. Incidence of ventricular arrhythmias, brady-arrhythmias and sudden ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ventricular arrhythmias (VAS), Including ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF) and Brady-arrhythmias, are life-threatening complications of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Objective: To study the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias, brady-arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) in Sudanese ...

  3. Citizen Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Program provides teachers and students with the opportunity and materials to participate in regionally focused ecological studies under the guidance of a mentor scientist working on a similar study. The Harvard Forest is part of a national network of ecological research sites known as the Long Term Ecological…

  4. Pioneer in Behavioral Pharmacology: A Tribute to Joseph V. Brady

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The contributions of Joseph V. Brady to behavioral pharmacology span more than 50 years and range from early studies using the Estes-Skinner ("conditioned emotional response") procedure to examine drug effects and various physiological processes in experimental animals to the implementation of mobile methadone treatment services and to small group…

  5. Mentoring Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kirsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give an introduction to the definition and learning process of mentoring, a structured overview of the value of mentoring for mentees, mentors, organisations and society, as well as present the key element for designing and implementing successful mentoring...

  6. The Brady Bunch? New evidence for nominative determinism in patients' health: retrospective, population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaney, John J; Groarke, John D; Galvin, Zita; McGorrian, Catherine; McCann, Hugh A; Sugrue, Declan; Keelan, Edward; Galvin, Joseph; Blake, Gavin; Mahon, Niall G; O'Neill, James

    2013-12-12

    To ascertain whether a name can influence a person's health, by assessing whether people with the surname "Brady" have an increased prevalence of bradycardia. Retrospective, population based cohort study. One university teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. People with the surname "Brady" in Dublin, determined through use of an online telephone directory. Prevalence of participants who had pacemakers inserted for bradycardia between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2013. 579 (0.36%) of 161,967 people who were listed on the Dublin telephone listings had the surname "Brady." The proportion of pacemaker recipients was significantly higher among Bradys (n=8, 1.38%) than among non-Bradys (n=991, 0.61%; P=0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for pacemaker implantation among individuals with the surname Brady compared with individuals with other surnames was 2.27 (1.13 to 4.57). Patients named Brady are at increased risk of needing pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. This finding shows a potential role for nominative determinism in health.

  7. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  8. The Brady Bunch? New evidence for nominative determinism in patients’ health: retrospective, population based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groarke, John D; Galvin, Zita; McGorrian, Catherine; McCann, Hugh A; Sugrue, Declan; Keelan, Edward; Galvin, Joseph; Blake, Gavin; Mahon, Niall G; O’Neill, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether a name can influence a person’s health, by assessing whether people with the surname “Brady” have an increased prevalence of bradycardia. Design Retrospective, population based cohort study. Setting One university teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Participants People with the surname “Brady” in Dublin, determined through use of an online telephone directory. Main outcome measure Prevalence of participants who had pacemakers inserted for bradycardia between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2013. Results 579 (0.36%) of 161 967 people who were listed on the Dublin telephone listings had the surname “Brady.” The proportion of pacemaker recipients was significantly higher among Bradys (n=8, 1.38%) than among non-Bradys (n=991, 0.61%; P=0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for pacemaker implantation among individuals with the surname Brady compared with individuals with other surnames was 2.27 (1.13 to 4.57). Conclusions Patients named Brady are at increased risk of needing pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. This finding shows a potential role for nominative determinism in health. PMID:24336304

  9. Anesthesiology mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Volker; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-12-01

    Mentoring is fundamentally valuable and important to students considering a path into our specialty, as well as to colleagues already in it and with ambition to advance. General principles and personal experiences are collected and described to help inform future mentors and to reinforce the value of having a mentor and the satisfaction (and work) that is associated with such a role. Detecting a latent talent among medical students or residents may be challenging but is worth the effort to develop personal careers and the specialty itself. Upon agreeing to jointly move a certain project, a professional plan is needed to improve chances of success and decrease the likelihood of frustration. Various challenges always have to be detected and solved, with the ultimate goal to guide a medical student to residency, subsequently into faculty status and preferably to lifelong collaboration. Access to a mentor is an often-cited key to choosing a specialty and the success of junior colleagues and thus the entire department. Mentoring is fundamentally valuable in providing role modeling and also in protecting the mentee from the inefficiency of learning lessons the hard way.

  10. Cestovní ruch na Labské cyklostezce Nymburk - Poděbrady

    OpenAIRE

    Francová, Kateřina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to assess the potential of the Labe River bicycle path in section Nymburk-Poděbrady. After defining the fundamental concepts of tourism and cycle tourism there is a characteristic of tourism in the cities mentioned. The practical part brings the results of the questionnaires on the use of bicycle path and services provided. Conclusion summarizes potential of the Labe River bicycle path in section Nymburk-Poděbrady and contains possible proposals for its impr...

  11. Mentoring in Parallel Universes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton-Hall, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the mentoring relationship the author established with students, and determines how her experiences and the mentoring she received from her professors influenced her mentoring practices with her own graduate students. Confirms the dynamic nature of the mentoring process, and notes how her mentors influenced her practices but also…

  12. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  13. The Mathew Brady Bunch: Civil War Newspapers. Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Amy; Ridgway, Elizabeth

    The Civil War was the first American war thoroughly caught on film. Mathew Brady and his crew of photographers captured many images of this divisive war, ranging from portraits to battle scenes. These photographs--over 1,000--are in the American Memory Collection's "Selected Civil War Photographs, 1861-1865." This lesson plan asks…

  14. The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Derek C.; Gormally, Cara; Clark, M. Diane

    2017-01-01

    Disabled individuals, women, and individuals from cultural/ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Research has shown that mentoring improves retention for underrepresented individuals. However, existing mentoring surveys were developed to assess the majority population, not underrepresented individuals. We describe the development of a next-generation mentoring survey built upon capital theory and critical race theory. It emphasizes community cultural wealth, thought to be instrumental to the success of individuals from minority communities. Our survey targets relationships between deaf mentees and their research mentors and includes Deaf community cultural wealth. From our results, we identified four segregating factors: Being a Scientist, which incorporated the traditional capitals; Deaf Community Capital; Asking for Accommodations; and Communication Access. Being a Scientist scores did not vary among the mentor and mentee variables that we tested. However, Deaf Community Capital, Asking for Accommodations, and Communication Access were highest when a deaf mentee was paired with a mentor who was either deaf or familiar with the Deaf community, indicating that cultural competency training should improve these aspects of mentoring for deaf mentees. This theoretical framework and survey will be useful for assessing mentoring relationships with deaf students and could be adapted for other underrepresented groups. PMID:28188283

  15. Mentoring an Entrepreneur: Guide for a Mentor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Memon, Jamshed; Rozan, M. Z. A; Ismail, Kamariah; Uddin, Mueen; Daud, DzurllKanian

    2015-01-01

    ...; it is difficult to even find pertinent and comprehensive articles on entrepreneurial learning. The research proposed in this article helps mentors to understand and find out what type of entrepreneurs need what kind of mentoring support...

  16. Mapping mentor teachers' roles in mentoring dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. F.J.A.J. Crasborn; Theo Bergen; Niels Brouwer; Fred Korthagen; Paul Hennissen

    2008-01-01

    The dialogue between a mentor teacher and a prospective teacher is a key element in the supervision of prospective teachers in the workplace. This literature study deals with the issue of how to conceptualize the supervisory behaviour of mentor teachers in mentoring dialogues by systematically

  17. Benthic organisms collected using sediment sampler from the CAPT. BRADY J in the Gulf of Mexico from (NODC Accession 8300082)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms were collected using sediment sampler casts from the CAPT. BRADY J and CAJUN SPECIAL in the Gulf of Mexico from 03 May 1982 to 13 October 1982....

  18. Contemporary Issues in Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin, Ed.

    This document contains six papers exploring contemporary issues in mentoring. "The Practice, Quality, and Cost of Mentoring" (Jean Baldwin Grossman) provides an introduction to and overview of the remaining five papers. "Mentoring Adolescents: What Have We Learned?" (Cynthia L. Sipe) reviews the literature on mentoring, discusses key elements in…

  19. Mentoring of young professionals in the field of rheumatology in Europe: results from an EMerging EUlar NETwork (EMEUNET) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Hatemi, Gulen; Ospelt, Caroline; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Mandl, Peter; Gossec, Laure; Buch, Maya H

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions of, participation in and satisfaction with mentoring programmes among young clinicians and researchers in rheumatology in Europe. To identify mentoring needs and expectations focusing on gender-specific differences. A survey on mentoring in rheumatology was distributed to young clinicians and researchers in rheumatology in Europe through the EMEUNET network. We received 248 responses from 30 European countries. Although 82% of respondents expressed the need for a formal mentoring scheme by EULAR, only 35% participated in mentoring programmes and merely 20% were very satisfied with mentoring. Respondents very satisfied with mentoring were more likely to participate in research, but not clinical mentoring programmes. Career mentoring was perceived as the most beneficial type of mentoring for career development by 46% of respondents, only 35% of respondents, however, declared the existence of career mentoring programmes in their country. There was no gender difference considering participation in mentoring programmes. Women, however, tended to be less satisfied than men with existing mentoring programmes and considered expectations from mentoring as more important for their career development, especially when pertaining to career planning, greater autonomy/responsibility and establishing new networks/collaborations. Career mentoring, especially in the clinical setting, was recognised as a major unmet need of existing mentoring programmes in rheumatology in Europe. Gender-specific differences were identified in the expectations from mentoring. Given this and the importance of mentoring for career prosperity of young physicians and scientists, our survey represents the first step towards developing and refining mentoring programmes in rheumatology in Europe.

  20. Evolution of glacier-dammed lakes through space and time; Brady Glacier, Alaska, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Capps, Denny McLane

    2011-01-01

    Glacier-dammed lakes and their associated jökulhlaups cause severe flooding in downstream areas and substantially influence glacier dynamics. The goal of this dissertation is to identify and characterize the evolution of glacier-dammed lakes to predict their future behaviour using ground-truthed remote sensing techniques and dendrochronology. Brady Glacier in southeast Alaska is particularly well suited for a study of these phenomena because it presently dams ten large (>1 square km) lakes...

  1. The Development, Implementation, and Assessment of an Innovative Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Lawrence C.; Borus, Jonathan F.; Nadelson, Carol C.; Seely, Ellen W.; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multi-specialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program (FMLP) as a peer-learning experience for mid-career and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course. Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two co-facilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants’ experiences. While the co-facilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to post-session and post-course (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships. In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program. PMID:23095917

  2. Collide@CERN is looking for mentors

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Collide@CERN Artist-in-Residence Programme is currently seeking CERN scientists interested in engaging in thought-provoking and creative collaborations with visiting artists.     In early 2012, a Digital artist will take up a 2-month residency and a Dance and Performance artist a 3-month residency.  Each artist will be allocated a specially selected science inspiration partner to work with. Both the artists and their mentors will give a public lecture in the Globe of Science and Innovation at the beginning and end of the residencies.  One scientist will be selected for each artist. Mentors and artists will be required to share knowledge by:   ·      Meeting once a week throughout the residency ·      Conducting online communications (such as a blog). If you are interested in becoming a mentor, please send the following information by e-m...

  3. Building a mentoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Angela Barron; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Manson, Spero M

    Mentoring has long been regarded as one of the key components of research training and faculty development. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program purposely facilitated scholars' development of a mentoring network by providing each individual with three mentors: a school-of-nursing mentor (primary), a university-based non-nurse research mentor (research), and a nationally-recognized nurse leader at another university (national). The Mentorship Effectiveness Scale was used to assess the effectiveness of each type of mentor in the first five completed cohorts. The ratings of mentorship effectiveness for all three kinds of mentors were generally high. Scholars valued most their mentors' support and advocacy; the biggest weakness in dealing with all mentors was accessibility. Even when one mentor proved a poor match, another mentor turned out to be an advocate and helpful, thus reaffirming the benefits of a mentoring network as opposed to only a single mentoring relationship. One lesson learned is the importance of preparing mentors for their role via written materials, in-person or phone orientations, and discussions at the annual meeting. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Why mentor? Linking mentor teachers' motivations to their mentoring conceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, G.V.M. van; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Verloop, N.

    2016-01-01

    Current mentoring models for teacher preparation and induction emphasize the need to engage novice teachers' learning through collaborative professional learning communities. Mentors in such communities are expected to engage in joint knowledge construction with novices, and to be 'co-thinkers' who

  5. Mentoring an Entrepreneur

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jamshed Memon; M. Z. A. Rozan; Kamariah Ismail; Mueen Uddin; DzurllKanian Daud

    2015-01-01

    ...; it is difficult to even find pertinent and comprehensive articles on entrepreneurial learning. The research proposed in this article helps mentors to understand and find out what type of entrepreneurs need what kind of mentoring support...

  6. Mentoring in Changing Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossi, Frank

    1997-01-01

    Mentoring programs are thriving at corporations, partly because of the downsizing that has occurred over the past decade. Mentoring offers a way to preserve intellectual capital and memory within a company. (JOW)

  7. Being a Mentor: Novice Teachers' Mentors' Conceptions of Mentoring Prior to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz-Oppenheimer, Orna

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with novice teachers' mentors' conceptions of mentoring prior to their mentoring training. In Israel, all novice teachers have to be supported and assessed by a mentor during their first year of teaching. The aim of this study was to elicit from prospective mentors their own conception of professional mentoring, as a basis for…

  8. Ethics With Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2017-04-01

    The concept of mentoring is a phenomenon critical to teaching-learning in coming to know in the performing art of leadership. The author of this article discusses the mentoring relationship from an alternative view through the humanbecoming lens of understanding. Possibilities of ethical nurse practice with the art of mentoring from the humanbecoming perspective are illuminated.

  9. Helping early career research scientists ascend the professional ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laina

    2013-08-01

    The Keystone Symposia Early Career Investigator Travel Award initiative is a unique successful research mentoring program tailored for 'end of the pipeline' life and biomedical scientists from academia and industry. Using targeted educational, mentoring, and networking activities, the program benefits early career scientists in solving a specific laboratory-based research question that is limiting their evolving research and could increase their ability to obtain new grants and improve their career progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mentoring an Entrepreneur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshed Memon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A mentor plays an important role in entrepreneurial development of an individual. He guides entrepreneurs from conception of business to product development and business growth. Previous literature on entrepreneurial learning is disseminated and not properly organized; it is difficult to even find pertinent and comprehensive articles on entrepreneurial learning. The research proposed in this article helps mentors to understand and find out what type of entrepreneurs need what kind of mentoring support. This article proposes a conceptual model for mentors and discusses that an entrepreneur may need different mentoring support and skills depending on the type of entrepreneurs, personality traits, or decision-making style and phase at which entrepreneurs are at that moment. This article will also help mentors in understanding what type of skills entrepreneurs need at each stage of mentoring relationship, that is, initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition stage.

  11. The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Derek C; Gormally, Cara; Clark, M Diane

    2017-01-01

    Disabled individuals, women, and individuals from cultural/ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Research has shown that mentoring improves retention for underrepresented individuals. However, existing mentoring surveys were developed to assess the majority population, not underrepresented individuals. We describe the development of a next-generation mentoring survey built upon capital theory and critical race theory. It emphasizes community cultural wealth, thought to be instrumental to the success of individuals from minority communities. Our survey targets relationships between deaf mentees and their research mentors and includes Deaf community cultural wealth. From our results, we identified four segregating factors: Being a Scientist, which incorporated the traditional capitals; Deaf Community Capital; Asking for Accommodations; and Communication Access. Being a Scientist scores did not vary among the mentor and mentee variables that we tested. However, Deaf Community Capital, Asking for Accommodations, and Communication Access were highest when a deaf mentee was paired with a mentor who was either deaf or familiar with the Deaf community, indicating that cultural competency training should improve these aspects of mentoring for deaf mentees. This theoretical framework and survey will be useful for assessing mentoring relationships with deaf students and could be adapted for other underrepresented groups. © 2017 D. C. Braun et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  13. The Dark Side of Addiction: The Horsley Gantt to Joseph Brady Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, George F

    2017-04-01

    W. Horsley Gantt and Joseph V. Brady laid a rich foundation for understanding the concept of emotion, derived from 2 prominent traditions of physiology and psychology: classic conditioning and operant conditioning, respectively. This framework guided my fierce interest in motivation in general and the interaction between reward and stress, which began at John Hopkins with my thesis work under the guidance of Drs. Zoltan Annau, Solomon Synder, and Joseph Brady, among many others. Using the study of the neurobiology of addiction as a framework, I argue that drug addiction not only involves positive reinforcement associated with the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse but also involves another major source of reinforcement, specifically negative reinforcement driven by negative emotional states (termed the "dark side" of addiction). Excessive activation of the brain reward systems leads to antireward or a decrease in the function of normal reward-related neurocircuitry and persistent recruitment of the brain stress systems, both of which may be neurobiologically linked. Understanding the neuroplasticity of the neurocircuitry that comprises the negative reinforcement associated with addiction is a key to understanding negative emotional states in general and their pathophysiology.

  14. Scientists want more children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Howard Ecklund

    Full Text Available Scholars partly attribute the low number of women in academic science to the impact of the science career on family life. Yet, the picture of how men and women in science--at different points in the career trajectory--compare in their perceptions of this impact is incomplete. In particular, we know little about the perceptions and experiences of junior and senior scientists at top universities, institutions that have a disproportionate influence on science, science policy, and the next generation of scientists. Here we show that having fewer children than wished as a result of the science career affects the life satisfaction of science faculty and indirectly affects career satisfaction, and that young scientists (graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have had fewer children than wished are more likely to plan to exit science entirely. We also show that the impact of science on family life is not just a woman's problem; the effect on life satisfaction of having fewer children than desired is more pronounced for male than female faculty, with life satisfaction strongly related to career satisfaction. And, in contrast to other research, gender differences among graduate students and postdoctoral fellows disappear. Family factors impede talented young scientists of both sexes from persisting to research positions in academic science. In an era when the global competitiveness of US science is at risk, it is concerning that a significant proportion of men and women trained in the select few spots available at top US research universities are considering leaving science and that such desires to leave are related to the impact of the science career on family life. Results from our study may inform university family leave policies for science departments as well as mentoring programs in the sciences.

  15. Scientists want more children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Lincoln, Anne E

    2011-01-01

    Scholars partly attribute the low number of women in academic science to the impact of the science career on family life. Yet, the picture of how men and women in science--at different points in the career trajectory--compare in their perceptions of this impact is incomplete. In particular, we know little about the perceptions and experiences of junior and senior scientists at top universities, institutions that have a disproportionate influence on science, science policy, and the next generation of scientists. Here we show that having fewer children than wished as a result of the science career affects the life satisfaction of science faculty and indirectly affects career satisfaction, and that young scientists (graduate students and postdoctoral fellows) who have had fewer children than wished are more likely to plan to exit science entirely. We also show that the impact of science on family life is not just a woman's problem; the effect on life satisfaction of having fewer children than desired is more pronounced for male than female faculty, with life satisfaction strongly related to career satisfaction. And, in contrast to other research, gender differences among graduate students and postdoctoral fellows disappear. Family factors impede talented young scientists of both sexes from persisting to research positions in academic science. In an era when the global competitiveness of US science is at risk, it is concerning that a significant proportion of men and women trained in the select few spots available at top US research universities are considering leaving science and that such desires to leave are related to the impact of the science career on family life. Results from our study may inform university family leave policies for science departments as well as mentoring programs in the sciences.

  16. Bloomsbury Scientists

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Bloomsbury Scientists is the story of the network of scientists and artists living in a square mile of London before and after the First World War. This inspired group of men and women viewed creativity and freedom as the driving force behind nature, and each strove to understand this in their own inventive way. Their collective energy changed the social mood of the era and brought a new synthesis of knowledge to ideas in science and art. Class barriers were threatened as power shifted from t...

  17. Mentor - den fleksible vejleder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om det at være mentor. Bidragsyderne i bogen er undervisere og studerende på en diplomuddannelse i mentoring. Der har været meget repons på især kapitel 12, som er skrevet af Birte Kaiser og bærer titlen: Mentorkarrusellen......Bogen handler om det at være mentor. Bidragsyderne i bogen er undervisere og studerende på en diplomuddannelse i mentoring. Der har været meget repons på især kapitel 12, som er skrevet af Birte Kaiser og bærer titlen: Mentorkarrusellen...

  18. Scientist contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Blank; W. Burkhardt; J. Chatterton; W. Dollarhide; L. James; D. Klebenow; W. Krueger; S. Leonard; E. Miller; N. Rimbey; K. Sanders; S. Swanson; R. Tausch; P. Tueller; N. West; J. Young

    2008-01-01

    The primary impetus for this Wildfire Forum is a document authored by John McLain and Sheila Anderson of Resource Concepts, Inc. entitled "Urgent Need for a Scientific Review of the Ecological and Management History of the Great Basin Natural Resources and Recommendations to Achieve Ecosystem Restoration." This document urged prominent scientists who have...

  19. Playing Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in the study of genetics is essential to building a deep understanding of heredity, a core idea in the life sciences (NRC 2012). By integrating into the curriculum the stories of famous scientists who studied genetics (e.g., Mendel, Franklin, Watson, and Crick), teachers remind their students that science is a human endeavor.…

  20. Den reflekterende mentor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trine Hinchley, Harck; Day, Barbara Noel; Kaiser, Birte

    Bogen belyser mentorskaber både praktisk og teoretisk for at kvalificere følgende niveuaer: * Individniveauet - mentors kompetenceudvikling * Det relationelle - kvalificering af mentorskabet og relationen mellem mentor og mentee * Det organisatoriske - kvalificering af organisationens opgaveløsning...

  1. Design mentoring tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 a design engineer on-line mentoring tool was developed and implemented The purpose of the tool was to assist senior engineers : mentoring new engineers to the INDOT design process and improve their technical competency. This approach saves se...

  2. Mentoring Freshmen Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Irmgard C.; McLaughlin, Marilou B.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the mentoring component of a federally funded project, Women's Academic and Career Choices. The objective of the project was to open and broaden young college women's thinking about academic and career choices through a two-credit strategy course, intensive mentoring/advising activity, and role-modeling. (Author)

  3. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  4. A narrative inquiry into novice science mentor teachers' mentoring practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Samina

    Many teacher education programs hire new mentors every year to work with their student teacher population. The literature about teacher mentoring suggests the importance of relevant and ongoing professional development (PD) for teacher mentors at all levels. However, it is much more commonly the case that most teacher mentors volunteer and do not have access to PD. Past research about mentoring provides a descriptive sense of the practices of experienced mentors, especially within a PD context, but little is known about how novice mentors, who are mentoring for the first or the second time, with no prior PD related to mentoring articulate their work as mentors. Using the telling form of narrative inquiry, my study documented how four novice science mentors (NSMs) who had no prior mentoring-related PD articulated the work of mentoring through the stories they told about their past experiences as learners and teachers. The term learner included experiences that the NSMs had before school through K-12 and in their teacher education programs. The experiences as a teacher referred to NSMs' in-service experiences -- teaching, coaching, and mentoring (if any). Each NSM was interviewed once a month for a period of five months. The interviews captured experiences of the NSMs since their childhood to present day experiences as teachers to summarize the experiences that informed their current mentoring practices; to document salient mentoring practices they employed; to identify sources and factors that shaped those practices, and to understand mentoring from mentor teachers' perspectives. Clandinin and Connelly's (2000) three commonplaces (temporality- sociality- place ) framework was used for structuring interview questions and analyzing data. The NSMs employed number of practices discussed in the literature. The study found that the most influential life experiences were upbringing, student teaching, teaching, prior mentoring, and coaching. By taking temporality into

  5. The Earth Science Women's Network: The Principles That Guide Our Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. S.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) began informally in 2002 as a way for six early career female atmospheric chemists to stay in contact and support each other. Twelve years later (2014), the ESWN formally became a non-profit organization with over 2000 members. The ESWN includes scientists from all disciplines of the geosciences with members located in over 50 countries. The ESWN is dedicated to career development, peer mentoring and community building for women in the geosciences. The mentoring philosophy of ESWN has evolved to include five main principles: 1.) Support community-driven mentoring, 2.) Encourage diverse mentoring approaches for diverse individuals, 3.) Facilitate mentoring across career phases, 4.) Promote combined personal and professional mentoring, 5.) Champion effective mentoring in a safe space. Surveys of ESWN members report gains in areas that are often considered barriers to career advancement, including recognition that they are not alone, new understanding of obstacles faced by women in science, and access to professional resources.

  6. Near-Peer Mentor Model: Synergy within Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Margery K.; Tenenbaum, Laura S.; Ramadorai, Swati B.; Yourick, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    The near-peer mentor model provides undergraduates and recent post-baccalaureates in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields with an internship in two related disciplines, STEM research and STEM education. The near-peer mentor is both a mentored research intern and a mentor to pre-college students. During the 2013…

  7. Mentoring Doctoral Students Online: Mentor Strategies and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Johnson, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to explore faculty members' experiences with online mentoring during the dissertation stage of an online doctoral program. During semi-structured interviews, four mentors reflected on their online mentoring of students, specifically the strategies that worked well, challenges faced while mentoring online, and other…

  8. Institution-wide peer mentoring: Benefits for mentors

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Beltman; Marcel Schaeben

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research has shown the benefits of mentoring, including peer mentoring, for higher education students, especially in their first year. However, few studies have focussed exclusively on the outcomes for the mentors themselves. This paper reports the findings of data gathered over three years about a university-wide peer mentoring program. Benefits identified by 858 mentors were coded inductively and four major categories emerged: altruistic, cognitive, social and personal growth. The...

  9. E-Mentoring: A New Approach in Mentoring

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Kuzu; Mehmet Kahraman; H. Ferhan ODABASI

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring goes long time back in history, arising from the knowledge transfer through the expert to the apprentice. Mentoring is based on the ideal of the development of all stakeholders and improving the communication among them. E-mentoring is one of the different applications of mentoring which developed due to technological developments. It includes the effective use of communication tools in e-learning media, plus forming a base for planning and evaluation. Mentoring that includes differ...

  10. Research Methodology and Youth Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, David L.; Doolittle, Fred; Yates, Brian T.; Silverthorn, Naida; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring programs for youth have grown tremendously in popularity in recent years and in many important respects reflect core principles of community psychology. Mentoring of youth is a complex phenomenon, however, with a range of significant processes occurring at the levels of individual youth and their mentors, youth-mentor relationships and…

  11. Mentor and protege attitudes towards the science mentoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Jimenez, Noemaris

    The purpose of this study was to examine mentor and protege attitudes towards the science mentoring program. This study focused on the attitudes that proteges and mentors participating in the Puerto Rico Statewide Systemic Initiative (PRSSI) have towards the PRSSI mentoring program and the mentoring relationship. The data was gathered from a questionnaire for mentors and beginning teachers designed by Reiman and Edelfelt in 1990. It was used to measure the mentor and protege attitudes towards the science mentoring program by three variables: mentor-protege relationship, professional development, and supportive school climate. Data were collected from 56 science teachers (proteges) and 21 mentors from fourteen (14) junior high schools. Descriptive statistics were used to indicate both proteges and mentor attitudes towards the science mentoring program. T-tests were conducted to establish if there was a statistically significant difference between protege and mentor attitudes. In conclusion, the attitudes of mentors and proteges in regard to mentor-protege relationship, professional development, and supportive school climate were similar.

  12. Sustainable Scientists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  13. A trait based approach to defining valued mentoring qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendall, E.

    2012-12-01

    Graduate training in the sciences requires strong personal interactions among faculty, senior lab members and more junior members. Within the lab-group setting we learn to frame problems, to conduct research and to communicate findings. The result is that individual scientists are partly shaped by a few influential mentors. We have all been influenced by special relationships with mentors, and on reflection we may find that certain qualities have been especially influential in our career choices. In this presentation I will discuss favorable mentoring traits as determined from an informal survey of scientists in varying stages of careers and from diverse backgrounds. Respondents addressed questions about traits they value in their mentors in several categories: 1) personal qualities such as approachability, humor and encouragement; background including gender, ethnicity, and family status; 2) scientific qualities including discipline or specialization, perceived stature in discipline, seniority, breadth of perspective, and level of expectations; and 3) community-oriented qualities promoted by mentors, such as encouraging service contributions and peer-mentoring within the lab group. The results will be compared among respondents by gender, ethnicity, stage of career, type of work, and subdiscipline within the broadly defined Biogeoscience community. We hope to contribute to the growing discussion on building a diverse and balanced scientific workforce.

  14. Brady-tachycardia syndrome after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Assessment by computed tomography and carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Michihata, Tetsuo; Katagiri, Takashi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Okazaki, Osamu; Izumo, Kazuhide; Harumi, Kenichi

    1999-09-01

    A 74-year-old male who had received radiotherapy (total 54 Gy) for right lung cancer 7 months earlier developed a symptomatic brady-tachycardia syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. Chest CT showed a pulmonary tumor of 2-cm diameter in the right lower lobe with direct extension into the surrounding tissue, suggesting the possibility of cardiac invasion. Carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography (PET) indicated the absence of visible invasion of the heart with lung cancer. The brady-tachycardia syndrome, therefore, was considered to be associated with sinus node injury due to radiation. Carbon-11 methionine PET metabolic imaging might play an important role in evaluating noninvasively the cause of the arrhythmia in this patient. (author)

  15. An Exploration of the Relationships between Mentor Recruitment, the Implementation of Mentoring, and Mentors' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia; Fresko, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring of new teachers is generally examined from the viewpoint of the mentees. In the present study, mentoring is explored based on reports from mentors within the context of the Israeli induction program. Recruitment variables (selection and training) were examined in relation to mentoring implementation (frequency, initiation, regularity,…

  16. Mentoring Provided: Relation to Mentor's Career Success, Personality, and Mentoring Received

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozionelos, Nikos

    2004-01-01

    The relationship of a mentor's perceptions of his/her career success, mentoring he/she received, personality, and the amount of mentoring he/she provided was investigated in a sample of 176 administrators. Results indicated that the amount of mentoring respondents reported they had provided was positively associated with their objective and their…

  17. Retaining STEM women with community-based mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, M.

    2011-12-01

    While women have been graduating from physical oceanography programs in increasing numbers for the past two decades, the number of women occupying senior positions in the field remains relatively low. Thus, the disparity between the percentages of women at various career stages seems to be related to the retention of those completing graduate school in physical oceanography, not in recruiting women to the field. Studies indicate that a positive mentoring experience is strongly correlated with success in science, and as such, MPOWIR (Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention) provides this essential mentoring to physical oceanographers from late graduate school through their early careers. Our network includes over 400 scientists at 70 institutions participating in a variety of online and face-to-face mentoring opportunities. The MPOWIR website (www.mpowir.org) includes resources for junior scientists, ways to get involved, data and career profiles, and a blog with job postings and relevant information. In October 2011, we will hold the third Pattullo conference to bring mentors and mentees together. The 43 participants at this conference will share their research, attend professional development sessions, and openly discuss issues related to the retention of young scientists in the field.

  18. Institution-wide peer mentoring: Benefits for mentors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Beltman

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research has shown the benefits of mentoring, including peer mentoring, for higher education students, especially in their first year. However, few studies have focussed exclusively on the outcomes for the mentors themselves. This paper reports the findings of data gathered over three years about a university-wide peer mentoring program. Benefits identified by 858 mentors were coded inductively and four major categories emerged: altruistic, cognitive, social and personal growth. The findings have implications for the promotion of mentor programs to administrators and to prospective mentors. The study provides evidence that university-wide peer mentoring programs offer multiple positive outcomes for the mentors involved, and potentially for higher education institutions administering and supporting such programs. 

  19. Mentoring in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shiria Banu, Fatema Zehra Juma, Tamkin Abas Manchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK  We read the paper by Al Qahtani1 with great interest and agree that mentoring is an important educational tool. As medical students from the University of Manchester who have been exposed to various mentoring schemes, we have experienced some of the benefits mentioned in this article. We found that the mentoring schemes provided us with a valuable support system, enhanced our professional and social development, and opened doors for networking. We have primarily been involved in two different types of mentoring schemes and feel that each has its own benefits.  View the original paper by Al Qahtani.

  20. A Serendipitous Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2017-07-17

    Growing up in a middle-class Jewish home in the Bronx, I had only one professional goal: to become a physician. However, as with most of my Vietnam-era MD colleagues, I found my residency training interrupted by the Doctor Draft in 1968. Some of us who were academically inclined fulfilled this obligation by serving in the US Public Health Service as commissioned officers stationed at the National Institutes of Health. This experience would eventually change the entire trajectory of my career. Here I describe how, over a period of years, I transitioned from the life of a physician to that of a physician scientist; my 50 years of work on cellular receptors; and some miscellaneous thoughts on subjects as varied as Nobel prizes, scientific lineages, mentoring, publishing, and funding. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology Volume 58 is January 6, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. The mentored journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilinski, Hope

    2002-01-01

    The "writing to learn" paradigm assists students in developing reflection, critical thinking, and the higher order cognitive skills of analysis and synthesis. One common teaching strategy used in this process is clinical journals. Integrating the concepts and underlying theory of journaling, mentoring, and the Circles of Meaning model in the development of the mentored journal, the author discusses a model in which each component acts synergistically to enhance the process of critical thinking within nursing students.

  2. Part 1: An Overview of Mentoring Practices and Mentoring Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Weese, Meghan M

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as a solution for retention and succession planning in nursing; however, there is a lack of information about "how to" mentor based on evidence. This seven-part leadership series will provide a deep dive into evidence-based mentoring practices and associated mentoring benefits for staff nurses and the organizations in which they work. Part 1 of this series provides an overview of the origins and evolution of mentoring, related definitions, and evidence-based mentoring practices and benefits.

  3. How Effective are Your Mentoring Relationships? Mentoring Quiz for Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Nagy, Paul; Chhabra, Avneesh; Lee, Cindy S

    Mentoring is an essential part of a resident's career development. It plays an important role in nurturing, and sustaining success along the career path of a young physician. Mentoring is a long-term goal that is development-driven rather than performance-driven. Although specific learning goals may be used as a basis, the focus of mentoring may also include self-confidence, self-perception, and work-life balance. A number of residency programs have implemented mentoring programs in their institutions. This article discusses the importance of mentoring, illustrates "do's and don'ts" for mentees and demonstrates how to choose the ideal mentor. Finally, a "mentoring quiz" is designed to evaluate your mentoring relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mentoring in neurology: filling the residency gap in academic mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul R; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2014-03-11

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology.

