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Sample records for brackish water ecosystems

  1. Rotifer trophic state indices as ecosystem indicators in brackish coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gutkowska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their short life cycles, rotifers react rapidly to changes in environmental conditions and so may be useful for biological monitoring. The objective of this paper was to investigate the applicability of rotifer trophic state indices as indicators of the trophic state of brackish waters, as exemplified by the Vistula Lagoon. Carried out in summer from 2007 to 2011, this study showed no significant correlation between the Lagoon's trophic state and the rotifer structure. This confirms the limited applicability of rotifer trophic state indices for evaluating water quality in brackish water bodies.

  2. Growing floricultural crops with brackish water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassaniti, C.; Romano, D.; Hop, M.E.C.M.; Flowers, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the current review we focus on the opportunity to use brackish water in the cultivation of floricultural plants, plants for which, due to their high economic value, growers have traditionally used good quality water for irrigation. Now, even for these crops the use of alternative water sources fo

  3. Caribbean fresh and brackish water Chlorophyta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den C.

    1959-01-01

    During his zoological collecting trips to the Antilles Dr. P. Wagenaar Hummelinck also gathered several samples of fresh and brackish water algae, which have been presented to the Rijksherbarium, Leiden. The present paper deals with the Chlorophyta of that collection, with the exception of Enteromor

  4. An integrated fish-plankton aquaculture system in brackish water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, S; Fargier, L; Lazzaro, X; Baras, E; De Wilde, N; Drakidès, C; Amiel, C; Rispal, B; Blancheton, J-P

    2013-02-01

    Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture takes advantage of the mutualism between some detritivorous fish and phytoplankton. The fish recycle nutrients by consuming live (and dead) algae and provide the inorganic carbon to fuel the growth of live algae. In the meanwhile, algae purify the water and generate the oxygen required by fishes. Such mechanism stabilizes the functioning of an artificially recycling ecosystem, as exemplified by combining the euryhaline tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii and the unicellular alga Chlorella sp. Feed addition in this ecosystem results in faster fish growth but also in an increase in phytoplankton biomass, which must be limited. In the prototype described here, the algal population control is exerted by herbivorous zooplankton growing in a separate pond connected in parallel to the fish-algae ecosystem. The zooplankton production is then consumed by tilapia, particularly by the fry and juveniles, when water is returned to the main circuit. Chlorella sp. and Brachionus plicatilis are two planktonic species that have spontaneously colonized the brackish water of the prototype, which was set-up in Senegal along the Atlantic Ocean shoreline. In our system, water was entirely recycled and only evaporation was compensated (1.5% volume/day). Sediment, which accumulated in the zooplankton pond, was the only trophic cul-de-sac. The system was temporarily destabilized following an accidental rotifer invasion in the main circuit. This caused Chlorella disappearance and replacement by opportunist algae, not consumed by Brachionus. Following the entire consumption of the Brachionus population by tilapias, Chlorella predominated again. Our artificial ecosystem combining S. m. heudelotii, Chlorella and B. plicatilis thus appeared to be resilient. This farming system was operated over one year with a fish productivity of 1.85 kg/m2 per year during the cold season (January to April).

  5. Desalting seawater and brackish waters: 1981 cost update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.A.

    1982-08-01

    This is the fourth in a series of desalting cost update reports. Cost data are reported for desalting seawater by various distillation systems and by reverse osmosis. Costs of desalting four brackish waters, representative of those found in the United States by both reverse osmosis and electrodialysis are also given. Cost data are presented parametrically as a function of energy cost and plant size. The cost of desalting seawater by distillation has increased by 40% during the past two years, while desalting by reverse osmosis has increased by about 36% during the same period. Brackish water desalting by reverse osmosis has only increased by about 12%, and brackish water desalting by electrodialysis is up by 40%. Again, the continued increase in energy costs has had a major impact on all desalination systems.

  6. Annual net ecosystem exchanges of carbon dioxide and methane from a temperate brackish marsh: should the focus of marsh restoration be on brackish environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Anderson, F. E.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Ferner, M. C.; Schile, L. M.; Spinelli, G.

    2015-12-01

    The exchange and transport of carbon in tidally driven, saline marsh ecosystems provide habitat and trophic support for coastal wildlife and fisheries, while potentially accumulating and storing carbon at some of the highest rates compared to other ecosystems. However, due to the predicted rise in sea level over the next century, the preservation and restoration of estuarine habitats is necessary to compensate for their expected decline. In addition, restoration of these marsh systems can also reduce the impacts of global climate change as they assimilate as much carbon as their freshwater counterparts, while emitting less methane due to the higher concentrations of sulfate in seawater. Unfortunately, in brackish marshes, with salinity concentrations less than 18 parts per thousand (ppt), simple relationships between methane production, salinity and sulfate concentrations are not well known. Here we present the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide and methane, as calculated by the eddy covariance method, from a brackish marsh ecosystem in the San Francisco Estuary where salinity ranges from oligohaline (0.5-5 ppt) to mesohaline (5-18 ppt) conditions. Daily rates of carbon dioxide and methane NEE ranged from approximately 10 gC-CO2 m-2 d-1 and 0 mgC-CH4 m-2 d-1, during the winter to -15 gC-CO2 m-2 d-1 and 30 mgC-CH4 m-2 d-1, in the summer growing season. A comparison between similar measurements made from freshwater wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta found that the daily rates of carbon dioxide NEE were similar, but daily rates of methane NEE were just a small fraction (0-15%). Our research also shows that the daily fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane at the brackish marsh were highly variable and may be influenced by the tidal exchanges of seawater. Furthermore, the observed decline in methane production from summer to fall may have resulted from a rise in salinity and/or a seasonal decline in water and air temperatures. Our research goals are

  7. Study on brackish water treatment technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xu-wen(何绪文); Xu De-ping (许德平); WU Bing(吴兵); WANG Tong(王通)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the characters of deep well-water quality in Fenxi Mining Group in Liulin, the feasibilities of two treatment technologies which use electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are analyzed. Through analyzing and comparing, reverse osmosis technology has several advantages, such as good treatment effect, convenient operating management and low run-cost.

  8. [On the colonization of brackish water by marine animals of different ecological origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Hermann

    1968-11-01

    Since animals of the marine littoral and supralitoral zones tolerate greater salinity-fluctuations than those of deep water layers they are far better adapted to colonize estuaries and brackish waters.This is why there live only few animals from the seabottom in brackish water even if it is very deep. Only animals from the littoral invade water with low or fluctuationg salinities.Those which are not restricted to surface regions (by their food - many depend on green plants) extend their range in brackish waters into deep layers since there is almost no competition.Therefore the bottom communities of the sea differ very much from the bottom communities of deep brackish waters.The extension of the range of marine littoral animals in deep brackish basins ("Brackwassersubmergenz") therefore is characteristic for deep brackish-water-zones and no special case of the Baltic Sea.

  9. Review of Brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) system designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alghoul, M.A.; Poovanaesvaran, P.; Sopian, K.; Sulaiman, M.Y. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2009-12-15

    Brackish water are any water sources with TDS between 1000 and 15 000 mg/L. Brackish water cannot be consumed by us directly due to its high salinity. According to World Health Organization (WHO), water with salinity below 500 mg/L is acceptable as drinking water. There are quite a large number of research that had been done on BWRO. Each of them has agreed with a common design on optimum BWRO design with a slight modification in order to improve more and make a better BWRO system. BWRO systems which have been tested in real situation agree that the single stage system with module connected to reject water is the most optimum system both economically and environmentally. There is some improvement done to the design by using SWRO membrane at the second stage. This improvement increases recovery rate to about 83% and reduces boron concentration at the same time. Another design is by using hybrid combination of ultra-low and conventional RO membranes. Hybrid improves permeate quality. It is also possible to create a hybrid array by mixing membrane element types within a pressure vessel itself. Co-operating an efficient module arrangement into a complete BWRO system will reduce energy consumption. Energy-recovery device is a component that must be included in any small or large-scale systems. A small-scale RO system, without energy recovery, would typically consume two to three times more energy. This will be more for large-scale systems. While single stage system with module connected to reject water is preferred by researchers who have done real environment testing, simulation prefers to add another membrane to the reject water of the second module. This system is yet to be tested in real environment to prove its standing. (author)

  10. Desalination of brackish water and concentration of industrial effluents by electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schoeman

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrodialysis (ED is, at present, used mainly for the desalination of brackish drinking-water. Brackish water with a high scaling potential can be successfully treated, using the electrodialysis reversal (EDR process without the addition of chemicals. The reliability of the ED process makes it very attractive for water treatment. Although used mainly for brackish water desalination, ED also has certain industrial applications. Plating wash waters, cooling tower recirculation water and glass etching effluents have been treated successfully with ED for water recovery and effluent volume reduction, while ED treatment of nickel plating wash waters is an established industrial process.

  11. Cellulose Derived Graphenic Fibers for Capacitive Desalination of Brackish Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugazhenthiran, Nalenthiran; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Prabhath, Anupama; Manikandan, Muthu; Swathy, Jakka Ravindran; Raman, V Kalyan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-09-16

    We describe a simple and inexpensive cellulose-derived and layer-by-layer stacked carbon fiber network electrode for capacitive deionization (CDI) of brackish water. The microstructure and chemical composition were characterized using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques; electrochemical/electrical performance was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and 4-probe electrical conductivity and surface area by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, respectively. The desalination performance was investigated using a laboratory batch model CDI unit, under fixed applied voltage and varying salt concentrations. Electro-adsorption of NaCl on the graphite reinforced-cellulose (GrC) electrode reached equilibrium quickly (within 90 min) and the adsorbed salts were released swiftly (in 40 min) back into the solution, during reversal of applied potential. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies clearly illustrate that sodium and chloride ions were physisorbed on the negative and positive electrodes, respectively during electro-adsorption. This GrC electrode showed an electro-adsorption capacity of 13.1 mg/g of the electrode at a cell potential of 1.2 V, with excellent recyclability and complete regeneration. The electrode has a high tendency for removal of specific anions, such as fluoride, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate from water in the following order: Cl->NO3->F->SO4(2-). GrC electrodes also showed resistance to biofouling with negligible biofilm formation even after 5 days of incubation in Pseudomonas putida bacterial culture. Our unique cost-effective methodology of layer-by-layer stacking of carbon nanofibers and concurrent reinforcement using graphite provides uniform conductivity throughout the electrode with fast electro-adsorption, rapid desorption, and extended reuse, making the electrode affordable for capacitive desalination of brackish water.

  12. Temperature dependent larval occurrence and spat settlement of the invasive brackish water bivalve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, M.; van der Velde, G.; Wijnhoven, S.; Rajagopal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mytilopsis leucophaeata, an invasive bivalve species, causes fouling problems by settling on submerged constructions and in cooling water circuits in brackish water. To predict spat fall we studied the larval occurrence and settlement of this species in the brackish Noordzeekanaal canal in the Nethe

  13. Desalination of Saline and Brackish Waters using Carbon Aerogel Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Massoudinejad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Background and Objectives: The increasing demand for drinking water has led scientists to the use of saline waters, but existing desalinating processes are very expensive. carbon aerogel is a type of organic aerogel that is suitable for desalination owing to its unique porous structure. Low potential of fouling and deposits, very low wastewater production, electrostatic regeneration of aerogels and, in turn, no need to acid consumption, and lower power consumption are some of this technology benefits.Materials and Method: In this experimental- analytical study, the purpose was survey of saline and brackish water desalination using carbon aerogel technology and its comparison with electrolysis.The community studied was synthetic salt water samples, using of TDS and EC indicators. The minimum synthetic samples were 243. In this regard, after polymerization of Resorsinol and Formaldehyde compounds under ambient pressure conditions and then its pyrolysis, we fabricated plates of carbon aerogel.Result: With manufacturing in the pilot-scale, the effect of different parameters, including input salt concentration, current, water flow, distance of between electrodes and pH, on NaCl sorption amount of carbon aerogel electrodes were studied. Generally, adsorption amount increased with increasing of current and NaCl concentration and decreased with increasing of distance electrodes, flow and pH.  Results: Fabricating reactor at pilot-scale, we studied the effect of different parameters, including input salt concentration, current, water flow, intra-distance of electrodes, and pH on the NaCl sorption using carbon aerogel electrodes. Generally, adsorption capacity increased with increasing of current and NaCl concentration in the inlet flow, and it decreased with increasing intra-distance of electrodes, flow, and pH.Conclusion: Under the most optimal

  14. Using mesoporous carbon electrodes for brackish water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Linda; Li, Lixia; Song, Huaihe; Morris, Gayle

    2008-04-01

    Electrosorptive deionisation is an alternative process to remove salt ions from the brackish water. The porous carbon materials are used as electrodes. When charged in low voltage electric fields, they possess a highly charged surface that induces adsorption of salt ions on the surface. This process is reversible, so the adsorbed salt ions can be desorbed and the electrode can be reused. In the study, an ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) electrode was developed for electrosorptive desalination. The effects of pore arrangement pattern (ordered and random) and pore size distribution (mesopores and micropores) on the desalination performance was investigated by comparing OMC and activated carbon (AC). It were revealed from X-ray diffraction and N(2) sorption measurements that AC has both micropores and mesopores, whereas ordered mesopores are dominant in OMC. Their performance as potential electrodes to remove salt was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests at a range of electrolyte concentrations and sweep rates. It is deduced that under the same electrochemical condition the specific capacitance values of OMC electrode (i.e. 133 F/g obtained from CV at a sweep rate of 1 mV/s in 0.1M NaCl solution) are larger than those of AC electrode (107 F/g), suggesting that the former has a higher desalting capacity than the latter. Furthermore, the OMC electrode shows a better rate capacity than the AC electrode. In addition, the desalination capacities were quantified by the batch-mode experiment at low voltage of 1.2V in 25 ppm NaCl solution (50 micros/cm conductivity). It was found that the adsorbed ion amounts of OMC and AC electrodes were 11.6 and 4.3 micromol/g, respectively. The excellent electrosorptive desalination performance of OMC electrode might be not only due to the suitable pore size (average of 3.3 nm) for the propagation of the salt ions, but also due to the ordered mesoporous structure that facilitates desorption of the

  15. Influence of nutrient input on the trophic state of a tropical brackish water lagoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Ganguly; Sivaji Patra; Pradipta R Muduli; K Vishnu Vardhan; Abhilash K R; R S Robin; B R Subramanian

    2015-07-01

    Ecosystem level changes in water quality and biotic communities in coastal lagoons have been associated with intensification of anthropogenic pressures. In light of incipient changes in Asia’s largest brackish water lagoon (Chilika, India), an examination of different dissolved nutrients distribution and phytoplankton biomass, was conducted through seasonal water quality monitoring in the year 2011. The lagoon showed both spatial and temporal variation in nutrient concentration, mostly altered by fresh-water input, regulated the chlorophyll distribution as well. Dissolved inorganic N:P ratio in the lagoon showed nitrogen limitation in May and December, 2011. Chlorophyll in the lagoon varied between 3.38 and 17.66 mg m−3. Spatially, northern part of the lagoon showed higher values of DIN and chlorophyll during most part of the year, except in May, when highest DIN was recorded in the southern part. Statistical analysis revealed that dissolved NH$^{+}_{4}$–N and urea could combinedly explain 43% of Chlorophyll- (Chl-) variability which was relatively higher than that explained by NO$^{-}_{3}$–N and NO$^{-}_{2}$–N (12.4%) in lagoon water. Trophic state index calculated for different sectors of the lagoon confirmed the inter-sectoral and inter-seasonal shift from mesotrophic to eutrophic conditions largely depending on nutrient rich freshwater input.

  16. Osmoregulatory adaptations of freshwater air-breathing snakehead fish (Channa striata) after exposure to brackish water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakkrasae, La-iad; Wisetdee, Khanitha; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-07-01

    NaCl-rich rock salt dissolved in natural water source leads to salinity fluctuation that profoundly affects freshwater ecosystem and aquatic fauna. The snakehead (Channa striata) can live in saline water, but the osmoregulatory mechanisms underlying this ability remain unclear. Herein, we found that exposure to salinities ≥ 10‰ NaCl markedly elevated plasma cortisol and glucose levels, and caused muscle dehydration. In a study of time-dependent response after being transferred from fresh water (0‰ NaCl, FW) to salt-dissolved brackish water (10‰ NaCl, SW), FW-SW, cortisol increased rapidly along with elevations of plasma glucose and lactate. Interestingly, plasma cortisol returned to baseline after prolonged exposure, followed by a second peak that probably enhanced the branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. Under SW-FW condition, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was not altered as compared to SW-adapted fish. In conclusion, salinity change, especially FW-SW, induced a stress response and hence cortisol release in C. striata, which might increase plasma glucose and lactate to energize the branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase.

  17. Integrated experimental investigation and mathematical modeling of brackish water desalination and wastewater treatment in microbial desalination cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Qingyun; Huang, Zuyi; Dosoretz, Carlos; He, Zhen

    2015-06-15

    Desalination of brackish water can provide freshwater for potable use or non potable applications such as agricultural irrigation. Brackish water desalination is especially attractive to microbial desalination cells (MDCs) because of its low salinity, but this has not been well studied before. Herein, three brackish waters prepared according to the compositions of actual brackish water in three locations in Israel were examined with domestic wastewater as an electron source in a bench-scale MDC. All three brackish waters could be effectively desalinated with simultaneous wastewater treatment. The MDC achieved the highest salt removal rate of 1.2 g L(-1) d(-1) with an initial salinity of 5.9 g L(-1) and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.8 d. The desalinated brackish water could meet the irrigation standard of both salinity (450 mg L(-1) TDS) and the concentrations of major ionic species, given a sufficient HRT. The MDC also accomplished nearly 70% removal of organic compounds in wastewater with Coulombic efficiency varied between 5 and 10%. A previously developed MDC model was improved for brackish water desalination, and could well predict salinity variation and the concentrations of individual ions. The model also simulated a staged operation mode with improved desalination performance. This integrated experiment and mathematical modeling approach provides an effective method to understand the key factors in brackish water desalination by MDCs towards further system development.

  18. Benthic diatoms as monitoring organisms for radionuclides in a brackish-water coastal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoeijs, P. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Notter, M. (Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Drottningholm (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The gamma-spectra of 421 algal samples (diatoms and filamentous macroalgae) taken in 1983-1989 from a brackish coastal area (northern Baltic Sea) were determined. The sources of radionuclide input in the ecosystem were (1) continuous discharge from the Forsmark nuclear power plant and (2) distinct discharge from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986. Discharge from Forsmark and concentrations in diatom samples were significantly related; distance from the discharge point and hydrographical conditions determined the level of radionuclides in the diatoms. After the Chernobyl accident very high radionuclide concentrations were found in diatom samples, especially at sites with little water exchange. The short-lived radionuclides from Chernobyl were below the detection limit after 1 year, but the caesium-isotopes were still found recycling in the diatom communities after 3 years. The use of benthic diatoms as monitoring organisms for radioactive discharges was compared with the use of macroalgae, and is discussed in connection with the present field study and general algal ecology. (author).

  19. Insights into the Physiology and Ecology of the Brackish-Water-Adapted Cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, B.; Bolhuis, H.; Fewer, D.P.; Kopf, M.; Möke, F.; Haas, F.; El-Shehawy, R.; Hayes, P.; Bergman, B.; Sivonen, K.; Dittmann, E.; Scanlan, D.J.; Hagemann, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hess, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft geno

  20. Fresh and brackish water Fishes from Sumba, Flores, Groot-Bastaard, Timor, Samaoe and Rotti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvens, C.L.

    1895-01-01

    Among the zoological collections, made by Dr. H. ten Kate during his travels in the Malay Archipelago, which are now preserved in the Leyden Museum, are many fishes caught in fresh and brackish water. As it is a rare fact to become fishes from the above mentioned islands, I venture to give an enumer

  1. Multiple Antibiotic Resistances of Vibrio Isolates from Coastal and Brackish Water Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manjusha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to assess the occurrence of multiple antibiotic resistances in Vibrio spp. from different (brackish and marine environments. Water samples from nine marine landing sites and two coastal inland aquaculture farms were screened for the Vibrio spp. and assessed their resistance to twenty-two different antibiotics, which are commonly encountered in the aquatic ecosystem. Tissue samples (shrimp, mussel and sepia were tested from the sampling site with highest antibiotic resistance. Of the total 119 Vibrio isolates, 16. 8% were susceptible to all antibiotics. Of the resistant (83.19% Vibrio strains, 30.3% were resistant against three antibiotics, 55.5% were resistant against 4-10 antibiotics, 14.14% were resistant against more than 10 antibiotics and 54% have shown multiple antibiotics resistance (MAR. Antibiotic resistance index was higher in Coastal 3, 6, Aqua farm 2 in isolates from water samples and all the tissues tested. Interestingly, incidence of antibiotic resistance in isolates from water samples was comparatively lower in aquaculture farms than that observed in coastal areas. Highest incidence of antibiotic resistance was evident against Amoxycillin, Ampicillin, Carbencillin and Cefuroxime followed by Rifampicin and Streptomycin and lowest against Chloramphenicol, Tetracycline, Chlortetracycline, Furazolidone, Nalidixic acid, Gentamycin Sulphafurazole, Trimethoprim, Neomycin and Amikacin irrespective of the sampling sites. Results from various tissue samples collected from the sites of highest antibiotic resistance indicated that antibiotic resistance Vibrio spp. collected from fish and tissue samples were higher than that of water samples. Overall results indicated that persistent use of antibiotics against diseases in human beings and other life forms may pollute the aquatic system and their impact on developing antibiotic resistant Vibrio spp. may be a serious threat in addition to the use of

  2. A comparative study of boron and arsenic (III) rejection from brackish water by reverse osmosis membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Teychene, Benoît

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to compare at lab-scale the rejection efficiency of several reverse osmosis membranes (RO) toward arsenic (III) and boron during the filtration of a synthetic brackish water. The effect of pH and operating conditions on the rejection of each RO membrane was studied. Two types of membrane were investigated: "brackish water" and "sea water" membranes. Our results showed that the metalloid rejection depends on the membrane type, pH and transmembrane pressure applied. Increasing pH above the dissociation constant (pKa) of each specie improves significantly the metalloid rejection by RO membranes, whatever the membrane type. Moreover, at identical operating conditions (pH, transmembrane pressure), results showed that the brackish water membranes have a higher water flux and exhibit lower metalloid rejection. The highest As(III) rejection value for the tested brackish water membranes was 99% obtained at pH = 9.6 and 40 bars, whereas it was found that the sea water RO membranes could highly reject As(III), more than 99%, even at low pH and low pressure (pH = 7.6 and 24 bars).Regarding Boron rejection, similar conclusions could be drawn. The sea water RO membranes exert higher removal, with a high rejection value above 96% over the tested conditions. More generally, this study showed that, whatever the operating conditions or the tested membranes, the boron and As(III) permeate concentrations are below the WHO guidelines. In addition, new data about the boron and arsenic permeability of each tested RO membrane was brought thanks to a theoretical calculation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Cultivation of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata Linnaeus, 1758 in low salinity inland brackish geothermal water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Appelbaum

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the course of attempting to culture gilthead sea bream in inland brackish geothermal water, indoor and outdoor research studies have been ongoing from early 2006 at the "Bengis Centre for Desert Aquaculture" of the Institutes for Desert Research in Israel, some of which are described below. Gilthead sea bream fingerlings with an average weight of 19 g were acclimated to and reared for 56 days in brackish water of three salinities: 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 ppt collected from three different locations. At the salinity of 3.5 ppt the fish grew best (P Artemia nauplii plus larval dry feed and were grown in brackish water of 2.6 ppt salinity for 8 weeks reaching a weight gain of 92% at a survival rate of 83%. The control groups at sea water (39 ppt reached at the same time a weight gain of 95% at a survival rate of 98%. In a further study gilthead sea bream juveniles with an average weight of 2.24 g were reared in brackish water with a salinity of 3.6 ppt for 8 weeks and received salt added diets of 4% and 6%. Compared with the control diet with no salt added, both salt rich diets significantly improved the fingerlings growth and survival rates as well as the feed conversion ratio. The 6% salt rich diet promoted fish weight gain by 560% which was the best performance (P <0.05 followed by 448% weight gain with the 4% salt rich diet while the lowest performance with a weight gain of only 360% was obtained with the control (no salt added diet. The next study with higher levels of salt added diets showed that gilthead sea bream post larvae with an average weight of 0.58 g reared in brackish geothermal water of 2.9 ppt salinity for 10 weeks grew best (P < 0.05 obtaining a weight gain of 778% with the highest survival rate of 88% when fed a diet containing 12% salt. In the studies with the salt rich diets, the salt incorporated was obtained by the evaporation of brine produced during the process of desalination of the brackish geothermal water from the same

  4. Benefits and hurdles of using brackish groundwater as a drinking water source in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuyfzand, Pieter J.; Raat, Klaasjan J.

    2010-02-01

    The production of fresh drinking water from brackish groundwater by reverse osmosis (BWRO) is becoming more attractive, even in temperate climates. For successful application of BWRO, the following approach is advocated: (1) select brackish source groundwater with a large volume and a composition that will yield a concentrate (waste water) with low mineral saturation; (2) maintain the feed water salinity at a constant level by pumping several wells with different salinities; (3) keep the permeate-to-concentrate ratio low, to avoid supersaturation in the concentrate; (4) keep the system anoxic (to avoid oxidation reactions) and pressurized (to prevent formation of gas bubbles); and (5) select a confined aquifer for deep well injection where groundwater quality is inferior to the membrane concentrate. This approach is being tested at two BWRO pilot plants in the Netherlands. Research issues are the pumping of a stable brackish source water, the reverse osmosis system performance, membrane fouling, quality changes in the target aquifer as a result of concentrate disposal, and clogging of the injection well. First evaluations of the membrane concentrate indicate that it is crucial to understand the kinetics of mineral precipitation on the membranes, in the injection wells, and in the target aquifer.

  5. Desalination of underground brackish waters using an electrodialysis system powered directly by photovoltaic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, J.M.; Exposito, E.; Gallud, F.; Garcia-Garcia, V.; Montiel, V.; Aldaz, A. [Grupo de Electroquimica Aplicada y Electrocatalisis, Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    The aims of this paper are: to demonstrate the feasibility of the desalination of brackish water from aquifers (total dissolved solids=2300-5100 g m{sup -3}) by means of an electrodialysis system powered directly by photovoltaic solar panels, and improve the mathematical model developed in a previous work in order to apply it to real brackish waters. The application of this model allows to predict the behaviour of the electrodialysis-photovoltaic system under different operational and meteorological conditions, and the time required to reach a given final concentration. Finally, the cost of electrodialysis-photovoltaic systems for small applications in isolated locations with lack of electric grid has been estimated. (author)

  6. MINERAL NUTRITION OF CRISPHEAD LETTUCE GROWN IN A HYDROPONIC SYSTEM WITH BRACKISH WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAMMADY RAMALHO E SOARES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water availability in the Brazilian semiarid is restricted and often the only water source available has high salt concentrations. Hydroponics allows using these waters for production of various crops, including vegetables, however, the water salinity can cause nutritional disorders. Thus, two experiments were conducted in a greenhouse at the Department of Agricultural Engineering of the Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, to evaluate the effects of salinity on the mineral nutrition of crisphead lettuce, cultivar Taina, in a hydroponic system (Nutrient Film Technique, using brackish water in the nutrient solution, which was prepared by adding NaCl to the local water (0.2 dS m-1. A randomized blocks experimental design was used in both experiments. The treatments consisted of water of different salinity levels (0.2, 1.2, 2.2, 3.2, 4.2 and 5.2 dS m-1 with four replications, totaling 24 plots for each experiment. The water added to compensate for the water-depth loss due to evapotranspiration (WCET was the brackish water of each treatment in Experiment I and the local water without modifications in Experiment II. The increase in the salinity of the water used for the nutrient solution preparation reduced the foliar phosphorus and potassium contents and increased the chloride and sodium contents, regardless of the WCET. Foliar nitrogen, calcium, magnesium and sulfur contents were not affected by increasing the water salinity used for the nutrient solution preparation.

  7. Integrating tunable anion exchange with reverse osmosis for enhanced recovery during inland brackish water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan C; SenGupta, Arup K

    2015-05-01

    For inland brackish water desalination by reverse osmosis or RO, concentrate or reject disposal poses a major challenge. However, enhanced recovery and consequent reduction in the reject volume using RO processes is limited by the solubility of ions present in the feedwater. One of the most common and stubborn precipitate formed during desalination is calcium sulfate. Reducing or eliminating the presence of sulfate would allow the process to operate at higher recoveries without threat to membrane scaling. In this research, this goal is accomplished by using an appropriate mixture of self-regenerating anion exchange resins that selectively remove and replace sulfate by chloride prior to the RO unit. Most importantly, the mixed bed of anion exchange resins is self-regenerated with the reject brine from the RO process, thus requiring no addition of external chemicals. The current work demonstrates the reversibility of the hybrid ion exchange and RO (HIX-RO) process with 80% recovery for a brackish water composition representative of groundwater in San Joaquin Valley in California containing approximately 5200 mg/L of total dissolved solids or TDS. Consequently, the reject volume can be reduced by 50% without the threat of sulfate scaling and use of antiscaling chemicals can be eliminated altogether. By appropriately designing or tuning the mixed bed of anion exchange resins, the process can be extended to nearly any composition of brackish water for enhanced recovery and consequent reduction in the reject volume.

  8. BELL PEPPER CULTIVATION WITH BRINE FROM BRACKISH WATER DESALINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS EDUARDO DE MOURA ARRUDA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In desalination process, besides the potable water, highly salty and pollutant water (brine is generated, which can be used for producing crops since it is carefully monitored. In order to test this hypothesis, bell pepper plants, cv. 'Margarita', were grown in coconut fiber substrate under greenhouse and were irrigated with nutrient solutions prepared with tap water, brine from desalination plant, and its dilution with tap water at 75, 50 and 25%, giving a range of electrical conductivities of the nutrient solution (ECs of 2.6, 3.1, 6.6, 10.0 and 12.2 dS m-1 after the dilutions and fertilizers addition. Completely randomized blocks design was used with 5 treatments (salinity levels of the nutrient solutions and six replications. Leaf area, number of marketable fruit, total and marketable yield were reduced with ECs increase. The marketable yield of bell pepper 'Margarita' reduced 6.3% for each unitary increase of ECs above 2.6 dS m-1 (threshold salinity and the results suggest that in hydroponic system, the reduction of marketable yield with increasing ECs is promoted by reduction of the number of fruits per plant instead of a reduction of fruit mean weight.

  9. Influence of dispersants on petroleum bioavailability to primary producers in a brackish water food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younghans-Haug, C.O.; Wolfe, M.F.; Tjeerdema, R.S. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Sowby, M.L. [Office of Oil Spill Prevention and Response, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Petroleum is transported and processed within biologically rich brackish environments worldwide. Past research has investigated disposition of chemically dispersed oil in mammals, fish, and higher invertebrates, yet little is known about how chemical dispersion influences petroleum behavior within primary producers within brackish water food chains. One concern is whether chemical dispersion influences petroleum bioavailability to primary producers and the potential for increased petroleum bioaccumulation. This research examines changes in petroleum bioavailability to the euryhaline phytoplankton Isochrysis galbana by measuring bioconcentration factors (BCFS) including uptake and deputation rates for dispersed and undispersed brackish water oil spills. Isochrysis is a major food source for zooplankton which are consumed by a multitude of larval fish having both ecological and commercial importance. Prudhoe Bay Crude oil, Corexit 9527, and {sup 14}C-naphthalene were used for these studies. Constant-concentration flow-through exposures were employed for the uptake and BCF experiments. Work was performed below the ``no observable effect concentration`` to eliminate stress-induced metabolic altercations that could in themselves influence petroleum behavior. Exposure chamber and experimental design will be discussed, and study results presented. Understanding how chemical dispersion alters petroleum behavior within the lowest levels of the food chain leads to better delineation of consumer risks.

  10. Energy from fresh and brackish water aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Aquatic plants can achieve relatively high biomass productivities when compared to terrestrial plants because they need not be water-stressed and can be optimally supplied with nutrients. Based on literature reports, productivities in southern US regions of about 40 to 60 t/ha-yr (dry weight basis) can be predicted for green algae or marsh plants and about 80 t/ha-yr for water hyacinth. Higher productivities may be possible in exceptionally favorable locations by assuming development of advanced cultivation technologies and genetic selection of improved strains. The lack of established cultivation systems and low-cost harvesting processes imposes great uncertainties on the cost of biomass production by aquatic plants. Three potentially practical aquatic biomass energy systems are chemicals production from microalgae, alcohol production from marsh plants, and methane production from water hyacinths. At present, aquatic plants are not being used commercially as a fuel source any place in the world. Nevertheless, it is clear that aquatic plants have potentially high biomass productivities and, specifically for the case of microalgae, could produce a high-quality, high-value biomass suitable for conversion to fuels and extraction of other products. A list of the relative advantages and disadvantages of aquatic plant energy systems in comparison with the concepts of terrestrial tree or herbaceous plant energy farming is given. Three favorable aspects of aquatic plant biomass systems should be stressed - the relative short-term research and development effort that will be required to determine the practical feasibility of such systems, the continuous production nature of such systems, and the relative independence of aquatic biomass systems from soil characteristics and weather fluctuations. The fast generation times of most aquatic plants allow rapid data acquisition, as compared to even short-rotation trees.

  11. High pressure membrane foulants of seawater, brackish water and river water: Origin assessed by sugar and bacteriohopanepolyol signatures

    KAUST Repository

    Mondamert, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the origin of foulant material recovered on membranes used in water treatment. Firstly, sugar signatures were assessed from the monosaccharide composition. As results were not conclusive, a statistical approach using discriminant analysis was applied to the sugar data set in order to predict the origin of the foulant material. Three groups of various origins (algal, microbial, continental dissolved organic matter) were used as sugar references for the prediction. The results of the computation showed that the origin of reverse osmosis (RO) seawater foulant material is influenced by both the location of the water sources and the season. RO brackish water and nanofiltration river water foulant materials had a terrestrial origin. Secondly, bacteriohopanepolyol signatures indicated that RO seawater foulant material had a marine signature, RO brackish water foulant material had both a marine and a terrestrial origin and the nanofiltration river water foulant material contained only a terrestrial signature. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Biological differences between brackish and fresh water-derived Aedes aegypti from two locations in the Jaffna peninsula of Sri Lanka and the implications for arboviral disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Jude, Pavilupillai J; Veluppillai, Thabothiny; Eswaramohan, Thampoe; Surendran, Sinnathamby N

    2014-01-01

    The mainly fresh water arboviral vector Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) can also undergo pre-imaginal development in brackish water of up to 15 ppt (parts per thousand) salt in coastal areas. We investigated differences in salinity tolerance, egg laying preference, egg hatching and larval development times and resistance to common insecticides in Ae. aegypti collected from brackish and fresh water habitats in Jaffna, Sri Lanka. Brackish water-derived Ae. aegypti were more tolerant of salinity than fresh water-derived Ae. aegypti and this difference was only partly reduced after their transfer to fresh water for up to five generations. Brackish water-derived Ae. aegypti did not significantly discriminate between 10 ppt salt brackish water and fresh water for oviposition, while fresh water-derived Ae. aegypti preferred fresh water. The hatching of eggs from both brackish and fresh water-derived Ae. aegypti was less efficient and the time taken for larvae to develop into pupae was prolonged in 10 ppt salt brackish water. Ae. aegypti isolated from coastal brackish water were less resistant to the organophosphate insecticide malathion than inland fresh water Ae. aegypti. Brackish and fresh water-derived Ae. aegypti however were able to mate and produce viable offspring in the laboratory. The results suggest that development in brackish water is characterised by pertinent biological changes, and that there is restricted genetic exchange between coastal brackish and inland fresh water Ae. aegypti isolates from sites 5 km apart. The findings highlight the need for monitoring Ae. aegypti developing in coastal brackish waters and extending vector control measures to their habitats.

  13. Differences in osmotolerance in freshwater and brackish water populations of Theodoxus fluviatilis (Gastropoda: Neritidae) are associated with differential protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symanowski, Frauke; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2010-03-01

    The euryhaline gastropod Theodoxus fluviatilis is found in northern Germany in freshwater or in brackish water habitats in the Baltic Sea. Previous studies have revealed that individuals from both habitats are not distinguishable by morphological characters or by sequence comparison of DNA encoding 16S RNA or cytochrome C. As reported in this study, animals collected in the two habitats differ substantially in their physiological ability to adapt to different salinities. Comparison of accumulation rates of ninhydrin-positive substances (NPS) in foot muscle upon transfer of animals to higher medium salinities revealed that brackish water animals were perfectly able to mobilize NPS, while freshwater animals had only limited ability to do so. In an attempt to explore whether this difference in physiology may be caused by genetic differentiation, we compared protein expression patterns of soluble foot muscle proteins using 2D gel electrophoresis and silver staining. Of the 40 consistently detected protein spots, 27 showed similar levels in protein expression in animals collected from freshwater or brackish water habitats, respectively. In 12 spots, however, protein concentration was higher in brackish water than in freshwater animals. In four of these spots, expression levels followed increases or decreases in medium salinities. In a different set of 4 of these 12 spots, protein levels were always higher in brackish water as compared to freshwater animals, regardless of their physiological situation (14 days in artificial pond water or in medium with a salinity of 16 per thousand). The remaining 4 of the 12 spots had complex expression patterns. Protein levels of the remaining single spot were generally higher in freshwater animals than in brackish water animals. These expression patterns may indicate that freshwater and brackish water animals of T. fluviatilis belong to different locally adapted populations with subtle genetic differentiation.

  14. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel Z H; Ching, Biyun; Chng, You R; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2013-01-01

    L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo) catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20) on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days), and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day) of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  15. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Z H Wong

    Full Text Available L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20 on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days, and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  16. Offshore Brackish Water Resources in Hong Kong: A Case Study on Lantau Island South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, H. T.; Jiao, J. J.; Chan, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Paleo-fluvial deposits associated with Quaternary sea level low stands have been recognized in Hong Kong waters. An integrated geophysical and hydrochemical approach is adopted to study these sand and gravel deposits, which are likely to constitute regional offshore aquifers and hold brackish paleo-waters. Marine seismic reflection profiles from Lantau Island South, are studied to depict the three-dimensional configuration of the subsurface aquifer-aquitard system. Sedimentological evidence and geophysical properties of an offshore vibrocore drilled south of Lantua Island show a three-fold sequence, with two upper marine layers and a lowermost oxidized terrestrial layer. The shifts of depositional environments are attributed to the Holocene sea level rise. Hydrochemical analysis of the porewater from the core samples indicates the presence of brackish water in the lowermost layer and possible diffusion transport. High ammonium levels in porewater and acoustic turbidity in seismic profiles are resulted from biogenic activities. This study provides preliminary information for feasibility study on exploiting submarine waters as an alternative water resource in Hong Kong.

  17. Economic Analysis of a Brackish Water Photovoltaic-Operated (BWRO-PV) Desalination System: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Karaghouli, A.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    2010-10-01

    The photovoltaic (PV)-powered reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination system is considered one of the most promising technologies in producing fresh water from both brackish and sea water, especially for small systems located in remote areas. We analyze the economic viability of a small PV-operated RO system with a capacity of 5 m3/day used to desalinate brackish water of 4000 ppm total dissolve solids, which is proposed to be installed in a remote area of the Babylon governorate in the middle of Iraq; this area possesses excellent insolation throughout the year. Our analysis predicts very good economic and environmental benefits of using this system. The lowest cost of fresh water achieved from using this system is US $3.98/ m3, which is very reasonable compared with the water cost reported by small-sized desalination plants installed in rural areas in other parts of the world. Our analysis shows that using this small system will prevent the release annually of 8,170 kg of CO2, 20.2 kg of CO, 2.23 kg of CH, 1.52 kg of particulate matter, 16.41 kg of SO2, and 180 kg of NOx.

  18. PRODUCTION COMPONENTS OF Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp IRRIGATED WITH BRACKISH WATER UNDER DIFFERENT LEACHING FRACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ FRANCISCO DE CARVALHO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the production components of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp subjected to irrigation with brackish water and different leaching fractions. The experiment was conducted in a lysimeter system of the Department of Agricultural Engineering of the Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife campus. The treatments, consisting of two water salinity levels (ECw (1.2 and 3.3 dS m - 1 and five leaching fractions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%, were evaluated using a completely randomized design in a 2x5 factorial arrangement with four replications. The variables evaluated were: number of pods per plant, 100 - grain weight, number of grains per pod, grain and shoot dry weight, grain yield and harvest index. The soil salinity increased with increasing salinity of the water used for irrigation, and reduced with increasing leaching fraction. The salinity of the water used for irrigation influenced only the variables number of pods per plant and grain yield. The estimated leaching fractions of 9.1% and 9.6% inhibited the damage caused by salinity on the number of pods per plant and grain yield, respectively. Therefore, the production of V. unguiculata irrigated with brackish water, leaching salts from the plant root environment, is possible under the conditions evaluated.

  19. On line monitoring systems of MIICON Cu-10Ni alloy in brackish water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, M. F. de; Duque, Z.; Rincon, O.T. de; Araujo, I.; Perez, O. [Centro de Estudios de Corrosion. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad de Zulia, Venezuela (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The alloy ASTM B-III UNS C70600 (Cu-1ONi) has been extensively used for surface condenser tubes in power stations. However, there have been cases of Microbiologically Induced Corrosion (MIC) in this alloy caused by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB). This paper presents the evaluation of Alloy C70600 in a dynamic monitoring system with one-way circulation using brackish water (Lake Maracaibo water) with and without chlorine treatment, for 3,6,8 and 12 months exposure period. The physical-chemical results indicated favorable conditions for microbial development with planktonic SRB present in the order of 107 cell/ml SEM, EDXA, WDX and XRD analysis evidenced organic and inorganic fouling, Cu{sub 2}S (Chalcocite) and Cu{sub 2}O (Cuprite) as the corrosion product and the characteristic MIC onset morphology. The electrochemical tests indicated that the corrosion current increased with the chlorine content (4.0 A/cm{sup 2}/0.0 ppm Cl{sub 2}, 6.0 u A/cm{sup 2}/0.1 ppm Cl{sub 2} and 16.0 A/cm{sup 2}/2.0 ppm Cl{sub 2}). Furthermore, the polarization curves did not show passivation of this alloy. All these results suggest that Alloy C70600 is not resistant to MIC in brackish water even with chlorine treatment. (Author)

  20. An arduino based control system for a brackish water desalination plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Ginna

    Water scarcity for agriculture is one of the most important challenges to improve food security worldwide. In this thesis we study the potential to develop a low-cost controller for a small scale brackish desalination plant that consists of proven water treatment technologies, reverse osmosis, cation exchange, and nanofiltration to treat groundwater into two final products: drinking water and irrigation water. The plant is powered by a combination of wind and solar power systems. The low-cost controller uses Arduino Mega, and Arduino DUE, which consist of ATmega2560 and Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU microcontrollers. These are widely used systems characterized for good performance and low cost. However, Arduino also requires drivers and interfaces to allow the control and monitoring of sensors and actuators. The thesis explains the process, as well as the hardware and software implemented.

  1. Production of halomethanes and isoprene in the culture of bacteria isolated from brackish water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, T.; Taniai, G.; Kurihara, M.; Tamegai, H.; Hashimoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Halomethanes produced naturally are important source of halogen in troposphere and stratosphere. In the ocean, macroalgae and phytoplankton have been considered to be the main producers of halomethanes. Recent investigations have shown that marine bacteria also produces halomethane such as iodomethane. However, knowledge of aquatic halomethane production, especially by bacteria, is insufficient. Here we survey bacteria, which produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including halomethanes, from brackish area (salinity: about 5‰) where high halomethane productions were observed. Bacteria was isolated and incubated in marine broth 2216, which is the media for marine bacteria. The VOCs such as halomethanes in the gas phase above cultured samples was determined using dynamic headspace (GESTEL DHS) - gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)- mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C). The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was also measured during the cultured period. From the result of the isolation and measurement of VOCs, some of the isolated bacteria produced halomethanes. For example, monohalomethanes (from 1 to about 600 nM) and isoprene (up to about 400 nM) were increased for several days in the culture (dibromomethane, chloroiodomethane, bromoiodomethane, and tribromomethane were not detected). Since halomethanes are abundant at the sampling point (under 1% of light intensity of the surface), bacteria is one of the possible candidates for halomethane producer there. Now, we are studying on the identification by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of bacteria collected from brackish water.

  2. Development of a sensor for the detection ofEscherichia coli in brackish waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mancuso Monique; Grossi Marco; Rappazzo Alessandro Ciro; Zaccone Renata; Caruso Gabriella; Ricc Bruno; Bergamasco Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of bacterial pathogens is important for marine environmental protection, because the presence of these microorganisms can be a serious risk for human health. For this reason, a portable sensor implemented as an electronic embedded system featuring disposable measurement cells was used to evaluate the ability and sensitivity of detection ofEscherichia coli (E. coli) as an indicator of fecal pollution in transitional environments and a water sample added withE. coli (102CFU/mL) was assayed. The first result obtained from the laboratory experiment seems promising for the determination ofE. coli in environmental samples, though further improvements will be needed for the field application of this sensor in marine and brackish waters.

  3. Bioconcentration and biotransformation of [¹⁴C]methoxychlor in the brackish water bivalve Corbicula japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Minoru; Ohyama, Kazutoshi; Hayashi, Osamu; Satsuma, Koji; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2011-09-01

    To obtain basic information on the metabolic fate of xenobiotics in the brackish water, bivalve Corbicula japonica, bioconcentration and biotransformation experiments were performed using methoxychlor (MXC) as a model compound. Bivalves were exposed to [ring-U-¹⁴C]MXC (10 µg L⁻¹) for 28 days under semi-static conditions followed by a 14-day depuration phase. The ¹⁴C concentration in the bivalves rapidly increased and reached a steady state after exposure for 7 days (BCFss = 2010); however, it rapidly decreased with a half-life of 2.2 days in the depuration phase. Mono- and bis-demethylated MXC, and their corresponding sulphate conjugates, were identified as minor metabolites. No glycoside conjugates (including glucuronide and glucoside) were detected. Despite this biotransformation system, bivalves were found to excrete retained MXC mostly unchanged although its relatively hydrophobic nature.

  4. Effects of plant diversity on primary production and species interactions in brackish water angiosperm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Tiina; Gustafsson, Camilla; Boström, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    plant productivity in brackish water angiosperm communities, a 14 wk field experiment was conducted. Using a replacement design with a standardized initial aboveground biomass, shoots of Zostera marina, Potamogeton filiformis and P. perfoliatus were planted on a shallow, sandy bottom in replicated...... monocultures and all possible species combinations. Response variables included aboveground and belowground biomass, shoot density, space occupation and porewater nutrients. To determine whether selection and/or complementarity controlled productivity, additive partitioning and Di were calculated. Richness...... effects were species-specific and only increased the biomass production of P. perfoliatus and tuber production of P. filiformis, while species composition generally had a stronger effect on biomass production. Additive partitioning indicated a positive complementarity effect for the aboveground biomass...

  5. Biofouling on Coated Carbon Steel in Cooling Water Cycles Using Brackish Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Water cooling utilizing natural waters is typically used for cooling large industrial facilities such as power plants. The cooling water cycles are susceptible to biofouling and scaling, which may reduce heat transfer capacity and enhance corrosion. The performance of two fouling-release coatings combined with hypochlorite treatment were studied in a power plant utilizing brackish sea water from the Baltic Sea for cooling. The effect of hypochlorite as an antifouling biocide on material performance and species composition of microfouling formed on coated surfaces was studied during the summer and autumn. Microfouling on surfaces of the studied fouling-release coatings was intensive in the cooling water cycle during the warm summer months. As in most cases in a natural water environment the fouling consisted of both inorganic fouling and biofouling. Chlorination decreased the bacterial number on the surfaces by 10–1000 fold, but the efficacy depended on the coating. In addition to decreasing the bacterial number, the chlorination also changed the microbial species composition, forming the biofilm on the surfaces of two fouling-release coatings. TeknoTar coating was proven to be more efficient in combination with the hypochlorite treatment against microfouling under these experimental conditions.

  6. Clean water from clean energy: removal of dissolved contaminants from brackish groundwater using wind energy powered electrodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Malek, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Around 770 million people lack access to improved drinking water sources (WHO 2013), urgently necessitating implementation of contaminant removal by e.g. desalination systems on a large scale. To improve water quality and enable use of brackish water sources for human consumption in remote arid areas, a directly coupled wind – electrodialysis system (Wind-ED) was developed. Modularity, sustainability and above all suitability for the practical use in off-grid locations were ...

  7. [Effects of brackish water irrigation on soil enzyme activity, soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-qian; Wang, Fei; Liu, Tao; Chu, Gui-xin

    2015-09-01

    Brackish water irrigation utilization is an important way to alleviate water resource shortage in arid region. A field-plot experiment was set up to study the impact of the salinity level (0.31, 3.0 or 5.0 g · L(-1) NaCl) of irrigated water on activities of soil catalase, invertase, β-glucosidase, cellulase and polyphenoloxidase in drip irrigation condition, and the responses of soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition were also determined by soil carbon dioxide flux instrument (LI-8100) and nylon net bag method. The results showed that in contrast with fresh water irrigation treatment (CK), the activities of invertase, β-glucosidase and cellulase in the brackish water (3.0 g · L(-1)) irrigation treatment declined by 31.7%-32.4%, 29.7%-31.6%, 20.8%-24.3%, respectively, while soil polyphenoloxidase activity was obviously enhanced with increasing the salinity level of irrigated water. Compared to CK, polyphenoloxidase activity increased by 2.4% and 20.5%, respectively, in the brackish water and saline water irrigation treatments. Both soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient decreased with increasing the salinity level, whereas, microbial metabolic quotient showed an increasing tendency with increasing the salinity level. Soil CO2 fluxes in the different treatments were in the order of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) ≥ saline water irrigation (5.0 g · L(-1)). Moreover, CO2 flux from plastic film mulched soil was always much higher than that from no plastic film mulched soil, regardless the salinity of irrigated water. Compared with CK, soil CO2 fluxes in the saline water and brackish water treatments decreased by 29.8% and 28.2% respectively in the boll opening period. The decomposition of either cotton straw or alfalfa straw in the different treatments was in the sequence of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) > saline water treatment (5.0 g · L(-1)). The organic matter

  8. Heterotrophic bacteria from brackish water of the southern Baltic Sea: biochemical and molecular identification and characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Cabaj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Six bacterial strains isolated from the surface water of thesouthern Baltic Sea were described on the basis of their morphological,physiological and biochemical features, and were classified onthe basis of 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Comparative analysesof the 16S rDNA sequences of five of the six bacterial strainsexamined displayed a ≥98% similarity to the sequences availablein the NCBI GenBank. The 16S rDNA sequence of strain 2 sharedonly a 96% similarity with other published sequences, whichsuggests that this is a new, hitherto unknown species. The isolatedheterotrophic bacteria belong to the families Bacillaceae(strain 1, Flexibacteriaceae (strain 2, Sphingomonadaceae(strains 3, 5, Micrococcaceae (strain 4 and Aurantimonadaceae(strain 6.    This is the first study in which the polyphasic approach hasbeen applied to the identification of heterotrophic bacteriafrom the brackish waters of the Gulf of Gdańsk and Gdańsk Deep.

  9. Selective removal of arsenic and monovalent ions from brackish water reverse osmosis concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Capito, Marissa; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2013-09-15

    Concentrate disposal and management is a considerable challenge for the implementation of desalination technologies, especially for inland applications where concentrate disposal options are limited. This study has focused on selective removal of arsenic and monovalent ions from brackish groundwater reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate for beneficial use and safe environmental disposal using in situ and pre-formed hydrous ferric oxides/hydroxides adsorption, and electrodialysis (ED) with monovalent permselective membranes. Coagulation with ferric salts is highly efficient at removing arsenic from RO concentrate to meet a drinking water standard of 10 μg/L. The chemical demand for ferric chloride however is much lower than ferric sulfate as coagulant. An alternative method using ferric sludge from surface water treatment plant is demonstrated as an efficient adsorbent to remove arsenic from RO concentrate, providing a promising low cost, "waste treat waste" approach. The monovalent permselective anion exchange membranes exhibit high selectivity in removing monovalent anions over di- and multi-valent anions. The transport of sulfate and phosphate through the anion exchange membranes was negligible over a broad range of electrical current density. However, the transport of divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium increases through monovalent permselective cation exchange membranes with increasing current density. Higher overall salt concentration reduction is achieved around limiting current density while higher normalized salt removal rate in terms of mass of salt per membrane area and applied energy is attained at lower current density because the energy unitization efficiency decreases at higher current density.

  10. Dynamic changes in the accumulation of metabolites in brackish water clam Corbicula japonica associated with alternation of salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hiroki; Okamoto, Seiji; Watanabe, Naoki; Hoshino, Naoshige; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Yasumoto, Ko; Watabe, Shugo

    2015-03-01

    The brackish water clam Corbicula japonica inhabits rivers and brackish waters throughout Japan where the major fishing grounds in the Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, are located at the Hinuma Lake and Hinuma River. Water salinity in the Lake Hinuma is low and stable due to the long distance from the Pacific Ocean, whereas that in the downstream of the river varies daily due to a strong effect of tidal waters. In the present study, we dissected the gill and foot muscle of brackish water clam collected from these areas, and subjected them to metabolome analysis by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. More than 200 metabolites including free amino acids, peptides and organic acids were identified, and their amounts from the foot muscle tend to be higher than those from the gill. The principal component analysis revealed that the amount of each metabolite was different among sampling areas and between the gill and foot muscle, whereas no apparent differences were observed between male and female specimens. When the metabolites in the female clam at high salinity were compared with those at low salinity, concentrations of β-alanine, choline, γ-aminobutyric acid, ornithine and glycine betaine were found to be changed in association with salinity. We also compared various metabolites in relation to metabolic pathways, suggesting that many enzymes were involved in their changes depending on salinity.

  11. Assessment of wind energy to power solar brackish water greenhouse desalination units. A case study from Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Hacene [Laboratory of Water and Environment, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef, P.O. Box 151 (Algeria); Faculty of Sciences and Engineering Sciences, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Spahis, Nawel [Faculty of Sciences and Engineering Sciences, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Goosen, Mattheus F. [Alfaisal University, P.O. Box 50927, Riyadh 11533, KSA (Saudi Arabia); Sablani, Shyam [Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (United States); Abdul-wahab, Sabah A. [College of Engineering, P.O. Box 33, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod 123, Muscat (Oman); Ghaffour, Noreddine [Middle East Desalination Research Center, P.O. Box 21, P.C. 133, Muscat (Oman); Drouiche, Nadjib [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Algiers (Algeria)

    2009-10-15

    The Algerian desert dominates large parts of the country's vast territory, and Algeria is among the countries filling most of the world's largest desert. In fact the country is over 80% desert. Even though more than 80% of the population is located in the northern Mediterranean coastal zone, most of oil and gas fields are located in the country's vast southern desert called Sahara. Furthermore, the desert region is developed into a major tourist destination. This arid zone region is characterized by a lack of potable water. However, in addition to the abundant solar energy, the region is also endowed with important wind and brackish groundwater resources with different qualities. Therefore, a brackish water greenhouse desalination unit that is powered by wind energy is a good solution for desalting groundwater for irrigation purposes in this region. Brackish water can be used to cool the greenhouse, creating the proper climate to grow valuable crops. Moreover, at the same time the fresh water that is produced in this system may be sufficient for the irrigation of crops grown inside the unit. In this study, five typical regions in the Sahara were selected and investigated. These regions were selected since they were areas of traditional agriculture. The frequency distributions of wind speed data were collected from Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) statistics developed by NASA and evaluated for a 10-year period. The distributions were used to determine the average wind speed and the available wind power for the five locations. The results indicated that the available wind energy is a suitable resource for power production and can be used to provide the required electricity for the brackish groundwater greenhouse desalination units. (author)

  12. Spoilage evaluation, shelf-life prediction, and potential spoilage organisms of tropical brackish water shrimp (Penaeus notialis) at different storage temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabade, D.S.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Azokpota, P.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hounhouigan, D.J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the freshness of shrimp is a concern to shrimp stakeholders. To improve shrimp quality management, it is of importance to evaluate shrimp spoilage characteristics. Therefore, microbiological, sensory, and chemical changes of naturally contaminated tropical brackish water shrimp (Penaeus

  13. Application of geothermal energy for heating and fresh water production in a brackish water greenhouse desalination unit. A case study from Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Hacene [Laboratory of Water and Environment, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef, P.O. Box 151 (Algeria); Faculty of Sciences and Engineering Sciences, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Spahis, Nawel [Faculty of Sciences and Engineering Sciences, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Goosen, Mattheus F. [Office of Research and Graduate Studies, Alfaisal University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Ghaffour, Noreddine [Middle East Desalination Research Center, P.O. Box 21, P.C. 133, Muscat (Oman); Drouiche, Nadjib [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399, Algiers (Algeria); Ouagued, Abdellah [Laboratory of Water and Environment, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef, P.O. Box 151 (Algeria)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this paper was to outline a proposed a new brackish water greenhouse desalination unit powered by geothermal energy for the development of arid and relatively cold regions, using Algeria as a case study. Countries which have abundant sea/brackish water resources and good geothermal conditions are ideal candidates for producing fresh water from sea/brackish water. The establishment of human habitats in these arid areas strongly depends on availability of fresh water. The main advantage of using geothermal energy to power brackish water greenhouse desalination units is that this renewable energy source can provide power 24 h a day. This resource is generally invariant with less intermittence problems compared to other renewable resources such as solar or wind energy. Geothermal resources can both be used to heat the greenhouses and to provide fresh water needed for irrigation of the crops cultivated inside the greenhouses. A review of the geothermal potential in the case study country is also outlined. (author)

  14. Growth, yield and ionic concentration of two sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. genotypes exposed to brackish water irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Azhar Hussain*, Javaid Akhtar, Muhammad Anwar-ul-haq and Rashid Ahmad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of brackish water application were assessed on the growth, uptake of sodium (Na+, potassium (K+, waterrelations, membrane stability index, proline accumulation, and yield of two sunflower genotypes (SF-187 and hysun-33. Treatments of irrigation water with different ECiw, SAR and RSC were T1, control; T2, EC: 8 dS m-1; T3, SAR: 16(mmol L-11/2; T4, RSC: 4 meq L-1, and T5, EC: 8 dS m-1 + SAR 16 (mmol L-11/2 + RSC 4 meq L-1. Genotypesdisplayed a substantial variability for salinity and/or sodicity tolerance and salt tolerant behavior of SF-187regarding, high K:Na ratio, increased water contents, higher membrane stability index and higher yield ascompared to Hysun-33, was confirmed under various treatments. Saline-sodic water caused maximum reductionin plant growth and yield in both sunflower genotypes followed by saline water treatment. However, no significantdifferences were noted between high SAR (T3 and high RSC (T4 treatments. In conclusion, SF-187 exhibited someimportant features of salt tolerance that can be successfully exploited under brackish water irrigation.

  15. Autonomous system without batteries for brackish water desalination; Sistema autonomo sem baterias para dessalinizacao de agua salobra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Eduardo Henrique Pereira de; Bezerra, Luiz Daniel Santos; Antunes, Fernando Luiz Marcelo [Universidade Federal do Ceara (PPGEE/UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Programa de Pos -Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica

    2008-07-01

    Ones of the goods most precious of the humanity, in the current times, with certainty is the drinking waters. Each scarcer and basic time for survival. In everybody more than 6,000 children die every day victims of some type of illness provoked for contaminated water (WHO, 2003). The underground water for being free of contamination is a good alternative, however its exploration if it becomes each more expensive time, since the water of better quality, is located in deeper sheets. In the state of the Ceara, techniques to explore water of deep well are each more frequent time, however, present a great inconvenience, most of the excavated wells, present brackish water, improper for the human consumption. In the attempt to make possible these wells the water is treated by desalination process. This article presents the practical implementation of a desalination the reverse Osmosis, Pump high-pressure supplied by solar photovoltaic energy system. (author)

  16. Assessing trace metal contamination and organic matter in the brackish lakes as the major source of potable water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuculić, Vlado; Cukrov, Neven; Kwokal, Željko; Strmečki, Slađana; Plavšić, Marta

    2017-03-14

    On small and medium karstic coastal islands in the Adriatic Sea, brackish lakes are often the only source of freshwater. Therefore, it is important to adequately evaluate the biogeochemical processes occurring in these complex water systems, as well as to determine the origin of contaminants present. In this study, the distribution and origin of trace metals (Tl, Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co) and organic matter in the water column, sediment, and surrounding soil of the brackish lakes on Mljet Island, South Adriatic Sea, Croatia, were evaluated. Thallium and mercury concentrations in the lake water were up to two orders of magnitude higher compared to ranges found in the adjacent coastal sea water. Elevated thallium concentrations were of anthropogenic origin resulting from previous use of rodenticide, while elevated mercury content was naturally enhanced. Levels for the other metals were characteristic of uncontaminated water systems. Speciation modelling showed that dissolved trace metals such as Cu, Pb, and Zn were mostly associated with organic matter, while Tl, Co, and Ni were present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. The presence of organic matter (OM) clearly influenced the speciation and distribution of some trace metals. OM was characterised by the determination of the complexing capacity for Cu ions (CuCC), surface active substances, and catalytically active compounds. Reduced sulphur species (glutathione and other thiols) representing significant Cu-binding ligands were determined and discussed as well.

  17. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted Cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Voss

    Full Text Available Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft genome analysis of N. spumigena sp. CCY9414 yielded a single scaffold of 5,462,271 nucleotides in length on which genes for 5,294 proteins were annotated. A subsequent strand-specific transcriptome analysis identified more than 6,000 putative transcriptional start sites (TSS. Orphan TSSs located in intergenic regions led us to predict 764 non-coding RNAs, among them 70 copies of a possible retrotransposon and several potential RNA regulators, some of which are also present in other N2-fixing cyanobacteria. Approximately 4% of the total coding capacity is devoted to the production of secondary metabolites, among them the potent hepatotoxin nodularin, the linear spumigin and the cyclic nodulapeptin. The transcriptional complexity associated with genes involved in nitrogen fixation and heterocyst differentiation is considerably smaller compared to other Nostocales. In contrast, sophisticated systems exist for the uptake and assimilation of iron and phosphorus compounds, for the synthesis of compatible solutes, and for the formation of gas vesicles, required for the active control of buoyancy. Hence, the annotation and interpretation of this sequence provides a vast array of clues into the genomic underpinnings of the physiology of this cyanobacterium and indicates in particular a competitive edge of N. spumigena in nutrient-limited brackish water ecosystems.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF THE SEASONAL SUCCESSION OF MESOZOOPLANKTON IN A BRACKISH WATER ODRA RIVER ESTUARY DURING 2003–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliusz C. Chojnacki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The entire estuary water is dominated by the discharge of the River Odra into the Szczecin Lagoon. The water body is brackish and the salinity in the central part ranges 0.5 and 2 PSU. The Lagoon has a long eutrophication history; usually, two phytoplankton biomass peaks are observed: Diatoms in spring and blue-green algae in summer. The recent data on zooplankton is limited. Rotifers and Cladocerans supply the bulk of the zooplankton biomass. The ichtiofauna is composed of fresh and brackish water, migratory and marine species. Zooplankton and water samples were collected during 2003–2005. The results suggest that during 10 season’s climate in Odra River estuary, Cladocera were the dominant group, large impact on the density of mesozooplankton were: Daphnia cucullata and Daphnia longispina, Copepoda played a lesser role in the Odra River estuary than Cladocera. Biomass of mesozooplankton from the Lagoon was significantly higher compared with the biomass of mesozooplankton from Odra River estuary, which could be related to a greater inflow of nutrients into the Lagoon and the increased growth of phytoplankton, which forms an excellent first stage food web for herbivorous and carnivorous zooplankton, and fish and consequently cormorants.

