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Sample records for brachytherapy treatment planning

  1. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  2. Inverse planning and class solutions for brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, P.

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy or interventional radiooncology is a method of radiation therapy. It is a method, where a small encapsulated radioactive source is placed near to / in the tumour and therefore delivers high doses directly to the target volume. Organs at risk (OARs) are spared due to the inverse square dose fall-off. In the past years there was a slight stagnation in the development of techniques for brachytherapy treatment. While external beam radiotherapy became more and more sophisticated, in brachytherapy traditional methods have been still used. Recently, 3D imaging was considered also as the modality for brachytherapy and more precise brachytherapy could expand. Nowadays, an image guided brachytherapy is state-of-art in many centres. Integration of imaging methods lead to the dose distribution individually tailored for each patient. Treatment plan optimization is mostly performed manually as an adaptation of a standard loading pattern. Recently, inverse planning approaches have been introduced into brachytherapy. The aim of this doctoral thesis was to analyze inverse planning and to develop concepts how to integrate inverse planning into cervical cancer brachytherapy. First part of the thesis analyzes the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimization (HIPO) algorithm and proposes a workflow how to safely work with this algorithm. The problem of inverse planning generally is that only the dose and volume parameters are taken into account and spatial dose distribution is neglected. This fact can lead to unwanted high dose regions in a normal tissue. A unique implementation of HIPO into the treatment planning system using additional features enabled to create treatment plans similar to the plans resulting from manual optimization and to shape the high dose regions inside the CTV. In the second part the HIPO algorithm is compared to the Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing (IPSA) algorithm. IPSA is implemented into the commercial treatment planning system. It

  3. Standardization of prostate brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove, Roger; Wallner, Kent; Badiozamani, Kas; Korjsseon, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Whereas custom-designed plans are the norm for prostate brachytherapy, the relationship between linear prostate dimensions and volume calls into question the routine need for customized treatment planning. With the goal of streamlining the treatment-planning process, we have compared the treatment margins (TMs) achieved with one standard plan applied to patients with a wide range of prostate volumes. Methods and Materials: Preimplant transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of 50 unselected University of Washington patients with T1-T2 cancer and a prostate volume between 20 cc and 50 cc were studied. Patients were arbitrarily grouped into categories of 20-30 cc, 30-40 cc, and 40-50 cc. A standard 19-needle plan was devised for patients in the 30- to 40-cc range, using an arbitrary minimum margin of 5 mm around the gross tumor volume (GTV), making use of inverse planning technology to achieve 100% coverage of the target volume with accentuation of dose at the periphery and sparing of the central region. The idealized plan was applied to each patient's TRUS study. The distances (TMs) between the prostatic edge (GTV) and treated volume (TV) were determined perpendicular to the prostatic margin. Results: Averaged over the entire patient group, the ratio of thickness to width was 1.4, whereas the ratio of length to width was 1.3. These values were fairly constant over the range of volumes, emphasizing that the prostate retains its general shape as volume increases. The idealized standard plan was overlaid on the ultrasound images of the 17 patients in the 30- to 40-cc group and the V100, the percentage of target volume receiving 100% or more of the prescription dose, was 98% or greater for 15 of the 17 patients. The lateral and posterior TMs fell within a narrow range, most being within 2 mm of the idealized 5-mm TM. To estimate whether a 10-cc volume-interval stratification was reasonable, the standard plan generated from the 30- to 40-cc prostate model was

  4. Inverse treatment planning based on MRI for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrin, Deborah; Ning, Holly; Guion, Peter; Li Guang; Susil, Robert C.; Miller, Robert W.; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Xie Huchen; Capala, Jacek; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Menard, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and optimize a technique for inverse treatment planning based solely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Phantom studies were performed to verify the spatial integrity of treatment planning based on MRI. Data were evaluated from 10 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who had undergone two high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy boosts under MRI guidance before and after pelvic radiotherapy. Treatment planning MRI scans were systematically evaluated to derive a class solution for inverse planning constraints that would reproducibly result in acceptable target and normal tissue dosimetry. Results: We verified the spatial integrity of MRI for treatment planning. MRI anatomic evaluation revealed no significant displacement of the prostate in the left lateral decubitus position, a mean distance of 14.47 mm from the prostatic apex to the penile bulb, and clear demarcation of the neurovascular bundles on postcontrast imaging. Derivation of a class solution for inverse planning constraints resulted in a mean target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose of 95.69%, while maintaining a rectal volume receiving 75% of the prescribed dose of <5% (mean 1.36%) and urethral volume receiving 125% of the prescribed dose of <2% (mean 0.54%). Conclusion: Systematic evaluation of image spatial integrity, delineation uncertainty, and inverse planning constraints in our procedure reduced uncertainty in planning and treatment

  5. Prostate HDR brachytherapy catheter displacement between planning and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, May; Hruby, George; Lovett, Aimee; Patanjali, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: HDR brachytherapy is used as a conformal boost for treating prostate cancer. Given the large doses delivered, it is critical that the volume treated matches that planned. Our outpatient protocol comprises two 9 Gy fractions, two weeks apart. We prospectively assessed catheter displacement between CT planning and treatment delivery. Materials and methods: Three fiducial markers and the catheters were implanted under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Metal marker wires were inserted into 4 reference catheters before CT; marker positions relative to each other and to the marker wires were measured from the CT scout. Measurements were repeated immediately prior to treatment delivery using pelvic X-ray with marker wires in the same reference catheters. Measurements from CT scout and film were compared. For displacements of 5 mm or more, indexer positions were adjusted prior to treatment delivery. Results: Results are based on 48 implants, in 25 patients. Median time from planning CT to treatment delivery was 254 min (range 81–367 min). Median catheter displacement was 7.5 mm (range −2.9–23.9 mm), 67% of implants had displacement of 5 mm or greater. Displacements were predominantly caudal. Conclusions: Catheter displacement can occur in the 1–3 h between the planning CT scan and treatment. It is recommended that departments performing HDR prostate brachytherapy verify catheter positions immediately prior to treatment delivery.

  6. Automated treatment planning engine for prostate seed implant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yan; Zhang, J.B.Y.; Brasacchio, Ralph A.; Okunieff, Paul G.; Rubens, Deborah J.; Strang, John G.; Soni, Arvind; Messing, Edward M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a computer-intelligent planning engine for automated treatment planning and optimization of ultrasound- and template-guided prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: The genetic algorithm was modified to reflect the 2D nature of the implantation template. A multi-objective decision scheme was used to rank competing solutions, taking into account dose uniformity and conformity to the planning target volume (PTV), dose-sparing of the urethra and the rectum, and the sensitivity of the resulting dosimetry to seed misplacement. Optimized treatment plans were evaluated using selected dosimetric quantifiers, dose-volume histogram (DVH), and sensitivity analysis based on simulated seed placement errors. These dosimetric planning components were integrated into the Prostate Implant Planning Engine for Radiotherapy (PIPER). Results: PIPER has been used to produce a variety of plans for prostate seed implants. In general, maximization of the minimum peripheral dose (mPD) for given implanted total source strength tended to produce peripherally weighted seed patterns. Minimization of the urethral dose further reduced the loading in the central region of the PTV. Isodose conformity to the PTV was achieved when the set of objectives did not reflect seed positioning uncertainties; the corresponding optimal plan generally required fewer seeds and higher source strength per seed compared to the manual planning experience. When seed placement uncertainties were introduced into the set of treatment planning objectives, the optimal plan tended to reach a compromise between the preplanned outcome and the likelihood of retaining the preferred outcome after implantation. The reduction in the volatility of such seed configurations optimized under uncertainty was verified by sensitivity studies. Conclusion: An automated treatment planning engine incorporating real-time sensitivity analysis was found to be a useful tool in dosimetric planning for prostate

  7. A quality assurance index for brachytherapy treatment plan verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.B.; Clarke, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    A method is described which provides an independent verification of a brachytherapy treatment plan. The method is applicable to any common geometric configuration and utilises a simple equation derived from a common form of nonlinear regression. The basis for the index value is the relationship between the treatment time, prescribed dose, source strength and plan geometry. This relationship may be described mathematically as: Total Treatment Time ∝ Prescribed Dose/Source Strength x (a geometric term) with the geometric term incorporating three geometric components, namely the distance from source positions to points of dose normalisation (d), the total length of the dwell positions (L), and the number of source trains or catheters (N). A general equation of the form GF = k (d) -α (L) -β (N) -y is used to describe the plan geometry, where GF is what we have termed the geometric factor, k is a constant of proportionality and the exponents are derived from the non-linear regression process. The resulting index is simple to calculate prior to patient treatment and sensitive enough to identify significant error whilst being robust enough to allow for a normal degree of geometric distortion

  8. Matlab Tools: An Alternative to Planning Systems in Brachytherapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Higmar; Rodriguez, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This work proposes the use of the Matlab environment to obtain the treatment dose based on the reported data by Krishnaswamy and Liu et al. The comparison with reported measurements is showed for the Amersham source model. For the 3M source model, measurements with TLDs and a Monte Carlo simulation are compared to the data obtained by Matlab. The difference for the Amersham model is well under the 15% recommended by the IAEA and for the 3M model, although the difference is greater, the results are consistent. The good agreement to the reported data allows the Matlab calculations to be used in daily brachytherapy treatments

  9. Oncentra brachytherapy planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jack

    2018-03-27

    In modern cancer management, treatment planning has progressed as a contemporary tool with all the advances in computing power in recent years. One of the advanced planning tools uses 3-dimensional (3D) data sets for accurate dose distributions in patient prescription. Among these planning processes, brachytherapy has been a very important part of a successful cancer management program, offering clinical benefits with specific or combined treatments with external beam therapy. In this chapter, we mainly discussed the Elekta Oncentra planning system, which is the main treatment planning tool for high-dose rate (HDR) modality in our facility and in many other facilities in the United States. HDR is a technically advanced form of brachytherapy; a high-intensity radiation source (3.6 mm in length) is delivered with step motor in submillimeter precision under computer guidance directly into the tumor areas while minimizing injury to surrounding normal healthy tissue. Oncentra planning is the key component to generate a deliverable brachytherapy procedure, which is executed on the microSelectron V3 remote afterloader treatment system. Creating a highly conformal plan can be a time-consuming task. The development of Oncentra software (version 4.5.3) offers a variety of useful tools that facilitate many of the clinical challenging tasks for planning, such as contouring and image reconstruction, as well as rapid planning calculations with dose and dose volume histogram analysis. Oncentra Brachy module creates workflow and optimizes the planning accuracy for wide varieties of clinical HDR treatments, such as skin, gynecologic (GYN), breast, prostate, and many other applications. The treatment file can also be transferred to the afterloader control station for speedy delivery. The design concept, calculation algorithms, and optimization modules presented some key characteristics to plan and treat the patients effectively and accurately. The dose distribution and accuracy of