  5. Elements of ethics for physical scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Greer, Sandra C

    2017-01-01

    This book offers the first comprehensive guide to ethics for physical scientists and engineers who conduct research. Written by a distinguished professor of chemistry and chemical engineering, the book focuses on the everyday decisions about right and wrong faced by scientists as they do research, interact with other people, and work within society. The goal is to nurture readers’ ethical intelligence so that they know an ethical issue when they see one, and to give them a way to think about ethical problems. After introductions to the philosophy of ethics and the philosophy of science, the book discusses research integrity, with a unique emphasis on how scientists make mistakes and how they can avoid them. It goes on to cover personal interactions among scientists, including authorship, collaborators, predecessors, reviewers, grantees, mentors, and whistle-blowers. It considers underrepresented groups in science as an ethical issue that matters not only to those groups but also to the development of scien...

  6. REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program: A Mentoring Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauler, Sandra

    Although mentoring dates back to Greek mythology, the concept continues to thrive in today's society. Mentoring is a strategy that successful people have known about for centuries. The REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program has made use of this strategy since its inception in November 1985 at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  7. Mentoring First Year Police Constables: Police Mentors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Mark A.; McKenzie, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Mentoring as a tool for the support and development of novices in many organisations has been considered a putative success. Nevertheless, the literature reveals a paucity of reporting of the mentoring strategies used within the policing profession within Australia. This paper aims to focus on what mentoring is and how it is deployed from…

  8. What Makes Proteges Take Mentors' Advice in Formal Mentoring Relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, SuJin; Kim, Do-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the factors affecting a protege's willingness to take a mentor's advice. The sample for this study consisted of 183 proteges from two different South Korean organizations who were part of formal mentoring programs. We found protege commitment to be the principal factor that predisposes a protege to take advice from mentors and…

  9. The Tradition of Mentoring Part I: Mentoring the Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Wayman Wendell

    2010-01-01

    This text is a summary of reflection points and notes from Part I of a two-part lecture on the Tradition of Mentoring. In this lecture, basic historical concepts on the origins of mentoring were reviewed. Of particular importance were several reflections concerning how effective mentoring differs from other forms of leadership and training in the…

  10. Strategies for Mentoring Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental for mentoring a preservice teacher is the mentor's articulation of pedagogical knowledge, which in this research draws upon specific practices, viz.: planning, timetabling lessons, preparation, teaching strategies, content knowledge, problem solving, questioning, classroom management, implementation, assessment and viewpoints for…

  11. Writing the Book on Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucey, Jason

    1998-01-01

    A training manual for mentors was developed by Pennsylvania educators to ensure success in the student/mentor relationship. It spells out the goals and objectives of job shadowing, reviews participant roles and expectations, and addresses communication with students. (JOW)

  12. High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Big Brothers Big Sisters Edmonton & Area, in partnership with Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, are providing the High School Teen Mentoring Program, a school-based mentoring program where mentor-mentee matches meet for one hour per week to engage in relationship-building activities at an elementary school. This initiative aims to…

  13. Virtual Mentoring of Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe music teachers' perceptions of the benefits and challenges they experienced as virtual mentors of preservice music teachers. Each mentor was assigned a cohort of preservice teachers who were enrolled in an elementary general music methods course. Cohorts observed their mentor's teaching via Skype. Mentors…

  14. Mentoring in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Hyde, Rosalyn

    2013-01-01

    Designed to support both teachers and university-based tutors in mentoring pre-service and newly qualified mathematics teachers at both primary and secondary levels, Mentoring Mathematics Teachers offers straightforward practical advice that is based on practice, underpinned by research, and geared specifically towards this challenging subject area.Developed by members of The Association of Mathematics Education Teachers, the authors draw upon the most up-to-date research and theory to provide evidence-based practical guidance. Themes covered include:

  15. Integration, mentoring & networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Lotte

    KVINFOs mentornetværk har siden 2003 anvendt mentoring og networking med det formål at åbne døre til det danske samfund og arbejdsmarked for kvinder med indvandrer-/flygtningebaggrund. I mentoringdelen matches kvinder med flygtninge- og indvandrerbaggrund (mentees) med kvinder, som er solidt...... KVINFOs mentornetværk, at indsamle og analysere disses erfaringer med at indgå i netværket samt opnå større viden om mentoring og networking som integrationsfremmende metoder....

  16. A successful educational collaboration between scientists and educators: microscopic explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lincoln; Schooley, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    The teacher's guide, Microscopic Explorations: A GEMS Festival Guide (Brady and Willard, 1998), is the result of a partnership between Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS), a program of the Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS), the public science and curriculum development center of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Microscopy Society of America (MSA). Microscopic Exploration supports the MSA's low-cost national outreach program and, also, reaches a very large educational community as part of the GEMS series. Some of the lessons learned through the extremely successful MSA/LHS collaboration are summarized here in hopes that they may be instructive to other scientists and educators as they launch their own partnerships and collaborations.

  17. Rejuvenating clinician-scientist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Cahoon, Judd

    2014-03-28

    Clinician-scientists are becoming increasingly rare in medicine as a whole, but especially in ophthalmology. There is a structural gap between MD-PhD training and K-series awards where interested candidates go through residency and fellowship without any structured research exposure or involvement. Furthermore, the success rate of the MD-PhD and K awards leaves much to be desired. The authors propose a redeployment of training resources to reconfigure residency and fellowship training programs for interested candidates with sufficient additional time for a credible research project, augmented salary, and sound mentoring. Opportunities for research training in nontraditional pathways to diversify skill sets and build interdisciplinary teams also would be a prime objective of this novel "Learn-and-Earn" approach.

  18. Maxims for Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, James J.

    This paper describes five maxims for an effective faculty mentoring program developed at Western Carolina University (North Carolina) designed to increase retention of new faculty. The first maxim, "ask what the program will do for the school," emphasizes that a program should not be undertaken until this question has been specifically…

  19. The Rewards of Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Powell, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of knowledge exists which describes the rewards and importance of mentors in the professional development of young men and women, particularly with relation to their interactions in professional and organizational settings. Research in both educational settings and the workplace indicates that students and employees alike are more…

  20. Developing a Scientist: A retrospective look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gail; Taylor, Amy; Forrester, Jennifer H.

    2011-08-01

    Although one of the goals of science education is to educate and nurture the next generation of scientists and engineers, there is limited research that investigates the pathway from childhood to becoming a scientist. This study examined the reflections of 37 scientists and engineers about their in- and out-of-school experiences as well as their memories of significant people who may have influenced their careers. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted and the interview transcripts were analyzed for potential influences on career decisions. Analysis showed several commonalities in participants' reported experiences that influenced career decisions in science and engineering. Informal advising and mentoring by teachers and family members were noted as important. Across participants, tinkering, building models, and exploring science independently in and out of school were viewed as factors that influenced interests in science and engineering. Implications of these results for formal and informal educational programs are discussed.

  1. Time-series analysis of surface deformation at Brady Hot Springs geothermal field (Nevada) using interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S. T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Akerley, J. [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Baluyut, E. C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Cardiff, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Davatzes, N. C. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science; Feigl, K. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Foxall, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratta, D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mellors, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spielman, P. [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Wang, H. F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zemach, E. [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We analyze interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired between 2004 and 2014, by the ERS-2, Envisat, ALOS and TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X satellite missions to measure and characterize time-dependent deformation at the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in western Nevada due to extraction of fluids. The long axis of the ~4 km by ~1.5 km elliptical subsiding area coincides with the strike of the dominant normal fault system at Brady. Within this bowl of subsidence, the interference pattern shows several smaller features with length scales of the order of ~1 km. This signature occurs consistently in all of the well-correlated interferometric pairs spanning several months. Results from inverse modeling suggest that the deformation is a result of volumetric contraction in shallow units, no deeper than 600 m, likely associated with damaged regions where fault segments mechanically interact. Such damaged zones are expected to extend downward along steeply dipping fault planes, providing a high permeability conduit to the production wells. Using time series analysis, we test the hypothesis that geothermal production drives the observed deformation. We find a good correlation between the observed deformation rate and the rate of production in the shallow wells. We also explore mechanisms that could potentially cause the observed deformation, including thermal contraction of rock, decline in pore pressure and dissolution of minerals over time.

  2. Student nurse mentoring: an evaluative study of the mentor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Rebecca; Barrett, Julie; Sixsmith, Pam; Ward, Donna

    2017-04-13

    An evaluative study aimed to capture the 'mentor voice' and provide an insight into the mentoring role from the perspective of the nurse mentor. Participants from each of the four fields of nursing practice were asked to comment on the satisfying and frustrating aspects of their mentoring role. The narrative data gleaned from the evaluation were qualitatively analysed and subsequently organised into key themes around the student-mentor relationship and the clinical environment. Given that the landscape of nurse education is set to change, in terms of new standards from the professional bodies and the political drivers, not to mention the changing profile of the student nurse, it is hoped that the findings may help to shape the relationship between the mentor, the student and the higher education institution.

  3. Mentoring the entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C K

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly, nurse administrators are experiencing less of match between what they want in their careers and what contemporary health care organizations have to offer them, pursuing instead a variety of entrepreneurial ventures. The decision to strike out on one's own must consider current performance strengths and weaknesses, tolerance for uncertainty and potential opportunities for business development. Working with a mentor is one way to assure that the right questions about this important life decision have been asked and answered.

  4. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  6. Pathways to URM Retention: IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2013-05-01

    As a not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. IBP also assists with formative program evaluation design and implementation to help strengthen URM recruitment and retention elements. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URMs with mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an improved retention rate of URM students. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science and Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science (ESS) Professional Development Program. The NASA OSSI recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA education and employment opportunities. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with Ocean Science REU programs and serves as a resource for REU program directors. Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The mentoring manual, which is organized by roles, provides undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty and project directors with valuable resources. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives, focuses on increasing the retention rate of URM students receiving advanced degrees in ESS. The program addresses barriers to retention in ESS including isolation, lack of preparation and professional development, and lack of mentoring. Program activities center on peer-to-peer community building, professional development exercises, networking experiences, one

  7. Deriving competencies for mentors of clinical and translational scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Zainab; Biskup, Ewelina; Silet, Karin; Garbutt, Jane M; Kroenke, Kurt; Feldman, Mitchell D; McGee, Richard; Fleming, Michael; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-06-01

    Although the importance of research mentorship has been well established, the role of mentors of junior clinical and translational science investigators is not clearly defined. The authors attempt to derive a list of actionable competencies for mentors from a series of complementary methods. We examined focus groups, the literature, competencies derived for clinical and translational scholars, mentor training curricula, mentor evaluation forms and finally conducted an expert panel process in order to compose this list. These efforts resulted in a set of competencies that include generic competencies expected of all mentors, competencies specific to scientists, and competencies that are clinical and translational research specific. They are divided into six thematic areas: (1) Communication and managing the relationship, (2) Psychosocial support, (3) Career and professional development, (4) Professional enculturation and scientific integrity, (5) Research development, and (6) Clinical and translational investigator development. For each thematic area, we have listed associated competencies, 19 in total. For each competency, we list examples that are actionable and measurable. Although a comprehensive approach was used to derive this list of competencies, further work will be required to parse out how to apply and adapt them, as well future research directions and evaluation processes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mentoring Triad: An Alternative Mentoring Model for Preservice Teacher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Angelina; Dekkers, John; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2017-01-01

    Within many preservice teacher education programs in Australia, mentoring is used as the overarching methodology for the professional placement. The professional placement is considered to be a key component of learning to teach, and typically a dyad mentoring model is utilized. However, it is reported that many preservice teachers experience a…

  9. Mentoring Female Entrepreneurs: A Mentors' Training Intervention Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, Katerina K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a mentor training intervention for experienced entrepreneurs in order to support and advise new and early stage female entrepreneurs in an attempt to enrich the limited literature of empirical data in the area of mentor training intervention assessment.…

  10. ANTIARRHYTMIC EFFICACY OF SOTALOL IN PATIENTS WITH TACHY-BRADY SYNDROME HAVING ATRIAL PACEMAKER WITH DIFFERENT ATRIAL ELECTRODE POSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Novikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate efficacy of the combined therapy (sotalol and constant electric cardiostimulation in AAI regimen at two atrial electrode position: in low back part of interatrial septum (IAS and in right atrial auricle (RAA.Material and methods. 20 patients with tachy-brady syndrome were examined. They were randomized in 2 groups depending on atrial electrode position. Sotalol (160 mg daily was prescribed to all patients in a month after implantation of constant atrial pacemaker (CAP. A number of atrial fibrillation paroxysms (AFP was evaluated initially, in a month after CAP implantation and in a month after start of sotalol therapy.Results. Significant AFP reduction was observed in IAS stimulation, unlike RAA stimulation. Sotalol addition had essential significance in the termination or reduction of AFP. Sotalol effect did not depend on atrial electrode position.Conclusion. Sotalol usage together with constant electric cardiostimulation significantly reduces AFP irrespectively of atrial electrode position. 

  11. Becoming a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric J.; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-05-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publicly released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  12. Learning to Be a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-01-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publically released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  13. Design mentoring tool : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 a design engineer on-line mentoring tool was developed and implemented The purpose of the tool was to assist senior engineers mentoring new engineers to the INDOT design process and improve their technical competency. This approach saves seni...

  14. PUENTE Project: The Mentor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas-Flores, Margarita; Chavez, Mauro

    This manual was developed for individuals serving as mentors in Evergreen Valley College's PUENTE Project, a program which integrates the skills of an English teacher, a Hispanic counselor, and Hispanic professionals/mentors into a team structure in an attempt to assist Hispanic students in making academic improvements, to build self-confidence,…

  15. Taking Up the Mentoring Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Hood, Marian

    1993-01-01

    Concern over low student achievement led to creation of a community-based Maryland mentoring program for at-risk African-American students. Mentoring was successfully used for teaching and coaching, strengthening racial harmony, promoting social change, ensuring equal education, and creating opportunities for personal empowerment. By portraying…

  16. Peer Mentoring for Bioinformatics presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    A handout used in a HUB (Heidelberg Unseminars in Bioinformatics) meeting focused on career development for bioinformaticians. It describes an activity for use to help introduce the idea of peer mentoring, potnetially acting as an opportunity to create peer-mentoring groups.

  17. The Multiple Roles of Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Sabrina R.; Roegman, Rachel; Goodwin, A. Lin

    2016-01-01

    Teaching Residents at Teachers College (TR@TC) is an 18-month program that prepares teachers for high-needs schools in New York City in two areas: teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) and teaching students with disabilities. Student teachers, called residents, spend a year working with a mentor teacher. Mentors play three roles:…

  18. Tutoring and Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelia Frade

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available South African institutions of higher education (HE have increasingly come under pressure to broaden access to historically under-represented groups who are often underprepared for tertiary education as a result of apartheid-era secondary schooling (White Paper, 2013. This has resulted in student enrolments becoming increasingly diverse with respect to racial, cultural, socio-economic and linguistic backgrounds (Underhill & McDonald, 2010. In an attempt to address these issues and promote increased throughput rates, institutions of HE have increasingly begun to introduce tutoring, including supplemental instruction (SI and peer-assisted learning (PAL and mentoring programmes.

  19. Scientists must speak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walters, D. Eric; Walters, Gale Climenson

    2011-01-01

    .... Scientists Must Speak: Bringing Presentations to Life helps readers do just that. At some point in their careers, the majority of scientists have to stand up in front of an inquisitive audience or board and present information...

  20. CREATIVE SCIENTISTS OF TODAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHAMBERS, J A

    1964-09-11

    To investigate traits differentiating highly creative research scientists from less creative ones, a questionnaire was sent to 740 male scientists (400 chemists and 340 psychologists). Half of each group had achieved eminence as research scientists; the other half had not achieved research eminence, but were matched on relevant variables. Results indicated that creative scientists are more dominant than less creative ones, that they have more initiative, and are more strongly motivated toward intellectual success.

  1. Exploring a two-dimensional model of mentor teacher roles in mentoring dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Niels Brouwer; Prof. Dr. Fred Korthagen; Dr. Paul Hennissen; Prof. Dr. Theo Bergen; Dr. F.J.A.J. Crasborn

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which mentor teachers are able to address mentees' individual needs is an important factor in the success of mentoring. A two-dimensional model of mentor teacher roles in mentoring dialogues, entitled MERID, is explored empirically. Data regarding five aspects of mentoring dialogues

  2. Best Practices Mentoring New Full-Time Faculty: Reenergizing and Improving an Existing Formal Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring is often used in academic settings (deJanasz & Sullivan, 2004). There is though, a lack of evaluation of these mentoring programs (Savage, Karp & Logue, 2004). Hopkins and Grigoriu (2005) found that research on mentoring in community colleges focused more on the informal mentoring of college leadership and less on the formal mentoring of…

  3. Inspiring Future Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betteley, Pat; Lee, Richard E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In an integrated science/language arts/technology unit called "How Scientists Learn," students researched famous scientists from the past and cutting-edge modern-day scientists. Using biography trade books and the internet, students collected and recorded data on charts, summarized important information, and inferred meaning from text. Then they…

  4. Improving the Human Condition through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clayton

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common terms in postsecondary education is "mentoring." Nearly all colleges and universities offer some type of mentoring. Sometimes mentoring is focused on certain students, such as at-risk first-year students, student-athletes, or honors program students. A number of institutions provide mentoring for new faculty and…

  5. Mentoring Connections between Coaches and Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Nancy L.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the role that mentoring could have in helping female athletes become leaders in their sports through coaching, focusing on: women in coaching; the importance of mentoring potential female coaches; successful mentoring relationships for female coaches; and strategies for mentors. This type of collaboration may help reverse the ongoing…

  6. Importance of mentoring in Australian radiology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Mentoring is widely accepted as a fundamental component of a number of professions; however, mentoring is underutilized, and its practice is poorly instituted in most Australian radiology training programmes. This article highlights the benefits of mentoring within the radiology training context. Potential barriers to successful mentoring are elucidated, and future pathways for improved implementation and application of mentor programmes with radiology training programmes are presented. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. The GLOBE International Scientists Network: Connecting scientists, teachers and students from around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Mackaro, J.

    2011-12-01

    The GLOBE Program invites scientists in all areas of Earth System Science to work with students and teachers around the work on exploring local scientific problems. GLOBE has a rich history of connecting scientists with schools around the world around issues of environmental and relevance. GLOBE is an international science and education program working with students, teachers and scientists in over 110 countries around the world. GLOBE has initiated a focus on climate science during the next two years and we are especially interested in connecting scientists with teachers and students in geographic and disciplinary areas of interest to climate scientists. In addition, GLOBE is revitalizing the technology support for science and communications which will provide an easy mechanism for scientists to connect with GLOBE schools. GLOBE is based on spheres of the Earth system with five investigation areas: Atmosphere, Hydrology, Soils, Land Cover / Biology, and Phenology. Classroom learning activities for each area help guide students in the classroom. Scientific protocols for data collection designed by scientists provide guidance for students to collect scientifically valid, high-quality data that can be used by professional scientists. The GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign aims to develop a framework for robust scientist participation in the program whereby scientists and GLOBE schools with mutual science interest can connect and develop collaborations. Scientist participation ranges from mentoring students on science investigations to working collaborative on local climate science research problems. Scientists interested in working with GLOBE are encouraged to participate in whatever level of engagement is appropriate to compliment their research program and professional goals. Scientists will become a part of the GLOBE International Scientist Network, which may provide entrée into other avenues of research and funding. The GLOBE Program office, headquartered

  8. Mentoring for 2000 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, K. M.; Farrance, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Today, more than 40 percent of the United States workforce are women. However, only a small percentage of working women are employed in science or engineering fields. The numbers of women in engineering and math professions have actually decreased since 1984. Last year, a mentoring program was created at NASA Ames Research Center aimed at encouraging young girls to stay in school, increasing their self confidence and helping them perform better academically. Teachers at the Ronald McNair Intermediate School matched fifth through eighth grade students with women engineers at NASA Ames. Results from a year-end survey submitted by the mentees indicated that the program was successful in achieving its first-year goals; more than one student reported that she felt 'really special' because of her mentor's efforts. The NASA Ames Mentor program has continued into the 1992-93 academic year with both returning mentor/mentee pairs and new participants.

  9. The Community Mentoring REU: A Novel Paradigm for Research Experiences for Undergraduates Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, Henry; Maierhofer, Lara; Kobulnicky, Carol; Dale, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Research Experience for Undergraduates programs were conceived to promote entry of college students into STEM disciplines. Evidence suggests that participating in REUs increases interest in STEM, conveys skills leading to STEM jobs and graduate study, increases science self-efficacy, builds professional networks for young scientists, and cultivates identity as a scientist. Nevertheless, the factors that mediate desired outcomes are still poorly understood, and persistence of negative mentoring experiences among REU participants motivates the design and study of novel approaches to preparing future STEM professionals. During five summers spanning 2012-2016 we implemented a "Community Mentoring" paradigm at the University of Wyoming's 10-week Astronomy REU program. In contrast to "traditional model (TM)" REUs that pair a single senior scientist mentor with a single junior mentee, community mentoring (CM) unites 6-8 undergraduates with 3-5 faculty (perhaps assisted by a graduate student or postdoc) on a collaborative team addressing a single science goal. In CM, students have access to a pool of mentors and a peer group reading the same literature, working in a common location, sharing equipment (in this case the WIRO 2.3 meter telescope), sharing data, and learning the same analysis skills. The community interacts daily, modeling the highly collaborative nature of modern scientific teams. Our study used an electronic survey consisting of 24 questions to compare a cohort of 28 CM students to a national control group of 77 students who conducted REUs elsewhere during the same period, typically under the TM. CM students report a significantly higher level of "learning from their peers", "learning to work on a science team", and "sense of community" compared to the TM cohort. The CM cohort also reports a higher overall level of satisfaction with the REU and a lower level of negative experiences, such as finding it difficult to get time with a mentor. This talk will

  10. Effects of Temperature and Salinity on the Survival and Egg Production of Gladioferens pectinatus Brady (Copepodas: Calanoida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. J.; Burns, C. W.

    2002-10-01

    The calanoid copepod Gladioferens pectinatus Brady occurs in Lake Waihola, New Zealand, a shallow, tidally-influenced lake. This lake experiences daily and seasonal fluctuations in salinity, and seasonal changes in temperature. To determine the potential contributions of salinity and temperature to observed seasonal population fluctuations, we tested the survival and egg production of G. pectinatus at two temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) and in a range of ' salinities ' (20 to 2700 mg l -1 Cl). Adult survival was highest in 1000 mg l -1 Cl at 10 °C, when 50% still remained alive after 23 d. Increases in salinity and temperature decreased the survival time to less than 10 d. The salinities tolerated were well below the maximum of 2500 mg l -1 Cl recorded in the lake. There was no difference in adult survival between males and females. Eggs were produced in salinities of up to 600 mg l -1 Cl. Only in 20 mg l -1 Cl did an increase in temperature reduce clutch retention time, and increase the rate of egg production. The rate of increase in salinity did not affect copepod survival, but acclimation at an intermediate salinity increased survival at 10 °C. Our results suggest that high temperatures and salinities in summer may lower the fitness of this population of G. pectinatus.

  11. Undergraduate nursing student mentors' experiences of peer mentoring in Korea: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Mi-Ra; Choi, Yun-Jung

    2017-04-01

    Although mentoring involves the achievement of a mutual relationship between mentors and mentees, most studies have focused on the effects of mentoring on the mentees rather than that on the mentors, which necessitates the need to identify mentors' experiences to provide original resources for mentoring. The purpose of this study was to explore the mentoring experience of nursing students who participated as mentors in a mentoring learning program, to offer evidence-based resources for nursing educators to develop mentoring programs and to use mentorship as an educational method. A qualitative content analysis of transcribed focus groups was conducted to describe and explore the undergraduate nursing students' mentoring experiences. This study was conducted in two nursing schools in South Korea. Fifteen student mentors from the peer mentoring program participated in the present study. They were aged between 21 and 24years, and 87% of the participants were female. The experiences of the mentors were explored through focus groups, and the collected data were analyzed by content analysis. The mentors' experiences could be summarized by the core theme, "Self-growth as a leader," consisting of the following themes: taking pride, guiding mentees, coping with conflicts, and building leadership. The themes and codes derived from mentors' experiences would provide evidence-based guidelines and resources for nursing educators and professionals in related disciplines regarding successful peer mentoring, which could facilitate self-growth and foster the development of leadership skills in undergraduate students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Key issues in mentoring in HIV prevention and mental health for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Andrew D; Stoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    We examine the challenges and barriers to quality mentoring for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups and propose solutions for establishing a robust pipeline of early-career scientists who are well equipped to conduct research on disparities in HIV and mental health. In addition, we review contributions to this special supplement on mentoring and advocate a multilevel strategy that targets funding agencies, academic and research institutions, mentors, and mentees to enhance the diversity of the nation's scientific workforce and ensure that the public health system benefits from innovations derived from the optimal use of existing human capital.

  13. Read Like a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawyer, Kirsten K. N.; Johnson, Heather J.

    2017-01-01

    Scientists read, and so should students. Unfortunately, many high school teachers overlook science texts as a way to engage students in the work of scientists. This article addresses how to help students develop literacy skills by strategically reading a variety of science texts. Unfortunately, most science teachers aren't trained to teach…

  14. Stories of Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascazine, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents three biographical sketches of scientists including John Wesley Powell (first to explore the geology of the Grand Canyon), Joseph von Fraunhofer (his work in optics led to the science of spectroscopy), and Gregor Mendel (of Mendelian genetics fame). Other scientists are mentioned along with sources for additional biographical information.…

  15. Young Scientist Wetenschapskalender 2018

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen-Oskam, K.H.; van Zundert, Joris J.; Koolen, Corina

    2017-01-01

    Bijdragen scheurkalender Young Scientist Wetenschapskalender 2018. Karina van Dalen-Oskam, Belangrijk woord: Wat is het belangrijkste woord in de Nederlandse taal? In: Young Scientist Wetenschapskalender 2018, 1 september Corina Koolen, Op naar het boekenbal: Hoe wordt je beroemd als schrijver? In:

  16. Scientists on the move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dente, Karen M

    2007-04-06

    In today's global world, scientists are increasingly mobile and the traditional view of "brain drain" is being replaced by "brain circulation." Countries such as China and India are tapping into a global pool of science talent attracting not only their own citizens back from abroad but also scientists from the US and Europe.

  17. Learning to Become a More Effective Research or Inquiry-based Project Mentor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, E. J.; Pfund, C.; Mathieu, R.; Branchaw, J.

    2010-08-01

    How effective of a mentor are you? Have you thought much about this question? Have you participated in training to become a better mentor? For many academics, the typical three answers are "pretty good, I think ... why wouldn't I be?!"; "I am right now while reading this;" "Uh, no." The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed a program called Research Mentor Training to help train scientists in myriad STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. Most of the field testing to date has focused on graduate students, post-docs, academic staff, and faculty mentoring undergraduate students who are participating in summer research experiences. The materials have proven quite effective in other areas as well, with only modest modifications. For example, several faculty cohorts concentrating on mentoring graduate students and post-docs have completed the training. In addition, the materials are used to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. The preferred venue for the mentor training program is a seminar meeting one hour per week for 8 to 9 weeks, plus readings and outside activities, including mentoring a student. However, the structure is flexible, and some meaningful learning can occur in a single 90-minute interactive workshop like the one presented at the 2009 ASP annual meeting, "Science Education and Outreach: Forging a Path to the Future." All of the materials, including case studies, facilitator notes and guidelines, plus reading lists, are available online for no charge (http://researchmentortraining.org). Users can select pre-built curricula, or they can customize a package using a "shopping cart" interface.

  18. Has ADVANCE Affected Senior Compared to Junior Women Scientists Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists to demonstrate that the NSF ADVANCE Inititiative has made a positive impact upon institutions. Since it began in 2001, ADVANCE has changed the conversation, policies, and practices in ways to remove obstacles and systemic barriers preventing success for academic women scientists and engineers. Results from ADVANCE projects on campuses have facilitated consensus nationally about policies and practices that institutions may implement to help to alleviate issues, particularly for junior women scientists.Although getting women into senior and leadership positions in STEM constituted an initial impetus for ADVANCE, less emphasis was placed upon the needs of senior women scientists. Surveys of academic women scientists indicate that the issues faced by junior and senior women scientists differ significantly. The focus of ADVANCE on junior women in many ways seemed appropriate--the senior cohort of women scinetists is fed by the junior cohort of scientists; senior women serve as mentors, role models, and leaders for the junior colleagues, while continuing to struggle to achieve full status in the profession. This presentation will center on the differences in issues faced by senior compared to junior women scientists to explore whether a next step for ADVANCE should be to address needs of senior academic women scientists.

  19. The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP): Final Year Pre-Service Physical Education Peer Mentors' Perceptions of Effective Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Kate A.; Benson, Amanda C.

    2017-01-01

    In the teacher education context, most peer mentoring programs have focused on pre-service teachers and a qualified teacher mentor within schools (Hobson, et.al., 2009; Ambrosetti, Knight & Dekkers, 2014). Few studies have focused on mentoring between pre-service physical education teachers. Therefore, we describe the Assessment and Mentoring…

  20. The Effect of Mentor Intervention Style in Novice Entrepreneur Mentoring Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jean, Etienne; Audet, Josee

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether mentor intervention styles influence benefits gained by novice entrepreneurs through their mentoring relationship. An empirical study conducted with 360 mentees who had received mentoring services shows that an intervention style which combines a maieutic approach with mentor involvement produced the…

  1. Development of a Technology Mentor Survey Instrument: Understanding Student Mentors' Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamuk, Sonmez; Thompson, Ann D.

    2009-01-01

    Agreement on the effectiveness of the technology mentoring approach in addressing educators' needs for learning different technologies has been growing. Literature on the concept of mentoring in general and technology mentoring specifically has indicated mentoring relationships in different settings provide benefits for the less experienced…

  2. An Analysis of the Value of Multiple Mentors in Formalised Elite Coach Mentoring Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawiuk, Rebecca; Taylor, William. G.; Groom, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Within the context of sports coaching and coach education, formalised mentoring relationships are often depicted as a mentor--mentee dyad. Thus, mentoring within sports coaching is typically conceptualised as a one-dimensional relationship, where the mentor is seen as the powerful member of the dyad, with greater age and/or experience…

  3. Clarifying preservice teacher perceptions of mentor teachers' developing use of mentoring skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennissen, P.; Crasborn, F.; Brouwer, N.; Korthagen, F.A.J.; Bergen, T.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify how pre-service teachers perceive mentor teachers' use of mentoring skills. Sixty stimulated-recall interviews were conducted, each in connection with a previously recorded mentoring dialogue. A quantitative analysis showed that six types of mentoring skills

  4. Clarifying pre-service teacher perceptions of mentor teachers' developing use of mentoring skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Paul Hennissen; Prof. Dr. Fred Korthagen; Prof. Dr. Theo Bergen; Dr. Niels Brouwer; Dr. F.J.A.J. Crasborn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify how pre-service teachers perceive mentor teachers' use of mentoring skills. Sixty stimulated-recall interviews were conducted, each in connection with a previously recorded mentoring dialogue. A quantitative analysis showed that six types of mentoring skills

  5. Building Relationships: A Guide for New Mentors. National Mentoring Center Technical Assistance Packet #4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucovy, Linda

    This guide describes 10 important features of successful mentors' attitudes and styles, using data from an examination of 82 pairs of mentors and adolescents in Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring programs nationwide. The key reasons that certain mentoring relationships succeeded while others failed was related to the expectations and approaches of…

  6. Adapting Mentoring to Individual Differences in Novice Teacher Learning: The Mentor's Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Gisbert; Oolbekkink, Helma; Meijer, Paulien C.; Verloop, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Being adaptive to the individual novice teacher is considered a condition for effective teacher mentoring. The aims of this study are therefore to explore (1) mentoring activities through which mentors intend to adapt to the individual novice teacher and (2) characteristics of adaptive mentors. Information was collected through on-site,…

  7. Mentoring in general surgery in Switzerland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reto M Kaderli; Jennifer M Klasen; Adrian P Businger

    2015-01-01

    .... The present study was conducted to describe the current situation of mentoring in the surgical community in Switzerland and to evaluate sex differences regarding the impact of mentoring on career...

  8. Utilizing Peer Mentor Roles in Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieske, Laura Jo; Benjamin, Mimi

    2015-01-01

    For a number of learning community programs, peer mentors provide an additional layer of staffing support. This chapter highlights peer mentor roles from a sample of programs and suggests important components for the construction of these roles.

  9. Is there enough mentoring in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, D; Duffield, C

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the debate about the benefits of mentoring in nursing and argues that the evidence indicates that mentoring is a professional behaviour that contributes to career success and the development of professional leaders. Some strategies to facilitate mentoring are suggested. As well, the paper presents the findings from analysis of four studies which provided data on the incidence of mentoring among 317 nursing unit managers, 368 clinical nurse specialists, 478 RNs entering a graduate course and 235 of the latter group on completion of their course. The results show that, of those who reported their mentoring experience, more unit managers (45%) than clinical specialists (35%) experiencing mentoring and that 79% of graduating RNs reported that they had increased their mentoring of others since beginning their course. The overall incidence of mentoring was lower than that reported in the United States. Reasons for the findings are discussed.

  10. Opinion & Special Articles: Mentoring in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology. PMID:24616198

  11. Mentoring Surgeons for the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singletary, S Eva

    2005-01-01

    Effective mentoring is especially critical in the training of surgeons. The practice of surgery in the 21st century is changing rapidly at every level, requiring a more complex approach to mentoring young...

  12. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  13. Minority students benefit from mentoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, D L; Rodak, B; Fitzgerald, N; Baker, S

    1993-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as one strategy to attract minority students to the radiologic sciences profession. This case study describes a minority mentoring program conducted for pre-radiologic science students at a Midwestern university during the 1991-92 academic year. Ten minority radiologic science students enrolled in the mentoring program. The study showed that mentoring may be a viable option to serve the special needs of minorities for recruitment and retention.

  14. A Multicultural Feminist Model of Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benishek, Lois A.; Bieschke, Kathleen J.; Park, Jeeseon; Slattery, Suzanne M.

    2004-01-01

    This article identifies ways professionals perpetuate misperceptions about mentoring when engaging in traditional methods of mentoring. Fassinger's feminist model of mentoring is expanded by incorporating multicultural elements into the model. The authors' definition of "multiculturalism" is inclusive of individuals from different races,…

  15. A Review of Undergraduate Mentoring Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenfeld, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes published studies on undergraduate mentoring programs from 2008 to 2012. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included empirical research on formal mentoring programs with undergraduate students as mentees or mentors. Each study was assessed based on limitations identified in two earlier reviews of the mentoring…

  16. Downsizing and the Willingness to Mentor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Stephen E.; Hwang, Alvin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine how employee perceptions of organizational context relate to willingness to mentor. This research will help organizations to understand the relationship between organizational context and willingness to mentor to encourage mentoring. Design/methodology/approach: This study used a survey approach. Employees who…

  17. Mentoring And Women's Perceived Professional Growth | Chovwen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of mentoring on professional growth of women and result indicated that although protégé/mentoring relationship was not formally constituted in most organizations it was found to be a significant predictor of growth and participants with mentors perceived they experienced higher growth ...