  19. Unraveling brackish groundwater - surface water interaction in an agricultural field using direct measurements at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsman, Joost; Waterloo, Maarten; Groen, Michel; Groen, Koos

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the interaction between groundwater and surface water is important for a myriad of reasons, including flow forecasting, nutrient transport, and water allocation for agriculture and other water users. This understanding is especially important in deep polder areas in the Netherlands, where brackish groundwater seepage (upward flowing regional groundwater) results in a significant salt load to surface water, and may damage crops if salts reach the rootzone in dry summers. Research on groundwater - surface water interaction historically focused on relatively pristine headwater catchments, only recently shifting somewhat to agricultural catchments. The latter pose specific research challenges, as agricultural activities and active water management can have a significant influence on hydrology. A brackish seepage flux, with a different density as precipitation, may significantly influence flow paths to surface water. Research on this specific topic is, however, lacking. We therefore investigated the interaction between groundwater and surface water in an agricultural catchment with a significant brackish seepage flux. In addition, we investigated the effects of intake of fresh water during periods of precipitation deficits, a common management strategy in lowland regions. We instrumented an agricultural ditch to enable direct, 15 min interval measurements of water fluxes and salinity to both agricultural drains and the ditch separately. These measurements are supported by piezometer nests, soil moisture sensors, temperature sensors, geophysics and a meteorological tower. Measurements focused on the summer period and were taken during two measurement periods: May 2012 - November 2012, and April 2013 - October 2013. Our measurements allowed for a direct, high-frequency separation of hydrological flow routes on this agricultural field between flow to agricultural drains and the ditch. The salinity of seepage water allowed for a relatively easy separation of

  20. Influence of Chlorination and Choice of Materials on Fouling in Cooling Water System under Brackish Seawater Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cooling systems remove heat from components and industrial equipment. Water cooling, employing natural waters, is typically used for cooling large industrial facilities, such as power plants, factories or refineries. Due to moderate temperatures, cooling water cycles are susceptible to biofouling, inorganic fouling and scaling, which may reduce heat transfer and enhance corrosion. Hypochlorite treatment or antifouling coatings are used to prevent biological fouling in these systems. In this research, we examine biofouling and materials’ degradation in a brackish seawater environment using a range of test materials, both uncoated and coated. The fouling and corrosion resistance of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V, super austenitic stainless steel (254SMO and epoxy-coated carbon steel (Intershield Inerta160 were studied in the absence and presence of hypochlorite. Our results demonstrate that biological fouling is intensive in cooling systems using brackish seawater in sub-arctic areas. The microfouling comprised a vast diversity of bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae and protozoa. Chlorination was effective against biological fouling: up to a 10–1000-fold decrease in bacterial and archaeal numbers was detected. Chlorination also changed the diversity of the biofilm-forming community. Nevertheless, our results also suggest that chlorination enhances cracking of the epoxy coating.

  1. Temperature dependent larval occurrence and spat settlement of the invasive brackish water bivalve Mytilopsis leucophaeata (Conrad, 1831) (Dreissenidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gaag, M.; van der Velde, G.; Wijnhoven, S.; Rajagopal, S.

    2014-03-01

    Mytilopsis leucophaeata, an invasive bivalve species, causes fouling problems by settling on submerged constructions and in cooling water circuits in brackish water. To predict spat fall we studied the larval occurrence and settlement of this species in the brackish Noordzeekanaal canal in the Netherlands for several years (1989-1992), while measuring water temperature, salinity and chlorophyll a levels. Larvae were collected monthly by means of a plankton net drawn across the whole width of the canal. Settled spat were collected from PVC panels exposed for one month. Larvae first appeared in May or June, and reached maximum numbers in June or July, before disappearing in October, November or even December. The larval period started at a water temperature of 14 °C, reached maximum numbers at 19-23 °C and ended when it fell below 9 °C. No larvae were observed anymore until the temperature rose to 14 °C in the spring of the next year. Spat fall (June-November) was related to the water temperature in April. If the water temperature in April was lower than 12.5 °C, spat fall started in July, while if temperature was already higher in April, it started a month earlier. The spat fall period started at 15 °C, with maximum numbers at 20-24 °C, and ended when the water temperature dropped below 5 °C. Redundancy analysis (RDA) demonstrated a strong relationship between larval and spat densities and water temperature.

  2. Water and bottom sediments quality of brackish water shrimp farms in Kaliganj Upazila, Satkhira, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Aktaruzzaman, Mohammed Shakhaoat Hossain, Abu Naieum Muhammad Fakhruddin, Mohammed Jamal Uddin, Syed Hafizur Rahman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp culture plays a central part in the fisheries sector of Bangladesh that leads to a significant change in the structure and composition of frozen food export sector. An investigation was carried out to determine physiochemical parameters, nutrients content, bacterial contamination and metal content in shrimp “Gher” (Farms water and sediments. Physicochemical parameters were analyzed in situ by portable meters. Ammonia, phosphate, bacterial counts, and metals contents were analyzed by Nesslerization, colorimetric and standard microbiological methods and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometery (AAS, respectively. Except Dissolve oxygen and temperature all other physiochemical parameters were unsuitable for shrimp culture. The concentration of ammonia was 0.384 to 1.5 mg L-1 and the concentration of phosphate ranged from 0.02 to 0.818 mg L-1. In bacteriological analysis, highest levels of coliform were found in the tested samples and total colifom count reached up to 2.04x103 cfu mL-1. Among the tested metals, Cr was highest in water and sediment samples. Concentration of Cr ranged from 0.150 to 0.807 mg L-1 and 1.957 to 3.436 mg kg-1 in water and sediment samples, respectively. A significant difference was observed for the concentration of metals in sediment and water samples. The high concentration of nutrients and metals in shrimp “Gher” water and sediment as well as the presence of pathogenic bacteria in the “Gher” and river water indicated unhygienic environment and the sources of contamination of shrimp “Gher”.

  3. Isolation and evaluation of oil-producing microalgae from subtropical coastal and brackish waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Y Lim

    Full Text Available Microalgae have been widely reported as a promising source of biofuels, mainly based on their high areal productivity of biomass and lipids as triacylglycerides and the possibility for cultivation on non-arable land. The isolation and selection of suitable strains that are robust and display high growth and lipid accumulation rates is an important prerequisite for their successful cultivation as a bioenergy source, a process that can be compared to the initial selection and domestication of agricultural crops. We developed standard protocols for the isolation and cultivation for a range of marine and brackish microalgae. By comparing growth rates and lipid productivity, we assessed the potential of subtropical coastal and brackish microalgae for the production of biodiesel and other oil-based bioproducts. This study identified Nannochloropsis sp., Dunaniella salina and new isolates of Chlorella sp. and Tetraselmis sp. as suitable candidates for a multiple-product algae crop. We conclude that subtropical coastal microalgae display a variety of fatty acid profiles that offer a wide scope for several oil-based bioproducts, including biodiesel and omega-3 fatty acids. A biorefinery approach for microalgae would make economical production more feasible but challenges remain for efficient harvesting and extraction processes for some species.

  4. Isolation and evaluation of oil-producing microalgae from subtropical coastal and brackish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, David K Y; Garg, Sourabh; Timmins, Matthew; Zhang, Eugene S B; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Schuhmann, Holger; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae have been widely reported as a promising source of biofuels, mainly based on their high areal productivity of biomass and lipids as triacylglycerides and the possibility for cultivation on non-arable land. The isolation and selection of suitable strains that are robust and display high growth and lipid accumulation rates is an important prerequisite for their successful cultivation as a bioenergy source, a process that can be compared to the initial selection and domestication of agricultural crops. We developed standard protocols for the isolation and cultivation for a range of marine and brackish microalgae. By comparing growth rates and lipid productivity, we assessed the potential of subtropical coastal and brackish microalgae for the production of biodiesel and other oil-based bioproducts. This study identified Nannochloropsis sp., Dunaniella salina and new isolates of Chlorella sp. and Tetraselmis sp. as suitable candidates for a multiple-product algae crop. We conclude that subtropical coastal microalgae display a variety of fatty acid profiles that offer a wide scope for several oil-based bioproducts, including biodiesel and omega-3 fatty acids. A biorefinery approach for microalgae would make economical production more feasible but challenges remain for efficient harvesting and extraction processes for some species.

  5. Strains of toxic and harmful microalgae, from waste water, marine, brackish and fresh water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Palacio, M C; Crisóstomo-Vázquez, L; Alvarez-Hernández, S; Lozano-Ramírez, C

    2012-01-01

    Some microalgae are economically important in Mexico and the world because they can be potentially toxic. Algal explosive population growths are named harmful algal blooms and are frequently recorded in Mexico. The authors set up potentially toxic microalgae cultures from the Gulf of Mexico (Garrapatas tideland, Barberena river, Carpintero lagoon in Tamaulipas State; Chalchoapan and Catemaco lakes in Veracruz State), from the Mexican Pacific Ocean, Guerrero, Colima and Michoacán States, and from interior water bodies such as Vicente Aguirre dam, Chapultepec lake and several waste water treatment plants. This research is about the diversity and abundance of phytoplankton in relation a specific site because of harmful algal bloom events. Microalgae cultures are useful in order to solve taxonomic problems, to know life cycles, molecular studies, for the study of toxic species, and the isolation of useful metabolites. The cultures for this research are clonal, non-axenic, semi-continuous, 12:12 light/dark photoperiod, 20 ± 1 °C temperature and 90.5 µmol m(-2)s(-1) illumination. Four different culture media were used. This collection is open to the worldwide scientific community as a source of organisms in controlled conditions that can be used as a useful tool for microalgae research work.

  6. Effect of Sodium Bisulfite Injection on the Microbial Community Composition in a Brackish-Water-Transporting Pipeline▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Soo; Chatterjee, Indranil; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Sensen, Christoph W.; Caffrey, Sean M.; Jack, Thomas R.; Boivin, Joe; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2011-01-01

    Pipelines transporting brackish subsurface water, used in the production of bitumen by steam-assisted gravity drainage, are subject to frequent corrosion failures despite the addition of the oxygen scavenger sodium bisulfite (SBS). Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the microbial community composition for planktonic samples of transported water and for sessile samples of pipe-associated solids (PAS) scraped from pipeline cutouts representing corrosion failures. These were obtained from upstream (PAS-616P) and downstream (PAS-821TP and PAS-821LP, collected under rapid-flow and stagnant conditions, respectively) of the SBS injection point. Most transported water samples had a large fraction (1.8% to 97% of pyrosequencing reads) of Pseudomonas not found in sessile pipe samples. The sessile population of PAS-616P had methanogens (Methanobacteriaceae) as the main (56%) community component, whereas Deltaproteobacteria of the genera Desulfomicrobium and Desulfocapsa were not detected. In contrast, PAS-821TP and PAS-821LP had lower fractions (41% and 0.6%) of Methanobacteriaceae archaea but increased fractions of sulfate-reducing Desulfomicrobium (18% and 48%) and of bisulfite-disproportionating Desulfocapsa (35% and 22%) bacteria. Hence, SBS injection strongly changed the sessile microbial community populations. X-ray diffraction analysis of pipeline scale indicated that iron carbonate was present both upstream and downstream, whereas iron sulfide and sulfur were found only downstream of the SBS injection point, suggesting a contribution of the bisulfite-disproportionating and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the scale to iron corrosion. Incubation of iron coupons with pipeline waters indicated iron corrosion coupled to the formation of methane. Hence, both methanogenic and sulfidogenic microbial communities contributed to corrosion of pipelines transporting these brackish waters. PMID:21856836

  7. Effect of sodium bisulfite injection on the microbial community composition in a brackish-water-transporting pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Soo; Chatterjee, Indranil; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Sensen, Christoph W; Caffrey, Sean M; Jack, Thomas R; Boivin, Joe; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2011-10-01

    Pipelines transporting brackish subsurface water, used in the production of bitumen by steam-assisted gravity drainage, are subject to frequent corrosion failures despite the addition of the oxygen scavenger sodium bisulfite (SBS). Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the microbial community composition for planktonic samples of transported water and for sessile samples of pipe-associated solids (PAS) scraped from pipeline cutouts representing corrosion failures. These were obtained from upstream (PAS-616P) and downstream (PAS-821TP and PAS-821LP, collected under rapid-flow and stagnant conditions, respectively) of the SBS injection point. Most transported water samples had a large fraction (1.8% to 97% of pyrosequencing reads) of Pseudomonas not found in sessile pipe samples. The sessile population of PAS-616P had methanogens (Methanobacteriaceae) as the main (56%) community component, whereas Deltaproteobacteria of the genera Desulfomicrobium and Desulfocapsa were not detected. In contrast, PAS-821TP and PAS-821LP had lower fractions (41% and 0.6%) of Methanobacteriaceae archaea but increased fractions of sulfate-reducing Desulfomicrobium (18% and 48%) and of bisulfite-disproportionating Desulfocapsa (35% and 22%) bacteria. Hence, SBS injection strongly changed the sessile microbial community populations. X-ray diffraction analysis of pipeline scale indicated that iron carbonate was present both upstream and downstream, whereas iron sulfide and sulfur were found only downstream of the SBS injection point, suggesting a contribution of the bisulfite-disproportionating and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the scale to iron corrosion. Incubation of iron coupons with pipeline waters indicated iron corrosion coupled to the formation of methane. Hence, both methanogenic and sulfidogenic microbial communities contributed to corrosion of pipelines transporting these brackish waters.

  8. Fecundity regulation in relation to habitat utilisation of two sympatric flounder (Platichtys flesus) populations in the brackish water Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissling, Anders; Thorsen, Anders; da Silva, Filipa F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Two populations of flounder (Platichtys flesus) with different life history traits inhabit the brackish water Baltic Sea. Both types share feeding areas in coastal waters during summer-autumn but utilise different habitats for spawning in spring, namely offshore spawning with pelagic eggs...... spawners decreased during autumn but was maintained as feeding started again prior to spawning. Thus, habitat utilisation according to spawning strategy affects the timing of fecundity down-regulation reflecting availability of resources, namely limited food resources in deep areas and higher availability...... in coastal areas. Offshore spawning flounder display characteristics typical for a capital spawner with ceasing of feeding and oocyte down-regulationwell before spawning,whereas coastal spawning flounder can be characterised as intermediate between a capital and income spawner with feeding prior...

  9. Cytological comparison of gill chloride cells and blood serum ion concentrations in kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum spawners from brackish (Caspian Sea and fresh water (Khoshkrood River environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghahremanzadeh Zahra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The size and number of chloride cells and serum ion concentrations in kutum, Rutillus frisii kutum Nordman, from brackish (Caspian Sea and fresh water (Khoshkrood River environments were studied to gain a better understanding of osmoregulation in this species. Twenty mature kutum specimens were collected from the Caspian Sea (Anzali coasts, 8.49 ppt salinity and 12.4°C temperature and 20 specimens from Khoshkrood River (0.18 ppt salinity and 18°C temperature. Gill samples were analyzed histologically and concentrations of Na+, Cl- , K+, and Mg2+ ions were determined in the blood serum. Concentrations of Na+, Cl- , K+, and Mg2+ ions and osmotic pressure in mature kutum from brackish water were significantly higher than in specimens from fresh water. The average size and number of chloride cells in the fish from seawater were considerably larger than those from fresh water. The mean size of chloride cells was 6.89 ± 1.16 μm in brackish water samples and 5.1 ± 0.81 μm in river samples. The average number of chloride cells in brackish and river water samples were 16.92 and 6.57, respectively. The density and size of chloride cells increased with increases in salinity

  10. Base of brackish-water mud as key regional stratigraphic marker of mid-Holocene marine flooding of the Baltic Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Endler, Michael; Moros, Matthias; Jokinen, Sami A.; Hämäläinen, Jyrki; Kotilainen, Aarno T.

    2016-12-01

    Many modern epicontinental seas were dry land before their marine flooding by the mid-Holocene glacioeustatic sea-level rise, whereas the Baltic Sea Basin was covered by a huge postglacial lake. This change from a postglacial lake to the present-day semi-enclosed brackish-water sea is studied here in sediment cores and acoustic profiles from the Baltic Sea major sub-basins, based on novel datasets combined with information extracted from earlier publications. In shallow areas (50m water depth), where it may be locally less clearly expressed due to reworking and bioturbation. Both in the shallow and deep areas, the brackish-water mud is strongly enriched in organic matter compared to underlying sediments. Bioturbation type changes at the flooding surface in response to the increased sedimentary organic content, but no firm-ground ichnofacies were developed because of low erosion. It is concluded that the base of the brackish-water mud is a robust allostratigraphic bounding surface that is identifiable by the lithologic examination of cores over the Baltic Sea. The surface is a distinct reflector in seismic-acoustic profiles, which facilitates mapping and basin-wide stratigraphic subdivision. Detailed geochronologic studies are required to confirm if sediments immediately overlying the erosional flooding surface in shallow areas are younger than the basal part of the brackish-water mud in deep areas that is predicted to be time-equivalent to the erosion.

  11. Base of brackish-water mud as key regional stratigraphic marker of mid-Holocene marine flooding of the Baltic Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Endler, Michael; Moros, Matthias; Jokinen, Sami A.; Hämäläinen, Jyrki; Kotilainen, Aarno T.

    2016-08-01

    Many modern epicontinental seas were dry land before their marine flooding by the mid-Holocene glacioeustatic sea-level rise, whereas the Baltic Sea Basin was covered by a huge postglacial lake. This change from a postglacial lake to the present-day semi-enclosed brackish-water sea is studied here in sediment cores and acoustic profiles from the Baltic Sea major sub-basins, based on novel datasets combined with information extracted from earlier publications. In shallow areas (water depth), the base of the brackish-water mud is erosional and covered by a patchy, thin, transgressive silt-sand sheet resulting from decreased sediment supply, winnowing and the redistribution of material from local coarse-grained deposits during transgression. This erosional marine flooding surface becomes sharp and possibly erosional in deep areas (>50m water depth), where it may be locally less clearly expressed due to reworking and bioturbation. Both in the shallow and deep areas, the brackish-water mud is strongly enriched in organic matter compared to underlying sediments. Bioturbation type changes at the flooding surface in response to the increased sedimentary organic content, but no firm-ground ichnofacies were developed because of low erosion. It is concluded that the base of the brackish-water mud is a robust allostratigraphic bounding surface that is identifiable by the lithologic examination of cores over the Baltic Sea. The surface is a distinct reflector in seismic-acoustic profiles, which facilitates mapping and basin-wide stratigraphic subdivision. Detailed geochronologic studies are required to confirm if sediments immediately overlying the erosional flooding surface in shallow areas are younger than the basal part of the brackish-water mud in deep areas that is predicted to be time-equivalent to the erosion.

  12. The Energy-Water Nexus: Spatially-Resolved Analysis of the Potential for Desalinating Brackish Groundwater by Use of Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B. Kjellsson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research looks at coupling desalination with renewable energy sources to create a high-value product (treated water from two low value resources (brackish groundwater and intermittent solar energy. Desalination of brackish groundwater is already being considered as a potential new water supply in Texas. This research uses Texas as a testbed for spatially-resolved analysis techniques while considering depth to brackish groundwater, water quality, and solar radiation across Texas to determine the locations with the best potential for integrating solar energy with brackish groundwater desalination. The framework presented herein can be useful for policymakers, regional planners, and project developers as they consider where to site desalination facilities coupled with solar photovoltaics. Results suggest that the northwestern region of Texas—with abundant sunshine and groundwater at relatively shallow depths and low salinity in areas with freshwater scarcity—has the highest potential for solar powered desalination. The range in capacity for solar photovoltaic powered reverse osmosis desalination was found to be 1.56 × 10—6 to 2.93 × 10—5 cubic meters of water per second per square meter of solar panel (m3/s/m2.

  13. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena sp. CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voß, B.; Bolhuis, H.; Fewer, D.; Kopf, M.; Möke, F.; Haas, F.; El-Shehawy, R.; Hayes, P.; Bergman, B.; Sivonen, K.; Dittmann, E.; Scanlan, D.J.; Hagemann, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hess, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft geno

  14. 87Sr/86Sr as a quantitative geochemical proxy for 14C reservoir age in dynamic, brackish waters: assessing applicability and quantifying uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougheed, Bryan; van der Lubbe, Jeroen; Davies, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    Accurate geochronologies are crucial for reconstructing the sensitivity of brackish and estuarine environments to rapidly changing past external impacts. A common geochronological method used for such studies is radiocarbon (14C) dating, but its application in brackish environments is severely limited by an inability to quantify spatiotemporal variations in 14C reservoir age, or R(t), due to dynamic interplay between river runoff and marine water. Additionally, old carbon effects and species-specific behavioural processes also influence 14C ages. Using the world's largest brackish water body (the estuarine Baltic Sea) as a test-bed, combined with a comprehensive approach that objectively excludes both old carbon and species-specific effects, we demonstrate that it is possible to use 87Sr/86Sr ratios to quantify R(t) in ubiquitous mollusc shell material, leading to almost one order of magnitude increase in Baltic Sea 14C geochronological precision over the current state-of-the-art. We propose that this novel proxy method can be developed for other brackish water bodies worldwide, thereby improving geochronological control in these climate sensitive, near-coastal environments.

  15. Flexible 3D Nanoporous Graphene for Desalination and Bio-decontamination of Brackish Water via Asymmetric Capacitive Deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deen, Ahmed G; Boom, Remko M; Kim, Hak Yong; Duan, Hongwei; Chan-Park, Mary B; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2016-09-28

    Nanoporous graphene based materials are a promising nanostructured carbon for energy storage and electrosorption applications. We present a novel and facile strategy for fabrication of asymmetrically functionalized microporous activated graphene electrodes for high performance capacitive desalination and disinfection of brackish water. Briefly, thiocarbohydrazide coated silica nanoparticles intercalated graphene sheets are used as a sacrificial material for creating mesoporous graphene followed by alkaline activation process. This fabrication procedure meets the ideal desalination pore diameter with ultrahigh specific surface area ∼ 2680 m(2) g(-1) of activated 3D graphene based micropores. The obtained activated graphene electrode is modified by carboxymethyl cellulose as negative charge (COO(-2)) and disinfectant quaternary ammonium cellulose with positively charged polyatomic ions of the structure (NR4(+)). Our novel asymmetric coated microporous activated 3D graphene employs nontoxic water-soluble binder which increases the surface wettability and decreases the interfacial resistance and moreover improves the electrode flexibility compared with organic binders. The desalination performance of the fabricated electrodes was evaluated by carrying out single pass mode experiment under various cell potentials with symmetric and asymmetric cells. The asymmetric charge coated microporous activated graphene exhibits exceptional electrosorption capacity of 18.43 mg g(-1) at a flow rate of 20 mL min(-1) upon applied cell potential of 1.4 V with initial NaCl concentration of 300 mg L(-1), high charge efficiency, excellent recyclability, and, moreover, good antibacterial behavior. The present strategy provides a new avenue for producing ultrapure water via green capacitive deionization technology.

  16. Conserving heat in a marine microcosm with a surface layer of fresh or brackish water: the ''semi-solar pond''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idso, S.B.; Idso, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of the standard solar pond is described, whereby thin surface layers of fresh or brackish water are used to retain heat captured naturally or supplied by passive solar panels to an underlying marine microcosm which simulates the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California near Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Several management options are discussed, combinations of which allow for about a 10/sup 0/C temperature advantage to be accrued as a result of employing the technique.

  17. In-situ surface wettability parameters of submerged in brackish water surfaces derived from captive bubble contact angle studies as indicators of surface condition level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, S. J.; Mazurek, A. Z.; Szczepanska, A.

    2013-06-01

    The characterization of wetting properties (by contact angles) of several undersea artificial (glass plates,) and natural (stones, sand layers, soft-bottom structures, aquatic macrophytes, sediments, and seafloor communities) solid substrata in the Baltic Sea brackish water (Gulf of Gdansk). The studies were performed under laboratory and field conditions using a novel captive bubble air-pipette computer microscope system. A set of the surface wettability parameters: the apparent surface free energy γSV, adhesive layer film pressure Π, work of adhesion WA, and work of spreading WS were determined to quantify the wetting properties of model substrata using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approach. The useful technique to measure in situ the contact angle giving reproducible and accurate values of CA turned out to be a captive bubble method, for fully hydrated interfacial layers of highly hydrophilic and porous nature met at seabed (Rodrigues-Valverde et al., 2002). CA measurements revealed mostly hydrophilic nature of the studied solid material (CA oil film covering lead to surface hydrophobization (CA↑, γSV ↓,WA↓, WS more negative). The adhesion of biofouling was correlated both with CAH and the dispersive interaction term γSVd of the total γSV. Monitoring of the artificial substrata of the hydrophilic nature with a CA technique can be used to observe the development of the organisms community i.e., microfouling, and to carry out a comprehensive study of surfaces of the submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton lucens in particular). Since aquatic macrophytes can act as bio-indicators of water chemistry their surface wettability may reflect plant surface erosion and organic matter accumulation state being of particular value in biological assessment of ecosystems status.

  18. Hepatic pathologies in the brackish water catfish (Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus) from contaminated locations of the Lagos lagoon complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarinmoye, O.; Taiwo, V.; Clarke, E.; Kumolu-Johnson, C.; Aderinola, O.; Adekunbi, F.

    2010-01-01

    Several toxicological studies into the effects of aquatic pollutants on the liver of teleost fish exist in literature. The focus on the liver in these studies is predicated on its central nature in the scheme of biotransformation and excretion of xenobiotics following exposure in polluted water bodies. As a consequence of the latter primary role of the liver in these processes it is regarded as a predilective site for the sub lethal effects of xenobiotics on the organism usually detectable at histological level. Hepatic histopathology recorded in livers from feral populations of the brackish water catfish Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus from locations on the Lagos lagoon complex with significant anthropogenic inputs from denizen populations and industries are presented. Liver sections from sixty specimens from two locations on the Lagos lagoon complex (Badagry lagoon: 6??24'N, 2??56'E; and Lagos lagoon: 6??29'N, 3??22'E) were analysed. Observed pathologies included hydropic degeneration (58%), portal / sinusoidal congestion (33%), hepatic necrosis (26%), hemosiderosis (12%) and foci of cellular alterations (FCA's). No obvious oncologic features were observed; the presence of the hydropic Vacuolation lesion was taken as prelude to the development of neoplasms and discussed as such. ?? 2009, Penkala Bt., Budapest, Hungary.

  19. Effect of combination dope composition and evaporation time on the separation performance of cellulose acetate membrane for demak brackish water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusworo Tutuk Djoko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The coastal areas in Indonesia often have a problem of clean water lack, because the water is classified as brackish water. Therefore, this research investigated the fabrication of CA membranes using phase inversion method for brackish water treatment. Investigation was conducted to study the effect of combination dope composition and evaporation time on separation performance and morphology of the memrbane. Membrane was fabricated by dry-wet phase inversion technique with variation of polymer concentration 17, 18 and 20 wt% in the total solid and evaporation time of 5, 10 and 15 seconds, respectively. The asymmetric membranes were characterized by permeability test through rejection and flux measurements using brackish water as feed. The experimental results from SEM images analysis showed that all the membranes have a thin small porous layer and thicker sub-structure of larger porous layer formed asymmetric membrane. Moreover, the greater polymer concentration is resulting smaller pore size and smaller membrane porosity. The longer evaporation time was also resulted in denser membrane active layer. The best membrane performance was observed at the composition of 20 wt% CA polymer, 1 wt % polyethylene glycol with the solvent evaporation time of 15 seconds.

  20. Hybrid male sterility between the fresh- and brackish-water types of ninespine stickleback Pungitius pungitius (Pisces, Gasterosteidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Goto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Two ecologically distinct forms, fresh- and brackish-water types, of ninespine stickleback co-exist in several freshwater systems on the coast of eastern Hokkaido. Recent genetic analyses of 13 allozyme loci revealed genetic separation between the two types even though their spawning grounds were in close proximity. On the other hand, there is only a small difference in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence between the two types suggesting that they diverged quite recently or that mtDNA introgression occurred between them. To test for postzygotic reproductive isolating mechanisms and hybrid mediated gene flow, we examined the viability and reproductive performance of reciprocal F1 hybrids. The hybrids grew to the adult size normally and both sexes expressed secondary sexual characters in the reciprocal crosses. The female hybrids were reciprocally fertile, while the male hybrids were reciprocally sterile. Histological and flow-cytometric analyses of the hybrid testis revealed that the sterility pattern was classified as 'gametic sterility,' with gonads of normal size but abnormal spermatogenesis. To our knowledge, the present finding is a novel example of one sex hybrid sterility in the stickleback family (Gasterosteidae).

  1. Effects of predicted climatic changes on distribution of organic contaminants in brackish water mesocosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripszam, M., E-mail: matyas.ripszam@chem.umu.se [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Gallampois, C.M.J. [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Berglund, Å. [Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Larsson, H. [Umeå Marine Sciences Centre, Umeå University, Norrbyn, 905 71 Hörnefors (Sweden); Andersson, A. [Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Tysklind, M.; Haglund, P. [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Predicted consequences of future climate change in the northern Baltic Sea include increases in sea surface temperatures and terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff. These changes are expected to alter environmental distribution of anthropogenic organic contaminants (OCs). To assess likely shifts in their distributions, outdoor mesocosms were employed to mimic pelagic ecosystems at two temperatures and two DOC concentrations, current: 15 °C and 4 mg DOC L{sup −1} and, within ranges of predicted increases, 18 °C and 6 mg DOC L{sup −1}, respectively. Selected organic contaminants were added to the mesocosms to monitor changes in their distribution induced by the treatments. OC partitioning to particulate matter and sedimentation were enhanced at the higher DOC concentration, at both temperatures, while higher losses and lower partitioning of OCs to DOC were observed at the higher temperature. No combined effects of higher temperature and DOC on partitioning were observed, possibly because of the balancing nature of these processes. Therefore, changes in OCs' fates may largely depend on whether they are most sensitive to temperature or DOC concentration rises. Bromoanilines, phenanthrene, biphenyl and naphthalene were sensitive to the rise in DOC concentration, whereas organophosphates, chlorobenzenes (PCBz) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were more sensitive to temperature. Mitotane and diflufenican were sensitive to both temperature and DOC concentration rises individually, but not in combination. - Highlights: • More contaminants remained in the ecosystem at higher organic carbon levels. • More contaminants were lost in the higher temperature treatments. • The combined effects are competitive with respect to contaminant cycling. • The individual properties of each contaminant determine their respective fate.

  2. Cirolana songkhla, a new species of brackish-water cirolanid isopod (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cirolanidae from the lower Gulf of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eknarin Rodcharoen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirolana songkhla sp. n. was collected from brackish-water habitats including lagoons and estuaries in the coastal zone of the lower Gulf of Thailand. C. songkhla sp. n. is described and fully illustrated; C. songkhla sp. n. can be recognized by the presence of abundant chromatophores dorsally, lack of ornamentation on the posterior pereonites, pleonites and pleotelson, the number of robust setae on the uropodal and pleotelson margins (uropod exopod lateral margin with 12–14 RS, mesial margin with 5–8 RS; endopod lateral margin with 8–10 RS, mesial margin with 11–13 RS; pleotelson with 12–15 RS and lack of setae on the endopods of pleopods 3–5. A dichotomous key of brackish Cirolana species in Thailand is given.

  3. A Thin Film Nanocomposite Membrane with MCM-41 Silica Nanoparticles for Brackish Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kadhom

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin film nanocomposite (TFN membranes containing MCM-41 silica nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized by the interfacial polymerization (IP process. An m-phenylenediamine (MPD aqueous solution and an organic phase with trimesoyl chloride (TMC dissolved in isooctane were used in the IP reaction, occurring on a nanoporous polysulfone (PSU support layer. Isooctane was introduced as the organic solvent for TMC in this work due to its intermediate boiling point. MCM-41 silica NPs were loaded in MPD and TMC solutions in separate experiments, in a concentration range from 0 to 0.04 wt %, and the membrane performance was assessed and compared based on salt rejection and water flux. The prepared membranes were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, contact angle measurement, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR analysis. The results show that adding MCM-41 silica NPs into an MPD solution yields slightly improved and more stable results than adding them to a TMC solution. With 0.02% MCM-41 silica NPs in the MPD solution, the water flux was increased from 44.0 to 64.1 L/m2·h, while the rejection virtually remained the same at 95% (2000 ppm NaCl saline solution, 25 °C, 2068 kPa (300 psi.

  4. Effects of vanadium on population growth and Na-K-ATPase activity of the brackish water hydroid Cordylophora caspia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringelband, U.; Karbe, L. [Institut fuer Hydrobiologie und Fischereiwissenschaft, Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    Vanadium, a relatively abundant heavy metal, enters the environment naturally through rock weathering. A large fraction of vanadium input is of human origin. The combustion of petroleum- and coal-products, which contain relatively high concentrations of vanadium, is one of the most important sources of the enrichment of vanadium in the environment. As it is used as an alloy, and vanadium rich iron-ores of various origin are used in steel production, the residual slag-stones of the steel industry can contain considerable vanadium concentrations. Wherever slag-stones serve as a cheap and convenient material in riverbank reinforcement, vanadium can leach into the aquatic environment. Vanadium is regarded as an essential trace element for higher animals. Cantley et al. indicated a regulatory function of vanadate in vivo. Although considerable information is available on the toxic effects of vanadium on humans, very little is known about the toxicity of vanadium towards aquatic organisms, especially invertebrates. Bell and Sargent have shown an inhibition of Na-K-ATPase activity in gills of the eel Anguilla anguilla. Holleland and Towle have demonstrated the inhibition of Na-K-ATPase activity in the gills of the shore crab Carcinus maenas. The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity of vanadium towards the brackish water hydroid Cordylophora caspia. Hydroids are known to be particularly sensitive to heavy metals and their asexual reproduction can be used in a well-established population growth test. Furthermore, the effects of vanadium on Na-K-ATPase activity in hydroids were studied in in vivo experiments, wherein the animals were exposed to sublethal concentrations of vanadium. In addition, the inhibition of Na-K-ATPase was measured in vitro, by adding vanadium to a microsomal preparation. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Rehabilitation of Seven (7) Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites in a Brackish Water/Lagoon Environment in South Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Avryl; Ramnath, Kelvin; Dyal, Shyam; Lalla, Francesca; Roopchand, Jaipersad

    2007-12-01

    The Petroleum Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited operates in a wide diversity of tropical habitats in South Trinidad one of which is a brackish water environment known as the Godineau Swamp. Historically this field was operated by predecessor multinational companies, who at that time employed operational practices based on the absence of legal requirements, that were not environmentally considerate. Following a detailed environmental audit of the field (also known as the Oropouche Field), seven (7) contaminated sites were found, that presented a risk to the lagoon and its associated mangrove swamp ecology. Remediation of the seven (7) sites was done in two (2) phases; phase 1 being sampling and characterization of the waste inclusive of migration and phase 2 the actual on-site soil remediation. Phase 1 conducted during the period December 2004 to February 2005, indicated a total of 19,484 m3 of contaminated material with TPH being the main contaminant. The average concentration of TPH was 3.25%. Phase 2 remediation was initiated in October 2005 and involved the following three (3) aspects to achieve a TPH concentration of less than 1%: ▪ Preparation of waste remediation sites adjacent to contaminated sites and excavation and spreading onto cells ▪ Bioremediation onsite using naturally occurring bacteria and rototilling ▪ Rehabilitation and closure of the site following accepted lab results. The benefits of conducting this project in the petroleum industry are to ensure compliance to the national Sensitive Areas Rules and Draft Waste Management Rules, conformance to ISO 14001 Certification requirements and conservation of biodiversity in the mangrove swamp.

  6. Biodiversity of brackish water amphipods (crustacean) in two estuaries, southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Nityananda; Rajkumar, Mayalagu; Sun, Jun; Kundu, Sourav; Lyla, P S; Khan, Seyed Ajmal; Trilles, Jean Paul

    2010-12-01

    The present study about the gammarid amphipods of Vellar and Uppanar estuaries was performed during two seasons (pre-monsoon and post-monsoon, 2005-2006), respectively, in nine habitats: five in the Vellar estuary and four in the Uppanar estuary. Amphipod samples were collected from sediments, oyster beds, seaweeds, sea grass, and mangroves. A total of 29 species of gammarid amphipods were collected in each area. The surface water temperature ranged from 16°C to 26°C, the salinity from 20 to 32 psu, and the pH between 7.5 and 8.3. Dissolved oxygen ranged from 5.3 to 7.8 ml/l. The maximum abundance of amphipods was observed during the pre-monsoon (July to September) in Vellar mangrove, and it was minimum during the pre-monsoon in Uppanar sea grass. It was found that several physicochemical factors, such as salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and the substrate have a marked effect on the distribution and the relative abundance of amphipods. The ranges of species diversity, richness, dominance, and evenness in the Vellar and Uppanar estuaries were 1.58-4.15, 1.82-5.29, 0-0.11, and 0.96-1, respectively. Using multivariate analyses, in each estuary, it was possible to identify different communities of amphipod species according to their habitats.

  7. First European record of the invasive brackish water clam Rangia cuneata (G.B. Sowerby I, 1831) (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    OpenAIRE

    Verween, A; Kerckhof, F.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.

    2006-01-01

    A population of Rangia cuneata (G.B. Sowerby I, 1831), an estuarine bivalve, has been recorded in the harbour of Antwerp, Belgium. This species is new to the European brackish water fauna. After initially finding only a few small individuals in August 2005, R. cuneata was encountered frequently in the pipes of the cooling water system of an industrial plant from February 2006 onwards. Before this present record, R. cuneata was only known from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic coast of North...

  8. Ecosystem level methane fluxes from tidal freshwater and brackish marshes of the Mississippi River Delta: Implications for coastal wetland carbon projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Johnson, Darren J.; Raynie, Richard C.; Killebrew, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate from seawater inhibits methane production in tidal wetlands, and by extension, salinity has been used as a general predictor of methane emissions. With the need to reduce methane flux uncertainties from tidal wetlands, eddy covariance (EC) techniques provide an integrated methane budget. The goals of this study were to: 1) establish methane emissions from natural, freshwater and brackish wetlands in Louisiana based on EC; and 2) determine if EC estimates conform to a methane-salinity relationship derived from temperate tidal wetlands with chamber sampling. Annual estimates of methane emissions from this study were 62.3 g CH4/m2/yr and 13.8 g CH4/m2/yr for the freshwater and brackish (8–10 psu) sites, respectively. If it is assumed that long-term, annual soil carbon sequestration rates of natural marshes are ~200 g C/m2/yr (7.3 tCO2e/ha/yr), healthy brackish marshes could be expected to act as a net radiative sink, equivalent to less than one-half the soil carbon accumulation rate after subtracting methane emissions (4.1 tCO2e/ha/yr). Carbon sequestration rates would need case-by-case assessment, but the EC methane emissions estimates in this study conformed well to an existing salinity-methane model that should serve as a basis for establishing emission factors for wetland carbon offset projects.

  9. Branchial Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit in a brackish water-type ionocyte of the euryhaline freshwater white-rimmed stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Yuen K; Hiong, Kum C; Wong, Samuel Z H; Ching, Biyun; Chen, Xiu L; Soh, Melody M L; Chng, You R; Ong, Jasmine L Y; Wilson, Jonathan M; Chew, Shit F

    2013-01-01

    Himantura signifer is a freshwater stingray which inhabits rivers in Southeast Asia. It can survive in brackish water but not seawater. In brackish water, it becomes partially ureosmotic, but how it maintains its plasma hypoionic to the external medium is enigmatic because of the lack of a rectal gland. Here, we report for the first time the expression of Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (nkcc1) in the gills of freshwaterH. signifer, and its moderate up-regulation (~2-fold) in response to brackish water (salinity 20) acclimation. The absence of the Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidation stress response kinase 1 interaction site from the N-terminus of H. signifer Nkcc1 suggested that it might not be effectively activated by stress kinases in response to salinity changes as in more euryhaline teleosts. The increased activity of Nkcc1 during salt excretion in brackish water would lead to an influx of Na(+) into ionocytes, and the maintenance of intracellular Na(+) homeostasis would need the cooperation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (Nka). We demonstrated for the first time the expression of nkaα1, nkaα2 and nkaα3 in the gills of H. signifer, and the up-regulation of the mRNA expression of nkaα3 and the overall protein abundance of Nkaα in response to acclimation to brackish water. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of a sub-type of ionocyte, co-expressing Nkcc1 and Nkaα, near the base of the secondary lamellae in the gills of H. signifer acclimated to brackish water, but this type of ionocyte was absent from the gills of fish kept in fresh water. Hence, there could be a change in the function of the gills of H. signifer from salt absorption to salt excretion during brackish water acclimation in the absence of a functioning rectal gland.

  10. Branchial Na+:K+:2Cl- cotransporter 1 and Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit in a brackish water-type ionocyte of the euryhaline freshwater white-rimmed stingray, Himantura signifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen K Ip

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Himantura signifer is a freshwater stingray which inhabits rivers in Southeast Asia. It can survive in brackish water but not seawater. In brackish water, it becomes partially ureosmotic, but how it maintains its plasma hypoionic to the external medium is enigmatic because of the lack of a rectal gland. Here, we report for the first time the expression of Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter 1 (nkcc1 in the gills of freshwater H. signifer, and its moderate up-regulation (~2-fold in response to brackish water (salinity 20 acclimation. The absence of the Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidation stress response kinase 1 interaction site from the N-terminus of H. signifer Nkcc1 suggested that it might not be effectively activated by stress kinases in response to salinity changes as in more euryhaline teleosts. The increased activity of Nkcc1 during salt excretion in brackish water would lead to an influx of Na+ into ionocytes, and the maintenance of intracellular Na+ homeostasis would need the cooperation of Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka. We demonstrated for the first time the expression of nkaα1, nkaα2 and nkaα3 in the gills of H. signifer, and the up-regulation of the mRNA expression of nkaα3 and the overall protein abundance of Nkaα in response to acclimation to brackish water. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of a sub-type of ionocyte, co-expressing Nkcc1 and Nkaα, near the base of the secondary lamellae in the gills of H. signifer acclimated to brackish water, but this type of ionocyte was absent from the gills of fish kept in fresh water. Hence, there could be a change in the function of the gills of H. signifer from salt absorption to salt excretion during brackish water acclimation in the absence of a functioning rectal gland.

  11. Excluding the di-unsaturated alkenone in the UK37 index strengthens temperature correlation for the common lacustrine and brackish-water haptophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yinsui; Huang, Yongsong; Andersen, Robert A.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2016-02-01

    Alkenone unsaturation indices, represented by either UK37 or UK‧37, are important tools for paleoclimate studies. The UK37 index is a reflection of the average number of double bonds from di-, tri-, tetra-unsaturated alkenones, but UK‧37 excludes the C37:4 in the calculation. Extensive studies indicate UK‧37 provides better regressions against in situ Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) than UK37 and is the most widely used SST proxy. However, recent studies have shown that including C37:4 alkenones for lacustrine or brackish water haptophytes such as Ruttnera (Chrysotila) lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana improves temperature correlations although there are still significant deviations at the extreme high and low temperatures. In this study, we use new culture-based calibration experiments alongside published culture data and in situ water column or surface sediment data, to demonstrate that a further improved temperature calibration for alkenones is, in fact, achieved when the di-unsaturated alkenone is excluded from the computation of the unsaturation index. We propose new indices, termed UK″ [UK″37 = C37:3/(C37:3 + C37:4) or UK″38 = C38:3/(C38:3 + C38:4)], for lacustrine, brackish and estuarine waters. Our observation suggests that di-unsaturated alkenones play a less important role than tri- and tetra-unsaturated alkenones in regulating cell functions to temperature variations in lacustrine and brackish waters. We suggest using UK″ indices for paleotemperature reconstructions in the lacustrine and estuarine settings.

  12. The soil-water flow system beneath a cotton field in arid north-west China, serviced by mulched drip irrigation using brackish water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianwen; Jin, Menggui; Huang, Jinou; Yuan, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    A field experiment was carried out in southern Xinjiang, China, to reveal soil-water flow pattern beneath a combined plastic-mulch (film) and drip-irrigation system using brackish water. The soil-water flow system (SWFS) was characterized from soil surface to the water table based on observed spatio-temporal distribution of total soil-water potential, water content and electric conductivity. Root suction provided a strong inner sink. The results indicated that SWFS determined the soil salinity and moisture distribution. Drip-irrigation events could leach excess salts from the root zone and provide soil conditions with a tolerable salinity level that supports the growth of cotton. High-salinity strips were formed along the wetting front and at the bare soil surface. Hydrogeology conditions, irrigation regime, climate, plant growth and use of mulch would affect potential sources and sinks, boundary conditions and the size of the SWFS. At depth 0-60 cm, the soil salinity at the end of the irrigation season was 1.9 times that at the beginning. Beneath the mulch cover, the soil-water content in the `wide rows' zone (55 cm between the two rows with no drip line) was higher than that in the `narrow rows' zone (15 cm between the two rows with a drip line) due to the strong root-water uptake. The downward water flow below the divergent curved surface of zero flux before irrigation, and the water-table fluctuation with irrigation events, indicated that excessive irrigation occurred.

  13. Brackish-water submergence of the common periwinkle, Littorina littorea, and its digenean parasites in the Baltic Sea and in the Kattegat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauckner, G.

    1984-03-01

    North Sea and Baltic Sea populations of Littorina littorea differ with respect to their vertical distribution. In the North Sea L. littorea is strictly intertidal while in the Baltic Sea maximum population densities occur in the sublittoral. Levels of infestation with larval digenetic trematodes diminish qualitatively (number of species recorded) and quantitatively (number of hosts infested) with decreasing salinity. Both the host and two parasite species — Cryptocotyle lingua and Microphallus pygmaeus — display ‘brackish-water submergence’ under conditions of reduced surface salinity.

  14. Report on Brackish Water/Coastal Aquaculture Development, Kenya: Preliminary Final Draft. A Report to the TCP/Ken/0051(A) Mangrove Conservation and Management.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Kenya has a coastline of about 1420 km. Along the coastline, there are about 64 426 ha of mangrove forests with a large area near Lamu island and at the mouth of the Tana River. The mangrove forests play a significant role in maintaining the productivity of coastal fishery resources providing nursery ground and shelter for fish and shrimp. Shrimp farming and fish culture in brackish water pond are the main aquaculture systems that found attractive and having a high potential for alternative u...

  15. Ecosystem services in urban water investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandulu, John M; Connor, Jeffery D; MacDonald, Darla Hatton

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, water agencies and utilities have an obligation to consider the broad environmental impacts associated with investments. To aid in understanding water cycle interdependencies when making urban water supply investment decisions, an ecosystem services typology was augmented with the concept of integrated water resources management. This framework is applied to stormwater harvesting in a case study catchment in Adelaide, South Australia. Results show that this methodological framework can effectively facilitate systematic consideration and quantitative assessment of broad environmental impacts of water supply investments. Five ecosystem service impacts were quantified including provision of 1) urban recreational amenity, 2) regulation of coastal water quality, 3) salinity, 4) greenhouse gas emissions, and 5) support of estuarine habitats. This study shows that ignoring broad environmental impacts can underestimate ecosystem service benefits of water supply investments by a value of up to A$1.36/kL, or three times the cost of operating and maintenance of stormwater harvesting. Rigorous assessment of the public welfare impacts of water infrastructure investments is required to guide long-term optimal water supply investment decisions. Numerous challenges remain in the quantification of broad environmental impacts of a water supply investment including a lack of peer-reviewed studies of environmental impacts, aggregation of incommensurable impacts, potential for double-counting errors, uncertainties in available impact estimates, and how to determine the most suitable quantification technique.

  16. Study on Gaining Fresh Water by Small Scale Reverse Osmosis Membrane with Photovoltaic Energy from Brackish Water

    OpenAIRE

    竹山, 光一

    2009-01-01

    Under frequent draughts and floods, many rainwater harvests as terraced paddy fields, dam− constructions, reservoirs, ponds, tanks, rivers and underground pools become more important. And the rapid urbanizations changed its water supply with much chlorine, which caused many water purifier users at home tap, and much drinkers of bottle water. And with many water treatments as by hollow fiber membrane, the final method for gaining freshwater becomes populous as desalination of clean sea water w...

  17. Tracing groundwater salinization processes in coastal aquifers: a hydrogeochemical and isotopic approach in Na-Cl brackish waters of north-western Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mongelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Mediterranean area the demand of good quality water is often threatened by salinization, especially in coastal areas. The salinization is the result of concomitant processes due to both marine water intrusion and rock-water interaction, which in some cases are hardly distinguishable. In northwestern Sardinia, in the Nurra area, salinization due to marine water intrusion has been recently evidenced as consequence of bore hole exploitation. However, the geology of the Nurra records a long history from Paleozoic to Quaternary, resulting in relative structural complexity and in a wide variety of lithologies, including Triassic evaporites. To elucidate the origin of the saline component in the Nurra aquifer, may furnish a useful and more general model for the salinization processes in the Mediterranean area, where the occurrence of evaporitic rocks in coastal aquifers is a common feature. In addition, due to intensive human activities and recent climatic changes, the Nurra has become vulnerable to desertification and, similarly to other Mediterranean islands, surface-water resources can periodically suffer from drastic shortage.

    With this in mind we report new data, regarding brackish waters of Na-Cl type of the Nurra, including major ions and selected trace elements (B, Br, I and Sr and isotopic data, including δ18O, δD in water, and δ34S and δ18O in dissolved sulphate. To better depict the origin of the salinity we also analyzed a set of Nurra Triassic evaporites for mineralogical and isotopic composition. The brackish waters have Cl contents up to 2025 mg L−1 and the ratios between dissolved ions and chlorine, with the exception of the Br/Cl ratio, are not those expected on the basis of a simple mixing between rain water and seawater.

    The δ18O and δD data indicate that most of the waters are within the Regional Meteoric Water Line and the Global Meteoric Water

  18. 太阳能直接法苦咸水淡化装置研究%Study on Brackish Water Desalination Plant of Solar Direct Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范辉; 冯冬艳

    2014-01-01

    In the southern mountainous area of Ningxia,the brackish water contains high salt and fluorine quantity.This experiment used the solar direct method for brackish water desalination plant,and desalination capacity factors were investigated.In addition,the bubbling method was used to strengthen the heat and mass transfer of distiller internal.The results showed that:(1) The fresh water conductivity was as low as 20 μS/cm and fluorine quantity around 0 mg/L; (2) The thickness of brackish water in distiller had a optimum value.The water yield would decline when it was greater than or less than the value; (3) Increasing the insulation measures around the device and adding the black sponge into distiller internal could extend its water production time.At the same time,the daily total productivity of the still was improved.(4) The use of the bubbling method to strengthen the heat and mass transfer of distiller internal which was observed that this method greatly improved the water production and different bubbling had different production.(5) Compared experimental production and theoretical production,it was found that theoretical analysis gave well agreement with the experiments.%宁夏南部山区苦咸水含盐量、含氟量均较高.设计了小型太阳能苦咸水淡化装置,考察其产水量的影响因素,并采用鼓泡方法对其进行内部传热传质强化.结果表明:(1)产生淡水电导率低至20 μS/cm,氟离子基本去除;(2)蒸馏器中苦咸水层厚度有适宜值,大于或小于该值产水量均有所下降;(3)装置外部增加保温措施、内部放入黑色海绵,均可延长产水时间,提高日产水量.(4)采用鼓泡强化方法很大程度上提高了产水量,不同鼓泡量对蒸馏器内部传热传质速率影响不同,从而产水量也不同.(5)将实验产水量与理论产水量进行比较,分析结果表明二者吻合较好.

  19. 添加黑色粒子降低太阳能苦咸水淡化系统中水体通光性能%Adding black particles in brackish water reduces water transmission properties of solar desalination system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常泽辉; 郑宏飞; 侯静; 贾彦; 何丰伯

    2013-01-01

    针对太阳能苦咸水淡化系统中太阳能集热系统在高温段时(≥100℃)效率低,而苦咸水淡化系统在低温段时效率低的结构性不匹配问题,提出了聚光直接加热式太阳能苦咸水淡化系统,为了提高苦咸水的吸光能力,将黑色粒子投入到透明玻璃蒸发器内的苦咸水中,实现了苦咸水的功能化,从光学角度对功能化苦咸水的通光性能展开研究,给出沸腾状功能化水体的通光性能变化规律,并对非沸腾状苦咸水的通光率进行了理论计算。结果表明,功能化苦咸水的通光率随粒子丰度增大在特定点前快速减小而后减小缓慢,其中在测试范围内,含有粒径为0.63 mm粒子的功能化水体的通光率最小,水体通光率最大可减小60.09%;且理论计算变化曲线与试验测量变化曲线趋势一样,理论计算结果与试验测试结果吻合较好,2个测试水体的决定系数R2分别为0.98694和0.96641。该文为提高苦咸水吸光能力的研究提供了有价值的参考。%The lack of drinking water has been a great challenge for humanity and will continue in the future. Previous research indicated that brackish water can be treated using solar energy with no negative impact on the environment. However, the biggest main obstacles for solar brackish water desalination technology are high cost and applied at small scale. Because the low efficiency of the solar collector system at high temperature (≥100℃) and low efficiency of the brackish water desalination system at low temperature are not consistent. In this study, a strong concentrating light and direct heating type solar brackish water system was testedd through utilizing the high efficient concentrating solar energy system. This kind of system produced high strength solar energy and could concentrate them to the brackish water directly. The high temperature and high pressure steam were generated and provided for the

  20. Tracing groundwater salinization processes in coastal aquifers: a hydrogeochemical and isotopic approach in the Na-Cl brackish waters of northwestern Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mongelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the Mediterranean, salinization threatens water quality, especially in coastal areas. This salinization is the result of concomitant processes related to both seawater intrusion and water–rock interaction, which in some cases are virtually indistinguishable. In the Nurra region of northwestern Sardinia, recent salinization related to marine water intrusion has been caused by aquifer exploitation. However, the geology of this region records a long history from the Palaeozoic to the Quaternary, and is structurally complex and comprises a wide variety of lithologies, including Triassic evaporites. Determining the origin of the saline component of the Jurassic and Triassic aquifers in the Nurra region may provide a useful and more general model for salinization processes in the Mediterranean area, where the occurrence of evaporitic rocks in coastal aquifers is a common feature. In addition, due to intensive human activity and recent climatic change, the Nurra has become vulnerable to desertification and, in common with other Mediterranean islands, surface water resources periodically suffer from severe shortages. With this in mind, we report new data regarding brackish and surface waters (outcrop and lake samples of the Na-Cl type from the Nurra region, including major ions and selected trace elements (B, Br, I, and Sr, in addition to isotopic data including δ18O, δD in water, and δ34S and δ18O in dissolved SO4. To identify the origin of the salinity more precisely, we also analysed the mineralogical and isotopic composition of Triassic evaporites. The brackish waters have Cl contents of up to 2025 mg L−1 , and the ratios between dissolved ions and Cl, with the exception of the Br / Cl ratio, are not those expected on the basis of simple mixing between rainwater and seawater. The δ18O and δD data indicate that most of the waters fall between the regional meteoric water line and the global meteoric water line, supporting the

  1. Evaluating the piscicide rotenone as an option for eradication of invasive Mozambique tilapia in a Hawaiian brackish-water wetland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Leo; Englund, Ronald A.; Jelks, Howard L.

    2015-01-01

    Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus were recently discovered in ‘Aimakapā Fishpond, a 12-hectare brackish-water wetland complex in Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, on the Island of Hawai’i. As a possible eradication method, we evaluated rotenone, a natural piscicide used in fish management and the active ingredient in plants traditionally used by indigenous Hawaiians for capturing fish. To assess rotenone’s efficacy in killing tilapia and effects on non-target species, laboratory toxicity tests involved exposing organisms to various concentrations of liquid CFT Legumine (5% rotenone) in static trials of 48-h to 72-h duration. Test organisms included: Mozambique tilapia, non-native guppy Poecilia reticulata, the non-native odonate Rambur’s forktail Ischnura ramburii, native feeble shrimp Palaemon debilis, and native ‘ōpae’ula shrimp Halocaridina rubra. All organisms and water used in tests were obtained from ‘Aimakapā (12.6–12.7 ppt salinity), or, for H. rubra, an anchialine pool (15.0–15.2 ppt salinity). Survival analyses indicated CFT Legumine concentrations >3 ppm (>0.15 mg/L rotenone) achieved 100% mortality of tilapia and 93% of guppies within 24 h, with most tilapia killed by 6 h and most guppies by 2 h. Little or no mortality was observed among invertebrate exposed to 1 to 5 mg/L CFT Legumine: 0% mortality for ‘ōpae’ula shrimp, 4% for feeble shrimp; and 16% for odonate larvae. The 48 h LC50 values for Mozambique tilapia and guppy were 0.06 and 0.11 mg/L rotenone, respectively. Results demonstrate rotenone’s potential for non-native fish eradication in brackish-water habitats, with benefit of low mortality to certain macro-invertebrates. High rotenone tolerance displayed by ‘ōpae’ula shrimp is noteworthy. Invasive fish are common in anchialine pools, threatening existence of shrimp and other invertebrate fauna. Although rotenone’s effects on freshwater organisms have been well studied, our research

  2. 倒极电去离子苦咸水淡化技术的试验研究%BRACKISH WATER DESALINATION BY ELECTRODEIONIZATION WITH POLARITY REVERSAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈维利; 王建友; 费兆辉; 樊改肖

    2012-01-01

    在常规电去离子(EDI)的浓缩室中采取与淡水室相同的树脂填充策略构成频繁倒极电去离子(EDIR)过程,以模拟苦咸水为处理对象,重点考察了阴阳树脂比例、树脂粒径、隔板厚度、树脂填充方式对EDI苦咸水淡化过程的影响.结果表明,在阴阳树脂体积比4∶6、树脂粒径0.45~0.71mm、采用隔板厚度3mm以及树脂均匀混合填充时,可获得最低的产水能耗.对于3000mg/L的进水含盐量,EDIR的脱盐率可达90%以上,耗电量1.95kWh/m3,过程运行稳定.EDIR有望成为具备较强竞争力的苦咸水淡化新技术.%In this paper, the electrodeionization process with frequent polarity reversal (EDIR) process, using the same resin filling strategy both in the dilute and concentrate compartments, was carried out for brackish water desalination. With the feed of simulated brackish water, the influences of volume ratio of anion-cation resins, resin particle size distribution, compartment thickness and resin filling pattern on the separation performances of the EDIR were investigated. The results showed that at a resin ratio of 4:6 (anion to cation), resin particle range of 0.45 to 0.71 mm and the compartment thickness of 3 mm, the lowest power Consumption was achieved when the even mixing pattern of resin filling was adopted. When the feed TDS was 3 000 mg/L, the EDIR can give a salt rejection of 90% while the power consumption was 1.95 kWh/m3 with good stability. The EDIR was hopeful to be a new choice for brackish water desalination with potential superiorities.

  3. Characterizing the Occurrence and Transport of Brackish Groundwater in Southwest Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    worland, S.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Bangladesh is host to the largest and the most active delta system in the world. The morphology of the southern part of the country is characterized by low lying deltaic plains partitioned by the distributary networks of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna river systems. Much of the tidal mangrove forest ecosystem of the lower delta has been converted into poldered islands that sustain shrimp farming and rice production. The polder inhabitants depend on shallow groundwater as a primary source for drinking water and sanitation. Understanding the origin and hydrologic controls on the distribution of the brackish water and freshwater on the polder is a necessary step to ensuring a sustainable and potable freshwater source for drinking and irrigation. Preliminary sampling from shallow tube wells on Polder 32 in southwest Bangladesh suggests sporadic lateral apportioning of fresh water in the primarily brackish aquifer. This research characterizes the occurrence, transport and fate of the brackish groundwater through a combination of 3H and 14C dating, geochemical signatures, subsurface mapping using inversions from electromagnetic induction, and a 1D finite difference model and a 2D finite element model. The geochemical analysis and radiometric dating suggest that the salt water originates from paleo-brackish estuarine water deposited ~5000 years ago along with the sediments that compose the shallow aquifer. Inversions of electromagnetic survey data show potential freshwater recharge areas where the clay cap pinches out. The finite difference model demonstrates that recharge from the distributary channels is unlikely due to the low transmissivity of the clay channel beds. The finite element model gives reasonable estimates of the flushing rates of the connate brackish water beneath the polder. Inversion of electromagnetic data from a two hundred meter transect taken on Polder 32 Head gradient and groundwater flow vectors for fixed head boundary conditions across Polder

  4. Biochemical Responses of Juvenile European Sturgeon, (Huso Huso to A Sub-Lethal Level of Copper and Cadmium in Freshwater and Brackish Water Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Zahedi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In Caspian Sea basin, sturgeons spend the larval and juvenile stages in freshwaters of rivers and then, they migrate to brackish waters of the sea where they grow and mature. With regard to the elevation of the metal concentrations in coastal waters and sediments of the Caspian Sea and its adjacent rivers, it is likely that juvenile sturgeon are exposed to sub-lethal levels of metals during seawater entry process. We compared the biochemical responses of juvenile European sturgeon, (Beluga, Huso huso exposed to a sub-lethal level of copper (Cu, 20 μg/L and cadmium (Cd, 300 μg/L in freshwater (FW, 0 ppt and brackish water (BW, 11 ppt for seven days. The results showed that the levels of plasma glucose increased significantly in BW and in all metal exposed groups. Also, plasma cortisol concentrations showed significant increases when juveniles were exposed to BW, Cu(FW/BW and Cd(BW. The activity of liver superoxide dismutase (SOD decreased significantly in BW compared with FW. Moreover, Cu and Cd exposure enhanced the activity of SOD in BW, while SOD did not show any changes in FW. The levels of tissue and plasma proteins as well as plasma triiodothyronine (T3, thyroxine (T4 and liver Catalase (CAT activity remained constant when animals were exposed to Cu/Cd in both FW and BW environments. Our data indicate that exposure of juvenile beluga to BW stimulated the general biochemical responses of stress such as cortisol and glucose, while sub-lethal exposure to Cu and Cd caused oxidative stress in BW environment but not in FW

  5. Brackish groundwater in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Anning, David W.; Brown, Craig J.; Moore, Richard B.; McGuire, Virginia L.; Qi, Sharon L.; Harris, Alta C.; Dennehy, Kevin F.; McMahon, Peter B.; Degnan, James R.; Böhlke, John Karl

    2017-04-05

    For some parts of the Nation, large-scale development of groundwater has caused decreases in the amount of groundwater that is present in aquifer storage and that discharges to surface-water bodies. Water supply in some areas, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, is not adequate to meet demand, and severe drought is affecting large parts of the United States. Future water demand is projected to heighten the current stress on groundwater resources. This combination of factors has led to concerns about the availability of freshwater to meet domestic, agricultural, industrial, mining, and environmental needs. To ensure the water security of the Nation, currently [2016] untapped water sources may need to be developed.Brackish groundwater is an unconventional water source that may offer a partial solution to current and future water demands. In support of the national census of water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey completed the national brackish groundwater assessment to better understand the occurrence and characteristics of brackish groundwater in the United States as a potential water resource. Analyses completed as part of this assessment relied on previously collected data from multiple sources; no new data were collected. Compiled data included readily available information about groundwater chemistry, horizontal and vertical extents and hydrogeologic characteristics of principal aquifers (regionally extensive aquifers or aquifer systems that have the potential to be used as a source of potable water), and groundwater use. Although these data were obtained from a wide variety of sources, the compiled data are biased toward shallow and fresh groundwater resources; data representing groundwater that is at great depths and is saline were not as readily available.One of the most important contributions of this assessment is the creation of a database containing chemical characteristics and aquifer information for the known areas with brackish groundwater

  6. Source areas and transport mechanisms for freshwater and Brackish-water diatoms deposited in pelagic sediments of the equatorial atlantic*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokras, Edward M.

    1991-01-01

    Distributions of freshwater and brackish-water diatoms from dust samples and modern sediments of the equatorial Atlantic demonstrate different transport mechanisms and source areas. Both Melosira spp. and Stephanodiscus spp. are transported via winds from the southern Sahara and Sahel in Northern Hemisphere winter. The core-top distribution of Cyclotella striata delineates the extent of the low-salinity plume formed by runoff from the Zaire River into the extreme eastern Atlantic. The transport mechanism and source areas for Melosira spp. during arid phases have not changed appreciably in the last 130,000 yr. There is no evidence for long-distance transport of freshwater diatoms by the southeast trade winds. This study confirms the validity of paleoclimatic research which inferred eolian transport of Melosira spp. in the winter dust plume from source regions north of the equator, although fluviatile input of Melosira valves into nearshore sediments cannot be ruled out.