  10. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Eric; Gardi, Lori; Fenster, Aaron; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments

  11. Adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer, comparison of conventional point A and CT based individual treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderaas, Anne D.; Langdal, Ingrid; Danielsen, Signe; Frykholm, Gunilla; Marthinsen, Anne B. L; Sundset, Marit

    2012-01-01

    Background. Locally advanced cervical cancer is commonly treated with external radiation therapy combined with local brachytherapy. The brachytherapy is traditionally given based on standard dose planning with prescription of dose to point A. Dosimetric aspects when changing from former standard treatment to individualized treatment plans based on computed tomography (CT) images are here investigated. Material and methods. Brachytherapy data from 19 patients with a total of 72 individual treatment fractions were retrospectively reviewed. Standard library plans were analyzed with respect to doses to organs at risk (OARs), and the result was compared to corresponding delivered individualized plans. The theoretical potential of further optimization based on prescription to target volumes was investigated. The treatments were performed with a Fletcher applicator. Results. For standard treatment planning, the tolerance dose limits were exceeded in the bladder, rectum and sigmoid in 26%, 4% and 15% of the plans, respectively. This was observed most often for the smallest target volumes. The individualized planning of the delivered treatment gave the possibility of controlling the dose to critical organs to below certain limits. The dose was still prescribed to point A. An increase in target dose coverage was achieved when additional individual optimization was performed, while still keeping the dose to the OARs below predefined limits. Relatively low average target coverage, especially for the largest volumes was however seen. Conclusion. The individualized delivered treatment plans ensured that doses to OARs were within acceptable limits. This was not the case in 42% of the corresponding standard plans. Further optimized treatment plans were found to give an overall better dose coverage. In lack of MR capacity, it may be favorable to use CT for planning due to possible protection of OARs. The CT based target volumes were, however, not equivalent to the volumes described

  12. Independent technique of verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Korb, Leroy J.; Darnell, Brenda; Krishna, K. V.; Ulewicz, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: An independent technique for verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans has been formulated and validated clinically. Methods and Materials: In HDR brachytherapy, dwell times at respective dwell positions are computed, using an optimization algorithm in a HDR treatment-planning system to deliver a specified dose to many target points simultaneously. Because of the variability of dwell times, concerns have been expressed regarding the ability of the algorithm to compute the correct dose. To address this concern, a commercially available low-dose rate (LDR) algorithm was used to compute the doses at defined distances, based on the dwell times obtained from the HDR treatment plans. The percent deviation between doses computed using the HDR and LDR algorithms were reviewed for HDR procedures performed over the last year. Results: In this retrospective study, the difference between computed doses using the HDR and LDR algorithms was found to be within 5% for about 80% of the HDR procedures. All of the reviewed procedures have dose differences of less than 10%. Conclusion: An independent technique for verifying HDR brachytherapy treatment plans has been validated based on clinical data. Provided both systems are available, this technique is universal in its applications and not limited to either a particular implant applicator, implant site, or implant type

  13. CT-Based Brachytherapy Treatment Planning using Monte Carlo Simulation Aided by an Interface Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Moslemi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In brachytherapy, radioactive sources are placed close to the tumor, therefore, small changes in their positions can cause large changes in the dose distribution. This emphasizes the need for computerized treatment planning. The usual method for treatment planning of cervix brachytherapy uses conventional radiographs in the Manchester system. Nowadays, because of their advantages in locating the source positions and the surrounding tissues, CT and MRI images are replacing conventional radiographs. In this study, we used CT images in Monte Carlo based dose calculation for brachytherapy treatment planning, using an interface software to create the geometry file required in the MCNP code. The aim of using the interface software is to facilitate and speed up the geometry set-up for simulations based on the patient’s anatomy. This paper examines the feasibility of this method in cervix brachytherapy and assesses its accuracy and speed. Material and Methods: For dosimetric measurements regarding the treatment plan, a pelvic phantom was made from polyethylene in which the treatment applicators could be placed. For simulations using CT images, the phantom was scanned at 120 kVp. Using an interface software written in MATLAB, the CT images were converted into MCNP input file and the simulation was then performed. Results: Using the interface software, preparation time for the simulations of the applicator and surrounding structures was approximately 3 minutes; the corresponding time needed in the conventional MCNP geometry entry being approximately 1 hour. The discrepancy in the simulated and measured doses to point A was 1.7% of the prescribed dose.  The corresponding dose differences between the two methods in rectum and bladder were 3.0% and 3.7% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Comparing the results of simulation using the interface software with those of simulation using the standard MCNP geometry entry showed a less than 1

  14. Automated high-dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning for a single-channel vaginal cylinder applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Klages, Peter; Tan, Jun; Chi, Yujie; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Yang, Ming; Hrycushko, Brian; Medin, Paul; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Jia, Xun

    2017-06-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed manually and/or with aids of preplanned templates. In general, the standard of care would be elevated by conducting an automated process to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human error, and reduce plan quality variations. Thus, our group is developing AutoBrachy, an automated HDR brachytherapy planning suite of modules used to augment a clinical treatment planning system. This paper describes our proof-of-concept module for vaginal cylinder HDR planning that has been fully developed. After a patient CT scan is acquired, the cylinder applicator is automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. The target CTV is generated based on physician-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of the dose calculation point, apex point and vaginal surface point, as well as the central applicator channel coordinates, and the corresponding dwell positions are determined according to their geometric relationship with the applicator and written to a structure file. Dwell times are computed through iterative quadratic optimization techniques. The planning information is then transferred to the treatment planning system through a DICOM-RT interface. The entire process was tested for nine patients. The AutoBrachy cylindrical applicator module was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinical grade quality. Computation times varied between 1 and 3 min on an Intel Xeon CPU E3-1226 v3 processor. All geometric components in the automated treatment plans were generated accurately. The applicator channel tip positions agreed with the manually identified positions with submillimeter deviations and the channel orientations between the plans agreed within less than 1 degree. The automatically generated plans obtained clinically acceptable quality.

  15. BrachyTPS -Interactive point kernel code package for brachytherapy treatment planning of gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilagam, L.; Subbaiah, K.V.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) are always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) applicators. Most of the commercially available brachytherapy TPS softwares estimate the absorbed dose at a point, only taking care of the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. So the doses estimated by them are not much accurate under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, interactive point kernel rode (BrachyTPS) has been developed to perform independent dose calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. As primary input data, the code takes patients' planning data including the source specifications, dwell positions, dwell times and it computes the doses at reference points by dose point kernel formalisms, with multi-layer shield build-up factors accounting for the contributions from scattered radiation. In addition to performing dose distribution calculations, this code package is capable of displaying an isodose distribution curve into the patient anatomy images. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code integrated with treatment planning systems against the other tools which are available in the market. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT) made low dose rate (LDR) applicator, Fletcher Green type LDR applicator and Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR) applicator were studied to test the accuracy of the software

  16. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  17. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Whitaker, May

    2016-06-01

    Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected.

  18. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  19. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): Dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. Methods: A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a ''modified TG-43'' (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an ''isotropic plan'' with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. Results: IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and the isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V 200 by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the isotropic plans. The conformity index for the

  20. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): Dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 (United States); Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. Methods: A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a ''modified TG-43'' (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an ''isotropic plan'' with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. Results: IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and the isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V{sub 200} by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the

  1. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2010-07-01

    The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a "modified TG-43" (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an "isotropic plan" with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and tht isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V200 by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the isotropic plans. The conformity index for the target was increased by 0.13 and 0

  2. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  3. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Zamboglou, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  4. A method of quality audit for treatment planning system for intracavitary HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Vandana, S.; Philomina, A.; Kannan, S.; Rituraj, U.

    2007-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy is a multipurpose modality. Quality audit (QAu) is an independent examination and evaluation of quality assurance activities and results of an institution. Both clinical and physical aspects of patient treatments must be subjected to careful control and planning to achieve a high degree of accuracy in radiation therapy treatments. Comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes should be established to cover all steps from dose prescription to dose delivery. These programmes should include detailed internal checks performed by the radiotherapy centres and external audits made by independent bodies. A systematic and independent examination and evaluation to determine whether quality activities and results comply with planned arrangements and whether the arrangements are implemented effectively and are suitable to achieve objectives is called quality audit. One purpose of a quality audit (QAu) is to evaluate the need for improvement or corrective action

  5. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  6. Treatment planning for prostate brachytherapy using region of interest adjoint functions and a greedy heuristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sua; Kowalok, Michael E; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Henderson, Douglass L

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an efficient treatment-planning algorithm for prostate implants that is based on region of interest (ROI) adjoint functions and a greedy heuristic. For this work, we define the adjoint function for an ROI as the sensitivity of the average dose in the ROI to a unit-strength brachytherapy source at any seed position. The greedy heuristic uses a ratio of target and critical structure adjoint functions to rank seed positions according to their ability to irradiate the target ROI while sparing critical structure ROIs. This ratio is computed once for each seed position prior to the optimization process. Optimization is performed by a greedy heuristic that selects seed positions according to their ratio values. With this method, clinically acceptable treatment plans are obtained in less than 2 s. For comparison, a branch-and-bound method to solve a mixed integer-programming model took more than 50 min to arrive at a feasible solution. Both methods achieved good treatment plans, but the speedup provided by the greedy heuristic was a factor of approximately 1500. This attribute makes this algorithm suitable for intra-operative real-time treatment planning

  7. CT-image-based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Major, T; Somogyi, A; Takácsi-Nagy, Z; Mangel, L C; Forrai, G; Sulyok, Z; Fodor, J; Németh, G

    2000-03-01

    To compare the conventional 2-D, the simulator-guided semi-3-D and the recently developed CT-guided 3-D brachytherapy treatment planning in the interstitial radiotherapy of breast cancer. In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single, double and triple plane implant was used in 6, 89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3-D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. With the help of conformal semi-3-D and 3-D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25

  8. A new optimization method using a compressed sensing inspired solver for real-time LDR-brachytherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, C.; Aschenbrenner, K. P.; Buergy, D.; Ehmann, M.; Wenz, F.; Hesser, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    This work discusses a novel strategy for inverse planning in low dose rate brachytherapy. It applies the idea of compressed sensing to the problem of inverse treatment planning and a new solver for this formulation is developed. An inverse planning algorithm was developed incorporating brachytherapy dose calculation methods as recommended by AAPM TG-43. For optimization of the functional a new variant of a matching pursuit type solver is presented. The results are compared with current state-of-the-art inverse treatment planning algorithms by means of real prostate cancer patient data. The novel strategy outperforms the best state-of-the-art methods in speed, while achieving comparable quality. It is able to find solutions with comparable values for the objective function and it achieves these results within a few microseconds, being up to 542 times faster than competing state-of-the-art strategies, allowing real-time treatment planning. The sparse solution of inverse brachytherapy planning achieved with methods from compressed sensing is a new paradigm for optimization in medical physics. Through the sparsity of required needles and seeds identified by this method, the cost of intervention may be reduced.