  18. Mentoring - et bidrag til bedre samspil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim

    2004-01-01

    Diskussion af mentoring som bidrag til at understøtte og styrke samspillet mellem efteruddannelse og arbejde. Artiklen inddrager erfaringer fra konkret forløb med mentoring og diskuterer forløbene i lyset af teorier om mentoring baseret på international litteratur. Artiklen udspringer af arbejde...

  19. Transition Mentoring in School Library Media Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaden, Bea

    2008-01-01

    Mentoring is defined as a professional relationship between an experienced person and inexperienced person. When newly hired library media specialists enter their schools, they often become part of the district's mentoring program. Yet, mentoring these new professionals can be problematic for school districts. In addition, when a library media…

  20. Peer Mentors Can Improve Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Shaki; Carter, Frederick, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between peer mentoring and academic performance. Students from two introductory psychology classes either received (n = 37) or did not receive (n = 36) peer mentoring. The data indicated a consistent improvement in the performance (i.e., grades on scheduled exams) of the mentored group. A similar pattern…

  1. The Truth about Mentoring Minorities: Race Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A 3-year study of mentoring patterns at 3 corporations reveals that whites and minorities follow distinct patterns of advancement and should be mentored in very different ways. Cross-race mentoring must acknowledge issues of negative stereotypes, role modeling, peer resentment, skepticism about intimacy, and network management. (JOW)

  2. The Mentoring Effect: Young People's Perspectives on the Outcomes and Availability of Mentoring. A Report for Mentor: The National Mentoring Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Mary; Bridgeland, John

    2014-01-01

    This report shares the findings from the first nationally representative survey of young people's perspectives on mentoring. While mentoring is needed and wanted by young people to help them stay on the path to high school graduation, college success, and productive adulthood, a significant mentoring gap exists in America, especially for at-risk…

  3. Community Mentoring: A Tool for Successful Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in an ad hoc and largely invisible manner in communities. This mentoring happens through modeling, storytelling, and asking open-ended questions. If Extension specialists and agents were more conscious and intentional about teaching community members and leaders about community mentoring, they would be more successful in resolving…

  4. 78 FR 853 - National Mentoring Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... Mentoring Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our American family is... Mentoring Month, we pay special tribute to the men and women who enrich the lives of our young people and... themselves. We created the Corporate Mentoring Challenge, which encourages businesses across our country to...

  5. Strategies for building an effective mentoring relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, Hilary; Hollands, Celeste; Gantt, Nancy L

    2013-11-01

    Mentoring has been recognized as a critical aspect of the professional and/or personal development of the student, resident or faculty member. This career development resource discusses strategies for building effective mentoring relationships and outlines some of the challenges to contemporary mentoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Minorities and Mentoring: Managing the Multicultural Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbfleisch, Pamela J.; Davies, Andrea B.

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the patterns in mentoring relationships among a group of 26 college or graduate educated Black data systems analysts. Finds that Black mentors play a significant role in helping Black proteges and that gender is not as important as cultural groups in predicting patterns of mentoring. (PRA)

  7. Mentor - valus, kuid aus peegel / Teeli Remmelg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Remmelg, Teeli

    2008-01-01

    Mentor Asko Talu näeb ennast kui juhi ausat peeglit ning väidab, et mentor ei saagi juhile otseselt midagi soovitada, vaid aitab pigem oma küsimustega teisel poolel ise vastusteni jõuda. Vt. samas: Mart Kallas. Mentor võtab hetkeemotsioonid maha

  8. Mentors' competence in mentoring culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students during clinical placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikarainen, Ashlee; Mikkonen, Kristina; Tuomikoski, Anna-Maria; Elo, Satu; Pitkänen, Salla; Ruotsalainen, Heidi; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2018-01-01

    To describe mentors' competence in mentoring culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students during clinical placement and identify the factors that affect mentoring. Healthcare education is confronted by several challenges in a time characterized by globalization and increasing international migration. Nursing students from diverse backgrounds continue to experience difficulties during clinical placement. Students can overcome these difficulties and assume responsibility for their learning when mentored by supportive and competent mentors. A cross-sectional, descriptive explorative study design was used. Data were collected during spring 2016 through a survey sent to mentors (n = 3,355) employed at five university hospitals in Finland. Mentors' competence in mentoring culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students was measured with the self-assessment Mentors' Competence Instrument and the Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Mentoring scale. The analysis included descriptive statistics, non-parametric tests and binary logistic regression analysis. Mentors with experience mentoring nursing students from diverse backgrounds rated their overall competence in mentoring as good. However, the results show continued challenges related to competence in linguistic diversity in mentoring. Seven factors that affect mentors' competence in linguistic diversity were identified. Despite high evaluations by mentors of competence related to cultural diversity in mentoring, there are still opportunities for improvement in this area. Innovative and effective strategies are needed to develop mentors' competence in mentoring culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students. Educational and healthcare organizations should strive to enhance collaboration and increase the competence of both mentors and nursing students to work in increasingly diverse healthcare environments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Venture Capitalist Enabled Entrepreneurial Mentoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Anirudh

    2018-01-01

    -up entrepreneur. Using some interviews and secondary data from three Indian VC firms, this chapter explores the VC and investee enterprise mentoring within the Indian start-up ecosystem, The data analysis suggests that factors for the best outcomes include VCs that are highly networked‚ intensively sector focused......, have entrepreneurs as investors, and that engage frequently with investees over managerial and market issues. Using these cases, this study proposes an antecedent‚ action and outcome model of venture capital enabled entrepreneurial mentoring in India. This model can be expanded in the global context....

  10. Using attachment theory in mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Kerri

    Attachment theory is a useful way to understand the bond between children and the people with whom they have emotional ties--usually caregivers. The theory can also help us to understand any adult relationship that provides closeness and a sense of attachment, especially in times of stress or need. Understanding the nature, cause and effect of the role and function of attachment from a training and development perspective, and different styles of attachment, may improve the quality of the mentoring experience for both mentors and mentees.

  11. Calibration and Recovery of Nuclear Test Seismic Ground-Motion Data from the Leo Brady Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, B.; Abbott, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    In 1960, Sandia National Laboratories established a small seismic network with stations in Nevada, Utah, and California with the mission to monitor underground nuclear tests (UGTs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). Over time, this seismic network came to be known as the Leo Brady Seismic Network (LBSN). The LBSN recorded approximately 800 UGTs at the NNSS from its inception through the end of testing in 1992. These irreplaceable data, mostly archived on analog, frequency-modulated magnetic tapes and stored in vaults, are now being digitized. This necessitated a calibration method to take the data from analog FM to digital counts to ground-motion units. Complicating the issue, the seismic system setup, telemetering, instrumentation, and calibration methods changed several times over the course of the LBSN's service life, and much of the documentation and knowledge of the system has been lost to time. The information necessary to understand, interpret, and ultimately calibrate these data was therefore collected from many disparate sources, each of which contains bits and pieces of relevant information. Contradictory information was often the rule rather than the exception. Where necessary (due to a lack of direct information) we made educated guesses as to the exact system, setup, and methodologies used. Ultimately, we documented the evolution and configuration of the seismic network, and determined both empirical and analytical approaches to calibrating these data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Scientists planning new internet

    CERN Multimedia

    Cookson, C

    2000-01-01

    British scientists are preparing to build the next generation internet - 'The Grid'. The government is expected to announce about 100 million pounds of funding for the project, to be done in collaboration with CERN (1/2 p).

  13. Scientists vs. the administration

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Article denouncing the supposed impartiality of signatories of a report released by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), which accused the Bush administration of systemically suborning objective science to a political agenda (1 page).

  14. Developing Scientists' "Soft" Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wendy Gordon

    2014-01-01

      A great deal of professional advice directed at undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and even early-career scientists focuses on technical skills necessary to succeed in a complex...

  15. Mentor Perspectives on the Place of Undergraduate Research Mentoring in Academic Identity and Career Development: An Analysis of Award Winning Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E.; Walkington, Helen; Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Kearsley A.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentors. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: (1) Academic Identity and Motivations; (2)…

  16. Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant at Brady's Hot Springs. The results of the study are positive, showing that a plant of innovative, yet proven design can be built to adapt current commerical fermentation-distillation technology to the application of geothermal heat energy. The specific method of heat production from the Brady's Hot Spring wells has been successful for some time at an onion drying plant. Further development of the geothermal resource to add the capacity needed for an ethanol plant is found to be feasible for a plant sized to produce 10 million gallons of motor fuel grade ethanol per year. A very adequate supply of feedgrains is found to be available for use in the plant without impact on the local or regional feedgrain market. The effect of diverting supplies from the animal feedlots in Northern Nevada and California will be mitigated by the by-product output of high-protein feed supplements that the plant will produce. The plant will have a favorable impact on the local farming economies of Fallon, Lovelock, Winnemucca and Elko, Nevada. It will make a positive and significant socioeconomic contribution to Churchill County, providing direct employment for an additional 61 persons. Environmental impact will be negligible, involving mostly a moderate increase in local truck traffic and railroad siding activity. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 deals with the technical design aspects of the plant. The second volume addresses the issue of expanded geothermal heat production at Brady's Hot Springs, goes into the details of feedstock supply economics, and looks at the markets for the plant's primary ethanol product, and the markets for its feed supplement by-products. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic viability of the proposed project.

  17. Moral issues in mentoring sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunink, G.; Leeuwen, van R.; Jansen, M.; Jochemsen, H.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the results of research that investigated whether student nurses identified the moral aspects of everyday nursing care situations and, if so, how they dealt with them. We intended to elucidate the role of mentoring situations in moral development. Student written documents

  18. Teacher to Teacher: Transgenerational Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Torres, Rachel; Hurst, Jeannine Lane; Hurst, Roy

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the relationship of teachers who mentor other teachers. We studied 125 autobiographical portfolios submitted by elementary and secondary teachers who had won awards as outstanding educators from their campuses and were competing at the district level. The research site was a midsize city (population 95,000) in…

  19. Perspectives on Mentoring Novice Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Greiner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to themed issue, vol 4, No 3 of Global Eduction Review. “Perspectives on Mentoring Novice Teachers,” Beginning teachers are confronted with specific challenges for which intensive internships for students in teacher education cannot prepare novice additional further support.

  20. Developing a mentoring program in clinical nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Robert G; McClave, Stephen; Heyland, Daren; August, David

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring programs in nutrition are essential to the survival of clinical nutrition as we know it today. The best method known to maintain an influx of talent to a discipline is by developing an active mentoring program. This paper describes 1 concept for development of a viable mentor program. Mentoring should be flexible and based on mentees' training background. Realistic goals should be set, with written and verbal feedback, to sustain a successful program. Programs should incorporate the Socratic Method whenever possible. Factors that leave doubt about the survival of nutrition as a viable area of focus for physicians include the inability to generate adequate funds to support oneself and limited numbers of mentors available with dedicated time to be a mentor. A healthy, sustainable mentoring program in clinical nutrition will ensure survival of physician-based nutrition programs.

  1. Institutional Incentives for Mentoring at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Universities: Associations With Mentors' Perceptions and Time Spent Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, Natalya C; Halvorson, Max A; Finney, John W; Bi, Xiaoyu; Hayashi, Ko P; Blonigen, Daniel M; Weitlauf, Julie C; Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth C

    2017-04-01

    Limited empirical attention to date has focused on best practices in advanced research mentoring in the health services research domain. The authors investigated whether institutional incentives for mentoring (e.g., consideration of mentoring in promotion criteria) were associated with mentors' perceptions of mentoring benefits and costs and with time spent mentoring. The authors conducted an online survey in 2014 of a national sample of mentors of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Services Research and Development Service (HSR&D) mentored career development award recipients who received an award during 2000-2012. Regression analyses were used to examine institutional incentives as predictors of perceptions of benefits and costs of mentoring and time spent mentoring. Of the 145 mentors invited, 119 (82%) responded and 110 (76%) provided complete data for the study items. Overall, mentors who reported more institutional incentives also reported greater perceived benefits of mentoring (P = .03); however, more incentives were not significantly associated with perceived costs of mentoring. Mentors who reported more institutional incentives also reported spending a greater percentage of time mentoring (P = .02). University incentives were associated with perceived benefits of mentoring (P = .02), whereas VA incentives were associated with time spent mentoring (P = .003). Institutional policies that promote and support mentorship of junior investigators, specifically by recognizing and rewarding the efforts of mentors, are integral to fostering mentorship programs that contribute to the development of early-career health services researchers into independent investigators.

  2. Reconciling Scientists and Journalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, H.

    2006-12-01

    The very nature of scientists' and journalists' jobs can put them at cross-purposes. Scientists work for years on one research project, slowly accumulating data, and are hesitant to draw sweeping conclusions without multiple rounds of hypothesis-testing. Journalists, meanwhile, are often looking for "news"—a discovery that was just made ("scientists have just discovered that...") or that defies conventional wisdom and is therefore about to turn society's thinking on its head. The very criteria that the mediamakers often use to determine newsworthiness can automatically preclude some scientific progress from making the news. There are other built-in problems in the relationship between journalists and scientists, some of which we can try to change and others of which we can learn to work around. Drawing on my personal experience as a journalist who has written for a wide variety of magazines, newspapers, and web sites, this talk will illustrate some of the inherent difficulties and offer some suggestions for how to move beyond them. It will provide a background on the way news decisions are made and how the journalist does her job, with an eye toward finding common ground and demonstrating how scientists can enjoy better relationships with journalists—relationships that can help educate the public on important scientific topics and avoid misrepresentation of scientific knowledge in the media.

  3. Faculty Mentoring Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Julie; Sawtelle, Stacy; Cheng, David; Perkins, Tony; Ownbey, Misha; MacNeill, Emily; Hockberger, Robert; Rusyniak, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Mentoring is considered a fundamental component of career success and satisfaction in academic medicine. However, there is no national standard for faculty mentoring in academic emergency medicine (EM) and a paucity of literature on the subject. The objective was to conduct a descriptive study of faculty mentoring programs and practices in academic departments of EM. An electronic survey instrument was sent to 135 department chairs of EM in the United States. The survey queried faculty demographics, mentoring practices, structure, training, expectations, and outcome measures. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare metrics of mentoring effectiveness (i.e., number of publications and National Institutes of Health [NIH] funding) across mentoring variables of interest. Thirty-nine of 135 departments completed the survey, with a heterogeneous mix of faculty classifications. While only 43.6% of departments had formal mentoring programs, many augmented faculty mentoring with project or skills-based mentoring (66.7%), peer mentoring (53.8%), and mentoring committees (18%). Although the majority of departments expected faculty to participate in mentoring relationships, only half offered some form of mentoring training. The mean number of faculty publications per department per year was 52.8, and 11 departments fell within the top 35 NIH-funded EM departments. There was an association between higher levels of perceived mentoring success and both higher NIH funding (p = 0.022) and higher departmental publications rates (p = 0.022). In addition, higher NIH funding was associated with mentoring relationships that were assigned (80%), self-identified (20%), or mixed (22%; p = 0.026). Our findings help to characterize the variability of faculty mentoring in EM, identify opportunities for improvement, and underscore the need to learn from other successful mentoring programs. This study can serve as a basis to share mentoring practices and stimulate

  4. Marketing for scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, Marc J

    2012-01-01

    It's a tough time to be a scientist: universities are shutting science departments, funding organisations are facing flat budgets, and many newspapers have dropped their science sections altogether. But according to Marc Kuchner, this anti-science climate doesn't have to equal a career death knell - it just means scientists have to be savvier about promoting their work and themselves. In "Marketing for Scientists", he provides clear, detailed advice about how to land a good job, win funding, and shape the public debate. As an astrophysicist at NASA, Kuchner knows that "marketing" can seem like a superficial distraction, whether your daily work is searching for new planets or seeking a cure for cancer. In fact, he argues, it's a critical component of the modern scientific endeavour, not only advancing personal careers but also society's knowledge. Kuchner approaches marketing as a science in itself. He translates theories about human interaction and sense of self into methods for building relationships - one o...

  5. Perceived benefits of a radiology resident mentoring program: comparison of residents with self-selected vs assigned mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kei; Slanetz, Priscilla J; Boiselle, Phillip M

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that assigned mentoring relationships are less successful than those that develop by free choice. This study evaluates radiology residents' overall experience with a mentoring program and compares the responses of those who self-selected mentors with those who were assigned mentors. A voluntary Web-based survey was sent to 27 radiology residents in postgraduate years 3-5. Data collected included the following: year in residency, method of mentor assignment, duration of relationship, frequency and types of communication, perceived value of mentoring, overall satisfaction with the program, and the perceived impact of mentoring. Twenty-five of 27 residents (93%) responded, with 14 having self-selected mentors (56%) and 11 having assigned mentors (44%). Both groups unanimously agreed that mentoring is beneficial or critical to their training; however, those residents with self-selected mentors were significantly more satisfied with the mentoring program (4 vs 3.3; P = .04) and more likely to consider their mentor as their primary mentor compared with those with assigned mentors (11 [79%] vs 4 [36%]; P = .049). Although all residents perceived a benefit, residents with self-selected mentors rated almost all mentoring parameters more positively than those with assigned mentors, although most of these parameters did not reach statistical significance. Residents highly value the importance of mentoring. However, residents who self-select their mentors are more likely to be satisfied with a mentoring program. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. How Korean Students See Scientists: The Images of the Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinwoong; Kim, Kwang-Suk

    1999-01-01

    Describes an investigation of five aspects of Korean students' images of scientists: (1) mental image; (2) physical image; (3) source of image; (4) "scientists around us;" and (5) "my favorite scientist." Finds that Korean students' stereotypical views of scientists were influenced more by affective and ethical personal…

  7. Informal Mentoring and Young Adult Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the role of informal mentoring (i.e., developing an important relationship with a non-parental adult) in the transition to full time employment among young adults (age 23-28). Multivariate analysis of the Add Health data reveals that mentoring is positively related to the likelihood of full time employment, and the relationship involves both selection and causation processes. Entrance into the world of work facilitates the development of mentoring relationships, especially among youth who identify work-related mentors after adolescence. These relationships have the potential for promoting attachment to the labor force. Mentoring relationships that develop outside of work settings and during adolescence have a positive impact on the odds of full time employment. The receipt of guidance and advice from mentors, as well as access to weak-tied mentoring relationships, teacher mentors, and friend mentors all contribute to the increased odds of employment in young adulthood. However, adolescent mentoring may be less effective among young women than it is among young men. PMID:19050736

  8. Informal Mentoring and Young Adult Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    This study explores the role of informal mentoring (i.e., developing an important relationship with a non-parental adult) in the transition to full time employment among young adults (age 23-28). Multivariate analysis of the Add Health data reveals that mentoring is positively related to the likelihood of full time employment, and the relationship involves both selection and causation processes. Entrance into the world of work facilitates the development of mentoring relationships, especially among youth who identify work-related mentors after adolescence. These relationships have the potential for promoting attachment to the labor force. Mentoring relationships that develop outside of work settings and during adolescence have a positive impact on the odds of full time employment. The receipt of guidance and advice from mentors, as well as access to weak-tied mentoring relationships, teacher mentors, and friend mentors all contribute to the increased odds of employment in young adulthood. However, adolescent mentoring may be less effective among young women than it is among young men.

  9. Mentoring a New Library Media Specialist: A Model Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Peggy Milam

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses her experiences mentoring new library media specialists for each of the past three years. She discusses the following topics: (1) What is a mentor?; (2) What exactly is the purpose of a mentor?; (3) Why mentor?; (4) What are the professional practices of a good mentor; (5) Building a professional toolbox; (6)…

  10. Mentoring: A Natural Role for Learning Community Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessenauer, Sarah L.; Law, Kristi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight mentoring as an important piece of leading a learning community. The authors will share a definition of mentoring which is applicable to the learning community experience. Characteristics of mentoring will be described, including types of mentoring and mentor-mentee relationships. The authors will apply…

  11. Developing Scientists' "Soft" Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    A great deal of professional advice directed at undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and even early-career scientists focuses on technical skills necessary to succeed in a complex work environment in which problems transcend disciplinary boundaries. Collaborative research approaches are emphasized, as are cross-training and gaining nonacademic experiences [Moslemi et al., 2009].

  12. Bringing Scientists to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he brings scientists to life when he visits schools. Having retired from teaching Drama and Theatre Studies in Liverpool for more than thirty years, the author set up his one-man Theatre-in-Education company, Blindseer Productions, and now takes his portrayals of Darwin, Galileo and Einstein to schools…

  13. Reading about Real Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Sunday

    2015-01-01

    Although students do need hands-on experiences to master key skills in science, technology, and engineering, Cummins asserts, K-12 teachers should also help students understand key STEM concepts by reading, writing, and talking about the work of professional scientists and engineers. Cummins lists high-quality texts that help young people…

  14. Michael Polanyi, the Scientist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 23; Issue 1. Comment: Michael Polanyi, the Scientist. John Polanyi. Article-in-a-Box Volume 23 Issue 1 January 2018 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/023/01/0015-0019. Abstract ...

  15. Vikram Sarabhai, the Scientist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    purposefulness he infused, contagious enthusiasm and inspira- tion he transmitted and the deep concern and love for people he showed made a strong impact on his close colleagues and the institutions he built. Bruno Russi, the celebrated scientist from. MIT with whom Sarabhai collaborated, very aptly summed up.

  16. Ethics for life scientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals, M.J.J.A.A.; Bogers, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this book we begin with two contributions on the ethical issues of working in organizations. A fruitful side effect of this start is that it gives a good insight into business ethics, a branch of applied ethics that until now is far ahead of ethics for life scientists. In the second part, ethics

  17. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  18. Today's Authors, Tomorrow's Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Although not all teachers can invite scientists into classrooms on a regular basis, they can invite them into their students' worlds through literature. Here the author shares how she used the nonfiction selection, "Science to the Rescue" (Markle 1994), as an opportunity for students to investigate socially significant problems and empower them to…

  19. A romantic scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaar Jacobsen, Anja

    2013-12-01

    While giving a lecture on electricity, electrochemistry and magnetism in the spring of 1820, the Danish scientist Hans Christian Ørsted noticed something remarkable: the magnetic needle he was using for one of his demonstrations was deflected by an electric current in a nearby wire.

  20. Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap: The Role of the Nurse Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jeannine M

    2015-11-01

    To describe the emerging role of the nurse scientist in health care organizations. Historical perspectives of the role are explored along with the roles of the nurse scientist, facilitators, barriers, and future implications. Relevant literature on evidence-based practice and research in health care organizations; nurse scientist role; interview with University of Colorado nurse scientist. The nurse scientist role is integral for expanding evidence-based decisions and nursing research. A research mentor is considered the most important facilitator for a successful nursing research program. Organizations should consider including the nurse scientist role to facilitate evidence-based practice and expand opportunities for nursing research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. From teacher to mentor: a case study on the development of mentoring skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Goulart Da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, based on a literature review, the characteristics of a good mentoring practice are presented; and second, based on an action research I analyze how one teacher developed these characteristics (or not during the process of becoming a mentor. Concerning the first objective, several researchers (MAYNARD, 2000; ORLANDI, 2001; RANDALL; THORNTON, 2001 have addressed the mentoring process. Considering their findings, it is possible to devise a list of good mentoring practices, consisting of characteristics, such as sharing expertise, developing an interpersonal relationship, understanding the mentoring situation, challenging and supporting, among others. Regarding the second objective, the data presented here are transcripts of the interactions between a novice mentor and student-teachers. These interactions show that even though all the characteristics of a good mentor were displayed during these sessions of mentoring, the extent to which they were displayed varies considerably.

  2. Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Scholars in Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences: Effects on Quality of Mentoring Interactions and Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Chaudron, Linda; Trief, Paula M.; LaGuardia, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Daryl; Goodman, Steven R.; Morse, Gene D.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Mentors rarely receive education about the unique needs of underrepresented scholars in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. We hypothesized that mentor-training and peer-mentoring interventions for these scholars would enrich the perceived quality and breadth of discussions between mentor-protégé dyads (i.e., mentor-protégé pairs). Our…

  3. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Störmann Sylvère

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite increasing recognition that mentoring is essential early in medical careers, little is known about the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students. We conducted this study to survey all medical schools in Germany regarding the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students as well as the characteristics, goals and effectiveness of these programs. Methods A definition of mentoring was established and program inclusion criteria were determined based on a review of the literature. The literature defined mentoring as a steady, long-lasting relationship designed to promote the mentee's overall development. We developed a questionnaire to assess key characteristics of mentoring programs: the advocated mentoring model, the number of participating mentees and mentors, funding and staff, and characteristics of mentees and mentors (e.g., level of training. In addition, the survey characterized the mentee-mentor relationship regarding the frequency of meetings, forms of communication, incentives for mentors, the mode of matching mentors and mentees, and results of program evaluations. Furthermore, participants were asked to characterize the aims of their programs. The questionnaire consisted of 34 questions total, in multiple-choice (17, numeric (7 and free-text (10 format. This questionnaire was sent to deans and medical education faculty in Germany between June and September 2009. For numeric answers, mean, median, and standard deviation were determined. For free-text items, responses were coded into categories using qualitative free text analysis. Results We received responses from all 36 medical schools in Germany. We found that 20 out of 36 medical schools in Germany offer 22 active mentoring programs with a median of 125 and a total of 5,843 medical students (6.9 - 7.4% of all German medical students enrolled as mentees at the time of the survey. 14 out of 22 programs (63% have been established within the

  4. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite increasing recognition that mentoring is essential early in medical careers, little is known about the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students. We conducted this study to survey all medical schools in Germany regarding the prevalence of mentoring programs for medical students as well as the characteristics, goals and effectiveness of these programs. Methods A definition of mentoring was established and program inclusion criteria were determined based on a review of the literature. The literature defined mentoring as a steady, long-lasting relationship designed to promote the mentee's overall development. We developed a questionnaire to assess key characteristics of mentoring programs: the advocated mentoring model, the number of participating mentees and mentors, funding and staff, and characteristics of mentees and mentors (e.g., level of training). In addition, the survey characterized the mentee-mentor relationship regarding the frequency of meetings, forms of communication, incentives for mentors, the mode of matching mentors and mentees, and results of program evaluations. Furthermore, participants were asked to characterize the aims of their programs. The questionnaire consisted of 34 questions total, in multiple-choice (17), numeric (7) and free-text (10) format. This questionnaire was sent to deans and medical education faculty in Germany between June and September 2009. For numeric answers, mean, median, and standard deviation were determined. For free-text items, responses were coded into categories using qualitative free text analysis. Results We received responses from all 36 medical schools in Germany. We found that 20 out of 36 medical schools in Germany offer 22 active mentoring programs with a median of 125 and a total of 5,843 medical students (6.9 - 7.4% of all German medical students) enrolled as mentees at the time of the survey. 14 out of 22 programs (63%) have been established within the last 2 years. Six

  5. Mentoring as the basis for social business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artcer Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the concept of mentoring as a basis for social business is considered. Besides, the ways of increase of efficiency of labor use through the institute of mentoring of young workers are considered by elderly people. Features of employment, work and dismissal of aging employees are also considered. Possibilities of application of mentoring, attraction of experience of pensioners taking into account the high level of their qualification are reflected. Tasks which the institute of mentoring will help to solve are formulated. The article examines the possibility of using mentoring and engaging retired employees with their experience, a high level of their education and professional qualification in the training of young inexperienced workers. Mentoring is presented as an element of social entrepreneurship.

  6. Mentoring for doctors. Do its benefits outweigh its disadvantages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Kasra; Shekarchian, Mina

    2008-01-01

    Mentoring is widely used in medicine and is an established means of professional development. We have all been mentored, knowingly or otherwise at some stage of our careers. To provide an overview of mentoring in clinical and academic medicine, review the literature, discuss various mentoring styles and weigh the advantages and disadvantages of mentoring. A discussion paper that describes good mentoring, promotes mentoring as a performance enhancer and gives examples to illustrate issues. It draws on available literature and introduces several novel ideas in mentoring. Doctors at all career stages including medical students can benefit from mentoring. Benefits of mentoring include; benefits to the mentee, benefits to the mentor and benefits to the organization. Overall, both mentees and mentors are highly satisfied with mentoring. Nevertheless, problems exist, such as conflict between the mentoring and supervisory roles of the mentor, confidentiality breaches, mentor bias, lack of "active listening" and role confusion. Problems usually stem from poor implementation of mentoring. Mentors should not be the mentee's educational supervisor or line manager or otherwise be involved in their assessment or appraisal to avoid blurring of these distinct roles. Safeguards of confidentiality are of vital importance in maintaining the integrity of the mentoring process. Good mentoring is a facilitative, developmental and positive process which requires good interpersonal skills, adequate time, an open mind and a willingness to support the relationship. Mentors should encourage critical reflection on issues to enable mentees to find solutions to their own problems. Mentoring is an important developmental process for all involved. There is a perception amongst mentors and mentees that well conducted, well timed mentoring can reap enormous benefits for mentees and be useful to mentors and organizations. However strong evidence for this is lacking and there is need for further

  7. Overcoming the obstacles: Life stories of scientists with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Crista Marie

    Scientific discovery is at the heart of solving many of the problems facing contemporary society. Scientists are retiring at rates that exceed the numbers of new scientists. Unfortunately, scientific careers still appear to be outside the reach of most individuals with learning disabilities. The purpose of this research was to better understand the methods by which successful learning disabled scientists have overcome the barriers and challenges associated with their learning disabilities in their preparation and performance as scientists. This narrative inquiry involved the researcher writing the life stories of four scientists. These life stories were generated from extensive interviews in which each of the scientists recounted their life histories. The researcher used narrative analysis to "make sense" of these learning disabled scientists' life stories. The narrative analysis required the researcher to identify and describe emergent themes characterizing each scientist's life. A cross-case analysis was then performed to uncover commonalities and differences in the lives of these four individuals. Results of the cross-case analysis revealed that all four scientists had a passion for science that emerged at an early age, which, with strong drive and determination, drove these individuals to succeed in spite of the many obstacles arising from their learning disabilities. The analysis also revealed that these scientists chose careers based on their strengths; they actively sought mentors to guide them in their preparation as scientists; and they developed coping techniques to overcome difficulties and succeed. The cross-case analysis also revealed differences in the degree to which each scientist accepted his or her learning disability. While some demonstrated inferior feelings about their successes as scientists, still other individuals revealed feelings of having superior abilities in areas such as visualization and working with people. These individuals revealed

  8. Mentoring Women in STEM: A Collegiate Investigation of Mentors and Proteges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Nicole

    Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States lags behind that of other industrialized nations. Despite national efforts to enhance the quality of STEM education for students, progress remains elusive. Underperformance is evident in measures of outcomes, participation, and retention. In particular, inequity persists in the attraction and retention of women to STEM fields. Mentoring is heavily cited as a means to improve our national efforts to fortify STEM education. This research explores mentoring styles, gender preferences, and differential impact on outcomes. The results challenge conventional wisdom that women prefer and benefit from a style of mentoring that is different from the preferred style of men. This study found that male and female proteges do not desire different types of mentoring. In fact, male and female proteges desire task-oriented mentoring when compared to relationship-oriented mentoring styles. However, female proteges prefer to be mentored by female mentors and male proteges prefer to be mentored by male mentors. In addition, with respect to gender, mentors do not differ in the type of mentoring they employ. Additionally, results of the study indicate that task-oriented mentoring style may bring incremental explanatory power with regard to intention to pursue STEM careers. This research implicates STEM program design in university settings. Gender-focused STEM programs are advised to focus on preferences and mentoring type, but not in the conventional way. This research indicates that women in STEM disciplines are not expressing a preference for relationship-oriented mentoring type and do benefit from task-oriented mentoring styles.

  9. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  10. General surgical trainee experiences of mentoring: a UK regional audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Usman; Pennell, Aaron; Musonda, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring is advocated as an essential adjunct in work-based learning providing support in career and noncareer related issues. This study aims to investigate trainee experiences and satisfaction with mentoring arrangements. E-mail survey of surgical trainees from the East of England Higher Surgical Training Deanery, UK. Factors affecting presence of a mentoring relationship and satisfaction with mentoring arrangements were analyzed. Of all respondents, 62.85% stated that they were not sure or did not have a mentor; 34.29% said that they had had a meaningful meeting with their mentor; 57.14% said that they were aware of the responsibilities of a mentor; 34.29% strongly agreed or agreed that mentoring had been useful; 25.71% said that mentoring had been useful in career development; and 20% found it useful in noncareer related issues. Of those with a mentor, only 31.43% were satisfied with mentoring. Factors affecting satisfaction with mentoring included having had a meaningful meeting, having clear objectives set, and help in job transition and noncareer related issues. Knowledge of a mentor's responsibilities was also associated with satisfaction. The only factor associated with the presence of a mentoring relationship was having a mentor appointed. We advocate the establishment of a mentoring matching scheme for mentors and mentees together with mentor training to improve mentoring provision for surgical trainees. Copyright 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mentoring for publication: faculty and student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, P W; Benjamin, F K

    1997-01-01

    Mentoring can be used to teach the writing process and to encourage undergraduate minority nursing students to produce manuscripts for publication. Through a one-to-one mentoring relationship with a nursing faculty member, a student is made aware of the links between writing as a critical skill for learning and acquiring the skills for professional nursing. The mentoring relationship supports the student from developing an idea for publication to actively participating in preparing a manuscript.

  12. Informal Mentoring and Young Adult Employment

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the role of informal mentoring (i.e., developing an important relationship with a non-parental adult) in the transition to full time employment among young adults (age 23-28). Multivariate analysis of the Add Health data reveals that mentoring is positively related to the likelihood of full time employment, and the relationship involves both selection and causation processes. Entrance into the world of work facilitates the development of mentoring relationships, especially...

  13. Mentoring in Schools: An Impact Study of Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carla; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Kauh, Tina J.; McMaken, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring involved 1,139 9- to 16-year-old students in 10 cities nationwide. Youth were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (receiving mentoring) or a control group (receiving no mentoring) and were followed for 1.5 school years. At the end of the first school…

  14. A comparison of well-peer mentored and non-peer mentored athletes' perceptions of satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matt D; Loughead, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare well-peer mentored and non-peer mentored athletes' perceptions of satisfaction. A total of 444 intercollegiate athletes (272 well-peer mentored and 172 non-peer mentored) from a variety of sport teams participated in the study. Athletes from both well-peer mentored and non-peer mentored groups reported their satisfaction levels using the Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire. The results of a MANOVA and follow-up post hoc ANOVAs showed that well-peer mentored athletes were significantly more satisfied than their non-peer mentored counterparts in terms of individual performance, personal dedication, team task contribution, team social contribution, team integration, ethics, ability utilisation and training and instruction. Overall, the findings suggest that athletes who are well-peer mentored by a teammate perceive higher satisfaction levels with various aspects of their athletic experience than athletes who are not peer mentored by a teammate. Given these positive findings, practitioners (i.e., coaches, sport psychology consultants) should inform athletes on the benefits of peer-to-peer mentoring. The practical implications of the results and strategies to promote peer athlete mentoring relationships in sport are highlighted.