  7. Performance analysis of functioned brackish water for lighting-induced evaporation type solar desalination system%聚光蒸发式太阳能苦咸水淡化系统水体光热性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯静; 杨桔材; 郑宏飞; 常泽辉; 于苗苗; 马元波

    2015-01-01

    Fresh water demands are increasing day by day because of industrialization, motorization and increased life standards of mankind. Fresh water reserves available naturally are not capable of meeting the fresh water demands because of their less availability. Desalination is not only necessary to overcome the issue of fresh water shortage in the future, but also important for the oil-gas-coal industry which generates substantial amount of waste water during the production of oil, natural gas and coal. Compared to conventional water treatment technology, solar brackish water desalination has advantages of cleanness and sustainability. However, high cost and small scale have become the biggest obstacles for solar brackish water desalination technology, which is caused by the high-cost solar collector, the structural mismatch of the optimum working ranges between the solar collector system and the brackish water desalination system, and the large heat transfer resistance between them. To solve this problem, this paper has proposed a strong light-concentrating direct evaporationtype solar brackish water desalination system. It utilizes the concentrating solar energy which is directly shined into the functioned brackish water to produce steam for repeated usage. It should be noted that solar collector is introduced to collect much more solar energy and produce steam efficiently to improve the performance of solar desalination units. The light-induced evaporation type solardesalination units show small heat transfer resistance, heat capacity small and small cavity evaporation, which can largely reduce the cost and be beneficial for the economic performance of the solar desalination system. Generally, the functioned brackish water is in the boiling state during the system working. The transmissivity of the functioned brackish water in the boiling state was measured in optical darkroom. At the same time, thermal energy utilization efficiency of functioned brackish water was

  8. Assessment of the impacts of climate change and brackish irrigation water on rice productivity and evaluation of adaptation measures in Ca Mau province, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Proloy; Tran, Duong Anh; Udmale, Parmeshwar D.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the temporal impacts of climate change on rice yield for summer-autumn (SA) and autumn-winter (AW) cropping pattern along with implication of brackish irrigation water for the SA season. Furthermore, evaluation of different agro-adaptations to overcome negative impacts of climate change was also done for Ca Mau province of Vietnam. Climatic variables were derived from six general circulation models which were further bias corrected at Ca Mau city station for three future time periods (2025s, 2055s, and 2085s). Calibrated AquaCrop 4.0 was used to project the future rice yield under climate change and different salinity levels in irrigation water. Simulation shows a decline in rice yield ranging from 1.60 to 23.69 % and 8.06 to 20.15 % by 2085s relative to baseline climate for A2 and B2 scenarios respectively in the case of the SA cropping season. However, an increase in rice yield ranging from 3.29 to 12.35 % and 6.64 to 17.23 % is observed for the corresponding time period and scenarios. Further simulations for the SA cropping season under climate change and increasing salinity in irrigation water suggest an insignificant increase in yield relative to the yield obtained without irrigation. Moreover, proper management practices, namely forward and early shifts in transplanting dates along with increasing fertilizer application rates, are observed to be beneficial to enhance the rice yield under climate change.

  9. Potabilization of brackish water by electrodialysis. Study of natural samples with a laboratory unit.; Potabilizacion de aguas salobres por electrodialisis. Estudio de muestras naturales con una unidad de laboratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz Sastre, J. A.; Alonso-Lopez, J.

    1972-07-01

    Potabilization of brackish waters from Ciguela (Toledo) and Riansares (Toledo) rivers, and from wells 1 and 2 at Torre Pacheco (Murcia), as well as of sea water diluted to 5,000 ppm has been studied in process conditions optimized from experiments with synthetic solutions. The study includes: removal of suspended and organic matter, determination of limit current density, power requirements, ion selectivity and daily maximum output of the unit. (Author) 8 refs.

  10. Research on Operation of Solar Brackish Water (Seawater) Desalination System%太阳能苦咸水(海水)淡化系统的运行研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志莉; 何强; 庄春龙; 郑宏飞; 易其臻

    2009-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of the falling film evaporation and the falling film condensa-tion, a brackish water (seawater) desalination unit with three effect regeneration was designed. The sys-tem is powered by a solar collector and a wind generator, and the matching optimization of the system is realized. The actual operation effect of the system is tested. The system can produce the freshwater of 12 the temperature and flow of the heating and cooling water and the operation pressure.%研制了集激淋降膜蒸发、降膜凝结与多效回热于一体的苦咸水(海水)淡化装置,其采用太阳能集热系统提供热源、风力发电提供动力,并实现了整个系统的匹配优化.测试了系统的实际运行效果,结果表明,在太阳能辐射为20 MJ/d时,系统的产水量可达12 kg/(m~2·d)以上.供热水和冷却水的温度和流量、运行压力是影响系统产水量的主要因素.

  11. Short- and long-term response of deteriorating brackish marshes and open-water ponds to sediment enhancement by thin-layer dredge disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, M.K.; Gossman, B.; Piazza, Bryan P.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial sediment enhancement using a thin layer of dredged material has been suggested as a means to increase elevation and create soil conditions conducive to increased marsh structure and function in deteriorating marshes. Using a chronosequence approach, we examined the effects of sediment enhancement in deteriorating marsh and open-water pond habitats located in six brackish marshes. Sediment enhancement of both marsh and interior pond sites had significant, immediate, and long-lasting effects on physical soil properties and nutrient status with increased bulk density and inorganic nitrogen. Vegetative cover and productivity response were minimal for deteriorating vegetated marshes with the short-term response data showing no significant impact of sediment enhancement and long-term trends indicating decreasing productivity over time. In contrast, trajectory models of vegetative cover and productivity in interior pond sites showed increases over time indicating that, for restoration of interior ponds, sediment enhancement may prove valuable. The use of trajectory models emphasizes the need for long-term monitoring to determine restoration success of projects. ?? 2008 U.S. Government.

  12. FLUORESCENCE EMISSION SPECTRA OF MARINE AND BRACKISH-WATER ECOTYPES OF FUCUS VESICULOSUS AND FUCUS RADICANS (PHAEOPHYCEAE) REVEAL DIFFERENCES IN LIGHT-HARVESTING APPARATUS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Gylle, Anna; Rantamäki, Susanne; Ekelund, Nils G A; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2011-02-01

    The Bothnian Sea in the northerly part of the Baltic Sea is a geologically recent brackish-water environment, and rapid speciation is occurring in the algal community of the Bothnian Sea. We measured low-temperature fluorescence emission spectra from the Bothnian Sea and the Norwegian Sea ecotypes of Fucus vesiculosus L., a marine macroalga widespread in the Bothnian Sea. Powdered, frozen thallus was used to obtain undistorted emission spectra. The spectra were compared with spectra measured from the newly identified species Fucus radicans Bergström et L. Kautsky, which is a close relative of F. vesiculosus and endemic to the Bothnian Sea. The spectrum of variable fluorescence was used to identify fluorescence peaks originating in PSI and PSII in this chl c-containing alga. The spectra revealed much higher PSII emission, compared to PSI emission, in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in F. radicans or in the Norwegian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus. The results suggest that more light-harvesting chl a/c proteins serve PSII in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in the two other algal strains. Treatment of the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus in high salinity (10, 20, and 35 practical salinity units) for 1 week did not lead to spectral changes, indicating that the measured features of the Bothnian Sea F. vesiculosus are stable and not simply a direct result of exposure to low salinity.

  13. Preliminary design of seawater and brackish water reverse osmosis desalination systems driven by low-temperature solar organic Rankine cycles (ORC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Torres, Agustin M. [Dpto. Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria Civil e Industrial, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n. 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Garcia-Rodriguez, Lourdes [Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad de Sevilla Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros, Camino de los Descubrimientos, s/n 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    In this paper, the coupling between the low-temperature solar organic Rankine cycle (ORC) and seawater and brackish water reverse osmosis desalination units has been carried out. Four substances have been considered as working fluids of the solar cycle (butane, isopentane, R245fa and R245ca). With these four fluids the volumetric flow of fresh water produced per unit of aperture area of stationary solar collector has been calculated. The former has been made with the optimized direct vapour generation (DVG) configuration and heat transfer fluid (HTF) configuration of the solar ORC. In the first one (DVG), working fluid of the ORC is directly heated inside the absorber of the solar collector. In the second one (HTF), a fluid different than the working fluid of the ORC (water in this paper) is heated without phase change inside the absorber of the solar collector. Once this fluid has been heated it is carried towards a heat exchanger where it is cooled. Thermal energy delivered in this cooling process is transferred to the working fluid of the ORC. Influence of condensation temperature of the ORC and regeneration's process effectiveness over productivity of the system has also been analysed. Finally, parameters of several preliminary designs of the low-temperature solar thermal driven RO desalination are supplied. R245fa is chosen as working fluid of the ORC in these preliminary designs. The information of the proposed preliminary designs can also be used, i.e., for the assessment of the use of thermal energy rejected by the solar cycle. Overall analysis of the efficiency of the solar thermal driven RO desalination technology is given with the results presented in this paper and the results obtained with the medium temperature solar thermal RO desalination system presented by the authors in previous papers. This work has been carried out within the framework of the OSMOSOL and POWERSOL projects. (author)

  14. Vegetation dynamics in response to water inflow rates and fire in a brackish Typha domingensis Pers. marsh in the delta of the Colorado River, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexicano, Lourdes; Nagler, Pamela L.; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco; Glenn, Edward P.

    2012-01-01

    The Cienega de Santa Clara is a 5600 ha, anthropogenic wetland in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico. It is the inadvertent creation of the disposal of brackish agricultural waste water from the U.S. into the intertidal zone of the river delta in Mexico, but has become an internationally important wetland for resident and migratory water birds. We used high resolution Quickbird and WorldView-2 images to produce seasonal vegetation maps of the Cienega before, during and after a test run of the Yuma Desalting Plant, which will remove water from the inflow stream and replace it with brine. We also used moderate resolution, 16-day composite NDVI imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on the Terra satellite to determine the main factors controlling green vegetation density over the years 2000–2011. The marsh is dominated by Typha domingensis Pers. with Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud. as a sub-dominant species in shallower marsh areas. The most important factor controlling vegetation density was fire. Spring fires in 2006 and 2011 were followed by much more rapid green-up of T. domingensis in late spring and 30% higher peak summer NDVI values compared to non-fire years (P growth compared to non-fire years. The second significant (P Salinity is a further determinant of vegetation dynamics as determined by greenhouse experiments, but was nearly constant over the period 2000–2011, so it was not a significant variable in regression analyses. It is concluded that any reduction in inflow volumes will result in a linear decrease in green foliage density in the marsh.

  15. 微咸水灌溉对斥水土壤水盐运移的影响%Effect of brackish water irrigation on water and salt movement in repellent soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春成; 李毅; 郭丽俊; 关冰艺; 廖轶群; 王娟

    2011-01-01

    The existence of soil water-repellency had impacts on crop yields. In order to study soil water and salt movements of water-repellent soils irrigated by brackish water, laboratory soil column infiltration experiments were conducted. Impacts of different mineralization degrees and different water-repellency degrees on the movements of soil water and soil salt were compared for two soil textures. The variations of soil water-repellency during infiltration were also discussed. The results showed that infiltration ability of non-water-repellent soils increased with the increase of mineralization degrees. Both the infiltration rates of wettable and repellent soils could be simply fitted by Kostiakov equation. For the water repellent soils, the infiltration ability was largest at mineral degree of lg/L, but decreased with the increase of mineralization degree when mineralization degree were larger than lg/L. There was good linear relationship between cumulative infiltration and the wetting front distance when irrigated by brackish water. Soil water content and soil salt content at the same depth of the water repellent soil profiles were smaller than those of the wettable soil profiles. To some extent, soil water repellency was caused after irrigated by brackish water. This work indicated that brackish water irrigation had some impacts on distributions of soil water and soil salt as well as water-repellency of salinized soil.%土壤斥水性影响着作物的产量,为了研究微成水灌溉对斥水土壤水盐运移的影响,进行了室内土柱微咸水入渗试验.对比了不同矿化度和斥水程度对两种土质水盐运移的影响,探讨了微咸水入渗后土壤斥水性的变化特征.结果表明,不斥水土壤的入渗能力随矿化度的增加而增加.亲水和斥水土壤的入渗率均可采用Kostiakov公式简单模拟.斥水土壤入渗能力在矿化度为1g/L时达到最大,超过1 g/L后则随矿化度的增大而减小.微咸水入渗的

  16. Estratégias de uso de água salobra na produção de alface em hidroponia NFT Strategies for use of brackish water in NFT hydroponic lettuce production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S. Alves

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Plantas de alface crespa 'Verônica' foram cultivadas em condições hidropônicas, objetivando avaliar três diferentes estratégias de emprego de águas salobras: 1 águas salobras para reposição das perdas por evapotranspiração (ETc e água doce para o preparo da solução nutritiva (SN; 2 águas salobras para o preparo da SN e água doce para reposição da ETc; 3 águas salobras para o preparo da SN e reposição da ETc. Os níveis de salinidade da água foram obtidos pela adição de NaCl à água doce (0,27 dS m-1: 1,45; 2,51; 3,6; 5,41 e 7,5 dS m-1. O experimento foi conduzido em quatro blocos aleatorizados, com quatro repetições por tratamento. Uma estrutura de pesquisa foi construída com 72 parcelas que simulam a técnica do fluxo laminar de nutrientes (NFT. O uso de água salobra apenas para repor a ETc não produziu efeito sobre a produção da alface. Por outro lado, o uso de águas salobras para o preparo da SN e água doce para reposição da ETc, reduziu o rendimento da alface (massa de matéria fresca da parte aérea em 4,99% por (dS m-1. O rendimento foi reduzido em 7% por dS m-1 quando águas salobras foram usadas tanto para o preparo da SN quanto para reposição da ETc. Apesar da redução linear da produção da alface com o aumento da salinidade da água, sintomas depreciativos para a qualidade da alface hidropônica não foram registrados.Plants of crisphead lettuce cv. 'Verônica' were grown under hydroponic conditions aiming to evaluate three different strategies of brackish waters utilization: 1 brackish waters to replace the evapotranspiration loss (ETc and fresh water to prepare nutrient solution (NS; 2 brackish waters to prepare NS and fresh water to replace the ETc; 3 brackish waters to prepare NS and replace ETc. The levels of water salinity were obtained by addition of NaCl to fresh water (0.27 dS m-1: 1.45; 2.51; 3.6; 5.41 and 7.5 dS m-1. The experiment was conducted in randomized blocks with four

  17. Early diagenetic high-magnesium calcite and dolomite indicate that coal balls formed in marine or brackish water: Stratigraphic and paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Coal balls are carbonate and pyrite permineralizations of peat that contain three-dimensional plant fossils preserved at the cellular level. Coal balls, which occur in Pennsylvanian and earliest Permian equatorial coals, provide a detailed record of terrestrial ecology and tropical climate during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age; yet their depositional environment remains controversial. The exquisite preservation of some coal-ball fossils, e.g. pollen with pollen tubes and leaves with mesophyll, indicates rapid formation. The presence of abundant, cement-filled, void spaces within and between the plant debris in most coal balls indicates that they formed in uncompacted peat, near the surface of the mire. Botanical, taphonomic and isotopic evidence point to a freshwater origin for coal balls. The nearest living relatives of coal ball plants (modern lycopsids, sphenopsids, marratialean ferns and conifers) grow in fresh water. Coal-ball peat contains a high percentage of aerial debris, similar to modern freshwater peat. The stable oxygen isotopes of coal-ball carbonate (δ18O = 16 to 3 per mil) suggest a freshwater origin. However, the widespread occurrence of marine invertebrates and early diagenetic framboidal pyrite in coal balls suggests that many formed in close proximity to marine water. Indeed, carbonate petrology points to a marine or brackish water origin for the first-formed carbonate cements in coal balls. Petrographic and geochemical (microprobe) analysis of coal-ball carbonates in Pennsylvanian coals from the midcontinent of North America (Western Interior Basin, West Pangaea) and the Ruhr and Donets Basins (East Pangaea) indicate that the first formed carbonate is either radaxial, nonstochiometric dolomite or high magnesium calcite (9 - 17 mol % MgCO3, indicating precipitation in marine or brackish water. Although both primary dolomite and high magnesium calcite can form in lacustrine settings, the lakes in which these minerals form occur in carbonate terranes

  18. Aquaculture, Salt and Brackish Water, Rhode Island Aquaculture Locations; Point Locations for Aquaculture operations in Narragansett Bay and the coastal ponds of Rhode Island., Published in 2005, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aquaculture, Salt and Brackish Water dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2005. It...

  19. Aquaculture, Salt and Brackish Water, The G-WIS data are created to support environmental assessments associated with oil and gas exploration, production, and transportation activities in the Gulf of Mexico., Published in 2001, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aquaculture, Salt and Brackish Water dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2001. It is described as 'The G-WIS data are created to support...

  20. Bringing ecosystem services into integrated water resources management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Crossman, Neville D; Nolan, Martin; Ghirmay, Hiyoba

    2013-11-15

    In this paper we propose an ecosystem service framework to support integrated water resource management and apply it to the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. Water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin have been over-allocated for irrigation use with the consequent degradation of freshwater ecosystems. In line with integrated water resource management principles, Australian Government reforms are reducing the amount of water diverted for irrigation to improve ecosystem health. However, limited understanding of the broader benefits and trade-offs associated with reducing irrigation diversions has hampered the planning process supporting this reform. Ecosystem services offer an integrative framework to identify the broader benefits associated with integrated water resource management in the Murray-Darling Basin, thereby providing support for the Government to reform decision-making. We conducted a multi-criteria decision analysis for ranking regional potentials to provide ecosystem services at river basin scale. We surveyed the wider public about their understanding of, and priorities for, managing ecosystem services and then integrated the results with spatially explicit indicators of ecosystem service provision. The preliminary results of this work identified the sub-catchments with the greatest potential synergies and trade-offs of ecosystem service provision under the integrated water resources management reform process. With future development, our framework could be used as a decision support tool by those grappling with the challenge of the sustainable allocation of water between irrigation and the environment.

  1. Eye spectral sensitivity in fresh- and brackish-water populations of three glacial-relict Mysis species (Crustacea): physiology and genetics of differential tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Kristian; Zak, Pavel; Viljanen, Martta; Lindström, Magnus; Feldman, Tatiana; Ostrovsky, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Absorbance spectra of single rhabdoms were studied by microspectrophotometry (MSP) and spectral sensitivities of whole eyes by electroretinography (ERG) in three glacial-relict species of opossum shrimps (Mysis). Among eight populations from Fennoscandian fresh-water lakes (L) and seven populations from the brackish-water Baltic Sea (S), L spectra were systematically red-shifted by 20-30 nm compared with S spectra, save for one L and one S population. The difference holds across species and bears no consistent adaptive relation to the current light environments. In the most extensively studied L-S pair, two populations of M. relicta (L(p) and S(p)) separated for less than 10,000 years, no differences translating into amino acid substitutions have been found in the opsin genes, and the chromophore of the visual pigments as analyzed by HPLC is pure A1. However, MSP experiments with spectrally selective bleaching show the presence of two rhodopsins (λ(max) ≈ 525-530 nm, MWS, and 565-570 nm, LWS) expressed in different proportions. ERG recordings of responses to "red" and "blue" light linearly polarized at orthogonal angles indicate segregation of the pigments into different cells differing in polarization sensitivity. We propose that the pattern of development of LWS and MWS photoreceptors is governed by an ontogenetic switch responsive to some environmental signal(s) other than light that generally differ(s) between lakes and sea, and that this reaction norm is conserved from a common ancestor of all three species.

  2. Water pollution by intensive brackish shrimp farming in south-east Vietnam: Causes and options for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham Thi Ahn,; Kroeze, C.; Bush, S.R.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on both the environmental impact of intensive shrimp farming in the coastal region of Vietnam and the identification of options for cleaner production. We investigated water pollution, sediment contamination and the spread of diseases related to shrimp farming in the Can Gio distr

  3. Effect of Combined Use of Brackish Water and Nitrogen Fertilizer on Biomass and Sugar Yield of Sweet Sorghum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.B.RAMOS; N.L.CASTANHEIRA; M.C.GONCALVES; M.L.FERNANDES; M.I.JANU(A)RIO; M.E.LOURENCO; F.P.PIRES; J.C.MARTINS

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinization and non-point source pollution are among the most important and widespread environmental problems in European Mediterranean regions.Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench var.saccharatum) is a moderate to high salinity tolerant crop with low water and nutrient needs,seen as an alternative to grow in the water scarce regions.A three-year multifactorial study was conducted in southern Portugal to evaluate the combined effects of saline water and nitrogen application on the dry biomass (total,stems,and leaves),sugar content (total reducing sugars and sucrose contents),and sugar yield (here defined as the product of total reducing sugars and stems dry biomass) functions of sweet sorghum.Sorghum dry biomass and sugar yield showed diminishing returns for each incremental change of nitrogen.The use of saline irrigation waters also led to yield reduction.Exception was sucrose content which increased with increasing levels of sodium in the soil.Nitrogen need decreased as the amount of sodium applied increased.Stem dry biomass,sucrose content,and sugar yield progressively increased with progress in the experiment.The effect could be attributed to the increase of the amount of irrigation applied throughout the years,thus increasing the leaching fraction which promoted salt leaching from the root zone,reduced the salinity stress,increased plant transpiration,nitrogen uptake and biomass yield.

  4. Study of the Influence of Intermittent Water supply on brackish soil infiltration and water-salt distribution characteristics%间歇供水对微咸水土壤入渗与水盐分布特性的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵俊昌

    2015-01-01

    China is a country of relatively water resources shortage ,to solve water shortage will be a pressing problem currently.China is rich in salty water resources ,scientific and rational use of brackish water to allevi-ate water shortages ,to ensure that agricultural production has an extremely important role in drought resis-tance.In this paper, the indoor one-dimensional vertical soil column infiltration test ,intermittent water brackish water infiltration and infiltration characteristics of soil water and salt distribution were studied ,focusing on dif-ferent salinity brackish water in different cycles and under conditions of circulation rate of infiltration ,and brackish water infiltration for continuous analysis and comparison reveals infiltration mechanism of intermittent water brackish,brackish water on soil intermittent water and salt for the future brackish water irrigation some test data and technical support ,provide theoretical and practical basis for the rational use of brackish water ir-rigation.%我国是一个水资源相对贫乏的国家,解决水资源的短缺将是我国目前面临的一个迫切问题。中国有着丰富的咸水资源,科学合理的利用微咸水对于缓解水资源短缺,确保农业增产抗旱有着极其重要的作用。本文采用室内一维垂直土柱入渗试验,对间歇供水条件下微咸水入渗土壤水分入渗特性及水盐分布特征进行研究,重点介绍不同矿化度的微咸水在不同的周期和循环率的入渗条件下,与微咸水连续入渗作分析比较,揭示微咸水间歇供水的入渗机理,分析微咸水间歇供水对土壤水分和盐分的影响,为今后微咸水灌溉提供一些试验数据和技术支撑,为微咸水灌溉的合理利用提供理论基础和实践依据。

  5. The effect of CO2 enrichment on net photosynthesis of the red alga Furcellaria lumbricalis in a brackish water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Georg; Paalme, Tiina; Põllumäe, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere are causing reduction in the global ocean pH, also known as ocean acidification. This change alters the equilibrium of different forms of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater that macroalgae use for their photosynthesis. In the Baltic Sea, benthic macroalgae live in a highly variable environment caused by seasonality and rapid changes in meteorological conditions. The effect of increasing water CO2 concentration on the net photosynthesis of the red macroalgae Furcellaria lumbricalis (Hudson) Lamouroux was tested in short-term mesocosm experiments conducted in Kõiguste Bay (N Gulf of Riga) in June–July 2012 and 2013. Separate mesocosms were maintained at different pCO2 levels: ca. 2,000, ca. 1,000 and ca. 200 µatm. In parallel, different environmental factors were measured such as nutrients, light and water temperature. Thus, the current study also investigated whether elevated pCO2 and different environmental factors exerted interactive effects on the photosynthetic rate of F. lumbricalis. In addition, laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the optimal temperature for photosynthesis of F. lumbricalis. The results of our field experiments demonstrated that elevated pCO2 levels may remarkably enhance the photosynthetic rate of F. lumbricalis. However, the magnitude of this effect is altered by different environmental factors, mainly by changes in water temperature. PMID:27761318

  6. Isolation and Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria from Brackish Waters of Chilika Lagoon, Odisha, India for Pharmaceutical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashree Parida

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present investigation was undertaken in order to isolate bacteria from eighteen different water samples collected from three different sectors of ‘Chilika’ lagoon of India and to study the resistance against ten different antibiotics viz., norfloxacin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, neomycin, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, streptomycin and amoxicillin as well as their serological implications.Methodology and Results: Four different pathogenic bacteria species viz., Shigella dysenteriae, Streptococcus lactis, Bacillus cereus and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated which showed a wide range of sensitivity to norfloxacin,tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and nitrofurantoin. S. dysenteriae was sensitive to streptomycin where as other isolates were found to be resistant. Agarose gel electrophoresis failed to reveal plasmid DNA band indicating that theobserved resistance was perhaps encoded by nucleotide sequences harboured on the chromosomal DNA. Bacterial isolates were used as antigen for the production of polyclonal antibodies in rabbits.Conclusion, significance and impact of study:All the isolates exhibited strong antigenic character with specific serological relationship which can be implicated towards development of novel and pharmaceutically effective antibacterial products.

  7. Species composition and dietary relationships in a brackish shallow water fish assemblage in the Bothnian Sea, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorman, Staffan; Wiederholm, Anne-Marie

    1984-09-01

    A nearshore fish assemblage inhabiting a shallow bay in the southern Bothnian Sea, Sweden, with demanding environmental conditions (c. 5‰; >15°C during 4 months 1980 and 1 month 1981) was studied during a two-year period, in 1980 and 1981. Seasonal distribution patterns, dietary relationships, and growth rates were studied in Pungitius pungitius (L.), Pomatoschistus minutus (Pallas.), Gasterosteus aculeatus (L.), Phoxinus phoxinus (L.), Pomatoschistus microps (Krøyer) and Gobius niger L. The structure of the juvenile populations changed both over seasons and years but the adult populations remained constant. Lower water temperature, fewer individuals, lower and delayed fish growth, and lower interspecific food overlaps were found in 1981 compared to 1980. Few significant correlations were found in both years between the following community parameters: diversity, niche width, food overlap, and the proportion of each species in the fish assemblage. According to these results it is suggested that food competition and resource partitioning were of minor importance for the structuring of the fish community in the present area. Rather, the extreme salinity and the fluctuations in temperature regulated the fish populations. One may conclude that the populations of juveniles were more influenced by short-term changes in the environment than those of the adults.

  8. Brackish to hypersaline lake dolostones of the Mississippian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Carys; Kearsey, Timothy; Davies, Sarah; Millward, David; Marshall, John

    2016-04-01

    Flat-lying ferroan dolomite beds are common in the Mississippian and occur along the southern margin of Laurassia, from Kentucky USA to Poland. These rocks are important as they record shallow marine to coastal plain environments that may have acted as a pathway or refugia for animals that were radiating into freshwaters such as tetrapods, fish, molluscs and arthropods. This study is a contribution to the TW:eed Project (Tetrapod World: early evolution and diversification), that examines the rebuilding of Carboniferous ecosystems following a mass extinction at the end of the Devonian. The project focuses on the Tournaisian Ballagan Formation of Scotland, which contains rare fish and tetrapod fossils. The formation is characterised by an overbank facies association of siltstone, sandstone and palaeosols, interbedded with dolostone and evaporite units, and cut by fluvial sandstone facies associations of fining-upwards conglomerate lags, cross-bedded sandstone and rippled siltstone. Two sites are used as a case study to describe the sedimentological, faunal and ichnofaunal diversity of these dolostones. More than 270 dolostone beds are recorded in each of the 500 metre depth Norham Core (near Berwick-upon-Tweed) and from a 520 metre thick field section at Burnmouth. The beds are laterally extensive, over ˜1 km, although individual units do not appear to correlate between the core and the field site. In the Norham Core dolostones comprise up to 14% of the succession. 17% of the beds contain marginal marine fossils: Spirorbis, rare orthocones, brachiopods and putative marine sharks. More common fauna include ostracods, bivalves, plants, eurypterids, gastropods and sarcopterygian fish, which are interpreted as brackish to freshwater tolerant. Bioturbation is fairly common with Serpula colonies within dolostone beds and Chondrites burrowing down from the base of dolostone beds. Some rare units in the field section have a bulbous bed surface and preserve tree root traces

  9. Desalination of brackish groundwater and concentrate disposal by deep well injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthek, N.; Raat, K.; Ruijter, J.A.; Kemperman, A.J.B.; Oosterhof, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the province of Friesland (in the Northern part of The Netherlands), problems have arisen with the abstraction of fresh groundwater due to salinization of wells by upcoming of brackish water. A solution to this problem is to intercept (abstract) the upcoming brackish water, desalinate it with a b

  10. Carbon and water vapor fluxes of different ecosystems in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on exchange of energy, carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) for major terrestrial ecosystems is vital to quantify carbon and water balances on a large-scale. It is also necessary to develop, test, and improve crop models and satellite-based production efficiency and evapotranspira...

  11. Progress in Investigation and Application of High Recovery Brackish Water Membrane Desalination Technology%高回收率膜法苦咸水淡化工艺的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋跃飞; 苏现伐; 周建国; 苏保卫; 高从堦

    2015-01-01

    膜法苦咸水淡化过程中,符合环境保护要求的浓排水处理方法成本高昂,所以只有当回收率达到较高值时,在实际运行中才具有经济可行性。目前,在不加剧膜污染的条件下进一步提高苦咸水淡化系统回收率的方法已成为该领域研究热点。本文详细综述了高回收率膜法苦咸水淡化工艺的应用研究进展,包括基于反渗透、纳滤、正渗透、膜蒸馏、电渗析和电容去离子化淡化工艺过程,以及这些过程面临的热点问题,并对此提出了建议。%The costs of environmentally responsible brine disposal methods at inland sites can be prohibitively expensive in membrane brackish water desalination processes. As a result, it is often economically infeasible to develop such ground water sources unless very high product water recovery is attained. High product water recovery in membrane desalination processes is often limited by scaling of sparingly soluble salts when the concentrate above the solubility limits in the highly concentrated brine. Therefore, attempt was currently made to solve or mitigate scaling of membrane for brackish water desalination while remaining or further increasing overall system product water recovery. In this paper, the progress in improving the recovery of brackish water desalination by membrane technology including reverse osmosis (RO), nanofiltration (NF), forward osmosis (FO), membrane distillation (MD), electrodialysis (ED) and capacitive deionization (CDI), the scaling problem therein, as well as critical issues existing in this region were presented and commented extensively. In addition, the problems and suggestions for the current research status are proposed.

  12. Caribbean brackish and freshwater Cyanophyceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Joséphine Th.

    1960-01-01

    Among the extensive collections of algae made by Dr P. Wagenaar Hummelinck (Utrecht) in the Antilles and adjacent regions during the years 1930, 1936, 1937, 1948—1949, 1955, a number of chiefly brackish, but also freshwater, Cyanophyceae were incorporated. This collection was kindly committed for st

  13. Water pulses and biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Amy T; Yahdjian, Laura; Stark, John M; Belnap, Jayne; Porporato, Amilcare; Norton, Urszula; Ravetta, Damián A; Schaeffer, Sean M

    2004-10-01

    The episodic nature of water availability in arid and semiarid ecosystems has significant consequences on belowground carbon and nutrient cycling. Pulsed water events directly control belowground processes through soil wet-dry cycles. Rapid soil microbial response to incident moisture availability often results in almost instantaneous C and N mineralization, followed by shifts in C/N of microbially available substrate, and an offset in the balance between nutrient immobilization and mineralization. Nitrogen inputs from biological soil crusts are also highly sensitive to pulsed rain events, and nitrogen losses, particularly gaseous losses due to denitrification and nitrate leaching, are tightly linked to pulses of water availability. The magnitude of the effect of water pulses on carbon and nutrient pools, however, depends on the distribution of resource availability and soil organisms, both of which are strongly affected by the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation cover, topographic position and soil texture. The 'inverse texture hypothesis' for net primary production in water-limited ecosystems suggests that coarse-textured soils have higher NPP than fine-textured soils in very arid zones due to reduced evaporative losses, while NPP is greater in fine-textured soils in higher rainfall ecosystems due to increased water-holding capacity. With respect to belowground processes, fine-textured soils tend to have higher water-holding capacity and labile C and N pools than coarse-textured soils, and often show a much greater flush of N mineralization. The result of the interaction of texture and pulsed rainfall events suggests a corollary hypothesis for nutrient turnover in arid and semiarid ecosystems with a linear increase of N mineralization in coarse-textured soils, but a saturating response for fine-textured soils due to the importance of soil C and N pools. Seasonal distribution of water pulses can lead to the accumulation of mineral N in the dry season

  14. 76 FR 55060 - Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of Conducting Multi-Stressor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... AGENCY Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of Conducting Multi-Stressor... of Availability. SUMMARY: EPA is releasing a final report entitled, Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality... with identifying, calculating, and mapping indicators of the relative vulnerability of water...

  15. The Winddrinker. Brackish water desalination in Somalia by means of wind energy; De Winddrinker. Brak water ontzilting in Somaliland door middel van windenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generaal, C. [Faculteit Luchtvaart- en Ruimtetechniek, Technische Universiteit Delft TUD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    The Winddrinker turns salt water into clean drinking water utilizing solely wind energy. It is a promising solution to solve water problems in dry coastal areas of developing countries. The Winddrinker combines a windmill and a desalination pump in the most efficient way. A mechanical coupling ensures a cheap, simple and reliable technology. [Dutch] De Winddrinker kan brak water ontzouten en veranderen in drinkwater met behulp van wind energie. Het is een veelbelovende oplossing voor het drinkwaterprobleem in droge kustgebieden in ontwikkelingslanden. De Winddrinker is een zeer efficient systeem bestaande uit een windmolen en een ontziltingspomp. Een mechanische koppeling zorgt voor een goedkope, eenvoudige en betrouwbare technologie.

  16. Integrated Water Resources Management Improving Langat Basin Ecosystem Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazlin B. Mokhtar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecosystem provides us with all the goods and services that form the base of our economic, social cultural and spiritual life. Good scientific information will be required for managing the environment by using the Ecosystem approach. The groundwater is considered as a possible supplementary of alternative water source, and some factories already started shifting their water source from surface water to groundwater. Uncontrolled use of groundwater, however, may induce serious environmental problems, e.g., land subsidence, saltwater intrusion to the aquifer. The establishment of a balanced multi-sector and integrated groundwater resources and environmental management plan is deemed urgent to attain a sustainable groundwater resources use and to maintain a favorable groundwater quality in the Langat Basin. To achieve sustainable lifestyle in large scale ecosystem requires integrated and holistic approaches from all stakeholders. Through Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR it was determined a revolutionized water resources management, providing a sustainable supply while minimizing the environmental impact of surface storage. By using underground geologic formations to store water, by integrated water resources management advisory system (IWRMAS aquifer recharge can now easily applied to obviate water resource and environmental problems, including seasonal shortages, emergency storage, ground subsidence and saline intrusion.

  17. Water cycle investigations in Hungarian forest ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judit Sitkey

    2006-01-01

    From the biological point of view the value of autotrophy plant association is determined by the carbon fixation and the carbon cycle. Among the plant associations of Hungary, forest has the largest biological carbon fixation and carbon cycle. In general,the annual water cycle is the key factor in the organic material production of the Hungarian forests. The most intensive water consumption and organic material production take place from May till July, which period is named main water consumption and respectively main growing period. In Hungary the categories of the forest climate are characterized by main tree species and based on the forest climate covers 8% of the forest area, hornbeam-oak forest climate covers 22%, sessile oak-Turkey oak forest climate covers48% and forest steppe climate covers 22%. Partly in the frame of ICP-Forests, the Department of Ecology in the Forest Research Institute carries out long term, complex ecophysiological investigations on several sample plots (so-called basic plots) throughout the whole country. The organic material production (growth), the nutrient and water cycle, the measurements of air pollutants and meteorological parameters, as well as chemical analyses are all part of the investigations. As a comparison the figure of two basic plotsforest steppe climate in the hydrological year of 2001-2002. In the Hungarian forest 60%-70% of the precipitation is used for interception, evaporation, and in the vegetation season, for the transpiration both in beech and forest steppe climate. From other point of view, only 30%-40% of the open air precipitation infiltrates into the soil and can be utilized by the forest.

  18. Report on follow-up for joint research of valuable resources recovery techniques from brackish water; Kansuichu no yuka shigen kaishu gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku follow up hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report describes follow-up for research and development on the recovery of valuable resources, such as magnesium, bromine and boron, contained in the brackish water for manufacture of common salt in the coastal region of Mexico. For the field survey, salt garden, irrigation plant and manufacturing plant of dinning salt were inspected. The optimum site was examined by assuming desalination plant and solar pond. The groundwater in coastal regions is progressively salified. Since the coastal region is a tourist resort with an round-trip area of whales, environmental protection is indispensable. For the joint research with invited researchers, the solar pond system and fresh water generation were studied. As a result, it was found that the solar pond system is an excellent method for keeping thermal energy in a low cost at the salt garden with abundant solar energy, and that the desalination system combined with distilling is the most suitable method. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effect of advective pore water flow on degradation of organic matter in permeable sandy sediment : - A study of fresh- and brackish water

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The carbon metabolism in costal sediments is of major importance for the global carbon cycle. Costal sediments are also subjected to physical forcing generating water fluxes above and through the sediments, but how the physical affect the carbon metabolism is currently poorly known. In this study, the effect of advective pore water flow on degradation of organic matter in permeable sandy sediment was investigated in a laboratory study during wintertime. Sediments were collected from both brac...

  20. Sustainable Irrigation with Brackish Groundwater in Heilonggang Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Saline groundwater is widely distributed in Heilonggang region. While deep confined water is being mined, saline water has not been used in most part of the region. Extension of saline water irrigation is of significance to resolve water shortage, slow down environmental degradation and support the sustainable development of the local agriculture. Four key points are proposed to be managed by comprehensive measures: (1) adapting salt-resistant ability; (2) reducing salt input; (3) decreasing soil surface evaporation and salt accumulation in the root zone, and (4) washing away salt from the root zone. Experiments and farming practices demonstrated that brackish water with TDS (total dissolved solids) of 2-5 g/l can be used for crop irrigation. For example, winter wheat can be sustainably irrigated by brackish water with a water limitation of 120 mm every year. Irrigation in combination with different comprehensive measures can increase the efficiency of saline water irrigation.

  1. Revealing Invisible Water: Moisture Recycling as an Ecosystem Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick W; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line J

    2016-01-01

    An ecosystem service is a benefit derived by humanity that can be traced back to an ecological process. Although ecosystem services related to surface water have been thoroughly described, the relationship between atmospheric water and ecosystem services has been mostly neglected, and perhaps misunderstood. Recent advances in land-atmosphere modeling have revealed the importance of terrestrial ecosystems for moisture recycling. In this paper, we analyze the extent to which vegetation sustains the supply of atmospheric moisture and precipitation for downwind beneficiaries, globally. We simulate land-surface evaporation with a global hydrology model and track changes to moisture recycling using an atmospheric moisture budget model, and we define vegetation-regulated moisture recycling as the difference in moisture recycling between current vegetation and a hypothetical desert world. Our results show that nearly a fifth of annual average precipitation falling on land is from vegetation-regulated moisture recycling, but the global variability is large, with many places receiving nearly half their precipitation from this ecosystem service. The largest potential impacts for changes to this ecosystem service are land-use changes across temperate regions in North America and Russia. Likewise, in semi-arid regions reliant on rainfed agricultural production, land-use change that even modestly reduces evaporation and subsequent precipitation, could significantly affect human well-being. We also present a regional case study in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil, where we identify the specific moisture recycling ecosystem services associated with the vegetation in Mato Grosso. We find that Mato Grosso vegetation regulates some internal precipitation, with a diffuse region of benefit downwind, primarily to the south and east, including the La Plata River basin and the megacities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. We synthesize our global and regional results into a generalized

  2. Revealing Invisible Water: Moisture Recycling as an Ecosystem Service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W Keys

    Full Text Available An ecosystem service is a benefit derived by humanity that can be traced back to an ecological process. Although ecosystem services related to surface water have been thoroughly described, the relationship between atmospheric water and ecosystem services has been mostly neglected, and perhaps misunderstood. Recent advances in land-atmosphere modeling have revealed the importance of terrestrial ecosystems for moisture recycling. In this paper, we analyze the extent to which vegetation sustains the supply of atmospheric moisture and precipitation for downwind beneficiaries, globally. We simulate land-surface evaporation with a global hydrology model and track changes to moisture recycling using an atmospheric moisture budget model, and we define vegetation-regulated moisture recycling as the difference in moisture recycling between current vegetation and a hypothetical desert world. Our results show that nearly a fifth of annual average precipitation falling on land is from vegetation-regulated moisture recycling, but the global variability is large, with many places receiving nearly half their precipitation from this ecosystem service. The largest potential impacts for changes to this ecosystem service are land-use changes across temperate regions in North America and Russia. Likewise, in semi-arid regions reliant on rainfed agricultural production, land-use change that even modestly reduces evaporation and subsequent precipitation, could significantly affect human well-being. We also present a regional case study in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil, where we identify the specific moisture recycling ecosystem services associated with the vegetation in Mato Grosso. We find that Mato Grosso vegetation regulates some internal precipitation, with a diffuse region of benefit downwind, primarily to the south and east, including the La Plata River basin and the megacities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. We synthesize our global and regional results

  3. Plant rooting strategies in water-limited ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D. B. G.; Bras, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Root depth and distribution are vital components of a plant's strategy for growth and survival in water-limited ecosystems and play significant roles in hydrologic and biogeochemical cycling. Knowledge of root profiles is invaluable in measuring and predicting ecosystem dynamics, yet data on root profiles are difficult to obtain. We developed an ecohydrological model of environmental forcing, soil moisture dynamics, and transpiration to explore dependencies of optimal rooting on edaphic, climatic, and physiological factors in water-limited ecosystems. The analysis considers individual plants with fixed biomass. Results of the optimization approach are consistent with profiles observed in nature. Optimal rooting was progressively deeper, moving from clay to loam, silt and then sand, and in wetter and cooler environments. Climates with the majority of the rainfall in winter produced deeper roots than if the rain fell in summer. Long and infrequent storms also favored deeper rooting. Plants that exhibit water stress at slight soil moisture deficiencies consistently showed deeper optimal root profiles. Silt generated the greatest sensitivity to differences in climatic and physiological parameters. The depth of rooting is governed by the depth to which water infiltrates, as influenced by soil properties and the timing and magnitude of water input and evaporative demand. These results provide a mechanistic illustration of the diversity of rooting strategies in nature.

  4. On the Vulnerability of Water Limited Ecosystems to Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly K. Caylor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Society is facing growing environmental problems that require new research efforts to understand the way ecosystems operate and survive, and their mutual relationships with the hydrologic cycle. In this respect, ecohydrology suggests a renewed interdisciplinary approach that aims to provide a better comprehension of the effects of climatic changes on terrestrial ecosystems. With this aim, a coupled hydrological/ecological model is adopted to describe simultaneously vegetation pattern evolution and hydrological water budget at the basin scale using as test site the Upper Rio Salado basin (Sevilleta, NM, USA. The hydrological analyses have been carried out using a recently formulated framework for the water balance at the daily level linked with a spatial model for the description of the spatial organization of vegetation. This enables quantitatively assessing the effects on soil water availability on future climatic scenarios. Results highlighted that the relationship between climatic forcing (water availability and vegetation patterns is strongly non-linear. This implies, under some specific conditions which depend on the ecosystem characteristics, small changes in climatic conditions may produce significant transformation of the vegetation patterns.

  5. Produção de girassol ornamental com uso de águas salobras em sistema hidropônico NFT Production of ornamental sunflower with use of brackish waters in NFT hydroponic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlo P Maciel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Plantas de girassol ornamental 'Sol Vermelho' foram cultivadas em hidroponia com o objetivo de avaliar o uso de águas salobras sobre seu rendimento e qualidade da inflorescência. As águas salobras foram usadas para preparar a solução nutritiva e repor as perdas por evapotranspiração. O experimento foi conduzido em delineamento inteiramente aleatorizado com cinco níveis de salinidade da água: 1,51; 2,56; 3,86 e 6,19 dS m-1, obtidos pela adição de NaCl na água doce local (0,47 dS m-1 que também foi usada como testemunha. Cada tratamento foi repetido quatro vezes e cada parcela (com quatro plantas foi construída para simular um sistema independente da técnica do fluxo laminar de nutrientes (NFT. Observou-se uma redução linear causada pelo aumento da salinidade da água sobre a altura das plantas, o diâmetro do caule e a massa da matéria seca da parte aérea. Tanto a altura da planta quanto o diâmetro do caule foram reduzidos em 3,2% e a massa de matéria seca da parte aérea foi reduzida em 5,78% (dS m-1-1, para cada acréscimo unitário da salinidade da água (dS m-1. Por outro lado, a salinidade da água não afetou o tamanho do capítulo do girassol e não foram registrados sintomas de toxicidade causados pela salinidade. Esses resultados sustentam a viabilidade técnica do uso de águas salobras para produção hidropônica de girassol ornamental.Plants of ornamental sunflower 'Sol Vermelho' were grown under hydroponic conditions aiming to evaluate the effects of use of brackish water on its yield and inflorescence (capitulum quality. The brackish waters were utilized to prepare nutrient solution and to replace water due to evapotranspiration loss. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized experimental design with five levels of water salinity: 1.51; 2.56; 3.86 and 6.19 dS m-1, obtained by addition of NaCl to local fresh water; this fresh water (0.47 dS m-1 was also studied as control treatment. Each

  6. Influence of Brackish Water Irrigation on the Environment of Water and Soil of Land Renovation Project%微咸水灌溉对土地整治项目区水土环境的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴全; 苏瑞东; 邢晓芹; 唐秀楠

    2015-01-01

    为了研究不同灌溉模式对土地整治项目区土壤环境、地下水矿化度和埋深的影响,在内蒙古河套灌区选定具有代表性的红卫试验场进行了枸杞田间微咸水灌溉试验,探讨对土壤环境、地下水环境影响最小的枸杞微咸水灌溉模式。结果表明:不同轮灌模式下土壤盐分均发生表聚现象,在枸杞根系发达区淡-咸-咸灌溉模式下土壤盐分最低,对枸杞生长影响较小;地下水矿化度存在显著差异,淡-咸-咸灌溉模式下枸杞整个生育期内地下水矿化度最低,咸-咸-咸灌溉模式下最高;不同轮灌模式下地下水埋深差异不大,并且在生育期末基本回到了开春时的水平;淡-咸-咸灌溉模式对地下水环境影响较小,是适合当地土地整治采用的最优灌溉模式。%In order to study the influence on different irrigation modes to the environment of soil, groundwater salinity and buried depth of land renovation project, this research selected representative filed which is called Hongwei testing field to carry on the experiments of brackish water irrigation in Hetao irrigation area in Inner Mongolia for wolfberry and studied the minimum influence of brackish water irrigation mode to the environment of soil and groundwater for wolfberry. Results show that soil salinity is occurred surface assembled phenomenon under the different rotational irrigation modes, soil salinity of fresh-salty-salty mode is the lowest in the wolfberry root developed area and the influence to the wolfberry grow is smaller; the groundwater salinity exists significant difference under different rotational irrigation modes, groundwater salinity is the minimum throughout the reproductive period under the fresh-salty-salty mode for wolfberry, groundwater salinity is the highest under the salty-salty-salty mode, from small to large followed by fresh-salty-salty < salty-salty-fresh water

  7. 76 FR 10892 - Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of Conducting Multi-Stressor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... AGENCY Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Global Change: Challenges of Conducting Multi-Stressor.... SUMMARY: EPA is announcing the release of the draft report titled, ``Aquatic Ecosystems, Water Quality... relative vulnerability of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, across the United States, to the...

  8. Scaling Soil Microbe-Water Interactions from Pores to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scales relevant to soil microbial activity are much finer than scales relevant to whole-ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. On the one hand, how to link such different scales and develop scale-aware biogeochemical and ecohydrological models remains a major challenge. On the other hand, resolving these linkages is becoming necessary for testing ecological hypotheses and resolving data-theory inconsistencies. Here, the relation between microbial respiration and soil moisture expressed in water potential is explored. Such relation mediates the water availability effects on ecosystem-level heterotrophic respiration and is of paramount importance for understanding CO2 emissions under increasingly variable rainfall regimes. Respiration has been shown to decline as the soil dries in a remarkably consistent way across climates and soil types (open triangles in Figure). Empirical models based on these respiration-moisture relations are routinely used in Earth System Models to predict moisture effects on ecosystem respiration. It has been hypothesized that this consistency in microbial respiration decline is due to breakage of water film continuity causing in turn solute diffusion limitations in dry conditions. However, this hypothesis appears to be at odds with what is known about soil hydraulic properties. Water film continuity estimated from soil water retention (SWR) measurements at the 'Darcy' scale breaks at far less negative water potential (tools from percolation theory, it is demonstrated that hydrological measurements can be spatially downscaled at a micro-level relevant to microbial activity. Such downscaling resolves the inconsistency between respiration thresholds and hydrological thresholds. This result, together with observations of residual microbial activity well below -15 MPa (dashed back curve in Figure), lends support to the hypothesis that soil microbes are substrate-limited in dry conditions.

  9. Does consideration of water routing affect simulated water and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The cycling of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is closely coupled with the cycling of water. An important mechanism connecting ecological and hydrological processes in terrestrial ecosystems is lateral flow of water along landscapes. Few studies, however, have examined explicitly how consideration of water routing affects simulated water and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study is to explore how consideration of water routing in a process-based hydroecological model affects simulated water and carbon dynamics. To achieve that end, we rasterized the regional hydroecological simulation systems (RHESSys and employed the rasterized RHESSys (R-RHESSys in a forested watershed. We performed and compared two contrasting simulations, one with and another without water routing. We found that R-RHESSys is able to correctly simulate major hydrological and ecological variables regardless of whether water routing is considered. When water routing was neglected, however, soil water table depth and saturation deficit were simulated to be smaller and spatially more homogeneous. As a result, evaporation, forest productivity and soil heterotrophic respiration also were simulated to be spatially more homogeneous compared to simulation with water routing. When averaged for the entire watershed, however, differences in simulated water and carbon fluxes are not significant between the two simulations. Overall, the study demonstrated that consideration of water routing enabled R-RHESSys to better capture our preconception of the spatial patterns of water table depth and saturation deficit across the watershed. Because the spatial pattern of soil moisture is fundamental to water efflux from land to the atmosphere, forest productivity and soil microbial activity, ecosystem and carbon cycle models, therefore, need to explicitly represent water routing in order to accurately quantify the magnitudes and patterns of water and carbon fluxes

  10. Experimental study of the hydrophobic PTFE membrane used in membrane distillation for brackish water desalination%用于膜蒸馏苦咸水淡化的PTFE疏水膜实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕海莉; 田瑞; 杨晓宏; 马淑娟

    2012-01-01

    利用目前国内生产的PTFE疏水膜,以自来水、盐水溶液作工质进行了多层并接气隙式膜蒸馏实验,比较了几种膜的分离性能,研究了料液温度、料液流量、浓度对膜渗透通量的影响,各种膜的通量稳定性及污染情况.实验结果表明:4#膜在长期自来水、盐水实验中通量、电导率都较稳定,特别是在后期实验中,通量最大;而孔径大、涂层薄的1#膜在前期实验中通量较大,而随运行时间增长,通量有所下降,特别是盐水实验中,截留率低,电导率高,因此不适合淡化苦咸水用,综合来看4#膜性能较好.实验后各种膜表面的污染情况较严重,都有黄色沉积物.%The domestic PTFE hydrophobic membranes were employed in the brackish water desalination experiment by multi parallel type air-gap membrane distillation, using tap-water and salt solution as testing solution. The desalination performances of membranes were compared. Simultaneously, the effects of the temperature, flow and concentration of the feed solution on the flux of MD processes, the stability of membrane flux, membrane fouling were studied. The results show that the flux and conductivity of membrane 4# are stable in the tap water and salt water experiments for long-term, especially in the later experiments, the flux of membrane 4# is the largest. The flux of the membrane 1# which has larger aperture and thinner coating is larger in previous experiments, but the flux declines with the running time, especially in the salt water experiments, the rejection of inorganic salt solutes is low, and the conductivity is high, so it is not suitable for using in brackish water desalination. On the whole, the performance of the membrane 4# is better. The membrane fouling is serious after the experiment, yellow sediment can be found on the membrane surface.

  11. Influence of environmental factors on the abundance of Anopheles farauti larvae in large brackish water streams in Northern Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butafa Charles

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main vector of malaria in Solomon Islands is Anopheles farauti, which has a mainly coastal distribution. In Northern Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, high densities of An. farauti are supported by large brackish streams, which in the dry season are dammed by localized sand migration. The factors controlling the high larval productivity of these breeding sites have not been identified. Accordingly the influence of environmental factors on the presence and density of An. farauti larvae was assessed in three large naturally dammed streams. Methods Larval sites were mapped and anopheline larvae were collected monthly for 12 months (July 2007 to June 2008 from three streams using standard dippers. Larval collections were made from 10 locations spaced at 50 m intervals along the edge of each stream starting from the coast. At each collection point, floating filamentous algae, aquatic emergent plants, sun exposure, and salinity were measured. These environmental parameters along with rainfall were correlated with larval presence and density. Results The presence and abundance of An. farauti larvae varied between streams and was influenced by the month of collection, and distance from the ocean (p 0.001. Larvae were more frequently present and more abundant within 50 m of the ocean during the dry season when the streams were dammed. The presence and density of larvae were positively associated with aquatic emergent plants (presence: p = 0.049; density: p = 0.001. Although filamentous algae did not influence the presence of larvae, this factor did significantly influence the density of larvae (p Conclusion This study has demonstrated that the presence and abundance An. farauti larvae are influenced by environmental factors within the large streams. Understanding these parameters will allow for targeted cost effective implementation of source reduction and larviciding to support the frontline malaria control measures i.e. indoor

  12. Recent ecosystem dynamics in nine North African lakes in the CASSARINA Project

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    An integrated multi-disciplinary study of nine North African lakes (CASSARINA) aims to establish ecological baselines and to explore responses to 20th century human impacts on their ecosystems. Water chemistry measurements (1997–1998) demonstrate a wide range from dilute oligotrophic to calcareous freshwaters and from mildly brackish to hypersaline lagoons. The biota are consequently highly diverse. Aquatic ecosystem responses to environmental stress over the last 100–200 years in all nine la...

  13. 正渗透—纳滤耦合处理苦咸水脱盐工艺%Technological Processes of Desalination Treatment for Brackish Water with Coupled Forward Osmosis-Nanofiltration System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时强; 张乾; 阮国岭; 初喜章

    2012-01-01

    Simulating 2 000 mg/L NaCl as brackish water, using divalent salt (Na2SO4, MgSO4, MgCl2 and their mixture solution) as draw solution, the water flux of forward osmosis(FO) for brackish water desalination was investigated. The nanofiltration (NF) performance for the recovery of draw solution was determined by software and experiment, and a dual NF process was designed for the recovery of diluted draw solution. Results show that the water flux of MgSO4 in FO process is lowest, and that of MgCl2 is highest. It is opposite in NF process that the NF performance of MgSO4 is best, and that of MgCl2 is worst. When the diluted draw solution of Na2SO4 is 30 g / L, it could be concentrated to the initial concentration (60 g/L) by a dual stage NF process, and the permeate TDS is lower than 500 mg/L.%以2000 mg/L氯化钠模拟苦咸水,采用二价无机盐作为汲取液,研究了正渗透淡化苦咸水时的水通量;通过软件计算和试验研究了不同组成汲取液的纳滤性能,并且设计了二级纳滤系统用于汲取液的回收.结果表明:相同浓度时硫酸镁汲取液正渗透水通量最低,而氯化镁汲取液水通量最高;相反在纳滤过程中,硫酸镁汲取液性能最佳,氯化镁最差;稀释硫酸钠汲取液浓度为30 g/L时,二级纳滤过程可以将汲取液浓缩至初始浓度(60g/L),并制得浓度低于500 mg/L的产水.

  14. Statutory protection for the water requirements of natural ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Uys

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available A project was recently registered with the National Parks Board to investigate the need for legal protection of the water requirements of natural ecosystems and the existing legislation which provides such protection. There is a distinct lack of legal protection, which is identified and discussed in this paper. It is submitted that the current South African water law is outdated and in need of reform so as to accommodate the demands of a wider spectrum of user sectors. Since the amendment of the existing water allocation system (in a country where water is a scarce resource could be politically a disconcerting step, it should be made only after due consideration of the various needs for water, the historical foundation of the existing system, and a study made of effective systems in countries with similar water problems. An in-depth study of the historical development of South African water law has already revealed interesting yet abrogated concepts, which can possibly serve as a means of protecting the natural water requirements.

  15. Relevant factors for membrane fouling in brackish water reverse osmosis desalination%苦咸水反渗透淡化中影响膜面的污染因素∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋跃飞; 李铁梅; 周建国; 苏保卫; 高从堦

    2015-01-01

    Fouling phenomenon, type and degree in brackish water reverse osmosis ( BWRO ) desalination are significantly different from seawater reverse osmosis ( SWRO) process, due to the complex components of brackish water in different regions and the higher concentrate factor ( CF ) value in the majority of BWRO processes. Currently, membrane fouling as one of the bottlenecks for the large⁃scale BWRO application, has attracted in creasing attentions. In this review, overseas and domestic research progresses in application factors influencing the fouling on membrane surface in BWRO desalination were summarized in detail. The fouling components, fouling potential and quality indicators in water resources, and the physical properties influencing membrane fouling were introduced respectively. Two types of pretreatment methods including conventional and membrane technology were analysed, and the advantage of consistently high quality independent of influent associated with for membrane pretreatment was pointed out. In addition, the problems and suggestions for the current research status were proposed.%由于苦咸水的化学组成和浓度分布在不同地区有着显著的差异,以及淡化工艺中普遍较高的浓缩因子( concentrate factor, CF)值(在4—10之间),苦咸水反渗透( brackish water reverse osmosis, BWRO)淡化过程中的膜污染现象、类型和程度较海水反渗透( seawater reverse osmosis, SWRO)淡化过程有明显的不同。目前,膜污染已成为BWRO大规模应用于苦咸水淡化领域的瓶颈之一,如何解决这一问题成为该领域的研究热点。本文详细综述了国内外BWRO淡化过程中影响膜面污染因素的应用研究进展,重点介绍了进水来源污染成分及污染倾向、进水水质优劣指标和进水物性对膜面污染的影响;按照分离技术的不同,分类讨论了常规预处理和膜法预处理工艺,指出后者不易受进水水质变化的

  16. Effect of substrate culture on the growth of different vegetables under brackish water irrigation%基质栽培对微咸水灌溉下不同种类蔬菜生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟红梅; 董宝娣; 乔匀周; 师长海; 杨静; 李东晓; 刘月岩; 刘孟雨

    2013-01-01

      环渤海区淡水资源匮乏,咸水资源丰富,为解决水资源短缺以及微咸水灌溉引起土壤盐渍化问题,研究了在微咸水灌溉条件下,基质栽培对番茄、青椒和茄子生长发育的影响,以土壤栽培为对照,基质为腐熟秸秆、珍珠岩和炉渣按质量比1∶1∶1混合,深30 cm ,整个生育期灌溉3 g・L-1微咸水。结果表明:基质栽培条件下番茄和茄子的生长发育受到显著抑制,相对于土壤栽培,株高分别下降44.1%和25.1%,生物量分别下降80.4%和48.9%,产量下降49.2%和27.6%;青椒的株高和生物量下降15.2%和27.0%,但是产量没有显著变化。通过测定基质和土壤的盐分,发现在基质栽培条件下蔬菜受到盐分胁迫,植株耐盐性能降低,细胞膜完整性被破坏,导致番茄、青椒和茄子的光合速率分别下降18.5%、15.3%和14.1%。可见这种基质栽培条件适宜于浅根系作物,不适宜深根系作物,并且基质材料应该选择不含有盐碱土的炉渣。%Bohai Sea region has plenty of brackish water but short of freshwater resources .In attempt to find the so-lution to solve the problems of freshwater shortages and soil salinization caused by brackish water irrigation ,we studied the effect of substrate culture on the growth of tomato ,green pepper and eggplant under brackish water irrigation .The substrate used in this study was made of composting straw ,perlite ,and slag mixed in a mass ratio of 1∶1∶1 .The depth of groove was 30 cm .All vegetables were irrigated with 3 g・L-1 saline water .The results showed the growth and devel-opment of tomato and eggplant was significantly inhibited in substrate culture .Compared with soil cultivation ,the plant height of tomato and eggplant were decreased 44 .1% and 25 .1% respectively ,the biomass was decreased 80 .4% and 48 .9% ,respectively ,and the yield was decreased 49 .2% and 27

  17. Linking economic water use, freshwater ecosystem impacts, and virtual water trade in a Great Lakes watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubako, S. T.; Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of human water uses and economic pressures on freshwater ecosystems is of growing interest for water resource management worldwide. This case study for a water-rich watershed in the Great Lakes region links the economic pressures on water resources as revealed by virtual water trade balances to the nature of the economic water use and the associated impacts on the freshwater ecosystem. A water accounting framework that combines water consumption data and economic data from input output tables is applied to quantify localized virtual water imports and exports in the Kalamazoo watershed which comprises ten counties. Water using economic activities at the county level are conformed to watershed boundaries through land use-water use relationships. The counties are part of a region implementing the Michigan Water Withdrawal Assessment Process, including new regulatory approaches for adaptive water resources management under a riparian water rights framework. The results show that at local level, there exists considerable water use intensity and virtual water trade balance disparity among the counties and between water use sectors in this watershed. The watershed is a net virtual water importer, with some counties outsourcing nearly half of their water resource impacts, and some outsourcing nearly all water resource impacts. The largest virtual water imports are associated with agriculture, thermoelectric power generation and industry, while the bulk of the exports are associated with thermoelectric power generation and commercial activities. The methodology is applicable to various spatial levels ranging from the micro sub-watershed level to the macro Great Lakes watershed region, subject to the availability of reliable water use and economic data.

  18. Origin of brackish groundwater in a sandstone aquifer on Bornholm, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niels Oluf; Heinemeier, Jan

    2008-01-01

    ). The occurrence of brackish groundwater is remarkable for this aquifer, which otherwise yields potable groundwater of good quality. The stable isotope (18O and 2H) compositions indicate a meteoric origin of the brackish groundwater, which rules out seawater intrusion into the aquifer. 14C activities show apparent...... reflecting long water-rock interaction and suggest a contribution of palaeowater from the fractured crystalline basement which has intruded into the Lower Cambrian sandstone aquifer....

  19. Simulation of Brackish Water Irrigation Management for Winter Wheat in the Yellow River Delta%黄河三角洲地区冬小麦微咸水灌溉制度模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞桂斌; 徐征和; 刘培成; 郝爱鑫

    2016-01-01

    The rational development of shallow underground brackish water for agricultural irrigation,not only can solve the problem of water shortage,but also can descend underground water level to reduce the soil secondary salinization hazards,meanwhile,soil and water environment for crop growth will be improved. This paper selected the Yellow River delta as the study area,where freshwater is in short supply,groundwater is shallow and the soil water and salt movement is active. In order to investigate the most applicable irrigation schedule with slight saline water (2-5 g/L ) for winter wheat in the Yellow River delta,the validated finite element subsurface FLOW system (FEFLOW)model was used to evaluate the effect of various irrigation schedule on water and salt balance in soil,crop growth and groundwater table. The simulated results indicate that the optimal irrigation schedule of winter wheat is a)key time of irrigation is needed with enough slight saline water;b)two times of irrigation are needed with slight saline water mixed with fresh water and;c)three or four times of irrigation are needed with alternate of slight saline water and freshwater.%合理开发浅埋区地下微咸水用于灌溉不仅可以解决水资源短缺的问题,而且可以通过降低地下水位减轻土壤次生盐碱化,改善作物生长的水土环境。选择淡水资源紧缺、地下水埋深浅、土壤水盐运动剧烈的黄河三角洲地区,基于FEFLOW软件建立了引黄灌区的水流与溶质运移数值模拟模型,并应用率定和验证后的模型对多种微咸水(矿化度为2~5 g/L)灌溉方案进行模拟,综合考虑地下水位临界深度和冬小麦生育期耐盐极限,确立了较优的微咸水灌溉制度,包括一次性灌足关键微咸水、微咸水与淡水混合灌溉、微咸水与淡水轮流灌溉三种灌溉方式。

  20. Optimal root profiles in water-limited ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Keith; Albertson, John D.; Ferrari, Silvia

    2014-09-01

    The vertical distribution of roots in the soil is of central importance to the mass and energy exchange between the land and the atmosphere. It has been demonstrated that the vertical root profiles which maximize transpiration in numerical experiments reflect well the characteristics of root profiles observed in nature for water-limited ecosystems. Previous research has demonstrated how the optimal vertical root profile depends on both the mean annual precipitation (MAP) and the soil texture. Recently, in the climate literature, it has been suggested Chou et al. (2012) [5] that increased greenhouse forcing in the tropics can lead to a simultaneous decrease in the frequency and increase in the intensity of precipitation. In this paper we demonstrate how such a change in the statistical structure of rainfall, even with no change to MAP, requires deeper root distributions to maintain optimal water use. These results raise interesting questions for future studies of nutrient dynamics, the cost of additional below ground carbon allocation, and inter plant functional type competition.