  9. A new optimization method using a compressed sensing inspired solver for real-time LDR-brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthier, C; Aschenbrenner, K P; Buergy, D; Ehmann, M; Wenz, F; Hesser, J W

    2015-01-01

    This work discusses a novel strategy for inverse planning in low dose rate brachytherapy. It applies the idea of compressed sensing to the problem of inverse treatment planning and a new solver for this formulation is developed. An inverse planning algorithm was developed incorporating brachytherapy dose calculation methods as recommended by AAPM TG-43. For optimization of the functional a new variant of a matching pursuit type solver is presented. The results are compared with current state-of-the-art inverse treatment planning algorithms by means of real prostate cancer patient data. The novel strategy outperforms the best state-of-the-art methods in speed, while achieving comparable quality. It is able to find solutions with comparable values for the objective function and it achieves these results within a few microseconds, being up to 542 times faster than competing state-of-the-art strategies, allowing real-time treatment planning. The sparse solution of inverse brachytherapy planning achieved with methods from compressed sensing is a new paradigm for optimization in medical physics. Through the sparsity of required needles and seeds identified by this method, the cost of intervention may be reduced. (paper)

  10. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G.; Forrai, G.; Sulyok, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [de

  11. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.; Yoo, S.; Kowalok, M.; Mackie, T.R.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-meter from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum

  12. Importance of the neutrons kerma coefficient in the planning of Brachytherapy treatments with Cf-252 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M.; Azorin N, J.; Francois L, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Cf-252 is a fast neutrons emitting radioisotope by spontaneous fission that can be used as sealed source in medicine applications, industry and research. Commercially its offer sources of different sizes, compact and with a fast neutrons emission of the order of 10 6 n/s-μg and an energy spectra that presents respectively maxim and average energy in 2.1 MeV and 0.7 MeV. In medicine new applications are being developed for the treatment of patient with hypoxic and voluminous tumors, where the therapy with photons has not given positive results, as well as for the protocols of therapy treatment by boron neutron capture, where very small sources of Cf-252 will be used with the interstitial brachytherapy technique of high and low dose rate. In this work an analysis of how the small differences that exist in the elementary composition of 4 wicked tumors, 4 ICRU healthy tissues and 3 substitute materials of ICRU tissue used in dosimetry are presented, its generate changes in the neutrons kerma coefficient in function of the energy and consequently in the absorbed dose in the interval of 11 eV to 29 MeV. These differences can produce maximum variations of the neutron kerma coefficients ratio for E n > 1 keV of the one: 15% tumor/ICRU guest healthy tissue, 12% ICRU tumor/muscle, 12% ICRU healthy tissues ICRU/ICRU muscle, 22% substitutes tissue/tumor and 22% ICRU substitutes tissue/muscle. Also, it was found that the average value of the neutrons kerma coefficient for the 4 wicked tumors is from 6% to 7% smaller that the average value for the soft tissue in the interval energy of interest for therapy with fast neutrons with E n > 1 MeV. These results have a special importance during the planning process of brachytherapy treatments with sources of 252 Cf, to optimize and to individualize the patients treatments. (Author)

  13. Quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning optimization: using a simple optimization to verify a complex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deufel, Christopher L; Furutani, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    As dose optimization for high dose rate brachytherapy becomes more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have a means of verifying that optimization results are reasonable. A method is presented for using a simple optimization as quality assurance for the more complex optimization algorithms typically found in commercial brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Quality assurance tests may be performed during commissioning, at regular intervals, and/or on a patient specific basis. A simple optimization method is provided that optimizes conformal target coverage using an exact, variance-based, algebraic approach. Metrics such as dose volume histogram, conformality index, and total reference air kerma agree closely between simple and complex optimizations for breast, cervix, prostate, and planar applicators. The simple optimization is shown to be a sensitive measure for identifying failures in a commercial treatment planning system that are possibly due to operator error or weaknesses in planning system optimization algorithms. Results from the simple optimization are surprisingly similar to the results from a more complex, commercial optimization for several clinical applications. This suggests that there are only modest gains to be made from making brachytherapy optimization more complex. The improvements expected from sophisticated linear optimizations, such as PARETO methods, will largely be in making systems more user friendly and efficient, rather than in finding dramatically better source strength distributions. (paper)

  14. Evaluation of a Machine-Learning Algorithm for Treatment Planning in Prostate Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolae, Alexandru [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Chung, Hans; Loblaw, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jain, Suneil; Mitchell, Darren [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast City Hospital, Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Lu, Lin [Department of Radiation Therapy, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Helou, Joelle; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heath, Emily [Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.ravi@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: This work presents the application of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to automatically generate high-quality, prostate low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. The ML algorithm can mimic characteristics of preoperative treatment plans deemed clinically acceptable by brachytherapists. The planning efficiency, dosimetry, and quality (as assessed by experts) of preoperative plans generated with an ML planning approach was retrospectively evaluated in this study. Methods and Materials: Preimplantation and postimplantation treatment plans were extracted from 100 high-quality LDR treatments and stored within a training database. The ML training algorithm matches similar features from a new LDR case to those within the training database to rapidly obtain an initial seed distribution; plans were then further fine-tuned using stochastic optimization. Preimplantation treatment plans generated by the ML algorithm were compared with brachytherapist (BT) treatment plans in terms of planning time (Wilcoxon rank sum, α = 0.05) and dosimetry (1-way analysis of variance, α = 0.05). Qualitative preimplantation plan quality was evaluated by expert LDR radiation oncologists using a Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The average planning time for the ML approach was 0.84 ± 0.57 minutes, compared with 17.88 ± 8.76 minutes for the expert planner (P=.020). Preimplantation plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the BT plans; the average prostate V150% was 4% lower for ML plans (P=.002), although the difference was not clinically significant. Respondents ranked the ML-generated plans as equivalent to expert BT treatment plans in terms of target coverage, normal tissue avoidance, implant confidence, and the need for plan modifications. Respondents had difficulty differentiating between plans generated by a human or those generated by the ML algorithm. Conclusions: Prostate LDR preimplantation treatment plans that have equivalent quality to plans created

  15. Evaluation of a Machine-Learning Algorithm for Treatment Planning in Prostate Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolae, Alexandru; Morton, Gerard; Chung, Hans; Loblaw, Andrew; Jain, Suneil; Mitchell, Darren; Lu, Lin; Helou, Joelle; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem; Heath, Emily; Ravi, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the application of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to automatically generate high-quality, prostate low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. The ML algorithm can mimic characteristics of preoperative treatment plans deemed clinically acceptable by brachytherapists. The planning efficiency, dosimetry, and quality (as assessed by experts) of preoperative plans generated with an ML planning approach was retrospectively evaluated in this study. Methods and Materials: Preimplantation and postimplantation treatment plans were extracted from 100 high-quality LDR treatments and stored within a training database. The ML training algorithm matches similar features from a new LDR case to those within the training database to rapidly obtain an initial seed distribution; plans were then further fine-tuned using stochastic optimization. Preimplantation treatment plans generated by the ML algorithm were compared with brachytherapist (BT) treatment plans in terms of planning time (Wilcoxon rank sum, α = 0.05) and dosimetry (1-way analysis of variance, α = 0.05). Qualitative preimplantation plan quality was evaluated by expert LDR radiation oncologists using a Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The average planning time for the ML approach was 0.84 ± 0.57 minutes, compared with 17.88 ± 8.76 minutes for the expert planner (P=.020). Preimplantation plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the BT plans; the average prostate V150% was 4% lower for ML plans (P=.002), although the difference was not clinically significant. Respondents ranked the ML-generated plans as equivalent to expert BT treatment plans in terms of target coverage, normal tissue avoidance, implant confidence, and the need for plan modifications. Respondents had difficulty differentiating between plans generated by a human or those generated by the ML algorithm. Conclusions: Prostate LDR preimplantation treatment plans that have equivalent quality to plans created

  16. Multicentre treatment planning study of MRI-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison between tandem-ovoid applicator users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Van Limbergen, Erik; Brabandere, Marisol de; Nulens, An; Nout, Remi A.; Laman, Mirjam; Ketelaars, Martijn; Lutgens, Ludovicus; Reniers, Brigitte; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare MRI-guided treatment planning approaches between four centres that use tandem-ovoid applicators. Material and methods: Four centres generated three treatment plans for four patients: standard, optimised intracavitary, and optimised intracavitary/interstitial. Prescribed D90 High-Risk CTV (HR-CTV) was 85 Gy EQD2 (external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy), while the D 2cc OAR limit was 90 Gy EQD2 for bladder and 75 Gy EQD2 for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel, respectively. DVH-parameters, source loading patterns and spatial dose distributions of the three treatment plans were compared. Results: The standard plans of the different centres were comparable with respect to the D90 HR-CTV, but differed in OAR doses. MRI-guided intracavitary optimisation resulted in organ sparing and smaller variation in DVH parameters between the centres. Adding interstitial needles led to target dose escalation while respecting the OAR constraints. However, substantial differences in relative weights of the applicator parts resulted in an increased variation in DVH parameters and locations of high dose regions. Conclusions: MRI-guided brachytherapy treatment planning optimisation provides the possibility to increase the dose to the HR-CTV and spare the OARs. Depending on the degree of conformity the centres make different choices in relative weighting of applicator parts, leading to different dose distributions