  15. "Mentoring Is Sharing the Excitement of Discovery": Faculty Perceptions of Undergraduate Research Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen; Miller, Paul C.; Peeples, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Although an increasing number of studies have examined students' participation in undergraduate research (UR), little is known about faculty perceptions of mentoring in this context. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate four aspects of mentoring UR, including how faculty define high-quality UR mentoring and operationalize it in…

  16. Student Perceptions of Benefits and Challenges of Peer Mentoring Programs: Divergent Perspectives from Mentors and Mentees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Frances; Lee, Seung Hwan; Steed, Madelyn

    2017-01-01

    In this exploratory research, the authors categorize the benefits and challenges of participating in a mentoring program from the perspectives of mentors and mentees. The authors use the mentoring framework proposed by Crisp and Cruz in 2009 to inform educators. The authors report the percentage of mention, the level of occurrence, and the effect…

  17. Toward Mentoring in Palliative Social Work: A Narrative Review of Mentoring Programs in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ying Pin; Karthik, R; Teo, Chia Chia; Suppiah, Sarasvathy; Cheung, Siew Li; Krishna, Lalit

    2017-01-01

    Mentoring by an experienced practitioner enhances professional well-being, promotes resilience, and provides a means of addressing poor job satisfaction and high burnout rates among medical social workers. This is a crucial source of support for social workers working in fields with high risk of compassion fatigue and burnout like palliative care. Implementing such a program, however, is hindered by differences in understanding and application of mentoring practice. This narrative review of mentoring practice in social work seeks to identify key elements and common approaches within successful mentoring programs in social work that could be adapted to guide the design of new mentoring programs in medical social work. Methodology and Data Sources: A literature search of mentoring programs in social work between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, using Pubmed, CINAHL, OVID, ERIC, Scopus, Cochrane and ScienceDirect databases, involving a senior experienced mentor and undergraduate and/or junior postgraduates, was carried out. A total of 1302 abstracts were retrieved, 22 full-text articles were analyzed, and 8 articles were included. Thematic analysis of the included articles revealed 7 themes pertaining to the mentoring process, outcomes and barriers, and the characteristics of mentoring relationships, mentors, mentees, and host organizations. Common themes in prevailing mentoring practices help identify key elements for the design of an effective mentoring program in medical social work. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings upon clinical practice in palliative care and on sustaining such a program.

  18. The Great Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jack

    1989-11-01

    This lively history of the development of science and its relationship to society combines vivid biographies of twelve pivotal scientists, commentary on the social and historical events of their time, and over four hundred illustrations, including many in color. The biographies span from classical times to the Atomic Age, covering Aristotle, Galileo, Harvey, Newton, Lavoisier, Humboldt, Faraday, Darwin, Pasteur, Curie, Freud, and Einstein. Through the biographies and a wealth of other material, the volume reveals how social forces have influenced the course of science. Along with the highly informative color illustrations, it contains much archival material never before published, ranging from medieval woodcuts, etchings from Renaissance anatomy texts, and pages from Harvey's journal, to modern false-color x-rays and infrared photographs of solar flares. A beautifully-designed, fact-filled, stimulating work, The Great Scientists will fascinate anyone with an interest in science and how history can influence scientific discovery.

  19. Mentoring among Pakistani postgraduate resident doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ali Sibtain Farooq; Sheikh, Saman Ali; Huynh, Minh-Huy; Mohamed, Mona Adel

    2017-03-01

    Mentorship is the key to career success, improving job quality and productivity; however, several barriers are prevalent in many academic institutions. Low/middle-income countries are particularly facing difficulty dealing with poor and often non-existing mentoring. To gauge the quality of mentorship at King Edward Medical University and discover factors responsible for satisfaction or dissatisfaction of mentors and mentees. This was an institution-based cross-sectional study using web-based questionnaires: one for mentors and another one for mentees. The authors analysed the collected data using the R statistical package (V.2.15.1). The authors used Fisher's exact test to assess associations between the satisfactions of mentees and mentors and various factors such as having defined goals or the hours spent towards mentoring. p Values mentors completed questionnaires. Greater face time, clear agreement in regard to goals and expectations and proper advice from mentor regarding best practices to advance in career were associated with greater mentee satisfaction (pmentors. The majority of the mentors (seven out of nine), believed that a certification course in mentorship should be mandatory. There is a lack of opportunities for effective mentorship at King Edward Medical University. Adequate training of mentors and mentees to adopt strategies for a better career outcome of young doctors should be in place. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Management Scientists Are Human

    OpenAIRE

    Geert Hofstede

    1994-01-01

    The culture of the national environment in which an organization operates affects the management process through the collective mental programming of its members, its managers, and the management scientists who offer their theories. Four dimensions of national culture differences have been found. Among other things, they affect the implicit models in people's minds of what the act of organizing means. Among the pioneers in management science around 1900, differences along these dimensions are...

  1. Electronic Portfolios for Scientists

    OpenAIRE

    Dahn, I.; Christmann, A

    2007-01-01

    Electronic portfolios (ePortfolios) are electronic versions of paper based portfolios. They are increasingly applied in education. Software for building and maintaining ePortfolios is emerging; open specifications for the exchange of ePortfolios exist. They show the potential to serve as a standard tool for documenting achievements in lifelong learning. In this paper we explore the potential of ePortfolios for scientists.

  2. Fostering research skills in undergraduate medical students through mentored students projects: example from an Indian medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, V; Abraham, R R; Adiga, A; Ramnarayan, K; Kamath, A

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare decision-making is largely reliant on evidence-based medicine; building skills in scientific reasoning and thinking among medical students becomes an important part of medical education. Medical students in India have no formal path to becoming physicians, scientists or academicians. This study examines students' perceptions regarding research skills improvement after participating in the Mentored Student Project programme at Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal Campus, India. Additionally, this paper describes the initiatives taken for the continual improvement of the Mentored Student Project programme based on faculty and student perspectives. At Melaka Manipal Medical College, Mentored Student Project was implemented in the curriculum during second year of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programme with the intention of developing research skills essential to the career development of medical students. The study design was cross-sectional. To inculcate the spirit of team work students were grouped (n=3 to 5) and each group was asked to select a research project. The students' research projects were guided by their mentors. A questionnaire (Likert's five point scale) on students' perceptions regarding improvement in research skills after undertaking projects and guidance received from the mentor was administered to medical students after they had completed their Mentored Student Project. The responses of students were summarised using percentages. The median grade with inter-quartile range was reported for each item in the questionnaire. The median grade for all the items related to perceptions regarding improvement in research skills was 4 which reflected that the majority of the students felt that Mentored Student Project had improved their research skills. The problems encountered by the students during Mentored Student Project were related to time management for the Mentored Student Project and mentors. This study shows that students

  3. To construct a "composite mentor": College women's conceptions of mentoring, future images, and motivation in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling

    This project investigated whether college science women's conceptions of mentoring could be expanded in the direction of a "composite mentor" and the influence of this redefinition of mentoring on their future career concerns and motivation in science. It was anticipated that the composite mentor model, emphasizing a diverse set of mentors and a pro-active student role, would help women in science who struggled with the discord between their desired future images and negative stereotyped images in their field, or clash of future selves. Thirty college women in science and engineering participated in a 12-week "future career concerns" workshop series designed to introduce the "composite mentor" strategy. Pre-assessments provided evidence that clash of future selves was a salient concern and that students were searching for one mentor who represented their desired future image. Workshops scaffolded students' reflection on and participation in mentoring through interactions with a role model web site, focus groups with women professionals, and assignments. Post-surveys indicated several important findings linking conceptions of mentoring, clash of future selves, and motivation in the field. First, students' conceptions of mentoring moved in the direction of a composite mentor; students expanded their mentor selection criteria to include men and people out of their fields and saw a pro-active role for themselves. Second, this redefinition of mentoring influenced their actions because students reported new mentoring and career-related experiences. Third, although students' experiences of clash of future selves (e.g., being a "science person", combining family and career) remained at the end of the program, students were now motivated rather than discouraged by their concerns. This was influenced by students seeing clash as an on-going tension shared by the professionals across fields. Fourth, students reported a renewed motivation to stay in the field, both at the

  4. Barbara McClintock's Final Years as Nobelist and Mentor: A Memoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomet, Paul; Martienssen, Rob

    2017-09-07

    September 2, 2017, marks the 25th year after the passing of Dr. Barbara McClintock, geneticist and recipient of the 1983 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for her discovery of transposable elements in maize. This memoir focuses on the last years of her life-after the prize-and includes personal recollections of how she mentored young scientists and inspired the age of genetics, epigenetics, and genomics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science educators. It illuminates the theories of Brandwein and his protégés and colleagues about the interaction of environment, schooling, and education and Brandwein's belief in having students do original research (that is, research whose results are unknown) on their way to discovering their future scientific paths. It tests Brandwein's 1955 hypothesis on the characteristics typical of the young who eventually become scientists, namely: Three factors are considered as being significant in the development of future scientists: a Genetic Factor with a primary base in heredity (general intelligence, numerical ability, and verbal ability); a Predisposing Factor, with a primary base in functions which are psychological in nature; an Activating Factor, with a primary base in the opportunities offered in school and in the special skills of the teacher. High intelligence alone does not make a youngster a scientist (p xix).

  6. Understanding wider environmental influences on mentoring: Towards an ecological model of mentoring in academic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Sambunjak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is a complex developmental relationship that contributes to individual growth and career advancement in different areas of human activity, including academic medicine. This article describes a broader environmental milieux in which mentoring occurs and considers the ways in which the environmental factors may affect the process and outcomes of mentoring. An ecological model of mentoring is proposed that takes into account various factors broadly operating at three contextual levels. The first is societal or “macro” level, which implies cultural, economic, and political factors. The second is institutional or “meso” level, consisting of a system-related factors such as field and discipline characteristics, and government policies, and b organization-related factors such as mentoring climate, reward structure, and work design. The third contextual level relates to intrapersonal and interpersonal characteristics of mentor-mentee dyads. If mentoring dyad is viewed as the focal point, societal and institutional levels may be labeled as “external”, and personal level as “internal”. The conceptual diversity and methodological challenges in the study of mentoring need to be acknowledged, but should not be an excuse to leave the external contextual elements out of the researchers’ horizon, as they inevitably shape and modify the mentoring relationships. Conclusion. Model presented in this article offers a holistic view of mentoring in academic medicine that may help one comprehend and appreciate the complexity of influences on mentoring, and inform the future research agenda on this important topic.

  7. Peer-mentors Reflect on the Benefits of Mentoring: An Autoethography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Booth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many PhD candidates bring with them a wealth of knowledge and skills; however, these may not sufficiently prepare candidates to work with high autonomy on a project with often limited interaction with the wider research community. A peer-mentor program model, in which a mentor delivers dyadic and group support to higher degree by research students from different disciplines and backgrounds, has the potential to enhance candidates’ knowledge and skills. However, the mentors themselves can experience significant advantages, as peer-mentoring can also have a positive effect on the mentors’ research experience. In order to further understanding of the potential benefits of peer-mentoring for mentors, three researchers explore their experiences as peer-mentors through an autoethnographic framework. Through discussing their personal experiences as peer-mentors, the researchers identified a range of benefits for themselves. These benefits in-volved finding that peer- mentoring enhanced their own learning, fostered reflective practice, and provided current tertiary teaching and research support experience. Peer mentoring also gave them broad exposure to a breadth of disciplines, theories, and methods; provided project management insights; created opportunities for professional networking; supported their social needs; and gave them invaluable insight into other candidate/supervisor relationships. Their role in a peer-mentor model has shaped their experiences as PhD candidates and also informed their decisions after graduation.

  8. Personal Characteristics That Distinguish Creative Scientists from Less Creative Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chaoying; Kaufman, James C.

    2017-01-01

    What are the personal characteristics that distinguish the creative scientist from the less creative scientist? This study used the concept of implicit theory in a four-part study of scientists and graduate students in science. In the first part, we collected 1382 adjective words that describe the personal characteristics of the creative scientist…

  9. Astronomer to Data Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Jessica Kirkpatrick received her PhD in Astrophysics from Berkeley in 2012. After an exhaustive job search within academia and beyond, she accepted a job as a data scientist / analyst for the social network Yammer (acquired by Microsoft) and is now the Director of Data Science for Education Company InstaEDU. Now instead of spending her days finding patterns in the large scale structure of galaxies, she finds patterns in the behaviors of people. She'll talk about her transition from astrophysics to tech, compare and contrast the two fields, and give tips about how to land a tech job, and discuss useful tools which helped her with her transition.

  10. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  11. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  12. Improving Spatial Ability with Mentored Sketching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L.; Miller, Craig L.

    2008-01-01

    As the result of a qualitative investigation into spatial ability, a teaching technique called mentored sketching was found to be effective for teaching visualization skills to freshman engineering students. This contribution describes the technique, how it evolved, and comments made by students as to its effectiveness. While mentored sketching…

  13. A Role for Imagery in Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Examples of imagery and visualization in medicine, sports, and preservice teaching explore the potential of these techniques in mentoring relationships. They help proteges develop a positive self-image in a new role, make mentors' experience more explicit, and depict possible selves toward which proteges can work. (SK)

  14. Repositioning Professionalism: Teachers, Mentors, Policy and Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingleby, Ewan; Tummons, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the interplay between the recommended policy of providing mentors for PCET ITT (Post-Compulsory Education and Training Initial Teacher Training) students and the praxis or application of this policy. The findings are based on questionnaire data that has been gathered from 80 PCET ITT students and their mentors alongside…

  15. The Mentoring Relationship as an Educational Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bova, Breda Murphy; Phillips, Rebecca R.

    A study conducted at the University of New Mexico determined what proteges learned from their mentors and how they learned it. The subjects, 247 men and women in professional associations and graduate programs, completed a questionnaire. Survey findings suggested that proteges learned four categories of skills from their mentors: risk-taking…

  16. Mentor Teacher Group Guide: Adult Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Judy

    2004-01-01

    This Mentor Teacher Group Guide was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) and the New Mexico Coalition for Literacy (NMCL) as part of the Connecting Practice, Policy, and Research Initiative (CPPR). It was piloted with five Mentor Teacher Groups throughout the state of New Mexico in the winter of…

  17. A cross-cultural mentoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang-Nissen, S.; Myers, R.Y.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarized the results of the pilot Cross-Cultural Mentoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, from the inception of the program idea through its implementation and assessment. It discusses the benefits of mentoring, the origins of the program, program design and implementation, program assessment, and conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Mentoring Relationships and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sarah E. O.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    An estimated three million American youth are in formal, one-to-one mentoring relationships, and countless more have meaningful, natural mentoring relationships with extended family members, teachers, neighbors, coaches and other caring, non-parental adults. The empirical literature generally indicates that close and enduring mentoring…

  19. Mentoring--A New Mantra for Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundli, Liv

    2007-01-01

    Mentoring has become an important part of teacher education, as an element in both the enhancement of reflective practice and the professional development of schools. Yet the concept remains confused. Problematic issues such as the elements of power and control, and the danger of dependence and intimacy are seldom heard when mentoring is…

  20. 75 FR 1263 - National Mentoring Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Mentoring Month, 2010 Proclamation 8471--National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2010 #0... have an enormous, lasting effect on a child's life. During National Mentoring Month, we recognize those... our children have access to high- quality health care, but the advice and example of a trusted adult...

  1. National Service and Mentoring. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corporation for National and Community Service, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) supports mentoring for children and youth from disadvantaged circumstances through several of their programs. CNCS believes that caring and capable adults can make a critical difference in the lives of children and youth in need. Mentoring is a proven method to ensure students complete…

  2. Using Mentoring to Encourage Others (and Ourselves)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerenk, Julia; Chermak, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Given their multifaceted roles, mentors provide many benefits. They make themselves and their experiences available to others. They share their knowledge, expertise, skills, and insights. Mentors pay attention, and they help to strengthen one's abilities. Through their teaching and role modeling, their mentees develop leadership, communication,…

  3. Mindfulness Practices in Mentoring and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trube, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Mentoring, including peer mentoring, is a key element of teacher education programs and subsequent teaching practice. In order to share the benefits of mindfulness practices, a faculty member in a state university in the Midwestern United States promoted the practice of mindfulness by teacher candidates enrolled in her courses. As members of a…

  4. Undergraduate Research Mentoring: Obstacles and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Brad; Behling, Laura L.; Miller, Paul; Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Researchers and policy-makers in higher education increasingly espouse the view that undergraduate students should have the opportunity to learn about scholarship and research in the context of faculty-mentored research experiences. There is mounting consensus that mentored undergraduate research should be standard pedagogical practice in all…

  5. Transforming beginner teacher mentoring interventions for social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on an investigation into the use of action research for beginner teachers' professional development through the use of peer mentoring. Action research principles were applied by the mentor and the participating mentees/peers, forming a scholarly community of practice. The mentees were empowered to ...

  6. Effect of Peer Mentors on Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate peer mentoring programs strive to retain students who solve their own problems, develop options, unravel obstacles, and establish a process of figuring out solutions. A crucial component of obtaining that goal is to effectively train peer mentors to serve as advocates to freshman undergraduate students. Terrion and Philion (2008)…

  7. The Case for Women Mentoring Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Betty Ann; Tietjen-Smith, Tara

    2016-01-01

    The authors argue that there will be a critical mass of women in leadership positions in kinesiology and across higher education for substantial gender-based mentoring to take place in the 21st century. First, the current state of women in higher education leadership, trends in mentoring, and the reasons it is important for women who have…

  8. Mentoring is a Lifelong Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    One of the greatest personal benefits of mentoring and working with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows is the life-long journey together. Having graduate students who keep up with you, ask advice and sometimes get it when they haven't asked for it, being able to help them find a job, and in some cases, continuing to do research together for over 50 years is a real gift. Seeing the success of your students in their own research programs, or as Professors, or in industry, makes me feel proud like I do in my children, and when we gather at conferences, it does seem like a family.

  9. Cultivating a Global Pool of Future Geoscientists and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Yule, S.; Murphy, A.; Fenzel, M.; Buali, S.; Bourgeault, J.; Tunkl, T.; Lawani, Y.; Elwan, M.; Ruairuen, W.; Altin, L.; Boonkhot, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program ( www.globe.gov) is an international science and education program in over 28,000 schools in 114 countries. GLOBE students conduct real science - ask questions, make observations, do measurements, analyze data, and participate in research collaborations with other students and Earth scientists. In the U.S., GLOBE operates through a GLOBE Implementation Office and partnerships with U.S. organizations that recruit schools, train teachers at professional development workshops, and mentor teachers and their students to engage in GLOBE learning and research activities. Internationally, GLOBE is implemented through bilateral agreements between the U.S. government and those of partner countries that provide the structure and funding to fulfill the responsibilities and functions of a GLOBE Partnership. GLOBE students have contributed more than 129 million measurements to ongoing science investigations. GLOBE, in its 20th year, has been successful in engaging students in Earth as a system and environmental science studies during K-12 schooling and beyond as students go into college and in their careers. GLOBE Alumni is a grassroots community of former GLOBE students committed to continue GLOBE activities at a higher level. They have worked with GLOBE in Estonia, Czech Republic, Benin, Thailand and Peru, to support teachers and students in student scientific research to better understand the Earth as a system and the environment. Survey results of participants at the 2014 GLOBE Learning Expedition indicate that 53% of GLOBE students would likely choose GLOBE involvement beyond secondary school, 80 % of teachers are likely to engage former GLOBE students as near-peer mentors to their students, 70% of GLOBE Partners are likely to use the assistance of former GLOBE students when training teachers and 100% of GLOBE Partners and teachers consider former GLOBE students who may be in college or

  10. [The happy scientist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijdink, Joeri K; Vergouwen, Anton C M; Smulders, Yvo M

    2012-01-01

    The H-index is a frequently used scale to rank scientists on their scientific output. Whether subjective feeling of happiness is influenced by the level of the H-index on scientists has never been investigated. To investigate the relation between the level of the H index as a measure of scientific success and feelings of unhappiness among Dutch professors. Descriptive; national online questionnaire. All medical professors working at the Dutch university medical centres were invited to participate in an online questionnaire. Pressure to publish was measured by a questionnaire developed for this purpose and signs of burnout were measured on the Utrecht Burnout Scale. The area of emotional exhaustion on this scale was used to measure feelings of unhappiness. Every professor was asked for his or her H-index as an outcome measure. A total of 437 professors completed the questionnaire. Those in the highest tertile of the H index had significantly lower scores for emotional exhaustion (p emotional exhaustion. Professors with children living at home had a 25% higher score on emotional exhaustion than those who did not (p emotional exhaustion: a lower H index is associated with higher scores on emotional exhaustion while a high H index is associated with lower scores.

  11. A Review of Mentoring in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Stephen A; Thigpen, S Calvin

    2017-02-01

    Many believe that mentoring is essential for new and developing faculty physicians to achieve their professional and personal goals, yet there are both positive and potential negative aspects of mentoring. Research reports on the process have few quantifiable objective outcomes, use mostly single-center study populations, lack controls and use mostly qualitative techniques. Absence of a standardized definition of mentorship has allowed widespread application of the term to other forms of protégé support. Several models have been developed, with other generalized descriptors used to differentiate the important qualities of mentoring relationships. Published evidence suggests some characteristic attitudes and personal qualities, knowledge, skills and behaviors are common among successful mentors. Identification and validation of better efficacy metrics, and use of these to design new programs to train effective mentors, are needed. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mentoring - The knowledge acquired for future ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Zupančič

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is a tool which enables the transfer of knowledge: it is receiving more and more attention in work environments. Mentoring offers new knowledge and competences, new job opportunities to job seekers on the one hand, and reduces labour market imbalances in the demand and supply of professions on the other. Mentoring includes various forms of activities, connects younger and older employees, those experienced and the first job seekers. In the times of economic crisis, mentoring can enable a smoother transition of youth from education/training into the labour market, and might contribute to lower unemployment rates for young people. By respecting the responsibilities of all partners involved, Slovenia could develop its own system of knowledge transfer on the basis of the experiences of the successful countries which have already implemented mentoring schemes. This could help Slovenia broaden its existing stock of knowledge and experiences and improve its performance in the labour market.

  13. WFIRST CGI Adjutant Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdin, N.

    One of the most exciting developments in exoplanet science is the inclusion of a coronagraph instrument on WFIRST. After more than 20 years of research and development on coronagraphy and wavefront control, the technology is ready for a demonstration in space and to be used for revolutionary science. Good progress has already been made at JPL and partner institutions on the coronagraph technology and instrument design and test. The next five years as we enter Phase A will be critical for raising the TRL of the coronagraph to the needed level for flight and for converging on a design that is robust, low risk, and meets the science requirements. In addition, there is growing excitement over the possibility of rendezvousing an occulter with WFIRST/AFTA as a separate mission; this would both demonstrate that important technology and potentially dramatically enhance the science reach, introducing the possibility of imaging Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars. In this proposal I will be applying for the Coronagraph Adjutant Scientist (CAS) position. I bring to the position the background and skills needed to be an effective liaison between the project office, the instrument team, and the Science Investigation Team (SIT). My background in systems engineering before coming to Princeton (I was Chief Systems Engineer for the Gravity Probe-B mission) and my 15 years of working closely with NASA on both coronagraph and occulter technology make me well-suited to the role. I have been a lead coronagraph scientist for the WFIRST mission from the beginning, including as a member of the SDT. Together with JPL and NASA HQ, I helped organize the process for selecting the coronagraphs for the CGI, one of which, the shaped pupil, has been developed in my lab. All of the key algorithms for wavefront control (including EFC and Stroke Minimization) were originally developed by students or post-docs in my lab at Princeton. I am thus in a unique position to work with

  14. Cyprus Children's Images of Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjikyriacou, Ritsa Maria

    1998-01-01

    Describes an attempt to determine if there were gender or age differences in the images that 11- to 14-year-old students have of scientists. Results indicate that as female students get older they adopt and project a more stereotypic image of scientists, whereas male students seem to harbor a less stereotypic image of scientists as they age.…

  15. How Scientists Can Become Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Jonathan N; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-05-01

    Translating basic research discoveries through entrepreneurship must be scientist driven and institutionally supported to be successful (not the other way around). Here, we describe why scientists should engage in entrepreneurship, where institutional support for scientist-founders falls short, and how these challenges can be overcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Opportunities for Scientists to Engage the Public & Inspire Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Worssam, J.; Vaughan, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research scientists are learning that communicating science to broad, non-specialist audiences, particularly students, is just as important as communicating science to their peers via peer-reviewed scientific publications. This presentation highlights opportunities that scientists in Flagstaff, AZ have to foster public support of science & inspire students to study STEM disciplines. The goal here is to share ideas, personal experiences, & the rewards, for both students & research professionals, of engaging in science education & public outreach. Flagstaff, AZ, "America's First STEM Community," has a uniquely rich community of organizations engaged in science & engineering research & innovation, including the Flagstaff Arboretum, Coconino Community College, Gore Industries, Lowell Observatory, Museum of Northern Arizona, National Weather Service, National Park Service, National Forest Service, Northern Arizona University, Northern Arizona Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology, US Geological Survey, US Naval Observatory, & Willow Bend Environmental Education Center. These organizations connect with the Northern Arizona community during the yearly Flagstaff Festival of Science - the third oldest science festival in the world - a 10 day long, free, science festival featuring daily public lectures, open houses, interactive science & technology exhibits, field trips, & in-school speaker programs. Many research scientists from these organizations participate in these activities, e.g., public lectures, open houses, & in-school speaker programs, & also volunteer as mentors for science & engineering themed clubs in local schools. An example of a novel, innovative program, developed by a local K-12 science teacher, is the "Scientists-in-the-Classroom" mentor program, which pairs all 7th & 8th grade students with a working research scientist for the entire school year. Led by the student & guided by the mentor, they develop a variety of science / technology

  17. James F. Crow and the art of teaching and mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    To honor James F. Crow on the occasion of his 95th birthday, GENETICS has commissioned a series of Perspectives and Reviews. For GENETICS to publish the honorifics is fitting, as from their birth Crow and GENETICS have been paired. Crow was scheduled to be born in January 1916, the same month that the first issue of GENETICS was scheduled to appear, and in the many years that Crow has made major contributions to the conceptual foundations of modern genetics, GENETICS has chronicled his and other major advances in the field. The commissioned Perspectives and Reviews summarize and celebrate Professor Crow's contributions as a research scientist, administrator, colleague, community supporter, international leader, teacher, and mentor. In science, Professor Crow was the international leader of his generation in the application of genetics to populations of organisms and in uncovering the role of genetics in health and disease. In education, he was a superb undergraduate teacher whose inspiration changed the career paths of many students. His teaching skills are legendary, his lectures urbane and witty, rigorous and clear. He was also an extraordinary mentor to numerous graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom went on to establish successful careers of their own. In public service, Professor Crow served in key administrative positions at the University of Wisconsin, participated as a member of numerous national and international committees, and served as president of both the Genetics Society of America and the American Society for Human Genetics. This Perspective examines Professor Crow as teacher and mentor through the eyes and experiences of one student who was enrolled in his genetics course as an undergraduate and who later studied with him as a graduate student.

  18. A Multi-faceted Mentoring Program for Junior Faculty in Academic Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mary M.; Sandborg, Christy I.; Hudgins, Louanne; Sanford, Rania; Bachrach, Laura K.

    2016-01-01

    Problem The departure of physician-scientists from education and research into clinical practice is a growing challenge for the future of academic medicine. Junior faculty face competing demands for clinical productivity, teaching, research and work-life integration which can undermine confidence in the value of an academic career. Mentorship is important to foster career development and satisfaction in junior faculty. Intervention The goals of this academic pediatrics department were to develop, implement, and evaluate a multi-faceted pediatric mentoring program to promote retention and satisfaction of junior faculty. Program elements included one-on-one mentor-mentee meetings, didactic workshops, grant review assistance, and facilitated peer-group mentoring. Program effectiveness was assessed using annual surveys of mentees, structured mentee exit interviews as well as retention data for assistant professors. Context The mentees were Instructors and Assistant Professors in the department of pediatrics Outcome Seventy-nine mentees participated in the program from 2007 through 2014. The response rate from seven annual surveys was 84%. Sixty-nine percent of mentees felt more prepared to advance their careers, 81% had a better understanding of the criteria for advancement, 84% were satisfied with the program, and 95% found mentors accessible. Mentees who exited the program reported they most valued the one-on-one mentoring and viewed the experience positively regardless of promotion. Retention of Assistant Professors improved after initiation of the program; 4 of 13 hired from 2002–2006 left the institution whereas 18 of 18 hired from 2007–2014 were retained. Lessons Learned This multi-faceted mentoring program appeared to bolster satisfaction and enhance retention of junior pediatric faculty. Mentees reported increased understanding of the criteria for promotion and viewed the program as a positive experience regardless of career path. Individual mentor

  19. Increasing retention of early career female atmospheric scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L. M.; Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Thiry, H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT uses a multi-faceted approach to provide junior scientists with tools that will help them meet the challenges in their research and teaching career paths and will promote their retention in the field. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful and prepared to fill vacancies created by the “baby boomer” retirees. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory, Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. Post-workshop reunion events are held at national scientific meetings to maintain connectivity among each year’s participants, and for collaborating among participants of all workshops held to date. Evaluations of the two workshop cohorts thus far conclude that the workshops have been successful in achieving the goals of establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

  20. The learning experiences of mentees and mentors in a nursing school's mentoring programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Annemarie; de Villiers, Johanna

    2015-03-24

    A School of Nursing supports third-year undergraduate students (mentees) by means of a mentoring programme in which critical-care nursing students (mentors) are involved. However, the programme designers needed to find out what gaps were evident in the programme. The objectives of the study were to explore and describe the learning experiences of the mentees and mentors and to obtain recommendations for improving the programme. An action-research method was used to develop and to refine the student-mentoring programme and to identify student needs. However, for the purposes of this article a descriptive design was selected and data were gathered by means of a nominal-group technique. Fourteen mentees and five mentors participated in the research. The findings indicated that attention should be paid to the allocation and orientation of both mentors and mentees. Amongst the positive experiences was the fact that the mentees were reassured by the mentor's presence and that a relationship of trust developed between them. In consequence, the mentees developed critical thinking skills, were able to apply their knowledge and improved their ability to integrate theory and practice. Not only did the mentees gain respect for the mentors' knowledge and competence, but they also lauded the mentoring programme as a memorable and vital experience. The findings indicated that several changes would be needed to improve the structure of the mentoring programme before a new group of mentees could be placed in critical-care units.

  1. Faculty Mentors' Perspectives on E-Mentoring Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Nancy; Jacobs, Karen; Ryan, Cathryn

    2016-12-01

    E-mentoring is a viable option for mentoring students in occupational therapy educational programs. The objective of this study was to investigate faculty perspectives of faculty-to-student e-mentoring in an online post-professional doctor of occupational therapy program. In a retrospective mixed-method design, nine faculty members described features and outcomes of e-mentoring 48 doctoral students. Online survey results were analysed quantitatively for descriptive statistics; transcripts from structured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that successful, satisfactory e-mentoring is student-centered, flexible, frequent, academically and psychosocially supportive; faculty members must be skilled in adapting e-mentoring to the needs and objectives of each mentee; e-mentoring provides opportunities for faculty members and students to achieve academic and professional objectives and growth. The findings suggest that implementation of e-mentoring may be a useful model in other occupational therapy programs. There is a need for future studies with broader participant pool, observable measures of e-mentoring, standardized measures of satisfaction and success and comparison between e-mentoring with and without web camera. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mentoring from Afar: Nurse Mentor Challenges in the Canadian Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Laura D M

    2015-06-01

    There is an integral connection between leadership, mentoring and professional career progression within the nursing profession. The purpose of this article is to examine recommendations and best practices from the literature and provide a basis to construct a formalized successful mentoring dyad program with guidelines on establishing and maintaining a productive mentoring relationship over long distance. Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) nurses practice within a unique domain both domestically and abroad. The military environment incorporates many aspects of mentoring that could benefit significantly by distance interchange. Supported through examining literature within nursing, CAF publications and other professions along with contrasting successful distance mentoring programs, the findings suggest that a top-down, leadership-driven formal mentoring program could be beneficial to CAF nurses. The literature review outlines definitions of terms for mentorship and distance mentoring or e-mentoring. A cross section of technology is now embedded in all work environments with personal communication devices commonplace. Establishing mentoring relationships from afar is practical and feasible. This article provides a guided discussion for nursing leaders, managers and grassroots nurses to implement mentoring programs over distances. The recommendations and findings of this article could have universal applications to isolated nursing environments outside of Canadian military operational frameworks. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  3. Voices of Romanian scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    As Romania has now become a Member State of CERN, Romanian scientists share their thoughts about this new era of partnership for their community.   Members of ATLAS from Romanian institutes at CERN (from left to right): Dan Ciubotaru, Michele Renda, Bogdan Blidaru, Alexandra Tudorache, Marina Rotaru, Ana Dumitriu, Valentina Tudorache, Adam Jinaru, Calin Alexa. On 17 July 2016, Romania became the twenty-second Member State of CERN, 25 years after the first cooperation agreement with the country was signed. “CERN and Romania already have a long history of strong collaboration”, says Emmanuel Tsesmelis, head of Relations with Associate Members and Non-Member States. “We very much look forward to strengthening this collaboration as Romania becomes CERN’s twenty-second Member State, which promises the development of mutual interests in scientific research, related technologies and education,” he affirms. Romania&...

  4. Python for scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, John M

    2017-01-01

    Scientific Python is a significant public domain alternative to expensive proprietary software packages. This book teaches from scratch everything the working scientist needs to know using copious, downloadable, useful and adaptable code snippets. Readers will discover how easy it is to implement and test non-trivial mathematical algorithms and will be guided through the many freely available add-on modules. A range of examples, relevant to many different fields, illustrate the language's capabilities. The author also shows how to use pre-existing legacy code (usually in Fortran77) within the Python environment, thus avoiding the need to master the original code. In this new edition, several chapters have been re-written to reflect the IPython notebook style. With an extended index, an entirely new chapter discussing SymPy and a substantial increase in the number of code snippets, researchers and research students will be able to quickly acquire all the skills needed for using Python effectively.