  1. A Wider Notion of the Scope of Water Services in EU Water LawBoosting Payment for Water-Related Ecosystem Services to Ensure Sustainable Water Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra E. Lindhout

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The services ecosystems on the Earth providing for mankind, like the provision of (clean water for drinking and other purposes, are under pressure. Payment for (water-related ecosystem services, incentive pricing policies and the recovery of service costs are instruments to attain a sustainable use of scarce environmental resources and ecosystems. Although the European Water Framework Directive (WFD, whose purpose explicitly includes striving for sustainable water use, includes an obligation to recover the costs of water services, the scope of application of this obligation depends on the width of the interpretation of 'water services' in the WFD. If 'water services' are interpreted broadly, the WFD embraces the concept of payment for water-related ecosystem services, but raises a number of questions that need to be addressed.

  2. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of groundwater contaminants to human health and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Rasmussen, Jes; Funder, Simon G.;

    2010-01-01

    for evaluating the impact of a TCE groundwater plume, located in an area with protected drinking water interests, to human health and surface water ecosystems. This is accomplished by coupling the system dynamicsbased decision support system CARO-Plus to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX via an analytical...

  3. Quantification of the surface brackish water layer and frontal zones in southern Chilean fjords between Boca del Guafo (43°30‧S) and Estero Elefantes (46°30‧S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, Carolina; Sobarzo, Marcus

    2011-03-01

    The southern Chilean region between the Boca del Guafo passage and Estero Elefantes contains one of the estuarine zones with the greatest freshwater influence on the planet. At the surface, plumes of freshwater from the fjord heads to their mouths, emptying into the Moraleda-Costa-Elefantes channel system and then the coastal ocean. The influence of this freshwater on the region's estuarine dynamics, coastal ecology, and biogeochemical processes has only recently begun to be elucidated. Using hydrographic data from the CIMAR-Fiordos cruises (1998-2001), this study quantifies the equivalent height of freshwater, emphasizing the role it plays in the potential energy anomaly and front locations, as well as its relationship with river discharges. Using a criterion of equivalent height of freshwater >15% (density Elefantes), with horizontal extensions on the order of 100 km. The limits of this layer tended to coincide with frontal zones having potential energy anomaly gradients >0.005 J/m 4. The frontal zones were located in the extreme southeast of Jacaf Channel, at the head of Ventisquero Sound, in the central part of the Puyuguapi and Moraleda channels, and at the head and mouth of Aysén Fjord. The equivalent height of freshwater and potential energy anomaly showed a good correlation with the accumulated (5-day) river discharges ( r2=0.87), which were greatest toward the fjord heads in spring. The brackish surface water had short residence times (3.5 days) in Aysen Fjord, unlike the deep layer, which other authors report to have a longer residence time (near 1 year).

  4. Energy and Water Fluxes in Heterogeneous Mediterranean Water-limited Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detto, M.; Katul, G.; Mancini, M.

    2005-12-01

    Research efforts in distributed eco-hydrologic models often fall in one of two categories: prognostic, in which predictions of root-zone soil moisture content and land surface fluxes is required for a projected radiative and precipitation forcing time series, or diagnostic in which the relationship between soil water status and atmospheric water vapor demand is to be derived for the various components of the landscape. The latter relationships are now receiving broad attention in climate change, hydrological, and ecological studies of arid and semi-arid ecosystems. This interest is now a central focus given the recognition that the component latent heat flux sensitivity to soil moisture decline can directly impact plant productivity, carbon and nutrient cycling, and ground water recharge. With projected shifts in precipitation statistics, mainly towards increased desertification, the "stability" of these ecosystems is highly dependent on their ability to uptake water at low soil moisture Here, we determine the relationship between soil water status and atmospheric water vapor demand for patchy landscapes within a semi-arid ecosystems using a combination remote sensing products and field experiments. In particular, we investigate how VIS/NIR measurements, in conjunction with standard micrometeorological data and ground based thermal infrared thermometers, provide "diagnostic" hydrologic relationship between soil water content and potential evapo-transpiration for the various components of the landscape. These experiments were conducted in the Orroli site, situated in the mid-west of Sardinia (Italy) within the Flumendosa river watershed, which is considered one of the most important water supply resources to the island. The landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types: trees, including wild olives (/Olea sylvestris/) and cork oaks (/Quercus suber/), different shrubs (/Asparagus acutifolius, Rubus ulmifolius/) and herbaceous species (/Asphodelus

  5. Metallic Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems: Water of OumerRbiariver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Asfers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study comes after a series of studies evaluating the quality of OumEr-Rbia river(1-4, the choice of this ecosystem is determined by the socioeconomic importance of this river and the high pollutant caused by the agglomeration and industrial units distributed through the banks and tributaries. Their rejects in the watercourses of OumEr-Rbia can modify the quality of the water and prevent the development of socioeconomic activities. In our study we have focused to evaluate the contamination degree by toxic metals Zn, Co,Cr, Al by the mesure of their amount in different stations in two companions. The result show that the stations S4, S8 and S9 of OumEr-Rbiariver are contaminated by cobalt, then, in the S4, the manganese amount exceeds the Moroccan standard values in this metal intended for the irrigation. However, the measure of Cr Zn and Al show that are favorable for the irrigation

  6. Placing ecosystem services at the heart of urban water systems management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, X; Barceló, D; Comas, J; Corominas, Ll; Hadjimichael, A; Page, T J; Acuña, V

    2016-09-01

    Current approaches have failed to deliver a truly integrated management of the different elements of the urban water system, such as freshwater ecosystems, drinking water treatment plants, distribution networks, sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants. Because the different parts of urban water have not been well integrated, poor decisions have been made for society in general, leading to the misuse of water resources, the degradation of freshwater ecosystems and increased overall treatment costs. Some attempts to solve environmental issues have adopted the ecosystem services concept in a more integrated approach, however this has rarely strayed far away from pure policy, and has made little impact in on-the-ground operational matters. Here, we present an improved decision-making framework to integrate the management of urban water systems. This framework uses the ecosystem service concept in a practical way to make a better use of both financial and water resources, while continuing to preserve the environment.

  7. Linking water quality and quantity in environmental flow assessment in deteriorated ecosystems: a food web view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Ma, Lekuan; Guo, Wei; Yang, Ying; Guo, Tong; Feng, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Most rivers worldwide are highly regulated by anthropogenic activities through flow regulation and water pollution. Environmental flow regulation is used to reduce the effects of anthropogenic activities on aquatic ecosystems. Formulating flow alteration-ecological response relationships is a key factor in environmental flow assessment. Traditional environmental flow models are characterized by natural relationships between flow regimes and ecosystem factors. However, food webs are often altered from natural states, which disturb environmental flow assessment in such ecosystems. In ecosystems deteriorated by heavy anthropogenic activities, the effects of environmental flow regulation on species are difficult to assess with current modeling approaches. Environmental flow management compels the development of tools that link flow regimes and food webs in an ecosystem. Food web approaches are more suitable for the task because they are more adaptive for disordered multiple species in a food web deteriorated by anthropogenic activities. This paper presents a global method of environmental flow assessment in deteriorated aquatic ecosystems. Linkages between flow regimes and food web dynamics are modeled by incorporating multiple species into an ecosystem to explore ecosystem-based environmental flow management. The approach allows scientists and water resources managers to analyze environmental flows in deteriorated ecosystems in an ecosystem-based way.

  8. How is water-use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems distributed and changing on Earth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Xuguang; Li, Hengpeng; Desai, Ankur R.

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of ecosystem water-use efficiency (WUE) will help us improve ecosystem management for mitigation as well as adaption to global hydrological change. Here, long-term flux tower observations of productivity and evapotranspiration allow us to detect a consistent latitudinal tre...

  9. Temporal and among-site variability of inherent water use efficiency at the ecosystem level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, C.; Ciais, P.; Reichstein, M.; Baldocchi, D.; Law, B.E.; Papale, D.; Soussana, J.F.; Ammann, C.; Buchmann, N.; Frank, D.; Gianelle, D.; Janssens, I.A.; Knohl, A.; Kostner, B.; Moors, E.J.; Roupsard, O.; Verbeeck, H.; Vesala, T.; Williams, C.A.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2009-01-01

    Half-hourly measurements of the net exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere provide estimates of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) at the ecosystem level and on daily to annual timescales. The ratio of these quantities re

  10. Study on Soil and Water Conservation Benefit Models of Grassland Ecosystem-A Case Study on Jianou Mountain Grassland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Lian-qi; WANG Yu-biao; ZHAO Qing-liang

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the mechanism of grassland ecosystem's soil and water conservation function on the basis of two years experiment and inspection in Jianou mountain grassland ecosystem experiment station, Fujian province. After analysis on the data of soil erosion and runoff coefficient, relations between eroded soil. runoff and slope gradient, we establish soil and water conservation benefit models. According to the models, experiment and inspection results, some proposals have been made to decrease the area of soil erosion in Fujian mountainous areas, e. g. , optimizing land use structure in mountainous areas, taking suitable measures for local condition, closing hills for grassland development, accelerating restoration and raising quality of mountain grassland ecosystem, strengthening scientific and technological input, breeding the grass species that are suitable to local physical geographic condition.

  11. Reducing the environmental impacts of reverse osmosis desalination by using brackish groundwater resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ivan; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo Rodríguez

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to find out whether or not, and to what extent, the environmental impacts of reverse osmosis desalination are reduced when brackish groundwater is used instead of sea water. In order to answer this question, the Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is used, and two water production plants are compared. The brackish groundwater scenario is based on a plant located in Almería (southern Spain), while the sea water scenario is based on literature data. Four impact categories and two environmental indicators, one of them related to brine discharge, are included. The results show that the key life-cycle issue of brackish groundwater desalination is electricity consumption, and since this is substantially reduced with regard to using sea water, the life-cycle impacts are found to be almost 50% lower. An uncertainty analysis based on Monte-Carlo simulation shows that these environmental savings are significant for all impact categories. Potential local impacts provoked by brine discharge are also found to be lower, due to a reduced content of salts. It is concluded that, when and wherever possible, exploitation of brackish groundwater resources should be assigned priority to sea water resources as an input for reverse osmosis desalination, although it must be taken into account that groundwater, as opposed to sea water, is a limited resource.

  12. Can payments for ecosystem services secure the water tower of Tibet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immerzeel, W.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Antle, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibet can be considered as the water tower of Asia and the protection of its water resources crucial. We show that a minimum data approach to model the supply of ecosystem services can potentially be applied to water conservation in Tibet. The approach integrates the spatial heterogeneity of the bio

  13. Desalination of brackish groundwater by direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, D Y; Wang, J; Qu, D; Luan, Z K; Zhao, C W; Ren, X J

    2010-01-01

    The direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) applied for desalination of brackish groundwater with self-made polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes was presented in the paper. The PVDF membrane exhibited high rejection of non-volatile inorganic salt solutes and a maximum permeate flux 24.5 kg m(-2) h(-1) was obtained with feed temperature at 70 degrees C. The DCMD experimental results indicated that the feed concentration had no significant influence on the permeate flux and the rejection of solute. When natural groundwater was used directly as the feed, the precipitation of CaCO(3) would be formed and clog the hollow fibre inlets with gradual concentration of the feed, which resulted in a rapid decline of the module efficiency. The negative influence of scaling could be eliminated by acidification of the feed. Finally, a 250 h DCMD continuous desalination experiment of acidified groundwater with the concentration factor at constant 4.0 was carried out. The permeate flux kept stable and the permeate conductivity was less than 7.0 microS cm(-1) during this process. Furthermore, there was no deposit observed on the membrane surface. All of these demonstrated that DCMD could be efficiently used for production of high-quality potable water from brackish groundwater with water recovery as high as 75%.

  14. The Function and Value of Water Conservation of Forest Ecosystem in Gongbo Nature Reserve of Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Gongbo Nature Reserve, located in Nyingchi of Tibet, is by far the largest construction project of forest reserves that China approves and invests in. This article adopts the shadow project method, and estimates the water conservation function of forest ecosystem of Gongbo Nature Reserve based on the Specifications for Assessment of Forest Ecosystem Services in China promulgated by State Forestry Administration of China. The results show that the total value of water conservation of forest ecosystem in Gongbo Nature Reserve is 8.485 billion yuan, while the function of water conservation is a small fraction of ecological service function, indicating that there is great ecological value in service function of forest ecosystem in Gongbo Nature Reserve, that is, Gongbo Nature Reserve has vital ecological value.

  15. Quality Evaluation and Its Application to Surface Water Ecosystem Based on Maximum Flux Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘年磊; 毛国柱; 赵林

    2010-01-01

    Based on the maximum flux principle(MFP),a water quality evaluation model for surface water ecosystem is presented by using self-organization map(SOM) neural network simulation algorithm from the aspect of systematic structural evolution.This evaluation model is applied to the case of surface water ecosystem in Xindu District of Chengdu City in China.The values reflecting the water quality of five cross-sections of the system at different developing stages are obtained,with stable values of 1.438,2.952,1.86...

  16. 微咸水膜下滴灌对土壤和棉花元素组成及产量的影响%Influence of Mulched Drip-Irrigation with Brackish Water on Element Composition of Soil,Cotton,and Cotton Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄金瓯; 靳孟贵; 栗现文

    2014-01-01

    Irrigation with brackish water has a long history throughout the world.Irrational use of brackish or saline waters, however,may lead to soil salinization and reduction of crop yields.In order to promote reasonable applications of brackish wa-ter and fertilizer irrigation,a series of experiments of mulched drip-irrigation with brackish and fresh waters were carried out at Bazhou Irrigation Experimental Station (Korla,Xinjiang,China).Plant and soil samples were collected at every growth stage. Cotton yields were measured at boll opening stage.Nine elements (Ca,Na,Mg,K,Cu,Fe,Mn,Zn and B)of each sample were tested in triplicate by ICP-OES (ICAP6300)after pretreated.The influence of water quality on the element compositions of soil and cotton and cotton yield were discussed based on the experiment.The results show that growth rate of Na+ in narrow rows and interspace of mulches was lower than that in wide rows because of higher content of Cu,Fe,Zn.The ratios of K+/Na+ and Ca2+/Na+ ,however,in most cotton organs show no significant differences between the two treatments.From buds to boll stages,brackish water irrigation enhanced the accumulation of above ground dry matters,which was favorable for vege-tative development.From boll to boll opening stages,root and reproductive growth under brackish water were superior to that for fresh water.Furthermore,dry matters,boll weight,numbers of boll per unit area and cotton yield under brackish water were higher than those for fresh water.According to the correlations analyses,relationship between most trace and macro ele-ments was weak.High correlations,however,were found among manganese,boron,and calcium.Within a certain threshold, boron,manganese promoted the absorption of calcium in cotton.It has been proved that a rational use of brackish water will not lead to the growth stress.On the contrary,it would not only lower the growth rate of Na+ in the soil effectively,but also strengthen cotton’s resistibility to salt stress

  17. Linking water quality and well-being for improved assessment and valuation of ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Bonnie L; Polasky, Stephen; Brauman, Kate A; Johnson, Kris A; Finlay, Jacques C; O'Neill, Ann; Kovacs, Kent; Dalzell, Brent

    2012-11-06

    Despite broad recognition of the value of the goods and services provided by nature, existing tools for assessing and valuing ecosystem services often fall short of the needs and expectations of decision makers. Here we address one of the most important missing components in the current ecosystem services toolbox: a comprehensive and generalizable framework for describing and valuing water quality-related services. Water quality is often misrepresented as a final ecosystem service. We argue that it is actually an important contributor to many different services, from recreation to human health. We present a valuation approach for water quality-related services that is sensitive to different actions that affect water quality, identifies aquatic endpoints where the consequences of changing water quality on human well-being are realized, and recognizes the unique groups of beneficiaries affected by those changes. We describe the multiple biophysical and economic pathways that link actions to changes in water quality-related ecosystem goods and services and provide guidance to researchers interested in valuing these changes. Finally, we present a valuation template that integrates biophysical and economic models, links actions to changes in service provision and value estimates, and considers multiple sources of water quality-related ecosystem service values without double counting.

  18. Water ecosystem service function assessment based on eco-hydrological process in Luanhe Basin,China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Hao, C.; Qin, T.; Wang, G.; Weng, B.

    2012-12-01

    At present, ecological water are mainly occupied by a rapid development of social economic and population explosion, which seriously threat the ecological security and water security in watershed and regional scale. Due to the lack of a unified standard of measuring the benefit of water resource, social economic and ecosystem, the water allocation can't take place in social economic and ecosystem. The function which provided by water in terrestrial, aquatic and social economic system can be addressed through water ecosystem service function research, and it can guide the water allocation in water resource management. The function which provided by water in terrestrial, aquatic and social economic system can be addressed through water ecosystem service function research, and it can guide the water allocation in water resource management. Throughout the researches of water ecosystem service, a clear identification of the connection of water ecosystem service function has not been established, and eco-economic approach can't meet the practical requirement of water allocation. Based on "nature-artificiality" dual water cycle theory and eco-hydrological process, this paper proposes a connection and indicator system of water ecosystem service function. In approach, this paper establishes an integrated assessment approach through prototype observation technology, numerical simulation, physical simulation and modern geographic information technology. The core content is to couple an eco-hydrological model, which involves the key processes of distributed hydrological model (WEP), ecological model (CLM-DGVM), in terms of eco-hydrological process. This paper systematically evaluates the eco-hydrological process and evolution of Luanhe Basin in terms of precipitation, ET, runoff, groundwater, ecosystem's scale, form and distribution. According to the results of eco-hydrological process, this paper assesses the direct and derived service function. The result indicates that the

  19. Linking levels of societal and ecosystems metabolism of water in a Mediterranean watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, V.

    2014-12-01

    Water resources degradation is a complex environmental problem that involves multiple dimensions and scales of analysis. The Socio-Ecological Systems Water Metabolism has been proposed as a general holistic framework to deal with integrated analysis of water use sustainability (Madrid and Giampietro 2014). The innovation of the approach is that it sets the research focus beyond the classical supply-demand modeling to societal integrity and ecosystems integrity. To do so, it integrates quantitative grammars of water use (relating water exchange to societal and ecosystems organization) and qualitative methods (discourse analysis). This work presents the first case study focused at a river basin extent: the Upper Andarax, in South-East Spain. Water metabolism is indicated at multiple levels for ecosystems and society. To deal with the interfaces among them, relational indicators of water exploitation, water use and impact over ecosystems are used alongside policies and narratives analysis.While being a rather not intensively exploited river basin (year Water Exploitation Index~0.3 blue water,~0.15 green water), impacts over water bodies are yet important (periodic aquifer overdraft, biological degradation of the river) especially during dry season. Perceived mayor problems of water sustainability are generated by the not integration of different policies at European, national and regional scales: while the water authority establishes a compulsory reduction over water withdrawal to attend environmental flows, agricultural markets force to raise productivity increasing water demands. Adaptation strategies are divided among irrigation efficiency improvement and a reorientation of the economy towards touristic activities. Both of them entail specific trade-offs to be deemed. Aquifer-river interactions and climate change impacts are yet mayor research challenges.

  20. Study on the cumulative impact of reclamation activities on ecosystem health in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengcheng; Shi, Honghua; Zheng, Wei; Li, Fen; Peng, Shitao; Ding, Dewen

    2016-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop feasible tools to investigate the cumulative impact of reclamations on coastal ecosystem health, so that the strategies of ecosystem-based management can be applied in the coastal zone. An indicator system and model were proposed to assess the cumulative impact synthetically. Two coastal water bodies, namely Laizhou Bay (LZB) and Tianjin coastal waters (TCW), in the Bohai Sea of China were studied and compared, each in a different phase of reclamations. Case studies showed that the indicator scores of coastal ecosystem health in LZB and TCW were 0.75 and 0.68 out of 1.0, respectively. It can be concluded that coastal reclamations have a historically cumulative effect on benthic environment, whose degree is larger than that on aquatic environment. The ecosystem-based management of coastal reclamations should emphasize the spatially and industrially intensive layout.

  1. Water quality assessment of aquatic ecosystems using ecological criteria - case study in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damyanova, Sonya; Ivanova, Iliana; Ignatova, Nadka

    2014-11-02

    Four aquatic ecosystems (two rivers and two dams) situated in the western part of Bulgaria were investigated over a three years' period. The River Egulya and Petrohan dam are situated in mountainous regions at about 1000 m altitude, and are not influenced by any anthropogenic sources. Petrohan dam is a site for long-term ecosystem research as a part of Bulgarian long-term ecological research network. The other two systems belong to populated industrial areas. The River Martinovska flows through a region with former long-term mining activity, while Ogosta dam is near a battery production factory. Both the geochemical and geographical ecosystems' conditions are different, and their social usage as well. Ogosta dam water is used for irrigation and Petrohan dam for electric supply. The ecosystem sensitivity to heavy metals was evaluated by a critical load approach. Two criteria were used for risk assessment: critical load exceedance and microbial toxicity test. All studied ecosystems were more sensitive to cadmium than to lead deposition. The potential risk of Cd damage is higher for Petrohan dam and the River Egulya, where critical load exceedance was calculated for two years. Pseudomonas putida growth inhibition test detected a lack of toxicity for all studied ecosystems at the time of investigation with the exception of the low water September sample of the River Martinovska. The fast bacterial test is very suitable for a regular measurement of water toxicity because of its simplicity, lack of sophisticated equipment and clear results.

  2. Improved aquifer characterization and the optimization of the design of brackish groundwater desalination systems

    KAUST Repository

    Malivaa, Robert G.

    2011-07-01

    Many water scarce regions possess brackish-water resources that can be desalted to provide alternative water supplies. Brackish groundwater desalination by reverse osmosis (RO) is less expensive than seawater systems because of reduced energy and pretreatment requirements and lesser volumes of concentrate that require disposal. Development of brackish groundwater wellfields include the same hydraulic issues that affect conventional freshwater wellfields. Managing well interference and prevention of adverse impacts such as land subsidence are important concerns. RO systems are designed to treat water whose composition falls within a system-specific envelope of salinities and ion concentrations. A fundamental requirement for the design of brackish groundwater RO systems is prediction of the produced water chemistry at both the start of pumping and after 10-20 years of operation. Density-dependent solute-transport modeling is thus an integral component of the design of brackish groundwater RO systems. The accuracy of groundwater models is dependent upon the quality of the hydrogeological data upon which they are based. Key elements of the aquifer characterization are the determination of the three-dimensional distribution of salinity within the aquifer and the evaluation of aquifer heterogeneity with respect to hydraulic conductivity. It is necessary to know from where in a pumped aquifer (or aquifer zone) water is being produced and the contribution of vertical flow to the produced water. Unexpected, excessive vertical migration (up-coning) of waters that are more saline has adversely impacted some RO systems because the salinity of the water delivered to the system exceeded the system design parameters. Improved aquifer characterization is possible using advanced geophysical techniques, which can, in turn, lead to more accurate solute-transport models. Advanced borehole geophysical logs, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, were run as part of the exploratory test

  3. Water Quality Index for Assessment of Rudrasagar Lake Ecosystem, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyanta pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality of lakes, rivers and reservoirs in developing countries like India is being degraded because of the contaminated inflows and surrounding influence. There is a serious need for appropriate water quality monitoring for future planning and management of Lake and other type of water resources. Quality of water in Rudrasagar Lake, Tripura, India has been investigated in this paper. Water Quality Index (WQI was applied in Rudrasagar Lake India using water quality parameters like pH, Turbidity, Conductivity, Hardness, Alkalinity, Dissolved Oxygen, Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Nitrate. Based on the importance of the parameter for aquatic life the relative weight is assigned to each water quality parameter ranged from 1 to 4. Tests were performed on site using electronic measuring device as well as on Laboratory with samples of water collected from different locations of Rudrasagar Lake. It shows that water quality of Rudrasagar Lake falls within the ‗good water‘ category but marginally. Continuous monitoring of Rudrasagar lake is suggested for proper management.

  4. AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF WATER RESOURCES IN ARGES RIVER BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Diaconu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lotic ecosystems, part of the Natural Capital, is one of the key factors functioning of socio - economic development andtheir support. An important role in their sustainable development, is the retention and recycling of nutrients, especiallyN, P and their compounds. The nutrients in lotic and lentic ecosystems are either due to natural biochemical processesor by human impact of pollution or broadcast process and characterize the ecological status of water bodies and thuscan determine the quality of services provided. A special importance have agro-ecosystems, particularly multifunctionallivestock farms. Pathways by which pollutants (especially nutrients and pesticides, and other pollutants to reach bodiesof water are different (surface drainage, percolation, etc..To ensure sustainable development of water resources is necessary for agricultural development to take place in termsof minimizing waste streams and not affect the production and support of NC.

  5. Regime shifts in bistable water-stressed ecosystems due to amplification of stochastic rainfall patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Dentz, Marco; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-05-01

    We develop a framework that casts the point water-vegetation dynamics under stochastic rainfall forcing as a continuous-time random walk (CTRW), which yields an evolution equation for the joint probability density function (PDF) of soil-moisture and biomass. We find regime shifts in the steady-state PDF as a consequence of changes in the rainfall structure, which flips the relative strengths of the system attractors, even for the same mean precipitation. Through an effective potential, we quantify the impact of rainfall variability on ecosystem resilience and conclude that amplified rainfall regimes reduce the resilience of water-stressed ecosystems, even if the mean annual precipitation remains constant.

  6. Water quality assessment of aquatic ecosystems using ecological criteria – case study in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damyanova, Sonya; Ivanova, Iliana; Ignatova, Nadka

    2014-01-01

    Four aquatic ecosystems (two rivers and two dams) situated in the western part of Bulgaria were investigated over a three years’ period. The River Egulya and Petrohan dam are situated in mountainous regions at about 1000 m altitude, and are not influenced by any anthropogenic sources. Petrohan dam is a site for long-term ecosystem research as a part of Bulgarian long-term ecological research network. The other two systems belong to populated industrial areas. The River Martinovska flows through a region with former long-term mining activity, while Ogosta dam is near a battery production factory. Both the geochemical and geographical ecosystems’ conditions are different, and their social usage as well. Ogosta dam water is used for irrigation and Petrohan dam for electric supply. The ecosystem sensitivity to heavy metals was evaluated by a critical load approach. Two criteria were used for risk assessment: critical load exceedance and microbial toxicity test. All studied ecosystems were more sensitive to cadmium than to lead deposition. The potential risk of Cd damage is higher for Petrohan dam and the River Egulya, where critical load exceedance was calculated for two years. Pseudomonas putida growth inhibition test detected a lack of toxicity for all studied ecosystems at the time of investigation with the exception of the low water September sample of the River Martinovska. The fast bacterial test is very suitable for a regular measurement of water toxicity because of its simplicity, lack of sophisticated equipment and clear results. PMID:26019591

  7. Potential effects of organic carbon production on ecosystems and drinking water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of tidal wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta is an important component of the Ecosystem Restoration Program of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CALFED. CALFED is a collaborative effort among state and federal agencies to restore the ecological health and improve water management of the Delta and San Francisco Bay (Bay. Tidal wetland restoration is intended to provide valuable habitat for organisms and to improve ecosystem productivity through export of various forms of organic carbon, including both algae and plant detritus. However, the Delta also provides all or part of the drinking water for over 22 million Californians. In this context, increasing sources of organic carbon may be a problem because of the potential increase in the production of trihalomethanes and other disinfection by-products created during the process of water disinfection. This paper reviews the existing information about the roles of organic carbon in ecosystem function and drinking water quality in the Bay-Delta system, evaluates the potential for interaction, and considers major uncertainties and potential actions to reduce uncertainty. In the last 10 years, substantial progress has been made on the role of various forms of organic carbon in both ecosystem function and drinking water quality; however, interactions between the two have not been directly addressed. Several ongoing studies are beginning to address these interactions, and the results from these studies should reduce uncertainty and provide focus for further research.

  8. Benefits Evaluation of Water Resources Used for Ecosystem in Shiyang River Basin of Gansu Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xiaoling; KANG Shaozhong; LI Fusheng; ZHANG Lu; TONG Ling

    2009-01-01

    Among the numerous inland river basins in the arid northwest China, Shiyang River basin is known for its most serious water shortage that constrains its social and economic developments and for some of the worst eco-logical and environmental deterioration in China. The research on the value of water resources used for ecosystem is the basis for reasonable allocation of water resources between users of ecosystem and economic system. In this paper the concept of dynamic value for the ecosystem services is proposed. A modified coefficient for the ecosys-tem service value per unit area is proposed according to the cover degrees of biomes combined with expert consul-tation. Based on the developmental stage coefficient and scarcity of ecological resources, a dynamic evaluation method is proposed. The theoretical formula and simple calculation formula of the sharing benefits coefficient and benefits per unit ecological water utilization are proposed. The result shows that the benefit of unit ecological water utilization in the lower reach was greater than that in the upper reach in the Shiyang River basin.

  9. Water Use Efficiency of China's Terrestrial Ecosystems and Responses to Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Xiao, J.; Ju, W.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, S.; Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Yibo Liu1, 2, Jingfeng Xiao2, Weimin Ju3, Yanlian Zhou4, Shaoqiang Wang5, Xiaocui Wu31 Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Agricultural Meteorology, School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, 210044, China, 2Earth Systems Research Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA, 3 International Institute for Earth System Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China, 4 School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China, 5 Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China Water use efficiency (WUE) measures the trade-off between carbon gain and water loss of terrestrial ecosystems, and better understanding its dynamics and controlling factors is essential for predicting ecosystem responses to climate change. We assessed the magnitude, spatial patterns, and trends of WUE of China's terrestrial ecosystems and its responses to drought using a process-based ecosystem model. During the period from 2000 to 2011, the national average annual WUE (net primary productivity (NPP)/evapotranspiration (ET)) of China was 0.79 g C kg-1 H2O. Annual WUE decreased in the southern regions because of the decrease in NPP and increase in ET and increased in most northern regions mainly because of the increase in NPP. Droughts usually increased annual WUE in Northeast China and central Inner Mongolia but decreased annual WUE in central China. "Turning-points" were observed for southern China where moderate and extreme drought reduced annual WUE and severe drought slightly increased annual WUE. The cumulative lagged effect of drought on monthly WUE varied by region. Our findings have implications for ecosystem management and climate policy making. WUE is expected to continue to change under future climate

  10. Methane Dynamics of a Brackish-water Tidal Phragmites australis Marsh in the Minjiang River Estuary%闽江口半咸水芦苇潮汐沼泽湿地甲烷动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仝川; 黄佳芳; 王维奇; 廖稷; 刘泽雄; 曾从盛

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 and 2009, methane emission to the atmosphere was measured seasonally using an enclosed static chamber technique in the Minjiang River estuary, southeast China, a brackish-water tidal marsh dominated by P. australis. Measurements were taken at three tidal stages. Potential rates of methane production and oxidation from the marsh sediments were also estimated in situ in summer and winter using acetylene as a methane oxidation inhibitor. We devised a 'hanging' enclosed static chamber to measure methane transport and emission directly from single stems of P. australis on days of neap tide. Methane emission from the P. australis tidal marsh showed a seasonal variation in all the three tidal stages, and reached a maximum during the summer when soil temperature was relatively high. The ranges of methane flux were 0.69-40.95, 0.26-9.57 and 0.74-22.10 mg m-2 h-1 before the flood, during the flood/ebb and after the ebb respectively and the average methane fluxes were 7.53, 2.19 and 4.93 mg m-2 h-1, respectively. Methane production and oxidation potentials in summer were all higher than those in winter. Methane concentrations within the lacunal of the P. australis stems were the greatest at the base and decreased faster compared with stem height, which start at the stem base, and showed lower lacunal methane concentrations at daytime and higher lacunal methane concentrations at night-time. On an annual basis, the average methane transport and emission of a single P. australis culm was 33.67 μg·culm-1-h-1. These methane transport rates differed between growth stages, with the highest transport and emission detected within the stage of fastest plant growth. Nearly half (43.4%) of the whole plant transport and emission occurred from P. australis culms nearest the ground (0-20 cm above the ground). We estimated that plant-mediated methane transport contributed 2.3%-28.5% of the total methane emission within this P. australis-dominated marsh.%利用2008-2010年3年的

  11. Cross-scale impact of climate temporal variability on ecosystem water and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Athanasios; Fatichi, Simone; Katul, Gabriel G.; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.

    2015-09-01

    While the importance of ecosystem functioning is undisputed in the context of climate change and Earth system modeling, the role of short-scale temporal variability of hydrometeorological forcing (~1 h) on the related ecosystem processes remains to be fully understood. Various impacts of meteorological forcing variability on water and carbon fluxes across a range of scales are explored here using numerical simulations. Synthetic meteorological drivers that highlight dynamic features of the short temporal scale in series of precipitation, temperature, and radiation are constructed. These drivers force a mechanistic ecohydrological model that propagates information content into the dynamics of water and carbon fluxes for an ensemble of representative ecosystems. The focus of the analysis is on a cross-scale effect of the short-scale forcing variability on the modeled evapotranspiration and ecosystem carbon assimilation. Interannual variability of water and carbon fluxes is emphasized in the analysis. The main study inferences are summarized as follows: (a) short-scale variability of meteorological input does affect water and carbon fluxes across a wide range of time scales, spanning from the hourly to the annual and longer scales; (b) different ecosystems respond to the various characteristics of the short-scale variability of the climate forcing in various ways, depending on dominant factors limiting system productivity; (c) whenever short-scale variability of meteorological forcing influences primarily fast processes such as photosynthesis, its impact on the slow-scale variability of water and carbon fluxes is small; and (d) whenever short-scale variability of the meteorological forcing impacts slow processes such as movement and storage of water in the soil, the effects of the variability can propagate to annual and longer time scales.

  12. Quantifying energy and water fluxes in dry dune ecosystems of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, B. R.; Bartholomeus, R. P.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Witte, J. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal and inland dunes provide various ecosystem services that are related to groundwater, such as drinking water production and biodiversity. To manage groundwater in a sustainable manner, knowledge of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) for the various land covers in dunes is essential. Aiming at im

  13. INVENTORY OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECTS - PUBLISHED ON THE OFFICE OF WATER WEB PAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory working jointly with the Office of Water, has developed an Internet-accessible database of ecosystem restoration projects within the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) region. This article informs project owners of the i...

  14. Improving SWAT for simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Xuesong

    2016-10-01

    As a widely used watershed model for assessing impacts of anthropogenic and natural disturbances on water quantity and quality, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has not been extensively tested in simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems. Here, we examine SWAT simulations of evapotranspiration (ET), net primary productivity (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and plant biomass at ten AmeriFlux forest sites across the U.S. We identify unrealistic radiation use efficiency (Bio_E), large leaf to biomass fraction (Bio_LEAF), and missing phosphorus supply from parent material weathering as the primary causes for the inadequate performance of the default SWAT model in simulating forest dynamics. By further revising the relevant parameters and processes, SWAT’s performance is substantially improved. Based on the comparison between the improved SWAT simulations and flux tower observations, we discuss future research directions for further enhancing model parameterization and representation of water and carbon cycling for forests.

  15. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, Simon Goltermann; Finkel, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    management tools designed to work with sparse data sets from preliminary site assessments are needed which can explicitly link contaminant point sources with groundwater, surface water and ecological impacts. Here, a novel integrated modelling approach was employed for evaluating the impact of a TCE...... groundwater plume, located in an area with protected drinking water interests, to human health and surface water ecosystems. This is accomplished by coupling the system dynamics-based decision support system CARO-Plus to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX via an analytical volatilisation model for the stream...... of “effective” parameters in groundwater transport modelling. The initial modelling results indicate that TCE contaminant plumes with μgL-1 concentrations entering surface water systems do not pose a significant risk to either human or ecological receptors. The current work will be extended to additional...

  16. Gaining the necessary geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical understanding for additional brackish groundwater development, coastal San Diego, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    Local water agencies and the United States Geological Survey are using a combination of techniques to better understand the scant freshwater resources and the much more abundant brackish resources in coastal San Diego, California, USA. Techniques include installation of multiple-depth monitoring well sites; geologic and paleontological analysis of drill cuttings; geophysical logging to identify formations and possible seawater intrusion; sampling of pore-water obtained from cores; analysis of chemical constituents including trace elements and isotopes; and use of scoping models including a three-dimensional geologic framework model, rainfall-runoff model, regional groundwater flow model, and coastal density-dependent groundwater flow model. Results show that most fresh groundwater was recharged during the last glacial period and that the coastal aquifer has had recurring intrusions of fresh and saline water. These intrusions disguise the source, flowpaths, and history of ground water near the coast. The flow system includes a freshwater lens resting on brackish water; a 100-meter-thick flowtube of freshwater discharging under brackish estuarine water and above highly saline water; and broad areas of fine-grained coastal sediment filled with fairly uniform brackish water. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the recharged water flows through many kilometers of fractured crystalline rock before entering the narrow coastal aquifer.

  17. Effects of sulphuric acid and acidifying ammonium deposition on water quality and vegetation of simulated soft water ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurkes, J.A.A.R.; Heck, I.C.C; Hesen, P.L.G.M.; Leuven, R.S.E.W.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    1986-11-01

    In a greenhouse, seven identical mini-ecosystems, simulating soft water ponds, were exposed to different types of artificial rain water. The effects of rain water containing H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and nitrate, and rain water containing ammonium sulphate on water quality and vegetation were studied and compared. Causal relations were established between rain water quality, water chemistry and changes in floristic composition. Ammonium sulphate deposition, particularly, strongly affected water quality and vegetation development. Although ammonium sulphate deposition was only slightly acid, due to nitrification it acted as an important acid source, causing acidification to pH 3.8. Under acidified conditions, ammonium sulphate deposition led to a luxuriant growth of Juncus bulbosus and Agrostis canina. In the mini-ecosystems, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ deposition with a pH of 3.5 only decreased the pH of the water to 5.1 within 1 yr, the acidification of water appeared to be coupled with changes in alkalinity, sulphate, Al, Cd, Ca, Mg, K and inorganic-N. It is concluded that in NH/sub 3/-affected regions in The Netherlands, the high atmospheric deposition of ammonium sulphate probably contributes to a large extent in the acidification, eutrophication and floristic changes of oligotrophic soft waters. 10 references.

  18. Shifting species interactions in terrestrial dryland ecosystems under altered water availability and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluney, Kevin E.; Belnap, Jayne; Collins, Scott L.; González, Angélica L.; Hagen, Elizabeth M.; Holland, J. Nathaniel; Kotler, Burt P.; Maestre, Fernando T.; Smith, Stanley D.; Wolf, Blair O.

    2012-01-01

    Species interactions play key roles in linking the responses of populations, communities, and ecosystems to environmental change. For instance, species interactions are an important determinant of the complexity of changes in trophic biomass with variation in resources. Water resources are a major driver of terrestrial ecology and climate change is expected to greatly alter the distribution of this critical resource. While previous studies have documented strong effects of global environmental change on species interactions in general, responses can vary from region to region. Dryland ecosystems occupy more than one-third of the Earth's land mass, are greatly affected by changes in water availability, and are predicted to be hotspots of climate change. Thus, it is imperative to understand the effects of environmental change on these globally significant ecosystems. Here, we review studies of the responses of population-level plant-plant, plant-herbivore, and predator-prey interactions to changes in water availability in dryland environments in order to develop new hypotheses and predictions to guide future research. To help explain patterns of interaction outcomes, we developed a conceptual model that views interaction outcomes as shifting between (1) competition and facilitation (plant-plant), (2) herbivory, neutralism, or mutualism (plant-herbivore), or (3) neutralism and predation (predator-prey), as water availability crosses physiological, behavioural, or population-density thresholds. We link our conceptual model to hypothetical scenarios of current and future water availability to make testable predictions about the influence of changes in water availability on species interactions. We also examine potential implications of our conceptual model for the relative importance of top-down effects and the linearity of patterns of change in trophic biomass with changes in water availability. Finally, we highlight key research needs and some possible broader impacts

  19. Ligophorus spp. (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae) parasitizing mullets (Teleostei: Mugiliformes: Mugilidae) occurring in the fresh and brackish waters of the Shatt Al-Arab River and Estuary in southern Iraq, with the description of Ligophorus sagmarius sp. n. from the greenback mullet Chelon subviridis (Valenciennes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsky, Delane C; Khamees, Najim R; Ali, Atheer H

    2013-12-01

    The gills of three of five species of mullets (Teleostei: Mugiliformes: Mugilidae) collected from the brackish and fresh waters of southern Iraq were infected with species of Ligophorus (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae) as follows: greenback mullet Chelon subviridis (Valenciennes) infected with Ligophorus lebedevi Dmitrieva, Gerasev, Gibson, Pronkina and Galli, 2012, Ligophorus bantingensis Soo and Lim, 2012, Ligophorus sagmarius n. sp., and Ligophorus fluviatilis (Bychowsky, 1949) Dmitrieva, Gerasev, Gibson, Pronkina, and Galli, 2012; Klunzinger’s mullet Liza klunzingeri (Day) with L. bantingensis, L. fluviatilis, and an apparently undescribed species of Ligophorus; and abu mullet Liza abu (Heckel) with L. bantingensis and L. fluviatilis. The keeled mullet Liza carinata (Valenciennes) and Speigler’s mullet Valamugil speigleri (Bleeker) were uninfected. L. sagmarius n. sp. is described, and L. lebedevi and L. bantingensis are redescribed. Available specimens of L. fluviatilis and the undescribed species of Ligophorus from Klunzinger’s mullet were insufficient for description.

  20. Estimating annual rainfall threshold for establishment of tree species in water-limited ecosystems using tree-ring data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, B.C.; Holmgren, M.; Sabate, S.; Gracia, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid ecosystems, water availability is discontinuous, highly variable, and characterized by discrete pulse events separated by long periods of limited resource availability. Plant recruitment in these ecosystems is also episodic and dependent on the water available during and after

  1. Taking the "waste" out of "wastewater" for human water security and ecosystem sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Stanley B; Saphores, Jean-Daniel; Feldman, David L; Hamilton, Andrew J; Fletcher, Tim D; Cook, Perran L M; Stewardson, Michael; Sanders, Brett F; Levin, Lisa A; Ambrose, Richard F; Deletic, Ana; Brown, Rebekah; Jiang, Sunny C; Rosso, Diego; Cooper, William J; Marusic, Ivan

    2012-08-10

    Humans create vast quantities of wastewater through inefficiencies and poor management of water systems. The wasting of water poses sustainability challenges, depletes energy reserves, and undermines human water security and ecosystem health. Here we review emerging approaches for reusing wastewater and minimizing its generation. These complementary options make the most of scarce freshwater resources, serve the varying water needs of both developed and developing countries, and confer a variety of environmental benefits. Their widespread adoption will require changing how freshwater is sourced, used, managed, and priced.

  2. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2007-11-30

    Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

  3. Assessment of Ecosystem Water Conservation Value In The Beijing Four Seasons Flower Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiao-Na

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data of field investigation and multi-source data analysis, Beijing Four Seasons Flower Valley declared in 2008 towards valley economy water conservation function and value was estimated by means of rainfall storage capacity as well as ecological economy. The results showed that: Landscape structure of FSFV was forest land-cultivated land-grassland. FSFV had the highest water conservation function in Beijing valleys, with the capacity of 1101.13 m3/hm2. Annual total amount of water conservation was 31.20×106 m3, accounting for 10.07% of Beijing valleys, and the total value of water conservation was 3.61×108 Yuan. High water conservation capacity areas were mainly located in the eastern mountainous region with broadleaf forest centralized distribution. Low water conservation function areas were mainly occurred in the regions effected by human activities. Forest ecosystem had the highest capacity of water conservation of 1116 m3/hm2, while construction ecosystem had the lowest. Higher degree of human activities, lower capacity of water conservation. Shrub forest and broadleaf forest had the largest contribution on valley water conservation, with contribution rate of 36.35% and 35.62%. Ranking of water conservation capacity, broadleaf forest had the highest value of 1135 m3/hm2, followed by coniferous forest, shrub forest and mixed forest.

  4. [Measuring water ecological carrying capacity with the ecosystem-service-based ecological footprint (ESEF) method: Theory, models and application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Wen-jun; Min, Qing-wen; Li, Wen-hua; Fuller, Anthony M

    2015-04-01

    Integrated watershed management based on aquatic ecosystems has been increasingly acknowledged. Such a change in the philosophy of water environment management requires recognizing the carrying capacity of aquatic ecosystems for human society from a more general perspective. The concept of the water ecological carrying capacity is therefore put forward, which considers both water resources and water environment, connects socio-economic development to aquatic ecosystems and provides strong support for integrated watershed management. In this paper, the authors proposed an ESEF-based measure of water ecological carrying capacity and constructed ESEF-based models of water ecological footprint and capacity, aiming to evaluate water ecological carrying capacity with footprint methods. A regional model of Taihu Lake Basin was constructed and applied to evaluate the water ecological carrying capacity in Changzhou City which located in the upper reaches of the basin. Results showed that human demand for water ecosystem services in this city had exceeded the supply capacity of local aquatic ecosystems and the significant gap between demand and supply had jeopardized the sustainability of local aquatic ecosystems. Considering aqua-product provision, water supply and pollutant absorption in an integrated way, the scale of population and economy aquatic ecosystems in Changzhou could bear only 54% of the current status.

  5. Reactive transport impacts on recovered freshwater quality during multiple partially penetrating wells (MPPW-)ASR in a brackish heterogeneous aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Koen G.; Hartog, Niels; Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of multiple partially penetrating wells (MPPW) during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) in brackish aquifers can significantly improve the recovery efficiency (RE) of unmixed injected water. The water quality changes by reactive transport processes in a field MPPW-ASR system and their impac

  6. Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity. The GLOBAQUA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Acuña, Vicenç; Bellin, Alberto; Burek, Peter; Cassiani, Giorgio; Choukr-Allah, Redouane; Dolédec, Sylvain; Elosegi, Arturo; Ferrari, Federico; Ginebreda, Antoni; Grathwohl, Peter; Jones, Colin; Rault, Philippe Ker; Kok, Kasper; Koundouri, Phoebe; Ludwig, Ralf Peter; Merz, Ralf; Milacic, Radmila; Muñoz, Isabel; Nikulin, Grigory; Paniconi, Claudio; Paunović, Momir; Petrovic, Mira; Sabater, Laia; Sabaterb, Sergi; Skoulikidis, Nikolaos Th.; Slob, Adriaan; Teutsch, Georg; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts river ecosystems, threatens the services they provide, and it will force managers and policy-makers to change their current practices. The EU-FP7 project GLOBAQUA aims at identifying the prevalence, interaction and linkages between stressors, and to assess their effects on the chemical and ecological status of freshwater ecosystems in order to improve water management practice and policies. GLOBAQUA assembles a multidisciplinary team of 21 European plus 2 non-European scientific institutions, as well as water authorities and river basin managers. The project includes experts in hydrology, chemistry, biology, geomorphology, modelling, socio-economics, governance science, knowledge brokerage, and policy advocacy. GLOBAQUA studies six river basins (Ebro, Adige, Sava, Evrotas, Anglian and Souss Massa) affected by water scarcity, and aims to answer the following questions: how does water scarcity interact with other existing stressors in the study river basins? How will these interactions change according to the different scenarios of future global change? Which will be the foreseeable consequences for river ecosystems? How will these in turn affect the services the ecosystems provide? How should management and policies be adapted to minimise the ecological, economic and societal consequences? These questions will be approached by combining data-mining, field- and laboratory-based research, and modelling. Here, we outline the general structure of the project and the activities to be conducted within the fourteen work-packages of GLOBAQUA. PMID:25005236

  7. Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity. The GLOBAQUA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Acuña, Vicenç; Bellin, Alberto; Burek, Peter; Cassiani, Giorgio; Choukr-Allah, Redouane; Dolédec, Sylvain; Elosegi, Arturo; Ferrari, Federico; Ginebreda, Antoni; Grathwohl, Peter; Jones, Colin; Rault, Philippe Ker; Kok, Kasper; Koundouri, Phoebe; Ludwig, Ralf Peter; Merz, Ralf; Milacic, Radmila; Muñoz, Isabel; Nikulin, Grigory; Paniconi, Claudio; Paunović, Momir; Petrovic, Mira; Sabater, Laia; Sabaterb, Sergi; Skoulikidis, Nikolaos Th; Slob, Adriaan; Teutsch, Georg; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-15

    Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts river ecosystems, threatens the services they provide, and it will force managers and policy-makers to change their current practices. The EU-FP7 project GLOBAQUA aims at identifying the prevalence, interaction and linkages between stressors, and to assess their effects on the chemical and ecological status of freshwater ecosystems in order to improve water management practice and policies. GLOBAQUA assembles a multidisciplinary team of 21 European plus 2 non-European scientific institutions, as well as water authorities and river basin managers. The project includes experts in hydrology, chemistry, biology, geomorphology, modelling, socio-economics, governance science, knowledge brokerage, and policy advocacy. GLOBAQUA studies six river basins (Ebro, Adige, Sava, Evrotas, Anglian and Souss Massa) affected by water scarcity, and aims to answer the following questions: how does water scarcity interact with other existing stressors in the study river basins? How will these interactions change according to the different scenarios of future global change? Which will be the foreseeable consequences for river ecosystems? How will these in turn affect the services the ecosystems provide? How should management and policies be adapted to minimise the ecological, economic and societal consequences? These questions will be approached by combining data-mining, field- and laboratory-based research, and modelling. Here, we outline the general structure of the project and the activities to be conducted within the fourteen work-packages of GLOBAQUA.

  8. Role of canopy interception on water and nutrient cycling in Chinese fir plantation ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Wenxing; DENG Xiangwen; ZHAO Zhonghui

    2007-01-01

    The role of canopy interception on nutrient cycling in Chinese fir plantation ecosystem was studied on the basis of the position data during four years.Results indicate that the average canopy interception amount was 267.0 mm/year.Canopy interception play a significant role in water cycle and nutrient cycle processes in ecosystem,and was an important part of evaporation from the Chinese fir plantation ecosystem,being up to 27.2%.The evaporation from the canopy interception was an important way of water output from ecosystem,up to 19.9%.The flush-eluviation of branches and leaves caused by canopy interception brought nutrient input of 143.629 kg/(hm2·year),which was 117.2% of the input 63.924kg/(hm2·year)from the atmospheric precipitation.The decreased amount of 80.1 mm precipitation input caused by canopy interception reduced the amount of rainfall into the stand surface and infiltration into the soil,reduced the output with runoff and drainage,and decreased nutrient loss through output water.Therefore,the additional preserve of nutrient by canopy interception was 8.664 kg/(hm2·year).

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions from a created brackish marsh in eastern North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Yo-Jin; Burchell, Michael R.; Krauss, Ken W.; Birgand, Francois; Broome, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Tidal marsh creation helps remediate global warming because tidal wetlands are especially proficient at sequestering carbon (C) in soils. However, greenhouse gas (GHG) losses can offset the climatic benefits gained from C storage depending on how these tidal marshes are constructed and managed. This study attempts to determine the GHG emissions from a 4–6 year old created brackish marsh, what environmental factors governed these emissions, and how the magnitude of the fluxes relates to other wetland ecosystems. The static flux chamber method was used to measure GHG fluxes across three distinct plant zones segregated by elevation. The major of soil GHG fluxes from the marsh were from CO2 (−48–192 mg C m-2 h-1), although it was near the lower end of values reported from other wetland types having lower salinities, and would mostly be offset by photosynthetic uptake in this created brackish marsh. Methane flux was also low (−0.33–0.86 mg C m-2 h-1), likely inhibited by the high soil SO42−and soil redox potentials poised above −150 mV in this in this created brackish marsh environment. Low N2O flux (−0.11–0.10 mg N m-2 h-1) was due to low soil NO3− and soil redox conditions favoring complete denitrification. GHG fluxes from this created brackish marsh were generally lower than those recorded from natural marshes, suggesting that C sequestration may not be offset by the radiative forcing from soil GHG emissions if projects are designed properly.

  10. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most

  11. Cut off from supplies - sulfate exhaustion and implications for methane emissions in a brackish rewetted peatland after separation from the coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Liu, Bo; Schmiedinger, Iris; Spitzy, Alejandro; Köhler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Gehre, Matthias; Sachs, Torsten; Böttcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coastal ecosystems are at the interface between marine and freshwater and exhibit a special geochemistry. We investigate the S and C geochemistry of a coastal, degraded fen peatland. The site has been cut off from the Baltic Sea since 1995 and was rewetted with freshwater from the surrounding catchment in 2010. Despite of locally high pore water sulfate (SO42-) concentrations, the fen turned into a strong source for methane (CH4) with annual budgets up to 0.26±0.06 kg m-2 (Hahn et al. 2015). To reconcile this apparent contradiction we use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, SO42-, pyrite, dissolved carbon, and CH4 (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) along a transect with increasing distance to the Baltic coastline (300-1500 m). The current peatland geochemistry is characterized by a combination of relict signals reflecting former brackish water intrusion events and indicators of recent human activities such as internal eutrophication and increasing freshwater contribution. The shallow peat layer (depth mostly ≤ 55 cm) exhibited a pronounced vertical gradient with a freshwater-front lying on top of the brackish water layer. S geochemistry was decoupled from present brackish water distribution as marine SO42- was almost completely biotically reduced and converted to pyrite. The remaining pore water SO42- pool was remarkably 34S-enriched in relation to Baltic Sea SO42- (up to +86.4 and +21‰, respectively) and also δ34S-values of pyrite were comparatively high (+4.8‰), thereby demonstrating a distinct reservoir effect under closed-system conditions. However, one of the profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic Sea coast line exhibited a contrasting S pattern with pronounced excess of isotopically lighter SO42- at depth (up to 32.8 mM and +22.7‰). We hypothesize, that local groundwater seeps might provide electron acceptors such as NO3- for the contemporary oxidation of pyrite. δ13C in DIC exhibited a pronounced vertical shift from -23.9

  12. Managing Forests for Water in the Anthropocene—The Best Kept Secret Services of Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena F. Creed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water and forests are inextricably linked. Pressures on forests from population growth and climate change are increasing risks to forests and their aquatic ecosystem services (AES. There is a need to incorporate AES in forest management but there is considerable uncertainty about how to do so. Approaches that manage forest ecosystem services such as fiber, water and carbon sequestration independently ignore the inherent complexities of ecosystem services and their responses to management actions, with the potential for unintended consequences that are difficult to predict. The ISO 31000 Risk Management Standard is a standardized framework to assess risks to forest AES and to prioritize management strategies to manage risks within tolerable ranges. The framework consists of five steps: establishing the management context, identifying, analyzing, evaluating and treating the risks. Challenges to implementing the framework include the need for novel models and indicators to assess forest change and resilience, quantification of linkages between forest practice and AES, and the need for an integrated systems approach to assess cumulative effects and stressors on forest ecosystems and AES. In the face of recent international agreements to protect forests, there are emerging opportunities for international leadership to address these challenges in order to protect both forests and AES.

  13. Linkages Among Water Vapor Flows, Food Production, and Terrestrial Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Rockström

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Global freshwater assessments have not addressed the linkages among water vapor flows, agricultural food production, and terrestrial ecosystem services. We perform the first bottom-up estimate of continental water vapor flows, subdivided into the major terrestrial biomes, and arrive at a total continental water vapor flow of 70,000 km3/yr (ranging from 56,000 to 84,000 km3/yr. Of this flow, 90% is attributed to forests, including woodlands (40,000 km3/yr, wetlands (1400 km3/yr, grasslands (15,100 km3/yr, and croplands (6800 km3/yr. These terrestrial biomes sustain society with essential welfare-supporting ecosystem services, including food production. By analyzing the freshwater requirements of an increasing demand for food in the year 2025, we discover a critical trade-off between flows of water vapor for food production and for other welfare-supporting ecosystem services. To reduce the risk of unintentional welfare losses, this trade-off must become embedded in intentional ecohydrological landscape management.

  14. The increasing importance of atmospheric demand for ecosystem water and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Kimberly A.; Ficklin, Darren L.; Stoy, Paul C.; Williams, Christopher A.; Bohrer, Gil; Oishi, A. Christopher; Papuga, Shirley A.; Blanken, Peter D.; Noormets, Asko; Sulman, Benjamin N.; Scott, Russell L.; Wang, Lixin; Phillips, Richard P.

    2016-11-01

    Soil moisture supply and atmospheric demand for water independently limit--and profoundly affect--vegetation productivity and water use during periods of hydrologic stress. Disentangling the impact of these two drivers on ecosystem carbon and water cycling is difficult because they are often correlated, and experimental tools for manipulating atmospheric demand in the field are lacking. Consequently, the role of atmospheric demand is often not adequately factored into experiments or represented in models. Here we show that atmospheric demand limits surface conductance and evapotranspiration to a greater extent than soil moisture in many biomes, including mesic forests that are of particular importance to the terrestrial carbon sink. Further, using projections from ten general circulation models, we show that climate change will increase the importance of atmospheric constraints to carbon and water fluxes in all ecosystems. Consequently, atmospheric demand will become increasingly important for vegetation function, accounting for >70% of growing season limitation to surface conductance in mesic temperate forests. Our results suggest that failure to consider the limiting role of atmospheric demand in experimental designs, simulation models and land management strategies will lead to incorrect projections of ecosystem responses to future climate conditions.

  15. Coupling water table fluctuation to mercury speciation and transport in wetland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branfireun, B. A.; Mitchell, C. P.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrological processes exert a first-order control over both the conditions required for mercury methylation to occur, and the transport of methylmercury from sites of production. In the recent literature, evidence has been presented that a relationship exists between water level fluctuation and mercury levels in aquatic organisms. These observations have led to the conclusion that this fluctuation is stimulating mercury methylation in littoral sediments and wetland ecosystems through the creation of favourable biogeochemical conditions. Using data from a range of wetland ecosystems, and several experiments that subjected wetland soils to fluctuating water levels, a relationship between water table fluctuation frequency and methylmercury production will be presented. Experimental data show that longer frequency wetting and drying periods result in greater methylmercury production relative to a static or high frequency fluctuation. It was also found that mercury methylation processes in wetland soils are able to sustain elevated pore water concentrations over repeated wetting and draining events. These data suggest that methylmercury export from wetlands is likely limited by the degree of hydrological connectivity rather than biogeochemical processes, highlighting the need to better understand the nature of hydrological linkages among wetlands and adjacent ecosystems.

  16. Optimum Landscape Allocation of Conservation Practices for Water Quality and Ecosystem Service Valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Pennington, D.; Nelson, E.; Mulla, D.; Polasky, S.; Taff, S.

    2012-12-01

    This study links a spatially-explicit biophysical model (SWAT) with an economic model (InVEST) to identify the economically optimum allocation of conservation practices on the landscape. Combining biophysical and economic analysis allows assessment of the benefits and costs of alternative policy choices through consideration of direct costs and benefits as measured by market transactions as well as non-market benefits and costs from changes in environmental conditions that lead to changes in the provision of ecosystem services. When applied to an agricultural watershed located in South-Central Minnesota, this approach showed that: (1) some modest gains (20% improvement, relative to baseline conditions) in water quality can be achieved without diminishing current economic returns, but that (2) more dramatic reductions in sediment and phosphorus required to meet water quality goals (50% reductions in loadings) will require transitioning land from row crops into perennial vegetation. This shift in land cover will result in a reduction in economic returns unless non-market ecosystem services are also valued. Further results showed that traditional best management practices such as conservation tillage and reduced fertilizer application rates are not sufficient to achieve water quality goals by themselves. Finally, if crop prices drop to pre-2007 levels or valuation of ecosystem services increases, then achieving water quality goals can occur with less of an economic impact to the watershed.

  17. Interacting coastal based ecosystem services: recreation and water quality in Puget Sound, WA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Kreitler

    Full Text Available Coastal recreation and water quality are major contributors to human well-being in coastal regions. They can also interact, creating opportunities for ecosystem based management, ecological restoration, and water quality improvement that can positively affect people and the environment. Yet the effect of environmental quality on human behavior is often poorly quantified, but commonly assumed in coastal ecosystem service studies. To clarify this effect we investigate a water quality dataset for evidence that environmental condition partially explains variation in recreational visitation, our indicator of human behavior. In Puget Sound, WA, we investigate variation in visitation in both visitation rate and fixed effects (FE models. The visitation rate model relates the differences in annual recreational visitation among parks to environmental conditions, park characteristics, travel cost, and recreational demand. In our FE model we control for all time-invariant unobserved variables and compare monthly variation at the park level to determine how water quality affects visitation during the summer season. The results of our first model illustrate how visitation relates to various amenities and costs. In the FE analysis, monthly visitation was negatively related to water quality while controlling for monthly visitation trends. This indicates people are responding to changes in water quality, and an improvement would yield an increase in the value of recreation. Together, these results could help in prioritizing water quality improvements, could assist the creation of new parks or the modification of existing recreational infrastructure, and provide quantitative estimates for the expected benefits from potential changes in recreational visitation and water quality improvements. Our results also provide an example of how recreational visitation can be quantified and used in ecosystem service assessments.

  18. Managing aquatic ecosystems and water resources under multiple stress--an introduction to the MARS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Daniel; Carvalho, Laurence; Argillier, Christine; Beklioglu, Meryem; Borja, Angel; Cardoso, Ana Cristina; Duel, Harm; Ferreira, Teresa; Globevnik, Lidija; Hanganu, Jenica; Hellsten, Seppo; Jeppesen, Erik; Kodeš, Vit; Solheim, Anne Lyche; Nõges, Tiina; Ormerod, Steve; Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Schmutz, Stefan; Venohr, Markus; Birk, Sebastian

    2015-01-15

    Water resources globally are affected by a complex mixture of stressors resulting from a range of drivers, including urban and agricultural land use, hydropower generation and climate change. Understanding how stressors interfere and impact upon ecological status and ecosystem services is essential for developing effective River Basin Management Plans and shaping future environmental policy. This paper details the nature of these problems for Europe's water resources and the need to find solutions at a range of spatial scales. In terms of the latter, we describe the aims and approaches of the EU-funded project MARS (Managing Aquatic ecosystems and water Resources under multiple Stress) and the conceptual and analytical framework that it is adopting to provide this knowledge, understanding and tools needed to address multiple stressors. MARS is operating at three scales: At the water body scale, the mechanistic understanding of stressor interactions and their impact upon water resources, ecological status and ecosystem services will be examined through multi-factorial experiments and the analysis of long time-series. At the river basin scale, modelling and empirical approaches will be adopted to characterise relationships between multiple stressors and ecological responses, functions, services and water resources. The effects of future land use and mitigation scenarios in 16 European river basins will be assessed. At the European scale, large-scale spatial analysis will be carried out to identify the relationships amongst stress intensity, ecological status and service provision, with a special focus on large transboundary rivers, lakes and fish. The project will support managers and policy makers in the practical implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), of related legislation and of the Blueprint to Safeguard Europe's Water Resources by advising the 3rd River Basin Management Planning cycle, the revision of the WFD and by developing new tools for

  19. Water use strategies and ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in two highly seasonal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kolle

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We compare assimilation and respiration rates, and water use strategies in four divergent ecosystems located in cold-continental central Siberia and in semi-arid southern Africa. These seemingly unrelated systems have in common a harsh and highly seasonal environment with a very sharp transition between the dormant and the active season, and with vegetation facing dry air and soil conditions for at least part of the year. Moreover, the northern high latitudes and the semi-arid tropics will likely experience changes in key environmental parameters (e.g., air temperature and precipitation in the future; indeed, in some regions marked climate trends have already been observed over the last decade or so. The magnitude of instantaneous or daily assimilation and respiration rates, derived from one to two years of eddy covariance measurements in each of the four ecosystems, was not related to the growth environment. For instance, respiration rates were clearly highest in the two deciduous systems included in the analysis (a Mopane woodland in northern Botswana and a Downy birch forest in Siberia; >300 mmol m−2 d−1, while assimilation rates in the Mopane woodland were relatively similar to a Siberian Scots pine canopy for a large part of the active season (ca. 420 mmol m−2 d−1. Acknowledging the limited number of ecosystems compared here, these data nevertheless suggest that factors like vegetation type, canopy phenology or ecosystem age can override larger-scale climate differences in terms of their effects on carbon assimilation and respiration rates. By far the highest rates of assimilation were observed in Downy birch, an early successional species. These were achieved at a rather conservative water use, as indicated by relatively low levels of λ, the marginal water cost of plant carbon gain. Surprisingly, the Mopane woodland growing in the semi-arid environment had significantly higher values of λ. However, its water use strategy

  20. Water use strategies and ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in two highly seasonal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Veenendaal, E. M.; Best, C.; Timmermans, W.; Kolle, O.; Montagnani, L.; Shibistova, O.