  17. Development of an adjoint sensitivity field-based treatment-planning technique for the use of newly designed directional LDR sources in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, V; Thomadsen, B R; Henderson, D L

    2012-02-21

    The development and application of an automated 3D greedy heuristic (GH) optimization algorithm utilizing the adjoint sensitivity fields for treatment planning to assess the advantage of directional interstitial prostate brachytherapy is presented. Directional and isotropic dose kernels generated using Monte Carlo simulations based on Best Industries model 2301 I-125 source are utilized for treatment planning. The newly developed GH algorithm is employed for optimization of the treatment plans for seven interstitial prostate brachytherapy cases using mixed sources (directional brachytherapy) and using only isotropic sources (conventional brachytherapy). All treatment plans resulted in V100 > 98% and D90 > 45 Gy for the target prostate region. For the urethra region, the D10(Ur), D90(Ur) and V150(Ur) and for the rectum region the V100cc, D2cc, D90(Re) and V90(Re) all are reduced significantly when mixed sources brachytherapy is used employing directional sources. The simulations demonstrated that the use of directional sources in the low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of the prostate clearly benefits in sparing the urethra and the rectum sensitive structures from overdose. The time taken for a conventional treatment plan is less than three seconds, while the time taken for a mixed source treatment plan is less than nine seconds, as tested on an Intel Core2 Duo 2.2 GHz processor with 1GB RAM. The new 3D GH algorithm is successful in generating a feasible LDR brachytherapy treatment planning solution with an extra degree of freedom, i.e. directionality in very little time.

  18. Development of an adjoint sensitivity field-based treatment-planning technique for the use of newly designed directional LDR sources in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, V.; Thomadsen, B. R.; Henderson, D. L.

    2012-02-01

    The development and application of an automated 3D greedy heuristic (GH) optimization algorithm utilizing the adjoint sensitivity fields for treatment planning to assess the advantage of directional interstitial prostate brachytherapy is presented. Directional and isotropic dose kernels generated using Monte Carlo simulations based on Best Industries model 2301 I-125 source are utilized for treatment planning. The newly developed GH algorithm is employed for optimization of the treatment plans for seven interstitial prostate brachytherapy cases using mixed sources (directional brachytherapy) and using only isotropic sources (conventional brachytherapy). All treatment plans resulted in V100 > 98% and D90 > 45 Gy for the target prostate region. For the urethra region, the D10Ur, D90Ur and V150Ur and for the rectum region the V100cc, D2cc, D90Re and V90Re all are reduced significantly when mixed sources brachytherapy is used employing directional sources. The simulations demonstrated that the use of directional sources in the low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of the prostate clearly benefits in sparing the urethra and the rectum sensitive structures from overdose. The time taken for a conventional treatment plan is less than three seconds, while the time taken for a mixed source treatment plan is less than nine seconds, as tested on an Intel Core2 Duo 2.2 GHz processor with 1GB RAM. The new 3D GH algorithm is successful in generating a feasible LDR brachytherapy treatment planning solution with an extra degree of freedom, i.e. directionality in very little time.

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  20. SU-F-BRA-13: Knowledge-Based Treatment Planning for Prostate LDR Brachytherapy Based On Principle Component Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, J; Bradshaw, B; Godette, K; Schreibmann, E [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chanyavanich, V [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Denver, CO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To create a knowledge-based algorithm for prostate LDR brachytherapy treatment planning that standardizes plan quality using seed arrangements tailored to individual physician preferences while being fast enough for real-time planning. Methods: A dataset of 130 prior cases was compiled for a physician with an active prostate seed implant practice. Ten cases were randomly selected to test the algorithm. Contours from the 120 library cases were registered to a common reference frame. Contour variations were characterized on a point by point basis using principle component analysis (PCA). A test case was converted to PCA vectors using the same process and then compared with each library case using a Mahalanobis distance to evaluate similarity. Rank order PCA scores were used to select the best-matched library case. The seed arrangement was extracted from the best-matched case and used as a starting point for planning the test case. Computational time was recorded. Any subsequent modifications were recorded that required input from a treatment planner to achieve an acceptable plan. Results: The computational time required to register contours from a test case and evaluate PCA similarity across the library was approximately 10s. Five of the ten test cases did not require any seed additions, deletions, or moves to obtain an acceptable plan. The remaining five test cases required on average 4.2 seed modifications. The time to complete manual plan modifications was less than 30s in all cases. Conclusion: A knowledge-based treatment planning algorithm was developed for prostate LDR brachytherapy based on principle component analysis. Initial results suggest that this approach can be used to quickly create treatment plans that require few if any modifications by the treatment planner. In general, test case plans have seed arrangements which are very similar to prior cases, and thus are inherently tailored to physician preferences.

  1. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  2. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi, Ramin; Siavashpour, Zahra; Aghamiri, Mahmoud Reza; Kirisits, Christian; Ghaderi, Reza

    2017-12-01

    Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs) deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in 'organs-applicators', while maintaining target dose at the original level. There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients' plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  3. SU-F-T-37: Dosimetric Evaluation of Planned Versus Decay Corrected Treatment Plans for the Treatment of Tandem-Based Cervical HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, M [Texas Oncology, PA, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Shobhit University, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh (India); Manjhi, J; Rai, D [Shobhit University, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh (India); Kehwar, T [Pinnacle Health Cancer Center, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Barker, J; Heintz, B; Shide, K [Texas Oncology, PA, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated dosimetric parameters for actual treatment plans versus decay corrected treatment plans for cervical HDR brachytherapy. Methods: 125 plans of 25 patients, who received 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy, were evaluated in this study. Dose was prescribed to point A (ICRU-38) and High risk clinical tumor volume (HR-CTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were, retrospectively, delineated on original CT images by treating physician. First HDR plan was considered as reference plan and decay correction was applied to calculate treatment time for subsequent fractions, and was applied, retrospectively, to determine point A, HR-CTV D90, and rectum and bladder doses. Results: The differences between mean point A reference doses and the point A doses of the plans computed using decay times were found to be 1.05%±0.74% (−2.26% to 3.26%) for second fraction; −0.25%±0.84% (−3.03% to 3.29%) for third fraction; 0.04%±0.70% (−2.68% to 2.56%) for fourth fraction and 0.30%±0.81% (−3.93% to 2.67%) for fifth fraction. Overall mean point A dose difference, for all fractions, was 0.29%±0.38% (within ± 5%). Mean rectum and bladder dose differences were calculated to be −3.46%±0.12% and −2.47%±0.09%, for points, respectively, and −1.72%±0.09% and −0.96%±0.06%, for D2cc, respectively. HR-CTV D90 mean dose difference was found to be −1.67% ± 0.11%. There was no statistically significant difference between the reference planned point A doses and that calculated using decay time to the subsequent fractions (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study reveals that a decay corrected treatment will provide comparable dosimetric results and can be utilized for subsequent fractions of cervical HDR brachytherapy instead of actual treatment planning. This approach will increase efficiency, decrease workload, reduce patient observation time between applicator insertion and treatment delivery. This would be particularly useful for institutions with limited

  4. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Forrai, G. [Haynal Imre Univ. of Health Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Sulyok, Z. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Surgery

    2000-03-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [German] Bei 103 Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom der Stadien T1

  5. A new treatment planning formalism for catheter-based beta sources used in intravascular brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N S; Chiu-Tsao, S T; Tsao, H S; Harrison, L B

    2001-01-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) is an emerging modality for the treatment of atherosclerotic lesions in the artery. As part of the refinement in this rapidly evolving modality of treatment, the current simplistic dosimetry approach based on a fixed-point prescription must be challenged by future rigorous dosimetry method employing image-based three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. The goals of 3D IVBT treatment planning calculations include (1) achieving high accuracy in a slim cylindrical region of interest, (2) accounting for the edge effect around the source ends, and (3) supporting multiple dwell positions. The formalism recommended by Task Group 60 (TG-60) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is applicable for gamma sources, as well as short beta sources with lengths less than twice the beta particle range. However, for the elongated beta sources and/or seed trains with lengths greater than twice the beta range, a new formalism is required to handle their distinctly different dose characteristics. Specifically, these characteristics consist of (a) flat isodose curves in the central region, (b) steep dose gradient at the source ends, and (c) exponential dose fall-off in the radial direction. In this paper, we present a novel formalism that evolved from TG-60 in maintaining the dose rate as a product of four key quantities. We propose to employ cylindrical coordinates (R, Z, phi), which are more natural and suitable to the slim cylindrical shape of the volume of interest, as opposed to the spherical coordinate system (r, theta, phi) used in the TG-60 formalism. The four quantities used in this formalism include (1) the distribution factor, H(R, Z), (2) the modulation function, M(R, Z), (3) the transverse dose function, h(R), and (4) the reference dose rate at 2 mm along the perpendicular bisector, D(R0=2 mm, Z0=0). The first three are counterparts of the geometry factor, the anisotropy function and the radial dose function in the

  6. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L; Den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D 90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2–5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D 90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D 90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models. (paper)

  7. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  8. Developing a Treatment Planning Software Based on TG-43U1 Formalism for Cs-137 LDR Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Sedigheh; Faghihi, Reza; Soleimani Meigooni, Ali; Siavashpour, Zahra; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-08-01

    The old Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) used for intracavitary brachytherapy with Cs-137 Selectron source utilize traditional dose calculation methods, considering each source as a point source. Using such methods introduces significant errors in dose estimation. As of 1995, TG-43 is used as the main dose calculation formalism in treatment TPSs. The purpose of this study is to design and establish a treatment planning software for Cs-137 Solectron brachytherapy source, based on TG-43U1 formalism by applying the effects of the applicator and dummy spacers. Two softwares used for treatment planning of Cs-137 sources in Iran (STPS and PLATO), are based on old formalisms. The purpose of this work is to establish and develop a TPS for Selectron source based on TG-43 formalism. In this planning system, the dosimetry parameters of each pellet in different places inside applicators were obtained by MCNP4c code. Then the dose distribution around every combination of active and inactive pellets was obtained by summing the doses. The accuracy of this algorithm was checked by comparing its results for special combination of active and inactive pellets with MC simulations. Finally, the uncertainty of old dose calculation formalism was investigated by comparing the results of STPS and PLATO softwares with those obtained by the new algorithm. For a typical arrangement of 10 active pellets in the applicator, the percentage difference between doses obtained by the new algorithm at 1cm distance from the tip of the applicator and those obtained by old formalisms is about 30%, while the difference between the results of MCNP and the new algorithm is less than 5%. According to the results, the old dosimetry formalisms, overestimate the dose especially towards the applicator's tip. While the TG-43U1 based software perform the calculations more accurately.