  5. Peer to peer mentoring: Outcomes of third-year midwifery students mentoring first-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Rosemarie; Fox, Deborah; Barratt-See, Georgina

    2017-06-01

    Undergraduate midwifery students commonly experience anxiety in relation to their first clinical placement. A peer mentoring program for midwifery students was implemented in an urban Australian university. The participants were first-year mentee and third-year mentor students studying a three-year Bachelor degree in midwifery. The program offered peer support to first-year midwifery students who had little or no previous exposure to hospital clinical settings. Mentors received the opportunity to develop mentoring and leadership skills. The aim was to explore the benefits, if any, of a peer mentoring program for midwifery students. The peer mentoring program was implemented in 2012. Sixty-three peer mentors and 170 mentees participated over three academic years. Surveys were distributed at the end of each academic year. Quantitative survey data were analysed descriptively and qualitative survey data were analysed thematically using NVivo 10 software. Over 80% of mentors and mentees felt that the program helped mentees adjust to their midwifery clinical placement. At least 75% of mentors benefited, in developing their communication, mentoring and leadership skills. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data, including 'Receiving start-up advice'; 'Knowing she was there' and 'Wanting more face to face time'. There is a paucity of literature on midwifery student peer mentoring. The findings of this program demonstrate the value of peer support for mentees and adds knowledge about the mentor experience for undergraduate midwifery students. The peer mentor program was of benefit to the majority of midwifery students. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ECNS '99 - Young scientists forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceretti, M.; Janssen, S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Young Scientists Forum is a new venture for ECNS and follows the established tradition of an active participation by young scientists in these conferences. At ECNS '99 the Young Scientists Forum brought together 30 young scientists from 13 European countries. In four working groups......, they discussed emerging scientific trends in their areas of expertise and the instrumentation required to meet the scientific challenges. The outcome was presented in the Young Scientists Panel on the final day of ECNS '99. This paper is a summary of the four working group reports prepared by the Group Conveners....... (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Reconceptualizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Dohm, Faith A.; Gill Lopez, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on mentoring in academia, providing effective mentoring for faculty presents several complex dilemmas for academic units charged with facilitating mentoring. How do we institutionalize voluntary and spontaneous mentoring interaction? How do we support a collaborative climate in an inherently individual and…

  8. Student Peer Mentoring in a Hospitality Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring programs are a well recognized means to quicken students' assimilation and increase retention, but not all mentoring programs are successful. It seems that for a peer student mentoring program to be effective, the program would need mandatory participation on both ends. Perhaps both mentors and mentees could voluntarily enroll in…

  9. Mentoring for Professional Geropsychology within a Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bob G.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in doctoral programs in professional psychology has its roots in mentoring in science programs of all types. Professional psychology in general may suffer from conflating mentoring with clinical supervision. Using the Pikes Peak Model competencies as a framework, mentoring in attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to professional…

  10. Mentoring Graduate Students: The Good, Bad, and Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Jeanne H.; Jolly-Ballantine, John-Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Good mentoring of graduate students influences their perseverance and success to completion, whereas bad mentoring can result in negative outcomes, including delayed degree completion or non-completion. What the authors refer to as the gray zone is that which falls between good and bad mentoring. Examples are partial mentoring or changes in…

  11. Guide to Mentoring Boys and Young Men of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENTOR: National Mentoring Partnership, 2017

    2017-01-01

    For more than 25 years, MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership has provided the youth mentoring field with a set of researched-informed and practitioner-approved practices for creating and sustaining positive and impactful mentoring relationships and strong program services. The fourth edition of "The Elements of Effective Practice for…

  12. Young Engineers and Scientists: a Mentorship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Wuest, Martin; Marilyn, Koch B.

    The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and local high schools in San Antonio Texas (USA). It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world research experiences in physical sciences and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics computers and the Internet careers science ethics and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year students publicly present and display their work acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past 10 years. All YES graduates have entered college several have worked for SwRI and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors.

  13. The Young Engineers and Scientists Mentorship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, D. C.; Lin, C.; Clarac, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA). It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science and astronomy) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past 12 years. All YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. We acknowledge funding from local charitable foundations and the NASA E/PO program.

  14. Mentoring Nurse Practitioners in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Rodica S

    2017-08-01

    Nursing philosophy is the foundation of nurse practitioner (NP) training. However, NP practice is based on the medical care model. Thus, the necessity of mediating between these two approaches is often problematic for new NPs who are transitioning into their new roles. Mentoring has been used successfully to facilitate role transition and role understanding for nurses, NPs, and physicians. However, mentoring has been rarely studied in NPs. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory of mentoring for new NPs in a hospital setting. Grounded theory methodology was used. The sampling approach was initially purposive and was then shifted to theoretical to ensure the collection of meaningful data. Semistructuredinterviews were recorded and transcribed into Word documents for analysis. The three-phase analysis developed by Corbin and Strauss was initiated after the second interview. Sixteen participants (eight mentors and eight mentees) were interviewed between February and June 2011. The core category that emerged from the data was "defining self," and the main categories were forming the relationship, developing the relationship, and mentoring outcomes. A well-designed formal mentoring program may greatly improve the transition of NPs into a new role. The theory generated by the data from these study participants provides clearly defined categories that may be operationally defined and utilized to develop evaluation tools for mentoring programs.

  15. Mentoring college-age women: a relational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Belle; Tracy, Allison J; Taylor, Catherine A; Williams, Linda M

    2002-04-01

    Despite the popularity of mentoring programs, the relational dimension of mentoring has not been elucidated. Traditional conceptions of mentoring may exclude factors that are particularly important for women and girls, thus limiting the efficacy of mentoring programs for female adolescents. We suggest that the presence of relational qualities in the mentoring relationship (e.g., empathy, engagement, authenticity, and empowerment) strongly influences the success of mentoring in the lives of young women. In this study, we use a promising new measure of mentoring, the Relational Health Index - Mentor, to explore the impact of relational aspects of mentoring in female college students. We found that mentoring relationships high in relational qualities were associated with higher self-esteem and less loneliness

  16. An evaluation of face-to-face mentoring vs. electronic mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Gregg A.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a variety of mentoring methods on students' attitudes toward science, academic performance and retention of classroom science material. Subjects for the research were seventy-one biology students at Brevard Community College located in Cocoa, Florida. Two NASA mentors provided real world applications of academic concepts being learned in an introductory biology class. The mentors worked with one class via videoconferencing and with another class in a face-to-face mode. A third class served as a control group. The study took place in the fall, 2001. Results indicated students' attitudes toward science changed over time, with the mentored classes having the higher interest scores on four of five interest subscales. The electronically mentored class had the highest mean on three of the five interest subscales. Student performance was also positively affected in the mentored classes. No significant increased retention of assigned science material was found.

  17. Factors Related to Success in Electronic Mentoring of Female College Engineering Students by Mentors Working in Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, William S.; Single, Peg Boyle

    This paper reports findings from a comprehensive evaluation of the first national electronic mentoring program that matches female engineering students with mentors working in industry. The program being evaluated--MentorNet--uses a combination of on-line tools, computer databases, mentoring specialists, and campus and industrial contacts to…

  18. Celebrating 25 Years of Student Mentoring | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most employees of NCI at Frederick have heard of the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP). The reason is simple—it has been wildly successful. And on Friday, April 22, the program will celebrate 25 years of mentoring and learning at the WHK SIP 25th Anniversary Symposium and Awards Ceremony. During the morning session, several former interns will talk about the impact that the WHK program has had on their lives. The afternoon session will begin with a panel of current and former mentors who will answer questions from students interested in the program and staff members interested in becoming mentors. Read more...

  19. Mentoring and coaching on an organizational level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Professor Paul Marinescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at suggesting a few of the advantages of mentoring and coachibng that could be equally beneficial to employees, managers and organizations. Organizational performance can be increased if people understand the sence of their development in connection to the development competencies that are so necessary to organizational performance. The nuances of coaching and mentoring activities emphasize two professions that, if well dosed, can provide satisfactions to both the individual (employee and the organization. Along with other methods and techniques, coaching and mentoring allow for synchronize actions to be taken in order to achieve organizational development.

  20. Mentoring Partnerships in Science Education

    CERN Document Server

    Schwortz, Andria C; Guffey, Sarah Katie

    2016-01-01

    The authors use an action research (AR) approach in a collegiate studio physics class to investigate the power of partnerships via conferences as they relate to issues of establishing a student/mentor rapport, empowering students to reduce inequity, and the successes and barriers to hearing students' voices. The graduate teaching assistant (TA, Author 1) conducted one-on-one conferences with 29 students, elicited student opinions about the progress of the course, and talked with faculty, TAs, and an undergraduate supplemental instructor for other sections of the course. At the end of the semester, the students reported increased knowledge of the TA as a person and as an instructor, and vice versa. Sixty-five percent of students reported no interest in changing circumstances to make it easier to talk about personal concerns with the TA. College students reluctantly voiced their opinions about the course, possibly due to the power structure of the classroom. Other TAs in the department expressed mostly disinter...

  1. Nature and Prevalence of Mentoring Support Reported by Air Force Nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zabokrtsky, Deedra

    2001-01-01

    .... Four types of mentoring support: career mentoring, coaching, collegial social, and collegial task support, were measured using the Mentoring and Communication Support Scale. Participants (N = 467...

  2. Mentoring by design: integrating medical professional competencies into bioengineering and medical physics graduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kendra V; Peek, Kathryn E; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-12-01

    Many students in bioengineering and medical physics doctoral programs plan careers in translational research. However, while such students generally have strong quantitative abilities, they often lack experience with the culture, communication norms, and practice of bedside medicine. This may limit students' ability to function as members of multidisciplinary translational research teams. To improve students' preparation for careers in cancer translational research, we developed and implemented a mentoring program that is integrated with students' doctoral studies and aims to promote competencies in communication, biomedical ethics, teamwork, altruism, multiculturalism, and accountability. Throughout the program, patient-centered approaches and professional competencies are presented as foundational to optimal clinical care and integral to translational research. Mentoring is conducted by senior biomedical faculty and administrators and includes didactic teaching, online learning, laboratory mini-courses, clinical practicums, and multidisciplinary patient planning conferences (year 1); student development and facilitation of problem-based patient cases (year 2); and individualized mentoring based on research problems and progress toward degree completion (years 3-5). Each phase includes formative and summative evaluations. Nineteen students entered the program from 2009 through 2011. On periodic anonymous surveys, the most recent in September 2013, students indicated that the program substantially improved their knowledge of cancer biology, cancer medicine, and academic medicine; that the mentors were knowledgeable, good teachers, and dedicated to students; and that the program motivated them to become well-rounded scientists and scholars. We believe this program can be modified and disseminated to other graduate research and professional health care programs.

  3. Engaging Students and Scientists through ROV Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zande, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center's network of regional and national remotely operated vehicle (ROV) competitions for students provide a unique and exciting way for the scientific community to get involved in education and outreach and meet broader impact requirements. From Hawaii to New England, MATE's ROV competitions also facilitate collaborations among the scientific community, professional societies, government agencies, business and industry, and public aquaria. Since 2001, the MATE Center and organizations such as the Marine Technology Society (MTS), NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration, and the Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, among others, have challenged 1,000+ students to design and build ROVs for underwater tasks based on science and exploration missions taking place in the real world. From the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), more than 60 scientists, engineers, and their organizations have supported the students participating in these events and, in doing so, have contributed to E&O and increased the awareness and impact of their work. What does it take to get involved with this E&O effort? That depends on the time, technical expertise, facilities, equipment, building materials, and/or funds that you can afford to contribute. Examples of how scientists and their institutions have and continue to support MATE's ROV competitions include: -Serving as technical advisors, judges, and competition-day technical assistants. -Sharing time and technical expertise as mentors. -Providing access to facilities and equipment. -Donating building materials and supplies. -Hosting the event at your institution. In addition to helping you to become involved in E&O and meet broader impact requirements, benefits to you include: -Exposing yourself to technologies that could support your science. -Getting ideas for creative and inexpensive solutions to challenges that you may face

  4. Preparing Scientists to be Community Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Many students, especially students from historically under-represented communities, leave science majors or avoid choosing them because scientific careers do not offer enough opportunity to contribute to their communities. Citizen science, or public participation in scientific research, may address these challenges. At its most collaborative, it means inviting communities to partner in every step of the scientific process from defining the research question to applying the results to community priorities. In addition to attracting and retaining students, this level of community engagement will help diversify science, ensure the use and usability of our science, help buttress public support of science, and encourage the application of scientific results to policy. It also offers opportunities to tackle scientific questions that can't be accomplished in other way and it is demonstrably effective at helping people learn scientific concepts and methods. In order to learn how to prepare scientists for this kind of intensive community collaboration, we examined several case studies, including a project on disease and public health in Africa and the professionally evaluated experience of two summer interns in Southern Louisiana. In these and other cases, we learned that scientific expertise in a discipline has to be accompanied by a reservoir of humility and respect for other ways of knowing, the ability to work collaboratively with a broad range of disciplines and people, patience and enough career stability to allow that patience, and a willingness to adapt research to a broader set of scientific and non-scientific priorities. To help students achieve this, we found that direct instruction in participatory methods, mentoring by community members and scientists with participatory experience, in-depth training on scientific ethics and communication, explicit articulation of the goal of working with communities, and ample opportunity for personal reflection were essential

  5. The Mentor Program of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Hansen, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    the traditional classical engineering disciplines as electrical, electronic, mechanic and civil engineering the rate of female students is about 15% and it is going down. In addition the drop out rate of female students has been double the rate of male students. Consequently a pilot mentoring program...... for these students was established during the summer of 1998. This paper is based on the experiences we have obtained during the first pilot mentor program at Aalborg University. In the paper we will at first present the mentor program which is inspired from the Aalborg University tradition of group work......, and followed by mainly e-mail correspondence and secondly some of the issues which have been raised during our conversations and evaluations with the participating students and mentors will be given. Finally we will present a number of questions which we will invite you all to discuss in groups and in plenum....

  6. The Director As Mentor: Bringing Up Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Janice P.

    1987-01-01

    Acknowledges that child care teachers work in a climate of low pay, over work, and poor working conditions and suggests several ways a director can support and nurture teachers, for example, by serving as a mentor. (BB)

  7. Competence Development among mentors: An Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Linda

    2014-01-01

    this framework. The analytical approach was qualitative content analysis. Results were not entirely as expected; they showed that when the tools were used as in the research design, mentors felt they benefitted and evidence indicated their competence would improve. Surprisingly, most mentors did not perform......Artiklen er blevet dobbelt blind reviewet og jeg er i gang med at rette den til. This article presents results about student nurse mentors' competence development in relation to exploiting learning opportunities in everyday life activities in hospital wards. They are from the Danish action research...... about them. The research used the concept of 'pseudo-everyday life activities' in which hitherto undiscovered learning opportunities in everyday situations can be exploited, alongside Lauvås and Handal's 'Mentoring loop'. The research sought to establish how mentors’ competence could be improved using...

  8. Steltzer Receives 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael N.

    2014-07-01

    Heidi Steltzer, an assistant professor at Fort Lewis College, received the 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring at the 2013 Fall Meeting. This award "recognizes women in AGU who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences, while excelling in teaching and especially in mentoring young scientists." Awardees are to serve as critical role models for the next generation of female scientists by sharing their passion for the natural world. Those who know her best agree that Heidi's passion for teaching and training the next generation of researchers truly embodies the spirit of the Sulzman award. According to one nominator, "Heidi single-handedly pushed [her] department toward a more modern and integrated view of the biological sciences, revamping curricula in both majors' and non-majors' courses to include citizen science, cross-disciplinary investigation techniques, and thought-provoking forays into real-world/real-time problems." Another nominator commented that "Heidi has made an incredibly strong impact on the careers of countless students through both compassionate and enthusiastic mentoring, as well as leadership in institutional and programmatic efforts that foster student professional development and that provide research experiences. I think it is extraordinary that at this relatively early point in her career, she has already achieved a lasting legacy."

  9. Attitudes to trainee-led surgical mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O; Nugent, M; Cahill, R; Mulsow, J

    2017-11-04

    Surgical mentorship remains important especially in an era of run-through training but can be hindered by the 'generation gap' between consultants and students. To cater for this, we established a trainee-led mentorship programme for medical students interested in surgery and herein report our initial findings. Our aim is to assess the attitudes of surgical mentors and mentees to a newly established surgical trainee-led mentorship programme to determine factors desirable for its successful delivery. Six first year surgical trainees enrolled as mentors in September 2014. Ninety students enrolled as mentees. During the second semester both mentees and mentors were surveyed by an anonymous questionnaire to assess attitudes to the programme. Data was collected from 85 respondents. Eighty-nine percent of mentees felt their participation had positively impacted their decision to pursue a surgical career. The main benefits were found to be in improving technical skills (40%), providing surgical career guidance (35%) and information about surgical training programmes (14%). Of the mentor qualities most appreciated, 89% preferred institutional proximity while 30 and 27% valued enthusiasm and approachability. Ninety-three percent felt gender is unimportant; 49% preferred a mentor in their speciality of interest. Mentors valued this responsibility drawing greater job satisfaction. Our study, the first to describe the experience and potential benefits of a surgical trainee-led mentoring programme in Ireland, demonstrates a significant appetite amongst students and surgical trainees for mentorship. Further evaluation of the importance of mentoring programmes and the role of trainees in their delivery are necessary.

  10. A Case Study of URM Retention through IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2012-12-01

    As a free-standing not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URM students with supportive mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an overall improved retention rate of URM students majoring in STEM degrees. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science, Pathways to Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) Professional Development program in Earth System Science (ESS). The NASA OSSI initiative recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA student education and employment opportunities. Through IBP's virtual and person-to-person communications, students learn how to identify, apply to, and participate in NASA programs. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with REU programs in the Ocean Sciences while serving as a resource for REU program directors. As one of IBP's newest initiatives, Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM STEM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The manual which is organized by user groups serves as an e-forum providing undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty members and project directors with valuable resources to facilitate a positive REU experience. This mentoring initiative also provides a mechanism for submitting new resources and inviting feedback in mentoring best practices throughout the STEM community. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives

  11. A successful online mentoring program for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Trish; Forrester, David Anthony Tony

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the successful implementation of An Online Mentoring Program for Nurses at a Magnet-designated acute care medical center, Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH/Atlantic Health). A comprehensive approach to incorporating mentor-protégée teams into professional nurse role development has been demonstrated to (1) improve nurse employee satisfaction, retention, and recruitment outcomes; (2) change the ways nurses and others perceive nurses; (3) augment support by managers and coworkers; and (4) improve patient care outcomes. Nurses are partnered in mentor-protégée relationships and continually engage one another by evaluating the protégée's unique contributions and identifying specific strategic actions to move the protégée toward accomplishing their professional objectives. Building an online mentor-protégée collaboration: (1) maximizing potential, (2) identifying the protégée's unique contributions, and (3) strategic planning. The online mentoring process is a success and has delivered measurable results that have benefited the nurse participants and contributed to our institution's culture of nursing engagement. The online mentoring process has potential to benefit nurses and their organizations by (1) providing real-time communication, (2) facilitating strategic thinking, (3) monitoring progress, (4) "going green," and (5) improving organizational knowledge.

  12. Interprofessional mentoring: enhancing students' clinical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lait, Jana; Suter, Esther; Arthur, Nancy; Deutschlander, Siegrid

    2011-05-01

    Interprofessional (IP) collaboration is recognized as critical for patient-centred care. The clinical setting is an ideal environment for students to learn the competencies required to effectively work with providers from other professions. To enhance traditional clinical placements, we propose an IP mentoring approach, defined as learning that takes place between providers and students who are from different disciplines or health professions. In IP mentoring, students have primary relationships with their preceptors, but also have interactions with providers from other professions. We implemented IP mentoring with the support of two faculties of nursing in Alberta, Canada who provided an IP clinical focus for interested fourth year students. We emphasized to providers and students that there are no prescribed interactions that comprise IP mentoring; experiences between providers and students are context-specific and often informal. Through our evaluation we demonstrated that in IP mentoring, provider commitment was important, students engaged in IP activities of varying complexity, and students learned about roles of other professions and how to work together to provide patient-centred care. IP mentoring is an effective learning strategy to enhance students' knowledge and skills in IP collaboration without radical changes to the structure of the placements or to the educational curricula. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. AGU Joins MentorNet to Support Young Geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Inés

    2009-11-01

    AGU has joined MentorNet as a partner in a mentoring network that encourages diversity in the engineering and science professions. MentorNet matches protégés and mentors and provides mentoring advice, suggestions, and gentle reminders to keep the exchange going. This partnership makes it possible for AGU to connect student members who would like a mentor in the geosciences with members who want to mentor. Mentoring is key to encouraging young people—particularly women, Latinos, and African Americans—to become involved and stay involved with the sciences. MentorNet partners with institutions of higher education, industry, government, and professional societies to provide online programs to serve science professionals and students.

  14. Scientists work on nextgen web

    CERN Multimedia

    Bagla, Pallava

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research or CERN are busy mastering the nextgen web. Very soon, the worldwide we as it is called will peak and scientists are already working on the replacement called GRID computing." (1/2 page)

  15. Simulation for the social scientist

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbert, G. Nigel; Troitzsch, Klaus G

    2005-01-01

    ... sciences. Simulation for the Social Scientist is a practical textbook on the techniques of building computer simulations to assist understanding of social and economic issues and problems. This authoritative book details all the common approaches to social simulation to provide social scientists with an appreciation of the literature and allow those w...

  16. Mentor Age and Youth Developmental Outcomes in School-Based Mentoring Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, NaYoung

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring programs that provide guidance and support for disadvantaged youth have expanded rapidly during the past decade in the United States. Research suggests that students with teenage mentors exhibit positive youth development, including enhanced academic self-esteem and connectedness. By contrast, some studies showed that programs that offer…

  17. Mentoring outside the Line: The Importance of Authenticity, Transparency, and Vulnerability in Effective Mentoring Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries-Britt, Sharon; Snider, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Informed by the literature and professional practice, this chapter examines the unique mentoring challenges facing women and underrepresented minorities in higher education. Findings indicate that traditional mentoring approaches fall short in fully supporting the needs of underrepresented populations in higher education.

  18. Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; Segovia, Jorge, Jr.; Del Real Viramontes, José

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the…

  19. EnvironMentors: Mentoring At-Risk High School Students through University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Melissa H.; Baustian, Melissa M.; Saari, Courtney R.; Welsh, Susan; D'Elia, Christopher F.; Powers, Joseph E.; Gaston, Suzan; Francis, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Informal place-based environmental education is a proven approach for increasing environmental awareness for students in urban cities. This article describes and qualitatively evaluates the first two academic years of the EnvironMentors program at Louisiana State University (LSU-EM), which is part of a national network of EnvironMentors programs.…

  20. Frontier Scientists use Modern Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connell, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Engaging Americans and the international community in the excitement and value of Alaskan Arctic discovery is the goal of Frontier Scientists. With a changing climate, resources of polar regions are being eyed by many nations. Frontier Scientists brings the stories of field scientists in the Far North to the public. With a website, an app, short videos, and social media channels; FS is a model for making connections between the public and field scientists. FS will demonstrate how academia, web content, online communities, evaluation and marketing are brought together in a 21st century multi-media platform, how scientists can maintain their integrity while engaging in outreach, and how new forms of media such as short videos can entertain as well as inspire.

  1. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  2. Mentoring for the next generation of new managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaw, Tasha; Comello, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring programs can be key to the continued success of an organization. With anticipated increasing turnover of employees and senior management getting closer to retirement, it has never been more important to train and mentor the next generation of new managers. This article identifies personality traits that may contribute to a successful mentor/mentee relationship and discusses new schemes and approaches designed to mentor new managers.Old and new ideas can be melded together through generational mentoring. This article highlights issues regarding both the advantages and disadvantages to mentoring.

  3. Mentoring in Clinical Geropsychology: Across the Stages of Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jennifer A; Fiske, Amy; Scogin, Forrest

    Projected growth in demand for clinical geropsychologists will require expanding the number of qualified geropsychology mentors at all stages of professional development. This special section provides information on mentoring from expert geropsychology mentors who offer their perspectives, and summarize relevant research, on mentoring graduate students, interns and postdoctoral fellows, junior faculty and members of special populations. The present paper provides an introduction to the special section by establishing the need for increased mentoring within clinical geropsychology, presenting results of a survey of mentoring practices and needs, and discussing ways in which the field is responding to the challenge.

  4. Mentoring. A quality assurance tool for dentists. Part 2: what are mentoring and coaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Vernon P; Ladwa, Russ

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the traditional model of mentoring is briefly explained. A description of the current technique, which has developed from the traditional model, is then presented and a distinction made between mentoring and coaching, followed by a brief explanation of how mentoring, coaching and counselling make up a triad of helping activities. The authors then provide information on the use and impact of mentoring and coaching in some areas of human activity, other than dentistry, before outlining the application potential of these approaches in general dental practice. The paper concludes that the modern approach to mentoring and counselling offers a person-centred approach that is much more likely than traditional approaches to produce personal change, personal growth and personal development. Further aspects of this important and exciting subject will be explored in subsequent papers in this series.

  5. Impact of mentoring medical students on scholarly productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Husain, Qasim; Mauro, Kevin M; Folbe, Adam J; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2014-02-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate collaboration with medical students and other nondoctoral authors, and assess whether mentoring such students influences the academic productivity of senior authors. Six issues of the Laryngoscope and International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology (IFAR) were examined for the corresponding author of each manuscript, and whether any students were involved in authorship. The h-index of all corresponding authors was calculated using the Scopus database to compare the scholarly impact of authors collaborating with students and those collaborating exclusively with other physicians or doctoral-level researchers. Of 261 Laryngoscope manuscripts, 71.6% had exclusively physician or doctoral-level authors, 9.2% had "students" (nondoctoral-level authors) as first authors, and another 19.2% involved "student" authors. Corresponding values for IFAR manuscripts were 57.1%, 6.3%, and 36.5%. Corresponding authors who collaborated with students had higher scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index, than those collaborating exclusively with physicians and doctoral-level scientists in both journals. Collaboration with individuals who do not have doctoral-level degrees, presumably medical students, has a strong association with scholarly impact among researchers publishing in the Laryngoscope and IFAR. Research mentorship of medical students interested in otolaryngology may allow a physician-scientist to evaluate the students' effectiveness and functioning in a team setting, a critical component of success in residency training, and may have beneficial effects on research productivity for the senior author. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  6. Leadership Mentoring in Nursing Research: Creating the future cadre of nurse scientists in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafteinsdottir, T.B.; Hamers, J.P.H.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Roodbol, P.; Schoonhoven, L.; Vermeulen, H.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands’ Council for Healthcare Research (RGO) concluded some years ago that the Dutch infrastructure for nursing research was both limited and vulnerable. This was informed by the very few permanent senior nursing research positions, including a total of three full

  7. Interactivity between protégés and scientists in an electronic mentoring program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnett, Cara; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactivity is defined by Henri (1992) as a three-step process involving communication of information, a response to this information, and a reply to that first response. It is a key dimension of computer-mediated communication, particularly in the one-on-one communication involved in an electr...

  8. Encouraging Greater Student Inquiry Engagement in Science through Motivational Support by Online Scientist-Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Stuessy, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for integrating knowledge and practice in learning experiences in K-12 science education. "PlantingScience" (PS), an ideal curriculum for use as an NGSS model, is a computer-mediated collaborative learning environment intertwining scientific inquiry, classroom instruction, and online…

  9. In memoriam Dieter Möhl his life as a scientist, mentor and friend

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    The scientific life of Dieter Möhl can be split up into four major categories; namely accelerators where he made major contributions, theory and teaching, advice to the management and human relations including human rights. Regarding the first point it should be recalled that Dieter is one of the founding fathers of LEAR and in parallel worked a lot on ICE, the PS as well as the AAC until it became the AD. The list of other machines (not always built) which have profited from his contributions is very long and include the RCS, SuperLEAR, Tau-charm and neutrino factories and also various rings of FAIR. Dieter was one of leading theorists in accelerator physics making fundamental contributions to stochastic cooling, ordered beam issues, electron cooling, polarized beams and beam stability problems. He was very often called in for advice by the management, not only at CERN but in numerous advisory committees. His excellent human qualities are known worldwide and they are held in the highest esteem in particular...

  10. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judie L. Brill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 sources. The search was narrowed to include only doctoral study and mentoring. Research questions of interest were: Why do high attrition rates exist for doctoral students? What are the barriers to retention? What are the benefits of doctoral mentoring? What programs do institutions have in place to reduce attrition? The researchers found a key factor influencing doctoral student retention and success is effective faculty mentorship. In particular, the design of a mentoring and faculty training program to increase retention and provide for success after graduation is important. This research represents a key area of interest in the retention literature, as institutions continue to search for ways to better support students during their doctoral programs and post-graduation. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i2.186

  11. Promoting Physical Understanding through Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Huesmann, A.; Hooper, E.; Moore, C.; Watson, L.; Trestrail, A.; Weber, J.; Timbie, P.; Jacob, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides a supportive learning community for students studying introductory physics, as well as teaching and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors who receive extensive training and supervision. Many of our Peer Tutors were former Physics Learning Center participants. A central goal of the Physics Learning Center is to address achievement/equity gaps (e.g. race, gender, socio-economic status, disability, age, transfer status, etc.) for undergraduate students pursuing majors and coursework in STEM fields. Students meet twice a week in small learning teams of 3-8 students, facilitated by a trained Peer Mentor Tutor or staff member. These active learning teams focus on discussing core physical concepts and practicing problem-solving. The weekly training of the tutors addresses both teaching and mentoring issues in science education such as helping students to build confidence, strategies for assessing student understanding, and fostering a growth mindset. A second weekly training meeting addresses common misconceptions and strategies for teaching specific physics topics. For non-science majors we have a small Peer Mentor Tutor program for Physics in the Arts. We will discuss the Physics Learning Center's approaches to promoting inclusion, understanding, and confidence for both our participants and Peer Mentor Tutors, as well as examples from the geosciences that can be used to illustrate introductory physics concepts.

  12. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judie L. Brill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 sources. The search was narrowed to include only doctoral study and mentoring. Research questions of interest were: Why do high attrition rates exist for doctoral students? What are the barriers to retention? What are the benefits of doctoral mentoring? What programs do institutions have in place to reduce attrition? The researchers found a key factor influencing doctoral student retention and success is effective faculty mentorship. In particular, the design of a mentoring and faculty training program to increase retention and provide for success after graduation is important. This research represents a key area of interest in the retention literature, as institutions continue to search for ways to better support students during their doctoral programs and post-graduation. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i2.186

  13. Bridging the Gap Between Scientists and Classrooms: Scientist Engagement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers in today s classrooms need to find creative ways to connect students with science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) experts. These STEM experts can serve as role models and help students think about potential future STEM careers. They can also help reinforce academic knowledge and skills. The cost of transportation restricts teachers ability to take students on field trips exposing them to outside experts and unique learning environments. Additionally, arranging to bring in guest speakers to the classroom seems to happen infrequently, especially in schools in rural areas. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program [1], facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate Education Program at the NASA Johnson Space Center has created a way to enable teachers to connect their students with STEM experts virtually. These virtual connections not only help engage students with role models, but are also designed to help teachers address concepts and content standards they are required to teach. Through EEAB, scientists are able to actively engage with students across the nation in multiple ways. They can work with student teams as mentors, participate in virtual student team science presentations, or connect with students through Classroom Connection Distance Learning (DL) Events.

  14. [Mentoring for medical students : Description and evaluation of a differentiated mentoring program at a medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelt, Corinna; Heinen, Ines; Guse, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, mentoring programs for medical students have been increasingly implemented in medical schools in Germany. This article describes a voluntary mentoring program for students, which is differentiated into a common mentoring program (AP), a mentoring program for excellent students (EP) and a mentoring plus program (PP) for students with academic difficulties, and its evaluation.The evaluation is based on annual evaluation surveys among the participating mentees, who evaluate the mentoring relationship as well as the impact on their studies.The three student groups differ significantly with regard to sociodemographic variables. The satisfaction with the mentoring program is generally high: 84-94% are mentored by their preferred mentor, the majority assesses the conversational atmosphere as open (78-91%), and 89-98% would recommend participation in the program to others. The programs differ with regard to specific aspects. While PP mentees report the highest ratings on the mentor's accessibility, trustworthiness and feedback, EP mentees report the highest ratings on the mentor's competence as well as increased identification with the faculty and early career promotion through the mentoring program.The different assessments of the three programs as well as the generally high acceptance and satisfaction ratings indicate that such a differentiated mentoring program provides a framework of individual support, which is highly appreciated by most students.

  15. Mentoring in Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Mentoring In Medicine Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of ... Hardin, Montana, got hands-on healthcare experience through Mentoring in Medicine (MIM). At front is Andrew Morrison, ...

  16. Scientists' views about communication objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, John C; Dudo, Anthony; Yuan, Shupei

    2017-08-01

    This study looks at how United States-based academic scientists from five professional scientific societies think about eight different communication objectives. The degree to which scientists say they would prioritize these objectives in the context of face-to-face public engagement is statistically predicted using the scientists' attitudes, normative beliefs, and efficacy beliefs, as well as demographics and past communication activity, training, and past thinking about the objectives. The data allow for questions about the degree to which such variables consistently predict views about objectives. The research is placed in the context of assessing factors that communication trainers might seek to reshape if they wanted get scientists to consider choosing specific communication objectives.

  17. Refugee scientists under the spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extance, Andy

    2017-07-01

    Thousands of people are forced to flee war-torn regions every year, but the struggles of scientists who have to leave their homeland often goes under the radar. Andy Extance reports on initiatives to help

  18. Software Design for Empowering Scientists

    OpenAIRE

    De Roure, David; Goble, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Scientific research is increasingly digital. Some activities, such as data analysis, search, and simulation, can be accelerated by letting scientists write workflows and scripts that automate routine activities. These capture pieces of the scientific method that scientists can share. The averna Workbench, a widely deployed scientific-workflow-management system, together with the myExperiment social Web site for sharing scientific experiments, follow six principles of designing software for ad...

  19. The Local-Cosmopolitan Scientist

    OpenAIRE

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to previous discussions in the literature treating cosmopolitan and local as two distinct groups of scientists, this paperi demonstrates the notion of cosmopolitan and local as a dual orientation of highly motivated scientists. This dual orientation is derived from institutional motivation, which is a determinant of both high quality basic research and accomplishment of non-research organizational activities. The dual orientation arises in a context of similarity of the institutio...