    2006-09-01

    We compare assimilation and respiration rates, and water use strategies in four divergent ecosystems located in cold-continental central Siberia and in semi-arid southern Africa. These seemingly unrelated systems have in common a harsh and highly seasonal environment with a very sharp transition between the dormant and the active season, with vegetation facing dry air and soil conditions for at least part of the year. Moreover, the northern high latitudes and the semi-arid tropics will likely experience changes in key environmental parameters (e.g., air temperature and precipitation) in the future; indeed, in some regions marked climate trends have already been observed over the last decade or so. The magnitude of instantaneous or daily assimilation and respiration rates, derived from one to two years of eddy covariance measurements in each of the four ecosystems, was not related to the growth environment. For instance, respiration rates were clearly highest in the two deciduous systems included in the analysis (a Mopane woodland in northern Botswana and a Downy birch forest in Siberia; >300 mmol m-2 d-1), while assimilation rates in the Mopane woodland were relatively similar to a Siberian Scots pine canopy for a large part of the active season (ca. 420 mmol m-2 d-1). Acknowledging the limited number of ecosystems compared here, these data nevertheless demonstrate that factors like vegetation type, canopy phenology or ecosystem age can override larger-scale climate differences in terms of their effects on carbon assimilation and respiration rates. By far the highest rates of assimilation were observed in Downy birch, an early successional species. These were achieved at a rather conservative water use, as indicated by relatively low levels of λ, the marginal water cost of plant carbon gain. Surprisingly, the Mopane woodland growing in the semi-arid environment had significantly higher values of λ. However, its water use strategy included a very plastic response

  1. Earth Observation Based Assessment of the Water Production and Water Consumption of Nile Basin Agro-Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim G.M. Bastiaanssen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing competition for water resources requires a better understanding of flows, fluxes, stocks, and the services and benefits related to water consumption. This paper explains how public domain Earth Observation data based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Second Generation Meteosat (MSG, Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM and various altimeter measurements can be used to estimate net water production (rainfall (P > evapotranspiration (ET and net water consumption (ET > P of Nile Basin agro-ecosystems. Rainfall data from TRMM and the Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS-NET RainFall Estimates (RFE products were used in conjunction with actual evapotranspiration from the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop and ETLook models. Water flows laterally between net water production and net water consumption areas as a result of runoff and withdrawals. This lateral flow between the 15 sub-basins of the Nile was estimated, and partitioned into stream flow and non-stream flow using the discharge data. A series of essential water metrics necessary for successful integrated water management are explained and computed. Net water withdrawal estimates (natural and humanly instigated were assumed to be the difference between net rainfall (Pnet and actual evapotranspiration (ET and some first estimates of withdrawals—without flow meters—are provided. Groundwater-dependent ecosystems withdraw large volumes of groundwater, which exceed water withdrawals for the irrigation sector. There is a strong need for the development of more open-access Earth Observation databases, especially for information related to actual ET. The fluxes, flows and storage changes presented form the basis for a global framework to describe monthly and annual water accounts in ungauged river basins.

  2. Irrigation Strategies and Crop Breeding As Complementary Measures for Improved Water Management and Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, G.; Manzoni, S.; Weih, M.; Porporato, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The projected population growth and changes in climate and dietary habits will further increase the pressure on water resources globally. Within precision farming, a host of technical solutions has been developed to reduce water consumption for agricultural uses. Examples are the shift from scheduled to demand-based irrigation and the use of sophisticated water distribution techniques. The next frontier for a more sustainable agriculture is the combination of reduced water requirements with enhanced ecosystem services. Currently, staple grains are obtained from annuals crops. Enhanced ecosystem services could be obtained shifting from annual to perennial crops, obtained by means of targeted breeding. In fact, perennial plants, with their continuous soil cover and the higher allocation of resources to the below ground, contribute to the reduction of soil erosion, water and nutrient losses, while enhancing carbon sequestration in the root zone. We explore here the implications for water management at the field- to farm-scale of both improved irrigation methods and targeted breeding. A probabilistic description of the soil water balance and crop development is employed to quantify water requirements and yields and their inter-annual variability, as a function of rainfall patterns, soil and crop features. Optimal irrigation strategies are thus defined in terms of maximization of yield and minimization of required irrigation volumes and their inter-annual variability. The probabilistic model is parameterized based on an extensive meta-analysis of traits of co-generic annual and perennial species (including both selected and wild species) to explore the consequences for water requirements of shifting from annual to perennial crops under current and future climates. The larger and more developed roots of perennial crops may allow a better exploitation of soil water resources than annual species. At the same time, perennial crops may require adequate water supply for

  3. [Biodiversity in plankton, benthos, and fish communities, and ecosystems of fresh water bodies with various productivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, A F

    2001-01-01

    The species diversity of phyto- and zooplankton, benthic animals, and ichthyofauna was studied in continental water bodies that differ in type, geographic location, size, and productivity. The results showed that the number of species in the communities of aquatic organisms and in ecosystems depends on the area and volume of the water body and the level of plankton primary production. Corresponding relationships can be approximated by the equations of exponential and polymodal functions. The species number and biomass per unit area or volume proved to decrease the area or volume of the water body increased. The greatest number of heterotrophic species was observed in water bodies whose primary production approached 1400 kcal/m2 per year. It is proposed that the number of aquatic species in a body of water depends on the total area of the latter and the area of individual territories occupied by the representatives of certain species.

  4. Exploring industry specific social welfare maximizing rates of water pollution abatement in linked terrestrial and marine ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roebeling, P.C.; Hendrix, E.M.T.; Grieken, van M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Marine ecosystems are severely affected by water pollution originating from coastal catchments, while these ecosystems are of vital importance from an environmental as well as an economic perspective. To warrant sustainable economic development of coastal regions, we need to balance the marginal cos

  5. Water environments: anthropogenic pressures and ecosystem changes in the Atlantic drainage basins of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marcia; da Costa, Monica F; Mayorga, Maria Irles de O; Pinheiro, Patrícia R

    2004-02-01

    Densely occupied drainage basins and coastal zones in developing countries that are facing economic growth are likely to suffer from moderate to severe environmental impacts regarding different issues. The catchment basins draining towards the Atlantic coast from northeastern to southern Brazil include a wide range of climatic zones and diverse ecosystems. Within its borders lies the Atlantic rain forest, significant extensions of semiarid thorn forests (caatinga), vast tree and scrub woodlands (cerrado) and most of the 6670 km of the Brazilian coast and its marine ecosystems. In recent decades, human activities have increasingly advanced over these natural resources. Littoralization has imposed a burden on coastal habitats and communities. Most of the native vegetation of the cerrado and caatinga was removed and only 7% of the original Atlantic rainforest still exists. Estuaries, bays and coastal lagoons have been irreversibly damaged. Land uses, damming and water diversion have become the major driving forces for habitat loss and aquatic ecosystem modification. Regardless of the contrast between the drought-affected northeastern Brazil and the much more prosperous and industrialized southeastern/southern Brazil, the impacts on habitat and communities were found equally severe in both cases. Attempts to halt environmental degradation have not been effective. Instead of focusing on natural resources separately, it is suggested that more integrated environmental policies that focus on aquatic ecosystems integrity are introduced.

  6. Modelling carbon and water flows in terrestrial ecosystems in the boreal zone - examples from Oskarshamn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlberg, Louise [Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Stockholm (Sweden); Gu stafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    Carbon budgets and mean residence times were estimated in four hypothetical ecosystems. The greatest uncertainties in the estimations lie in the calculation of fluxes to and from the field layer. A parametrisation method based on multiple criteria, synthesising a wide range of empirical knowledge on ecosystem behaviour, proved to be useful both in the estimation of unknown parameters, to demonstrate model sensitivity, and to identify processes where our current knowledge is limited. The parameterizations derived from the study of the hypothetical systems were used to estimate site-specific carbon and water budgets for four ecosystems located within the Oskarshamn study-area. Measured soil respiration was used to calibrate the simulations. An analysis of the simulated carbon fluxes indicated that two of the ecosystems, namely the grassland and the spruce forest, were net sources of carbon dioxide, while the alder and the pine forest were net sinks of CO{sub 2}. In the former case, this was interpreted as a result of recent drainage of the organogenic soils and the concurrent increase in decomposition. The results from the study conformed rather well with results from a previous study on carbon budgets from the Oskarshamn study area.

  7. Integrated Assessment of the impact of Aqueous Contaminant Stressors on Surface Water Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Rasmussen, Jes J.; Kronvang, Brian

    2011-01-01

    be ruled out as a stressor on stream ecological conditions (Rasmussen et al., 2011). This study follows earlier work conducted on a Danish case study involving a TCE groundwater plume discharging into a small stream, located in an area with protected drinking water interests (McKnight et al., 2010...... ecosystems. Traditional approaches for managing aquatic resources have often failed to account for the potential effects of anthropogenic disturbances on biota. To fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive will be challenging, as it is difficult to successfully separate and evaluate all...

  8. Ecosystem Metabolism and Air-Water Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in High Arctic Wetland Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnherr, I.; Venkiteswaran, J.; St. Louis, V. L.; Emmerton, C.; Schiff, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater lakes and wetlands can be very productive systems on the Arctic landscape compared to terrestrial tundra ecosystems and provide valuable resources to many organisms, including waterfowl, fish and humans. Rates of ecosystem productivity dictate how much energy flows through food webs, impacting the abundance of higher-level organisms (e.g., fish), as well as the net carbon balance, which determines whether a particular ecosystem is a source or sink of carbon. Climate change is predicted to result in warmer temperatures, increased precipitation and permafrost melting in the Arctic and is already altering northern ecosystems at unprecedented rates; however, it is not known how freshwater systems are responding to these changes. To predict how freshwater systems will respond to complex environmental changes, it is necessary to understand the key processes, such as primary production and ecosystem respiration, that are driving these systems. We sampled wetland ponds (n=8) and lakes (n=2) on northern Ellesmere Island (81° N, Nunavut, Canada) during the open water season for a suite of biogeochemical parameters, including concentrations of dissolved gases (O2, CO2, CH4, N2O) as well as stable-isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC), dissolved oxygen (δ18O-DO), and water (δ18O-H2O). We will present rates of primary production and ecosystem respiration, modeled from the concentration and stable isotope ratios of DIC and DO, as well as air-water gas exchange of greenhouse gases in these high Arctic ponds and lakes. Preliminary results demonstrate that ecosystem metabolism in these ponds was high enough to result in significant deviations in the isotope ratios of DIC and DO from atmospheric equilibrium conditions. In other words ecosystem rates of primary production and respiration were faster than gas exchange even in these small, shallow, well-mixed ponds. Furthermore, primary production was elevated enough at all sites except Lake Hazen, a

  9. Sustainability of Water Resources in Arid Ecosystems: A View from Hei River Basin, China (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C.; Cheng, G.; Xiao, H.; Ma, R.

    2009-12-01

    The northwest of China is characterized by an arid climate and fragile ecosystems. With irrigated agriculture, the region is a prolific producer of cotton, wheat, and maize with some of the highest output per acre in the country. The region is also rich in ore deposits, with the reserves of numerous minerals ranked at or near the top in the country. However, the sustainability of irrigated agriculture and economic development in the region is threaten by severe eco-environmental problems resulting from both global changes and human activities, such as desertification, salinization, groundwater depletion, and dust storms. All these problems are a direct consequence of water scarcity. As global warming accelerates and rapid economic growth continues, the water shortage crisis is expected to worsen. To improve the bleak outlook for the health of ecosystem and environment in northwest China, the Chinese government has invested heavily in ecosystem restoration and watershed management in recent years. However, the effectiveness of such measures and actions depends on scientific understanding of the complex interplays among ecological, hydrological and socioeconomic factors. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of a major new research initiative supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China to study the integration of ecological principles, hydrological processes and socioeconomic considerations toward more sustainable exploitation of surface water and groundwater resources in the Hei River Basin in northwest China. The Hei River Basin is an inland watershed located at the center of the arid region in East Asia, stretching from Qilianshan Mountains in the south to the desert in the north bordering China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and Mongolia. The total area of Hei River Basin is approximately 130,000 km2. The research initiative builds on existing research infrastructure and ecohydrological data and seeks to reveal complex

  10. Ecosystem services and integrated water resource management: different paths to the same end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brian R; Spray, Christopher J

    2012-10-30

    The two concepts that presently dominate water resource research and management are the Global Water Partnership's (GWP, 2000) interpretation of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) and Ecosystem Services (ES) as interpreted by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA, 2005). Both concepts are subject to mounting criticism, with a significant number of critiques focusing on both their conceptual and methodological incompatibility with management and governance, what has come to be known as the 'implementation gap'. Emergent within the ES and IWRM literatures, then, are two parallel debates concerning the gap between conceptualisation and implementation. Our purpose for writing this review is to argue: 1) that IWRM and ES have evolved into nearly identical concepts, 2) that they face the same critical challenge of implementation, and 3) that, if those interested in water research and management are to have a positive impact on the sustainable utilisation of dwindling water resources, they must break the tendency to jump from concept to concept and confront the challenges that arise with implementation.

  11. [Spatial changes and sources of nitrate in Beijing urban ecosystem surface water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-wei; Zhang, Xin-yu; Ren, Yu-fen; Sun, Xiao-min; Wang, Xiao-ke; Wang, Sheng-zhong

    2012-08-01

    The spatial variation in nitrate-nitrogen (NO3- -N) concentrations in surface water of ten sampling sites in the Beijing urban ecosystem from Kunminghu Lake to Tonghui River were assessed using monitoring data from 2009 to 2010. Nitrogen sources were examined using a hydro-chemical method. The results showed that the average nitrate-N concentrations of surface water in the Beijing urban ecosystem ranged from 0.7-7.6 mg x L(-1), with concentrations at all sites affected by human activities to a varying degree. The nitrate-N concentrations in the Dongbianmen and Tonghui River located in the southeastern of Beijing ranged from 7.0-7.6 mg x L(-1) and were significantly higher than those in the upper reaches (P waste water, leakage from solid waste disposal and domestic wastewater mainly controlled nitrate distribution in the Beijing urban surface water. The results from this study suggest that surface water management should focus on downstream sites located in the southeastern region of Beijing such as the Dongbianmen and Tonghui River in the future.

  12. Total nitrogen concentrations in surface water of typical agro- and forest ecosystems in China, 2004-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Xu

    Full Text Available We assessed the total nitrogen (N concentrations of 28 still surface water (lake and pond, and 42 flowing surface water (river, monitoring sites under 29 typical terrestrial ecosystems of the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN using monitoring data collected between 2004 and 2009. The results showed that the median total N concentrations of still surface water were significantly higher in the agro- (1.5 mg · L(-1 and oasis agro- ecosystems (1.8 mg · L(-1 than in the forest ecosystems (1.0 mg · L(-1. This was also the case for flowing surface water, with total N concentrations of 2.4 mg · L(-1, 1.8 mg · L(-1 and 0.5 mg · L(-1 for the agro-, oasis agro- and forest ecosystems, respectively. In addition, more than 50% of the samples in agro- and oasis agro- ecosystems were seriously polluted (>1.0 mg · L(-1 by N. Spatial analysis showed that the total N concentrations in northern and northwestern regions were higher than those in the southern region for both still and flowing surface waters under agro- and oasis agro- ecosystems, with more than 50% of samples exceeding 1.0 mg · L(-1 (the Class III limit of the Chinese National Quality Standards for Surface Waters in surface water in the northern region. Nitrogen pollution in agro- ecosystems is mainly due to fertilizer applications, while the combination of fertilizer and irrigation exacerbates nitrogen pollution in oasis agro- ecosystems.

  13. Water demand for ecosystem protection in rivers with hyper-concentrated sediment-laden flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Huaming; LI Tianhong; NI Jinren; WANG Yudong

    2004-01-01

    Sediment transport is one of the main concerns in a river system with hyper-concentrated flows. Therefore, the water use for sediment transport must be considered in study on the water demand for river ecosystem. The conventional methods for calculating the Minimum Water Demand for River Ecosystem (MWDRE) are not appropriate for rivers with high sediment concentration. This paper studied the MWDRE in wet season, dry season and the whole year under different water-and-sediment conditions in the Lower Yellow River, which is regarded as a typical river with sediment-laden flows. The characteristics of MWDRE in the river are analyzed. Firstly,the water demand for sediment transport (WDST) is much larger than the demands for other riverine functions, the WDST accounts for the absolute majority of the MWDRE.Secondly, in wet season when the WDST is satisfied, not only most of the annual incoming sediment can be transported downstream, but also the water demands for other river functions can be satisfied automatically, so that the MWDRE in wet season is identical to the WDST. Thirdly, in dry season, when the WDST is satisfied, the water demands for other river functions can also be satisfied, but the low sediment transport efficiency results in significant waste of water resources. According to these characteristics and aiming at decreasing sediment deposition in the riverbed and improving the utilization efficiency of water resources, hydrological engineering works can be used to regulate or control flow and sediment so that the sediment incoming in dry season can be accumulated and be transported downstream intensively and thus efficiently in wet season.

  14. Diffuse radiation increases global ecosystem-level water-use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, A. M.; Reichstein, M.; Cescatti, A.; Knohl, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2012-12-01

    Current environmental changes lead not only to rising atmospheric CO2 levels and air temperature but also to changes in air pollution and thus the light quality of the solar radiation reaching the land-surface. While rising CO2 levels are thought to enhance photosynthesis and closure of stomata, thus leading to relative water savings, the effect of diffuse radiation on transpiration by plants is less clear. It has been speculated that the stimulation of photosynthesis by increased levels of diffuse light may be counteracted by higher transpiration and consequently water depletion and drought stress. Ultimately, in water co-limited systems, the overall effect of diffuse radiation will depend on the sensitivity of canopy transpiration versus photosynthesis to diffuse light, i.e. whether water-use efficiency changes with relative levels of diffuse light. Our study shows that water-use efficiency increases significantly with higher fractions of diffuse light. It uses the ecosystem-atmosphere gas-exchange observations obtained with the eddy covariance method at 29 flux tower sites. In contrast to previous global studies, the analysis is based directly on measurements of diffuse radiation. Its effect on water-use efficiency was derived by analyzing the multivariate response of carbon and water fluxes to radiation and air humidity using a purely empirical approach based on artificial neural networks. We infer that per unit change of diffuse fraction the water-use efficiency increases up to 40% depending on diffuse fraction levels and ecosystem type. Hence, in regions with increasing diffuse radiation positive effects on primary production are expected even under conditions where water is co-limiting productivity.

  15. Predicting tree water use and drought tolerance from leaf traits in the Los Angeles urban ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, G. P.; Scoffoni, C.; Sack, L.

    2013-12-01

    Urban green space provides a suite of valuable ecosystem services. In semiarid systems, like Los Angeles, trees rely primarily on irrigation water for transpiration. Managers may need to reduce irrigation associated with urban trees given climate change, urban expansion, and the steady decrease in available freshwater. While leaf and whole plant water relations have been extensively studied, we are only now gaining a detailed understanding of diverse leaf anatomical designs, and their use for predicting physiology and water use at landscape scale. For 50 diverse urban species, we quantified leaf anatomical and physiological traits important to tree drought tolerance and water use efficiency including turgor loss point, vein architecture, cellular anatomy, leaf mass per unit area, and petiole and leaf dimensions. We hypothesized detailed relationships to develop models relating leaf functional traits to tree water relations. These models provide key insights regarding the role of anatomical designs in leaf stress tolerance and water use efficiency. Additionally we predicted how traits measured at the leaf level would scale with existing data for individuals at the whole plant level. We tested our predictions by determining correlations between leaf level anatomical traits and drought tolerance. Additionally, we determined correlations between functional traits, physiology and water use, and the climate of origin for the urban species. Leaf level measurements will be valuable for rapid estimation of more difficult to measure whole plant water relations traits important at the landscape scale. The Los Angeles urban ecosystem can serve as a model for other semiarid system and provide more informed system wide water conservation strategies.

  16. Ecosystem Services Mapping for Sustainable Agricultural Water Management in California's Central Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matios, Edward; Burney, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Accurate information on agricultural water needs and withdrawals at appropriate spatial and temporal scales remains a key limitation to joint water and land management decision-making. We use InVEST ecosystem service mapping to estimate water yield and water consumption as functions of land use in Fresno County, a key farming region in California's Central Valley. Our calculations show that in recent years (2010-2015), the total annual water yield for the county has varied dramatically from ∼0.97 to 5.37 km(3) (all ±17%; 1 MAF ≈ 1.233 km(3)), while total annual water consumption has changed over a smaller range, from ∼3.37 to ∼3.98 km(3) (±20%). Almost all of the county's water consumption (∼96% of total use) takes place in Fresno's croplands, with discrepancy between local annual surface water yields and crop needs met by surface water allocations from outside the county and, to a much greater extent, private groundwater irrigation. Our estimates thus bound the amount of groundwater needed to supplement consumption each year (∼1.76 km(3) on average). These results, combined with trends away from field crops and toward orchards and vineyards, suggest that Fresno's land and water management have become increasingly disconnected in recent years, with the harvested area being less available as an adaptive margin to hydrological stress.

  17. Ecohydrology of managed ecosystems: Linking rainfall unpredictability, agronomic performance, and sustainable water use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Giulia; Porporato, Amilcare

    2014-05-01

    The field of ecohydrology, traditionally focusing on natural ecosystems, can offer the necessary quantitative tools to assess and compare the sustainability of agriculture across climates, soil types, crops, and irrigation strategies, including rainfall unpredictability. In particular, irrigation is one of the main strategies to enhance and stabilize agricultural productivity, but represents a cost in terms of often scarce water resources. Here, the sustainability of irrigated and rainfed agriculture is assessed by means of water productivity (defined as the ratio between yield and total supplied water), yields, water requirements, and their variability. These indicators are quantified using a probabilistic description of the soil water balance and crop development. Employing this framework, we interpret changes in water productivity as total water input is altered, in two staple crops (maize and wheat) grown under different soils, climates, and irrigation strategies. Climate change scenarios are explored by using the same approach and altering the rainfall statistics. For a given irrigation strategy, intermediate rainfall inputs leads to the highest variability in yield and irrigation water requirement - it is under these conditions that water management is most problematic. When considering the contrasting needs of limiting water requirements while ensuring adequate yields, micro-irrigation emerges as the most sustainable strategy at the field level, although consideration should be given to its profitability and long-term environmental implications.

  18. [Water and soil conservation function of typical plantation forest ecosystems in semi-arid region of Western Liaoning Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ping; Guo, Fang; Luo, Yue-Chu; Wei, Jing; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Gang

    2007-12-01

    From the aspects of surface runoff and soil erosion, this paper quantitatively studied the water and soil conservation function of five plantation forest ecosystems in semi-arid region of Western Liaoning Province. The results showed that various types of test plantation forest ecosystems were all able to reduce surface runoff and soil erosion effectively. In June - September, the monthly mean surface runoff coefficient of Pinus tabulaeformis forest ecosystem, P. tabulaeformis - Hippophae rhamnoides forest ecosystem, H. rhamnoides forest ecosystem, P. simonii forest ecosystem, and P. simonii - H. rhamnoides forest ecosystem was 10.1%, 6.5%, 2.3%, 8.6% and 5.3% of that of barren hill, respectively, and the soil erosion quantity was 2.65%, 0.96%, 0.15%, 2.32% and 0.69% of that of barren hill, respectively. Among the five forest ecosystems, H. rhamnoides forest ecosystem had the least surface runoff and soil erosion, being the best in water and soil conservation function.

  19. Science to Support Management of Receiving Waters in an Event-Driven Ecosystem: From Land to River to Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart E. Bunn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Managing receiving-water quality, ecosystem health and ecosystem service delivery is challenging in regions where extreme rainfall and runoff events occur episodically, confounding and often intensifying land-degradation impacts. We synthesize the approaches used in river, reservoir and coastal water management in the event-driven subtropics of Australia, and the scientific research underpinning them. Land-use change has placed the receiving waters of Moreton Bay, an internationally-significant coastal wetland, at risk of ecological degradation through increased nutrient and sediment loads. The event-driven climate exacerbates this issue, as the waterways and ultimately Moreton Bay receive large inputs of nutrients and sediment during events, well above those received throughout stable climatic periods. Research on the water quality and ecology of the region’s rivers and coastal waters has underpinned the development of a world-renowned monitoring program and, in combination with catchment-source tracing methods and modeling, has revealed the key mechanisms and management strategies by which receiving-water quality, ecosystem health and ecosystem services can be maintained and improved. These approaches provide a useful framework for management of water bodies in other regions driven by episodic events, or where novel stressors are involved (e.g., climate change, urbanization, to support sustained ecosystem service delivery and restoration of aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Global impacts of conversions from natural to agricultural ecosystems on water resources: Quantity versus quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B.R.; Jolly, I.; Sophocleous, M.; Zhang, L.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Past land use changes have greatly impacted global water resources, with often opposing effects on water quantity and quality. Increases in rain-fed cropland (460%) and pastureland (560%) during the past 300 years from forest and grasslands decreased evapotranspiration and increased recharge (two orders of magnitude) and streamflow (one order of magnitude). However, increased water quantity degraded water quality by mobilization of salts, salinization caused by shallow water tables, and fertilizer leaching into underlying aquifers that discharge to streams. Since the 1950s, irrigated agriculture has expanded globally by 174%, accounting for ???90% of global freshwater consumption. Irrigation based on surface water reduced streamflow and raised water tables resulting in waterlogging in many areas (China, India, and United States). Marked increases in groundwater-fed irrigation in the last few decades in these areas has lowered water tables (???1 m/yr) and reduced streamflow. Degradation of water quality in irrigated areas has resulted from processes similar to those in rain-fed agriculture: salt mobilization, salinization in waterlogged areas, and fertilizer leaching. Strategies for remediating water resource problems related to agriculture often have opposing effects on water quantity and quality. Long time lags (decades to centuries) between land use changes and system response (e.g., recharge, streamflow, and water quality), particularly in semiarid regions, mean that the full impact of land use changes has not been realized in many areas and remediation to reverse impacts will also take a long time. Future land use changes should consider potential impacts on water resources, particularly trade-offs between water, salt, and nutrient balances, to develop sustainable water resources to meet human and ecosystem needs. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Water quality assessment of Gautami — Godavari mangrove estuarine ecosystem of Andhra Pradesh, India during September 2001

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Tripathy; A K Ray; S Patra; V V Sarma

    2005-04-01

    Some chemical and biological parameters were analysed at sixteen stations in the mangrove ecosystem, of the neighbouring Gautami-Godavari (GG) river estuary and Kakinada (KKD) bay to understand the present status of water quality and the impact of external terrigenous inputs during southwest (SW) monsoon in the study areas. High concentrations of nutrients in the mangrove ecosystem compared to the bay and estuarine ecosystems reveal the importance of this zone as a source of nutrients to the adjacent coastal ecosystems. Low Si :N:P (29 : 4 : 1) ratios in these ecosystems are due to the enrichment of these nutrients through external anthropogenic inputs even after the utilization by phytoplankton in the biological cycle. The mean Chl /Chl and Chl /Chl ratios and high phaeopigments (Pp) concentrations compared to Chl and high ratios of Chl /Pp suggests the possibility of the potential growth of phytoplankton populations in lower light intensity and low turbulent areas of these mangrove ecosystems.

  2. [Aquatic ecosystem modelling approach: temperature and water quality models applied to Oualidia and Nador lagoons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrissi, J Lakhdar; Orbi, A; Hilmi, K; Zidane, F; Moncef, M

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an aquatic ecosystem and apply it on Moroccan lagoon systems. This model will keep us abreast of the yearly development of the main parameters that characterize these ecosystems while integrating all the data that have so far been acquired. Within this framework, a simulation model of the thermal system and a model of the water quality have been elaborated. These models, which have been simulated on the lagoon of Oualidia (North of Morocco) and validated on the lagoon of Nador (North West Mediterranean), permit to foresee the cycles of temperature of the surface and the parameters of the water quality (dissolved oxygen and biomass phytoplankton) by using meteorological information, specific features and in situ measurements in the studied sites. The elaborated model, called Zero-Dimensional, simulates the average conduct of the site during the time of variable states that are representatives of the studied ecosystem. This model will provide answers for the studied phenomena and is a work tool adequate for numerical simplicity.

  3. Water quality assessment of Gautami-Godavari mangrove estuarine ecosystem of Andhra Pradesh, India during September 2001

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripathy, S.C.; Ray, A.K.; Patra, S.; Sarma, V.V.

    Some chemical and biological parameters were analysed at sixteen stations in the mangrove ecosystem, of the neighbouring Gautami-Godavari (GG) river estuary and Kakinada (KKD) bay to understand the present status of water quality and the impact...

  4. Tropical organic soils ecosystems in relation to regional water resources in southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T. V.

    1982-01-01

    Tropical organic soils have functioned as natural sinks for carbon, nitrogen, slfur and other nutrients for the past 4000 years or more. Topographic evolution in peat swamp forests towards greater oligotrophy has concentrated storage of the limited nutrient stock in surface soils and biota. Tropical peat systems thus share common ecosystem characteristics with northern peat bogs and certain tropical oligotrophic forests. Organic matter accumulation and high cation-exchange-capacity limit nutrient exports from undisturbed organic soils, although nutrient retention declines with increasing eutrophy and wetland productivity. Peat swamps are subject to irreversible degradation if severely altered because disturbance of vegetation, surface peats and detritus can disrupt nuttrient cycles and reduce forest recovery capacity. Drainage also greatly increases exports of nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients and leads to downstream eutrophication and water quality degradation. Regional planning for clean water supplies must recognize the benefits provided by natural peatlands in balancing water supplies and regulating water chemistry.

  5. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, B.; Kim, Y.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Noone, D. C.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bible, K.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Still, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf-level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from three heights to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  6. Agricultural Best Management Practice Abundance and Location does not Influence Stream Ecosystem Function or Water Quality in the Summer Season

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) are tools commonly used to mitigate negative impacts of agriculture on water quality; however, the relationship between BMPs and aquatic ecological function is unknown. Our research goal was to determine the association between both stream ecosystem metabolism and water quality, and the abundance and location of four different BMPs in agricultural catchments. Dissolved oxygen was measured over a two-week period in mid-June and used to estimate ecosystem metabo...

  7. Hydrologic Modeling of Urbanizing Oregon Basins for Water-Related Ecosystem Service Assessment using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaris, A. M.; Chang, H.; Winfield, T.; Lambrinos, J.

    2012-12-01

    Since humans rely on nature for certain goods and services, there should be accurate economic representations for them. These goods and services are commonly called ecosystem services. Our research seeks to investigate how water-related ecosystem services - water yield, sediment retention, and nutrient retention, can be measured and quantified spatially, and explores how the issue of scale affects these measurements. The water model of the ecosystem service evaluation tool Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoff (InVEST) is being tested against the well-known, physically based model, SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) in the Yamhill and Tualatin basins, located in Oregon, USA. Both models are being used to assess the potential hydrologic changes that may result from climate and land use changes in the middle of the 21st century. We build a total of five sub-basin models representing an urban-rural gradient, and use SWAT-CUP for calibration. Our study area contains a mixture of forested, agricultural, and developed land, and the Tualatin River is a regulated river with one dam and four wastewater treatment plants. Fanno Creek is a highly developed subwatershed of Tualatin and has the best model results with an NSE = 0.87 and a % BIAS = -1.15 after calibration for simulating monthly hydrograph. Dairy Creek is a forested sub-basin of the Tualatin and has an NSE = 0.72 and a % BIAS = 0.29. The upstream Tualatin gage (Dilley) has good results with an NSE = 0.77 and a % BIAS = 2.50 after calibration. While the Dilley results are acceptable, the monthly hydrograph shows clear problems during the summer due to water releases from Hagg Lake and Barney reservoirs which are not included in the model at this time. Yamhill basin has an NSE = 0.80 and a % BIAS = -13.0. This basin is mostly agricultural land which utilizes water withdrawls for irrigation. This may account for the consistent over estimation of flow. Finally, the whole Tualatin River basin has an

  8. Plant responses, climate pivot points, and trade-offs in water-limited ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant species in dryland ecosystems are limited by water availability and may be vulnerable to increases in aridity. Methods are needed to monitor and assess the rate of change in plant abundance and composition in relation to climate, understand the potential for degradation in dryland ecosystems, and forecast future changes in plant species assemblages. I employ nearly a century of vegetation monitoring data from three North American deserts to demonstrate an approach to determine plant species responses to climate and critical points over a range of climatic conditions at which plant species shift from increases to decreases in abundance (climate pivot points). I assess these metrics from a site to regional scale and highlight how these indicators of plant performance can be modified by the physical and biotic environment. For example, shrubs were more responsive to drought and high temperatures on shallow soils with limited capacity to store water and fine-textured soils with slow percolation rates, whereas perennial grasses were more responsive to precipitation in sparse shrublands than in relatively dense grasslands and shrublands, where competition for water is likely more intense. The responses and associated climate pivot points of plant species aligned with their lifespan and structural characteristics, and the relationship between responses and climate pivot points provides evidence of the trade-off between the capacity of a plant species to increase in abundance when water is available and its drought resistance.

  9. Mercury in sediment, water, and fish in a managed tropical wetland-lake ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malczyk, Evan A; Branfireun, Brian A

    2015-08-15

    Mercury pollution has not been well documented in the inland lakes or fishes of Mexico, despite the importance of freshwater fish as a source of protein in local diets. Total mercury and methylmercury in waters, sediments, and the commercial fish catch were investigated in Lake Zapotlán, Mexico. Concentrations of total and methylmercury were very high in runoff and wastewater inputs, but very low in sediments and surface waters of the open water area of the lake. Concentrations of total mercury in tilapia and carp were very low, consistent with the low concentrations in lake water and sediments. Particle settling, sorption, the biogeochemical environment, and/or bloom dilution are all plausible explanations for the significant reductions in both total mercury and methylmercury. Despite very high loading of mercury, this shallow tropical lake was not a mercury-impaired ecosystem, and these findings may translate across other shallow, alkaline tropical lakes. Importantly, the ecosystem services that seemed to be provided by peripheral wetlands in reducing mercury inputs highlight the potential for wetland conservation or restoration in Mexico.

  10. Sustainable Development of Water Conservancy Ecosystem%水利生态系统可持续发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈青青

    2015-01-01

    对可持续发展、生态系统服务和生态配水这三个研究目标的生态学研究价值进行了详细的分析,得出一些水利生态系统可持续发展研究的结论。%Sustainable development, ecosystem services and ecosystem ecology of the value of water with three research goals for a detailed analysis, draw some conclusions of the study of ecosystem water conservation and sustainable development.

  11. The Climate change impact on the water balance and use efficiency of two contrasting water limited Mediterranean ecosystems in Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, Nicola; Corona, Roberto; Albertson, John

    2016-04-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are commonly heterogeneous savanna-like ecosystems, with contrasting plant functional types (PFT) competing for the water use. Often deforestation activities have been more intensive along the plan and alluvial river valleys, where deep soils are well suited for agricultural and grass became the primary PFT, while more natural woody vegetation (trees and shrubs) survived in the steep hillslopes and mountain areas, where soil thickness is low, i.e. less attractive for agricultural. Hence, Mediterranean regions are characterized by two main ecosystems, grassland and woodland, which for both natural and anthropogenic causes can grow in soils with also different characteristics (texture, hydraulic properties, depth), highly impacting water resources. Mediterranean regions suffer water scarcity produced in part by natural (e.g., climate variations) influences. For instance, in the Flumendosa basin water reservoir system, which plays a primary role in the water supply for much of southern Sardinia, the average annual input from stream discharge in the latter part of the 20th century was less than half the historic average rate. The precipitation over the Flumendosa basin has decreased, but not at such a drastic rate as the discharge, suggesting a marked non-linear response of discharge to precipitation changes. Indeed, precipitation decreased in winter months, which are crucial for reservoirs recharge through runoff. At the same time air temperature increased during the spring-summer season, when the precipitation slightly increased. The IPCC models predicts a further increase of drought in the Mediterranean region during winter, increasing the uncertainty on the future of the water resources system of these regions. Hence, there is the need to investigate the role of the PFT vegetation dynamics on the soil water budget of these ecosystems in the context of the climate change, and predict hydrologic variables for climate change scenarios

  12. Synergy of extreme drought and shrub invasion reduce ecosystem functioning and resilience in water-limited climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Maria C; Lecomte, Xavier; David, Teresa S; Pinto, Joaquim G; Bugalho, Miguel N; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Extreme drought events and plant invasions are major drivers of global change that can critically affect ecosystem functioning and alter ecosystem-atmosphere exchange. Invaders are expanding worldwide and extreme drought events are projected to increase in frequency and intensity. However, very little is known on how these drivers may interact to affect the functioning and resilience of ecosystems to extreme events. Using a manipulative shrub removal experiment and the co-occurrence of an extreme drought event (2011/2012) in a Mediterranean woodland, we show that native shrub invasion and extreme drought synergistically reduced ecosystem transpiration and the resilience of key-stone oak tree species. Ecosystem transpiration was dominated by the water use of the invasive shrub Cistus ladanifer, which further increased after the extreme drought event. Meanwhile, the transpiration of key-stone tree species decreased, indicating a competitive advantage in favour of the invader. Our results suggest that in Mediterranean-type climates the invasion of water spending species and projected recurrent extreme drought events may synergistically cause critical drought tolerance thresholds of key-stone tree species to be surpassed, corroborating observed higher tree mortality in the invaded ecosystems. Ultimately, this may shift seasonally water limited ecosystems into less desirable alternative states dominated by water spending invasive shrubs.

  13. Problems of mine waters discharge in the Samara River and its influence on biota of the ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kochet

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of long-term studies of aquatic organisms’ reactions to mine waters the approximate estimation of the waters influence on theSamaraRiver’s ecosystems was performed. Modern variants of the waters discharge were analyzed. The most acceptable environmental and economic choice of mine pumping at the modern stage of coal mining is presented.

  14. Prediction of harmful water quality parameters combining weather, air quality and ecosystem models with in situ measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to predict water quality in lakes is important since lakes are sources of water for agriculture, drinking, and recreational uses. Lakes are also home to a dynamic ecosystem of lacustrine wetlands and deep waters. They are sensitive to pH changes and are dependent on d...

  15. Cost-effective alternatives for mitigating Cryptosporidium risk in drinking water and enhancing ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, B. A.; Kandulu, J. M.

    2009-08-01

    Under the multibarrier paradigm, water quality management barriers that mitigate risk to consumers are required at multiple points from the catchment to the tap. We present a cost-effectiveness analysis of 13 catchment- and treatment-based management alternatives for mitigating Cryptosporidium risk in the Myponga water supply catchment, South Australia. A broad range of costs and benefits are identified and valued, including setup, operation and maintenance, and opportunity costs, and benefits for ecosystem services including water quality, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and farm production services. The results suggest that the cost-effectiveness of investment in water quality management can be substantially enhanced by considering the costs of management and the benefits for ecosystem services, in addition to Cryptosporidium removal effectiveness. Cost-effectiveness of investment in management alternatives is dependent upon the desired level of Cryptosporidium removal effectiveness by both the catchment and treatment barriers. The combination of a spatially targeted 25% restriction in water course access of nondairy cattle and treatment by enhanced coagulation provides the most (net) cost-effective Cryptosporidium risk mitigation strategy. This combination may achieve 0.614 log removal at a net cost of A0.7 million and (net) cost-effectiveness of A1.14 million per log removal. Additional risk mitigation can be achieved through the addition of ultraviolet irradiation treatment, higher levels of water course access restriction for cattle, and the adoption of dung beetles in the catchment. Economic valuation of a range of costs and benefits of management priorities can support cost-effective water quality management investment decisions and inform elements of policy design such as cost-sharing arrangements and spatial targeting.

  16. Water use efficiency of net primary production in global terrestrial ecosystems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lei Xia; Fei Wang; Xingmin Mu; Kai Jin; Wenyi Sun; Peng Gao; Guangju Zhao

    2015-07-01

    The carbon and water cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, which are strongly coupled via water use efficiency (WUE), are influenced by global climate change. To explore the relationship between the carbon and water cycles and predict the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to study the WUE in global terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the 13-year WUE (i.e., net primary production (NPP)/evapotranspiration (ET)) of global terrestrial ecosystems was calculated based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) NPP (MOD17A3) and ET (MOD16A3) products from 2000 to 2012. The results indicate that the annual average WUE decreased but not significantly, and the 13-year mean value was 868.88 mg C m−2 mm−1. The variation trend of WUE value for each pixel differed greatly across the terrestrial ecosystems. A significant variation ( < 0.05) occurred in about 18.50% of the land surface. WUE was spatially distributed from 0 to 2541 mg C m−2 mm−1, and 58.78% of the WUE values were concentrated in the interval of 600–1200 mg C m−2 mm−1. The WUE increased from north to south in Africa and Oceania and from east to west in Europe and South America. Both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients existed in Asia and North America. The following trends in the WUE of different continents and Köppen–Geiger climates were observed: Europe (1129.71 mg C m−2 mm−1) > Oceania (1084.46 mg C m−2 mm−1) > Africa (893.51 mg C m−2 mm−1) > South America (893.07 mg C m−2 mm−1) > North America (870.79 mg C m−2 mm−1) > Asia (738.98 mg C m−2 mm−1) and warm temperate climates (1094 mg C m−2 mm−1) > snowy climates (862 mg C m−2 mm−1) > arid climates (785 mg C m−2 mm−1) > equatorial climates (732 mg C m−2 mm−1) > polar climates (435 mg C m−2 mm−1). Based on the WUE value and the present or future rainfall, the maximum carbon that fixed in one region may be theoretically calculated. Also, under the

  17. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Laura; de Goeij, Jasper M; Mueller, Christina E; Struck, Ulrich; Middelburg, Jack J; van Duyl, Fleur C; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Wild, Christian; Naumann, Malik S; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-07

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments.

  18. Change in Terrestrial Ecosystem Water-use Efficiency Over the Last Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Piao, S.; Sun, Y.; Ciais, P.; Cheng, L.; Mao, J.; Poulter, B.; Shi, X.; Zeng, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Defined as the ratio between gross primary productivity (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET), ecosystem-scale water-use efficiency (EWUE) is an indicator of the adjustment of vegetation photosynthesis to water loss. The processes controlling EWUE are complex and reflect both a slow evolution of plants and plant communities as well as fast adjustments of ecosystem functioning to changes of limiting resources. In this study, we investigated EWUE trends from 1982 to 2008 using data-driven models derived from satellite observations, and process-oriented carbon cycle models. Our findings suggest positive EWUE trends of 0.0056, 0.0007 and 0.0001 g C m-2 mm-1 yr-1 under the single effect of rising CO2 ('CO2'), climate change ('CLIM') and nitrogen deposition ('NDEP'), respectively. Global patterns of EWUE trends under the different scenarios suggest that: (i) EWUE-CO2 shows global increases, (ii) EWUE-CLIM increases in mainly high latitudes and decreases at middle and low latitudes, (iii) EWUE-NDEP displays slight increasing trends except in west Siberia, eastern Europe, parts of North America and central Amazonia. The data-driven MTE model, however, shows a slight decline of EWUE during the same period (-0.0005 g C m-2 mm-1 yr-1), which differs from process-models (0.0064 g C m-2 mm-1 yr-1) simulations with all drivers are taken into account. We attribute this discrepancy to the fact that the non-modeled physiological effects of elevated CO2 reducing stomatal conductance and transpiration (TR) in the MTE model. Partial correlation analysis between EWUE and climate drivers shows similar responses to climatic variables with the data-driven model and the process-oriented models across different ecosystems. Change in water-use efficiency defined from transpiration-based WUEt (GPP/TR) and inherent water-use efficiency IWUEt (GPP×VPD/TR) in response to rising CO2, climate change, and nitrogen deposition are also discussed. Our analyses will facilitate mechanistic understanding of

  19. Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló Cullerés, Damià; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Water and water-related services are major components of the human wellbeing, and as such are major factors of socio-economic development in Europe; yet freshwater systems are under threat by a variety of stressors (organic and inorganic pollution, geomorphological alterations, land cover change, water abstraction, invasive species and pathogens. Some stressors, such as water scarcity, can be a stressor on its own because of its structural character, and drive the effects of other stressors. The relevance of water scarcity as a stressor is more important in semi-arid regions, such as the Mediterranean basin, which are characterized by highly variable river flows and the occurrence of low flows. This has resulted in increases in frequency and magnitude of extreme flow events. Furthermore, in other European regions such as eastern Germany, western Poland and England, water demand exceeds water availability and water scarcity has become an important management issue. Water scarcity is most commonly associated with inappropriate water management, with resulting river flow reductions. It has become one of the most important drivers of change in freshwater ecosystems. Conjoint occurrence of a myriad of stressors (chemical, geomorphological, biological) under water scarcity will produce novel and unfamiliar synergies and most likely very pronounced effects. Within this context, GLOBAQUA has assembled a multidisciplinary team of leading scientists in the fields of hydrology, chemistry, ecology, ecotoxicology, economy, sociology, engineering and modeling in order to study the interaction of multiple stressors within the frame of strong pressure on water resources. The aim is to achieve a better understanding how current management practices and policies could be improved by identifying the main drawbacks and alternatives.

  20. Relating Ctenophore Population to Water Mass Indices in the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sparks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ctenophores exist throughout the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Ecosystem, but the underlying mechanisms that control ctenophore populations at this scale are not clear. Ctenophore population data over the last 30 years coincides with changes in several water masses on the shelf, but discovering which water mass was most influential was problematic without mechanistic clarity. This paper strives to identify the relationship between oceanography and ctenophore populations over the last 30 years. Using a numerical modeling approach, we found a strong relationship between the North Atlantic Oscillation index, percent Labrador Subarctic Slope Water, and ctenophore population. We suggest these results might inform future efforts to develop a predictive capability for major changes in ctenophore population.

  1. Ecosystem function in waste stabilisation ponds: Improving water quality through a better understanding of biophysical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadouani, Anas; Reichwaldt, Elke S.; Coggins, Liah X.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Zhou, Wenxu; Laurion, Isabelle; Chua, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are highly productive systems designed to treat wastewater using only natural biological and chemical processes. Phytoplankton, microbial communities and hydraulics play important roles for ecosystem functionality of these pond systems. Although WSPs have been used for many decades, they are still considered as 'black box' systems as very little is known about the fundamental ecological processes which occur within them. However, a better understanding of how these highly productive ecosystems function is particularly important for hydrological processes, as treated wastewater is commonly discharged into streams, rivers, and oceans, and subject to strict water quality guidelines. WSPs are known to operate at different levels of efficiency, and treatment efficiency of WSPs is dependent on physical (flow characteristics and sludge accumulation and distribution) and biological (microbial and phytoplankton communities) characteristics. Thus, it is important to gain a better understanding of the role and influence of pond hydraulics and vital microbial communities on pond performance and WSP functional stability. The main aim of this study is to investigate the processes leading to differences in treatment performance of WSPs. This study uses a novel and innovative approach to understand these factors by combining flow cytometry and metabolomics to investigate various biochemical characteristics, including the metabolite composition and microbial community within WSPs. The results of these analyses will then be combined with results from the characterisation of pond hydrodynamics and hydraulic performance, which will be performed using advanced hydrodynamic modelling and advanced sludge profiling technology. By understanding how hydrodynamic and biological processes influence each other and ecosystem function and stability in WSPs, we will be able to propose ways to improve the quality of the treatment using natural processes, with

  2. Tracking Ecosystem Water Use Efficiency of Cropland by Exclusive Use of MODIS EVI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuguang Tang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important linkages that couple terrestrial carbon and water cycles is ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE, which is relevant to the reasonable utilization of water resources and farming practices. Eddy covariance techniques provide an opportunity to monitor the variability in WUE and can be integrated with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS observations. Scaling up in situ observations from flux tower sites to large areas remains challenging and few studies have been reported on direct estimation of WUE from remotely-sensed data. This study examined the main environmental factors driving the variability in WUE of corn/soybean croplands, and revealed the prominent role of solar radiation and temperature. Time-series of MODIS-derived enhanced vegetation indices (EVI, which are proxies for the plant responses to environmental controls, were also strongly correlated with ecosystem WUE, thereby implying great potential for remote quantification. Further, both performance of the indirect MODIS-derived WUE from gross primary productivity (GPP and evapotranspiration (ET, and the direct estimates by exclusive use of MODIS EVI data were evaluated using tower-based measurements. The results showed that ecosystem WUE were overpredicted at the beginning and ending of crop-growth periods and severely underestimated during the peak periods by the indirect estimates from MODIS products, which was mainly attributed to the error source from MODIS GPP. However, a simple empirical model that is solely based on MODIS EVI data performed rather well to capture the seasonal variations in WUE, especially for the growing periods of croplands. Independent validation at different sites indicates the method has potential for broad application.

  3. Insights into the water mean transit time in a high-elevation tropical ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Giovanny M.; Segura, Catalina; Vaché, Kellie B.; Windhorst, David; Breuer, Lutz; Crespo, Patricio

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of the mean transit time (MTT) of water and its spatial variability in a tropical high-elevation ecosystem (wet Andean páramo). The study site is the Zhurucay River Ecohydrological Observatory (7.53 km2) located in southern Ecuador. A lumped parameter model considering five transit time distribution (TTD) functions was used to estimate MTTs under steady-state conditions (i.e., baseflow MTT). We used a unique data set of the δ18O isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow water samples collected for 3 years (May 2011 to May 2014) in a nested monitoring system of streams. Linear regression between MTT and landscape (soil and vegetation cover, geology, and topography) and hydrometric (runoff coefficient and specific discharge rates) variables was used to explore controls on MTT variability, as well as mean electrical conductivity (MEC) as a possible proxy for MTT. Results revealed that the exponential TTD function best describes the hydrology of the site, indicating a relatively simple transition from rainfall water to the streams through the organic horizon of the wet páramo soils. MTT of the streams is relatively short (0.15-0.73 years, 53-264 days). Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between the catchment's average slope and MTT (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.05). MTT showed no significant correlation with hydrometric variables, whereas MEC increases with MTT (R2 = 0.89, p < 0.001). Overall, we conclude that (1) baseflow MTT confirms that the hydrology of the ecosystem is dominated by shallow subsurface flow; (2) the interplay between the high storage capacity of the wet páramo soils and the slope of the catchments provides the ecosystem with high regulation capacity; and (3) MEC is an efficient predictor of MTT variability in this system of catchments with relatively homogeneous geology.

  4. Landform-water-vegetation feedbacks regulate ecosystem stability and restoration potential in semiarid landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Saco, Patricia; Merino Martin, Luis; Espigares, Tiscar; Nicolau, Jose Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Plant production and vegetation dynamics in drylands are shaped by landform patterns, and largely depends on favorable surface redistribution of runoff and sediments. Similarly, the organization of vegetation in these systems controls runoff generation and erosion, and strongly influences the spatial redistribution of water and soil resources. Landform-water-vegetation feedbacks may have, therefore, a key role determining the stability and restoration potential of arid and semiarid ecosystems. We present a synthesis of field, remotely-sensed and modelling studies on landform-soil-vegetation patterns in semiarid rangelands of Australia and reclaimed coal-mining slopes of Mediterranean-dry Spain. Our results indicate that the organization and stability of vegetation patterns strongly depends on feedbacks with coevolving landforms. Exploration of banded woodlands in central Australia reveals that disturbances (e.g. grazing, wildfires) can impact landform-water-vegetation feedbacks, altering the way water is spatially redistributed and used by vegetation, which results in non-linear reductions of ecosystem function. Successful experiences on the restoration of these systems suggest that the spatial management of runoff and sediments is decisive to rehabilitate vegetation patchiness and landscape function. The study of vegetation-water-landform feedbacks in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed mining slopes of Spain offers additional indications on the restoration of drylands, particularly on the effects of rill and gully erosion on the stability of restored vegetation. The development of rill and gully networks provides very efficient drainage networks for the routing of runoff and sediments that drastically reduce the availability of water and soil resources for plant production, ultimately causing degradation of vegetation and restoration failure. This work is supported by a Beatriu de Pinós fellowship co-funded by the European Commission and the Generalitat de Catalunya

  5. Combining Ballast Water Exchange and Treatment To Maximize Prevention of Species Introductions to Freshwater Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briski, Elizabeta; Gollasch, Stephan; David, Matej; Linley, R Dallas; Casas-Monroy, Oscar; Rajakaruna, Harshana; Bailey, Sarah A

    2015-08-18

    The most effective way to manage species transfers is to prevent their introduction via vector regulation. Soon, international ships will be required to meet numeric ballast discharge standards using ballast water treatment (BWT) systems, and ballast water exchange (BWE), currently required by several countries, will be phased out. However, there are concerns that BWT systems may not function reliably in fresh and/or turbid water. A land-based evaluation of simulated "BWE plus BWT" versus "BWT alone" demonstrated potential benefits of combining BWE with BWT for protection of freshwater ecosystems. We conducted ship-based testing to compare the efficacy of "BWE plus BWT" versus "BWT alone" on voyages starting with freshwater ballast. We tested the hypotheses that there is an additional effect of "BWE plus BWT" compared to "BWT alone" on the reduction of plankton, and that taxa remaining after "BWE plus BWT" will be marine (low risk for establishment at freshwater recipient ports). Our study found that BWE has significant additional effect on the reduction of plankton, and this effect increases with initial abundance. As per expectations, "BWT alone" tanks contained higher risk freshwater or euryhaline taxa at discharge, while "BWE plus BWT" tanks contained mostly lower risk marine taxa unlikely to survive in recipient freshwater ecosystems.

  6. Ecological values of shallow-water habitats: Implications for the restoration of disturbed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, C.B.; Cloern, J.E.; Schraga, T.S.; Little, A.J.; Lucas, L.V.; Thompson, J.K.; Burau, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A presumed value of shallow-habitat enhanced pelagic productivity derives from the principle that in nutrient-rich aquatic systems phytoplankton growth rate is controlled by light availability, which varies inversely with habitat depth. We measured a set of biological indicators across the gradient of habitat depth within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California) to test the hypothesis that plankton biomass, production, and pelagic energy flow also vary systematically with habitat depth. Results showed that phytoplankton biomass and production were only weakly related to phytoplankton growth rates whereas other processes (transport, consumption) were important controls. Distribution of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea was patchy, and heavily colonized habitats all supported low phytoplankton biomass and production and functioned as food sinks. Surplus primary production in shallow, uncolonized habitats provided potential subsidies to neighboring recipient habitats. Zooplankton in deeper habitats, where grazing exceeded phytoplankton production, were likely supported by significant fluxes of phytoplankton biomass from connected donor habitats. Our results provide three important lessons for ecosystem science: (a) in the absence of process measurements, derived indices provide valuable information to improve our mechanistic understanding of ecosystem function and to benefit adaptive management strategies; (b) the benefits of some ecosystem functions are displaced by water movements, so the value of individual habitat types can only be revealed through a regional perspective that includes connectedness among habitats; and (c) invasive species can act as overriding controls of habitat function, adding to the uncertainty of management outcomes. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  7. Analysis of selection procedures to determine priority areas for payment for water ecosystem services programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Feital Gjorup

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The approach of ecosystem services has shown promise for the evaluation of interactions between ecosystems and society, integrating environmental and socioeconomic concepts which require interdisciplinary knowledge. However, its usefulness in decision making is limited due to information gaps. This study was therefore developed in order to contribute to the application of principles of ecosystem services in the decision-making for water resources management. It aims to identify procedures and methodologies used for decision-making in order to select priority areas to be included in projects or compensation programs for environmental services. To do so, we searched technical and scientific literature describing methods and experiences used to select priority areas. Key steps in the process of selecting priority areas were identified; then a survey was conducted of the procedures adopted for each key step considering the literature selected; and, finally, the information collected was analyzed and classified. Considering the study’s sample, we noted that the selection of priority areas was based on the direct use of predetermined criteria. The use of indicators and spatial analyses are practices still scarcely employed. We must highlight, however, that most of the analyzed documents did not aim to describe the process of selecting priority areas in detail, which may have resulted in some omissions. Although these conditions may limit the analysis in this study, the results presented here allow us to identify the main objectives, actions and criteria used to select priority areas for programs or compensation projects for environmental services.

  8. Assessment of water supply as an ecosystem service in a rural-urban watershed in southwestern Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jujnovsky, Julieta; González-Martínez, Teresa Margarita; Cantoral-Uriza, Enrique Arturo; Almeida-Leñero, Lucia

    2012-03-01

    Studies from the ecosystem services perspective can provide a useful framework because they allow us to fully examine the benefits that humans obtain from socio-ecological systems. Mexico City, the second largest city in the world, has faced severe problems related to water shortages, which have worsened due to increasing population. Demand for space has forced changes in land cover, including covering areas that are essential for groundwater recharge. The city has 880 km(2) of forest areas that are crucial for the water supply. The Magdalena River Watershed was chosen as a model because it is a well-preserved zone within Mexico City and it provides water for the population. The general aim of this study was to assess the ecosystem service of the water supply in the Magdalena River Watershed by determining its water balance (SWAT model) and the number of beneficiaries of the ecosystem services. The results showed that the watershed provides 18.4 hm(3) of water per year. Baseflow was dominant, with a contribution of 85%, while surface runoff only accounted for 15%. The zone provides drinking water to 78,476 inhabitants and could supply 153,203 potential beneficiaries. This work provides an example for understanding how ecosystem processes determine the provision of ecosystem services and benefits to the population in a rural-urban watershed in Mexico City.

  9. Assessment of Water Supply as an Ecosystem Service in a Rural-Urban Watershed in Southwestern Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jujnovsky, Julieta; González-Martínez, Teresa Margarita; Cantoral-Uriza, Enrique Arturo; Almeida-Leñero, Lucia

    2012-03-01

    Studies from the ecosystem services perspective can provide a useful framework because they allow us to fully examine the benefits that humans obtain from socio-ecological systems. Mexico City, the second largest city in the world, has faced severe problems related to water shortages, which have worsened due to increasing population. Demand for space has forced changes in land cover, including covering areas that are essential for groundwater recharge. The city has 880 km2 of forest areas that are crucial for the water supply. The Magdalena River Watershed was chosen as a model because it is a well-preserved zone within Mexico City and it provides water for the population. The general aim of this study was to assess the ecosystem service of the water supply in the Magdalena River Watershed by determining its water balance (SWAT model) and the number of beneficiaries of the ecosystem services. The results showed that the watershed provides 18.4 hm3 of water per year. Baseflow was dominant, with a contribution of 85%, while surface runoff only accounted for 15%. The zone provides drinking water to 78,476 inhabitants and could supply 153,203 potential beneficiaries. This work provides an example for understanding how ecosystem processes determine the provision of ecosystem services and benefits to the population in a rural-urban watershed in Mexico City.

  10. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots affects whole-stand evapotranspiration and net ecosystem carbon exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domec, Jean-Christophe; King, John S; Noormets, Asko; Treasure, Emrys; Gavazzi, Michael J; Sun, Ge; McNulty, Steven G

    2010-07-01

    *Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of water via roots from moist to drier portions of the soil occurs in many ecosystems, potentially influencing both water use and carbon assimilation. *By measuring soil water content, sap flow and eddy covariance, we investigated the temporal variability of HR in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation during months of normal and below-normal precipitation, and examined its effects on tree transpiration, ecosystem water use and carbon exchange. *The occurrence of HR was explained by courses of reverse flow through roots. As the drought progressed, HR maintained soil moisture above 0.15 cm(3) cm(-3) and increased transpiration by 30-50%. HR accounted for 15-25% of measured total site water depletion seasonally, peaking at 1.05 mm d(-1). The understory species depended on water redistributed by the deep-rooted overstory pine trees for their early summer water supply. Modeling carbon flux showed that in the absence of HR, gross ecosystem productivity and net ecosystem exchange could be reduced by 750 and 400 g C m(-2) yr(-1), respectively. *Hydraulic redistribution mitigated the effects of soil drying on understory and stand evapotranspiration and had important implications for net primary productivity by maintaining this whole ecosystem as a carbon sink.

  11. The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Guy; Bonada, Núria; Brown, Lee E; Death, Russell G; Durance, Isabelle; Gray, Clare; Hladyz, Sally; Ledger, Mark E; Milner, Alexander M; Ormerod, Steve J; Thompson, Ross M; Pawar, Samraat

    2016-05-19

    Most research on the effects of environmental change in freshwaters has focused on incremental changes in average conditions, rather than fluctuations or extreme events such as heatwaves, cold snaps, droughts, floods or wildfires, which may have even more profound consequences. Such events are commonly predicted to increase in frequency, intensity and duration with global climate change, with many systems being exposed to conditions with no recent historical precedent. We propose a mechanistic framework for predicting potential impacts of environmental fluctuations on running-water ecosystems by scaling up effects of fluctuations from individuals to entire ecosystems. This framework requires integration of four key components: effects of the environment on individual metabolism, metabolic and biomechanical constraints on fluctuating species interactions, assembly dynamics of local food webs, and mapping the dynamics of the meta-community onto ecosystem function. We illustrate the framework by developing a mathematical model of environmental fluctuations on dynamically assembling food webs. We highlight (currently limited) empirical evidence for emerging insights and theoretical predictions. For example, widely supported predictions about the effects of environmental fluctuations are: high vulnerability of species with high per capita metabolic demands such as large-bodied ones at the top of food webs; simplification of food web network structure and impaired energetic transfer efficiency; and reduced resilience and top-down relative to bottom-up regulation of food web and ecosystem processes. We conclude by identifying key questions and challenges that need to be addressed to develop more accurate and predictive bio-assessments of the effects of fluctuations, and implications of fluctuations for management practices in an increasingly uncertain world.

  12. Combined System of Organic Rankine Cycle and Brackish Water Desalination for Industrial Gas Flue Waste Heat Recycling Utilization%利用烟气余热的有机朗肯循环与苦咸水淡化联合系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘乙成; 闫广; 高传昌; 王为术

    2013-01-01

    Aimint at the problems of industrial flue gas waste heat emissions and shortage of fresh water in coastal and the northwest areas, a system combined with organic rankine cycle (ORC) and brackish water desalination was designed to reclaim industrial gas flue waste heat and produce fresh water and electricity. The thermal process of the system was dynamic integrated with ORC and flash evaporation. The pentane as working medium was promoted to calculate cycle efficiency of the ORC system with variable parameter method. And then the optimal parameters of the system operation was determined. Compared with water rankine cycle, the advantage of this system was proved.%针对沿海和西北内陆地区淡水紧缺和工业烟气余热的排放问题,设计了一种有机朗肯循环与苦咸水淡化的联合系统对工业烟气余热进行有效回收,以生产淡水和电能.该联合系统将闪蒸法与有机朗肯循环进行有机结合,通过变参数法计算采用戊烷作为工质的有机朗肯循环的循环效率,确定该系统运行的最佳参数,并与水工质朗肯循环进行对比,证明了联合系统的优越性.