  9. SU-G-201-04: Can the Dynamic Library of Flap Applicators Replace Treatment Planning in Surface Brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Harris, T; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Contemporary brachytherapy treatment planning systems-(TPS) include the applicator model libraries to improve digitization; however, the library of surface-flap-applicators-(SFA) is not incorporated into the commercial TPS. We propose the dynamic library-(DL) for SFA and investigate if such library can eliminate applicator reconstruction, source activation and dose normalization. Methods: DL was generated for the SFA using the C++class libraries of the Visualization Toolkit-(VTK) and Qt-application framework for complete abstraction of the graphical interface. DL was designed such that the user can initially choose the size of the applicator that corresponds to the one clinically placed to the patient. The virtual applicator-(VA) has an elastic property so that it can be registered to the clinical CT images with a real applicator-(RA) on it. The VA and RA matching is performed by adjusting the position and curvature of the VA. The VA does not elongate or change its size so each catheter could always be at a distance of 5mm from the skin and 10mm apart from the closest catheter maintaining the physical accuracy of the clinical setup. Upon the applicator placement, the dwell positions were automatically activated, and the dose is normalized to the prescription depth. The accuracy of source positioning was evaluated using various applicator sizes. Results: The accuracy of the applicator placement was in the sub-millimeter range. The time-study reveals that up to 50% of the planning time can be saved depending on the complexity of the clinical setup. Unlike in the classic approach, the planning time was not highly dependent on the applicator size. Conclusion: The practical benefits of the DL of the SFA were demonstrated. The time demanding planning processes can be partially automated. Consequently, the planner can dedicate effort to fine tuning, which can result in the improvement of the quality of treatment plans in surface brachytherapy.

  10. SU-G-201-04: Can the Dynamic Library of Flap Applicators Replace Treatment Planning in Surface Brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Harris, T; Cormack, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Contemporary brachytherapy treatment planning systems-(TPS) include the applicator model libraries to improve digitization; however, the library of surface-flap-applicators-(SFA) is not incorporated into the commercial TPS. We propose the dynamic library-(DL) for SFA and investigate if such library can eliminate applicator reconstruction, source activation and dose normalization. Methods: DL was generated for the SFA using the C++class libraries of the Visualization Toolkit-(VTK) and Qt-application framework for complete abstraction of the graphical interface. DL was designed such that the user can initially choose the size of the applicator that corresponds to the one clinically placed to the patient. The virtual applicator-(VA) has an elastic property so that it can be registered to the clinical CT images with a real applicator-(RA) on it. The VA and RA matching is performed by adjusting the position and curvature of the VA. The VA does not elongate or change its size so each catheter could always be at a distance of 5mm from the skin and 10mm apart from the closest catheter maintaining the physical accuracy of the clinical setup. Upon the applicator placement, the dwell positions were automatically activated, and the dose is normalized to the prescription depth. The accuracy of source positioning was evaluated using various applicator sizes. Results: The accuracy of the applicator placement was in the sub-millimeter range. The time-study reveals that up to 50% of the planning time can be saved depending on the complexity of the clinical setup. Unlike in the classic approach, the planning time was not highly dependent on the applicator size. Conclusion: The practical benefits of the DL of the SFA were demonstrated. The time demanding planning processes can be partially automated. Consequently, the planner can dedicate effort to fine tuning, which can result in the improvement of the quality of treatment plans in surface brachytherapy.

  11. SU-F-T-65: AutomaticTreatment Planning for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed in a manual fashion. Yet it is highly desirable to perform computerized automated planning to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human errors, and reduce plan quality variation. The goal of this research is to develop an automatic treatment planning tool for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator for vaginal cancer. Methods: After inserting the cylinder applicator into the patient, a CT scan was acquired and was loaded to an in-house developed treatment planning software. The cylinder applicator was automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. CTV was generated based on user-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of relevant points (apex point, prescription point, and vaginal surface point), central applicator channel coordinates, and dwell positions were determined according to their geometric relations with the applicator. Dwell time was computed through an inverse optimization process. The planning information was written into DICOM-RT plan and structure files to transfer the automatically generated plan to a commercial treatment planning system for plan verification and delivery. Results: We have tested the system retrospectively in nine patients treated with vaginal cylinder applicator. These cases were selected with different treatment prescriptions, lengths, depths, and cylinder diameters to represent a large patient population. Our system was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinically acceptable quality. Computation time varied from 3–6 min. Conclusion: We have developed a system to perform automated treatment planning for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator. Such a novel system has greatly improved treatment planning efficiency and reduced plan quality variation. It also served as a testbed to demonstrate the feasibility of automatic HDR treatment planning for more complicated cases.

  12. SU-F-T-65: AutomaticTreatment Planning for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed in a manual fashion. Yet it is highly desirable to perform computerized automated planning to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human errors, and reduce plan quality variation. The goal of this research is to develop an automatic treatment planning tool for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator for vaginal cancer. Methods: After inserting the cylinder applicator into the patient, a CT scan was acquired and was loaded to an in-house developed treatment planning software. The cylinder applicator was automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. CTV was generated based on user-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of relevant points (apex point, prescription point, and vaginal surface point), central applicator channel coordinates, and dwell positions were determined according to their geometric relations with the applicator. Dwell time was computed through an inverse optimization process. The planning information was written into DICOM-RT plan and structure files to transfer the automatically generated plan to a commercial treatment planning system for plan verification and delivery. Results: We have tested the system retrospectively in nine patients treated with vaginal cylinder applicator. These cases were selected with different treatment prescriptions, lengths, depths, and cylinder diameters to represent a large patient population. Our system was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinically acceptable quality. Computation time varied from 3–6 min. Conclusion: We have developed a system to perform automated treatment planning for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator. Such a novel system has greatly improved treatment planning efficiency and reduced plan quality variation. It also served as a testbed to demonstrate the feasibility of automatic HDR treatment planning for more complicated cases.

  13. SU-G-201-01: An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Assurance Program for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Plan specific quality assurance (QA) is an important step in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy to ensure the integrity of a treatment plan. The conventional approach is to assemble a set of plan screen-captures in a document and have an independent plan-checker to verify it. Not only is this approach cumbersome and time-consuming, using a document also limits the items that can be verified, hindering plan quality and patient safety. We have initiated efforts to develop a web-based HDR brachytherapy QA system called AutoBrachy QA, for comprehensive and efficient QA. This abstract reports a new plugin in this system for the QA of a cylinder HDR brachytherapy treatment. Methods: A cylinder plan QA module was developed using Python. It was plugged into our AutoBrachy QA system. This module extracted information from CT images and treatment plan. Image processing techniques were employed to obtain geometric parameters, e.g. cylinder diameter. A comprehensive set of eight geometrical and eight dosimetric features of the plan were validated against user specified planning parameter, such as prescription value, treatment depth and length, etc. A PDF document was generated, consisting of a summary QA sheet with all the QA results, as well as images showing plan details. Results: The cylinder QA program has been implemented in our clinic. To date, it has been used in 11 patient cases and was able to successfully perform QA tests in all of them. The QA program reduced the average plan QA time from 7 min using conventional manual approach to 0.5 min. Conclusion: Being a new module in our AutoBrachy QA system, an automated treatment plan QA module for cylinder HDR brachytherapy has been successfully developed and clinically implemented. This module improved clinical workflow and plan integrity compared to the conventional manual approach.

  14. SU-G-201-01: An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Assurance Program for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Plan specific quality assurance (QA) is an important step in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy to ensure the integrity of a treatment plan. The conventional approach is to assemble a set of plan screen-captures in a document and have an independent plan-checker to verify it. Not only is this approach cumbersome and time-consuming, using a document also limits the items that can be verified, hindering plan quality and patient safety. We have initiated efforts to develop a web-based HDR brachytherapy QA system called AutoBrachy QA, for comprehensive and efficient QA. This abstract reports a new plugin in this system for the QA of a cylinder HDR brachytherapy treatment. Methods: A cylinder plan QA module was developed using Python. It was plugged into our AutoBrachy QA system. This module extracted information from CT images and treatment plan. Image processing techniques were employed to obtain geometric parameters, e.g. cylinder diameter. A comprehensive set of eight geometrical and eight dosimetric features of the plan were validated against user specified planning parameter, such as prescription value, treatment depth and length, etc. A PDF document was generated, consisting of a summary QA sheet with all the QA results, as well as images showing plan details. Results: The cylinder QA program has been implemented in our clinic. To date, it has been used in 11 patient cases and was able to successfully perform QA tests in all of them. The QA program reduced the average plan QA time from 7 min using conventional manual approach to 0.5 min. Conclusion: Being a new module in our AutoBrachy QA system, an automated treatment plan QA module for cylinder HDR brachytherapy has been successfully developed and clinically implemented. This module improved clinical workflow and plan integrity compared to the conventional manual approach.