  20. Deriving Competencies for Mentors of Clinical and Translational Scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Abedin, Zainab; Biskup, Ewelina; Silet, Karin; Garbutt, Jane M.; Kroenke, Kurt; Feldman, Mitchell D.; McGee, Richard; Fleming, Michael; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although the importance of research mentorship has been well established, the role of mentors of junior clinical and translational science investigators is not clearly defined. The authors attempt to derive a list of actionable competencies for mentors from a series of complementary methods. We examined focus groups, the literature, competencies derived for clinical and translational scholars, mentor training curricula, mentor evaluation forms and finally conducted an expert panel process in ...

  1. Youth mentoring: what is it and what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Chris; Openshaw, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This article serves as a review of the mentoring literature. Specifically, it seeks to review discussions on the issues, particularly the difficulties of defining the term mentor. Next there is an examination of any empirical evidence of possible benefits resulting from mentoring relationships. Lastly, the article explores the mentoring relationship in an effort to determine which, if any, specific characteristics may impact any positive outcomes.

  2. Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satendra Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors. Methods: Volunteer faculty (n=52, near-peers (n=57, and new entrants (n=148 admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]. Results: Many respondent faculty (27, 96% and mentees (65, 88% believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33% to 34/74 (46%. Benefits resulted from mentors’ and near-peers’ demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees; 23 mentees (82% wanted to become near-peers themselves. Conclusion: Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness.

  3. Experience in Teacher Training Through Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación Sánchez Delgado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the experience of the University of Valencia (UV in the training of new faculty members, beginning in the year 2000 with the course Introduction to University Teaching (CIDU—acronym in Spanish and continuing with the current certification program Diploma in Research, Management and University Teaching (DIGEU—acronym in Catalan. In particular, it posits mentoring, integrated into a broader training proposal, as a strategy for new faculty training; consequently, the mentor training program as well as the theoretical bases for its operation in the case of the University of Valencia, is presented. In addition, we include a report on the program’s evaluation plan, the aim of which is to provide quality information for the improvement of the program. Finally, we provide the results of two editions of said evaluation as evidence of the quality and dynamics of the reflection and the continuous improvement of the mentoring program.

  4. A Social Capital Perspective on the Mentoring of Undergraduate Life Science Researchers: An Empirical Study of Undergraduate–Postgraduate–Faculty Triads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Sadselia, Sona; Watkins, Keiana; Evans, Mara; Eby, Lillian T.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate researchers at research universities are often mentored by graduate students or postdoctoral researchers (referred to collectively as “postgraduates”) and faculty, creating a mentoring triad structure. Triads differ based on whether the undergraduate, postgraduate, and faculty member interact with one another about the undergraduate’s research. Using a social capital theory framework, we hypothesized that different triad structures provide undergraduates with varying resources (e.g., information, advice, psychosocial support) from the postgraduates and/or faculty, which would affect the undergraduates’ research outcomes. To test this, we collected data from a national sample of undergraduate life science researchers about their mentoring triad structure and a range of outcomes associated with research experiences, such as perceived gains in their abilities to think and work like scientists, science identity, and intentions to enroll in a PhD program. Undergraduates mentored by postgraduates alone reported positive outcomes, indicating that postgraduates can be effective mentors. However, undergraduates who interacted directly with faculty realized greater outcomes, suggesting that faculty interaction is important for undergraduates to realize the full benefits of research. The “closed triad,” in which undergraduates, postgraduates, and faculty all interact directly, appeared to be uniquely beneficial; these undergraduates reported the highest gains in thinking and working like a scientist. PMID:27174583

  5. Mentoring in general surgery in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto M. Kaderli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mentorship has been found as a key factor for a successful and satisfying career in academic medicine and surgery. The present study was conducted to describe the current situation of mentoring in the surgical community in Switzerland and to evaluate sex differences regarding the impact of mentoring on career success and professional satisfaction. Methods: The study was designed as an anonymous national survey to all members of the Swiss Surgical Society in 2011 (820 ordinary and 49 junior members. It was a 25-item questionnaire addressing mentor–mentee relationships and their impact on the professional front. Results: Of the 869 mailed surveys, 512 responses were received (response rate: 58.9%. Mentor–mentee relationships were reported by 344 respondents (68.1% and structured mentoring programs were noted in 23 respondents (6.7%. Compared to individuals without mentors, male mentees exhibited significantly higher subjective career advancement (5.4±1.2 vs. 5.0±1.3; p=0.03 and career development (3.3±1.9 vs. 2.5±1.7; p<0.01 scores, but the differences for female mentees were not statistically significant (4.7±1.1 vs. 4.3±1.2, p=0.16; 2.5±1.6 vs. 1.9±1.4, p=0.26; respectively. The pursuit of an academic career was not influenced by the presence of a mentor–mentee relationship for female (p=0.14 or male participants (p=0.22. Conclusions: Mentor–mentee relationships are important for the career advancement of male surgeons. The reason for the lack of an impact on the careers of female surgeons is difficult to ascertain. However, mentoring also provides lifelong learning and personal development. Thus, specific attention should be paid to the development of more structured mentoring programs for both sexes.

  6. Mentor-mentee relationship in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opota, O; Greub, G

    2017-07-01

    Clinical microbiology is a field in constant evolution, with increasing technological opportunities and a growing emphasis on human and social issues. Maintaining knowledge and skills and anticipating future changes is challenging both for laboratory managers and for all the co-workers. Training and succession preparation represents a unique opportunity to adapt/prepare future generations according to the evolutions of the field. The aim of this review is to provide to clinical microbiologists a reflection on ongoing technological and social changes in their field and a deepening of the central role of preparing future generations to these changes through a fruitful mentor-mentee relationship. This narrative review relies on selected publications addressing mentor-mentee interactions in various academic fields, on interview with our colleagues and pairs, as well as on our personal experience. From the qualities and aspects that emerged as necessary for a productive mentor-mentee interaction, we selected and discuss five of them for the mentor: the role and responsibility, the positioning, the vision, the scientific credibility, and the moral credibility, as well as five for the mentee: creativity, flexibility, energy, responsibility, and self evaluation. This review emphasizes the importance of both the scientific and the ethical credibility of the mentor and the mentee as well as the importance of human and social values such as solidarity, equality, equity, respectfulness, and empathy, and might support mentor and mentee in the field of clinical microbiology and also in the field of infectious disease in their intent for a fruitful interaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Why mentoring matters in a hypercompetitive world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Thomas J; Gabarro, John J; Lees, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Professional service firms (PSFs), like so many other companies, are juggling the modern challenges of global competition, increased regulation, and rapid employee turnover. In a people-oriented industry, attrition has special import. DeLong and Gabarro, of Harvard Business School, along with former Morgan Stanley and Ernst & Young executive Lees, argue that a PSF can gain a much-needed competitive edge by renewing its focus on mentoring. The authors' in-depth interviews with professionals from more than 30 PSFs have yielded four principles for firms to heed as they rediscover this lost art. First, mentoring is personal. Rather than relying on standardized programs, mentors must frequently--and fairly--provide authentic advice and nurturing. Partners at PSFs know how to use their ample people skills effectively with clients; the benefits of using them with junior colleagues are even greater. Second, not everyone is an A player. A small dose of attention given to a B player goes at least as far as a large one offered to an A player. Since B players constitute about 70% of PSF staff, that's time well spent. Third, choice assignments are in short supply, which limits the number of learning opportunities available for associates. Good alternatives include shadowing senior professionals on assignments and taking on research or other projects that are not client-related but that nonetheless build expertise. Finally, mentoring is a two-way street. Protégés should not only learn from their senior counterparts, but also be taught to attract mentors--and to co-mentor one another.

  8. The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Pupils' Emotional Literacy Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that peer mentoring can positively impact on emotional literacy competencies. This study explored the effects of peer mentoring on the emotional literacy competencies of Year 7 peer mentees using a quasi-experimental pre-test and post-test control group design. Results supported the hypothesis that peer mentoring has a positive…

  9. Peer Mentoring for Health Behavior Change: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R. L.; Smith, Laureen H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peer mentoring can be a powerful complement to health instruction. Mentoring has been used to change health behaviors and promote sustainable lifestyle patterns in adults and, more recently, among adolescents. Purpose: This article reviews the use of peer mentoring to promote health practices and describes how this approach can be used…

  10. Changing Institutional Culture through Peer Mentoring of Women STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicole; Bystydzienski, Jill; Desai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions often use mentoring to socialize faculty members into their academic disciplines and to retain them. Mentoring can also be used to change organizational culture to meet the needs of historically marginalized faculty members. In this article we focus on peer mentoring circles for women STEM faculty at a large,…

  11. Investigating mentor teachers’ use and acquisition of supervisory skills:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Paul Hennissen; Dr. F.J.A.J. Crasborn; Prof. dr. Fred Korthagen; Dr. Niels Brouwer

    2015-01-01

    The quality of mentoring in teacher education is an essential component of a powerful learning environment for teachers. There is no single approach to mentoring that will work in the same way for every teacher in each context. Nevertheless, most mentor teachers hardly vary their supervisory

  12. Hands Off: Mentoring a Student-Led Robotics Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Nathan R.; Mitchell, Claire E.; Tai, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Mentors play important roles in determining the working environment of out-of-school-time clubs. On robotics teams, they provide guidance in hopes that their protégés progress through an engineering process. This study examined how mentors on one robotics team who defined their mentoring style as "let the students do the work" navigated…

  13. An Evaluation of the Intensity of Mentoring: Child Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Richard; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Abbott-Shim, Martha

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the intensity effect of a mentoring intervention for Head Start teachers, the Individualised Learning Intervention (ILI), as it impacts child social emotional outcomes. Pairs of Mentor and Protégé teachers across three sites in two states were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Mentors in the intervention…

  14. Mentoring and Argumentation in a Game-Infused Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Deena L.; Parekh, Priyanka

    2017-11-01

    Engaging in argumentation from evidence is challenging for most middle school students. We report the design of a media-based mentoring system to support middle school students in engaging in argumentation in the context of a game-infused science curriculum. Our design emphasizes learners apprenticing with college student mentors around the socio-scientific inquiry of a designed video game. We report the results of a mixed-methods study examining the use of this media-based mentoring system with students ages 11 through 14. We observed that the discourse of groups of students that engaged with the game-infused science curriculum while interacting with college student mentors via a social media platform demonstrated statistically significant higher ratings of cognitive, epistemic, and social aspects of argumentation than groups of students that engaged with the social media platform and game-infused science curriculum without mentors. We further explored the differences between the Discourses of the mentored and non-mentored groups. This analysis showed that students in the mentored groups were invited, guided, and socialized into roles of greater agency than students in the non-mentored groups. This increased agency might explain why mentored groups demonstrated higher levels of scientific argumentation than non-mentored groups. Based on our analyses, we argue that media-based mentoring may be designed around a video game to support middle school students in engaging in argumentation from evidence.

  15. The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Marketing Content Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Lynn E.; Neill, Stern; Simon, Lisa R.; Dobson, Sharon; Davis, Brennan

    2016-01-01

    This article describes and assesses a course design that uses peer mentors to facilitate a collaborative, hands-on learning experience in an introductory marketing course. Results demonstrate that peer mentoring increased content mastery and had a positive effect on students' perceptions of the learning experience. Peer marketing mentors, along…

  16. Medical Student Mentorship in Plastic Surgery: The Mentor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Jeffrey E; Barker, Jenny C

    2016-11-01

    The reproducible benefits of mentoring to mentees have been studied extensively. However, insights from the mentor perspective are less well described. This study evaluates mentorship of plastic surgery medical students from the attending surgeon's perspective. A comparison is made with a previous publication evaluating mentorship from the medical student's perspective. An electronic survey was sent to 1025 active members of the American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons (ACAPS) and the American Association of Plastic Surgeons (AAPS), with a combined response rate of 23 percent. For individual organizations, the response rate was 40 percent for ACAPS and 24 percent for AAPS. Eighty-three percent of attending surgeons reported participation in medical student mentoring. Mentor demographics and preferences were defined. The majority of mentors are men, older than 50 years, with a clinically focused, academic practice. Although scheduled, one-on-one meetings were the most preferred form of interaction, mentors generally favored group activities. Mentors also preferred to meet less frequently and in less personalized formats than mentees. Mentors perceived enhanced job satisfaction and a sense of "giving back" as most important. The most common barriers included mentor time constraints and lack of exposure to medical students. The presence of plastic surgery involvement in the medical school curriculum correlated directly with the formation of mentoring relationships. By comparing the perspectives on mentoring between attending surgeons and medical students, discrepancies and similarities were identified. These findings can be used to increase efficacy and strengthen mentoring efforts for medical students in plastic surgery.

  17. Mentoring At-Risk Students in a Remedial Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    A peer mentoring program has been implemented to support a group of at-risk students enrolled in two sections of an elementary algebra course at an urban community college. Peer mentors were recruited from advanced mathematics classes and trained to provide individualized tutoring and mentoring support to at-risk students. The results show that…

  18. Peer mentoring in doctor performance assessment: strategies, obstacles and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Karlijn; Driessen, Erik W.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Wollersheim, Hub C.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mentors are increasingly involved in doctor performance assessments. Mentoring seems to be a key determinant in achieving the ultimate goal of those assessments, namely, improving doctor performance. Little is known, however, about how mentors perceive and fulfil this role. OBJECTIVE: The

  19. Academic mentoring and the future of tertiary education in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tertiary education is a major outlet for the provision of high manpower for national development. This paper therefore highlighted the challenges of tertiary education in Nigeria, early perspectives of mentoring undergraduates, the rationale for academic mentoring, the role of a mentor, and the role of library as catalyst in the ...

  20. Peer mentoring in doctor performance assessment: strategies, obstacles and benefits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Driessen, E.W.; Arah, O.A.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mentors are increasingly involved in doctor performance assessments. Mentoring seems to be a key determinant in achieving the ultimate goal of those assessments, namely, improving doctor performance. Little is known, however, about how mentors perceive and fulfil this role. OBJECTIVE: The

  1. A Conceptual Framework for Mentoring in a Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a conceptual framework for mentoring as an added component of a learning organization in the context of adult learning and development theories. Mentoring is traditionally a process in which an experienced person (the mentor) guides another person (the mentee or protégé) in the development of her or his…

  2. Collaborations That Promote Growth: Music Student Teachers as Peer Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draves, Tami J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the experiences of four music student teachers engaged in peer mentoring. This was an intrinsic case study with a focus on the peer-mentoring programme. Data included reflections on peer-mentoring activities and individual and focus group interviews. Five themes resulted from data analysis: expanding…

  3. Mentoring as Professional Development for Novice Entrepreneurs: Maximizing the Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jean, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring can be seen as relevant if not essential in the continuing professional development of entrepreneurs. In the present study, we seek to understand how to maximize the learning that occurs through the mentoring process. To achieve this, we consider various elements that the literature suggested are associated with successful mentoring and…

  4. Weaving Authenticity and Legitimacy: Latina Faculty Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative to typical top-down mentoring models, the authors advance a conception of peer mentoring that is based on research about collectivist strategies that Latina faculty employ to navigate the academy. The authors advance recommendations for institutional agents to support mentoring for faculty who are members of historically…

  5. Peer Mentoring in Higher Education: Issues of Power and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    In response to widespread support for mentoring schemes in higher education this article calls for a more critical investigation of the dynamics of power and control, which are intrinsic to the mentoring process, and questions presumptions that mentoring brings only positive benefits to its participants. It provides this more critical appraisal by…

  6. Mentoring and Student Support in Online Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Coe, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The increase in online graduate programs and the online mentoring of student research have led to the need to identify challenges faced by online mentees and successful strategies used by online mentors during the dissertation process. Based on semistructured interviews with ten graduates, strategies for online mentoring and areas of support…

  7. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  8. MENTORING. What can support projects achieve that schools cannot?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crul, M.R.J.; Schneider, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring and coaching is an established practice in corporate multinational firms worldwide, but mentoring programs for school pupils are still relatively new in Europe. This policy brief highlights a special kind of mentor: students in higher education with an immigrant background who can act as

  9. Mentors for Women Entering Administration: A Program That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebkemann, Heinz; Clemens, Jacqueline

    1994-01-01

    Describes a Florida State University study of six women principals to determine specific influences in their emerging development as successful leaders. Although women can advance without mentors, having mentors can definitely advance the timetable for entering the administrative ranks. Since mentoring efforts are not always successful, careful…

  10. Athena's Daughters: Women's Perceptions of Mentoring and the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, Christine F.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Egan's theory of women's mentoring styles, and related attitudes toward mentoring and the workplace, generalize to women in higher education administration and to women of color. Egan's theory of women's mentoring, based upon the epistemologies conceptualized by Belenky, Clinchy, Goldberger, and…

  11. Mentor and Protege Goal Orientations as Predictors of Newcomer Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullick, Julia M.; Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Yarbrough, Charyl Staci; Scielzo, Shannon A.

    2012-01-01

    Although many academic organizations offer formal mentoring programs, little is known about how individual characteristics of peer mentors and their proteges interact to reduce new-student stress. First-year college students participated in a peer-mentoring program designed to reduce stress. The results of this study demonstrated that proteges who…

  12. Experienced Teachers' Voices: What Motivates Them to Mentor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Ruben; Ramirez, Alfredo, Jr.; Ovando, Martha

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined 88 experienced teachers' responses related to mentoring. Our findings suggest mentors possess the willingness and expertise to enhance the professional development and growth of a beginning teacher. Mentors were motivated by the opportunity to express an altruistic value, to provide affective support, to grow…

  13. Mentoring and Leadership: A Practical Application for One's Career Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Kevin; Moore, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores mentoring and mentorship at the beginning and ending of one's career path and the role of mentoring in the process. It frames the mentoring and leadership discussion using the lens of a first year teacher in a LaSallian elementary school in Browning, Montana, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Topics examined in this paper…

  14. Mentor development in higher education in Botswana: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mentors can develop their mentoring abilities through reflective practice and an overt transformational approach to mentoring. An action research methodology was used for a framework of cycles used in the data collection from face-to-face conversations, reflective journals and focus group interviews. The findings indicate ...

  15. Mentoring Relationship Quality and Maltreated Children's Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesmore, Ashley A; Weiler, Lindsey M; Taussig, Heather N

    2017-09-01

    Coping strategies are believed to protect against the harmful effects of maltreatment on children's psychosocial outcomes. Caregivers are thought to be critical in helping children develop adaptive coping strategies, yet many maltreated children have poor and/or insecure relationships with their parents. A quality relationship with a caring, non-parental adult (e.g., a mentor), however, may be one strategy to promote healthy coping among maltreated children. Children (N = 154) in this study participated in a mentoring and skill-based program for maltreated preadolescents placed in foster care. Hierarchical regression was used to assess the association between children's reports of their relationship with their mentor at the end of the intervention and four coping strategies (i.e., Active, Support-seeking, Avoidance, and Distraction) 6 months following the intervention, while accounting for baseline coping strategies and other demographic factors. Above and beyond the covariates, better mentoring relationship quality was associated with children's greater use of Active and Distraction coping 6-month post-intervention. Mentoring relationship quality was not significantly associated with children's Avoidance or Support-seeking coping. The findings suggest that mentoring programs may be a fruitful approach to improving vulnerable children's coping skills. Healthy coping is hypothesized to protect against the harmful effects of maltreatment and to promote resilience in the face of multiple stressors (Banyard & Williams, ; Boxer & Sloan-Power, 2013; Cicchetti & Rogosch, 2009). It remains unclear, however, how best to promote positive coping among maltreated children, who are disproportionately exposed to numerous adverse childhood experiences (Raviv, Taussig, Culhane & Garrido, 2010). Theories of coping emphasize the importance of coping socialization through quality parent-child relationships (Kliewer et al., 2006; Skinner & Wellborn, ). Unfortunately, many

  16. Mentoring Women in the Frederick Community | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy Beveridge, clinical project manager III, is all about building relationships. Her work as a clinical project manager requires her to manage teams such as the Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials, Center for Global Health, Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative, and Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis. Equally important are the relationships Beveridge builds through her work with Woman to Woman Mentoring, Inc. (W2WM), a 501(C)3 non-profit organization that seeks to cultivate mentoring relationships that provide women with guidance, support, and connections.

  17. Besitzt Mentoring kultur- und strukturverändernde Potenziale? Does Mentoring have Cultural and Structural Changing Potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Franzke

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Während Mentoring bislang hinsichtlich seiner individuellen Effekte vor allem in theoretischen Arbeiten untersucht und in Evaluationsstudien empirisch ausgewertet worden ist, fragen die Herausgeberinnen nach den kultur- und strukturverändernden Potenzialen durch Mentoring im universitären Feld.Theoretical surveys have examined the individual effects of mentoring and evaluative studies have empirically analyzed these effects. However, the editors inquire into the cultural and structural changing potential of mentoring for the university field.

  18. Professional Ethics for Climate Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, K.; Mann, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Several authors have warned that climate scientists sometimes exhibit a tendency to "err on the side of least drama" in reporting the risks associated with fossil fuel emissions. Scientists are often reluctant to comment on the implications of their work for public policy, despite the fact that because of their expertise they may be among those best placed to make recommendations about such matters as mitigation and preparedness. Scientists often have little or no training in ethics or philosophy, and consequently they may feel that they lack clear guidelines for balancing the imperative to avoid error against the need to speak out when it may be ethically required to do so. This dilemma becomes acute in cases such as abrupt ice sheet collapse where it is easier to identify a risk than to assess its probability. We will argue that long-established codes of ethics in the learned professions such as medicine and engineering offer a model that can guide research scientists in cases like this, and we suggest that ethical training could be regularly incorporated into graduate curricula in fields such as climate science and geology. We recognize that there are disanalogies between professional and scientific ethics, the most important of which is that codes of ethics are typically written into the laws that govern licensed professions such as engineering. Presently, no one can legally compel a research scientist to be ethical, although legal precedent may evolve such that scientists are increasingly expected to communicate their knowledge of risks. We will show that the principles of professional ethics can be readily adapted to define an ethical code that could be voluntarily adopted by scientists who seek clearer guidelines in an era of rapid climate change.

  19. The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Mentee Academic Performance: Is Any Mentoring Style Better than No Mentoring at All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, Birgit; Strassnig, Barbara; Schütz, Marlene; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Schabmann, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Universities frequently offer support programs to assist first-year students with the transition from school to the university. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different mentoring styles on mentee academic performance after 1 year and 2 years of study. Participants consisted of 417 psychology students who started their…

  20. The Value of Preparing PhD Students as Research Mentors: Application of Kram's Temporal Mentoring Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott-Anderson, Kristen; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Lyles, Annmarie A

    The ability to successfully mentor others is an essential skill necessary for building and strengthening an infrastructure of well-prepared nurse faculty to accelerate advancements in nursing science. Mentoring is a fundamental part of the nurse faculty role, but new faculty are often unprepared to take on mentoring roles early in their academic career. Applied training in research mentoring initiated during doctor of philosophy (PhD) programs may better prepare future faculty to manage teaching and mentoring responsibilities earlier and with greater confidence. The unique opportunity exists for PhD students to engage in research mentoring with undergraduate nursing students, with probable benefits for both the mentor and the mentee. This manuscript uses Kram's temporal mentoring model as a guide to examine the training experiences of 3 PhD students mentoring undergraduate nursing students and discusses the benefits and challenges associated with these mentoring relationships. Collectively, these experiences provide preliminary support and guidance for the development and adoption of formal PhD mentor training programs to better prepare future PhD nursing faculty for their mentoring responsibilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mentoring: A Grounded Theory Study Examining How the Relationship between the Mentor and Mentee Becomes Mutually Beneficial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David Richard

    2013-01-01

    This grounded theory qualitative study examined the mentee/mentor relationship between five first year teachers and their five assigned mentors in a school district in Central Florida. To generate a model that seeks to explain how and why a mentee/mentor relationship changes and evolves from that of a single directional stream of information to…

  2. Spectrum Approach to Mentoring: An Evidence-Based Approach to Mentoring for Academics Working in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marina; Ambler, Trudy; Cahir, Jayde

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal and empirical evidence indicates that mentoring can be a successful strategy for supporting professional learning, yet limited literature exists on approaches to mentoring designed specifically for academics working in higher education. The aim of this study was to create an approach to mentoring tailored to the needs of academics and…

  3. Mentor's brain functional connectivity network during robotic assisted surgery mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Somayeh B; Doyle, Scott T; Guru, Khurshid A

    2016-08-01

    In many complicated cognitive-motor tasks mentoring is inevitable during the learning process. Although mentors are expert in doing the task, trainee's operation might be new for a mentor. This makes mentoring a very difficult task which demands not only the knowledge and experience of a mentor, but also his/her ability to follow trainee's movements and patiently advise him/her during the operation. We hypothesize that information binding throughout the mentor's brain areas, contributed to the task, changes as the expertise level of the trainee improves from novice to intermediate and expert. This can result in the change of mentor's level of satisfaction. The brain functional connectivity network is extracted by using brain activity of a mentor during mentoring novice and intermediate surgeons, watching expert surgeon operation, and doing Urethrovesical Anasthomosis (UVA) procedure by himself. By using the extracted network, we investigate the role of modularity and neural activity efficiency in mentoring. Brain activity is measured by using a 24-channel ABM Neuro-headset with the frequency of 256 Hz. One mentor operates 26 UVA procedures and three trainees with the expertise level of novice, intermediate, and expert perform 26 UVA procedures under the supervision of mentor. Our results indicate that the modularity of functional connectivity network is higher when mentor performs the task or watches the expert operation comparing mentoring the novice and intermediate surgeons. At the end of each operation, mentor subjectively assesses the quality of operation by giving scores to NASA-TLX indexes. Performance score is used to discuss our results. The extracted significant positive correlation between performance level and modularity (r = 0.38, p - value <; 0.005) shows the increase of automaticity and decrease in neural activity cost by improving the performance.

  4. The value of speed mentoring in a pediatric academic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwint, Janet R; Cellini, Melissa M; Spector, Nancy D; Gusic, Maryellen E

    2014-01-01

    A reliable and supportive mentor is indispensable to the career development of successful academic professionals. The Academic Pediatric Association (APA) utilized a speed mentoring format at the 2012 Pediatric Academic Societies meeting to enhance mentoring potential. We sought to evaluate the structure of the speed mentoring event and to determine the benefits and impact from the perspectives of the mentors and mentees. Sixty mentees were matched with 60 mentors within various tracks. Each mentee met with 6 mentors for 10 minutes for each dyad. Participants were then asked to complete a survey 1 to 4 weeks after the event. Survey items included expectation, impact, and value of the experience along with potential for ongoing mentoring relationships. Fifty-four (90%) of the 60 mentees and 52 (87%) of 60 of the mentors completed the evaluation. Mentees stated that the event allowed them to receive advice from multiple mentors in a short time period. Mentors appreciated that they gained new insights, reflected on their own careers, and were able to give back to their field. Both mentees and mentors agreed that the time was well spent, would participate again, and identified chemistry as a major factor in pursuing an ongoing relationship. This national speed mentoring event provided an innovative, fun, and time-efficient mechanism to establish connections, network, and determine whether chemistry existed for potential mentor-mentee relationships. Further study should evaluate whether it can be used in other venues and lead to the development of lasting mentor-mentee relationships. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Benefits of Peer Mentoring to Mentors, Female Mentees and Higher Education Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia; Faber, Stine Thidemann

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a study of a pilot mentoring program for early career female researchers at a university that addressed the under-representation of female researchers in senior academic positions. Embracing a grounded theory approach, we draw on a design comprising an ex-ante and an ex......-post evaluation. We disclose that development mentoring was at play. Benefits for the mentees consisted of guidance to career planning, competence awareness, establishment of networks, navigating in the research environment, and moral support. In our study we also show that the mentor–mentee relationship...... was reciprocal, as also mentors benefited. Benefits for the mentors comprised professional development, institutional recognition, and personal satisfaction. We conclude with an inventory of benefits, including for the institution in terms of a strengthened research environment....

  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see ...

  7. Affective Commitment to Organizations: A Comparison Study of Reverse Mentoring Versus Traditional Mentoring Among Millennials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrin Hechl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A current topic of interest in management and organization research is the phenomenon of a generation shift in the workforce and how this shift will affect organizations in the near future.  Millennials represent the largest generational cohort in the American workforce.  Organizations find themselves challenged with retention efforts as Millennials tend to leave an organization after short tenures.  The problem this study addressed is the high turnover rates among millennial employees. Specifically, it was unknown whether Millennials who received reverse mentoring evidenced greater affective commitment to the organization as compared to Millennials who received standard mentoring.  The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that Millennials who received reverse mentoring evidenced greater affective commitment to the organization as compared to Millennials who received standard mentoring.  A two group post-test only quasi-experimental design was conducted.  A total of 90 participants (45 per group completed the survey.  The survey was conducted by Qualtrics, an online survey company.  The sample population included male and female individuals, born between 1982 and 1998, employed by all types of organizations in the United States and participating in a mentoring program at the time the survey was taken.  Affective commitment was greater in the reverse mentoring group (M = 36.683, SE = .959 compared to the traditional mentoring group (M = 34.984, SE = .959.  However, after adjustment for quality of relationship (LMX and length and frequency of mentoring (LFM there was no statistically significant difference (p < .05 between traditional mentoring and reverse mentoring on affective commitment to the organization indicated by F(1,86 = 1.569, p = .214.  Additional results of this study showed that two-thirds of the surveyed millennial employees had already exceeded the average length of employment of 12 to 18 months with

  8. Mentoring as a supportive pedagogy in theological training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan H. Chiroma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article contends that theological training supported by effective mentoring can contribute to the shaping of theology students in terms of their spiritual growth, character development and ministry formation. It is further argued that mentoring as a supportive pedagogy needs to be an essential element of theological education. Subsequently, guidelines for making mentoring an effective pedagogy in theological training are proposed. A lot has been written about mentoring; however this article focuses on the use of mentoring as a supportive pedagogy in denominational seminaries as a means of fostering the holistic development of theology students.

  9. Speed dating for mentors: a novel approach to mentor/mentee pairing in surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Akia D; Schwartzman, Jacob; Kunac, Anastasia

    2017-06-15

    Resident-resident mentoring offers significant benefits. Previous works have shown that the quality of the mentorship pairing is important, but techniques of pairing have seldom been described. We describe a system for mentor-mentee pairing that we call "Speed Dating for Mentors" (SDM). The SDM activity took place in an academic general surgery residency program in the Northeast. Senior residents met with junior residents (JR) in 90-second intervals. On completion of interviews, residents documented their top three choices-this was used to create senior-junior resident pairings. A cross-sectional Likert survey was conducted with univariate analysis of satisfaction with the SDM event. Forty-two surgical residents participated in SDM-23 junior residents and 19 senior residents-resulting in 23 mentor-mentee pairings. Fourteen pairs were generated, where both mentor and mentee were among top three choices, seven pairings generated where either/or was a top three choice, and two pairings were assigned; six pairs were assigned for nonattendees. A total of 36 surveys were completed-28 (78%) respondents participated in SDM compared to eight (22%) who did not. Eighty-five percent of respondents who attended were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their pairing compared to only 12% of nonattendees (P = 0.001). "Speed dating" is a novel approach to forming mentorship pairings and identifying mentors/mentees with similar interests. Residents who attended the event were satisfied with the event and with the outcome of their mentor/mentee pairing. Further investigations are warranted to determine what effects resident mentoring has on resident performance, stress levels, and well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mentoring for Inclusion: The Impact of Mentoring on Undergraduate Researchers in the Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeger, Heather; Fresquez, Carla

    Increasing inclusion of underrepresented minority and first-generation students in mentored research experiences both increases diversity in the life sciences research community and prepares students for successful careers in these fields. However, analyses of the impact of mentoring approaches on specific student gains are limited. This study addresses the impact of mentoring strategies within research experiences on broadening access to the life sciences by examining both how these experiences impacted student success and how the quality of mentorship affected the development of research and academic skills for a diverse population of students at a public, minority-serving institution. Institutional data on student grades and graduation rates (n = 348) along with postresearch experience surveys (n = 138) found that students mentored in research had significantly higher cumulative grade point averages and similar graduation rates as a matched set of peers. Examination of the relationships between student-reported gains and mentoring strategies demonstrated that socioemotional and culturally relevant mentoring impacted student development during mentored research experiences. Additionally, extended engagement in research yielded significantly higher development of research-related skills and level of independence in research. Recommendations are provided for using mentoring to support traditionally underrepresented students in the sciences. © 2016 H. Haeger and C. Fresquez. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. The learning experiences of mentees and mentors in a nursing school’s mentoring programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Joubert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A School of Nursing supports third-year undergraduate students (mentees by means of a mentoring programme in which critical-care nursing students (mentors are involved. However, the programme designers needed to find out what gaps were evident in the programme.Objectives: The objectives of the study were to explore and describe the learning experiences of the mentees and mentors and to obtain recommendations for improving the programme.Method: An action-research method was used to develop and to refine the student-mentoring programme and to identify student needs. However, for the purposes of this article a descriptive design was selected and data were gathered by means of a nominal-group technique. Fourteen mentees and five mentors participated in the research.Results: The findings indicated that attention should be paid to the allocation and orientation of both mentors and mentees. Amongst the positive experiences was the fact that the mentees were reassured by the mentor’s presence and that a relationship of trust developed between them. In consequence, the mentees developed critical thinking skills, were able to apply their knowledge and improved their ability to integrate theory and practice. Not only did the mentees gain respect for the mentors’ knowledge and competence, but they also lauded the mentoring programme as a memorable and vital experience.Conclusion: The findings indicated that several changes would be needed to improve the structure of the mentoring programme before a new group of mentees could be placed in critical-care units.

  12. [MENTORING IN NURSING, A PHENOMENOLOGICAL APPROACH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna Torres, Blanca Herlinda; González Rendón, M C E Cristina

    2014-11-01

    The essay explains that mentoring, originally established to improve student trajectories, reflects a deeper improvement of the people involved in the process. The method used is the analysis of the mentoring experience from participant observation and phenomenology of lived processes. The results reveal that the early analysis of risk factors present in academics--socio-psychological, family and institutional matters, that may affect the student experience in its passage through the academic unit--, requires the intervention of a preventive nature and monitoring operating variables. In addition, tutoring is a teaching experience which is consolidated with the daily life from the human relationship established between the mentor and the mentee, from the position of the older adult and experience is a state meet demand related care. However, in the tutorial process face to face, usually with academic aspects, therefore, the teaching function is fulfilled but operated in particular. By helping to find meaning to knowledge not understood, this function is still performed if tutors pairs learn to know each other that occasionally is the mirror which reflects the own story. While they are recognizing the problems of the mentee, the mentor will exorcise his ghosts. Therefore, we argue that, although originally born tutoring to abate dropout rates, failure and increase retention and degree, over time, has become a process of improving people.