  13. Ecosystem impacts of Alpine water intakes for hydropower: the challenge of sediment management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbud, Chrystelle; Lane, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Natural Alpine flow regimes are strongly modified by anthropogenic activities, notably water abstraction or impoundment for hydroelectric power production, which impacts upon both river discharge and sediment transfer systems, and in turn upon flora and fauna downstream. These kinds of impacts are well studied where rivers are regulated by dams, with sediment retained in the associated reservoirs although occasional flushing may be required (a frequency typically of many years). Such impacts may be managed by environmental flows or e-flows, whose restoration value has been shown in a number of research publications. However, there has been less attention in relation to the e-flows needed at water intakes which in Alpine environments may be associated with serious sediment-related problems. Water intakes have a very smaller sediment storage capacity than dams and thus may need to be flushed of accumulated sediment more regularly. In an Alpine setting, because rates of erosion are naturally higher, sediment is flushed in 'purges' with a frequency that may even be sub-daily at certain times of the year. Purges feed the river with solid material, but as the means of transporting it, the water, is being abstracted, sediment transport capacity is reduced. In theory, this does not eliminate sediment connectivity, but rather reduces it: the sediment is still delivered, but it can only be transported for a reduced duration; and the results may be profound hydrogeomorphic and ecosystem impacts, including downstream aggradation. In this study, we present results from a combined study of fluvial geomorphology, hydrology and ecosystem impacts of flow abstraction at water intakes. Using hydrodynamic modelling, we show that because the duration of remobilisation of purges and the peak discharge are much shorter than under natural flows, this causes the formation of a zone of sediment aggradation that moves progressively downstream as a sediment wave, leading to sedimentation

  14. Ecosystem approach to water resources management using the MIKE 11 modeling system in the Strymonas River and Lake Kerkini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulgeris, Charalampos; Georgiou, Pantazis; Papadimos, Dimitris; Papamichail, Dimitris

    2012-02-01

    The ability to apply an ecosystem approach to the Strymonas River catchment was investigated using the MIKE 11 modeling system for the simulation of surface water. The Strymonas River catchment is shared mainly between Bulgaria and Greece. The river feeds the artificial Lake Kerkini, a significant wetland ecosystem, and further downstream it outflows to the Gulf of Strymonikos, whose estuary ecosystem is very important for fisheries, biodiversity and tourism. MIKE 11-NAM was used for the simulation of rainfall-runoff process in the Strymonas River catchment and MIKE 11-HD was used to simulate the unsteady flow of the Strymonas River and to apply management rules based on the water level of Lake Kerkini. Two water level management scenarios were investigated. The first scenario referred to the mean daily-observed water level of Lake Kerkini between 1986 and 2006, and the second scenario represented adjustments necessary to fulfill the lake's ecosystem requirements. Under the current water level management practices (Scenario 1), the Strymonas River-Lake Kerkini system has enough water to fulfill its Irrigation Water Requirements (IWR) in normal and wet years while a slight deficit is appeared in dry years; however, both Lake Kerkini and the Strymonas River estuary ecosystems are subject to pressures, since reduction of the forest area has been recorded. Applying the ecosystem approach (Scenario 2), the protection of the riparian forest of Lake Kerkini is achieved while in normal and wet years the IWR are fulfilled and the deficit of the IWR is increased in dry years. Compared to Scenario 1, the pressure of the Strymonas River estuary ecosystem is slightly increased.

  15. Environmental impacts on the evapotranspiration of an water limited and heterogeneous Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Curreli, M.; Corona, R.; Oren, R.

    2015-12-01

    Mediterranean water limited ecosystems are characterized by an heterogeneous spatial distribution of different plant functional types (PFT), such as grass and trees, competing for water use. Typically, during the dry summers, these ecosystems are characterized by a simple dual PFTs system with strong-resistant woody vegetation and bare soil, since grass died. The coupled use of sap flow measurements and eddy covariance technique is essential to estimate Evapotransiration (ET) in an heterogeneous ecosystem. An eddy covariance - micrometeorological tower has been installed since 2003 and 33 thermo-dissipation probes based on the Granier technique have installed at the Orroli site in Sardinia (Italy). The site landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types: wild olives, different shrubs and herbaceous species, which died during the summer. The sensors have been installed at the Orroli site into 15 wild olives clumps with different characteristics in terms of tree size, exposition to wind and solar radiation and soil depth. A network of 30 soil moisture sensors has also been installed for monitoring soil moisture spatial and temporal dynamics and their correlation with trees. Sap flow measurements show the significantly impacts on ET of soil moisture, radiation, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and interestingly of tree position into the clump, showing double rates for the trees inside the wild olive clumps. The sap flow sensor outputs are analyzed for estimating innovative allometric relationships between sapwood area, diameter, canopy cover area, which are needed for the correct upscale of the local tree measurements to the site plot larger scale. Finally using an innovative scaling procedure, the sap-flow transpiration at field scale have been compared to the eddy covariance ET, showing the approximation of the eddy covariance technique. Finally the impact of environmental factors on ET for different soil depth and tree position is demonstrated.

  16. Influence factors research of typical soil salinization and alkalization under brackish water drip irrigation in arid areas%干旱区微咸水滴灌条件下典型土壤盐碱化影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵建荣; 张凤华; 董艳; 李乐佳; 赵宇; 张敬远; 胡治强; 徐秀

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the change of soil salinity,soil alkalinity and main cations under long time drip irriga-tion with different concentration of brackish water in alluvial fan of the edge and the dry delta area in Manas River Basin, taking the representative sandy loam and clay loam soil in cotton field as the research object,using the high and low saline water for 5 years irrigation,has set up four treatments as clay loam-low salinity,clay loam-high salinity,sandy loam-low salinity and sandy loam-high salinity,measured the soil total salt,pH,Na +,K+,Ca2 +,Mg2 +,SAR,ESP, etc.in 0 ~100 cm soil layers,discussed the ions that have produced the main impact to soil salinization and alkaliza-tion,to provide the theoretical reference of ecological security for brackish water irrigation in arid area.The results indi-cated that:The soil salinization and alkalization in clay loam of alluvial fan of the edge and sandy loam of the dry delta area was together occurred,also was mainly affected by irrigation water salinity.The ion of main influence for soil salin-ization and soil alkalization was Na +and for soil salinization was Na +and Ca2 +.It indicated that amelioration of the soil salinization in Manas River Basin should be started with reducing irrigation water Na +,and combined control of total salt content in irrigation water with reducng the proportion of Na + to achieve the purpose of reducing salt and preventing and controlling soil alkalization.%以代表性的沙壤和黏壤棉田土壤为研究对象,分别利用高、低矿化度水进行5年灌溉,即黏壤-低矿化度,黏壤-高矿化度,沙壤-低矿化度,沙壤-高矿化度共四个处理,测定0~100 cm 分层土样总盐、pH、Na +、K+、Ca2+、Mg2+、SAR、ESP 等指标,以研究玛纳斯河流域冲积扇扇缘和干三角洲区不同浓度微咸水长期滴灌条件下土壤盐分、土壤碱度、主要阳离子的变化,探讨对土壤盐化和碱化产生主要影响

  17. Seasonal dynamics of water use efficiency of typical forest and grassland ecosystems in China

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xianjin; Wang, Qiufeng; Hu, Zhongmin; Han, Shijie; Yan, Junhua; Wang, Yanfen; Zhao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    We selected four sites of ChinaFLUX representing four major ecosystem types in China-Changbaishan temperate broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest (CBS), Dinghushan subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest (DHS), Inner Mongolia temperate steppe (NM), and Haibei alpine shrub-meadow (HBGC)-to study the seasonal dynamics of ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE = GPP/ET, where GPP is gross primary productivity and ET is evapotranspiration) and factors affecting it. Our seasonal dynamics results indicated single-peak variation of WUE in CBS, NM, and HBGC, which were affected by air temperature (Ta) and leaf area index (LAI), through their effects on the partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into transpiration (T) (i.e., T/ET). In DHS, WUE was higher at the beginning and the end of the year, and minimum in summer. Ta and soil water content affected the seasonal dynamics of WUE through their effects on GPP/T. Our results indicate that seasonal dynamics of WUE were different because factors affecting the seasonal dyn...

  18. HEAVY METALS IN WATERS, PENETRATING THE FOOD, ECOSYSTEMS AND THE ECONOMY OF KOSOVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dreshaj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The waters of the oceans and seas play an important role in the hydrological cycle of the Earth. With Kosovo's economic development, increasing population developed many branches of industry, which caused pollution of rivers with heavy metals such as mine "Trepça", the treatment of agriculture products with pesticides and herbicides, eutrophication of lakes, transition metal in agricultural products, coming up ecological balance disorders. Uncontrolled exploitation of natural resources, irresponsible treatment (industrial waste and sewage, has caused contamination above the permitted ecosystem with toxic elements such as: Hg, Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ni, Mn, etc. Heavy metals in natural waters unpolluted behave low concentration (approximately 1μg / l; some of them are essential for enzymatic reactions. Increase their concentration as a result of industrial activities, often exceeds the allowed limit, causing serious changes to cosystems and tourist areas, to living organisms in natural aquatic systems. Ecological preservation of ecosystems from heavy metals is vital for the environment, food security and the preservation of ecological habitats which represents an economic cost in R. Kosovo.

  19. Carbon-water Cycling in the Critical Zone: Understanding Ecosystem Process Variability Across Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Holly [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Brooks, Paul [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-16

    One of the largest knowledge gaps in environmental science is the ability to understand and predict how ecosystems will respond to future climate variability. The links between vegetation, hydrology, and climate that control carbon sequestration in plant biomass and soils remain poorly understood. Soil respiration is the second largest carbon flux of terrestrial ecosystems, yet there is no consensus on how respiration will change as water availability and temperature co-vary. To address this knowledge gap, we use the variation in soil development and topography across an elevation and climate gradient on the Front Range of Colorado to conduct a natural experiment that enables us to examine the co-evolution of soil carbon, vegetation, hydrology, and climate in an accessible field laboratory. The goal of this project is to further our ability to combine plant water availability, carbon flux and storage, and topographically driven hydrometrics into a watershed scale predictive model of carbon balance. We hypothesize: (i) landscape structure and hydrology are important controls on soil respiration as a result of spatial variability in both physical and biological drivers: (ii) variation in rates of soil respiration during the growing season is due to corresponding shifts in belowground carbon inputs from vegetation; and (iii) aboveground carbon storage (biomass) and species composition are directly correlated with soil moisture and therefore, can be directly related to subsurface drainage patterns.

  20. Advances in management and utilization of invasive water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) in aquatic ecosystems - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shao-Hua; Song, Wei; Guo, Jun-Yao

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this review is to provide a concise summary of literature in the Chinese language since late 1970s and focuses on recent development in global scenarios. This work will replenish the FAO summary of water hyacinth utilization from 1917 to 1979 and review ecological and socioeconomic impacts of the water hyacinth from 1980 to 2010. This review also discusses the debate on whether the growth of the water hyacinth is a problem, a challenge or an opportunity. Literature suggested that integrated technologies and good management may be an effective solution and the perception of water hyacinth could change from that of a notorious aquatic weed to a valuable resource, including its utilization as a biological agent for the application in bioremediation for removing excess nutrients from eutrophic water bodies at low cost. Key aspects on system integration and innovation may focus on low-cost and efficient equipment and the creation of value-added goods from water hyacinth biomass. In the socioeconomic and ecological domain of global development, all the successful and sustainable management inputs for the water hyacinth must generate some sort of social and economic benefit simultaneously, as well as benefiting the ecosystem. Potential challenges exist in linkages between the management of water hyacinth on the large scale to the sustainable development of agriculture based on recycling nutrients, bio-energy production or silage and feed production. Further research and development may focus on more detailed biology of water hyacinth related with its utilization, cost-benefit analysis of middle to large-scale application of the technologies and innovation of the equipment used for harvesting and dehydrating the plant.

  1. Assessing The Ecosystem Service Freshwater Production From An Integrated Water Resources Management Perspective. Case Study: The Tormes Water Resources System (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momblanch, Andrea; Paredes-Arquiola, Javier; Andreu, Joaquín; Solera, Abel

    2014-05-01

    The Ecosystem Services are defined as the conditions and processes through which natural ecosystems, and the species that make them up, sustain and fulfil human life. A strongly related concept is the Integrated Water Resources Management. It is a process which promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and related resources in order to maximise the resultant economic and social welfare in an equitable manner without compromising the sustainability of vital ecosystems. From these definitions, it is clear that in order to cover so many water management and ecosystems related aspects the use of integrative models is increasingly necessary. In this study, we propose to link a hydrologic model and a water allocation model in order to assess the Freshwater Production as an Ecosystem Service in anthropised river basins. First, the hydrological model allows determining the volume of water generated by each sub-catchment; that is, the biophysical quantification of the service. This result shows the relevance of each sub-catchment as a source of freshwater and how this could change if the land uses are modified. On the other hand, the water management model allocates the available water resources among the different water uses. Then, it is possible to provide an economic value to the water resources through the use of demand curves, or other economic concepts. With this second model, we are able to obtain the economical quantification of the Ecosystem Service. Besides, the influence of water management and infrastructures on the service provision can be analysed. The methodology is applied to the Tormes Water Resources System, in Spain. The software used are EVALHID and SIMGES, for hydrological and management aspects, respectively. Both models are included in the Decision Support System Shell AQUATOOL for water resources planning and management. A scenario approach is presented to illustrate the potential of the methodology, including the current

  2. Ecosystem health evaluation system of the water-fluctuating zone in the Three Gorges Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-ao; YUAN Hui; ZHANG Yan-hui; HU Gang

    2004-01-01

    This paper discribes the definition of ecosystem health for the water-level flutuation zone of the Three Gorges Region and puts forward an evaluation system involving indicators in three groups: 1) structural indicators comprise slope, biodiversity,environmental capacity, stability, restoration ability and damage situation; 2) functional indicators including probability of geological hazard, erosion rate, habitat rate, land use intension and days of tourist season; 3) environmental indicatiors made up of population quality, potential intension of human, ground water quality, ambient air quality, wastewater treatment rate, pesticide use rate, fertilizer use rate, environmental management and public participation. In the design of the system, the subject zone is regarded as the type similar to wetland and the impacts of human activities on the zone are attached great importance to.

  3. Senio river ecosystem: characterization and distribution of inorganic species in water and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo; Locatelli, Clinio

    2006-01-01

    Analytical results are reported for the determination of inorganic species in water and sediments sampled in the Senio river ecosystem. The species determined are Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Co, Cr, Ni, Fe, Mn, Hg, F-, Cl-, Br, NO3-, SO4-, Na+, K+, Ca++, Mg++, NH4+ in integrated water, and Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Co, Cr, Ni, Fe, Mn, Hg in sediments. For all the elements, in addition to detection limits, precision and accuracy are given: the former, expressed as relative standard deviation (sr), and the latter, expressed as relative error (e), were good, being in all cases lower than 6%. Limitedly to Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn a critical comparison with voltammetric measurements is also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of the Ecosystem Services of Inland Waters in the Slovak Republic - To Date Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnovský Radoslav

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem services (ES (goods and services represent the outputs of natural systems from which people can have benefits. Evaluation of the benefits resulting from ES of inland waters or the benefits, which are lost when the necessary measures are not implemented, is one of the methods of evaluating the external costs of environmental damage - environmental and resource costs. Evaluation of ES is based on the CICES classification v. 4.3, which defines provision, regulation/ maintenance and cultural services. In the assessment of ES also enters groundwater, although in comparison with surface waters in lesser extent. At present, the evaluation is performed at the level of sub-basins of the Slovak Republic. In this paper, evaluation of selected ES is presented. Use of evaluation in practice is also discussed.

  5. Occurrence of perchloroethylene in surface water and fish in a river ecosystem affected by groundwater contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittlingerová, Zdena; Macháčková, Jiřina; Petruželková, Anna; Zimová, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Long-term monitoring of the content of perchloroethylene (PCE) in a river ecosystem affected by groundwater contamination was performed at a site in the Czech Republic. The quality of surface water was monitored quarterly between 1994 and 2013, and fish were collected from the affected ecosystem to analyse the content of PCE in their tissue in 1998, 2011 and 2012. Concentrations of PCE (9-140 μg/kg) in the tissue of fish collected from the contaminated part of the river were elevated compared to the part of the river unaffected by the contamination (ND to 5 μg/kg PCE). The quality of surface water has improved as a result of groundwater remediation during the evaluated period. Before the remedial action, PCE concentrations ranged from 30 to 95 μg/L (1994-1997). Following commencement of remedial activities in September 1997, a decrease in the content of PCE in the surface water to 7.3 μg/L (1998) and further to 1 μg/L (2011) and 1.1 μg/L (2012) led to a progressive decrease in the average concentration of PCE in the fish muscle tissue from 79 μg/kg (1998) to 24 (2011) and 30 μg/kg (2012), respectively. It was determined that the bioconcentration of PCE does not have a linear dependence because the decrease in contamination in the fish muscle tissue is not directly proportional to the decrease in contamination in the river water. The observed average bioconcentration factors were 24 and 28 for the lower concentrations of PCE and 11 for the higher concentrations of PCE in the river. In terms of age, length and weight of the collected fish, weight had the greatest significance for bioconcentration, followed by the length, with age being evaluated as a less significant factor.

  6. Effective Ecological Restoration of Collapsed Ecosystems - Linking Soil, Water and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petursdottir, Thorunn; Finger, David

    2014-05-01

    All natural resources, utilized by humans are embedded in complex social-ecological systems (SESs). To maintain the systems' sustainability, the SESs needs to be managed within their resilience optimum, considering both social and ecological elements. Throughout the centuries the humankind has often failed in doing so. Overexploitation of natural resources has thus widely disrupted equilibrium within the respective SESs, driving unforeseen changes of ecosystems worldwide. Anthropogenic factors such as poor institutional structure on resource utilization and weak policies in combination to environmental factors like droughts, fires or other unpredictable events have ruptured ecosystems' resilience and caused global degradation on a scale that currently threatens the Earth's welfare. As an example it's worth to mention that up to 40% of the world's agricultural land is severely degraded mainly due to unsustainable landuse. Once an ecosystem, or part/s of it, have collapsed, ecological restoration is almost always necessary to overcome the threshold/s that may prevent the system from self-recovering. It also re-activates the system's environmental cycles like the water, carbon and nutrient circulation. Although soil is the fundamental body of terrestrial ecosystems, water availability is of equal importance and should be taken more into consideration in restoration than currently is done. Based on that, we will focus on how to best manage effective large-scale ecological restoration (LSER) of collapsed ecosystems and link it to water catchment areas. LSER is a fundamental social-ecological activity that substantially can improve ecosystem condition, human livelihood and if well organized, facilitate improved management of natural resources. By definition, restoration of ecological integrity and functions is the fundamental basis for all restoration activities. But to achieve long-term sustainability of LSER activities the initial set of rules/policies established by

  7. Effects of experimental water table and temperature manipulations on ecosystem CO2 fluxes in an Alaskan rich fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Waddington, J.M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Peatlands store 30% of the world's terrestrial soil carbon (C) and those located at northern latitudes are expected to experience rapid climate warming. We monitored growing season carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes across a factorial design of in situ water table (control, drought, and flooded plots) and soil warming (control vs. warming via open top chambers) treatments for 2 years in a rich fen located just outside the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in interior Alaska. The drought (lowered water table position) treatment was a weak sink or small source of atmospheric CO2 compared to the moderate atmospheric CO2 sink at our control. This change in net ecosystem exchange was due to lower gross primary production and light-saturated photosynthesis rather than increased ecosystem respiration. The flooded (raised water table position) treatment was a greater CO2 sink in 2006 due largely to increased early season gross primary production and higher light-saturated photosynthesis. Although flooding did not have substantial effects on rates of ecosystem respiration, this water table treatment had lower maximum respiration rates and a higher temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration than the control plot. Surface soil warming increased both ecosystem respiration and gross primary production by approximately 16% compared to control (ambient temperature) plots, with no net effect on net ecosystem exchange. Results from this rich fen manipulation suggest that fast responses to drought will include reduced ecosystem C storage driven by plant stress, whereas inundation will increase ecosystem C storage by stimulating plant growth. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. An integrated model for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human receptors and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, S.G.; Rasmussen, J.J.;

    2010-01-01

    The practical implementation of the European Water Framework Directive has resulted in an increased focus on the hyporheic zone. In this paper, an integrated model was developed for evaluating the impact of point sources in groundwater on human health and surface water ecosystems. This was accomp...

  9. Water quality as an indicator of the health status of agro-pastoral dams' ecosystems in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kpéra, G.N.; Mensah, G.A.; Aarts, M.N.C.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Based on a study in three agro-pastoral dams in Nikki, Sakabansi and Fombawi in northern Benin, this article aims to characterize their physical, chemical and microbiological water quality. The ecosystem services framework underlies this article. Water of the three dams was sampled in the field and

  10. Integrated constructed wetlands: water management as a land-use issue, implementing the 'Ecosystem Approach'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, R; Carroll, P; Cook, S; Harrington, C; Scholz, M; McInnes, R J

    2011-01-01

    Awareness of the need for social, economic and environmental coherence in the management of water is becoming evermore apparent. Water supply as well as treatment is becoming more costly; a challenge that is not only limited to developing countries. The use of wetlands, natural and constructed, is now more widely accepted as a means of tackling a range of problems in water management to deliver this coherence. The use of 16 Integrated Constructed Wetlands that mimic shallow, emergent-vegetated, palustrine wetlands in a 2,500 ha catchment in County Waterford, Southeast Ireland, has shown a number of distinct advantages in implementing the all encompassing 'Ecosystem Approach', addressing the key elements for sustainable water management in an intensively used agricultural area. The significant increase in water quality, biodiversity, social amenities and acceptance by the local rural community provided by this 'real' field-scale demonstration show the benefits that such a joined-up approach can have on catchment management in the widest sense.

  11. Building a framework to explore water-human interaction for sustainable agro ecosystems in US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Ding, D.; Rapolu, U.

    2012-12-01

    Human activity is intricately linked to the quality and quantity of water resources. Although many studies have examined water-human interaction, the complexity of such coupled systems is not well understood largely because of gaps in our knowledge of water-cycle processes which are heavily influenced by socio-economic drivers. On this context, this team has investigated connections among agriculture, policy, climate, land use/land cover, and water quality in Iowa over the past couple of years. To help explore these connections the team is developing a variety of cyber infrastructure tools that facilitate the collection, analysis and visualization of data, and the simulation of system dynamics. In an ongoing effort, the prototype system is applied to Clear Creek watershed, an agricultural dominating catchment in Iowa in the US Midwest, to understand water-human processes relevant to management decisions by farmers regarding agro ecosystems. The primary aim of this research is to understand the connections that exist among the agricultural and biofuel economy, land use/land cover change, and water quality. To help explore these connections an agent-based model (ABM) of land use change has been developed that simulates the decisions made by farmers given alternative assumptions about market forces, farmer characteristics, and water quality regulations. The SWAT model was used to simulate the impact of these decisions on the movement of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus across the landscape. The paper also demonstrate how through the use of this system researchers can, for example, search for scenarios that lead to desirable socio-economic outcomes as well as preserve water quantity and quality.

  12. Mangrove coservation in coastal areas Samas beach lagoon for controlling sea water abrasion

    OpenAIRE

    Nurhayati, A.P.; Siwi, B.R.F. Raka; Muzoffar, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Lagoon is a puddle of water (like a lake/pond) near the beach that was once a part of the (united with) the sea, but because of geological events, apart from the sea and coastal wetland ecosystems forming new ones. Samas beach lagoon is one of the lagoons are located in Bantul, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta. From the perspective of the Environment, lagoon is a unique ecosystem that consists of a body of water (lagoon) is brackish, mangrove forests and land affected low tide. Ecosyste...

  13. A freshwater species wintering in a brackish environment: Habitat selection and diet of Slavonian grebes in the southern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Nicole; Garthe, Stefan; Adler, Sven

    2009-09-01

    After the breeding season, Slavonian grebes ( Podiceps auritus) leave their freshwater breeding habitats and migrate to wintering grounds in marine or brackish waters. The most important wintering area in northwestern Europe is located in the southern Baltic Sea, with the largest concentrations in the offshore area of the Pommeranian Bight. Analysis of ship-based surveys revealed that the habitat selection of Slavonian grebes in this brackish area is significantly influenced by water depth and bottom sediment type. The grebes prefer shallow waters of 4-14 m depth and occur only over sandy sediments. While the diving depths of endothermic animals is limited due to energetic constraints and thermoregulation, sediment type is regarded to be a proxy for food choice. The diet of Slavonian grebes in the Pomeranian Bight consists mainly of demersal gobies (Gobiidae) that frequently occur over sandy bottom substrates.

  14. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions Support Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.; Hooker, S. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Russell, P. B.; Palacios, S. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Negrey, K.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Broughton, J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has a continuing requirement to collect high-quality in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation ocean color satellite sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal is to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue spectral domain to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data are accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the CIRPAS Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of phytoplankton for coastal zone research.

  15. Ecosystem relevance of variable jellyfish biomass in the Irish Sea between years, regions and water types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas; Lilley, Martin K. S.; Beggs, Steven E.; Hays, Graeme C.; Doyle, Thomas K.

    2014-08-01

    Monitoring the abundance and distribution of taxa is essential to assess their contribution to ecosystem processes. For marine taxa that are difficult to study or have long been perceived of little ecological importance, quantitative information is often lacking. This is the case for jellyfish (medusae and other gelatinous plankton). In the present work, 4 years of scyphomedusae by-catch data from the 2007-2010 Irish Sea juvenile gadoid fish survey were analysed with three main objectives: (1) to provide quantitative and spatially-explicit species-specific biomass data, for a region known to have an increasing trend in jellyfish abundance; (2) to investigate whether year-to-year changes in catch-biomass are due to changes in the numbers or in the size of medusa (assessed as the mean mass per individual), and (3) to determine whether inter-annual variation patterns are consistent between species and water masses. Scyphomedusae were present in 97% of samples (N = 306). Their overall annual median catch-biomass ranged from 0.19 to 0.92 g m-3 (or 8.6 to 42.4 g m-2). Aurelia aurita and Cyanea spp. (Cyanea lamarckii and Cyanea capillata) made up 77.7% and 21.5% of the total catch-biomass respectively, but species contributions varied greatly between sub-regions and years. No consistent pattern was detected between the distribution and inter-annual variations of the two genera, and contrasting inter-annual patterns emerged when considering abundance either as biomass or as density. Significantly, A. aurita medusae were heavier in stratified than in mixed waters, which we hypothesize may be linked to differences in timing and yield of primary and secondary productions between water masses. These results show the vulnerability of time-series from bycatch datasets to phenological changes and highlight the importance of taking species- and population-specific distribution patterns into account when integrating jellyfish into ecosystem models.

  16. High salinity tolerance in eggs and fry of a brackish Esox lucius population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A.T.; Hansen, B.W.; Vismann, B.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge on the biology and physiology of pike, Esox lucius L., populations inhabiting saline environments is scarce. An experimental setup was used to examine egg development and fry behaviour and growth under varying salinity levels in a brackish-water pike population from the western Baltic Sea....... Eggs and fry developed at 8.5 psu, which is higher than hitherto reported for other populations. Fry exhibited stress behaviour and reduced growth when subjected to salinities above 13 psu. This indicates that early life stages of E. lucius tolerate ambient salinity conditions equivalent to the natural...

  17. A Methodology to Assess the Water Energy Food Ecosystems Nexus in Transboundary River Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia de Strasser

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The “nexus” is a potentially very appropriate approach to enhance resource efficiency and good governance in transboundary basins. Until now, however, evidence has been confined to isolated case studies and the nexus approach remains largely undefined. The methodology presented in this paper, developed for preparing a series of nexus assessments of selected river basins under the Water Convention of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE, is a timely contribution to this ongoing debate. The nexus assessment of a transboundary basin has the objective of identifying trade-offs and impacts across sectors and countries and to propose possible policy measures and technical actions at national and transboundary levels to reduce intersectoral tensions. This is done jointly with policy makers and local experts. Compared to an Integrated Water Resource Management approach, the water energy food ecosystems nexus approach concurrently considers multiple sectors and their evolution. This offers the opportunity to better involve key economic sectors—energy and agriculture in particular—in the dialogue over transboundary water resource uses, protection and management.

  18. Effects on water ecosystem by synthetic detergents. Gosei senzai no seitaikei ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N. (Shiga University, Shiga (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Considerations have been given on the effects of commercially available detergents on environments and ecosystems. As a result of the water quality test, BOD, COD, TOD, and TOC of powder soaps showed as high value as 6.7 times, 2.9 times, 2.6 times, and 3.1 times those of phosphorus-free powdered synthetic detergents. According to the result of a mortality experiment on water fleas, a concentration of surfactant MBAS in household waste water channels of 50 ppm has caused a 100% death after 24 hours, which is a considerably higher mortality than with soaps. Aggravation of aquatic environment in the Lake Biwa has generated a sudden increase in mud snails, which play a large role in water purification. Soaps contain two to three times more organics than synthetic detergents, but the decomposability of the organics is so high that naturally purifying function does not decline. Fishery products suffer stronger toxicity from synthetic detergents than from soaps. It has been indicated that surfactant LAS with low concentration accelerates ecological condensation of organic chlorine compounds in fishes. Difference in types of commercially available detergents and types of sea urchins has given the varied effects on fertilization rates, first cleavage occurrence rates, normal generation rates, and incubation rates. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Ecosystem responses to warming and watering in typical and desert steppes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Hou, Yanhui; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-10-01

    Global warming is projected to continue, leading to intense fluctuations in precipitation and heat waves and thereby affecting the productivity and the relevant biological processes of grassland ecosystems. Here, we determined the functional responses to warming and altered precipitation in both typical and desert steppes. The results showed that watering markedly increased the aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in a typical steppe during a drier year and in a desert steppe over two years, whereas warming manipulation had no significant effect. The soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and the soil respiration (SR) were increased by watering in both steppes, but the SR was significantly decreased by warming in the desert steppe only. The inorganic nitrogen components varied irregularly, with generally lower levels in the desert steppe. The belowground traits of soil total organic carbon (TOC) and the MBC were more closely associated with the ANPP in the desert than in the typical steppes. The results showed that the desert steppe with lower productivity may respond strongly to precipitation changes, particularly with warming, highlighting the positive effect of adding water with warming. Our study implies that the habitat- and year-specific responses to warming and watering should be considered when predicting an ecosystem’s functional responses under climate change scenarios.

  20. Ecosystem responses to warming and watering in typical and desert steppes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Hou, Yanhui; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is projected to continue, leading to intense fluctuations in precipitation and heat waves and thereby affecting the productivity and the relevant biological processes of grassland ecosystems. Here, we determined the functional responses to warming and altered precipitation in both typical and desert steppes. The results showed that watering markedly increased the aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in a typical steppe during a drier year and in a desert steppe over two years, whereas warming manipulation had no significant effect. The soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and the soil respiration (SR) were increased by watering in both steppes, but the SR was significantly decreased by warming in the desert steppe only. The inorganic nitrogen components varied irregularly, with generally lower levels in the desert steppe. The belowground traits of soil total organic carbon (TOC) and the MBC were more closely associated with the ANPP in the desert than in the typical steppes. The results showed that the desert steppe with lower productivity may respond strongly to precipitation changes, particularly with warming, highlighting the positive effect of adding water with warming. Our study implies that the habitat- and year-specific responses to warming and watering should be considered when predicting an ecosystem’s functional responses under climate change scenarios. PMID:27721480

  1. A weight-of-evidence approach to assessing the ecological impact of organotin pollution in Dutch marine brackish waters; combining risk prognosis and field monitoring using common periwinkles (Littorina littorea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, R.; Smit, M.G.D.; Kaag, N.H.B.M.; Vethaak, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study an integrated ecological risk assessment based on multiple lines of evidence (LOEs) was evaluated in order to better assess the risk from TBT in Dutch harbours and open coastal waters. On the basis of spatial distributions of measured tributyltin (TBT) concentrations in sediment

  2. Contrasting water use pattern of introduced and native plants in an alpine desert ecosystem, Northeast Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huawu, E-mail: wuhuawu416@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Xiao-Yan, E-mail: xyli@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Jiang, Zhiyun; Chen, Huiying; Zhang, Cicheng; Xiao, Xiong [College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Plant water use patterns reflect the complex interactions between different functional types and environmental conditions in water-limited ecosystems. However, the mechanisms underlying the water use patterns of plants in the alpine desert of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau remain poorly understood. This study investigated seasonal variations in the water sources of herbs (Carex moorcroftii, Astragalus adsurgens) and shrubs (Artemisia oxycephala, Hippophae rhamnoides) using stable oxygen-18 isotope methods. The results indicated that the native herbs (C. moorcroftii, A. adsurgens) and one of the shrubs (A. oxycephala) mainly relied on water from the shallow layer (0–30 cm) throughout the growing season, while the introduced shrub (H. rhamnoides) showed plasticity in switching between water from shallow and deep soil layers depending on soil water availability. All studied plants primarily depended on water from shallow soil layers early in the season. The differences of water use patterns between the introduced and native plants are closely linked with the range of active root zones when competing for water. Our findings will facilitate the mechanistic understanding of plant–soil–water relations in alpine desert ecosystems and provide information for screening introduced species for sand fixation. - Highlights: • Stable oxygen-18 in soil water experienced great evaporation enrichment. • H. rhamnoides experiences a flexible plasticity to switch between shallow and deep soil water. • Native plants mostly relied on shallow and middle soil water. • Water-use patterns by introduced-native plants are controlled by root characteristics.

  3. Fuzzy logic: applications to the pretreatment of brackish feed water in reverse osmosis treatment plants; Logica difusa: aplicaciones al pretratamiento del agua salobre de elimentacion de plantas desalladoras por osmosis inversa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluss Contino, J.; Simon Ruiz, J. L.; Hernandez, A.; Menendez Martinez, A.; Yaglian Steiner, E.; Menendez Fernandez, A.; Marcelo Cano, F.

    2004-07-01

    Frequently physical and chemical alteration that can suffer feed water composition and membranes behaviour of reverse osmosis desalination plants (RODP), define a vague nature system from the point of view of decision make process. In this work, we proposes the utilization of the approximate reasoning associated with the fuzzy logic, as an alternative to approach this problem and to make possible early corrective actions, that is, to do a proactive maintenance with Condition-based maintenance (CBM) technology. (Author) 21 refs.

  4. A weight-of-evidence approach to assessing the ecological impact of organotin pollution in Dutch marine and brackish waters; combining risk prognosis and field monitoring using common periwinkles (Littorina littorea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Cor A; Smit, Mathijs G D; Kaag, Nicholas H B M; Dick Vethaak, A

    2008-08-01

    In the present study an integrated ecological risk assessment based on multiple lines of evidence (LOEs) was evaluated in order to better assess the risk from TBT in Dutch harbours and open coastal waters. On the basis of spatial distributions of measured tributyltin (TBT) concentrations in sediments and suspended matter, predictions of the intersex index (ISI) in Littorina littorea and the ecological risk expressed as the Potentially Affected Fraction (PAF) of species were made. The results were compared to actual ISI measurements and presence of L. littorea in the field. The PAF calculated on the basis of TBT levels for open coastal waters ranged from 4.2% to 15.3%; for harbours it ranged from 3.5% to 26.9%. Significant intersex levels were observed only in waters where the risk was calculated above 10% PAF. This study suggests that the absence of L. littorea from some harbours with high ecological risk values can be explained by high TBT concentrations. A call is made for the use of integrated approaches like weight-of-evidence (WOE) to help practitioners improve ecological risk assessment.

  5. Land-margin ecosystem hydrologic data for the coastal Everglades, Florida, water years 1996-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gordon H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Balentine, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests and salt marshes dominate the landscape of the coastal Everglades (Odum and McIvor, 1990). However, the ecological effects from potential sea-level rise and increased water flows from planned freshwater Everglades restoration on these coastal systems are poorly understood. The National Park Service (NPS) proposed the South Florida Global Climate Change Project (SOFL-GCC) in 1990 to evaluate climate change and the effect from rising sea levels on the coastal Everglades, particularly at the marsh/mangrove interface or ecotone (Soukup and others, 1990). A primary objective of SOFL-GCC project was to monitor and synthesize the hydrodynamics of the coastal Everglades from the upstream freshwater marsh to the downstream estuary mangrove. Two related hypotheses were set forward (Nuttle and Cosby, 1993): 1. There exists hydrologic conditions (tide, local rainfall, and upstream water deliveries), which characterize the location of the marsh/mangrove ecotone along the marine and terrestrial hydrologic gradient; and 2. The marsh/mangrove ecotone is sensitive to fluctuations in sea level and freshwater inflow from inland areas. Hydrologic monitoring of the SOFL-GCC network began in 1995 after startup delays from Hurricane Andrew (August 1992) and organizational transfers from the NPS to the National Biological Survey (October 1993) and the merger with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biological Research Division in 1996 (Smith, 2004). As the SOFL-GCC project progressed, concern by environmental scientists and land managers over how the diversion of water from Everglades National Park would affect the restoration of the greater Everglades ecosystem. Everglades restoration scenarios were based on hydrodynamic models, none of which included the coastal zone (Fennema and others, 1994). Modeling efforts were expanded to include the Everglades coastal zone (Schaffranek and others, 2001) with SOFL-GCC hydrologic data assisting the ecological modeling needs. In 2002

  6. The Role of Vegetation Dynamics on the Soil Water Balance in Water-Limited Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Rondena, R.; Albertson, J. D.; Mancini, M.

    2003-12-01

    The structure and function of the vegetation regulates the exchange of mass, energy and momentum across the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Vegetation dynamics are usually neglected, other than seasonal phenology, in land surface models (LSMs). However, changes in vegetation densities, influencing the partitioning of incoming solar energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes, can result in long-term changes in both local and global climates (e.g., precipitation and temperature), which in turn will feedback to affect the vegetation growth. In semi-arid regions, this may result in persistent drought and desertification, with substantial impacts on the human populations of these regions through reduction in agricultural productivity and reduction in quantity and quality of water supply. With an objective of finding a simple vegetation model able to accurately simulate the leaf area index (LAI) dynamics, vegetation models of different level of complexity (e.g., including or not the modeling of the root biomass or the modeling of the dead biomass) are developed and compared. The vegetation dynamics models are coupled to a LSM, with the vegetation models providing the green biomass and the LAI evolution through time, and the LSM using this information in the computation of the land surface fluxes and updating the soil water content in the root-zone. We explore the models on a case study of a water limited grass field in California. Results show that a simple vegetation model that simulates the living aboveground green biomass (i.e., with low parameterization and computational efforts) is able to accurately simulate the LAI. Results also highlight the importance of including the plant growth model in the LSM when studying the climate-soil-vegetation interactions and the impact of watershed management practices on the scarce water resources over moderate to long time scales. The inclusion of the vegetation model in the LSM is demonstrated to be essential for assessing the

  7. Firms’ willingness to invest in a water fund to improve water-related ecosystem services in the Lake Naivasha basin, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulatu, D.W.; Oel, van P.R.; Veen, van der A.

    2015-01-01

    A valuation scenario was designed using a contingent-valuation approach and presented to decision makers in business firms in Kenya’s Lake Naivasha basin to test how applicable a water fund might be as a potential financing mechanism for a payment for water-related ecosystem services scheme. The fin

  8. TIPEX (Tropical Indo-Pacific water transport and ecosystem monitoring EXperiment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchull Jeon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors influencing the climate around Korea is the oceanic-atmospheric variability in the tropical region between the eastern Indian and the western Pacific Oceans. Lack of knowledge about the air-sea interaction in the tropical Indo-Pacific region continues to make it problematic forecasting the ocean climate in the East Asia. The ‘Tropical Indo-Pacific water transport and ecosystem monitoring EXperiment (TIPEX’ is a program for monitoring the ocean circulation variability between Pacific and Indian Oceans and for improving the accuracy of future climate forecasting. The main goal of the TIPEX program is to quantify the climate and ocean circulation change between the Indian and the Pacific Oceans. The contents of the program are 1 to observe the mixing process of different water masses and water transport in the eastern Indian and the western Pacific, 2 to understand the large-scale oceanic-climatic variation including El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO/Warm Pool/Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO/Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD, and 3 to monitor the biogeochemical processes, material flux, and biological changes due to the climate change. In order to effectively carry out the monitoring program, close international cooperation and the proper co-work sharing of tasks between China, Japan, Indonesia, and India as well as USA is required.

  9. Water sources of plants and groundwater in typical ecosystems in the lower reaches of the Heihe River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YunFeng Ruan; LiangJu Zhao; HongLang Xiao; GuoDong Cheng; MaoXian Zhou; Fang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ18O andδD) of soil water and shallow groundwater of a riparian forest, an artificial shrub forest, and Gobi of the lower reaches of the Heihe River Basin are used to study the recharge water sources of those ecosystems. IsoSource software is used to determine theδ18O values for root water of Populous euphratica and Tamarix ramosissima in the riparian forest ecosystem, Haloxylon ammodendron in the artificial shrub forest, and Reaumuria soongorica in the Gobi, as well as for local soil water and groundwater, and precipitation in the upper reaches of the Heihe River Basin. Our results showed that soil water and shallow groundwater of the riparian forest and the artificial shrub forest were recharged by river water which originated from precipitation in the upper reaches, and strong evaporation occurred in the artificial shrub forest. Soil water of the Gobi was not affected by Heihe River water due to this area being far away from the river channel. The main water sources of Populous euphratica were from 40-60-cm soil water and groundwater, and of Tamarix ramosissima were from 40-80-cm soil water in the riparian forest ecosystem. In the artificial forest, Haloxylon ammodendron used 200-cm saturated-layer soil water and shallow groundwater. The Reaumuria soongorica mainly used soil water from the 175-200-cm depth in the Gobi. Therefore, soil water and groundwater are the main water sources which maintain survival and growth of the plants in the extremely arid regions of the lower reaches of the Heihe River Basin.

  10. An integrated model for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human receptors and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, S.G.; Rasmussen, J.J.;

    2010-01-01

      The practical implementation of the European Water Framework Directive has resulted in an increased focus on the hyporheic zone. In this paper, an integrated model was developed for evaluating the impact of point sources in groundwater on human health and surface water ecosystems....... This was accomplished by coupling the system dynamics-based decision support system CARO-PLUS to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX using an analytical volatilization model for the stream. The model was applied to a case study where a TCE contaminated groundwater plume is discharging to a stream. The TCE source...... will not be depleted for many decades, however measured and predicted TCE concentrations in surface water were found to be below human health risk management targets. Volatilization rapidly attenuates TCE concentrations in surface water. Thus, only a 300 m stream reach fails to meet surface water quality criteria...

  11. Quantifying energy and water fluxes in dry dune ecosystems of the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, B. R.; Bartholomeus, R. P.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Witte, J. P. M.

    2015-09-01

    Coastal and inland dunes provide various ecosystem services that are related to groundwater, such as drinking water production and biodiversity. To manage groundwater in a sustainable manner, knowledge of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) for the various land covers in dunes is essential. Aiming at improving the parameterization of dune vegetation in hydrometeorological models, this study explores the magnitude of energy and water fluxes in an inland dune ecosystem in the Netherlands. Hydrometeorological measurements were used to parameterize the Penman-Monteith evapotranspiration model for four different surfaces: bare sand, moss, grass and heather. We found that the net longwave radiation (Rnl) was the largest energy flux for most surfaces during daytime. However, modeling this flux by a calibrated FAO-56 Rnl model for each surface and for hourly time steps was unsuccessful. Our Rnl model, with a novel submodel using solar elevation angle and air temperature to describe the diurnal pattern in radiative surface temperature, improved Rnl simulations considerably. Model simulations of evaporation from moss surfaces showed that the modulating effect of mosses on the water balance is species-dependent. We demonstrate that dense moss carpets (Campylopus introflexus) evaporate more (5 %, +14 mm) than bare sand (total of 258 mm in 2013), while more open-structured mosses (Hypnum cupressiforme) evaporate less (-30 %, -76 mm) than bare sand. Additionally, we found that a drought event in the summer of 2013 showed a pronounced delayed signal on lysimeter measurements of ETa for the grass and heather surfaces, respectively. Due to the desiccation of leaves after the drought event, and their feedback on the surface resistance, the potential evapotranspiration in the year 2013 dropped by 9 % (-37 mm) and 10 % (-61 mm) for the grass and heather surfaces, respectively, which subsequently led to lowered ETa of 8 % (-29 mm) and 7 % (-29 mm). These feedbacks are of importance for

  12. Ecosystem-groundwater interactions under changing land uses: Linking water, salts, and carbon across central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Nosetto, M. D.; Santoni, C. S.; Jackson, R. B.

    2007-05-01

    Although most ecosystems display a one-way connection with groundwater based on the regulation of deep water drainage (recharge), this link can become reciprocal when the saturated zone is shallow and plants take up groundwater (discharge). In what context is the reciprocal link most likely? How is it affected by land use changes? Has it consequences on salt and carbon cycling? We examine these questions across a precipitation gradient in the Pampas and Espinal of Argentina focusing on three vegetation change situations (mean annual rainfall): afforestation of humid (900-1300 mm) and subhumid grassland (700-900 mm/yr of rainfall), annual cultivation of subhumid grasslands (700-800 mm/yr), and annual cultivation of semiarid forests (500-700 mm). Humid and subhumid grasslands have shallow (salinity of tree species. Cultivation with corn and soybean can lead to groundwater consumption in the driest belt of subhumid grassland. Up to five-fold yield increases in lowlands vs. uplands during the driest years indicate a dramatic impact of groundwater use on carbon uptake and groundwater salinization suggests a recharge-to- discharge switch. In dry forests groundwater is not accessible (> 15 m deep) and recharge under natural conditions is null. The establishment of crops, however, triggers the onset of recharge, as evidenced by vadose zones getting wetter and leached of atmospheric chloride. Cropping may cause water table raises leading to a two-way coupling of ecosystems and groundwater in the future, as it has been documented for similar settings in Australia and the Sahel. In the Pampas land use change interacts with groundwater consumption leading to higher carbon uptake (humid and subhumid grasslands) and salt accumulation (subhumid grasslands). In the Espinal (semiarid forest) land use change currently involves a one-way effect on groundwater recharge that may switch to a reciprocal connection if regional water table raises occur. Neglecting the role of groundwater

  13. SPATIAL AND MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN THE SURFACE WATER AND DEEP SEDIMENTS OF FRESH WATER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the levels of various trace metals present in water and sediment of fresh water aquatic ecosystem during the post monsoon season. The study was extended to identify the trace metal contamination in the water and sediment samples collected along the shores of Lambapur and Peddagattu the tribal villages in India using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICPMS. The trace metal contents in water samples were copper- 24.2 to 47.5, chromium- 4.4 to 8.2, cadmium- 0.1 to 0.3, lead- 2.1 to 3.8, Nickel- 5.9 to 9.7, Zinc- 4.6 to 9.7, Manganese- 10.8 to 13.2, Iron- 52.9 to 157.2 (µg L-1 cobalt and arsenic were in BDL and the values were within the limits of Indian drinking water standards (BIS 10500: 1991. The trace metals concentration in the sediment samples ranged from (mg kg-1: Copper- 61.5 to 113.7, chromium- 138.4 to 177.5, cobalt- 33.2 to 42.7, cadmium- 1.0 to 2.1, lead- 57.9 to 103.4, Nickel- 36.1 to 56.6, Zinc- 51.2 to 102.1, Manganese- 610.8 to 1301.7 and Iron- 2.5 to 2.9%. In our study, four reliable indices such as Enrichment factor, Contamination factor, Geoaccumulation Index and Pollution Load Index were applied to estimate metal pollution and the results comparison are discussed below. The data generated were used to determine the quality of the sediments based on the enrichment factor, contamination factor and degree of contamination, geochemical index and Pollution Load Index (PLI.

  14. Environmental water requirements of groundwater dependent ecosystems: conflict between nature and man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witczak, S.; Kania, J.; Rozanski, K.; Wachniew, P.; Zurek, A.; Dulinski, M.

    2012-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at investigating possible interactions between the porous sandy aquifer intensively exploited for drinking water purposes and the groundwater dependent ecosystem (GDE) consisting of a valuable forest stand. The investigated aquifer (Bogucice Sands) and the associated GDE (Niepolomice Forest) are located in the south of Poland. The aquifer covers the area of ca. 200 km2 and belongs to the category of medium groundwater basins in Poland. The Niepolomice Forest is a lowland forest covering around 110 km2. This relic of once vast forests is protected as a Natura 2000 Special Protection Area "Puszcza Niepolomicka" (PLB120002) that supports bird populations of European importance. Additionally, a fen in the western part of the Niepolomice Forest comprises a separate Natura 2000 area "Torfowisko Wielkie Bloto" (PLH120080), a significant habitat of endangered butterfly species associated with wet meadows. The Niepolomice Forest contains also several nature reserves and the European bison breeding centre and has an important recreational value as the largest forest complex in the vicinity of Krakow. Due to spatially variable lithologies and groundwater levels, the Niepolomice Forest is a mosaic of various forest and non-forest habitats, including wetlands, marsh forests, humid forests and fresh forests. Dependence of the Niepolomice Forest stands on groundwater is enhanced by low available water capacity and low capillary rise of soils in the area. Groundwater conditions in the Niepolomice Forest, including Wielkie Bloto fen have been affected by meliorations carried out mostly in the period 1900-1930 and after the Second World War and by forest management. Due to artesian conditions in the area and relatively thin clay layer separating Tertiary aquifer layers from shallow Quaternary aquifer, the upward leaching of deeper groundwater may contribute in a significant way to the water balance of the investigated GDE. In September 2009 a cluster of

  15. Concentrações de amônia, nitrito e nitrato em larvicultura do camarão Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man, realizada em sistema fechado com água salobra natural e artificial Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate concentrations in a recirculating Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man hatchery, performed with natural and artificial brackish water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cotroni Valenti

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da água salobra natural e artificial e da sua utilização em dois cultivos consecutivos sobre as concentrações de amônia, nitrito e nitrato, em sistema fechado de larvicultura de M. rosenbergii (Crustacea, Decapoda. A amônia oscilou entre 1,1 e 74,0 µg/l e o nitrito entre e 1,1 e 34,6 µg/l; estes não diferiram entre os tipos de água analisados. A concentração de nitrato (N aumentou ao longo do tempo (T de forma similar na água natural e artificial, seguindo um modelo linear (N = 0,241T – 0,734. Os resultados indicaram que a água salobra artificial não alterou o processo de nitrificação, tampouco o comportamento das principais variáveis ambientais. A reutilização da água também não produziu nenhum efeito negativo sobre essas variáveis. A fórmula de água do mar artificial aqui apresentada pode ser, portanto usada em sistemas de recirculação para a produção de pós-larvas de M. rosenbergii em até dois cultivos consecutivos.Variations of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in a recirculating M. rosenbergii (Crustacea, Decapoda hatchery, reusing natural and artificial brackish water, in two successive cultures, were studied. Ammonia and nitrite values oscillated between 1.1 to 74.0 µg/l and 1.1 to 34.6 µg/l, respectively, and did not differ among the tested water types. Nitrate concentrations (N increased similarly with time (T, according to a linear model (N = 0,241T – 0,734 with both natural and artificial water. Data suggested that the use and reuse of the artificial water did not affect the nitrification process. Therefore, it can be used in recirculating systems for M. rosenbergii hatchery.

  16. Impacts of Green Infrastructure on the Water Budget and Other Ecosystem Services in Subhumid Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Burian, S. J.; Pardyjak, E.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Green infrastructure (GI) measures have been well established as part of low-impact development approaches for stormwater (SW) management. The origin of the concepts, practices and the preponderance of research have taken place in humid climates. Recent work has begun to explore and adapt GI to subhumid and semi-arid climates, which experience warmer and drier periods. But much remains unknown about effects of GI on the water cycle and how to effectively implement to maximize ecosystem benefits. This research synthesizes observation and modeling to address questions related to changes in evapotranspiration (ET), SW runoff volume, and other water cycle processes from GI introduction in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. First, the water budget of green roofs is being studied via weighing lysimeter systems on two rooftop gardens on the University of Utah campus. ET, outflow, and soil moisture have been measured for approximately one year. Up to this early summer, average ET rates for lysimeters of pure medium, Sedums, and Bluegrass are 1.85±1.01, 1.97±0.94, and 2.31±0.91 mm/d respectively; the maximum ET rate could reach 6.11 mm/d from Sedums. Over 2/3 of total rainfall and irrigation were slowly consumed via ET from green roof. Second, the observation studies are leading to new ET modeling techniques that are being incorporated into the U.S. EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). The modified SWMM has been used to simulate ET, SW runoff volume, and overall water budget changes from GI implementation. Preliminary result shows that ET could account for 10% of the total inflows into bioretentions, and 25% of the inflows into landscapes; potential ET rates could vary up to 0.95 mm/hr across 53 subcatchments in the 29 acres catchment. The influence of various design factors for GI on SW runoff reduction and the water budget is also to be estimated. The application of the research is to analyze the water budget of the Red Butte Creek Watershed in Salt Lake City and to

  17. Soil and water losses on citrus orchards under Mediterranean Type Ecosystems. Organic against chemical farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, A.; Bodí, M. B.; García-Orenes, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion in Mediterranean Type Ecosystems is highly dependent on the land use and land management (Cerdà et al., 2010). This is due mainly to the impact of agriculture (Cerdà et al., 2009) as a consequence of tillage and the use of herbicides. Both strategies contribute to a reduction in the vegetation cover and the soil biological activities (García-Orenes et al., 2009). The impact of soil erosion on agronomic productivity and environmental quality is widely known (Lal, 1998), although little has been researched in the Mediterranean. The impact of agriculture on soil erosion and water losses in the Mediterranean basin has been studied in olive orchards (Gómez, 2004); vineyards (Ramos and Martínez Casasnovas, 2004), citrus (Cerdà et al., 2009), cereals (De Santisteban et al., (2005), and the high erosion rates were found to be related to the land management and land use (García Ruiz, 2010). The current Mediterranean agriculture is based on tillage and herbicides, which contribute to high soil and water losses. The development of sustainable agriculture practices is a challenge for farmers, technicians and politicians. Organic farming use strategies to reduce the soil losses and develop new strategies of soil conservation. Moreover organic farming recover the soil fertility and biodiversity (Maeder et al., 2002). Organic farming is growing in the Mediterranean but little is know about his effect on soil conservation. There is a lack in the knowledge of how organic farming affect the soil properties and, there is no information on his effect on soil and water losses. This paper aims to measure the impact of organic farming on soil and water losses. 10 plots of 1 x 0,5 m were selected in a chemically managed farm in Montesa (Eastern Spain) and 10 plots in a nearby organic farming managed farm. Both of them were cultivated with citrus. The ten paired plots were monitored. After earch rainfall event the sediment and water collected were measured and analized

  18. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, R.; Brown, J.; Holm, E.; Roos, P.; Saxen, R.; Outola, I.

    2012-01-15

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  19. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Brackish Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_brackish_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) brackish marshes data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  20. Origin and characteristics of brackish groundwater in Abu Madi coastal area, Northern Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Al Temamy, A. M.; Salah, Mohamed K.; Kassab, M.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogeochemical and geoelectrical resistivity investigations were carried out to assess the origin and characteristics of a brackish groundwater in Abu Madi coastal area. Twenty six surface water, shallow and deep groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for various ionic concentrations as well as oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopic contents. In addition, a total of 20 vertical electrical sounding sites were conducted to investigate layers' thicknesses, resistivities, and to detect the water-bearing layers. Then, 2-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) along two profiles in the study area was conducted to get information about the surface water effect on recharge. The stable isotopic composition and the chloride concentrations strongly suggest that the deep groundwater in Abu Madi area is dominated by inland freshwater with a minor seawater component. This groundwater was recharged during the first and the third Holocene humid climatic cycles where the sea surface was about 125 and 25 m below the current sea level, respectively. The brackish nature and higher piezometric surface of the groundwater, as well as the occurrence of vertical low-salinity seawater zone in front of the study area, support the possibility of submarine groundwater discharge. The geoelectrical resistivity surveying, on the other hand, revealed a number of geoelectrical groundwater-bearing layers. The main water-bearing layer in the study area is represented by the sixth geoelectrical layer, which has relatively high resistivity and a considerable thickness being consistent with the hydrogeochemical observations. ERT results point to the presence of shallow water-bearing layers recharged from the surface water drains with low resistivity and surface rain water of moderate resistivity. Results from the hydrogeochemical analyses and the different hydrogeological data are consistent with the high resistivity values of this geoelectrical layer. However, the overall high specific

  1. [Evaluation of ecosystem service and emergy of Wanshan Waters in Zhuhai, Guangdong Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuan-xin; Chen, Pi-mao; Zhang, An-kai; Yuan, Hua; Li, Guo-ying; Shu, Li-ming; Zhou, Yan-bo; Li, Xiao-guo

    2015-06-01

    The method for monetary value and emergy value analysis of ecosystem service was used in this paper to analyze the change in value of marine ecosystem service of Wanshan District, Zhuhai from 2007 to 2012. The result showed that the monetary value and emergy value of marine ecosystem service of Wanshan District, Zhuhai rose to 11512840000 yuan and 1.97 x 10(22) sej from 7721630000 yuan and 1.04 x 10(22) sej, respectively. Both monetary value and emergy value could forecast the change in the value of marine ecosystem service, but they reflected different value structures and ecological energy, which could be used to more objectively evaluate the ecosystem service. Ecological civilization development, as an inherent driving force to impel the development of marine ecosystem service structure, was important for rational exploitation of marine resources and optimization of marine ecosystem service.

  2. Fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; He, Di; Waite, T David

    2015-11-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging water desalination technology in which pairs of porous electrodes are electrically charged to remove ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode CDI was investigated. Initially, the effects of flow rate, initial fluoride concentration, and initial coexisting NaCl concentration on fluoride removal were studied. The steady-state fluoride concentration declined as the initial fluoride concentration decreased while initial NaCl concentration remained constant. Due to the competitive electrosorption between fluoride and chloride for limited pore surface sites, a higher initial chloride concentration resulted in a higher equilibrium dissolved fluoride concentration. A simplified one-dimensional transport model for dual anions was developed and found to reliably describe the dynamic process of removal of both fluoride and chloride ions in CDI cells over a range of well-defined operating conditions. Based on the ability of the model to describe fluoride removal, it was extended to description of nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters and also found to perform well. Thus, the approach to description of ion removal, at least in batch studies, appears robust and should assist in optimization of design and operating conditions such that optimal removal of trace ionic species is achieved even when high background concentrations of salt are present.

  3. Use of UASB reactors for brackish aquaculture sludge digestion under different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Gross, Amit

    2013-05-15

    Treatment and disposal of high volume of salty waste production in recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) is a major challenge and the sludge is often a source of environmental pollution and salinization of receiving soils and water bodies. Anaerobic digestion is an efficient mean for the treatment of wastes of different origins and might serve a useful tool for the reduction of salty aquaculture discharge load. Use of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for digestion of brackish aquaculture sludge from RASs under different C:N ratios, temperatures, and hydraulic retention times demonstrated high removal efficiencies of over 92% as volatile solids (VS), 98% as chemical oxygen demand and 81% as total suspended solids in all reactors. Methane production topped 7.1 mL/gVS d and was limited by low C:N ratio but was not influenced by temperature fluctuations. The treated liquid effluent from all reactors was of sufficient quality for reuse in the RAS, leading to significant water recycling and saving rates. UASB may be an attractive solution for brackish sludge management in RASs.

  4. Convergence of the effect of root hydraulic functioning and root hydraulic redistribution on ecosystem water and carbon balance across divergent forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    domec, J.; King, J. S.; Ogée, J.; Noormets, A.; Warren, J.; Meinzer, F. C.; Sun, G.; Jordan-Meille, L.; Martineau, E.; Brooks, R. J.; Laclau, J.; Battie Laclau, P.; McNulty, S.

    2012-12-01

    INVITED ABSTRACT: Deep root water uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) play a major role in forest ecosystems during drought, but little is known about the impact of climate change on root-zone processes influencing HR and its consequences on water and carbon fluxes. Using data from two old growth sites in the western USA, two mature sites in the eastern USA, one site in southern Brazil, and simulations with the process-based model MuSICA, our objectives were to show that HR can 1) mitigate the effects of soil drying on root functioning, and 2) have important implications for carbon uptake and net ecosystem exchange (NEE). In a dry, old-growth ponderosa pine (USA) and a eucalyptus stand (Brazil) both characterized by deep sandy soils, HR limited the decline in root hydraulic conductivity and increased dry season tree transpiration (T) by up to 30%, which impacted NEE through major increases in gross primary productivity (GPP). The presence of deep-rooted trees did not necessarily imply high rates of HR unless soil texture allowed large water potential gradients to occur, as was the case in the wet old-growth Douglas-fir/mixed conifer stand. At the Duke mixed hardwood forest characterized by a shallow clay-loam soil, modeled HR was low but not negligible, representing annually up to 10% of T, and maintaining root conductance high. At this site, in the absence of HR, it was predicted that annual GPP would have been diminished by 7-19%. At the coastal loblolly pine plantation, characterized by deep organic soil, HR limited the decline in shallow root conductivity by more than 50% and increased dry season T by up to 40%, which increased net carbon gain by the ecosystem by about 400 gC m-2 yr-1, demonstrating the significance of HR in maintaining the stomatal conductance and assimilation capacity of the whole ecosystem. Under future climate conditions (elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature), HR is predicted to be reduced by up to 50%; reducing the resilience of

  5. Contrasting water use pattern of introduced and native plants in an alpine desert ecosystem, Northeast Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huawu; Li, Xiao-Yan; Jiang, Zhiyun; Chen, Huiying; Zhang, Cicheng; Xiao, Xiong

    2016-01-15

    Plant water use patterns reflect the complex interactions between different functional types and environmental conditions in water-limited ecosystems. However, the mechanisms underlying the water use patterns of plants in the alpine desert of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau remain poorly understood. This study investigated seasonal variations in the water sources of herbs (Carex moorcroftii, Astragalus adsurgens) and shrubs (Artemisia oxycephala, Hippophae rhamnoides) using stable oxygen-18 isotope methods. The results indicated that the native herbs (C. moorcroftii, A. adsurgens) and one of the shrubs (A. oxycephala) mainly relied on water from the shallow layer (0-30 cm) throughout the growing season, while the introduced shrub (H. rhamnoides) showed plasticity in switching between water from shallow and deep soil layers depending on soil water availability. All studied plants primarily depended on water from shallow soil layers early in the season. The differences of water use patterns between the introduced and native plants are closely linked with the range of active root zones when competing for water. Our findings will facilitate the mechanistic understanding of plant-soil-water relations in alpine desert ecosystems and provide information for screening introduced species for sand fixation.

  6. Adoption of land uses compatible with the water ecosystem service in agricultural farms in Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Meza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of trees in the farms is typically considered a good practice in water shed management. Therefore, it was examined the voluntary adoption of land uses considered more compatible with the water ecosystem service (shade coffee and woodland in the region of Trifinio (located in Honduras and Guatemala, where there is not given any incentives or payment for this environmental service. It was observed low adoption of these land uses on small farms. In practice, participation of small farms in conservation programs are subject to certain factors beyond the control of the producers such as minimum area of the farm. But, other factors such as perceived importance of land use has on food security and future motivation for adopting a production system can be more easily manipulated, although, in practical terms it is not always possible. Thus, for a spontaneous adoption of the trees and the forest should also influence cultural factors, even if the changes in this dimension generally take longer to be observed than the lifetime of the conservation projects.

  7. A transdisciplinary approach for supporting the integration of ecosystem services into land and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatt Siew, Tuck; Döll, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Transdisciplinary approaches are useful for supporting integrated land and water management. However, the implementation of the approach in practice to facilitate the co-production of useable socio-hydrological (and -ecological) knowledge among scientists and stakeholders is challenging. It requires appropriate methods to bring individuals with diverse interests and needs together and to integrate their knowledge for generating shared perspectives/understanding, identifying common goals, and developing actionable management strategies. The approach and the methods need, particularly, to be adapted to the local political and socio-cultural conditions. To demonstrate how knowledge co-production and integration can be done in practice, we present a transdisciplinary approach which has been implemented and adapted for supporting land and water management that takes ecosystem services into account in an arid region in northwestern China. Our approach comprises three steps: (1) stakeholder analysis and interdisciplinary knowledge integration, (2) elicitation of perspectives of scientists and stakeholders, scenario development, and identification of management strategies, and (3) evaluation of knowledge integration and social learning. Our adapted approach has enabled interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral communication among scientists and stakeholders. Furthermore, the application of a combination of participatory methods, including actor modeling, Bayesian Network modeling, and participatory scenario development, has contributed to the integration of system, target, and transformation knowledge of involved stakeholders. The realization of identified management strategies is unknown because other important and representative decision makers have not been involved in the transdisciplinary research process. The contribution of our transdisciplinary approach to social learning still needs to be assessed.

  8. An integrated model for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human receptors and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, S.G.; Rasmussen, J.J.;

    2010-01-01

    . This was accomplished by coupling the system dynamics-based decision support system CARO-PLUS to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX using an analytical volatilization model for the stream. The model was applied to a case study where a TCE contaminated groundwater plume is discharging to a stream. The TCE source...... will not be depleted for many decades, however measured and predicted TCE concentrations in surface water were found to be below human health risk management targets. Volatilization rapidly attenuates TCE concentrations in surface water. Thus, only a 300 m stream reach fails to meet surface water quality criteria....... An ecological risk assessment found that the TCE contamination did not impact the stream ecosystem. Uncertainty assessment revealed hydraulic conductivity to be the most important site-specific parameter. These results indicate that contaminant plumes with μgL-1 concentrations of TCE entering surface water...