  15. SU-G-201-09: Evaluation of a Novel Machine-Learning Algorithm for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolae, A; Lu, L; Morton, G; Chung, H; Helou, J; Al Hanaqta, M; Loblaw, A; Ravi, A; Heath, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A novel, automated, algorithm for permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) treatment planning has been developed. The novel approach uses machine-learning (ML), a form of artificial intelligence, to substantially decrease planning time while simultaneously retaining the clinical intuition of plans created by radiation oncologists. This study seeks to compare the ML algorithm against expert-planned PPB plans to evaluate the equivalency of dosimetric and clinical plan quality. Methods: Plan features were computed from historical high-quality PPB treatments (N = 100) and stored in a relational database (RDB). The ML algorithm matched new PPB features to a highly similar case in the RDB; this initial plan configuration was then further optimized using a stochastic search algorithm. PPB pre-plans (N = 30) generated using the ML algorithm were compared to plan variants created by an expert dosimetrist (RT), and radiation oncologist (MD). Planning time and pre-plan dosimetry were evaluated using a one-way Student’s t-test and ANOVA, respectively (significance level = 0.05). Clinical implant quality was evaluated by expert PPB radiation oncologists as part of a qualitative study. Results: Average planning time was 0.44 ± 0.42 min compared to 17.88 ± 8.76 min for the ML algorithm and RT, respectively, a significant advantage [t(9), p = 0.01]. A post-hoc ANOVA [F(2,87) = 6.59, p = 0.002] using Tukey-Kramer criteria showed a significantly lower mean prostate V150% for the ML plans (52.9%) compared to the RT (57.3%), and MD (56.2%) plans. Preliminary qualitative study results indicate comparable clinical implant quality between RT and ML plans with a trend towards preference for ML plans. Conclusion: PPB pre-treatment plans highly comparable to those of an expert radiation oncologist can be created using a novel ML planning model. The use of an ML-based planning approach is expected to translate into improved PPB accessibility and plan uniformity.

  16. SU-G-201-09: Evaluation of a Novel Machine-Learning Algorithm for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolae, A [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lu, L; Morton, G; Chung, H; Helou, J; Al Hanaqta, M; Loblaw, A; Ravi, A [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Heath, E [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A novel, automated, algorithm for permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) treatment planning has been developed. The novel approach uses machine-learning (ML), a form of artificial intelligence, to substantially decrease planning time while simultaneously retaining the clinical intuition of plans created by radiation oncologists. This study seeks to compare the ML algorithm against expert-planned PPB plans to evaluate the equivalency of dosimetric and clinical plan quality. Methods: Plan features were computed from historical high-quality PPB treatments (N = 100) and stored in a relational database (RDB). The ML algorithm matched new PPB features to a highly similar case in the RDB; this initial plan configuration was then further optimized using a stochastic search algorithm. PPB pre-plans (N = 30) generated using the ML algorithm were compared to plan variants created by an expert dosimetrist (RT), and radiation oncologist (MD). Planning time and pre-plan dosimetry were evaluated using a one-way Student’s t-test and ANOVA, respectively (significance level = 0.05). Clinical implant quality was evaluated by expert PPB radiation oncologists as part of a qualitative study. Results: Average planning time was 0.44 ± 0.42 min compared to 17.88 ± 8.76 min for the ML algorithm and RT, respectively, a significant advantage [t(9), p = 0.01]. A post-hoc ANOVA [F(2,87) = 6.59, p = 0.002] using Tukey-Kramer criteria showed a significantly lower mean prostate V150% for the ML plans (52.9%) compared to the RT (57.3%), and MD (56.2%) plans. Preliminary qualitative study results indicate comparable clinical implant quality between RT and ML plans with a trend towards preference for ML plans. Conclusion: PPB pre-treatment plans highly comparable to those of an expert radiation oncologist can be created using a novel ML planning model. The use of an ML-based planning approach is expected to translate into improved PPB accessibility and plan uniformity.

  17. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold 198 , Cesium 137 and Iridium 192 . The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  18. Workflow efficiency for the treatment planning process in CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Anthony L; Benedict, Stanley; Montemayor, Eliseo; Hunt, Jon Paul; Wright, Cari; Mathai, Mathew; Mayadev, Jyoti S

    2016-01-01

    To investigate process efficiency, we present a prospective investigation of the treatment planning phase of image-guided brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancer using a specific checklist. From October 2012 to January 2014, 76 BT procedures were consecutively performed. Prospective data on the CT-based treatment planning process was collected using a specific checklist which details the following steps: (1) dosimetry planning, (2) physician review start, (3) physician review time, (4) dosimetry processing, (5) physics review start, (6) physics review, and (7) procedural pause. Variables examined included the use of a pre-BT MRI, clinic duty conflicts, resident teaching, and the use of specific BT planners. Analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and analysis of variance. Seventy-five prospectively gathered checklists comprised this analysis. The mean time for treatment planning was 95 minutes (med 94, std 18). The mean intervals in the above steps were (1) = 42, (2) = 5, (3) = 19, (4) = 10, (5) = 6, (6) = 13, and (7) = 26 minutes. There was no statistical difference in patients who had a pre-BT MRI. Resident teaching did not influence time, p = 0.17. Treatment planning time was decreased with a specific planner, p = 0.0015. A skillful team approach is required for treatment planning efficiency in image-guided BT. We have found that the specific BT planners can have a significant effect on the overall planning efficiency. We continue to examine clinical and workflow-related factors that will enhance our safety and workflow process with BT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Saiful Huq, M.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) plays a crucial role in the management of invasive cervix cancer from stage I to IV. Intracavitary techniques are based on afterloading devices, with different types of applicators. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better assessment of gross tumour volume (GTV) and definition and delineation of target volume (CTV) compared to traditional approaches. To evaluate reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in 3D CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in Brachytherapy

  20. Permanent Seed Implant Dosimetry (PSID)TM 4.5 version as isodose and Treatment Planning System (TPS) programme for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indra Saptiama; Moch Subechi; Anung Pujiyanto; Hotman Lubis; Herlan Setiawan

    2014-01-01

    The medical treatment using radiation therapy for cancer diseases is increasingly developed. One of the method used in radiotherapy is brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is radiation therapy method in which a radiation source is implanted in cancer cell directly so the dose accepted by cancer cell is the highest dose and the dose accepted by normal cell is the lowest dose. I-125 Seed have been made successfully in domestic. To support the implant of I-125 seed for brachytherapy needs computer programme for the isodose calculation and Treatment Planning System (TPS). Permanent Seed Implant Dosimetry (PSID) 4.5 is one of the isodose calculation and Treatment Planning System (TPS) programme that is owned by Center for Radioisotope and Radiopharmaceutical-BATAN. In isodose calculation, PSID 4.5 uses 1D formalism and 2D formalism based on AAPM-TG43 (Association of American Physicist in Medicine- Task Group No.43). Anisotropic function on 1D formalism depend on distance function while on 2D formalism count on distance and angle function therefore 2D formalism has isodose calculation better than 1D formalism usage. PSID 4.5 can display the isodose contour of the seed I-125 radiation source in 2 dimension (2D) and 3 dimension (3D). The computer programme of isodose calculation and TPS uses PSID 4.5 is expected able to help planning for seed I-125 implantation process for brachytherapy that used by paramedics and to support the usage of seed I-125 as domestic product. (author)

  1. Technical aspects of the integration of three-dimensional treatment planning dose parameters (GEC-ESTRO Working Group) into pre-implant planning for LDR gynecological interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, A; Gao, M; Nguyen, N P; Albuquerque, K

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the technical feasibility of pre-implant image-based treatment planning for LDR GYN interstitial brachytherapy(IB) based on the GEC-ESTRO guidelines. Initially, a virtual plan is generated based on the prescription dose and GEC-ESTRO defined OAR dose constraints with a pre-implant CT. After the actual implant, a regular diagnostic CT was obtained and fused with our pre-implant scan/initial treatment plan in our planning software. The Flexi-needle position changes, and treatment plan modifications were made if needed. Dose values were normalized to equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (LQED 2 Gy) derived from the linear-quadratic model with alpha/beta of 3 for late responding tissues and alpha/beta of 10 for early responding tissues. D(90) to the CTV, which was gross tumor (GTV) at the time of brachytherapy with a margin to count for microscopic disease, was 84.7 +/- 4.9% of the prescribed dose. The OAR doses were evaluated by D(2cc) (EBRT+IB). Mean D(2cc) values (LQED(2Gy)) for the rectum, bladder, sigmoid, and small bowel were the following: 63.7 +/- 8.4 Gy, 61.2 +/- 6.9 Gy, 48.0 +/- 3.5 Gy, and 49.9 +/- 4.2 Gy. This study confirms the feasibility of applying the GEC-ESTRO recommended dose parameters in pre-implant CT-based treatment planning in GYN IB. In the process, this pre-implant technique also demonstrates a good approximation of the target volume dose coverage, and doses to the OARs.

  2. Commissioning of a grid-based Boltzmann solver for cervical cancer brachytherapy treatment planning with shielded colpostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikell, Justin K; Klopp, Ann H; Price, Michael; Mourtada, Firas

    2013-01-01

    We sought to commission a gynecologic shielded colpostat analytic model provided from a treatment planning system (TPS) library. We have reported retrospectively the dosimetric impact of this applicator model in a cohort of patients. A commercial TPS with a grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) was commissioned for (192)Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer with stainless steel-shielded colpostats. Verification of the colpostat analytic model was verified using a radiograph and vendor schematics. MCNPX v2.6 Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare dose distributions around the applicator in water with the TPS GBBS dose predictions. Retrospectively, the dosimetric impact was assessed over 24 cervical cancer patients' HDR plans. Applicator (TPS ID #AL13122005) shield dimensions were within 0.4 mm of the independent shield dimensions verification. GBBS profiles in planes bisecting the cap around the applicator agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within 2% at most locations; differing screw representations resulted in differences of up to 9%. For the retrospective study, the GBBS doses differed from TG-43 as follows (mean value ± standard deviation [min, max]): International Commission on Radiation units [ICRU]rectum (-8.4 ± 2.5% [-14.1, -4.1%]), ICRUbladder (-7.2 ± 3.6% [-15.7, -2.1%]), D2cc-rectum (-6.2 ± 2.6% [-11.9, -0.8%]), D2cc-sigmoid (-5.6 ± 2.6% [-9.3, -2.0%]), and D2cc-bladder (-3.4 ± 1.9% [-7.2, -1.1%]). As brachytherapy TPSs implement advanced model-based dose calculations, the analytic applicator models stored in TPSs should be independently validated before clinical use. For this cohort, clinically meaningful differences (>5%) from TG-43 were observed. Accurate dosimetric modeling of shielded applicators may help to refine organ toxicity studies. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dosimetric study of prostate brachytherapy using techniques of Monte-Carlo simulation, experimental measurements and comparison with a treatment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, Pedro; Barros, Silvia; Vaz, Pedro; Goncalves, Isabel; Facure, Alessandro; Rosa, Luiz da; Santos, Maira; Pereira Junior, Pedro Paulo; Zankl, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Prostate Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy technique, which consists in inserting a number of radioactive seeds (containing, usually, the following radionuclides 125 l, 241 Am or 103 Pd ) surrounding or in the vicinity of, prostate tumor tissue . The main objective of this technique is to maximize the radiation dose to the tumor and minimize it in other tissues and organs healthy, in order to reduce its morbidity. The absorbed dose distribution in the prostate, using this technique is usually non-homogeneous and time dependent. Various parameters such as the type of seed, the attenuation interactions between them, their geometrical arrangement within the prostate, the actual geometry of the seeds,and further swelling of the prostate gland after implantation greatly influence the course of absorbed dose in the prostate and surrounding areas. Quantification of these parameters is therefore extremely important for dose optimization and improvement of their plans conventional treatment, which in many cases not fully take into account. The Monte Carlo techniques allow to study these parameters quickly and effectively. In this work, we use the program MCNPX and generic voxel phantom (GOLEM) where simulated different geometric arrangements of seeds containing 125 I, Amersham Health model of type 6711 in prostates of different sizes, in order to try to quantify some of the parameters. The computational model was validated using a phantom prostate cubic RW3 type , consisting of tissue equivalent, and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Finally, to have a term of comparison with a treatment real plan it was simulate a treatment plan used in a hospital of Rio de Janeiro, with exactly the same parameters, and our computational model. The results obtained in our study seem to indicate that the parameters described above may be a source of uncertainty in the correct evaluation of the dose required for actual treatment plans. The use of Monte Carlo techniques can serve as a complementary