  13. 75 FR 81083 - National Mentoring Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    .... Mentors can provide a steady presence and share their valuable knowledge and experiences. Even brief... tomorrow's leaders. We know the difference that a responsible, caring adult can make in a child's life... staff with young men and women in the Washington, D.C., area. For information and resources about...

  14. Journal Editorship: Mentoring, Democratic, and International Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    This essay builds on a review of studies in education. Journal editorship is explored from the mentoring, democratic, and international perspectives. Trends are examined within the publishing culture around these three editorial functions. Theoretical groundwork is provided for exploring contemporary journal editorship and its challenges and…

  15. Mentoring--A Powerful Learning Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Susan E.; Lambert, Jonathan W.

    1982-01-01

    The mentoring model, in which an "expert" develops an in-depth, sharing relationship with a student, is highly appropriate for gifted students who manifest strong performance discrepancies in academic areas, whose interpersonal peer relationships are weak, who suffer from a physical or emotional handicap, or are talented in nontraditional areas.…

  16. Pharmacy Mentors' Views of Practical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katajavuori, Nina; Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2005-01-01

    Practical knowledge and skills are necessary components of expertise. Practical training in higher education has been shown to foster students' learning and understanding of theoretical backgrounds. The attitude and skill of mentors play a central role in enhancing the quality of students' practical learning. The aims of this study were to explore…

  17. 77 FR 207 - National Mentoring Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... next generation, and we recommit to expanding mentorship opportunities across our country. At school... with a mentor. Last January, we partnered with businesses across America to launch the Corporate... with positive role models, foster leadership skills, and put them on the path to success in school and...

  18. Do You Have a Bad Mentor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2008-01-01

    In every assistant professor there seems to lurk a Karate Kid seeking a Mr. Miyagi who will train his acolyte to be a skilled warrior in the art of research, teaching, and service and impart pithy life lessons along the way. Such singular folks exist. But it's far more likely that one will find several mentors who, while not well-versed in all…

  19. Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Contexts of Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    This paper explores and highlights the importance of social, cultural, and behavioral contexts in the effectiveness of mentoring relationships. A first section looks at growing up in American and the varieties of personal and social development that are found. This section argues against viewing adolescents as similar across the boundaries of…

  20. Citrus Community College District Mentor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Diane; Sprague, Caroline

    The Citrus College faculty and staff addressed the problem of lower career aspirations among women by establishing a support group, Citrus Women in Higher Education (CWHE). In addition to group meetings and special programs of interest, the CWHE has developed a mentor program to address the problem of blocked careers faced by women. The goals of…

  1. Empowering the Faculty through Faculty Mentoring Needs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the mentoring assessment needs of faculties of the University of Education, Winneba, UEW; a public university in Ghana. The study was exploratory, and used survey, focus groups and semi-structured interviews in collecting data from 102 participants. The survey consisted of a 13-item 5-point ...

  2. Setting up a structured laboratory mentoring programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talkmore Maruta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Laboratory mentoring programmes can be an important vehicle to establish and solidify quality management systems and help laboratories achieve accreditation goals. Different mentoring approaches have been used with varying levels of success. The authors provide a guide to implementing a structured laboratory mentorship programme based on their practical field experience.Method: The study is based on experience in Lesotho as well as subsequent roll out of a similar approach in the other African countries of Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Swaziland and Cameroon between 2009 and 2011.Summary: We highlight critical elements to consider when setting up a long-term, sustainable and well-structured mentorship programme. These elements include: well-defined goals; sufficient length of mentor engagement on site; standardised approach across laboratories; measurement of progress using standardised tools; well-structured reporting mechanisms; alignment of the programme with overall Ministry of Health plans; and selection and training of the mentors. These elements will differ in application, depending on countries’ needs and available resources. A structured approach allows for scalability, comparison across laboratories and countries and an easier approach to budgeting and planning for countries intending to set up similar programmes.

  3. Mentoring and Supervision for Teacher Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Alan J.; Thies-Sprinthall, Lois

    The fields of instructional supervision, adult development, teacher education and mentoring, and ongoing professional development are synthesized in this text. Examples and case studies are drawn from local systems in North Carolina as well as state, national, and international public school/university consortia to identify emerging trends in…

  4. Investing in the workforce through mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    The term mentor is often used synonymously with a faculty adviser in academic settings, but a mentorship is also a career development relationship in which more experienced senior colleagues share their knowledge and experience with mentees. Having the advice and guidance of an e...

  5. Mentoring--Is It Failing Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring programs are gaining traction as human resource development initiatives that can support women to advance in their careers in organizations. However, some of these programs are falling short of delivering on this promise due to particular inherent flaws. This case study considers the following three potential flaws of formal mentoring…

  6. Mentoring Experiences of Latina Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Irán O.; Henderson, Sheila J.

    2015-01-01

    In order to contribute to knowledge on the Latina graduate students' experiences and the role of mentoring relationships in their pursuit of higher education, the purpose of this qualitative study was to interview Latina doctoral students about their lived experience. Four Latina graduate students at a graduate university in San Francisco,…

  7. Community service nurses' perceptions regarding mentoring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to measure and describe the perceptions of community service nurses (CSNs) regarding their mentoring in the North West Province South Africa. Descriptive survey research design was used for data collection in which a stratified random sample of 224 community service nurses completed a ...

  8. When Is a Mentor Like a Monk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The author of this article was particularly intrigued with an observation made in a paper written by one of her students in a graduate seminar on the philosophy of higher education. Most class members wrote about contemporary issues, but this student focused instead on mentoring in the medieval church. He reported that both the eastern and western…

  9. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  10. Addressing Psychosocial Factors with Library Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Bridget; Alabi, Jaena; Whaley, Pambanisha; Jenda, Claudine

    2017-01-01

    The majority of articles on mentoring in the library and information science field address career development by emphasizing the orientation process for new librarians and building the requisite skills for a specific job. Few articles deal with the psychological and social challenges that many early-career and minority librarians face, which can…

  11. Mediators of Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mentored K Award Receipt Among U.S. Medical School Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Dorothy A; Yan, Yan; Jeffe, Donna B

    2017-10-01

    Mentored K (K01/K08/K23) career development awards are positively associated with physicians' success as independent investigators; however, individuals in some racial/ethnic groups are less likely to receive this federal funding. The authors sought to identify variables that explain (mediate) the association between race/ethnicity and mentored K award receipt among U.S. Liaison Committee for Medical Education-accredited medical school graduates who planned research-related careers. The authors analyzed deidentified data from the Association of American Medical Colleges and the National Institutes of Health Information for Management, Planning, Analysis, and Coordination II grants database for a national cohort of 28,690 graduates from 1997-2004 who planned research-related careers, followed through August 2014. The authors examined 10 potential mediators (4 research activities, 2 academic performance measures, medical school research intensity, degree program, debt, and specialty) of the association between race/ethnicity and mentored K award receipt in models comparing underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM) and non-URM graduates. Among 27,521 graduates with complete data (95.9% of study-eligible graduates), 1,147 (4.2%) received mentored K awards (79/3,341 [2.4%] URM; 1,068/24,180 [4.4%] non-URM). All variables except debt were significant mediators; together they explained 96.2% (95%, CI 79.1%-100%) of the association between race/ethnicity and mentored K award. Research-related activities during/after medical school and standardized academic measures largely explained the association between race/ethnicity and mentored K award in this national cohort. Interventions targeting these mediators could mitigate racial/ethnic disparities in the federally funded physician-scientist research workforce.

  12. Do scientists trace hot topics?

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Tian; Wu, Chensheng; Yan, XiaoYong; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more likely to be attracted by hot fields, where the hotness of a field is measured by the number of papers belonging to the field. This indicates that scientists generally do follow hot topics. However, there are qualitative differences among scientists from various countries, among research works regarding different number of authors, different number of affiliations and different number of references. These observations could be valuable for policy makers when deciding research funding and also for individual researchers when searching for scientific projects.

  13. The Lived Experiences of Mentoring Nurses in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraini Binti Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a nursing mentor is not an entirely new concept in nursing. However, it is a new phenomenon in the nursing profession in Malaysia. The nursing administration and the senior nurses in Malaysia have claimed that they have started a mentorship program by having senior nurses shadow new graduate nurses for the past two to three years ago. With no study found in Malaysia investigating the lived experiences of mentors mentoring new registered nurses, it led the researcher to develop this research that explores the real life experiences of these senior Malaysian nurses who mentor neophyte nurses.Objectives: This research explores and describes the lived experiences of nurses mentoring neophyte or new registered nurses at one of the major hospital in the Malaysia Borneo and how such experiences influence their daily routine as a nurse and also as a mentor. The research will also attaches meaning to these experiences and identifies both positive and negative experiences as a mentor to neophyte.Methods: The experiences of nurses mentoring the neophyte in the clinical area were captured using a qualitative approach to research and further viewed through methods informed by phenomenology, which used interpretive and descriptive semi-structured interviews. Hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was used in the focus to analyze interview transcript into textual expression of the mentors. Three main themes emerge from this study are being unprepared and challenged, perceptions of mentees, mentor hope and desire.Key words: nursing mentor, phenomenon, neophyte, Malaysia.

  14. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Fornari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods: Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results: The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions: Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established.

  15. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  16. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S; Menzin, Andrew W; Woo, Vivian A; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established.

  17. The Local-Cosmopolitan Scientist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to previous discussions in the literature treating cosmopolitan and local as two distinct groups of scientists, this paperi demonstrates the notion of cosmopolitan and local as a dual orientation of highly motivated scientists. This dual orientation is derived from institutional motivation, which is a determinant of both high quality basic research and accomplishment of non-research organizational activities. The dual orientation arises in a context of similarity of the institutional goal of science with the goal of the organization; the distinction between groups of locals and cosmopolitans derives from a conflict between two goals.

  18. Key components of an effective mentoring relationship: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Lev, Elise L; Feurer, Amy

    2014-05-01

    Despite the recognized importance of mentoring, little is known about specific mentoring behaviors that result in positive outcomes. To identify key components of an effective mentoring relationship identified by protégés-mentor dyads in an academic setting. In this qualitative study, purposive sampling resulted in geographic diversity and representation of a range of academic disciplines. Participants were from 12 universities in three regions of the U.S. (South, n=5; Northeast, n=4; Midwest, n=2) and Puerto Rico (n=1). Academic disciplines included natural sciences (51%), nursing/health sciences (31%), engineering (8%), and technology (1%). Twelve workshops using the Technology of Participation method were held with 117 mentor-protégé dyads. Consensus was reached regarding the key components of an effective mentoring relationship. Conventional content analysis, in which coding categories were informed by the literature and derived directly from the data, was employed. Eight themes described key components of an effective mentoring relationship: (1) open communication and accessibility; (2) goals and challenges; (3) passion and inspiration; (4) caring personal relationship; (5) mutual respect and trust; (6) exchange of knowledge; (7) independence and collaboration; and (8) role modeling. Described within each theme are specific mentor-protégé behaviors and interactions, identified needs of both protégé and mentor in the relationship, and desirable personal qualities of mentor and protégé. Findings can inform a dialog between existing nurse mentor-protégé dyads as well as student nurses and faculty members considering a mentoring relationship. Nurse educators can evaluate and modify their mentoring behaviors as needed, thereby strengthening the mentor-protégé relationship to ensure positive outcomes of the learning process. © 2013.

  19. Imagine a universe with 85% down quarks: Mentoring for inclusive excellence in nuclear science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennello, Sherry J.

    2017-09-01

    If nature created six down quarks for every up quark the world might be a bit more strange. The US population is made up of over 50% women. Hispanic Americans and African Americans make up over 30% of the US population. The processes by which we foster curiosity, educate our youth, encourage people into science, recruit and retain people into physics and welcome them as members of our nuclear physics community results in a much different demographic in the membership of the DNP. Enabling the development of an identity as a scientist or nuclear scientist is a crucial part of mentoring young people to successful careers in nuclear science. Research experiences for students can play a critical role in that identity development. Since 2004, over 170 students have explored nuclear science through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute.

  20. Is the training of biomedical scientists at a crossroads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halushka, Perry V; Krug, Edward L

    2009-04-01

    In this commentary, the authors respond to the allegation that the title "scientist" has lost much of its classical meaning because of the highly specialized nature of biomedical graduate training programs that produce "researchers" and "supertechnologists." Scientists, by this definition, have a firm grasp of the historical, philosophical, and biological contexts in which their work exists, whereas their researcher and supertechnologist counterparts are limited by narrowly focused, technologically driven experimentation and data collection with little knowledge or appreciation of the integrated nature of biological systems and the historical basis of discovery. With these definitions in mind, the authors discuss how to ensure that innovative thinking and the ability to integrate molecular knowledge into a higher-order context remain alive and well, complementing today's highly technological environment. In this regard, examples of new emphasis from both scientific societies and funding agencies are provided. However, effective mentoring strategies, practiced on a daily basis, remain the best means for assuring that narrowly focused researchers and supertechnologists do not become the norm of the future. Technological innovation is critical for acquiring new insight into fundamental questions, but using that information for a greater understanding will always favor the prepared intellect. Multidisciplinary teams are emerging as the future of biomedical research. The authors propose a course of action to ensure that trainees are given the necessary opportunities and guidance to help them function effectively in a contemporary teamwork environment with scientific reasoning and logic at its core.

  1. Developing Mentors: Adult participation, practices, and learning in an out-of-school time STEM program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipio, Deana Aeolani

    This dissertation examines learning within an out-of-school time (OST) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) broadening participation program. The dissertation includes an introduction, three empirical chapters (written as individual articles), and a conclusion. The dissertation context is a chemical oceanography OST program for middle school students called Project COOL---Chemical Oceanography Outside the Lab. The program was a collaboration between middle school OST programming, a learning sciences research laboratory, and a chemical oceanography laboratory. Both labs were located at a research-based university in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Participants include 34 youth, 12 undergraduates, and five professional scientists. The dissertation data corpus includes six years of ethnographic field notes across three field sites, 400 hours of video and audio recordings, 40 hours of semi-structured interviews, and more than 100 participant generated artifacts. Analysis methods include comparative case analysis, cognitive mapping, semiotic cluster analysis, video interaction analysis, and discourse analysis. The first empirical article focuses on synthesizing productive programmatic features from four years of design-based research.. The second article is a comparative case study of three STEM mentors from non-dominant communities in the 2011 COOL OST Program. The third article is a comparative case study of undergraduates learning to be mentors in the 2014 COOL OST Program. Findings introduce Deep Hanging as a theory of learning in practice. Deep Hanging entails authentic tasks in rich contexts, providing access, capitalizing on opportunity, and building interpersonal relationships. Taken together, these three chapters illuminate the process of designing a rich OST learning environment and the kinds of learning in practice that occurred for adult learners learning to be mentors through their participation in the COOL OST program. In

  2. Introductory mathematics for earth scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2009-01-01

    Any quantitative work in earth sciences requires mathematical analysis and mathematical methods are essential to the modelling and analysis of the geological, geophysical and environmental processes involved. This book provides an introduction to the fundamental mathematics that all earth scientists need.

  3. Working Women Scientists and Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Betty M.

    1980-01-01

    Reported are findings of an 18-month study by the Scientific Manpower Commission of the labor force participation of women scientists and engineers and the factors affecting their participation. Those factors relating directly include graduate student status, highest degree level, presence and age of children, and field of degree. (CS)

  4. JBS Haldane: an uncommon scientist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 5. J. B. S. Haldane: an uncommon scientist. M. S. SWAMINATHAN. HALDANE AT 125 Volume 96 Issue 5 November 2017 pp 731-732. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/096/05/0731-0732. Keywords.

  5. Wilhelm Ostwald–The Scientist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 5. Wilhelm Ostwald –The Scientist. Pallavi Bhattacharyya. Article-in-a-Box Volume 17 Issue 5 May 2012 pp 428-433. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/05/0428-0433 ...

  6. Meet EPA Scientist Jay Garland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientist Jay Garland Ph.D. spent twenty years at NASA trying to figure out how astronauts could stay in outer space for a long time without needing more supplies. Now he is bringing the same concepts of reusing and recovering resources to his research

  7. Comprehensive mathematics for computer scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzola, Guerino; Weissmann, Jody

    2005-01-01

    This two-volume textbook Comprehensive Mathematics for the Working Computer Scientist is a self-contained comprehensive presentation of mathematics including sets, numbers, graphs, algebra, logic, grammars, machines, linear geometry, calculus, ODEs, and special themes such as neural networks, Fourier theory, wavelets, numerical.

  8. Scientists and the Selection Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Ransdell, Sarah E.

    1986-01-01

    Presents findings of a study of scientists on the Wason four-card selection task, finding little understanding of the effect of disconfirmatory data in assessing conditionals. Found performance influenced by problem content. Explains performance as memory-cueing plus reasoning-by-analogy. (JM)

  9. Charles William Lacaillade. Biologist, Parasitologist, Educator, and Mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James

    2017-02-01

    's College in Brooklyn, New York. Although a small single-gender college for men, the Department of Biology there under Dr. Andrew I. Dawson had an impressive record of research achievements. Lacaillade remained at this institution for the remainder of his career until his retirement in 1970. He eventually became Distinguished Professor of Biology, Chair of the Department of Biology, and the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions. Lacaillade quickly developed a reputation as an outstanding teacher, mentor, and scientist. He taught introductory courses in biology as well as advanced ones in parasitology and entomology. He preceptored graduate students and guided their dissertation research. Above all else, he was a superb mentor who provided sage advice to pre-professional students planning careers in medicine and dentistry. Lacaillade effortlessly adapted to the transformation of St. John's College, with an annual enrollment of some 600, to St. John's University, with an average annual student census of 20,000. He also oversaw the geographic relocation of his department from Brooklyn to the then new campus in Jamaica, New York in 1955. He proved to be a stabilizing presence during the faculty strike of 1966 and its aftermath which included a reorganization of the university. Throughout his life, Lacaillade was admired as a man of letters. His interests spanned art, literature, opera, and the theater. He had a passionate interest in English literature, about which he wrote, and was proud of his collection of first editions of English writers. Charles William Lacaillade was an eminent success as a research biologist early in his career. However, his greater successes came later as an outstanding educator and mentor. As such, he had a positive and lasting influence on the lives and careers of many students and colleagues. He passed away on 17 September 1978 in Danvers, Massachusetts.

  10. Growing the Pipeline of Diverse HIV Investigators: The Impact of Mentored Research Experiences to Engage Underrepresented Minority Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jonathan; Kouyate, Aminta; Kroboth, Liz; McFarland, Willi

    2016-09-01

    Structured, mentored research programs for high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented minority (URM) backgrounds are needed to increase the diversity of our nation's biomedical research workforce. In particular, a robust pipeline of investigators from the communities disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic is needed not only for fairness and equity but for insights and innovations to address persistent racial and ethnic disparities in new infections. We created the Summer HIV/AIDS Research Program (SHARP) at the San Francisco Department of Public Health for URM undergraduates as a 12-week program of hands-on research experience, one-on-one mentoring by a senior HIV investigator, didactic seminars for content and research methods, and networking opportunities. The first four cohorts (2012-2015) of SHARP gained research skills, built confidence in their abilities and self-identified as scientists. In addition, the majority of program alumni is employed in research positions and has been admitted to or is pursuing graduate degree programs in fields related to HIV prevention. While we await empirical studies of specific mentoring strategies at early educational stages, programs that engage faculty who are sensitive to the unique challenges facing diverse students and who draw lessons from established mentoring frameworks can help build an inclusive generation of HIV researchers.

  11. A case study of mobile learning in teacher training - MENTOR ME (Mobile Enhanced Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Cushing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With announcements such as «more than half the world own a cell phone» (Lefkowitz, 2010 plus the convergence of multi-media elements in handsets, it is perhaps not surprising that education is calling for an increased use of mobile phones to support learning (Hartnell-Young & Heym, 2008. Phone use will contribute to cost efficiencies by subsidising IT budgets (Yorston, 2010 and support personalised learning and students’ underpinning knowledge. However, the reality is often ‹blanket bans› on mobiles in schools (Hartnell-Young & Heym, 2008 due to teaching staff who are nervous of possible disruption and uncertain of pedagogic application. MENTOR ME (Mobile Enhanced Mentoring was a pilot project with 20 teacher training students at Barnet College, North London. The limited time available to mentors and trainee teachers to engage in mentoring was solved by providing all students and mentors with email-activated mobile phones for ease of communication and support, facilitating situated learning (Naismith et al., 2004. Face-to-face meetings were partially replaced by capturing students’ formal and informal learning with mobile functionality. This was shared with peers, tutors, mentors and lesson observers to further improve the mentoring and teaching experience. Self-reflection, peer assessment, peer support and idea-sharing contributed to improving trainees’ practice and employability. In addition, teachers’ confidence and ability in using technology improved, particularly in supporting learning and underpinning knowledge. The success of this project has influenced the organisation to adopt mobile learning across the curriculum by facilitating student use of personal devices.

  12. Developing future nurse educators through peer mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenau PA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patricia A Rosenau, Rita F Lisella, Tracey L Clancy, Lorelli S NowellFaculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaBackground: The nursing workforce and nursing education demographic trends reinforce the urgency to cultivate future nursing leaders, educators, and mentors. The changing realities of health care environments, involving crowded student placements, overtaxed clinical mentors and preceptors, and inexperienced staff, hamper student learning and professional development. Peer mentoring has been used successfully in nursing education to enhance student engagement and the quality of the student learning experience. Although various terms like peer mentor have been used to describe the role of senior students facilitating junior student learning, the literature is silent about how peer mentoring fosters the development of future nursing education leaders.Objectives: The aim of this study was to understand how peer mentorship fosters the development of nursing education leadership in senior undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an elective undergraduate peer-mentoring credit course, Introductory Concepts in Nursing Education and Leadership Through Peer-Led Learning.Design and method: This phenomenological study explored the development of nursing education leadership in senior undergraduate students through the analysis of critical reflections of individual senior students and online discussions between triads of senior students teaching/learning across diverse junior-level theory and practice courses.Participants: Seventeen senior undergraduate nursing students enrolled in the elective course participated in the study.Results: From the critical reflections and online discussions, four themes emerged: "developing teaching philosophies and pedagogies", "learning teaching strategies", "supportive peer relationship", and "benefits of the peer mentorship program".Conclusion: The creation and promotion of peer leadership

  13. A research mentor training curriculum for clinical and translational researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; House, Stephanie; Spencer, Kimberly; Asquith, Pamela; Carney, Paula; Masters, Kristyn S; McGee, Richard; Shanedling, Janet; Vecchiarelli, Stephanie; Fleming, Michael

    2013-02-01

    To design and evaluate a research mentor training curriculum for clinical and translational researchers. The resulting 8-hour curriculum was implemented as part of a national mentor training trial. The mentor training curriculum was implemented with 144 mentors at 16 academic institutions. Facilitators of the curriculum participated in a train-the-trainer workshop to ensure uniform delivery. The data used for this report were collected from participants during the training sessions through reflective writing, and following the last training session via confidential survey with a 94% response rate. A total of 88% of respondents reported high levels of satisfaction with the training experience, and 90% noted they would recommend the training to a colleague. Participants also reported significant learning gains across six mentoring competencies as well as specific impacts of the training on their mentoring practice. The data suggest the described research mentor training curriculum is an effective means of engaging research mentors to reflect upon and improve their research mentoring practices. The training resulted in high satisfaction, self-reported skill gains as well as behavioral changes of clinical and translational research mentors. Given success across 16 diverse sites, this training may serve as a national model. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. COMMUNICATION COMPONENT FORMATION OF TEACHERS’ COMPETENCE IN THE MENTORING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera T. Sopegina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the integration process and special pedagogical competence in solving production and pedagogical challenges in the educational organizations and production enterprises engaged in the training of mentors.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of psycho-pedagogical and methodological literature on the issue; analysis of the Federal State Educational Standards and professional standards; modeling of processes.Results and scientific novelty. The problems of formation of communicative competence in the preparation of teachers are considered. The characteristic of the formation levels of mentoring such as «mentor-formal»; «mentor-theoretician», a «mentor-coach»; «mentor-adviser»; «mentor-professional» are given. The pedagogical potential of the phenomenon of «mentoring» is disclosed; an innovative way of mentoring within the competence approach is shown. The integrative activity of the teacher in solving production and pedagogical problems is analysed.Practical significance. The results can be used by trainers and mentors in the formation of communicative competence of students. The implementation of integration model of pedagogical and production tasks will provide the formation of communicative competence as part of vocational training. Using the obtained results can improve the effectiveness of vocational teacher education.

  15. The role and importance of mentoring in physiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Naidoo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous opportunities are afforded by mentoring for career development, new knowledge, stronger theoretical and practical foundations, as well as development of leadership and problem-solving skills. In physiotherapy, mentoring as relates to practice, education and research will help to ensure the growth and future of the profession. Mentoring can be utilised in many different instances in the teaching and learning cycle of physiotherapy students and physiotherapists and can contribute towards professional growth. The benefits derived by the mentor and mentee are immense if implemented in accordance with a deep understanding of the mentoring process. The mentoring process needs to be based on intelligent reading of situations and action by the mentor and mentee for a successful relationship. Each mentoring connection is unique, therefore each person enters the relationship and process with their own values and expectations. Mentoring practices are an effective way of supporting and fosteringdevelopment throughout the duration of the undergraduate physiotherapy programme, and professional and career development of physiotherapists. This article reviews the process of mentoring and its importance for implementation in physiotherapy, for undergraduate training and physiotherapy professional growth.

  16. 16PF in screening for appropriateness of mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Curtis M; Byars, Allyn; Greenwood, Michael; Garner, Karen A

    2003-02-01

    The utility of the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire, Fifth Edition (16PF) as an indicator of mentor effectiveness was examined. A random sample of the 16PF scores of 74 mentors was drawn from a population of 837 mentors from Big Brothers Big Sisters. Caseworkers rated mentor's effectiveness using a rubric developed for this purpose. The rubric showed good interrater agreement. Caseworkers' ratings of mentor's effectiveness was used to rate mentors systematically as appropriate or inappropriate. The 16PF scores of mentors were compared at an alpha level of .05 for appropriate and inappropriate groups using independent t tests and multivariate analyses of variance, which reflected significant differences between male and female mentors on Factors E and Q3. Significant differences were also found between "appropriate" and "inappropriate" mentors on Factors L and Q4. These differences reflected only moderate effect sizes and lacked practical significance or meaning. The results suggest that, while the 16PF discriminates statistically between "appropriate" and "inappropriate" mentors, in terms of practical significance, the questionnaire is not particularly useful as an initial screening tool.

  17. At the Tipping Point? Role of Formal Faculty Mentoring in Changing University Research Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.; Hutinger, Janice L.

    2008-01-01

    The present article focuses on how faculty can be guided in the mentoring process and how formal mentoring programs improve practice, as well as the impact of formal mentoring on new faculty and faculty mentors. The empirical case study described features a new faculty mentoring program in its second year of development in a university research…

  18. Is Experience the Best Teacher? Extensive Clinical Practice and Mentor Teachers' Perspectives on Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, A. Lin; Roegman, Rachel; Reagan, Emilie M.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a study of mentor teachers who work with residents in an urban teacher residency program in New York City. Forty-six mentor teachers (i.e., cooperating teachers) were asked to describe moments of effective mentoring, as well as their own strengths, weaknesses, and goals as mentors. Implicit in mentor teachers' descriptions of…

  19. Pieter Cullis: an outstanding lipid biophysicist, drug delivery scientist, educator, and entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Leaf; Miao, Lei

    2016-11-01

    There are much said about Pieter Cullis in this special volume honoring him. He was the pioneer to study the role of hexagonal HII phase in membrane fusion and the one who applied this concept for the design of lipid nanoparticles. He was also the first to utilize remote loading techniques for the delivery of amphipathic bases. At the same time, he is a tremendous entrepreneur and an excellent mentor. He is, without doubt, an exceptional scientist and set us an excellent model to follow.

  20. Making NASA Earth Observing System Satellite Data Accessible to the K-12 and Citizen Scientist Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan W.; Phelps, Carrie S.; Chambers, Lin H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) at NASA s Langley Research Center houses over 700 data sets related to Earth s radiation budget, clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry. These data sets are produced to increase academic understanding of the natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influence global climate change. The Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs (MY NASA DATA) project has been established to systematically support educational activities at all levels of formal and informal education by reducing these large data holdings to microsets that will be easily explored and understood by the K-12 and the amateur scientist communities

  1. A scientist's view of bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, F P

    1994-03-01

    So, to summarize: my themes in this lecture have been: 1. Bioengineering is a many-splendoured thing. 2. There are few differences in principle between scientists and engineers, and they need to work together and respect one another's special contribution. 3. The Department of Health has done much to enhance your career structure and prospects recently; now you have to help us to polish your image even further. 4. There is urgent need for collaboration amongst all parties if we are to counter some potentially deleterious effects of the recent NHS reforms on the work of clinical scientists and engineers. Finally, I wanted to thank you for admitting me, just a little way, into the magical world of biological engineering. Life has become infinitely more exciting since you did so, and I owe you all a considerable debt of gratitude.

  2. Research Integrity of Individual Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haklak, Rockbill

    We are discussing about many aspects of research integrity of individual scientist, who faces the globalization of research ethics in the traditional culture and custom of Japan. Topics are scientific misconduct (fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism) in writing paper and presenting research results. Managements of research material, research record, grant money, authorship, and conflict of interest are also analyzed and discussed. Finally, we make 5 recommendations to improve research integrity in Japan.

  3. Mathematics for engineers and scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Although designed as a textbook with problem sets in each chapter and selected answers at the end of the book, Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists, Sixth Edition serves equally well as a supplemental text and for self-study. The author strongly encourages readers to make use of computer algebra software, to experiment with it, and to learn more about mathematical functions and the operations that it can perform.

  4. The Scientist as Sentinel (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists have been warning the world for some time about the risks of anthropogenic interference in the climate system. But we struggle with how, exactly, to express that warning. The norms of scientific behavior enjoin us from the communication strategies normally associated with warnings. If a scientist sounds excited or emotional, for example, it is often assumed that he has lost his capac¬ity to assess data calmly and therefore his conclusions are suspect. If the scientist is a woman, the problem is that much worse. In a recently published article my colleagues and I have shown that scientists have systematically underestimated the threat of climate change (Brysse et al., 2012). We suggested that this occurs for norma¬tive reasons: The scientific values of rationality, dispassion, and self-restraint lead us to demand greater levels of evidence in support of surprising, dramatic, or alarming conclusions than in support of less alarming conclusions. We call this tendency 'err¬ing on the side of least drama.' However, the problem is not only that we err on the side of least drama in our assessment of evidence, it's also that we speak without drama, even when our conclusions are dramatic. We speak without the emotional cadence that people expect to hear when the speaker is worried. Even when we are worried, we don't sound as if we are. In short, we are trying to act as sentinels, but we lack the register with which to do so. Until we find those registers, or partner with colleagues who are able to speak in the cadences that communicating dangers requires, our warnings about climate change will likely continue to go substantially unheeded.

  5. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  6. Empowering Muslim Women Though Executive Coaching & Mentoring

    OpenAIRE

    Fadila Grine

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the role and effect of executive coaching and mentoring on the empowerment of Muslim women and enhancing their levels of contribution. It further substantiates the manner in which executive coaching can accommodate both the nature and needs of Muslim women while further unleashing her respective talents, creativity and skills. The study further highlights the role and significance of coaching in spheres relevant to family, as well as social and career development. This stu...

  7. Recipe for an Eclectic Life as Research Scientist and Mom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Recipe for an Eclectic Life as Research Scientist and Mom Fresh ingredients: curiosity, conviction, who knows what else Spices: equal parts ambition, humility, risk Staples: Boundless energy! This recipe requires a lot of prep time. It makes a great first meal but also "keeps on giving" as leftovers for many meals. It can be set aside and rekindled at various stages but requires frequent touch-ups to stay fresh. This recipe is especially great for large gatherings, eclectic palettes, and it includes a mix of cultural opportunities (AGU council member for example!). First, shop for a graduate department as you might for a farmers' market that has a good feel and good mix of "customers" (grad students) who share your attitude and interests. Then seek out professors and later, career mentors, who not only have great methods and recipes but whose lifestyles seem like good examples. I like my mentors and advisees alike to be approachable, supportive, and dedicated to both problem solving and whole-life choices. For the cooking part of the recipe, you'll certainly need a great partner who is hungry for science and appreciative of those pairings between new discoveries and long-awaited accomplishments. My own husband is a geologist. My professors were in their "late career" stages (one had retired 25 years before; another retired within a year of my degree) and this seemed to foster a philosophical perspective rather than a competitive one. Advice? The keys to my child-rearing recipe were efficiency and concentration: I try to organize and sequence and to save the multi-tasking for cleanups and paperwork. Don't take yourself too seriously: we all think of ourselves as frauds and know-nothings; we all are stretched between worry and guilt when it comes to child rearing. Don't give up: who is to say whether your quest for science isn't as fundamental to your goodness as your maternal drive?

  8. Mentoring health information professionals in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Susan S; Fenton, Susan H

    2008-04-07

    As a major employer of health information professionals, the VA faces significant recruitment and retention challenges. The authors evaluated mentoring as a retention tool through a review of existing literature and the retrospective review of a VA health information management mentoring program. The literature review showed a link between employer mentorship and employee retention, regardless of the nature and structure of the mentoring relationship. Most organizations support employees who are willing to serve as mentors through increased compensation, recognition, and other types of support. No literature was found that studied retention rates for more than three years after a mentoring experience. The review of the VA mentoring program showed increased retention in the three years following enrollment in the program, but the increase was not statistically significant. The review did not demonstrate improvement in retention over a seven-year period. The combined evaluation gives mixed findings for mentorship as a retention tool and demonstrates the need for more research on the topic.

  9. Mentorship as practitioner collaboration: Mentors' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miškeljin Lidija D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on conducted researches many authors point out that professionalism in the field of education in early childhood is closely linked with the skill of critical study of pedagogic practice and the ability of changing it. In accordance with modern views and research of professional development which indicate the fact that training professionals is not sufficient if we want to create a sustainable change the issue of mentorship development becomes increasingly topical. The paper considers a concept of mentorship in the frame of the project Kindergartens without borders 2 - quality inclusive preschool education in Serbia, based on a systemic approach to professional development, as a support to improving the quality and the development of ethical practice of preschool education. The new concept of mentorship includes active integration and synergy of the requirements of practice and theory, competence in mutual process of learning and reflexive examination of one's own practice, i.e. the ability of critical thinking and changing practice. The qualitative research was aimed at considering the perspective of mentors in the light of the mentoring concept. The results show that mentors see this kind of support as important in the processes of introducing changes in the practice and the development of quality in all dimensions of real context. The conclusion states that it is necessary to change the concept of professional development in order to ensure important support in the processes of changing the practice and the development of quality in all dimensions of real context.