  9. A natural driven membrane process for brackish and wastewater treatment: photovoltaic powered ED and FO hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Pinoy, Luc; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2013-09-17

    In isolated locations, remote areas, or islands, potable water is precious because of the lack of drinking water treatment facilities and energy supply. Thus, a robust and reliable water treatment system based on natural energy is needed to reuse wastewater or to desalinate groundwater/seawater for provision of drinking water. In this work, a hybrid membrane system combining electrodialysis (ED) and forward osmosis (FO), driven by renewable energy (solar energy), denoted as EDFORD (ED-FO Renewable energy Desalination), is proposed to produce high-quality water (potable) from secondary wastewater effluent or brackish water. In this hybrid membrane system, feedwater (secondary wastewater effluent or synthetic brackish water) was drawn to the FO draw solution while the organic and inorganic substances (ions, compounds, colloids and particles) were rejected. The diluted draw solution was then pumped to the solar energy driven ED. In the ED unit, the diluted draw solution was desalted and high-quality water was produced; the concentrate was recycled to the FO unit and reused as the draw solution. Results show that the water produced from this system contains a low concentration of total organic carbon (TOC), carbonate, and cations derived from the feedwater; had a low conductivity; and meets potable water standards. The water production cost considering the investment for membranes and solar panel is 3.32 to 4.92 EUR m(-3) (for 300 days of production per year) for a small size potable water production system.

  10. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  11. Geochemical indicators and characterization of soil water repellence in three dominant ecosystems of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Jordan, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; Stevens, Jason; González-Pérez, Jose Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Soil water repellency (SWR) has critical implications for restoration of vegetation in degraded areas as it is responsible of poor plant establishment and a high incidence of erosion processes. Different organic substances are capable of inducing SWR but polar molecules such as certain fatty acids, and waxes i.e. esters and salts of fatty acids, appear to be the main constituents of hydrophobic coatings on soil mineral particles (Doerr et al., 2005). Plant species most commonly associated with SWR are evergreen trees with a considerable amount of resins, waxes or aromatic oils such as eucalypts and pines. Most of these substances are abundant in ecosystems and are released to soil by plants as root exudates or decaying organic debris, and by soil fauna, fungi and other microorganisms, but a thorough knowledge of substances capable of inducing hydrophobicity in soils is still not complete (Jordan et al., 2013). Although SWR has been reported in most continents of the world for different soil types, climate conditions and land uses, there are still many research gaps in this area, particularly in semi-arid areas largely affected by this phenomenon. Materials and methods This research was conducted in three dominant ecosystems of Western Australia (WA), e.g. semi-arid grassland in the Pilbara region (North WA), Banksia woodland, and a coastal dune (both located in South WA). These environments have different climate characteristics and soil types but similar vegetation communities. Soil samples were collected under the canopy of a broad range of plant species that compose the dominant vegetation communities of these ecosystems, and SWR was measured under lab conditions in oven-dry samples (48 h, 105 °C). Soil microbial activity was measured with the 1-day CO2 test, a cost-effective and rapid method to determine soil microbial respiration rate based on the measurement of the CO2 burst produced after moistening dry soil (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2016). Soil p

  12. Agricultural Best Management Practice Abundance and Location does not Influence Stream Ecosystem Function or Water Quality in the Summer Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan J. T. Pearce

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Best management practices (BMPs are tools commonly used to mitigate negative impacts of agriculture on water quality; however, the relationship between BMPs and aquatic ecological function is unknown. Our research goal was to determine the association between both stream ecosystem metabolism and water quality, and the abundance and location of four different BMPs in agricultural catchments. Dissolved oxygen was measured over a two-week period in mid-June and used to estimate ecosystem metabolism of 13 headwater streams representing a gradient of BMP implementation in Southern Ontario, Canada. Stepwise regression analyses were used to associate stream metabolism and water quality with metrics describing the abundance and location of BMPs within each catchment. Studied streams exhibited rates of metabolism comparable to catchments from other agricultural regions. However, metrics of BMP implementation were not associated with either stream metabolism or water quality. Our results suggest that BMPs in the studied agricultural catchments are not improving water quality or mitigating water quality impacts on stream metabolism during the summer season. We propose that seasonality of catchment hydrology and time lag effects associated with past agricultural land use may be masking the mitigation benefits of BMPs on stream ecosystem conditions during the summer season.

  13. Effects of landcover, water redistribution, and temperature on ecosystem processes in the South Plate Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J. S.; Hartman, M.D.; Kittel, T. G. F.; Band, L.E.; Ojima, D. S.; Lammers, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Over one-third of the land area in the South Platte Basin of Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming, has been converted to croplands. Irrigated cropland now comprises 8% of the basin, while dry croplands make up 31%. We used the RHESSys model to compare the changes in plant productivity and vegetation-related hydrological processes that occurred as a result of either land cover alteration or directional temperature changes (−2°C, +4°C). Land cover change exerted more control over annual plant productivity and water fluxes for converted grasslands, while the effect of temperature changes on productivity and water fluxes was stronger in the mountain vegetation. Throughout the basin, land cover change increased the annual loss of water to the atmosphere by 114 mm via evaporation and transpiration, an increase of 37%. Both irrigated and nonirrigated grains became active earlier in the year than shortgrass steppe, leading to a seasonal shift in water losses to the atmosphere. Basin-wide photosynthesis increased by 80% due to grain production. In contrast, a 4°C warming scenario caused annual transpiration to increase by only 3% and annual evaporation to increase by 28%, for a total increase of 71 mm. Warming decreased basin-wide photosynthesis by 16%. There is a large elevational range from east to west in the South Platte Basin, which encompasses the western edge of the Great Plains and the eastern front of the Rocky Mountains. This elevational gain is accompanied by great changes in topographic complexity, vegetation type, and climate. Shortgrass steppe and crops found at elevations between 850 and 1800 m give way to coniferous forests and tundra between 1800 and 4000 m. Climate is increasingly dominated by winter snow precipitation with increasing elevation, and the timing of snowmelt influences tundra and forest ecosystem productivity, soil moisture, and downstream discharge. Mean annual precipitation of <500 mm on the plains below 1800 m is far less than potential

  14. Controls On Water Use Efficiency For Different Forest Ecosystems Across North America: From The Leaf To Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, R.; Lepine, L. C.; Asbjornsen, H.; Xiao, J.; Ollinger, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE), defined as the ratio of carbon assimilation (A) to water loss via transpiration, is the key physiological parameter that explicitly links water and carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. Most studies examining the influence of climatic factors on forest-WUE have focused on site-specific and water-limited ecosystems. Much less is known about the dynamics of WUE across different forest ecosystems, along gradients of climate and soil nutrients. This study explores the variation in WUE at twelve different forested Ameriflux sites across North America spanning a wide range of forest types and climate conditions. We were interested in answering the following questions: 1) Are patterns of WUE at the tree level similar to those for whole ecosystems? 2) Is there a consistent relationship between foliar nitrogen (N) and WUE at the two different scales? 3) To what extent does species diversity explain forest ecosystem functioning and resilience to drought? Finally, 4) Can changes in GPP, ET and WUE across the studied climate gradient be estimated using remotely derived water indices, such as NDWI? We address these questions through a combination of techniques applied at the leaf to landscape level, including foliar δ13C, δ18O and N, eddy covariance and remote sensing data. At each site, we used foliar δ13C to infer intrinsic WUE (iWUE=A/gs) for the two dominant tree species, while foliar N and δ18O provided insights about the species-specific physiological mechanisms underlying variation in iWUE. Furthermore, we used flux data to derive ET and WUEe (i.e., ecosystem WUE= GPP/ET). Variations in iWUE and WUEe in relation to foliar N, climate parameters and water stress index (PSDI) are considered across sites. Moreover, differences in GPP, ET and WUEe are explored in relation to forest ecosystem type, species richness and Shannon's diversity index. Finally we examine the degree to which changes in WUE are related to NDVI and NDWI.

  15. Successful water quality monitoring: The right combination of intent, measurement, interpretation, and a cooperating ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soballe, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    Water quality monitoring is invaluable to ensure compliance with regulations, detect trends or patterns, and advance ecological understanding. However, monitoring typically measures only a few characteristics in a small fraction of a large and complex system, and thus the information contained in monitoring data depends upon which features of the ecosystem are actually captured by the measurements. Difficulties arise when these data contain something other than intended, but this can be minimized if the purpose of the sampling is clear, and the sampling design, measurements, and data interpretations are all compatible with this purpose. The monitoring program and data interpretation must also be properly matched to the structure and functioning of the system. Obtaining this match is sometimes an iterative process that demands a close link between research and monitoring. This paper focuses on water quality monitoring that is intended to track trends in aquatic resources and advance ecological understanding. It includes examples from three monitoring programs and a simulation exercise that illustrate problems that arise when the information content of monitoring data differs from expectation. The examples show (1) how inconsistencies among, or lack of information about, the basic elements of a monitoring program (intent, design, measurement, interpretation, and the monitored system) can produce a systematic difference (bias) between monitoring measurements and sampling intent or interpretation, and (2) that bias is not just a statistical consideration, but an insidious problem that can undermine the scientific integrity of a monitoring program. Some general suggestions are provided and hopefully these examples will help those engaged in water quality monitoring to enhance and protect the value of their monitoring investment.

  16. Water Tables, Evapotranspiration, and Climate Variability: A Decade of Observations From a Semi-Arid Riparian Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, J. R.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C.

    2009-12-01

    Native (Rio Grande cottonwood) riparian ecosystems in the semi-arid Rio Grande floodplain of central New Mexico are threatened by hydrologic alterations and highly competitive invasive vegetation (saltcedar, Russian olive). Climate change is expected to alter surface runoff in the southwestern United States and exacerbate water scarcity. Depletions are likely to increase in this agricultural riverine corridor downstream of the rapidly growing Albuquerque metropolitan area. Long-term monitoring of shallow alluvial water tables (WTs) and evapotranspiration (ET) in native, non-native, and mixed communities along the river has provided critical information to help understand how water availability affects these ecosystems during a decade of extreme climate variability. Here, we present several observations, with implications for restoration. WTs ranged from several meters depth to flood stage and from relatively stable to highly dynamic, which can influence recruitment of native vegetation and ecosystem functioning. Annual ET declined with deeper WTs across sites, with robust correlations where WTs were dynamic. Riparian communities responded differently to drought cycles and to restorative flooding during peak runoff at the onset of the growing season. Annual ET in a native-dominated system was reduced following removal of non-native understory vegetation, but returned to previous levels when regrowth was left unmanaged. Long-term data are valuable assets that can help optimize efforts to sustain and restore native ecosystems amid the challenges of a changing climate.

  17. River basins as social-ecological systems: linking levels of societal and ecosystem water metabolism in a semiarid watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Cabello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available River basin modeling under complexity requires analytical frameworks capable of dealing with the multiple scales and dimensions of environmental problems as well as uncertainty in the evolution of social systems. Conceptual and methodological developments can now be framed using the wide socio-eco-hydrological approach. We add hierarchy theory into the mix to discuss the conceptualization of river basins as complex, holarchic social-ecological systems. We operationalize the social-ecological systems water metabolism framework in a semiarid watershed in Spain, and add the governance dimension that shapes human-environment reciprocity. To this purpose, we integrate an eco-hydrological model with the societal metabolism accounting scheme for land use, human activity, and water use. We explore four types of interactions: between societal organization and water uses/demands, between ecosystem organization and their water requirements/supplies, between societal metabolism and aquatic ecosystem health, and between water demand and availability. Our results reveal a metabolic pattern of a high mountain rural system striving to face exodus and agricultural land abandonment with a multifunctional economy. Centuries of social-ecological evolution shaping waterscapes through traditional water management practices have influenced the eco-hydrological functioning of the basin, enabling adaptation to aridity. We found a marked spatial gradient on water supply, use pattern, and impact on water bodies from the head to the mouth of the basin. Management challenges posed by the European water regulatory framework as a new driver of social-ecological change are highlighted.

  18. Network Analysis as a tool for assessing environmental sustainability: applying the ecosystem perspective to a Danish Water Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Scotti, Marco; Thomsen, Marianne

    2013-03-30

    New insights into the sustainable use of natural resources in human systems can be gained through comparison with ecosystems via common indices. In both kinds of system, resources are processed by a number of users within a network, but we consider ecosystems as the only ones displaying sustainable patterns of growth and development. This study aims at using Network Analysis (NA) to move such "ecosystem perspective" from theory into practice. A Danish municipal Water Management System (WMS) is used as case study to test the NA methodology and to discuss its generic applicability. We identified water users within the WMS and represented their interactions as a network of water flows. We computed intensive and extensive indices of system-level performance for seven different network configurations illustrating past conditions (2004-2008) and future scenarios (2015 and 2020). We also computed the same indices for other 24 human systems and for 12 ecosystems, by using information from the existing scientific literature on NA. The comparison of these results reveals that the WMS is similar to the other human systems and that human systems generally differ from ecosystems. The WMS is highly efficient at processing the water resource, but the rigid and almost linear structure makes it vulnerable in situations of stress such as heavy rain events. The analysis of future scenarios showed a trend towards increased sustainability, but differences between past and expected future performance of the WMS are marginal. We argue that future interventions should create alternative pathways for reusing rainwater within the WMS, increasing its potential to withstand the occurrence of flooding. We discuss advantages, limitations, and general applicability of NA as a tool for assessing environmental sustainability in human systems.

  19. The Future of Evapotranspiration: Global requirements for ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources

    KAUST Repository

    Fisher, Joshua B.

    2017-03-11

    The fate of the terrestrial biosphere is highly uncertain given recent and projected changes in climate. This is especially acute for impacts associated with changes in drought frequency and intensity on the distribution and timing of water availability. The development of effective adaptation strategies for these emerging threats to food and water security are compromised by limitations in our understanding of how natural and managed ecosystems are responding to changing hydrological and climatological regimes. This information gap is exacerbated by insufficient monitoring capabilities from local to global scales. Here, we describe how evapotranspiration (ET) represents the key variable in linking ecosystem functioning, carbon and climate feedbacks, agricultural management, and water resources, and highlight both the outstanding science and applications questions and the actions, especially from a space-based perspective, necessary to advance them. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. A continuous, real-time water quality monitoring system for the coral reef ecosystems of Nanwan Bay, Southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Kwee Siong; Leu, Ming-Yih; Wang, Jih-Terng; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Chung-Chi; Meng, Pei-Jie

    2014-08-30

    The coral reef ecosystems of Nanwan Bay, Southern Taiwan are undergoing degradation due to anthropogenic impacts, and as such have resulted in a decline in coral cover. As a first step in preventing the continual degradation of these coral reef environments, it is important to understand how changes in water quality affect these ecosystems on a fine-tuned timescale. To this end, a real-time water quality monitoring system was implemented in Nanwan Bay in 2010. We found that natural events, such as cold water intrusion due to upwelling, tended to elicit temporal shifts in coral spawning between 2010 and 2011. In addition, Degree Heating Weeks (DHWs), a commonly utilized predictor of coral bleaching, were 0.92 and 0.59 in summer 2010 and 2011, respectively. Though this quantity of DHW was below the presumed stress-inducing value for these reefs, a rise in DHWs in the future may stress the resident corals.

  1. Membrane scaling and flux decline during fertiliser-drawn forward osmosis desalination of brackish groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuntsho, Sherub; Lotfi, Fezeh; Hong, Seungkwan; Shaffer, Devin L; Elimelech, Menachem; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2014-06-15

    Fertiliser-drawn forward osmosis (FDFO) desalination has been recently studied as one feasible application of forward osmosis (FO) for irrigation. In this study, the potential of membrane scaling in the FDFO process has been investigated during the desalination of brackish groundwater (BGW). While most fertilisers containing monovalent ions did not result in any scaling when used as an FO draw solution (DS), diammonium phosphate (DAP or (NH4)2HPO4) resulted in significant scaling, which contributed to severe flux decline. Membrane autopsy using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the reverse diffusion of DAP from the DS to the feed solution was primarily responsible for scale formation during the FDFO process. Physical cleaning of the membrane with deionised water at varying crossflow velocities was employed to evaluate the reversibility of membrane scaling and the extent of flux recovery. For the membrane scaled using DAP as DS, 80-90% of the original flux was recovered when the crossflow velocity for physical cleaning was the same as the crossflow velocity during FDFO desalination. However, when a higher crossflow velocity or Reynolds number was used, the flux was recovered almost completely, irrespective of the DS concentration used. This study underscores the importance of selecting a suitable fertiliser for FDFO desalination of brackish groundwater to avoid membrane scaling and severe flux decline.

  2. Characterization of the bacterial community in the sediment of a brackish lake with oyster aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander-De Leon, Sheila Mae S; Okunishi, Suguru; Kihira, Masaki; Nakano, Miyo; Nuñal, Sharon N; Hidaka, Masayasu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Maeda, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    The physicochemical properties and bacterial community in sediments of Lake Shiraishi, a lake with brackish water, were characterized to elucidate the influence of oyster farming and seawater and freshwater inflow. Physicochemical analyses suggested the marine origin of the sediment at the mouth of the lake, while higher organic matter load and the resultant anaerobic, reductive condition of the sediments of the inner part were observed. The bacterial community in the sediments reflects these sediment environments: the bacterial community in the vicinities of oyster farms included sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) , although sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were found at all the sampling sites. In addition, similarity of the band profiles obtained with 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA) -denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) decreased in proportion to the distance from the mouth of the lake to the oyster farms in the inner part. This study was able to characterize the microbial community shift in brackish lake sediments with an oyster aquaculture system through the molecular fingerprinting technique, DGGE, in relation to their physicochemical characteristics.

  3. [Estimation on value of water and soil conservation of agricultural ecosystems in Xi' an metropolitan, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-yan; Zhou, Zhong-xue

    2014-12-01

    With the urban eco-environment increasingly deteriorating, the ecosystem services provided by modern urban agriculture are exceedingly significant to maintain and build more suitable environment in a city. Taking Xi' an metropolitan as the study area, based on remote sensing data, DEM data and the economic and social statistics data, the water and soil conservation service of the agricultural ecosystems was valued employing the remote sensing and geographic information system method, covering the reduction values on land waste, soil fertility loss and sediment loss from 2000 to 2011, and analyzed its changes in time and space. The results showed that during the study period, the total value of water and soil conservation service provided by agricultural systems in Xi' an metropolitan was increased by 46,086 and 33.008 billion yuan respectively from period of 2000 to 2005 and from 2005 to 2011. The cultivated land (including grains, vegetables and other farming land), forest (including orchard) and grassland provided higher value on the water and soil conservation service than waters and other land use. Ecosystem service value of water and soil conserva- tion provided by agriculture was gradually decreasing from the southern to the northern in Xi' an metropolitan. There were significantly positive relationship between the ecosystem service value and the vegetation coverage. Forest, orchard and grassland distributed intensively in the southern which had higher vegetation coverage than in northern where covered by more cultivated land, sparse forest and scattered orchard. There were significantly negative correlation between the urbanization level and the value of water and soil conservation. The higher level of urbanization, the lower value there was from built-up area to suburban and to countryside within Xi' an metropolitan.

  4. Exploring the Capacity of Water Framework Directive Indices to Assess Ecosystem Services in Fluvial and Riparian Systems: Towards a Second Implementation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Abarca, M. R.; Santos-Martín, F.; Martín-López, B.; Sánchez-Montoya, M. M.; Suárez Alonso, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    We explored the capacity of the biological and hydromorphological indices used in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) to assess ecosystem services by evaluating the ecological status of Spanish River Basins. This analysis relies on an exhaustive bibliography review which showed scientific evidence of the interlinkages between some ecosystem services and different hydromorphological and biological elements which have been used as indices in the WFD. Our findings indicate that, of a total of 38 ecosystem services analyzed, biological and hydromorphological indices can fully evaluate four ecosystem services. In addition, 18 ecosystem services can be partly evaluated by some of the analyzed indices, while 11 are not related with the indices. While Riparian Forest Quality was the index that was able to assess the largest number of ecosystem services ( N = 12), the two indices of macrophytes offered very poor guarantees. Finally, biological indices related to diatoms and aquatic invertebrates and the Fluvial Habitat Index can be related with 7, 6, and 6 ecosystem services, respectively. Because the WFD indices currently used in Spain are not able to assess most of the ecosystem services analyzed, we suggest that there is potential to develop the second phase of the WFD implementation taking this approach into consideration. The incorporation of the ecosystem services approach into the WFD could provide the framework for assess the impacts of human activities on the quality of fluvial ecosystems and could give insights for water and watershed management in order to guarantee the delivery of multiple ecosystem services.

  5. Tracing sewage water by 15N in a mangrove ecosystem to test its bioremediation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambs, Luc; Léopold, Audrey; Zeller, Bernd; Herteman, Mélanie; Fromard, Francois

    2011-10-15

    Mangrove forests could be a simple and effective alternative to conventional sewage treatment, particularly for island communities given its low cost and low maintenance. Due to their high adaptation capacity, these plants are able to tolerate and bioremediate the high levels of nutrients and pollutants found in sewage water. This solution could be applied to small tropical islands with high population density such as Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This paper reports on a trial by stable isotopic (15)N tracing of such a bioremediation process on pre-treated wastewater near the village of Malamani, in the middle of the large coastal mangrove in the bay near Chirongui. The first results show a boost in the mangrove growth, but a longer period of observation is needed to confirm the beneficial effects, and also to clarify the role of the local crab population, whose engineering activities play an important part in the ecosystem. The exact denitrification process is not yet understood, and the mass balance equation also reveals loss of nitrogen-containing compounds, which needs to be analyzed more closely.

  6. Acinetobacter bohemicus sp. nov. widespread in natural soil and water ecosystems in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Sedo, Ondrej; Nemec, Alexandr

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the taxonomic status of a phenetically unique group of 25 Acinetobacter strains which were isolated from multiple soil and water samples collected in natural ecosystems in the Czech Republic. Based on the comparative sequence analyses of the rpoB, gyrB, and 16S rRNA genes, the strains formed a coherent and well separated branch within the genus Acinetobacter. The genomic uniqueness of the group at the species level was supported by the low average nucleotide identity values (≤77.37%) between the whole genome sequences of strain ANC 3994(T) (NCBI accession no. APOH00000000) and the representatives of the known Acinetobacter species. Moreover, all 25 strains created a tight cluster clearly separated from all hitherto described species based on whole-cell protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and shared a unique combination of metabolic and physiological properties. The capacity to assimilate l-histidine and the inability to grow at 35°C differentiated them from their phenotypically closest neighbor, Acinetobacter johnsonii. We conclude that the 25 strains represent a novel Acinetobacter species, for which the name Acinetobacter bohemicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. bohemicus is ANC 3994(T) (=CIP 110496(T)=CCUG 63842(T)=CCM 8462(T)).

  7. Water-to-Wildlife Transfer of Radionuclides in Freshwater Ecosystems around the Gyeongju Nuclear Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The IAEA and ICRP have recognized that not only humans but also wildlife needs to be protected from the impact of ionizing radiations. In many advanced countries, it is legally required to evaluate the radiological impact to wildlife. Therefore, it can be expected that the wildlife dose assessment will also soon become a legal requirement in Korea. One of the key parameters in evaluating radiation doses to wildlife is the concentration ratio (CR), which is used for quantifying radionuclide transfer from an environmental medium such as soil and water to an organism. CR values can vary greatly with environmental conditions and wildlife species. Accordingly, it is important for a reliable dose assessment that site-specific CR data be used. In this study, CR values of various radionuclides were measured for several freshwater wildlife species living around the Gyeongju nuclear site. CR values of a total of 20 elements were determined for three fish species and three plant species living in freshwater ecosystems around the Gyeongju nuclear site. The CR values showed considerable variations with the elements and with wildlife species. For the establishment of a reliable input data file of K-BIOTA, a Korean wildlife dose assessment model, data on CR values needs to be increased to cover a wider range of domestic wildlife.

  8. Sensitivity of the N. AEGEAN SEA ecosystem to Black Sea Water inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. PETIHAKIS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Black Sea Water (BSW inputs on the North Aegean Sea productivity and food web dynamics was investigated, by means of sensitivity simulations, investigating the effect of the inflowing BSW, in terms of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic matter. The model used has been successfully applied in the area in the past and extensively presented. Considering the importance of the microbial loop in the ecosystem functioning, the role of the dissolved organics and in order to achieve a more realistic representation of the Dissolved Organic Matter pool, the bacteria sub-model was appropriately revised. The importance of the microbial loop is highlighted by the carbon fluxes where almost 50% of carbon is channelled within it. The impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM (in the inflowing to the Aegean Sea, BSW appears to be stronger than the impact of dissolved inorganic nutrients, showing a more extended effect over the N Aegean. Bacterial production and biomass is more strongly affected in the simulations by modified DOM, unlike phytoplankton biomass and production, which are more dependent on the inflowing nutrients and particularly phosphorus (inorganic and dissolved organic. In the phytoplankton composition, the dinoflagellates appear to be mostly affected, being favoured by higher nutrient availability at the expense of all other groups, particularly picoplankton, indicating a shift to a more classical food chain.

  9. Role of mangroves in brackish water fish culture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, S.

    to get seed mixtures. Dwivedi 1982 has introduced the concept of hatchery earning Rs. 20,000 or more by fish and prawn culture. Majority of coastal population depend for their livelihood on the fishery resources of mangrove estuaries. Thus, it becomes...

  10. Aspects of the biodiversity of brackish water foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Rao, K.K.

    Foraminiferal fauna of the Chilka lake situated between 19 degrees 25 minutes and 19 degrees 54 minutes N and 85 degrees 6 minutes and 85 degrees 38 minutes E in Orissa state on the east coast of India during different seasons was studied using...

  11. DNA barcoding identifies Argentine fishes from marine and brackish waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Mabragaña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcoding has been advanced as a promising tool to aid species identification and discovery through the use of short, standardized gene targets. Despite extensive taxonomic studies, for a variety of reasons the identification of fishes can be problematic, even for experts. DNA barcoding is proving to be a useful tool in this context. However, its broad application is impeded by the need to construct a comprehensive reference sequence library for all fish species. Here, we make a regional contribution to this grand challenge by calibrating the species discrimination efficiency of barcoding among 125 Argentine fish species, representing nearly one third of the known fauna, and examine the utility of these data to address several key taxonomic uncertainties pertaining to species in this region. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Specimens were collected and morphologically identified during crusies conducted between 2005 and 2008. The standard BARCODE fragment of COI was amplified and bi-directionally sequenced from 577 specimens (mean of 5 specimens/species, and all specimens and sequence data were archived and interrogated using analytical tools available on the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD; www.barcodinglife.org. Nearly all species exhibited discrete clusters of closely related haplogroups which permitted the discrimination of 95% of the species (i.e. 119/125 examined while cases of shared haplotypes were detected among just three species-pairs. Notably, barcoding aided the identification of a new species of skate, Dipturus argentinensis, permitted the recognition of Genypterus brasiliensis as a valid species and questions the generic assignment of Paralichthys isosceles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a significant contribution to the global barcode reference sequence library for fishes and demonstrates the utility of barcoding for regional species identification. As an independent assessment of alpha taxonomy, barcodes provide robust support for most morphologically based taxon concepts and also highlight key areas of taxonomic uncertainty worthy of reappraisal.

  12. Soil and ecosystem respiration responses to grazing, watering and experimental warming chamber treatments across topographical gradients in northern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkhuu, Anarmaa; Plante, Alain F.; Enkhmandal, Orsoo; Gonneau, Cédric; Casper, Brenda B.; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Petraitis, Peter S.

    2017-01-01

    Globally, soil respiration is one of the largest fluxes of carbon to the atmosphere and is known to be sensitive to climate change, representing a potential positive feedback. We conducted a number of field experiments to study independent and combined impacts of topography, watering, grazing and climate manipulations on bare soil and vegetated soil (i.e., ecosystem) respiration in northern Mongolia, an area known to be highly vulnerable to climate change and overgrazing. Our results indicated that soil moisture is the most important driving factor for carbon fluxes in this semi-arid ecosystem, based on smaller carbon fluxes under drier conditions. Warmer conditions did not result in increased respiration. Although the system has local topographical gradients in terms of nutrient, moisture availability and plant species, soil respiration responses to OTC treatments were similar on the upper and lower slopes, implying that local heterogeneity may not be important for scaling up the results. In contrast, ecosystem respiration responses to OTCs differed between the upper and the lower slopes, implying that the response of vegetation to climate change may override microbial responses. Our results also showed that light grazing may actually enhance soil respiration while decreasing ecosystem respiration, and grazing impact may not depend on climate change. Overall, our results indicate that soil and ecosystem respiration in this semi-arid steppe are more sensitive to precipitation fluctuation and grazing pressure than to temperature change. PMID:28239190

  13. Soil and ecosystem respiration responses to grazing, watering and experimental warming chamber treatments across topographical gradients in northern Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkhuu, Anarmaa; Plante, Alain F; Enkhmandal, Orsoo; Gonneau, Cédric; Casper, Brenda B; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Petraitis, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Globally, soil respiration is one of the largest fluxes of carbon to the atmosphere and is known to be sensitive to climate change, representing a potential positive feedback. We conducted a number of field experiments to study independent and combined impacts of topography, watering, grazing and climate manipulations on bare soil and vegetated soil (i.e., ecosystem) respiration in northern Mongolia, an area known to be highly vulnerable to climate change and overgrazing. Our results indicated that soil moisture is the most important driving factor for carbon fluxes in this semi-arid ecosystem, based on smaller carbon fluxes under drier conditions. Warmer conditions did not result in increased respiration. Although the system has local topographical gradients in terms of nutrient, moisture availability and plant species, soil respiration responses to OTC treatments were similar on the upper and lower slopes, implying that local heterogeneity may not be important for scaling up the results. In contrast, ecosystem respiration responses to OTCs differed between the upper and the lower slopes, implying that the response of vegetation to climate change may override microbial responses. Our results also showed that light grazing may actually enhance soil respiration while decreasing ecosystem respiration, and grazing impact may not depend on climate change. Overall, our results indicate that soil and ecosystem respiration in this semi-arid steppe are more sensitive to precipitation fluctuation and grazing pressure than to temperature change.

  14. Framing scenarios of binational water policy with a tool to visualize, quantify and valuate changes in ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Niraula, Rewati; Meixner, Thomas; Frisvold, George; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    In the Santa Cruz Watershed, located on the Arizona-Sonora portion of the U.S.-Mexico border, an international wastewater treatment plant treats wastewater from cities on both sides of the border, before discharging it into the river in Arizona. These artificial flows often subsidize important perennial surface water ecosystems in the region. An explicit understanding of the benefits of maintaining instream flow for present and future generations requires the ability to assess and understand the important trade-offs implicit in water-resource management decisions. In this paper, we outline an approach for modeling and visualizing impacts of management decisions in terms of rare terrestrial and aquatic wildlife, vegetation, surface water, groundwater recharge, real-estate values and socio-environmental vulnerable communities. We identify and quantify ecosystem services and model the potential reduction in effluent discharge to the U.S. that is under scrutiny by binational water policy makers and of concern to stakeholders. Results of service provisioning are presented, and implications for policy makers and resource managers are discussed. This paper presents a robust ecosystem services assessment of multiple scenarios of watershed management as a means to discern eco-hydrological responses and consider their potential values for future generations living in the borderlands.

  15. Framing Scenarios of Binational Water Policy with a Tool to Visualize, Quantify and Valuate Changes in Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Labiosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Santa Cruz Watershed, located on the Arizona-Sonora portion of the U.S.-Mexico border, an international wastewater treatment plant treats wastewater from cities on both sides of the border, before discharging it into the river in Arizona. These artificial flows often subsidize important perennial surface water ecosystems in the region. An explicit understanding of the benefits of maintaining instream flow for present and future generations requires the ability to assess and understand the important trade-offs implicit in water-resource management decisions. In this paper, we outline an approach for modeling and visualizing impacts of management decisions in terms of rare terrestrial and aquatic wildlife, vegetation, surface water, groundwater recharge, real-estate values and socio-environmental vulnerable communities. We identify and quantify ecosystem services and model the potential reduction in effluent discharge to the U.S. that is under scrutiny by binational water policy makers and of concern to stakeholders. Results of service provisioning are presented, and implications for policy makers and resource managers are discussed. This paper presents a robust ecosystem services assessment of multiple scenarios of watershed management as a means to discern eco-hydrological responses and consider their potential values for future generations living in the borderlands.

  16. The stochastic structure of critical transitions in water-stressed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the stochastic structure of natural forcing mechanisms, such as precipitation or temperature, are likely to transform the form and function of ecological systems. Climate models and global datasets show that an increase in global temperature may result in an amplification of the hydrological cycle, not necessarily accompanied by significant changes in mean annual precipitation. In arid and semiarid environments, feedbacks between climate, soil moisture and vegetation are linked to the existence of alternative stable ecosystem states. It has been hypothesized that bistability is associated with tipping points, whereby slow changes in rainfall forcing, and random or anthropogenic disturbances, may trigger catastrophic shifts towards degraded states of the ecosystem. Identifying tipping points and characterizing ecosystem resilience are essential in the assessment of ecological services in a changing environment. We develop a stochastic framework to understand the joint probability density function (pdf) of soil moisture and vegetation biomass under stochastic rainfall. We emphasize the impact of amplified hydrological cycles on ecosystems where alternative states are possible. The joint pdf characterizes the states in which the ecosystem is most likely to be found. We show that the structure of precipitation, not just the mean annual precipitation, controls the most likely state of the ecosystem. We synthesize our analysis by proposing a definition of ecosystem resilience that is based on the modality and time dynamics of the soil moisture-biomass joint pdf.

  17. Water-table height and microtopography control biogeochemical cycling in an Arctic coastal tundra ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, D. A.; Zona, D.; Raab, T. K.; Bozzolo, F.; Mauritz, M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Drained thaw lake basins (DTLB's) are the dominant land form of the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska. The presence of continuous permafrost prevents drainage and so water tables generally remain close to the soil surface, creating saturated, suboxic soil conditions. However, ice wedge polygons produce microtopographic variation in these landscapes, with raised areas such as polygon rims creating more oxic microenvironments. The peat soils in this ecosystem store large amounts of organic carbon which is vulnerable to loss as arctic regions continue to rapidly warm, and so there is great motivation to understand the controls over microbial activity in these complex landscapes. Here we report the effects of experimental flooding, along with seasonal and spatial variation in soil chemistry and microbial activity in a DTLB. The flooding treatment generally mirrored the effects of natural landscape variation in water-table height due to microtopography. The flooded portion of the basin had lower dissolved oxygen, lower oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and higher pH, as did lower elevation areas throughout the entire basin. Similarly, soil pore water concentrations of organic carbon and aromatic compounds were higher in flooded and low elevation areas. Dissolved ferric iron (Fe(III)) concentrations were higher in low elevation areas and responded to the flooding treatment in low areas, only. The high concentrations of soluble Fe(III) in soil pore water were explained by the presence of siderophores, which were much more concentrated in low elevation areas. All the aforementioned variables were correlated, showing that Fe(III) is solubilized in response to anoxic conditions. Dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations were higher in low elevation areas, but showed only subtle and/or seasonally dependent effects of flooding. In anaerobic laboratory incubations, more CH4 was produced by soils from low and flooded areas, whereas anaerobic CO2

  18. Water content differences have stronger effects than plant functional groups on soil bacteria in a steppe ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximei Zhang

    Full Text Available Many investigations across natural and artificial plant diversity gradients have reported that both soil physicochemical factors and plant community composition affect soil microbial communities. To test the effect of plant diversity loss on soil bacterial communities, we conducted a five-year plant functional group removal experiment in a steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia (China. We found that the number and composition type of plant functional groups had no effect on bacterial diversity and community composition, or on the relative abundance of major taxa. In contrast, bacterial community patterns were significantly structured by soil water content differences among plots. Our results support researches that suggest that water availability is the key factor structuring soil bacterial communities in this semi-arid ecosystem.

  19. Soil and water related forest ecosystem services and resilience of social ecological system in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekalign, Meron; Muys, Bart; Nyssen, Jan; Poesen, Jean

    2014-05-01

    In the central highlands of Ethiopia, deforestation and forest degradation are occurring and accelerating during the last century. The high population pressure is the most repeatedly mentioned reason. However, in the past 30 years researchers agreed that the absence of institutions, which could define the access rights to particular forest resources, is another underlying cause of forest depletion and loss. Changing forest areas into different land use types is affecting the biodiversity, which is manifested through not proper functioning of ecosystem services. Menagesha Suba forest, the focus of this study has been explored from various perspectives. However the social dimension and its interaction with the ecology have been addressed rarely. This research uses a combined theoretical framework of Ecosystem Services and that of Resilience thinking for understanding the complex social-ecological interactions in the forest and its influence on ecosystem services. For understanding the history and extent of land use land cover changes, in-depth literature review and a GIS and remote sensing analysis will be made. The effect of forest conversion into plantation and agricultural lands on soil and above ground carbon sequestration, fuel wood and timber products delivery will be analyzed with the accounting of the services on five land use types. The four ecosystem services to be considered are Supporting, Provisioning, Regulating, and Cultural services as set by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. A resilience based participatory framework approach will be used to analyze how the social and ecological systems responded towards the drivers of change that occurred in the past. The framework also will be applied to predict future uncertainties. Finally this study will focus on the possible interventions that could contribute to the sustainable management and conservation of the forest. An ecosystem services trade-off analysis and an environmental valuation of the water

  20. A Checklist of the Phytoplankton Flora of a Southern Nigerian Lotic Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osagie Ekhator

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a first compilation of phytoplankton species composition of a stretch of fresh and brackish water ecosystem in Southern Nigeria. Samples collection spanned a period of sixteen months (January 2003 to April 2004. Phytoplankton samples were collected monthly in the open water using plankton net of 55 µm mesh size towed horizontally for about five minutes. The net hauls were transferred into 200 mL properly labelled plastic containers and immediately preserved with 4% formation solution. Samples were examined and illustrations made with a Leitz Orthoplan Research Microscope equipped with a tracing and measuring devices at the phycology laboratory in University of Benin, Benin City. A seasonal pattern of phytoplankton variation was observed with a hundred and 154 phytoplankton species recorded. The taxa recorded belong to four divisions namely: Bacillariophyceae (diatoms, Cyanophyceae (blue-green algae, Euglenophyceae (euglenoids and Chlorophyceae (green algae. The Diatoms were the predominant group and account for 79% of total species composition. Others are Chlorophyceae 19.77%; Cyanophyceae 1% and Euglenophyceae, 0.23%. The brackish water stations recorded relatively higher number of species and number of individuals of each species than the freshwater stations. An array of floristically diverse phytoplankton was observed with notable common and cosmopolitan diatom species like Coscinodiscus and Nitschia spp in abundance.

  1. Pulicat Lake: A Fragile Ecosystem Under Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathy R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pulicat Lake is the second largest brackish water lake after Chilika Lake in India. The average area of the water spread is 461 sq km. During the monsoon Pulicat Lake receives freshwater through three major rivers, namely, the Swarnamukhi, the Kalangi and the Arani. The Pulicat lagoon system, which is a storehouse of rich biological resources, is under great threat because of the anthropogenic influences. The Pulicat Lake ecosystem is degraded by siltation, bar mouth dynamics, shell mining and processing and population pressure due to the resettlement of villagers from Sriharikota Island. It has been determined that the extent of the lake, including its water spread area, is decreasing. Therefore, it is essential to assess the land use / land cover changes taking place in and around Pulicat Lake using remote sensing and GIS. Studies on its sediment characteristics are also vital. The grain size content reveals that most of the sediments contain clay and silt in enormous amounts. This lake has been the prime source of a livelihood through fishing for a large section of the population living in the surrounding villages. It is the most important refuge for water birds in south India. The fishing community who lives in and around Pulicat Lake follows the Padu system for fishing in the lake. In this study, apart from studies on configuration changes and sediment analysis, a study of the flora and fauna of the lake and the socio-economic conditions of the local community were also carried out. Finally, mitigation measures for the sustainable protection of the lake’s ecosystem were identified.

  2. Pulicat Lake: A Fragile Ecosystem Under Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathy, R.; Pandian, Pitchai Kasinatha

    2016-09-01

    The Pulicat Lake is the second largest brackish water lake after Chilika Lake in India. The average area of the water spread is 461 sq km. During the monsoon Pulicat Lake receives freshwater through three major rivers, namely, the Swarnamukhi, the Kalangi and the Arani. The Pulicat lagoon system, which is a storehouse of rich biological resources, is under great threat because of the anthropogenic influences. The Pulicat Lake ecosystem is degraded by siltation, bar mouth dynamics, shell mining and processing and population pressure due to the resettlement of villagers from Sriharikota Island. It has been determined that the extent of the lake, including its water spread area, is decreasing. Therefore, it is essential to assess the land use / land cover changes taking place in and around Pulicat Lake using remote sensing and GIS. Studies on its sediment characteristics are also vital. The grain size content reveals that most of the sediments contain clay and silt in enormous amounts. This lake has been the prime source of a livelihood through fishing for a large section of the population living in the surrounding villages. It is the most important refuge for water birds in south India. The fishing community who lives in and around Pulicat Lake follows the Padu system for fishing in the lake. In this study, apart from studies on configuration changes and sediment analysis, a study of the flora and fauna of the lake and the socio-economic conditions of the local community were also carried out. Finally, mitigation measures for the sustainable protection of the lake's ecosystem were identified.

  3. Dew contribution to the water balance in a semiarid coastal steppe ecosystem (Cabo de Gata, SE Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, M. J.; Were, A.; Morillas, L.; Villagarcia, L.; Canton, Y.; Lazaro, R.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Kowalski, A. S.; Domingo, F.

    2009-07-01

    Dewfall deposition can be a significant source of moisture in arid and semiarid ecosystems, thus contribution to improve daily and annual water balances. Occurrence, frequency and amount of dewfall were measured in the Balsa Blanca site (Cabo de Gata, Almeria, Spain) from January 2007 to May 2008. this area has a sparse vegetation cover dominated by Stipa tenacissima combined with bare soil and biological soil crusts. (Author) 3 refs.

  4. Water resources management in the urban agglomeration of the Lake Biwa region, Japan: An ecosystem services-based sustainability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaochen; Chen, Yuqing; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Niu, Jia; Nakagami, Ken'ichi; Qian, Xuepeng; Jia, Baoju; Nakajima, Jun; Han, Ji; Li, Jianhua

    2017-05-15

    An innovative ecosystem services-based sustainability assessment was conducted in the important urban agglomeration of the Lake Biwa region, Japan, covering the time period from 1950 to 2014. A 22-indicator system was established that was based on the major ecosystem services of Lake Biwa and its water courses, i.e., provisioning services regarding aquatic products and water; regulating services regarding floods and water quality; cultural services regarding recreation and tourism, scientific research, and environmental education; and supporting services regarding biodiversity. First, changes in the eight ecosystem services were discussed together with the considerable experience and difficult lessons that can be drawn from the development trajectory. Next, with the indicators rearranged according to sustainability principles, the regional sustainability over the past six-plus decades was assessed. In general, this urban agglomeration has been progressing in terms of its sustainability, although economic and social development was achieved at the cost of environmental degradation in the past, and the current economic downturn is hurting the balanced development and integrated benefits. The results lead directly to recommendations for regional development, especially in terms of economic rejuvenation, from the perspective of improving management of Lake Biwa's water resources. Moreover, the relevant knowledge is educational and inspirational for other places in the world that are facing similar development issues. For example, the effective and even pioneering countermeasures that have been taken against environmental degradation, as well as the participation and collaboration of multiple stakeholders, could be useful as a model. Moreover, the study invites increased understanding of ecosystem vulnerability to anthropogenic devastation and emphasizes the priority of precautionary measures over countermeasures in the context of holistic urban planning and sustainable

  5. Thermal regulation of functional groups in running water ecosystems. Progress report, October 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, K.W.; Klug, M.J.

    1976-07-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: characterization of functional groups of running water organisms, particularly macroconsumers; studies on relationship of functional groups to qualitative and quantitative characteristics of organic inputs to stream ecosystems; studies on relationship of functional groups to thermal regimes; and dimensioning the control of feeding and growth by temperature and food quality and quantity and determining the extent of compensatory action of each. (HLW)

  6. Simulated carbon and water processes of forest ecosystems in Forsmark and Oskarshamn during a 100-year period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering; Gaerdenaes, Annemieke [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil Sciences; Eckersten, Henrik [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Crop Production Ecology

    2006-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is currently investigating the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas for possible localisation of a repository for spent nuclear fuel. Important components of the investigations are characterizations of the land surface ecosystems in the areas with respect to hydrological and biological processes, and their implications for the fate of radionuclide contaminants entering the biosphere from a shallow groundwater contamination. In this study, we simulate water balance and carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems representative for the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas for a 100-year period using the ecosystem process model CoupModel. The CoupModel describes the fluxes of water and matter in a one-dimensional soil-vegetation-atmosphere system, forced by time series of meteorological variables. The model has previously been parameterized for many of the vegetation systems that can be found in the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas: spruce/pine forests, willow, grassland and different agricultural crops. This report presents a platform for further use of models like CoupModel for investigations of radionuclide turnover in the Forsmark and Oskarshamn area based on SKB data, including a data set of meteorological forcing variables for Forsmark 1970-2004, suitable for simulations of a 100-year period representing the present day climate, a hydrological parameterization of the CoupModel for simulations of the forest ecosystems in the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas, and simulated carbon budgets and process descriptions for Forsmark that correspond to a possible steady state of the soil storage of the forest ecosystem.

  7. Ballast water management that adapts to climate changes and reduces harmful bio-invasions in marine eco-systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2015-01-01

    for them. In addition, future changes of temperature, storm patterns and sea-currents may also change shipping routes and ballast water management practices. Based on methods like stock taking, trend tracking and scenario modeling the paper aims to evaluate possible ecological and economic impacts......The shipping ballast water is defined as water taken on board a ship to control trim, cargo, draught, stability and stress of the ship. Alien bio-organisms in ballast water have a range of ecological impacts, for instance reducing native bio-diversity, altering habitat and potentially the overall...... in marine ecosystem of changed factors in the shipping sector, for instance change of number, size, and design of vessels as well as treatment technologies of ballast water. New areas for shipping due to climate changes are also included. Our study would contribute to improve decision support tools, usable...

  8. Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to model ecosystem services: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, Wendy; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Pérez-Miñana, Elena; Willcock, Simon P.; Quintero, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    SWAT, a watershed modeling tool has been proposed to help quantify ecosystem services. The concept of ecosystem services incorporates the collective benefits natural systems provide primarily to human beings. It is becoming increasingly important to track the impact that human activities have on the environment in order to determine its resilience and sustainability. The objectives of this paper are to provide an overview of efforts using SWAT to quantify ecosystem services, to determine the model's capability examining various types of services, and to describe the approach used by various researchers. A literature review was conducted to identify studies in which SWAT was explicitly used for quantifying ecosystem services in terms of provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural aspects. A total of 44 peer reviewed publications were identified. Most of these used SWAT to quantify provisioning services (34%), regulating services (27%), or a combination of both (25%). While studies using SWAT for evaluating ecosystem services are limited (approximately 1% of SWAT's peered review publications), and usage (vs. potential) of services by beneficiaries is a current model limitation, the available literature sets the stage for the continuous development and potential of SWAT as a methodological framework for quantifying ecosystem services to assist in decision-making.

  9. Partitioning understory evapotranspiration in semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia using the isotopic composition of water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Gaj, Marcel; Holtorf, Kim-Kirsten; Gröngröft, Alexander; Brokate, Ralph; Himmelsbach, Thomas; Eschenbach, Annette

    2016-04-01

    In dry environments with a sparse vegetation cover, understory evapotranspiration is a major component of the ecosystem water balance. Consequently, knowledge on the size of evapotranspiration fluxes and the driving factors is important for our understanding of the hydrological cycle. Understory evapotranspiration is made up of soil evaporation and plant transpiration. Soil evaporation can be measured directly from patches free of vegetation. However, when understory vegetation is present distinguishing between soil evaporation and plant transpiration is challenging. In this study, we aim to partition understory evapotranspiration based on an approach that combines the measurements of water-vapour fluxes using the closed chamber method with measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour. The measurements were done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management). The study sites were located in three different semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia: thornbush savanna, Baikiaea woodland and shrubland. At each site measurements were done under tree canopies as well as at unshaded areas between the canopies. We measured evaporation from the bare soil and evapotranspiration from patches covered with herbaceous species and shrubs using a transparent chamber connected with an infrared gas analyser (LI-8100A, LICOR Inc.). The stable isotope composition of water vapour inside the chamber and depth profiles of soil water stable isotopes were determined in-situ using a tuneable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscope (OA-ICOS, Los Gatos Research, DLT 100). Xylem samples were extracted using the cryogenic vacuum extraction method and the isotopic composition of the extracted water was measured subsequently with a cavity-ring-down spectrometer (CRDS L2120-i, Picarro Inc.). We will present the quantified fluxes of understory evapotranspiration measured in the three different ecosystems, show the

  10. Plants in water-controlled ecosystems: active role in hydrologic processes and response to water stress. IV. Discussion of real cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laio, F.; Porporato, A.; Fernandez-Illescas, C. P.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    Three water-controlled ecosystems are studied here using the stochastic description of soil moisture dynamics and vegetation water stress proposed in Part II (F. Laio, A. Porporato, L. Ridolfi, I. Rodriguez-Iturbe, Adv. Water Res. 24 (7) (2001) 707-723) and Part III (A. Porporato, F. Laio, L. Ridolfi, I. Rodriguez-Iturbe, Adv. Water Res. 24 (7) (2001) 725-744) of this series of papers. In the savanna of Nylsvley (South Africa) the very diverse physiological characteristics of the existing plants give rise to different strategies of soil moisture exploitation. Notwithstanding these differences, the vegetation water stress for all the species turns out to be very similar, suggesting that coexistence might be attained also through differentiation of water use. The case of the savanna of Southern Texas points out how rooting depth and interannual rainfall variability can impact soil moisture dynamics and vegetation water stress. Because of the different responses to water stress of trees and grasses, external climatic forcing could be at the origin of the dynamic equilibrium allowing coexistence in this ecosystem. Finally, the analysis of a short grass steppe in Colorado provides an interesting example of the so-called inverse texture effect, whereby preferential conditions for vegetation are dependent on soil texture and rainfall. Sites which are more favorable during wet conditions may become less suitable to the same vegetation type during drier years. Such an effect is important to explain the predominance of existing species, as well as to investigate their reproductive strategies.

  11. Integrated water resources management of the Ichkeul basin taking into account the durability of its wetland ecosystem using WEAP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabou, M.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Gastli, W.; Chakroun, H.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Oueslati, I.; Lasram, F.; Laajimi, R.; Shaiek, M.; Romdhane, M. S.; Mnajja, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Conservation of coastal wetlands in the Mediterranean area is generally faced with development issues. It is the case of Tunisia where the precipitation is irregular in time and space. For the equity of water use (drinking, irrigation), there is a planning at the national level allowing the possibility of water transfer from regions rich in water resources to poor ones. This plan was initially done in Tunisia without taking into account the wetlands ecosystems and their specificities. The main purpose of this study is to find a model able to integrate simultaneously available resources and various water demands within a watershed by taking into account the durability of related wetland ecosystems. It is the case of the Ichkeul basin. This later is situated in northern of Tunisia, having an area of 2080 km2 and rainfall of about 600 mm/year. Downstream this basin, the Ichkeul Lake is characterized by a double alternation of seasonal high water and low salinity in winter and spring and low water levels and high salinity in summer and autumn that makes the Ichkeul an exceptional ecosystem. The originality of this hydrological system of Lake-marsh conditions is related to the presence of aquatic vegetation in the lake and special rich and varied hygrophilic in the marshes that constitutes the main source of food for large migrating water birds. After the construction of three dams on the principle rivers that are feeding the Ichkeul Lake, aiming particularly to supply the local irrigation and the drinking water demand of cities in the north and the east of Tunisia, freshwater inflow to the lake is greatly reduced causing a hydrological disequilibrium that influences the ecological conditions of the different species. Therefore, to ensure the sustainability of the water resources management, it's important to find a trade off between the existing hydrological and ecological systems taking into account water demands of various users (drinking, irrigation fishing, and

  12. Rendimento da Atriplex nummularia irrigada com efluentes da criação de tilápia em rejeito da dessalinização de água Behavior of saltbush (Atriplex nummularia irrigated with effluents from tilapia raised in brackish water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo R. Porto

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a influência no rendimento da erva-sal (Atriplex nummularia e em algumas características do solo, quando irrigada com efluentes da criação de tilápia (Oreochromis sp. em rejeito da dessalinização de água salobra no semi-árido brasileiro, a erva-sal foi irrigada durante um ano com quatro volumes de efluentes na Embrapa Semi-Árido, em Petrolina, PE, cuja salinidade média foi, de 8,29 dS m-1. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com quatro tratamentos e três repetições. Os tratamentos T1, T2, T3 e T4 correspondem, respectivamente, aos volumes de efluentes aplicados semanalmente, de 75, 150, 225 e 300 L planta-1 . A salinidade média do solo na profundidade 0 - 90 cm foi de 0,40 dS m-1, antes de serem iniciadas as irrigações. Após a colheita, respectivamente para os tratamentos T1, T2, T3 e T4, as salinidades médias dos perfis de solo na mesma profundidade (0 - 90 cm foram de 8,02, 6,09, 4,97 e 4,60 dS m-1 e os rendimentos de matéria seca da erva-sal, de 9,75, 12,26, 14,49 e 13,81 t ha-1. O maior rendimento de matéria seca por litro de efluente aplicado foi para o tratamento T1, com 4,84 g L-1 que apresentou, também, a melhor relação entrada/saída de sal, removendo 13,84% do total de sal incorporado ao solo.Looking forward to reduce environmental impacts resulting from desalinization of brackish water in the region of the crystalline rocks in the semi-arid Brazil, saltbush (Atriplex nummularia was cultivated during one year with four different volumes of aquiculture effluent generated from an intensive tilapia (Oreochromis sp raising system, with a mean salinity of 8.29 dS m-1, in an experimental field of Embrapa Semi-Arid. A completely randomized block design, with four treatments and three replications was used. The treatments T1, T2, T3 and T4 corresponded, respectively, to the weekly volumes of irrigation of 75, 150, 225 and 300 L of water per plant. The mean soil salinity of the

  13. Rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation impact plant and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 on a Chesapeake Bay wetland: review of a 28-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bert G

    2014-11-01

    An ongoing field study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on a brackish wetland on Chesapeake Bay, started in 1987, is unique as the longest continually running investigation of the effects of elevated CO2 on an ecosystem. Since the beginning of the study, atmospheric CO2 increased 18%, sea level rose 20 cm, and growing season temperature varied with approximately the same range as predicted for global warming in the 21st century. This review looks back at this study for clues about how the effects of rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation interact with high atmospheric CO2 to alter the physiology of C3 and C4 photosynthetic species, carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration, plant and ecosystem nitrogen, and distribution of plant communities in this brackish wetland. Rising sea level caused a shift to higher elevations in the Scirpus olneyi C3 populations on the wetland, displacing the Spartina patens C4 populations. Elevated CO2 stimulated carbon assimilation in the Scirpus C3 species measured by increased shoot and root density and biomass, net ecosystem production, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, and methane production. But elevated CO2 also decreased biomass of the grass, S. patens C4. The elevated CO2 treatment reduced tissue nitrogen concentration in shoots, roots, and total canopy nitrogen, which was associated with reduced ecosystem respiration. Net ecosystem production was mediated by precipitation through soil salinity: high salinity reduced the CO2 effect on net ecosystem production, which was zero in years of severe drought. The elevated CO2 stimulation of shoot density in the Scirpus C3 species was sustained throughout the 28 years of the study. Results from this study suggest that rising CO2 can add substantial amounts of carbon to ecosystems through stimulation of carbon assimilation, increased root exudates to supply nitrogen fixation, reduced dark respiration, and improved water and nitrogen use efficiency.

  14. Extreme drought event and shrub invasion combine to reduce ecosystem functioning and resilience in water-limited climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Maria; Lecomte, Xavier; David, Teresa; Pinto, Joaquim; Bugalho, Miguel; Werner, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    Extreme droughts and plant invasions are major drivers of global change that can critically affect ecosystem functioning. Shrub encroachment is increasing in many regions worldwide and extreme events are projected to increase in frequency and intensity, namely in the Mediterranean region. Nevertheless, little is known about how these drivers may interact and affect ecosystem functioning and resilience to extreme droughts. Using a manipulative shrub removal experiment and the co-occurrence of an extreme drought event (2011/2012) in a Mediterranean woodland, we show that the native shrub invasion and extreme drought combined to reduce ecosystem transpiration and the resilience of the key-stone oak tree species. We established six 25 x 25 m paired plots in a shrub (Cistus ladanifer L.) encroached Mediterranean cork-oak (Quercus suber L.) woodland. We measured sapflow and pre-dawn leaf water potential of trees and shrubs and soil water content in all plots during three years. We determined the resilience of tree transpiration to evaluate to what extent trees recovered from the extreme drought event. From February to November 2011 we conducted baseline measurements for plot comparison. In November 2011 all the shrubs from one of all the paired plots were cut and removed. Ecosystem transpiration was dominated by the water use of the invasive shrub, which further increased after the extreme drought. Simultaneously, tree transpiration in invaded plots declined much stronger (67 ± 13 %) than in plots cleared from shrubs (31 ± 11%) relative to the pre-drought year. Trees in invaded plots were not able to recover in the following wetter year showing lower resilience to the extreme drought event. Our results imply that in Mediterranean-type of climates invasion by water spending species can combine with projected recurrent extreme droughts causing critical drought tolerance thresholds of trees to be overcome increasing the probability of tree mortality (Caldeira et.al. 2015

  15. Responses of aquatic ecosystems to environmental changes in Finland and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eWeckström

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The concern for the state of global freshwater reservoirs has increased due to deterioration of the water quality during the last decades. This has prompted monitoring and restoration efforts such as the European Water Framework Directive and the national-scale 2nd-investigation and monitoring of the water quality, water volume and biota resources in China. The challenge so far has been the determination of the natural state (reference conditions of freshwater ecosystems. We used the sediment archives of five lakes and one brackish water embayment in Finland and China to assess the impact of selected variables of climatology, hydrology, nutrients, and changes in human population on these ecosystems during the last few centuries. The study sites represent catchment areas with varying land use. Despite the long distance between the sites and their different land-use characteristics, the direction and timing of changes during the last few centuries are well comparable between the high latitudes of Finland and the mid-low latitudes of China. This study reinforces the sensitivity of aquatic ecosystems to environmental change and underlines the usefulness of the palaeolimnological approach as a tool for determining reference conditions.

  16. The Influence of Canal Water Releases on the Distribution of Methylmercury in Everglades National Park: Implications for Ecosystem Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Aiken, G.; Orem, W.; Tate, M. T.; Kline, J.; Castro, J.

    2010-12-01

    Elevated levels of mercury (Hg) in the food web of the Florida Everglades have been well recognized for about two decades. Researchers have revealed the vexing complexity of ecosystem-scale factors that control Hg bioaccumulation across the Everglades, including: land use, elevated levels of atmospheric Hg deposition, water use and management, and disturbances (e.g., fire and droughts). Many of these factors directly interface with the Everglades Restoration Program; a fifteen year effort to return this unique ecosystem to a condition more closely resembling the historical uninterrupted flow way from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay. However, some activities of the Everglades restoration plan may result in exacerbated methylmercury (MeHg) production due to chemical and hydrologic effects on methylation. Specifically, planned increasing amounts of canal water releases, rich in sulfate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), to the southern most part of the Everglades (Everglades National Park, ENP). In addition, with a more “natural” flow regime, regions of the ENP may also experience more frequent wetting and drying cycles, a phenomenon known to stimulate MeHg production in the Everglades and elsewhere. In the past two years, the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service have been undertaking annual surveys of surface water and forage fish from about 70 sites across the ENP. The project is designed to assess the distribution and occurrence of MeHg across the ENP, and relate it to the major factors that affect Hg methylation discussed above. Results from the analysis of fish and water samples clearly show that canal water travels through ENP along the Shark River Slough, the historical center of flow through the Everglades. Several chemical makers of the canal water are evident, including sulfate, chloride and fluoride. Also evident in the data is a significant increase in the abundance of MeHg along the Shark River Slough, and direct result of sulfate

  17. Modeling coupled interactions of carbon, water, and ozone exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. I: model description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Ned; Zeller, Karl F

    2003-01-01

    A new biophysical model (FORFLUX) is presented to study the simultaneous exchange of ozone, carbon dioxide, and water vapor between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The model mechanistically couples all major processes controlling ecosystem flows trace gases and water implementing recent concepts in plant eco-physiology, micrometeorology, and soil hydrology. FORFLUX consists of four interconnected modules-a leaf photosynthesis model, a canopy flux model, a soil heat-, water- and CO2- transport model, and a snow pack model. Photosynthesis, water-vapor flux and ozone uptake at the leaf level are computed by the LEAFC3 sub-model. The canopy module scales leaf responses to a stand level by numerical integration of the LEAFC3model over canopy leaf area index (LAI). The integration takes into account (1) radiative transfer inside the canopy, (2) variation of foliage photosynthetic capacity with canopy depth, (3) wind speed attenuation throughout the canopy, and (4) rainfall interception by foliage elements. The soil module uses principles of the diffusion theory to predict temperature and moisture dynamics within the soil column, evaporation, and CO2 efflux from soil. The effect of soil heterogeneity on field-scale fluxes is simulated employing the Bresler-Dagan stochastic concept. The accumulation and melt of snow on the ground is predicted using an explicit energy balance approach. Ozone deposition is modeled as a sum of three fluxes- ozone uptake via plant stomata, deposition to non-transpiring plant surfaces, and ozone flux into the ground. All biophysical interactions are computed hourly while model projections are made at either hourly or daily time step. FORFLUX represents a comprehensive approach to studying ozone deposition and its link to carbon and water cycles in terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. Ecosystem productivity and water stress in tropical East Africa: A Case Study of the 2010-11 drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E. S.; Yang, X.; Lee, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of changes in ecosystem productivity as a consequence of water stress and changing precipitation regimes is critical in defining the response of tropical ecosystems to water stress and projecting future land cover transitions in the East African tropics. Through the analysis of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), soil moisture, rainfall and reanalysis data, this paper characterizes the 2010-11 drought in tropical East Africa. We demonstrated that SIF, a proxy of ecosystem productivity, varied with water availability during the 2010-11 drought. A comparison of the 2010-11 drought to previous regional droughts revealed that the consecutive failure of rainy seasons in fall 2010 and spring 2011 yielded a drought that is distinguished not only in intensity, but also in spatial and temporal extent as compared to an average of previous regional droughts: the 2010-11 event extended further east and with greater intensity in the southern hemisphere. Anomalously low SIF values during the 2010-11 drought are strongly correlated with those of soil moisture and precipitation. SIF also demonstrated a stronger temporal sensitivity to accumulated water deficit as compared to the conventional Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which approximates photosynthetic potential (chlorophyll content and leaf mass), from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Anomalously high rainfall during the dry seasons preceding failed rainy seasons suggest that the seasonality of East African rainfall may be transitioning from a regime characterized by biannual monsoons to one with increasing convective rainfall. Rising boundary layer height during the dry season further substantiates this conclusion by suggesting a transition towards increased deep convection during the summers. This work demonstrated the unique characteristics of the 2010-11 East African drought, and the ability of SIF to track the levels of water stress during the

  19. Increases in soil water content after the mortality of non-native trees in oceanic island forest ecosystems are due to reduced water loss during dry periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kachi, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    The control of dominant, non-native trees can alter the water balance of soils in forest ecosystems via hydrological processes, which results in changes in soil water environments. To test this idea, we evaluated the effects of the mortality of an invasive tree, Casuarina equisetifolia Forst., on the water content of surface soils on the Ogasawara Islands, subtropical islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, using a manipulative herbicide experiment. Temporal changes in volumetric water content of surface soils at 6 cm depth at sites where all trees of C. equisetifolia were killed by herbicide were compared with those of adjacent control sites before and after their mortality with consideration of the amount of precipitation. In addition, the rate of decrease in the soil water content during dry periods and the rate of increase in the soil water content during rainfall periods were compared between herbicide and control sites. Soil water content at sites treated with herbicide was significantly higher after treatment than soil water content at control sites during the same period. Differences between initial and minimum values of soil water content at the herbicide sites during the drying events were significantly lower than the corresponding differences in the control quadrats. During rainfall periods, both initial and maximum values of soil water contents in the herbicided quadrats were higher, and differences between the maximum and initial values did not differ between the herbicided and control quadrats. Our results indicated that the mortality of non-native trees from forest ecosystems increased water content of surface soils, due primarily to a slower rate of decrease in soil water content during dry periods.