  4. Dosimetric comparison between a planning system and Radiochromic-EBT2 films in surface brachytherapy treatments of high rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Ramos, S. M.; Carrasco Herrera, M. a.; Vicent, D.; Rodriguez, C.; Herrador, M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study a situation in which, the accuracy of the calculation of the planner may be limited, superficial brachytherapy treatment. It has relative to the dose obtained with the planner with that obtained with film radiochromic EBT2. (Author)

  5. Sensitivity studies in Monte Carlo treatment planning for neutron brachytherapy of cervical cancer : role of boron augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, A.; Wallace, S.A.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignancy of women in the world and in the third world often presents in an advanced state. While photo radiation therapy is an established form of treatment, neutron brachytherapy with Cf-252 has proven to give superior local control in advanced cases without serious complications. This advantage arises from the reduction in radio-resistance, ascribed to hypoxia in bulky tumours, which occurs with high LET radiation. A further improvement is being sought by dose augmentation with boron neutron capture therapy. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo Neutron Photon radiation transport code MCNP is being used to investigate the effects of fat, muscle, bone and voids in the fast and thermal dose distributions. Whereas the fast neutron dose determines normal tissue tolerance, the boron neutron capture dose rate is determined by the thermal flux distribution. The neutron spectrum is sensitive to changes in hydrogen density, as occurs with muscle, fat and bone. The implications of this sensitivity are examined to determine whether detailed individual Monte Carlo calculations are required for patient clinical treatment plans. (author)

  6. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  7. Brachytherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yul

    1999-01-01

    Brachytherapy has been proved to be an effective method for the purpose of increasing radiation dose to the tumor and reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, the rationale of brachytherapy is as follows; Firstly, early small lesion is radiocurative and the major cause of failure is local recurrence. Secondly, it can diminish evidently the dose to the normal tissue especially masseteric muscle and salivary gland. Thirdly, the anatomy of head and neck is suitable to various technique of brachytherapy. On background of accumulated experience of LDR iridium brachytherapy of head and neck cancer for the last 15 years, the author reviewed the history of radioisotope therapy, the characteristics of radionuclides, and some important things in the method, clinical technique and treatment planning. The author analyzed the clinical result of 185 cases of head and neck cancer treated in the Korea Cancer Center Hospital. Finally the future prospect of brachytherapy of head and neck cancer is discussed

  8. Determining the distribution of the absorbed dose for a body exposed to Cs-137 using the Monte Carlo method and application in a brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriantsizafy, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a means of precise and effective cancer treatment. This is due to the nearby sources of ionizing radiation. The precision and efficiency requires a good dosimetry and a good knowledge of the dose distribution in the patient. The aim is to give the right dose of ionizing radiation to destroy the tumor while reducing the dose to sensitive organs such as the bladder , liver, .... The Monte Carlo is a recognized model method for the distribution of radiation in the material. It is used in this work to determine the doses to organs during treatment planning for Cesium -137 brachytherapy. The programming language used is Python . Library outcome of this work is used in a web application BrachyPy, we designed to replace the manual processing in the Cs-137 brachytherapy planning. Model validation is done by comparing the isodose curves of the model with the isodose curves abacus NUCLETRON and the last report of the American Association of Medical Physics (AAPM) on the amendment to the algorithm TG43. [fr

  9. SU-F-T-61: Treatment Planning Observations for the CivaSheet Directional Brachytherapy Device Using VariSeed 9.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Rothley, DJ [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The VariSeed 9.0 brachytherapy TPS is recently available and has new features such as ability to rotate a brachytherapy source away from normal to the imaging plane. Consequently, a dosimetric analysis was performed for a directional brachytherapy source (CivaSheet) with tests of this functionality and experiences from clinical treatment planning were documented. These observations contribute to safe, practical, and accurate use of such new software features. Methods: Several tests were established to evaluate the new rotational feature, specific to the CivaSheet for the first patients treated using this new brachytherapy device. These included suitability of imaging slice-thickness and in-plane resolution, window/level adjustments for brachytherapy source visualization, commissioning the source physical length for performing rotations, and using different planar and 3D window views to identify source orientation. Additional CivaSheet-specific tests were performed to determine the dosimetric influence on target coverage: changing the source tilt angle, source positioning in the treatment plan based on the CivaSheet rectangular array of CivaDots, and influence of prescription depth on the necessary treatment margin for adequate target coverage. Results: Higher imaging-resolution produced better accuracy for source orientation and positioning, with sub-millimeter CT slice-thickness and in-plane resolution preferred. Source rotation was possible only in sagittal or coronal views. The process for validating source orientation required iteratively altering rotations then checking them in the 3D view, which was cumbersome given the absence of quantitative plan documentation to indicate orientation. Given the small Pd-103 source size, influence of source tilt within 30° was negligible for <1.0 cm. Influence of source position was important when the source was positioned in/out of the adjacent source plane, causing changes of 15%, 7%, and 3% at depths of 0.5, 0

  10. SU-F-19A-01: APBI Brachytherapy Treatment Planning: The Impact of Heterogeneous Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loupot, S; Han, T; Salehpour, M; Gifford, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the difference in dose to PTV-EVAL and OARs (skin and rib) as calculated by (TG43) and heterogeneous calculations (CCC). Methods: 25 patient plans (5 Contura and 20 SAVI) were selected for analysis. Clinical dose distributions were computed with a commercially available treatment planning algorithm (TG43-D-(w,w)) and then recomputed with a pre-clinical collapsed cone convolution algorithm (CCCD-( m,m)). PTV-EVAL coverage (V90%, V95%), and rib and skin maximum dose were compared via percent difference. Differences in dose to normal tissue (V150cc, V200cc of PTV-EVAL) were also compared. Changes in coverage and maximum dose to organs at risk are reported in percent change, (100*(TG43 − CCC) / TG43)), and changes in maximum dose to normal tissue are absolute change in cc (TG43 − CCC). Results: Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the SAVI cases were −0.2%, −0.4%, −0.03cc, and −0.14cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −0.78%, −1.7%, 1.28cc, and 1.01cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −1.4% and −0.22%, respectively, with maximum differences of −4.5% and 16%, respectively. Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the Contura cases were −1.2%, −2.1%, −1.8cc, and −0.59cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −2.0%, −3.16%, −2.9cc, and −0.76cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −2.6% and −3.9%, respectively, with maximum differences of −3.2% and −5.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The effects of translating clinical knowledge based on D-(w,w) to plans reported in D-(m,m) are minimal (2% or less) on average, but vary based on the type and placement of the device, source, and heterogeneity information

  11. WE-DE-201-04: Cross Validation of Knowledge-Based Treatment Planning for Prostate LDR Brachytherapy Using Principle Component Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, J; Ghavidel, B; Godette, K; Schreibmann, E [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, GA (United States); Chanyavanich, V [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, CO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a knowledge-based algorithm for prostate LDR brachytherapy treatment planning. Methods: A dataset of 100 cases was compiled from an active prostate seed implant service. Cases were randomized into 10 subsets. For each subset, the 90 remaining library cases were registered to a common reference frame and then characterized on a point by point basis using principle component analysis (PCA). Each test case was converted to PCA vectors using the same process and compared with each library case using a Mahalanobis distance to evaluate similarity. Rank order PCA scores were used to select the best-matched library case. The seed arrangement was extracted from the best-matched case and used as a starting point for planning the test case. Any subsequent modifications were recorded that required input from a treatment planner to achieve V100>95%, V150<60%, V200<20%. To simulate operating-room planning constraints, seed activity was held constant, and the seed count could not increase. Results: The computational time required to register test-case contours and evaluate PCA similarity across the library was 10s. Preliminary analysis of 2 subsets shows that 9 of 20 test cases did not require any seed modifications to obtain an acceptable plan. Five test cases required fewer than 10 seed modifications or a grid shift. Another 5 test cases required approximately 20 seed modifications. An acceptable plan was not achieved for 1 outlier, which was substantially larger than its best match. Modifications took between 5s and 6min. Conclusion: A knowledge-based treatment planning algorithm for prostate LDR brachytherapy is being cross validated using 100 prior cases. Preliminary results suggest that for this size library, acceptable plans can be achieved without planner input in about half of the cases while varying amounts of planner input are needed in remaining cases. Computational time and planning time are compatible with clinical practice.