  10. Mentoring medical students in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNunzio, Nick; Parekh, Arti; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2010-09-01

    Mentoring in academic medicine has been described on a multitude of levels in medical literature, but seldom with respect to medical students. In fact, although some fields have addressed mentoring in the context of medical student education, radiation oncology has yet to do so in a comprehensive fashion. Furthermore, the projected domestic and worldwide epidemiologic trends in cancer cases, coupled with the frequent use of radiation-based cancer treatment regimens, make this an opportune moment to initiate such a discussion. Herein, the authors consider mentoring in the context of radiation oncology and related fields from the perspective of a medical student. They present a paradigm for promoting mentorship through traditional classroom-based and nontraditional socially and research-based initiatives. It is the authors' hope that both radiation oncology and other specialties will benefit from the initiation of this discussion, as well as build on the suggestions detailed here as we prepare the next generation of radiation oncologists. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Dimitriadis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods: All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534. Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203. A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results: High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001. Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%, career planning (59.6%, and experiences abroad (57.6%. Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%, providers of ideas (85.0%, and role models (73.3%. Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2% and research (75.0%. Conclusions: Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications: Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students.

  12. "Building the Bench" - Army National Guard Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-27

    OmniFile; accessed 18 December 2007. 34 Abraham Zaleznik , “ Managers and Leaders : Are They Different ?” Harvard Business Review (January 2004): 7-8. 35...mentee-driven, mentor-guided; dynamically reciprocal with active learning; different from managing , performance coaching or sponsoring; voluntary...thought that it also made sense for soldiers to look for a mentor. The group also came to understand the differences between the leader and mentor

  13. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvère; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001). Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%), career planning (59.6%), and experiences abroad (57.6%). Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Conclusions Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students. PMID:22989620

  14. "I just had to be flexible and show good patience": management of interactional approaches to enact mentoring roles by peer mentors with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ariel E; Kramer, Jessica M

    2017-06-08

    Peer mentoring may be an effective approach for fostering skill development for mentors and mentees with developmental disabilities. However, little is known about how mentors with developmental disabilities perceive and enact their roles. (1) How do young adults with developmental disabilities describe their role as a peer mentor in the context of instrumental peer mentoring? (2) How do they enact their perceived roles? Thematic analysis of semi-structured reflections completed by six mentors with developmental disabilities (ages 17-35) with multiple mentoring experiences. Mentors perceived themselves as professionals with a primary role of teaching, and for some mentoring relationships, a secondary role of developing an interpersonal relationship. To enact these roles, mentors used a supportive interactional approach characterized by actions such as encouragement and sharing examples and dispositions, such as flexibility and patience. Mentors monitored mentee learning and engagement within the mentoring session and, as needed, adjusted their approach to optimize mentee learning and engagement. To successfully manage their interactional approach, mentors used supports such as peer mentoring scripts, tip sheets, and supervisors. While mentors reported several actions for teaching, they may benefit from training to learn approaches to facilitate more consistent development of interpersonal relationships. Implications for Rehabilitation Peer mentoring may be an effective approach for fostering skill development for young adult mentors and mentees with developmental disabilities. In this study, young adult peer mentors with developmental disabilities perceived themselves as professionals with a primary role of teaching and a secondary role of developing an interpersonal relationship. Peer mentors used actions and dispositions that matched their perceived roles and supported mentees with developmental disabilities to engage in instrumental mentoring. With supports and

  15. Senior Leader Mentoring: Its Role in Leader Development Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-03

    employ mentors."’ 21 It defined a mentor as a leader who develops "an individual by being for that individual a role model , teacher, coach, advisor, and...Shapiro, E. C., F. P. Hazeltine, and M. P. Rowe. "Moving Up: Role Models , Mentors, and the Patron System." Sloan Management Review (Spring 1978): 51-58...AD-A284 464 3 June 1994 Master’s Thesis, 2 Aug 93-3 Jun 94 Senior Leader Mentoring: Its Role in Leader Development Doctrine Major Mark L. Ritter, USA

  16. Partnering Research Involving Mentoring and Education (PRIME) in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Marva M

    2007-01-01

    Partnering Research Involving Mentoring and Education in Prostate Cancer (PRIME) is a partnership between two nursing schools, Duke University School of Nursing and North Carolina Central University (NCCU...

  17. Partnering Research Involving Mentoring and Education (PRIME) in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Marva M

    2008-01-01

    Partnering Research Involving Mentoring and Education in Prostate Cancer (PRIME) was a partnership between two nursing schools, Duke University School of Nursing and North Carolina Central University (NCCU...

  18. Postdoctoral Mentoring at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Molly

    2018-01-01

    The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) has, on average, about 30 postdoctoral researchers. This groups is funded primarily by individual grants but includes independent Fellows (Giacconi, Lasker, and Hubble Fellows) and postdocs based at neighboring Johns Hopkins University but with supervisors based at STScI. Our mentoring program aims to support the intellectual and career development of this entire group, outside of the scientific and career mentoring they receive from their direct supervisors or fellowship sponsors. Our mentoring program consists of two parts. First and foremost, each postdoc has a mentor (someone on the research staff) with whom they meet regularly. Ideally, the mentor is not someone with whom the postdoc collaborates scientifically and can therefore provide an outside, independent, fresh perspective. As different postdocs require different kinds of mentoring, we try to best pair postdocs and mentors according to the postdocs’ needs and the mentors’ backgrounds, skills, and mentoring styles. Second, we conduct several career guidance seminars and related events throughout the year. These have included proposal writing workshops, formalized practice talks, academic job application seminars, and discussion sessions on career paths outside of academia (featuring colleagues who are no longer in academia). These workshops have the added benefit of providing the postdocs with a wider support network of staff members. Finally, we have begun to conduct an annual survey of the postdocs to gauge their experience and integration at STScI, the efficacy of the mentoring program, and to collect feedback on how to improve postdoctoral life at the Institute.

  19. Esteemed connection: creating a mentoring relationship for nurse leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloughen, Andrea; O'Brien, Louise; Jackson, Debra

    2009-12-01

    Mentoring relationships occur across a range of nursing contexts and are shown to have multiple, favourable personal and professional outcomes. Specifically, mentoring has been associated with the development of nurse leaders. This study describes features that are integral to initiating mentoring relationships that focus on nursing leader development. These significant features are addressed in relation to the nursing literature. Thirteen nurse leaders from eastern states of Australia were interviewed during 2005 and 2006 about their understanding and experiences of mentoring for leadership. Their narratives were analysed using a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology. Mentoring relationships for nurse leadership were revealed as developing from esteemed connections between two people. Mentors were shown to unconditionally champion their mentee's careers, and mentees were shown to possess a leadership vision for nursing. The findings of this study have implications for establishing mentoring relationships for nurse leader development. Consideration should be given to the specific focus and context of these relationships to ensure that the full potential of the mentoring process is realised. It is also important to better understand the key aspects that contribute to the phases of mentoring relationships for nurse leader development because they are shown to influence the dynamic and function of these relationships over time.

  20. Mentoring portfolio use in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Hanke; Driessen, Erik; Ter Braak, Edith; Scheele, Fedde; Slaets, Joris; Van Der Molen, Thys; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2009-10-01

    Mentoring is widely acknowledged as being crucial for portfolio learning. The aim of this study is to examine how mentoring portfolio use has been implemented in undergraduate and postgraduate settings. The results of interviews with six key persons involved in setting up portfolio use in medical education programmes were used to develop a questionnaire, which was administered to 30 coordinators of undergraduate and postgraduate portfolio programmes in the Netherlands and Flanders. The interviews yielded four main aspects of the portfolio mentoring process--educational aims, individual meetings, small group sessions and mentor characteristics. Based on the questionnaire data, 16 undergraduate and 14 postgraduate programmes were described. Providing feedback and stimulating reflection were the main objectives of the mentoring process. Individual meetings were the favourite method for mentoring (26 programmes). Small group sessions to support the use of portfolios were held in 16 programmes, mostly in the undergraduate setting. In general, portfolio mentors were clinically qualified academic staff trained for their mentoring tasks. This study provides a variety of practical insights into implementing mentoring processes in portfolio programmes.

  1. Mentors' experiences of using the Active Mentoring model to support older adults with intellectual disability to participate in community groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Bigby, Christine; Stancliffe, Roger J; Balandin, Susan; Craig, Diane; Anderson, Kate

    2013-12-01

    Social inclusion is a widely acknowledged goal; who is best positioned to provide support and how support is delivered are key questions. Using Active Mentoring training, members of community groups mentored a person with intellectual disability and supported their inclusion in that group. Interviews with 14 mentors explored their experiences of supporting a previously unknown person with intellectual disability to participate in their community group. The core theme was No Different From Us. Mentors saw beyond the disability, they valued others, were community leaders, and had intrinsic qualities. With some basic orientation to the task, mentors were able to support the inclusion of their mentee in the group. Community members are willing to support people with intellectual disability to join their community groups. The Active Mentoring training is one way of harnessing the goodwill of community groups and their members to include people with intellectual disability to participate on an individual basis in community groups.

  2. A Comprehensive Approach to Partnering Scientists with Education and Outreach Activities at a National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.

    2002-12-01

    With the establishment of an Office of Education and Outreach (EO) in 2000 and the adoption of a five-year EO strategic plan in 2001, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) committed to augment the involvement of AGU scientists and their partners in education and public outreach activities that represent the full spectrum of research in the atmospheric and related sciences. In 2002, a comprehensive program is underway which invites scientists from UCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and UCAR Office of Programs (UOP) into partnership with EO through volunteer orientation workshops, program specific training, skill-building in pedagogy, access to classroom resources, and program and instructor evaluation. Scientists contribute in one or several of the following roles: program partners who bridge research to education through collaborative grant proposals; science content advisors for publications, web sites, exhibits, and informal science events; science mentors for high school and undergraduate students; NCAR Mesa Laboratory tour guides; scientists in the schools; science education ambassadors to local and national community events; science speakers for EO programs, conferences, and meetings of local organization; and science wizards offering demonstrations at public events for children and families. This new EO initiative seeks to match the expertise and specific interests of scientists with appropriate activities, while also serving as a communications conduit through which ideas for new activities and resources can be seeded and eventually developed into viable, fully funded programs.

  3. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program manager...

  4. One Model for Scientist Involvement in K-12 Education: Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meese, D.; Shipp, S. S.; Porter, M.; Bruccoli, A.

    2002-12-01

    Scientists involved in the NSF-funded Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) Program integrate a K-12 science teacher into their polar field project. Objectives of the program include: having the science teacher immersed in the experience of research; 2) through the teacher, leveraging the research experience to better inform teaching practices; and 3) sharing the experience with the broader educational and general community. The scientist - or qualified team member - stays involved with the teacher throughout the program as a mentor. Preparation of the teacher involves a week-long orientation presented by the TEA Program, and a two week pre-expedition visit at the scientist's institution. Orientation acquaints teachers with program expectations, logistical information, and an overview of polar science. While at the scientist's institution, the teacher meets the team, prepares for the field, and strengthens content knowledge. In the field, the teacher is a team member and educational liaison, responding to questions from students and colleagues by e-mail, and posting electronic journals describing the research experience. Upon return, the teachers work closely with colleagues to bring the experience of research into classrooms through creation of activities, design of longer-term student investigations, and presentations at scientific, educational, and community meetings. Interaction with the scientific team continues with a visit by the scientist to the teacher's classrooms, collaboration on presentations at scientific meetings, and consultation on classroom activities. In some cases, the teacher may participate in future expeditions. The involvement by scientists in mentor relationships, such as those of the TEA Program, is critical to improving science education. Many teachers of science have not had the opportunity to participate in field research, which offers valuable first-hand experience about the nature of science, as well as about specific

  5. Inverting EPO: Pedagogy for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. E.

    2002-05-01

    ``Education and Public Outreach" has an increasingly important role in our field, and is critical to the continued levels of funding from congress. However, in our enthusiasm to interact with the public and improve undergraduate courses, many astronomers find themselves ``reinventing the wheel" in astronomy education. There are many fundamental principles in education with which scientists should be familiar before entering the classroom or engaging the public. In this talk I will overview a pedagogy course we are developing to give graduate students in astronomy a grounding in important and useful principles in education.

  6. A scientist at the seashore

    CERN Document Server

    Trefil, James S

    2005-01-01

    ""A marvelous excursion from the beach to the ends of the solar system . . . captivating.""-The New York Times""So easy to understand yet so dense with knowledge that you'll never look at waves on a beach the same way again.""-San Francisco Chronicle""One of the best popular science books.""-The Kansas City Star""Perfect for the weekend scientist.""-The Richmond News-LeaderA noted physicist and popular science writer heads for the beach to answer common and uncommon questions about the ocean. James S. Trefil, author of Dover Publications' The Moment of Creation: Big Bang Physics from Before th

  7. Becoming a Mentor: The Impact of Training and the Experience of Mentoring University Students on the Autism Spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josette Hamilton

    Full Text Available While it is widely recognised that the number of young adults diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disoders (ASD is increasing, there is currently limited understanding of effective support for the transition to adulthood. One approach gaining increasing attention in the university sector is specialised peer mentoring. The aim of this inductive study was to understand the impact of peer mentor training on seven student mentors working with university students with an ASD. Kirkpatrick's model framed a mixed methods evaluation of the mentors' training and description of their experience. Overall, the training was well received by the mentors, who reported on average a 29% increase in their ASD knowledge following the training. Results from the semi-structured interviews conducted three months after the training, found that mentors felt that the general ASD knowledge they gained as part of their training had been essential to their role. The mentors described how their overall experience had been positive and reported that the training and support provided to them was pivotal to their ability to succeed in as peer mentors to students with ASD. This study provides feedback in support of specialist peer-mentoring programs for university students and can inform recommendations for future programs and research.

  8. Becoming a Mentor: The Impact of Training and the Experience of Mentoring University Students on the Autism Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Josette; Stevens, Gillian; Girdler, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    While it is widely recognised that the number of young adults diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disoders (ASD) is increasing, there is currently limited understanding of effective support for the transition to adulthood. One approach gaining increasing attention in the university sector is specialised peer mentoring. The aim of this inductive study was to understand the impact of peer mentor training on seven student mentors working with university students with an ASD. Kirkpatrick's model framed a mixed methods evaluation of the mentors' training and description of their experience. Overall, the training was well received by the mentors, who reported on average a 29% increase in their ASD knowledge following the training. Results from the semi-structured interviews conducted three months after the training, found that mentors felt that the general ASD knowledge they gained as part of their training had been essential to their role. The mentors described how their overall experience had been positive and reported that the training and support provided to them was pivotal to their ability to succeed in as peer mentors to students with ASD. This study provides feedback in support of specialist peer-mentoring programs for university students and can inform recommendations for future programs and research.

  9. Between forwarding and mentoring: a qualitative study of recommending medical doctors for international postdoctoral research positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušić Matko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young scientists rarely have extensive international connections that could facilitate their mobility. They often rely on their doctoral supervisors and other senior academics, who use their networks to generate opportunities for young scientists to gain international experience and provide the initial trigger for an outward move. Methods To explore the process of informal recommending of young physicians from a small country for postdoctoral research positions in foreign countries, we conducted in-depth interviews with eight senior academics who acted as recommenders and eight physicians who, based on the recommendations of senior academics, spent at least a year working in a laboratory abroad. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed by using the framework approach. Results The findings showed that recommending can take four distinct forms: 1 forwarding information, 2 passive recommending, 3 active recommending, and 4 mentor recommending. These forms differ in their level of commitment and mutual trust among actors, and possible control over the success of the process. Two groups of recommendees - 'naive' and 'experienced' - can be distinguished based on their previous scientific experience and research collaboration with the recommender. Crucial for the success of the process is an adequate preparation of recommendees' stay abroad, as well as their return and reintegration. The benefits of recommending extend beyond the individual participants to the scientific community and broader society of the sending country. Conclusions With a sufficient level of commitment by the actors, informal recommending can be a part of or grow into an all-encompassing developmental relationship equal to mentoring. The importance of senior academics' informal contacts and recommendations in promoting junior scientists' mobility should be acknowledged and encouraged by the research institutions and universities, particularly in developing

  10. Increasing STEM success: a near-peer mentoring program in the physical sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaniewski, Anna M; Reinholz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    .... While physics education has made progress in classifying the availability and structural components related to mentoring programs, little is known about the qualitative nature of mentoring relationships...

  11. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  12. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video ... Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information ...

  13. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see ... I become a scientist? Click to Watch Did You Know? An eagle’s eyesight is about five times ...

  14. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors ... like these and more with our Ask a Scientist video series. Dr. Sheldon Miller answers questions about ...

  15. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The prospects for life in the Universe just got sweeter, with the first discovery of a simple sugar molecule in space. The discovery of the sugar molecule glycolaldehyde in a giant cloud of gas and dust near the center of our own Milky Way Galaxy was made by scientists using the National Science Foundation's 12 Meter Telescope, a radio telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona. "The discovery of this sugar molecule in a cloud from which new stars are forming means it is increasingly likely that the chemical precursors to life are formed in such clouds long before planets develop around the stars," said Jan M. Hollis of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. Hollis worked with Frank J. Lovas of the University of Illinois and Philip R. Jewell of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, on the observations, made in May. The scientists have submitted their results to the Astrophysical Journal Letters. "This discovery may be an important key to understanding the formation of life on the early Earth," said Jewell. Conditions in interstellar clouds may, in some cases, mimic the conditions on the early Earth, so studying the chemistry of interstellar clouds may help scientists understand how bio-molecules formed early in our planet's history. In addition, some scientists have suggested that Earth could have been "seeded" with complex molecules by passing comets, made of material from the interstellar cloud that condensed to form the Solar System. Glycolaldehyde, an 8-atom molecule composed of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, can combine with other molecules to form the more-complex sugars Ribose and Glucose. Ribose is a building block of nucleic acids such as RNA and DNA, which carry the genetic code of living organisms. Glucose is the sugar found in fruits. Glycolaldehyde contains exactly the same atoms, though in a different molecular structure, as methyl formate and acetic acid, both of which were detected previously in interstellar clouds

  16. Young scientists in the making

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2011-01-01

    Some 700 local primary-school children will be trying out the scientific method for themselves from February to June. After "Draw me a physicist", the latest project "Dans la peau d’un chercheur" ("Be a scientist for a day") is designed to give children a taste of what it's like to be a scientist. Both schemes are the fruit of a partnership between CERN, "PhysiScope" (University of Geneva) and the local education authorities in the Pays de Gex and the Canton of Geneva.   Juliette Davenne (left) and Marie Bugnon (centre) from CERN's Communication Group prepare the mystery boxes for primary schools with Olivier Gaumer (right) of PhysiScope. Imagine a white box that rattles and gives off a strange smell when you shake it… How would you go about finding out what's inside it without opening it? Thirty primary-school teachers from the Pays de Gex and the Canton of Geneva tried out this exercise on Wednesday 26 ...

  17. Attributes of Effective Mentoring Relationships for Novice Faculty Members: Perspectives of Mentors and Mentees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jessica L.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Nottingham, Sara L.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Although doctoral education provides ample opportunities for skill development, the new faculty member may still require further support and guidance. Mentorship is often the mechanism whereby continued encouragement is provided. Limited understanding exists of the mentoring relationships developed between a new faculty member and a…

  18. Peer-mentored research development meeting: a model for successful peer mentoring among junior level researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Aimee K; Lingler, Jennifer H; Schmidt, Karen L; Nolan, Beth A D; Thatcher, Dawn; Polk, Deborah E

    2008-01-01

    This report describes a model for the development, process, and tracking methods of a Peer-mentored Research Development Meeting (PRDM), an interdisciplinary peer mentoring program. The program was initiated in 2004 by a group of postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty from the Schools of the Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. From February 2004 through February 2006, PRDM's first five members tracked and documented their research activity (e.g., manuscripts, grants) every 4 months. The defining features of PRDM are adherence to a structured frequency and format for meetings, systematic tracking and evaluation of research development activities, and maintenance of ongoing relationships with senior mentors. During the 24-month data collection period, members were involved in 91 research development projects including grant applications, journal article manuscripts, book chapters, and conference abstracts. Members' productivity increased during the 24-month period, as did the efficiency and focus of the completed projects. Members increased the efficiency and focus of their research development activities during the study period. Structured peer-mentoring groups have the potential to enhance research productivity among junior investigators in research intensive environments.

  19. Mentoring Australian Emerging Researchers in Aging: Evaluation of a Pilot Mentoring Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, Tim; Bartlett, Helen; Carroll, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A survey of Australian emerging researchers in aging identified the need for greater professional development and networking opportunities. To address this, a formal mentorship scheme was developed and evaluated. Fourteen postgraduate researchers (proteges) were matched by discipline and research interest to experienced academics (mentors).…

  20. An Aphasia Mentoring Program: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathology Students and of Mentors with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Barbara A.; Petersen, Jill; Puurveen, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that…

  1. Ideabook for Mentors. Hand in Hand: Mentoring Young Women. Book 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddis, Bonnie; And Others

    This document is one of three products developed as part of a 2-year project designed to increase the motivation of minority young women to pursue occupations and careers that will be in demand in the future. It is hoped that these products will help schools and businesses to cooperate in conducting a mentoring program. This ideabook was written…

  2. Can scientists and policy makers work together?

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, B.; Pang, T.; Lin, V.; Puska, P.; Sherman, G.; Goddard, M.; Ackland, M.; Sainsbury, P.; Stachenko, S.; Morrison, H.; Clottey, C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a fundamental question in evidence based policy making—can scientists and policy makers work together? It first provides a scenario outlining the different mentalities and imperatives of scientists and policy makers, and then discusses various issues and solutions relating to whether and how scientists and policy makers can work together. Scientists and policy makers have different goals, attitudes toward information, languages, perception of time, and career paths. Impor...

  3. Students work as scientists for the summer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryde, Marianne Vang

    2006-01-01

    Each year, Risø offers its PhD students a course to challenge the natural scientists of the future and to provide them with a more balanced view of their own role as scientists in society.......Each year, Risø offers its PhD students a course to challenge the natural scientists of the future and to provide them with a more balanced view of their own role as scientists in society....

  4. Some Psychological Knowledge for Scientists' Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    Relying on empirical evidences our paper presents the most salient personality traits, developmental factors and cognitive characteristics of the scientists. We claim that a sound exploration of scientists' mind and patterns of behavior could improve public support for science and enhance scientists' mutual understanding.

  5. Still Persistent Global Problem of Scientists' Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Pre-service teachers' views of science and scientists have been widely studied. The purpose of this study is to identify whether there is problem of image of scientists and determine where they receive about scientist image. Three hundred thirty five (105 from Turkey, 162 from Europe, 68 from US) elementary pre-service teachers participated in…

  6. A virtual appreciative coaching and mentoring programme to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An appreciative virtual coaching and mentoring programme underpinned by an appreciative inquiry philosophy is proposed. Connectivism formed the pedagogical approach with training, coaching and mentoring forming the main teaching and learning strategies. A blended cyber learning approach is recommended in ...

  7. Using Blackboard and Skype for Mentoring Beginning Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk Hwang, Young; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the nature of the Blackboard and Skype-based electronic mentoring system for beginning teachers. The Quality Teachers for Quality Students project developed an electronic mentoring system between beginning teachers and experienced teachers to support beginning teachers' instructional and classroom…

  8. Impact of the ATEC Mentor Program on DAWIA Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Mentoring has been found to influence employee retention because it helps establish an organizational culture that is attractive to the top talent clamoring...companies report that mentoring programs are effective in increasing employee retention and performance. The American Society for Training and

  9. Undergraduate Peer Mentors as Teacher Leaders: Successful Starts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Dawn; DeLathouwer, Erin; Adilman, Jordan; Hoffart, Jessie; Prior-Hildebrandt, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a qualitative study that examined the professional growth of undergraduate peer mentors as teacher leaders during an innovative Learning Community initiative designed for a teacher education program at the University of Saskatchewan. The paper describes the extent to which peer mentors exhibited characteristics…

  10. Sex Differences in the Perceived Importance of Mentoring Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Laurie L.; O'Neill, Regina M.; Nelson, Teresa; Dumas, Colette

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To be the first study to consider the difference between men's and women's perceptions of most important mentoring functions. Design/methodology/approach: Survey recipients identified the three most important things that mentors can do for their proteges. Two independent coders categorized the behaviors listed by the 637 respondents.…

  11. A Mentoring Program Drills down on the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Emily; Sinclair, Steve; Gschwend, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Santa Cruz/Silicon Valley New Teacher Project--under the aegis of the New Teacher Center--devised a program to train teacher mentors to help new teachers incorporate the Common Core standards into their teaching. The three-year program yielded five critical lessons: Mentors need ongoing support to develop their readiness and willingness to…

  12. Transforming Beginner Teacher Mentoring Interventions for Social Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Tanya; du Toit, Pieter H.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the use of action research for beginner teachers' professional development through the use of peer mentoring. Action research principles were applied by the mentor and the participating mentees/peers, forming a scholarly community of practice. The mentees were empowered to transform their teaching…

  13. Onboarding the Faculty: A Model for Win-Win Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Literature finds mentoring to be a substantive, enduring practice in widespread arena, and among the attributes associated with career success and satisfaction. This paper provides a tangible mentoring model that has been operational for several years, and which applies what the literature proscribes to higher education academic settings. The…

  14. ClassCompass: A Software Design Mentoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Wesley; Murphy, Gail

    2007-01-01

    Becoming a quality software developer requires practice under the guidance of an expert mentor. Unfortunately, in most academic environments, there are not enough experts to provide any significant design mentoring for software engineering students. To address this problem, we present a collaborative software design tool intended to maximize an…

  15. Placement Mentors Making Sense of Research-Based Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaen, Finn Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Placement mentors' role increasingly implies demonstrating to student teachers how research-based knowledge in combination with experience-based knowledge may be relevant in teachers' professional work. This is a challenge. Placement mentors are often unsure how to make sense of research-based knowledge. Frequently there is a mismatch between what…

  16. Perceptions of mentoring: Expectations of a key resource for higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the context of higher education, the role of mentoring new staff is variously established, though often informal. It is sometimes associated with research supervision, but more recently the increasing sophistication of the roles of staff has seen the introduction of `mentoring' to manage induction. In South Africa, a strong ...

  17. Business Education University Supervisors' Perspectives of Mentor Teachers' Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Edward C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of an expert panel of 31 business education university supervisors from the U.S. and Canada using a modified Delphi approach regarding the areas in which mentor teachers are typically most and least prepared. Findings indicated business education mentor teachers are most prepared in the areas of classroom…

  18. The Roles of Mentors in Electronic Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shujen

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the roles of mentors to meet the need for mentors in electronic learning (eLearning) environments. The existing literature has documented factors impeding effective eLearning and the multiplicity of the faculty's roles that demands too much time on the faculty within eLearning environments. This paper argues for the need for…

  19. Mentors: Making a Difference in Our Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas W.

    This book describes the success of mentor programs and of individuals such as Hillary Clinton, Barbara Bush, Bill Cosby, and Arnold Schwarzenegger among many others, who have worked as mentors in public schools. The first section describes the work of Eugene Lang and his "I Have a Dream" program. The second section describes the work of…

  20. 13 CFR 124.520 - Mentor/protege program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... include technical and/or management assistance; financial assistance in the form of equity investments and... mentor and receive benefits as set forth in this section. This includes businesses that have graduated... financial health, a firm seeking to be a mentor must submit its federal tax returns for the last two years...

  1. Peers for Promotion: Achieving Academic Advancement through Facilitated Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockene, Judith K.; Milner, Robert J.; Thorndyke, Luanne E.; Congdon, John; Cain, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    The promotion process is challenging, particularly for non-tenure track faculty in academic medicine. To address this challenge, we implemented a facilitated peer mentoring program that included a structured curriculum with regular meetings, guided by two senior faculty mentors. Participants expressed satisfaction with the program, showed…

  2. Mentoring Empowers Gifted/Learning Disabled Students To Soar!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevitz, Betty; Weinfeld, Rich; Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the Wings Mentor Program in Maryland, a program developed to provide additional support to students with gifts who also have learning disabilities and highly able students who were not succeeding in the classroom. Students realize their creative and intellectual potential when paired with mentors who nurture them. (Contains…

  3. Student Teacher Perceptions of the Role of Classroom Mentors on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Student Teacher Perceptions of the Role of Classroom Mentors on Attachment Teaching Practice: The Case at Morgan ZINTEC College. ... Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research ... This study sought to identify the perceptions that student teachers hold towards their mentors whilst on attachment teaching practice.

  4. Best Practices in Academic Mentoring: A Model for Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M. Nick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mentoring is important for the recruitment and retention of qualified nurse faculty, their ongoing career development, and leadership development. However, what are current best practices of mentoring? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of a model for excellence in establishing a formal mentoring program for academic nurse educators. Six themes for establishing a formal mentoring program are presented, highlighting best practices in mentoring as culled from experience and the literature. Themes reflect aims to achieve appropriately matched dyads, establish clear mentorship purpose and goals, solidify the dyad relationship, advocate for and guide the protégé, integrate the protégé into the academic culture, and mobilize institutional resources for mentoring support. Attending to the six themes will help mentors achieve important protégé outcomes, such as orientation to the educator role, integration into the academic community, development of teaching, scholarship, and service skills, as well as leadership development. The model is intended to be generalizable for faculty teaching in a variety of academic nursing institution types and sizes. Mentoring that integrates the six themes assists faculty members to better navigate the academic environment and more easily transition to new roles and responsibilities.

  5. Requisite Participant Characteristics for Effective Peer Group Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Effective mentorship, due to the developmental nature of the experience, hinges upon the people involved--specifically, the personal characteristics of the mentoring collaborators. In this paper, the author explored requisite participant characteristics for peer group mentoring. One dozen executive-level professional women shared their…

  6. Mentoring Beginning Teachers in Primary Schools: Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner-Lane, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    While mentoring programmes have proven to be successful in reducing attrition and improving teaching ability in beginning teachers, there remains a lack of research delineating the key components of effective mentoring programmes in primary education. This integrative research review examines empirical studies conducted since 2000 on the nature…

  7. Mentoring in Sports Coaching: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robyn L.; Harris, Richard; Miles, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite criticism of its positive claims being largely unfounded and ill-clarified, the concept of mentoring has come into common use within sports coaching. Purpose: In an attempt to address these concerns, the purpose of this paper is to take better account of the researched evidence on mentoring in general before providing some…

  8. Mentoring as a Formalized Learning Strategy with Community Sports Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark; Armour, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine formalized mentoring as a learning strategy for volunteer sports coaches and to consider implications for other volunteer groups in the community. Despite the increasingly popular use of mentoring as a learning and support strategy across professional domains, and the sheer scale of volunteer sports coach…

  9. Ethical Issues in Mentoring Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Anna; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues abound in any relationship that is defined by differences between the parties in rank, status, and power. Such is the case in the relationship between a doctoral student in clinical psychology and his or her mentor. In this article, we examine several potential areas of ethical concern within the mentor-student relationship. We…

  10. Besitzt Mentoring kultur- und strukturverändernde Potenziale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Franzke

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Während Mentoring bislang hinsichtlich seiner individuellen Effekte vor allem in theoretischen Arbeiten untersucht und in Evaluationsstudien empirisch ausgewertet worden ist, fragen die Herausgeberinnen nach den kultur- und strukturverändernden Potenzialen durch Mentoring im universitären Feld.

  11. Anchoring a Mentoring Network in a New Faculty Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane-Katner, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Intentional mentoring of the next generation of faculty is critical if they are to be successful teacher-scholars. The traditional model of one-on-one mentoring is insufficient given the changing demographics of next-generation faculty members, their particular expectations, the limited professional training they receive in graduate school, and…

  12. Mentoring portfolio use in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Hanke; Driessen, Erik; Ter Braak, Edith; Scheele, Fedde; Slaets, Joris; Van Der Molen, Thys; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Mentoring is widely acknowledged as being crucial for portfolio learning. The aim of this study is to examine how mentoring portfolio use has been implemented in undergraduate and postgraduate settings. Method: The results of interviews with six key persons involved in setting up portfolio use

  13. Mentoring Gifted Young Women: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jill M.; Welch, Dorothy B.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes of 33 female and 28 male students who had completed a Mentor Connection program in high school. Attitudes regarding the effect of a mentor on the students' lives, career/work focus, personal confidence, skill development, networking, and long-term goals were analyzed. (Author/DB)

  14. Hybrid-Mentoring Programs for Beginning Elementary Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, EunJin

    2013-01-01

    This study examines four induction models and teacher changes in science teaching practices, as a result of several mentoring programs. It explores three different computer-mediated mentoring programs, and a traditional offline induction program--in terms of interactivity, inquiry-based teaching, and topics of knowledge. Fifteen elementary science…

  15. Elements of Successful Mentoring of a Female School Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, April

    2010-01-01

    This case study examines the successful mentoring relationship between an early-career principal and her mentor as they participated in an Entry Year Program for early-career school administrators as a component of an Administrative Leadership Academy (ALA). Using a feminist poststructuralist framework, the findings show that contrary to…

  16. How To Set Up a Workplace Mentoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

    This document provides background for those looking to establish workplace mentoring or buddy systems. It touches briefly on the other two legs of an effective workplace preparation program, which are orientation and on-the-job training. These six steps for setting up a mentoring system are described: recruitment, flexibility, training, written…

  17. Mentoring and Organizational Communication: A Review of the Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Brant; Seeger, Matthew

    From the perspective of organizational behavior, mentoring received little attention until the mid 1970s. Since that time, the topic has been praised, criticized, analyzed, and in some organizations formally endorsed. A survey of 1,200 leading corporate executives found that two thirds of those surveyed had a mentor, that the number of these…

  18. Becoming professionally qualified: The school-based mentoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on a study which explored the mentoring experiences of professionally unqualified practicing teachers enrolled in a part-time Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. The study sought to understand the mentoring experiences these students received ...

  19. Mentoring in Higher Education: Does It Enhance Mentees' Research Productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschallik, Julia; Pull, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring programs are increasingly widespread in academia. Still, comparatively little is known about their effects. With the help of a self-collected dataset of 368 researchers in two different fields and accounting for self-selection via matching techniques, we find mentees in formal mentoring programs to be more productive than comparable…

  20. Mentoring as a supportive pedagogy in theological training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article contends that theological training supported by effective mentoring can contribute to the shaping of theology students in terms of their spiritual growth, character development and ministry formation. It is further argued that mentoring as a supportive pedagogy needs to be an essential element of theological ...