  20. Use of the Complex Conductivity Method to Monitor Hydrocarbon Degradation in Brackish Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Beaver, C. L.; Kimak, C.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of the subsurface is a global environmental problem. The size, location and recurrence rate of contamination very often inhibits active remediation strategies. When there is no direct threat to humans, and direct/invasive remediation methods are prohibited, monitored natural attenuation is often the remediation method of choice. Consequently, long-term monitoring of hydrocarbon degradation is needed to validate remediation. Geophysical methods, frequently utilized to characterize subsurface contamination, have the potential to be adopted for long term monitoring of contaminant degradation. Over the last decade, the complex conductivity method has shown promise as a method for monitoring hydrocarbon degradation processes in freshwater environments. We investigated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to natural attenuation of oil in a brackish setting, being more representative of the conditions where most oil spills occur such as in coastal environments. We performed a series of laboratory hydrocarbon biodegradation experiments whilst continuously monitoring complex conductivity. Sediments from a beach impacted by the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill were used to provide the hydrocarbon degraders, while fluids with three different salinities, ranging from fresh water to brackish water, were used as the supporting media. All experimental columns, including two abiotic controls, were run in duplicate. Early results show a dependence of the complex conductivity parameters (both electrolytic and interfacial) on biodegradation processes. Despite the small signals relative to freshwater conditions, the imaginary part of the complex conductivity appears to be sensitive to biodegradation processes. The columns with highest salinity fluids - similar to the salinites for the site where the sediments were collected - showed distinctive complex conductivity responses similar to microbial growth curves. Geochemical monitoring confirmed elevated rates

  1. Accuracy of the cosmic-ray soil water content probe in humid forest ecosystems: The worst case scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Baatz, R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-09-01

    Soil water content is one of the key state variables in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum due to its important role in the exchange of water and energy at the soil surface. A new promising method to measure integral soil water content at the field or small catchment scale is the cosmic-ray probe (CRP). Recent studies of CRP measurements have mainly presented results from test sites located in very dry areas and from agricultural fields with sandy soils. In this study, distributed continuous soil water content measurements from a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) were used to investigate the accuracy of CRP measurements for soil water content determination in a humid forest ecosystem. Such ecosystems are less favorable for CRP applications due to the presence of a litter layer. In addition, lattice water and carbohydrates of soil organic matter and belowground biomass reduce the effective sensor depth and thus were accounted for in the calibration of the CRP. The hydrogen located in the biomass decreased the level of neutron count rates and thus also decreased the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray probe, which in turn resulted in an increase of the measurement uncertainty. This uncertainty was compensated by using longer integration times (e.g., 24 h). For the Wüstebach forest site, the cosmic-ray probe enabled the assessment of integral daily soil water content dynamics with a RMSE of about 0.03 cm3/cm3 without explicitly considering the litter layer. By including simulated water contents of the litter layer in the calibration, a better accuracy could be achieved.

  2. Insights into saline intrusion and freshwater resources in coastal karstic aquifers using a lumped Rainfall-Discharge-Salinity model (the Port-Miou brackish spring, SE France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfib, Bruno; Charlier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual model of saline intrusion within coastal karst aquifers by analyzing Rainfall-Discharge-Salinity data and to assess freshwater resources using a lumped modeling approach. In a first step, we analyzed 4 years of data (rainfall, discharge and salinity times series) of the Port-Miou brackish submarine spring in South France (400 km2). A conceptual model of the aquifer was then designed to differentiate a deep brackish reservoir and a shallower fresh one. Salinity variations at the spring are assumed to be controlled mainly by dilution originating from the fresh water in the shallower reservoir. In a second step, a lumped modeling approach was developed based on the conceptual model to simulate discharge as well as salinity over time. We proposed a reservoir-model to take into account slow and fast components in the shallower part of the aquifer and a saline intrusion in the deeper one. This Rainfall-Discharge-Salinity model was calibrated and validated for two periods of 1.5 years at a daily time step and was also tested to reproduce a multi-annual evolution of the available discharge and salinity time series. Good simulation results were obtained to reproduce water and mass budgets as well as discharge and salinity dynamics during several hydrological cycles. The simultaneous modeling of hydrodynamics and quality data showed the robustness of the model in addition to its easy implementation. Our results led us to propose a new type of seawater mixing mechanism for brackish springs: the dilution type, in addition to the well-known Ventury suction and Head balance types. The application of the lumped model on the Port-Miou brackish spring validated the hydrogeological processes deduced from experimental data, given an initial quantification of the freshwater resources available in such complex brackish karstic aquifers.

  3. How Much for Water? Economic Assessment and Mapping of Floodplain Water Storage as a Catchment-Scale Ecosystem Service of Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika Chrzanowska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The integration of water management goals in protected wetland areas agriculturally managed in an intensive manner recalls the comparison of apples (ecological values and oranges (economic dimension of agriculture. Sustainable wetland management frequently fails if environmental features are not referred to as ecosystem services and quantified in economic terms. In our hydrological-economical study on floodplain wetlands located in the Lower Basin of the Biebrza Valley, we attempt to quantify the monetary value of water storage in the floodplain during flood phenomena as an important ecosystem service. The unit monetary value of water storage in the catchment of Biebrza Valley was assessed on the basis of small artificial water reservoirs, constructed in recent years and located in the area of research, and reached 0.53 EUR·m−3·year−1. In a GIS-based study on hydrological floodplain processes in the years 1995–2011, we assessed the average annual volume of active water storage in the floodplain which reached 10.36 M m3 year−1, giving a monetary value of EUR 5.49 million per annum. We propose that the methodology presented in our analysis could be applied as water storage subsidies in valuable floodplains, to prevent their deterioration originating from agriculture intensification.

  4. Effect of water stress on ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration of a Leymus chinensis steppe in Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Many studies on global climate have forecast major changes in the amounts and spatial patterns of precipitation that may significantly affect temperate grasslands in arid and semi-arid regions. As a part of ChinaFLUX, eddy covariance flux measurements were made at a semi-arid Leymus chinensis steppe in Inner Mongolia, China during 2003-2004 to quantify the response of carbon exchange to environmental changes. Results showed that gross ecosystem production (FGEP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) of the steppe were significantly depressed by water stress due to lack of precipitation during the growing season. Temperature was the dominant factor affecting FGEP and Reco in 2003, whereas soil moisture imposed a significant influence on both Reco and FGEP in 2004. Under wet conditions, Reco showed an exponentially increasing trend with temperature (Q10 = 2.0), but an apparent reduction in the value of Reco and its temperature sensitivity were observed during the periods of water stress (Q10=1.6). Both heat and water stress can cause decrease in FGEP. The sea-sonality of ecosystem carbon exchange was strongly correlated with the variation of precipitation. With less precipitation in 2003, the steppe sequestrated carbon in June and July, and went into a senescence in early August due to water stress. As compared to 2003, the severe drought during the spring of 2004 delayed the growth of the steppe until late June, and the steppe became a CO2 sink from early July until mid-September, with ample precipitation in August. The semi-arid steppe released a total of 9.7 g C·m-2 from May 16 to the end of September 2003, whereas the net carbon budget during the same period in 2004 was close to zero. Long-term measurements over various grasslands are needed to quantify carbon balance in temperate grasslands.

  5. Flow and rent-based opportunity costs of water ecosystem service provision in a complex farming system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia R. Rendon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Unsustainable land uses present many challenges for securing ecosystem service provision. It is also difficult to estimate the cost of a transition to more sustainable land-management practices for individual landholders. The main cost to landholders is the opportunity costs, the income foregone when changing land use for continued or enhanced ecosystem service provision. Thus accurate estimation of opportunity costs and understanding their distribution are crucial starting points for determining the economic viability and design of any payment for ecosystem services (PES scheme. We compare two opportunity cost approaches and examine the distribution of these costs for improving drinking water quality in a complex farming system in a Honduran forest catchment. Data for both approaches was collected through a survey applied to upstream catchment landholders. Our results indicate that the direct flow approach and the proxy rent approach provide comparable and consistent opportunity cost estimates. The mean net flow return ha-1 was US$1410, but this estimate was skewed, mainly by exceptionally high coffee returns and negative returns of land uses making a loss. This estimate would imply spending over US$2 million per annum for water conservation, but a revised estimate comes to US$257,057 per annum. Opportunity costs were found to vary according to differences in land use and landholder characteristics. High value cash crops upholding the local economy, such as coffee, entail much higher opportunity costs than for example cattle grazing. These results suggest that discriminate PES payments, that vary according to opportunity costs and thus discriminate between land uses and landholders, are essential. Water quality at our case study site could be managed sustainably by a scheme focusing on high-impact land uses with lower opportunity costs and closer to water sources.

  6. Stable oxygen isotope analysis reveal vegetation influence on soil water movement and ecosystem water fluxes in a semi-arid oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piayda, Arndt; Dubbert, Maren; Werner, Christiane; Cuntz, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Mechanistically disentangling the role and function of vegetation within the hydrological cycle is one of the key questions in the interdisciplinary field of ecohydrology. The presence of vegetation can have various impacts on soil water relations: transpiration of active vegetation causes great water losses, rainfall is intercepted, soil evaporation can be reduced and infiltration, hydraulic redistribution and translatory flow might be altered. In drylands, covering around 40% of the global land surface, the carbon cycle is closely coupled to water availability due to (seasonal) droughts. Specifically savannah type ecosystems, which cover large areas worldwide, are, due to their bi-layered structure, very suitable to study the effects of distinct vegetation types on the ecosystem water cycle. Oxygen isotope signatures (δ18O) have been used to partition ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET ) because of the distinct isotopic compositions of water transpired by leaves relative to soil evaporated vapor. Recent developments in laser spectroscopy enable measurements of δ18O in the vapor phase with high temporal resolution in the field and bear a novel opportunity to trace water movement within the ecosystem. In the present study, the effects of distinct vegetation layers (i.e. trees and herbaceous vegetation) on soil water infiltration and redistribution as well as ecosystem water fluxes in a Mediterranean cork-oak woodland are disentangled. An irrigation experiment was carried out using δ18O labeled water to quantify the distinct effects of trees and herbaceous vegetation on 1) infiltration and redistribution of water in the soil profile and 2) to disentangle the effects of tree cover on the contribution of unproductive soil evaporation and understory transpiration to total ET . First results proof that stable δ18O isotopes measured onsite with laser spectroscopy is a valuable tool to trace water movement in the soil showing a much higher sensitivity than common TDR

  7. Modification of a fire drought index for tropical wetland ecosystems by including water table depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taufik, Muh; Setiawan, B.I.; Lanen, van H.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss how an existing empirical drought index, i.e. the Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) that is commonly used for assessing forest fire danger, has been adjusted and modified for improved use in tropical wetland ecosystems. The improvement included: (i) adjustment of the dro

  8. Vulnerability assessment of urban ecosystems driven by water resources, human health and atmospheric environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Lu, Hongwei; Zhang, Yang; Song, Xinshuang; He, Li

    2016-05-01

    As ecosystem management is a hotspot and urgent topic with increasing population growth and resource depletion. This paper develops an urban ecosystem vulnerability assessment method representing a new vulnerability paradigm for decision makers and environmental managers, as it's an early warning system to identify and prioritize the undesirable environmental changes in terms of natural, human, economic and social elements. The whole idea is to decompose a complex problem into sub-problem, and analyze each sub-problem, and then aggregate all sub-problems to solve this problem. This method integrates spatial context of Geographic Information System (GIS) tool, multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method, ordered weighted averaging (OWA) operators, and socio-economic elements. Decision makers can find out relevant urban ecosystem vulnerability assessment results with different vulnerable attitude. To test the potential of the vulnerability methodology, it has been applied to a case study area in Beijing, China, where it proved to be reliable and consistent with the Beijing City Master Plan. The results of urban ecosystem vulnerability assessment can support decision makers in evaluating the necessary of taking specific measures to preserve the quality of human health and environmental stressors for a city or multiple cities, with identifying the implications and consequences of their decisions.

  9. Throughfall and its spatial variability beneath xerophytic shrub canopies within water-limited arid desert ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-feng; Wang, Xin-ping; Hu, Rui; Pan, Yan-xia

    2016-08-01

    Throughfall is known to be a critical component of the hydrological and biogeochemical cycles of forested ecosystems with inherently temporal and spatial variability. Yet little is understood concerning the throughfall variability of shrubs and the associated controlling factors in arid desert ecosystems. Here we systematically investigated the variability of throughfall of two morphological distinct xerophytic shrubs (Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica) within a re-vegetated arid desert ecosystem, and evaluated the effects of shrub structure and rainfall characteristics on throughfall based on heavily gauged throughfall measurements at the event scale. We found that morphological differences were not sufficient to generate significant difference (P decline with the increase in rainfall amount, intensity and duration, and stabilized passing a certain threshold. Our findings highlight the great variability of throughfall beneath the canopies of xerophytic shrubs and the time stability of throughfall pattern among rainfall events. The spatially heterogeneous and temporally stable throughfall is expected to generate a dynamic patchy distribution of soil moisture beneath shrub canopies within arid desert ecosystems.

  10. Hierarchical levels in agro-ecosystems: selective case studies on water and nitrogen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de N.

    1997-01-01

    The subject of this thesisToday, agronomic research faces the triple challenge to develop knowledge and insight to manage agro-ecosystems which are inherently sustainable, to diminish the undesirable side effects and to meet the increasing demand of food of a still growing world population, without

  11. Effects of coal-bed methane discharge waters on the vegetation and soil ecosystem in Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, M.; Tindall, J.A.; Cronin, G.; Friedel, M.J.; Bergquist, E.

    2005-01-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) co-produced discharge waters in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, resulting from extraction of methane from coal seams, have become a priority for chemical, hydrological and biological research during the last few years. Soil and vegetation samples were taken from affected and reference sites (upland elevations and wetted gully) in Juniper Draw to investigate the effects of CBM discharge waters on soil physical and chemical properties and on native and introduced vegetation density and diversity. Results indicate an increase of salinity and sodicity within local soil ecosystems at sites directly exposed to CBM discharge waters. Elevated concentrations of sodium in the soil are correlated with consistent exposure to CBM waters. Clay-loam soils in the study area have a much larger specific surface area than the sandy soils and facilitate a greater sodium adsorption. However, there was no significant relation between increasing water sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values and increasing sediment SAR values downstream; however, soils exposed to the CBM water ranged from the moderate to severe SAR hazard index. Native vegetation species density was highest at the reference (upland and gully) and CBM affected upland sites. The affected gully had the greatest percent composition of introduced vegetation species. Salt-tolerant species had the greatest richness at the affected gully, implying a potential threat of invasion and competition to established native vegetation. These findings suggest that CBM waters could affect agricultural production operations and long-term water quality. ?? Springer 2005.

  12. 淡水和半咸水条件下中华鲟幼鱼鳃上皮泌氯细胞的形态特征与数量分布%Characters of morphology,distribution and quantity of branchial chloride cells of juvenile Acipenser sinensis acclimated in freshwater and brackish water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵峰; 杨刚; 张涛; 王妤; 庄平

    2016-01-01

    To understand the adaptive changes of branchial chloride cells (CCs)in juvenile Chinese sturgeon Acipenser sinensis in the Yangtze Estuary,juveniles were acclimated to 0 (freshwater,FW)and brackish water (salinity 15,BW)for 60 days.Histological and ultrastructural observation on branchial CCs were comparatively studied in juveniles adapted either in FW or BW.Results showed that:CCs were slightly oval, and mainly distributed in the base of lamellae and interlamellar regions of filaments.When juveniles were adapted in BW,the number and size of branchial CCs on filaments increased significantly.However,there was no change on number of CCs,and there was a significant increase on size of CCs on lamellae.The morphology of CCs on filaments and lamellae did not change in fish adapted to FW or BW.Apical opening of CCs was largely classified into the following three types:Ⅰ,convex type;Ⅱ,concave type;Ⅲ,deep-hole type.In FW,apical opening of CCs on juvenile Chinese surgeon gills presented as type Ⅰ and Ⅱ,and no type Ⅲ was found.After the fish was adapted in BW,apical opening of CCs on juvenile gills was mainly type Ⅲ, and a small amount of type Ⅰ and Ⅱ apical opening appeared.The increase of number and size of branchial CCs on filaments and the morphological changes of apical opening of CCs is the adapting adjustment of juvenile Acipenser sinensis for osmoregulation and maintaining osmotic balance.%为了探讨中华鲟幼鱼进入长江口半咸水环境后,渗透压适应调节过程中鳃上皮泌氯细胞的适应性变化,将幼鱼在淡水(盐度0)和半咸水(盐度15)两种条件下驯养60 d,利用光镜和扫描电镜技术对比分析鳃上皮泌氯细胞的形态、分布与数量特征.结果表明:幼鱼鳃上皮泌氯细胞主要集中分布于鳃小片基部和鳃小片之间的鳃丝上,细胞略呈椭圆形.半咸水条件下,幼鱼鳃丝上皮泌氯细胞数量和大小显著增加,鳃小片上皮泌氯细胞数量则未发生改变,但

  13. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra C; Costa E Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Joao S; Werner, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP) even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET) accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated. The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43 and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss) similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to drought.

  14. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra C.; Costa e Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Joao S.; Werner, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP) even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET) accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated. The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43 and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss) similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to drought. PMID

  15. Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren eDubbert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Semi-arid ecosystems contribute about 40% to global net primary production (GPP even though water is a major factor limiting carbon uptake. Evapotranspiration (ET accounts for up to 95% of the water loss and in addition, vegetation can also mitigate drought effects by altering soil water distribution. Hence, partitioning of carbon and water fluxes between the soil and vegetation components is crucial to gain mechanistic understanding of vegetation effects on carbon and water cycling. However, the possible impact of herbaceous vegetation in savanna type ecosystems is often overlooked. Therefore, we aimed at quantifying understory vegetation effects on the water balance and productivity of a Mediterranean oak savanna. ET and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE were partitioned based on flux and stable oxygen isotope measurements and also rain infiltration was estimated.The understory vegetation contributed importantly to total ecosystem ET and GPP with a maximum of 43% and 51%, respectively. It reached water-use efficiencies (WUE; ratio of carbon gain by water loss similar to cork-oak trees. The understory vegetation inhibited soil evaporation (E and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish WUE during water-limited times. The understory strongly increased soil water infiltration, specifically following major rain events. At the same time, the understory itself was vulnerable to drought, which led to an earlier senescence of the understory growing under trees as compared to open areas, due to competition for water. Thus, beneficial understory effects are dominant and contribute to the resilience of this ecosystem. At the same time the vulnerability of the understory to drought suggests that future climate change scenarios for the Mediterranean basin threaten understory development. This in turn will very likely diminish beneficial understory effects like infiltration and ground water recharge and therefore ecosystem resilience to

  16. Are harmful algal blooms becoming the greatest inland water quality threat to public health and aquatic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bryan W; Lazorchak, James M; Howard, Meredith D A; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V; Morton, Steve L; Perkins, Dawn A K; Reavie, Euan D; Scott, Geoffrey I; Smith, Stephanie A; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2016-01-01

    In this Focus article, the authors ask a seemingly simple question: Are harmful algal blooms (HABs) becoming the greatest inland water quality threat to public health and aquatic ecosystems? When HAB events require restrictions on fisheries, recreation, and drinking water uses of inland water bodies significant economic consequences result. Unfortunately, the magnitude, frequency, and duration of HABs in inland waters are poorly understood across spatiotemporal scales and differentially engaged among states, tribes, and territories. Harmful algal bloom impacts are not as predictable as those from conventional chemical contaminants, for which water quality assessment and management programs were primarily developed, because interactions among multiple natural and anthropogenic factors determine the likelihood and severity to which a HAB will occur in a specific water body. These forcing factors can also affect toxin production. Beyond site-specific water quality degradation caused directly by HABs, the presence of HAB toxins can negatively influence routine surface water quality monitoring, assessment, and management practices. Harmful algal blooms present significant challenges for achieving water quality protection and restoration goals when these toxins confound interpretation of monitoring results and environmental quality standards implementation efforts for other chemicals and stressors. Whether HABs presently represent the greatest threat to inland water quality is debatable, though in inland waters of developed countries they typically cause more severe acute impacts to environmental quality than conventional chemical contamination events. The authors identify several timely research needs. Environmental toxicology, environmental chemistry, and risk-assessment expertise must interface with ecologists, engineers, and public health practitioners to engage the complexities of HAB assessment and management, to address the forcing factors for HAB formation, and

  17. Two prototype tools for assessing good environmental/ecological status (GES) in aquatic ecosystems – DEVOTES and WATERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Ciarán; Carstensen, Jacob; Andersen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    We present two prototype tools for assessment of GES (good ecological status and good environmental status) in aquatic ecosystems: the DEVOTES biodiversity assessment tool (for the MSFD) and the WATERS ecological status assessment tool (for the WFD). Both tools are multi-metric indicator......-based tools, which classify ecological/environmental status in two classes (good or not good) and five classes (High, Good, Moderate, Poor or Bad) by comparing observed indicator values with specified status classification boundaries. Assessments are made for geographical entities (“sectors” in DEVOTES...... / “waterbodies” in WATERS) resulting in both an overall status for the geographical entity as well as classifications within indicator groups. Both tools are Excel-based and share many similarities. Whilst the WATERS tool performs assessments for a simple “flat” set of waterbodies, the DEVOTES tools allows...

  18. Water addition regulates the metabolic activity of ammonia oxidizers responding to environmental perturbations in dry subhumid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Macdonald, Catriona A; Trivedi, Pankaj; Holmes, Bronwyn; Bodrossy, Levente; He, Ji-Zheng; Singh, Brajesh K

    2015-02-01

    Terrestrial arid and semi-arid ecosystems (drylands) constitute about 41% of the Earth's land surface and are predicted to experience increasing fluctuations in water and nitrogen availability. Mounting evidence has confirmed the significant importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in nitrification, plant nitrogen availability and atmospheric N2 O emissions, but their responses to environmental perturbations in drylands remain largely unknown. Here we evaluate how the factorial combinations of irrigation and fertilization in forests and land-use change from grassland to forest affects the dynamics of AOA and AOB following a 6-year dryland field study. Potential nitrification rates and AOA and AOB abundances were significantly higher in the irrigated plots, accompanied by considerable changes in community compositions, but their responses to fertilization alone were not significant. DNA-stable isotope probing results showed increased (13) CO2 incorporation into the amoA gene of AOA, but not of AOB, in plots receiving water addition, coupled with significantly higher net mineralization and nitrification rates. High-throughput microarray analysis revealed that active AOA assemblages belonging to Nitrosopumilus and Nitrosotalea were increasingly labelled by (13) CO2 following irrigation. However, no obvious effects of land-use changes on nitrification rates or metabolic activity of AOA and AOB could be observed under dry conditions. We provide evidence that water addition had more important roles than nitrogen fertilization in influencing the autotrophic nitrification in dryland ecosystems, and AOA are increasingly involved in ammonia oxidation when dry soils become wetted.

  19. Monitoring of impact of anthropogenic inputs on water quality of mangrove ecosystem of Uran, Navi Mumbai, west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Prabhakar R

    2013-10-15

    Surface water samples were collected from substations along Sheva creek and Dharamtar creek mangrove ecosystems of Uran (Raigad), Navi Mumbai, west coast of India. Water samples were collected fortnightly from April 2009 to March 2011 during spring low and high tides and were analyzed for pH, Temperature, Turbidity, Total solids (TS), Total dissolved solids (TDS), Total suspended solids (TSS), Dissolved oxygen (DO), Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), Carbon dioxide (CO2), Chemical oxygen demand (COD), Salinity, Orthophosphate (O-PO4), Nitrite-nitrogen (NO2-N), Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), and Silicates. Variables like pH, turbidity, TDS, salinity, DO, and BOD show seasonal variations. Higher content of O-PO4, NO3-N, and silicates is recorded due to discharge of domestic wastes and sewage, effluents from industries, oil tanking depots and also from maritime activities of Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT), hectic activities of Container Freight Stations (CFS), and other port wastes. This study reveals that water quality from mangrove ecosystems of Uran is deteriorating due to industrial pollution and that mangrove from Uran is facing the threat due to anthropogenic stress.

  20. Evaluating Responses in Complex Adaptive Systems: Insights on Water Management from the Southern African Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (SAfMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Bohensky

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem services are embedded in complex adaptive systems. These systems are riddled with nonlinearities, uncertainties, and surprises, and are made increasingly complex by the many human responses to problems or changes arising within them. In this paper we attempt to determine whether there are certain factors that characterize effective responses in complex systems. We construct a framework for response evaluation with three interconnected scopes or spatial and temporal domains: the scope of an impact, the scope of the awareness of the impact, and the scope of the power or influence to respond. Drawing from the experience of the Southern African Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (SAfMA, we explore the applicability of this framework to the example of water management in southern Africa, where an ongoing paradigm shift in some areas has enabled a transition from supply-side to demand-side responses and the creation of new institutions to manage water across scales. We suggest that the most effective responses exhibit congruence between the impact, awareness, and power scopes; distribute impacts across space and time; expand response options; enhance social memory; and depend on power-distributing mechanisms. We conclude by stressing the need for sufficient flexibility to adapt responses to the specific, ever-evolving contexts in which they are implemented. Although our discussion focuses on water in southern Africa, we believe that the framework has broad applicability to a range of complex systems and places.

  1. Socio-hydrologic Modeling to Understand and Mediate the Competition for Water between Humans and Ecosystems: Murrumbidgee River Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Li, Zheng; Pande, Saket; Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    Around the world the demand for water resources is growing in order to satisfy rapidly increasing human populations, leading to competition for water between humans and ecosystems. An entirely new and comprehensive quantitative framework is needed to establish a holistic understanding of that competition, thereby enabling development and evaluation of effective mediation strategies. We present a case study centered on the Murrumbidgee river basin in eastern Australia that illustrates the dynamics of the balance between water extraction and use for food production and efforts to mitigate and reverse consequent degradation of the riparian environment. Interactions between patterns of water resources management and climate driven hydrological variability within the prevailing socio-economic environment have contributed to the emergence of new whole system dynamics over the last 100 years. In particular, data analysis reveals a pendulum swing between an exclusive focus on agricultural development and food production in the initial stages of water resources development and its attendant socio-economic benefits, followed by the gradual realization of the adverse environmental impacts, efforts to mitigate these with the use of remedial measures, and ultimately concerted efforts and externally imposed solutions to restore environmental health and ecosystem services. A quasi-distributed coupled socio-hydrologic system model that explicitly includes the two-way coupling between human and hydrological systems, including evolution of human values/norms relating to water and the environment, is able to mimic broad features of this pendulum swing. The model consists of coupled nonlinear differential equations that include four state variables describing the co-evolution of storage capacity, irrigated area, human population, and ecosystem health, which are all connected by feedback mechanisms. The model is used to generate insights into the dominant controls of the trajectory of

  2. Uptake of uranium by aquatic plants growing in fresh water ecosystem around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, V.N., E-mail: jhavn1971@gmail.com; Tripathi, R.M., E-mail: tripathirm@yahoo.com; Sethy, N.K., E-mail: sethybarc@rediffmail.com; Sahoo, S.K., E-mail: sksbarc@gmail.com

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of uranium was determined in aquatic plants and substrate (sediment or water) of fresh water ecosystem on and around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India. Aquatic plant/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) of uranium were estimated for different sites on and around the uranium mill tailings disposal area. These sites include upstream and downstream side of surface water sources carrying the treated tailings effluent, a small pond inside tailings disposal area and residual water of this area. Three types of plant groups were investigated namely algae (filamentous and non-filamentous), other free floating & water submerged and sediment rooted plants. Wide variability in concentration ratio was observed for different groups of plants studied. The filamentous algae uranium concentration was significantly correlated with that of water (r = 0.86, p < 0.003). For sediment rooted plants significant correlation was found between uranium concentration in plant and the substrate (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). Both for other free floating species and sediment rooted plants, uranium concentration was significantly correlated with Mn, Fe, and Ni concentration of plants (p < 0.01). Filamentous algae, Jussiaea and Pistia owing to their high bioproductivity, biomass, uranium accumulation and concentration ratio can be useful for prospecting phytoremediation of stream carrying treated or untreated uranium mill tailings effluent. - Highlights: • Uranium mill tailings pond. • Jaduguda, India. • Fresh water plants. • Uranium uptake. • Relationship of uranium with stable elements.

  3. Late Permian marine ecosystem collapse began in deeper waters: evidence from brachiopod diversity and body size changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W-H; Shi, G R; Twitchett, R J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K-X; Song, H-J; Yue, M-L; Wu, S-B; Wu, H-T; Yang, T-L; Xiao, Y-F

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Permian-Triassic brachiopod diversity and body size changes from different water depths spanning the continental shelf to basinal facies in South China provides insights into the process of environmental deterioration. Comparison of the temporal changes of brachiopod diversity between deepwater and shallow-water facies demonstrates that deepwater brachiopods disappeared earlier than shallow-water brachiopods. This indicates that high environmental stress commenced first in deepwater settings and later extended to shallow waters. This environmental stress is attributed to major volcanic eruptions, which first led to formation of a stratified ocean and a chemocline in the outer shelf and deeper water environments, causing the disappearance of deep marine benthos including brachiopods. The chemocline then rapidly migrated upward and extended to shallow waters, causing widespread mass extinction of shallow marine benthos. We predict that the spatial and temporal patterns of earlier onset of disappearance/extinction and ecological crisis in deeper water ecosystems will be recorded during other episodes of rapid global warming.

  4. Monitoring Watershed Water Quality Impacts on Near-Shore Coral Reef Ecosystems in American Samoa using NASA Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaby, A.; Price, J.; Minovitz, D.; Makely, L.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Schmidt, C.; Guild, L. S.; Palacios, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Land use changes can greatly increase erosion and sediment loads reaching watersheds and downstream coastal waters. In coastal environments with steep terrain and small drainage basins, sedimentation directly influences water quality in near-shore marine environments. Poor water quality indicators (i.e., dissolved nutrients and high particulates) affect coral calcification, photosynthesis, and coral cover. The abundance, recruitment, and biodiversity of American Samoa's coral reefs have been heavily affected by population growth, land cover change, pollution, and sediment influx. Monitoring, managing, and protecting these fragile ecosystems remains difficult due to limited resource availability, steep terrain, and local land ownership. Despite extensive field hours, traditional field and lab-based water quality research produces temporally and spatially limited datasets. Using a 'ridge to reef' effort, this project built a management tool to assess coral reef vulnerability using land use, hydrology, water quality, and coral reef cover in American Samoa to provide local agencies and partners with spatial representation of water quality parameters and site-specific implications for coral reef vulnerability. This project used land cover classified from Landsat 7 and 8 images, precipitation data from NOAA, and physical ocean factors from Terra MODIS. Changes in land cover from 2000 to 2014 were also estimated using Landsat imagery. Final products were distributed to partners to enhance water quality management, community outreach, and coral reef conservation.

  5. Trends in a satellite-derived vegetation index and environmental variables in a restored brackish lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yoon Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated relative influence of climatic variables on the plant productivity after lagoon restoration. Chilika Lagoon, the largest brackish lake ecosystem in East Asia, experienced severe problems such as excessive dominance of freshwater exotic plants and rapid debasement of biodiversity associated with decreased hydrologic connectivity between the lagoon and the ocean. To halt the degradation of the lagoon ecosystem, the Chilika Development Authority implemented a restoration project, creating a new channel to penetrate the barrier beach of the lagoon. Using a satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI dataset, we compared the trend of vegetation changes after the lagoon restoration, from April 1998 to May 2014. The time series of NDVI data were decomposed into trend, seasonal, and random components using a local regression method. The results were visualized to understand the traits of spatial distribution in the lagoon. The NDVI trend, indicative of primary productivity, decreased rapidly during the restoration period, and gradually increased (slope coefficient: 2.1×10−4, p<0.05 after two years of restoration. Level of seawater exchange had more influences on plant productivity than local precipitation in the restored lagoon. Higher El Niño/Southern Oscillation increased sea level pressure, and caused intrusion of seawater into the lagoon, and the subsequently elevated salinity decreased the annual mean NDVI. Our findings suggest that lagoon restoration plans for enhancing interconnectivity with the ocean should consider oceanographic effects due to meteorological forcing, and long-term NDVI results can be used as a valuable index for adaptive management of the restoration site.

  6. Impacts of climatic changes on carbon and water balance components of boreal forest ecosystems in central part of European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, A.; Novenko, E.; Desherevskaya, O.; Kurbatova, J.

    2009-04-01

    Within the framework of the study the possible impacts of climatic changes on carbon and water balances of boreal forest ecosystems of the central part of European Russia for period up to 2100 was estimated using results of model simulations and field measurements. The boreal forests of the Central Forest State Natural Biosphere Reserve (CFSNBR) were selected for the study. They are located at the southern boundary of south taiga zone in the European part of Russia (Tver region) and it can be expected that they will be very sensitive to modern climate warming. Expected future pattern of climatic parameters in the study area was derived using the global climatic model ECHAM5 (MPI Hamburg, Germany) and climatic scenarios B1, A1B and A2 (IPCC 2007). The possible scenarios of species composition changes of the boreal forests were developed using reconstructions of Holocene vegetation cover and climatic conditions on the base of pollen and plant macrofossil analysis of peat profiles in CFSNBR. The annual future pattern of CO2 and H2O fluxes of the forests were simulated using a process-based Mixfor-SVAT model (Olchev et al. 2002, 2008). The main advantage of Mixfor-SVAT is that it allows us to describe CO2 and H2O fluxes both in mono-specific and mixed forest stands. It is able to quantify both total ecosystem fluxes and flux partitioning among different tree species and canopy layers. It is obvious that it can be very helpful to describe accurately effects of species composition changes on structure of dynamics of carbon and water balance of forest ecosystems. Results of modeling experiments show that expected climatic and vegetation changes can have significant impact on evapotranspiration, transpiration, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross (GPP) and Net (NPP) Primary Productivities of boreal forest ecosystems. These changes have a clear seasonal trend and they are depended on species composition of a forest stand. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation

  7. [Evaluation of cultural service value of aquaculture pond ecosystem: a case study in a water conservation area of Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Guo, Zong-xiang; Yang, Huai-yu; Yang, Zheng-yong

    2009-12-01

    Pond aquaculture has existed in China for thousands of years, which has not only contributed great economic value, but also presented cultural value for human beings. With the development and upgrading of Chinese economy and culture, these values will be highlighted further. To evaluate the cultural service value of pond aquaculture ecosystem would provide a scientific base to the policy-making to avoid or reduce the wrong design-making or avoid the policy-malfunction, and also, to promote the development of aquaculture and related recreational fishing industry, increase the added value of aquaculture and the income of fish-farmers, and promote the economic development of rural area. Based on the survey data from the aquaculture ponds in the water conservation area of Dianshan Lake in Qingpu District of Shanghai and the related statistical data, the cultural service value including recreational value and existence value of the aquaculture pond ecosystem in the area was estimated by means of travel cost method (TCM) and contingent valuation method (CVM). The total cultural service value of this ecosystem was about 213 million Yuan x a(-1) or 231296. 69 Yuan x hm(-2) x a(-1), being 5. 25 times of the market value of aquaculture products, among which, recreational value was about 189 million Yuan x a(-1), and existence value was about 24 million Yuan x a(-1). It was suggested that in the construction of new rural areas of Shanghai, sufficient attention should be paid on the full play of the cultural service value of aquaculture pond ecosystem.

  8. Recovery of injected freshwater from a brackish aquifer with a multiwell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotliński, Konrad; Dillon, Peter J; Pavelic, Paul; Barry, Karen; Kremer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Herein we propose a multiple injection and recovery well system strategically operated for freshwater storage in a brackish aquifer. With the system we call aquifer storage transfer and recovery (ASTR) by using four injection and two production wells, we are capable of achieving both high recovery efficiency of injected freshwater and attenuation of contaminants through adequately long residence times and travel distances within the aquifer. The usual aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) scheme, in which a single well is used for injection and recovery, does not warrant consistent treatment of injected water due to the shorter minimum residence times and travel distances. We tested the design and operation of the system over 3 years in a layered heterogeneous limestone aquifer in Salisbury, South Australia. We demonstrate how a combination of detailed aquifer characterization and solute transport modeling can be used to maintain acceptable salinity of recovered water for its intended use along with natural treatment of recharge water. ASTR can be used to reduce treatment costs and take advantage of aquifers with impaired water quality that might locally not be otherwise beneficially used.

  9. Improving ASR Recovery Efficiency by Partially-penetrating Wells in Brackish Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a proven cost-effective powerful technology for environmental protection and water resources optimization. The recovery efficiency (RE) is regarded as the key criteria for evaluating the ASR performance. In this study, a particular ASR scheme with the fully-penetrating well (FPW) for injection and the partially-penetrating well (PPW) for recovery is proposed to improve the RE for ASR schemes implemented in brackish aquifers. This design appreciates the tilting shape of the interface with underlying heavier salt water. For the FPW, recovery has to be terminated as soon as the interface toe reaches the well, while the toe can be pulled up to the PPW for recovery termination, resulting in later breakthrough of salt water into the pumping well, more recoverable water extracted from the shallow layers, and a higher RE. Key hydrogeological and operational parameters affecting the RE were investigated by numerical simulations. Results demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of the new ASR scheme and provided practical guidance for designing such a scheme in various hydrogeological conditions.

  10. Tradeoffs of modifications of storm water managements systems for nitrogen loss pathways in semi-arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, K. A.; Gallo, E. L.; Brooks, P. D.; Meixner, T.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is altering hydrologic and nitrogen (N) inputs to streams that may substantially increase nitrogen-containing trace gas emissions to the atmosphere with regional and global consequences. In the semi-arid southwestern US, human modifications of ephemerally dry stream channels interact with hydrologic and nitrogen alterations to lead to extremely high fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O). Cumulative N2O losses ranged from 0.04 to 0.97 mg N m-2 in 6 hr for rainfall compared to 22.5-59.3 mg N m-2 for flood pulse events. Impervious channels eliminated N trace gas losses but increased delivery of water and N to downstream ecosystems and areas of focused recharge by 6 fold compared to watersheds with greater pervious channel lengths. In contrast, importation of clay into channels increased total N trace gas losses by 8-32 fold relative to more natural sand dominated channels but this result depended on the degree of wetting. Our integrated findings suggest human modification of storm water management systems to impervious channels increases delivery of water and N to downstream navigable waters and areas of focused recharge whereas importation of clay materials leads to higher N trace gas losses and reduced delivery of nitrate. Management will need to address long-term challenges of balancing tradeoffs of greenhouse N gases and N in water supplies, intermediate scale issues of enhancing recharge, and short-term issues of removing water and preventing flooding.

  11. Uptake of uranium by aquatic plants growing in fresh water ecosystem around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V N; Tripathi, R M; Sethy, N K; Sahoo, S K

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of uranium was determined in aquatic plants and substrate (sediment or water) of fresh water ecosystem on and around uranium mill tailings pond at Jaduguda, India. Aquatic plant/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) of uranium were estimated for different sites on and around the uranium mill tailings disposal area. These sites include upstream and downstream side of surface water sources carrying the treated tailings effluent, a small pond inside tailings disposal area and residual water of this area. Three types of plant groups were investigated namely algae (filamentous and non-filamentous), other free floating & water submerged and sediment rooted plants. Wide variability in concentration ratio was observed for different groups of plants studied. The filamentous algae uranium concentration was significantly correlated with that of water (r=0.86, pplants significant correlation was found between uranium concentration in plant and the substrate (r=0.88, pplants, uranium concentration was significantly correlated with Mn, Fe, and Ni concentration of plants (p<0.01). Filamentous algae, Jussiaea and Pistia owing to their high bioproductivity, biomass, uranium accumulation and concentration ratio can be useful for prospecting phytoremediation of stream carrying treated or untreated uranium mill tailings effluent.

  12. Evaluating an ecosystem management approach for improving water quality in two contrasting study catchments in south-west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendell, Miriam; Brazier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) 2000 established a new emphasis for the management of freshwaters by establishing ecologically-based water quality targets that are to be achieved through holistic, catchment-scale, ecosystem management approaches. However, significant knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the cumulative effectiveness of multiple mitigation measures on a number of pollutants at a catchment scale. This research furthers the understanding of the effectiveness of an ecosystem management approach to deliver catchment-scale water quality improvements in two contrasting study catchments in south-west England: the lowland agricultural Aller and the upland semi-natural Horner Water. Characterisation of the spatial variability of soil properties (bulk density, total carbon, nitrogen, C:N ratio, stable isotope δ15N, total, organic and inorganic phosphorus) in the two study catchments demonstrated extensive alteration of soil properties in the agricultural catchment, with likely long-term implications for the restoration of ecosystem functioning and water quality management (Glendell et al., 2014b). Further, the agricultural catchment supported a proportionally greater total fluvial carbon (dissolved and particulate) export than the semi-natural catchment. During an eight month period for which a comparable continuous turbidity record was available, the estimated SS yields from the agricultural catchment (25.5-116.2 t km-2) were higher than from the semi-natural catchment (21.7-57.8 t km-2). In addition, the agricultural catchment exported proportionally more TPC (0.51-2.59 kg mm-1) than the semi-natural catchment (0.36-0.97 kg mm-1) and a similar amount of DOC (0.26-0.52 kg mm-1 in the Aller and 0.24-0.32 kg mm-1 in Horner Water), when normalised by catchment area and total discharge, despite the lower total soil carbon pool, thus indicating an enhanced fluvial loss of sediment and carbon (Glendell and Brazier, in review). Whilst

  13. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions in Support of Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Liane S.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Kudela, Raphael; Morrow, John; Russell, Philip; Myers, Jeffrey; Dunagan, Stephen; Palacios, Sherry; Livingston, John; Negrey, Kendra; Torres-Perez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, coastal marine ecosystems are exposed to land-based sources of pollution and sedimentation from anthropogenic activities including agriculture and coastal development. Ocean color products from satellite sensors provide information on chlorophyll (phytoplankton pigment), sediments, and colored dissolved organic material. Further, ship-based in-water measurements and emerging airborne measurements provide in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation satellite ocean color sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal of the airborne missions was to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. Utilizing an imaging spectrometer optimized in the blue to green spectral domain enables higher signal for detection of the relatively dark radiance measurements from marine and freshwater ecosystem features. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic

  14. Impact of herbaceous understory vegetation to ecosystem water cycle, productivity and infiltration in a semi arid oak woodland assessed by stable oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Silva, Filipe Costa e.; Correia, Alexandra C.; Pereira, Joao S.; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Water is one of the key factors driving ecosystem productivity, especially in water-limited ecosystems. Thus a separation of these component fluxes is needed to gain a functional understanding on the development of net ecosystem water and carbon fluxes. Oxygen isotope signatures are valuable tracers for such water movements within the ecosystem because of the distinct isotopic compositions of water in the soil and vegetation. Here, a novel approach was used (Dubbert et al., 2013), combining a custom build flow-through gas-exchange branch chamber with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a Mediterranean cork-oak woodland where two vegetation layers respond differently to drought: oak-trees (Quercus suber L.) avoid drought due to their access to ground water while herbaceous plants survive the summer as seeds. We used this approach to quantify the impact of the understory herbaceous vegetation on ecosystem carbon and water fluxes throughout the year and disentangle how ET components of the ecosystem relate to carbon dioxide exchange. Partitioning ecosystem ET and NEE into its three sources revealed that understory vegetation contributed markedly to ecosystem ET and gross primary production (GPP; max. 43 and 51%, respectively). It reached similar water-use efficiencies (WUE) as cork-oak trees and significantly contributed to the ecosystem sink-strength in spring and fall. The understory vegetation layer further strongly inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish ecosystem WUE during water-limited times (Dubbert et al., 2014a). Although, during most of the year, interactions with trees neither facilitated nor hampered the development of the understory vegetation, strong competition for water could be observed at the end of the growing period, which shortened the life-cycle of understory plants and significantly reduced the carbon uptake of the ecosystem in spring (Dubbert et al., 2014b). Finally, herbaceous understory

  15. Role of vegetation in modulating rainfall interception and soil water flux in ecosystems under transition from grassland to woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chris; Will, Rodney; Stebler, Elaine; Qiao, Lei

    2014-05-01

    Vegetation exerts strong control on the hydrological budget by shielding the soil from rainfall through interception and modulating water transmission in the soil by altering soil properties and rooting zone water extraction. Therefore, a change in vegetation alters the water cycle by a combination of a passive, rainfall redistribution mechanism controlled by the physical dimensions of vegetation and active, water extracting processes resulting from physiological attributes of different plants. As a result, the role of vegetation on the water cycle is likely to change where vegetation is under transition such as in the southern Great Plains of USA due to woody plant encroachment. However, it remains largely unknown how this physiognomic transformation from herbaceous cover to woody canopy alters rainfall influx, soil water transmission and efflux from the soil profile and consequently alters historic patterns of runoff and groundwater recharge. This knowledge is critical for both water resource and ecosystem management. We conducted a comprehensive, 5-year study involving direct quantification of throughfall and stemflow for grassland and encroached juniper woodland (Juniperus virginiana), water efflux through transpiration using an improved Granier thermal dissipation method (trees) and ET chamber (grassland), soil moisture storage and dynamics (capacitance probe) and streamflow (small catchment). We calibrated a prevailing hydrological model (SWAT) based on observed data to simulate potential change in runoff and recharge for the Cimarron River basin (study site located within this basin) under various phases of grassland to woodland transition. Our results show that juniper encroachment reduces throughfall reaching the soil surface compared with grassland under moderate grazing. The evergreen junipers transpired water year-round including fall and winter when the warm season grasses were senescent. As a result, soil water content and soil water storage on the

  16. Changes of evapotranspiration and water yield in China's terrestrial ecosystems during the period from 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are interactively linked at various spatial and temporal scales. Evapotranspiration (ET plays a key role in the terrestrial water cycle and altering carbon sequestration of terrestrial ecosystems. The study of ET and its response to climate and vegetation changes is critical in China since water availability is a limiting factor for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems in vast arid and semiarid regions. In this study, the process-based Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS model was employed in conjunction with a newly developed leaf area index (LAI dataset and other spatial data to simulate daily ET and water yield at a spatial resolution of 500 m over China for the period from 2000 to 2010. The spatial and temporal variations of ET and water yield and influences of temperature, precipitation, land cover types, and LAI on ET were analyzed. The validations with ET measured at 5 typical ChinaFLUX sites and inferred using statistical hydrological data in 10 basins showed that the BEPS model was able to simulate daily and annual ET well at site and basin scales. Simulated annual ET exhibited a distinguishable southeast to northwest decreasing gradient, corresponding to climate conditions and vegetation types. It increased with the increase of LAI in 74% of China's landmass and was positively correlated with temperature in most areas of southwest, south, east, and central China and with precipitation in the arid and semiarid areas of northwest and north China. In the Tibet Plateau and humid southeast China, the increase in precipitation might cause ET to decrease. The national mean annual ET varied from 345.5 mm yr−1 in 2001 to 387.8 mm yr−1 in 2005, with an average of 369.8 mm yr−1 during the study period. The overall increase rate of 1.7 mm yr−2 (r = 0.43 p = 0.19 was mainly driven by the increase of total ET in forests. During the period from 2006 to 2009, precipitation and LAI decreased

  17. Changes of evapotranspiration and water yield in China's terrestrial ecosystems during the period from 2000 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Ju, W.; Chen, J.; Wang, S.; He, H.; Wang, H.; Guan, D.; Zhao, F.; Li, Y.; Hao, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are interactively linked at various spatial and temporal scales. Evapotranspiration (ET) plays a key role in the terrestrial water cycle and altering carbon sequestration of terrestrial ecosystems. The study of ET and its response to climate and vegetation changes is critical in China since water availability is a limiting factor for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems in vast arid and semiarid regions. In this study, the process-based Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) model was employed in conjunction with a newly developed leaf area index (LAI) dataset and other spatial data to simulate daily ET and water yield at a spatial resolution of 500 m over China for the period from 2000 to 2010. The spatial and temporal variations of ET and water yield and influences of temperature, precipitation, land cover types, and LAI on ET were analyzed. The validations with ET measured at 5 typical ChinaFLUX sites and inferred using statistical hydrological data in 10 basins showed that the BEPS model was able to simulate daily and annual ET well at site and basin scales. Simulated annual ET exhibited a distinguishable southeast to northwest decreasing gradient, corresponding to climate conditions and vegetation types. It increased with the increase of LAI in 74% of China's landmass and was positively correlated with temperature in most areas of southwest, south, east, and central China and with precipitation in the arid and semiarid areas of northwest and north China. In the Tibet Plateau and humid southeast China, the increase in precipitation might cause ET to decrease. The national mean annual ET varied from 345.5 mm yr-1 in 2001 to 387.8 mm yr-1 in 2005, with an average of 369.8 mm yr-1 during the study period. The overall increase rate of 1.7 mm yr-2 (r = 0.43 p = 0.19) was mainly driven by the increase of total ET in forests. During the period from 2006 to 2009, precipitation and LAI decreased widely and consequently

  18. Ecosystem engineering creates a direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water coral mounds and surface productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Karline; Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; Grehan, Anthony; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-10-01

    Cold-water corals (CWCs) form large mounds on the seafloor that are hotspots of biodiversity in the deep sea, but it remains enigmatic how CWCs can thrive in this food-limited environment. Here, we infer from model simulations that the interaction between tidal currents and CWC-formed mounds induces downwelling events of surface water that brings organic matter to 600-m deep CWCs. This positive feedback between CWC growth on carbonate mounds and enhanced food supply is essential for their sustenance in the deep sea and represents an example of ecosystem engineering of unparalleled magnitude. This ’topographically-enhanced carbon pump’ leaks organic matter that settles at greater depths. The ubiquitous presence of biogenic and geological topographies along ocean margins suggests that carbon sequestration through this pump is of global importance. These results indicate that enhanced stratification and lower surface productivity, both expected consequences of climate change, may negatively impact the energy balance of CWCs.

  19. Introduction: Water for Food and Ecosystems: How to Cut which Pie?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, J.F.; Bindraban, P.S.; Keulen, van H.

    2006-01-01

    Two decades of awareness-raising and dialogues have clearly spelled out the water-related challenges the world is facing. Still, not enough concrete improvements have been realized on key issues, such as the coverage of potable water and sanitation services, and an adequate balance between water for

  20. Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Ortega, A.; Acuña, V.; Bellin, A.; Burek, P.; Cassiani, G.; Choukr-Allah, R.; Dolédec, S.; Elosegi, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ginebreda, A.; Grathwohl, P.; Jones, C.; Ker Rault, P.A.; Kok, K.; Koundouri, P.; Ludwig, R.P.; Merz, R.; Milacic, R.

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts

  1. Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity. The GLOBAQUA project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Ortega, A.; Acuña, V.; Bellin, A.; Burek, P.; Cassiani, G.; Choukr-Allah, R.; Dolédec, S.; Elosegi, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ginebreda, A.; Grathwohl, P.; Jones, C.; Rault, P.K.; Kok, K.; Koundouri, P.; Ludwig, R.P.; Merz, R.; Milacic, R.; Muñoz, I.; Nikulin, G.; Paniconi, C.; Paunović, M.; Petrovic, M.; Sabater, L.; Sabaterb, S.; Skoulikidis, N.T.; Slob, A.; Teutsch, G.; Voulvoulis, N.; Barceló, D.

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts

  2. Snowmelt as a driver of ecosystem response in water limited mountain forests of the Western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotch, N. P.; Trujillo, E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent large-scale changes in snow cover over Western North America associated with climate warming may have widespread impacts on water availability. These changes have potentially varied impacts on water availability as snowmelt influences, soil moisture, streamflow, and evapotranspiration. These changes may significantly alter runoff production and gross primary productivity in mountain forests. Analysis of remotely sensed and in situ soil moisture data indicate strong sensitivities of the timing of peak soil moisture to the timing of snowmelt. Observations of vegetation greenness indicate strong forest and understory growth dependencies associated with snow accumulation, snowmelt, and soil moisture with peak snow water equivalent explaining 40-50% of inter-annual greenness variability in the Rocky Mountains. Examples of these dependencies will be presented based on the 2012 drought in the Southwestern US whereby near record low snow accumulation and record high potential evapotranspiration have resulted in record low forest greening as evident in the 30+ year satellite record. Forest response to aridity in 2012 was exacerbated by forest disturbance with greenness anomalies 90% greater in magnitude in Bark Beetle and Spruce Budworm affected areas versus undisturbed areas and 182% greater in magnitude in areas impacted by fire. Greenness sensitivities to aridity showed seasonal dependencies with record high Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values in April (14% above average) and record low NDVI values in July (7% below average). Gross primary productivity estimates from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and from the Niwot Ridge, Colorado Ameriflux tower indicate record high April GPP (30% and 90% above average for MODIS and the tower, respectively) and record low July GPP (19% and 30% below average, respectively). These energy, water, ecosystem relationships indicate that the sensitivity of ecosystems to changes in climate is

  3. Impact of water management interventions on hydrology and ecosystem services in Garhkundar-Dabar watershed of Bundelkhand region, Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh; Garg, Kaushal K.; Wani, Suhas P.; Tewari, R. K.; Dhyani, S. K.

    2014-02-01

    Bundelkhand region of Central India is a hot spot of water scarcity, land degradation, poverty and poor socio-economic status. Impacts of integrated watershed development (IWD) interventions on water balance and different ecosystem services are analyzed in one of the selected watershed of 850 ha in Bundelkhand region. Improved soil, water and crop management interventions in Garhkundar-Dabar (GKD) watershed of Bundelkhand region in India enhanced ET to 64% as compared to 58% in untreated (control) watershed receiving 815 mm annual average rainfall. Reduced storm flow (21% vs. 34%) along with increased base flow (4.5% vs. 1.2%) and groundwater recharge (11% vs. 7%) of total rainfall received were recorded in treated watershed as compared to untreated control watershed. Economic Water productivity and total income increased from 2.5 to 5.0 INR m-3 and 11,500 to 27,500 INR ha-1 yr-1 after implementing integrated watershed development interventions in GKD watershed, respectively. Moreover IWD interventions helped in reducing soil loss more than 50% compared to control watershed. The results demonstrated that integrated watershed management practices addressed issues of poverty in GKD watershed. Benefit to cost ratio of project interventions was found three and pay back period within four years suggest economic feasibility to scale-up IWD interventions in Bundelkhend region. Scaling-up of integrated watershed management in drought prone rainfed areas with enabling policy and institutional support is expected to promote equity and livelihood along with strengthening various ecosystem services, however, region-specific analysis is needed to assess trade-offs for downstream areas along with onsite impact.

  4. A general one-dimensional vertical ecosystem model of Lake Shira (Russia, Khakasia): description, parametrization and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prokopkin, I.; Mooij, W.M.; Janse, J.H.; Degermendzhy, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    A one-dimensional ecological model of the meromictic brackish Lake Shira (Russia, Khakasia) was developed. The model incorporates state-of-the-art knowledge about the functioning of the lake ecosystem using the most recent field observations and ideas from PCLake, a general ecosystem model of shallo

  5. Effects of Sewage Discharge on Trophic State and Water Quality in a Coastal Ecosystem of the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-González, Héctor Hugo; Arreola-Lizárraga, José Alfredo; Mendoza-Salgado, Renato Arturo; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Lechuga-Deveze, Carlos Hernando; Padilla-Arredondo, Gustavo; Cordoba-Matson, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides evidence of the effects of urban wastewater discharges on the trophic state and environmental quality of a coastal water body in a semiarid subtropical region in the Gulf of California. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and organic matter from urban wastewater primary treatment were estimated. La Salada Cove was the receiving water body and parameters measured during an annual cycle were temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, orthophosphate, and chlorophyll a. The effects of sewage inputs were determined by using Trophic State Index (TRIX) and the Arid Zone Coastal Water Quality Index (AZCI). It was observed that urban wastewater of the city of Guaymas provided 1,237 ton N yr−1 and 811 ton P yr−1 and TRIX indicated that the receiving water body showed symptoms of eutrophication from an oligotrophic state to a mesotrophic state; AZCI also indicated that the environmental quality of the water body was poor. The effects of urban wastewater supply with insufficient treatment resulted in symptoms of eutrophication and loss of ecological functions and services of the coastal ecosystem in La Salada Cove. PMID:24711731

  6. Effects of Sewage Discharge on Trophic State and Water Quality in a Coastal Ecosystem of the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Hugo Vargas-González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides evidence of the effects of urban wastewater discharges on the trophic state and environmental quality of a coastal water body in a semiarid subtropical region in the Gulf of California. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and organic matter from urban wastewater primary treatment were estimated. La Salada Cove was the receiving water body and parameters measured during an annual cycle were temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, orthophosphate, and chlorophyll a. The effects of sewage inputs were determined by using Trophic State Index (TRIX and the Arid Zone Coastal Water Quality Index (AZCI. It was observed that urban wastewater of the city of Guaymas provided 1,237 ton N yr−1 and 811 ton P yr−1 and TRIX indicated that the receiving water body showed symptoms of eutrophication from an oligotrophic state to a mesotrophic state; AZCI also indicated that the environmental quality of the water body was poor. The effects of urban wastewater supply with insufficient treatment resulted in symptoms of eutrophication and loss of ecological functions and services of the coastal ecosystem in La Salada Cove.

  7. Regulation of transpirational water loss in Quercus suber trees in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, D O; Schmidt, M W T; Kurz-Besson, C; Lobo Do Vale, R; Pereira, J S; Tenhunen, J D

    2007-08-01

    Sap flux density in branches, leaf transpiration, stomatal conductance and leaf water potentials were measured in 16-year-old Quercus suber L. trees growing in a plantation in southern Portugal to understand how evergreen Mediterranean trees regulate water loss during summer drought. Leaf specific hydraulic conductance and leaf gas exchange were monitored during the progressive summer drought to establish how changes along the hydraulic pathway influence shoot responses. As soil water became limiting, leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration declined significantly. Predawn leaf water potential reflected soil water potential measured at 1-m depth in the rhizospheres of most trees. The lowest predawn leaf water potential recorded during this period was -1.8 MPa. Mean maximum stomatal conductance declined from 300 to 50 mmol m(-2) s(-1), reducing transpiration from 6 to 2 mmol m(-2) s(-1). Changes in leaf gas exchange were attributed to reduced soil water availability, increased resistances along the hydraulic pathway and, hence, reduced leaf water supply. There was a strong coupling between changes in soil water content and stomatal conductance as well as between stomatal conductance and leaf specific hydraulic conductance. Despite significant seasonal differences among trees in predawn leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, leaf transpiration and leaf specific hydraulic conductance, there were no differences in midday leaf water potentials. The strong regulation of changes in leaf water potential in Q. suber both diurnally and seasonally is achieved through stomatal closure, which is sensitive to changes in both liquid and vapor phase conductance. This sensitivity allows for optimization of carbon and water resource use without compromising the root-shoot hydraulic link.

  8. [Assessment of ecosystem energy flow and carrying capacity of swimming crab enhancement in the Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin Qun; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhong-yi; Wu, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Stock enhancement is increasingly proved to be an important measure of the fishery resources conservation, and the assessment of carrying capacity is the decisive factor of the effects of stock enhancement. Meanwhile, the variations in the energy flow patterns of releasing species and ecosystem were the basis for assessing carrying capacity of stock enhancement. So, in the present study, based on the survey data collected from the Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters during 2012-2013, three Ecopath mass-balance models were established in June, August and October, and the variations in ecosystem energy flow in these months were analyzed, as well as the assessment of carrying capacity of swimming crab enhancement. The energy flow mainly concentrated on trophic level I-III in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters, and was relatively less on trophic level IV or above. The system flow proportion on the trophic level I was the highest in June, and was the lowest in August. The highest system flow proportion on the trophic level II was found in August, and the lowest in June. The relative and absolute energy flow of swimming crab mainly concentrated on the trophic level III, and the mean trophic level of swimming crab among June, August and October were 3.28. Surplus production was relatively higher in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters, the highest value was found in June, and the lowest value in August. The ratios of total primary production/total respiration (TPP/TR) were 5.49, 2.47 and 3.01 in June, August and October, respectively, and the ratios of total primary production/total biomass (TPP/B) were 47.61, 33.30 and 29.78, respectively. Combined with the low Finn' s cycling index (FCI: 0.03-0.06), these changes indicated that the Yellow River estuary ecosystem was at an early development stage with higher vulnerability. The energy conversion efficiency of system was from 7.3% to 11.5%, the mean trophic levels of the catch were 3.23, 2.97 and 2.82 in

  9. Assessment of Ganga river ecosystem at Haridwar, Uttarakhand, India with reference to water quality indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutiani, R.; Khanna, D. R.; Kulkarni, Dipali Bhaskar; Ruhela, Mukesh

    2016-06-01

    The river Ganges is regarded as one of the most holy and sacred rivers of the world from time immemorial. The evaluation of river water quality is a critical element in the assessment of water resources. The quality/potability of water that is consumed defines the base line of protection against many diseases and infections. The present study aimed to calculate Water Quality Index (WQI) by the analysis of sixteen physico-chemical parameters on the basis of River Ganga index of Ved Prakash, weighted arithmetic index and WQI by National sanitation foundation (NSF) to assess the suitability of water for drinking, irrigation purposes and other human uses. These three water quality indices have been used to assess variation in the quality of the River Ganga at monitored locations over an 11-year period. Application of three different indexes to assess the water quality over a period of 11 years shows minor variations in water quality. Index values as per River Ganga Index by Ved Prakash et al. from 2000 to 2010 ranged between medium to good, Index values as per NSF Index for years 2000-2010 indicate good water quality, while Index values as per the weighted arithmetic index method for the study period indicate poor water quality.

  10. Relations between vegetation and water level in alkaline fen ecosystems in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch Johansen, Ole; Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    and low and high water level periods, were calculated based on the water level time series. A complete plant species list was recorded in plots covering 78.5 m2 at each site. Community metrics such as total number of species and the number of bryophytes were generated from the species lists and Ellenberg...... Indicator scores of moisture, pH and nutrients were calculated for each site. The water level correlates with the number of typical fen species of vascular plants, whereas bryophytes are closer connected to the stable water level conditions provided by groundwater seepage. The water level variability...... is proved to be a significant limiting factor for species diversity in wetlands, which should be considered along with the fertility in order to access the habitat quality. The study provides new insight in the water level preferences for GWDTEs which is highly needed in the management and assessment...

  11. Connecting the Water and Carbon Cycles for the Generation of Food Security and Ecosystem Services

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Shivaan M.; Poncé-Hernandez, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity and food insecurity are pervasive issues in the developing world and are also intrinsically linked to one another. Through the connection of the water cycle and the carbon cycle this study illustrates that synergistic benefits can be realized by small scale farmers through the implementation of waste water irrigated agroforestry. The WaNuLCAS model is employed using La Huerta agroforestry site in Texcoco, South Central Mexico, as the basis for parameterization. The results of m...

  12. Water quality assessment in the Mexican Caribbean: Impacts on the coastal ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Terrones, Laura M.; Null, Kimberly A.; Ortega-Camacho, Daniela; Paytan, Adina

    2015-07-01

    Coastal zones are dominated by economically important ecosystems, and excessive urban, industrial, agricultural, and tourism activities can lead to rapid degradation of those habitats and resources. Groundwater in the Eastern Yucatan Peninsula coastal aquifer discharges directly into the coastal ocean affecting the coral reefs, which are part of the Mesoamerican Coral Reef System. The composition and impacts of groundwater were studied at different coastal environments around Akumal (SE Yucatan Peninsula). Radium isotopes and salinity were used to quantify fresh groundwater and recirculated seawater contributions to the coastal zone. Excess Ra distribution suggests spatially variable discharge rates of submarine groundwater. High NO3- levels and high coliform bacteria densities indicate that groundwater is polluted at some sites. Dissolved phosphorous content is elevated in the winter and during the high tourism season, likely released from untreated sewage discharge and from aquifer sediments under reducing conditions.

  13. Influence of changing water sources and mineral chemistry on the everglades ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, P.V.; Harvey, J.W.; Crawford, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    Human influences during the previous century increased mineral inputs to the Florida Everglades by changing the sources and chemistry of surface inflows. Biogeochemical responses to this enrichment include changes in the availability of key limiting nutrients such as P, the potential for increased turnover of nutrient pools due to accelerated plant decomposition, and increased rates of mercury methylation associated with sulfate enrichment. Mineral enrichment has also been linked to the loss of sensitive macrophyte species, although dominant Everglades species appear tolerant of a broad range of mineral chemistry. Shifts in periphyton community composition and function provide an especially sensitive indicator of mineral enrichment. Understanding the influence of m