  12. A fast inverse treatment planning strategy facilitating optimized catheter selection in image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, Christian V; Damato, Antonio L; Hesser, Juergen W; Viswanathan, Akila N; Cormack, Robert A

    2017-12-01

    Interstitial high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of locally advanced gynecologic (GYN) cancers. The outcome of this therapy is determined by the quality of dose distribution achieved. This paper focuses on a novel yet simple heuristic for catheter selection for GYN HDR brachytherapy and their comparison against state of the art optimization strategies. The proposed technique is intended to act as a decision-supporting tool to select a favorable needle configuration. The presented heuristic for catheter optimization is based on a shrinkage-type algorithm (SACO). It is compared against state of the art planning in a retrospective study of 20 patients who previously received image-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy using a Syed Neblett template. From those plans, template orientation and position are estimated via a rigid registration of the template with the actual catheter trajectories. All potential straight trajectories intersecting the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) are considered for catheter optimization. Retrospectively generated plans and clinical plans are compared with respect to dosimetric performance and optimization time. All plans were generated with one single run of the optimizer lasting 0.6-97.4 s. Compared to manual optimization, SACO yields a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) improved target coverage while at the same time fulfilling all dosimetric constraints for organs at risk (OARs). Comparing inverse planning strategies, dosimetric evaluation for SACO and "hybrid inverse planning and optimization" (HIPO), as gold standard, shows no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). However, SACO provides the potential to reduce the number of used catheters without compromising plan quality. The proposed heuristic for needle selection provides fast catheter selection with optimization times suited for intraoperative treatment planning. Compared to manual optimization, the

  13. Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer. II: Comparative Planning Study With Intracavitary and Intracavitary–Interstitial Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dae Yup [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Safigholi, Habib; Soliman, Abraam [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Scanderbeg, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Liu, Zhaowei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Owrangi, Amir [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, William Y., E-mail: william.song@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparative planning study evaluating the utility of the proposed direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator against standard applicators, in the setting of image guided adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A detailed conceptual article was published in 2014. The proposed DMBT tandem applicator has 6 peripheral grooves of 1.3-mm width, along a 5.4-mm-thick nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cm{sup 3}, capable of generating directional dose profiles. We performed a comparative planning study with 45 cervical cancer patients enrolled consecutively in the prospective observational EMBRACE study. In all patients, MRI-based planning was performed while utilizing various tandem-ring (27 patients) and tandem-ring-needles (18 patients) applicators, in accordance with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie–European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology recommendations. For unbiased comparisons, all cases were replanned with an in-house–developed inverse optimization code while enforcing a uniform set of constraints that are reflective of the clinical practice. All plans were normalized to the same high-risk clinical target volume D90 values achieved in the original clinical plans. Results: In general, if the standard tandem was replaced with the DMBT tandem while maintaining all other planning conditions the same, there was consistent improvement in the plan quality. For example, among the 18 tandem-ring-needles cases, the average D2cm{sup 3} reductions achieved were −2.48% ± 11.03%, −4.45% ± 5.24%, and −5.66% ± 6.43% for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. An opportunity may also exist in avoiding use of needles altogether for when the total number of needles required is small (approximately 2 to 3 needles or less), if DMBT tandem is used. Conclusions: Integrating the novel DMBT tandem onto both intracavitary and intracavitary

  14. Comparison of different treatment planning optimization methods for vaginal HDR brachytherapy with multichannel applicators: A reduction of the high doses to the vaginal mucosa is possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Mauro; Cusumano, Davide; Giandini, Tommaso; Tenconi, Chiara; Mazzarella, Ester; Grisotto, Simone; Massari, Eleonora; Mazzeo, Davide; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Pappalardi, Brigida; Fallai, Carlo; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-12-01

    A direct planning approach with multi-channel vaginal cylinders (MVCs) used for HDR brachytherapy of vaginal cancers is particularly challenging. Purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric performances of different forward and inverse methods used for the optimization of MVC-based vaginal treatments for endometrial cancer, with a particular attention to the definition of strategies useful to limit the high doses to the vaginal mucosa. Twelve postoperative vaginal HDR brachytherapy treatments performed with MVCs were considered. Plans were retrospectively optimized with three different methods: Dose Point Optimization followed by Graphical Optimization (DPO + GrO), Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing with two different class solutions as starting conditions (surflPSA and homogIPSA) and Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization (HIPO). Several dosimetric parameters related to target coverage, hot spot extensions and sparing of organs at risk were analyzed to evaluate the quality of the achieved treatment plans. Dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformal index (COIN) and a further parameter quantifying the proportion of the central catheter loading with respect to the overall loading (i.e., the central catheter loading index: CCLI) were also quantified. The achieved PTV coverage parameters were highly correlated with each other but uncorrelated with the hot spot quantifiers. HomogIPSA and HIPO achieved higher DHIs and CCLIs and lower volumes of high doses than DPO + GrO and surflPSA. Within the investigated optimization methods, HIPO and homoglPSA showed the highest dose homogeneity to the target. In particular, homogIPSA resulted also the most effective in reducing hot spots to the vaginal mucosa. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  16. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  17. Current status of brachytherapy in cancer treatment – short overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographical location, and its prevalence is growing around the world. Most of cancer treatments include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy with energy from radionuclides inserted directly into the tumor, is increasingly used in cancer treatment. For cervical and skin cancers, it has become a standard therapy for more than 100 years as well as an important part of the treatment guidelines for other malignancies, including head and neck, skin, breast, and prostate cancers. Compared to external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy has the potential to deliver an ablative radiation dose over a short period of time directly to the altered tissue area with the advantage of a rapid fall-off in dose, and consequently, sparing of adjacent organs. As a result, the patient is able to complete the treatment earlier, and the risks of occurrence of another cancer are lower than in conventional radiotherapy treatment. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment, and become more advanced with the spread of pulsed-dose-rate and high-dose-rate afterloading machines; the use of new 3D/4D planning systems has additionally improved the quality of the treatment. The aim of the present study was to present short summaries of current studies on brachytherapy for the most frequently diagnosed tumors. Data presented in this manuscript should help especially young physicians or physicists to explore and introduce brachytherapy in cancer treatments.

  18. TU-AB-201-02: An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Assurance Program for Tandem and Ovoid High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J; Shi, F; Hrycushko, B; Medin, P; Stojadinovic, S; Pompos, A; Yang, M; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For tandem and ovoid (T&O) HDR brachytherapy in our clinic, it is required that the planning physicist manually capture ∼10 images during planning, perform a secondary dose calculation and generate a report, combine them into a single PDF document, and upload it to a record- and-verify system to prove to an independent plan checker that the case was planned correctly. Not only does this slow down the already time-consuming clinical workflow, the PDF document also limits the number of parameters that can be checked. To solve these problems, we have developed a web-based automatic quality assurance (QA) program. Methods: We set up a QA server accessible through a web- interface. A T&O plan and CT images are exported as DICOMRT files and uploaded to the server. The software checks 13 geometric features, e.g. if the dwell positions are reasonable, and 10 dosimetric features, e.g. secondary dose calculations via TG43 formalism and D2cc to critical structures. A PDF report is automatically generated with errors and potential issues highlighted. It also contains images showing important geometric and dosimetric aspects to prove the plan was created following standard guidelines. Results: The program has been clinically implemented in our clinic. In each of the 58 T&O plans we tested, a 14- page QA report was automatically generated. It took ∼45 sec to export the plan and CT images and ∼30 sec to perform the QA tests and generate the report. In contrast, our manual QA document preparation tooks on average ∼7 minutes under optimal conditions and up to 20 minutes when mistakes were made during the document assembly. Conclusion: We have tested the efficiency and effectiveness of an automated process for treatment plan QA of HDR T&O cases. This software was shown to improve the workflow compared to our conventional manual approach

  19. TU-AB-201-02: An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Assurance Program for Tandem and Ovoid High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J; Shi, F; Hrycushko, B; Medin, P; Stojadinovic, S; Pompos, A; Yang, M; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For tandem and ovoid (T&O) HDR brachytherapy in our clinic, it is required that the planning physicist manually capture ∼10 images during planning, perform a secondary dose calculation and generate a report, combine them into a single PDF document, and upload it to a record- and-verify system to prove to an independent plan checker that the case was planned correctly. Not only does this slow down the already time-consuming clinical workflow, the PDF document also limits the number of parameters that can be checked. To solve these problems, we have developed a web-based automatic quality assurance (QA) program. Methods: We set up a QA server accessible through a web- interface. A T&O plan and CT images are exported as DICOMRT files and uploaded to the server. The software checks 13 geometric features, e.g. if the dwell positions are reasonable, and 10 dosimetric features, e.g. secondary dose calculations via TG43 formalism and D2cc to critical structures. A PDF report is automatically generated with errors and potential issues highlighted. It also contains images showing important geometric and dosimetric aspects to prove the plan was created following standard guidelines. Results: The program has been clinically implemented in our clinic. In each of the 58 T&O plans we tested, a 14- page QA report was automatically generated. It took ∼45 sec to export the plan and CT images and ∼30 sec to perform the QA tests and generate the report. In contrast, our manual QA document preparation tooks on average ∼7 minutes under optimal conditions and up to 20 minutes when mistakes were made during the document assembly. Conclusion: We have tested the efficiency and effectiveness of an automated process for treatment plan QA of HDR T&O cases. This software was shown to improve the workflow compared to our conventional manual approach.

  20. Image based brachytherapy planning with special reference to gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in India and one of the most frequent malignancies in Europe and in North America. In addition endometrium, vagina and vulva cancer are treated with brachytherapy. Especially for locally advanced cervix cancer the integration of image based brachytherapy planning into clinical routine is becoming a new standard for the future

  1. A Japanese prospective multi-institutional feasibility study on accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial brachytherapy: treatment planning and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yuki; Nose, Takayuki; Dokiya, Takushi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Kumazaki, Yu

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, breast-conserving surgery with closed cavity has generally been performed for breast cancer patients, and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is considered difficult because Asian females generally have smaller breast sizes than Western females. Therefore, common identification of target and treatment plan method in APBI is required. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in Japan to determine institutional compliance with APBI using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) designed for Japanese female patients. For this study, 46 patients were recruited at eight institutions from January 2009 to December 2011. The reproducibility of the ISBT–APBI plan was evaluated using three criteria: (1) minimum clinical target volume dose with a clip dose ≥ 6 Gy/fraction, (2) irradiated volume constraint of 40-150 cm 3 , and (3) uniformity of dose distribution, expressed as the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR, V150/V100) < 0.35. The ISBT–APBI plan for each patient was considered reproducible when all three criteria were met. When the number of non-reproducible patients was ≤ 4 at study completion, APBI at this institution was considered statistically reproducible. Half of the patients (52 %) had a small bra size (A/B cup). The mean values of the dose-constrained parameters were as follows: Vref, 117 cm 3 (range, 40-282), DNR, 0.30 (range, 0.22-0.51), and clip dose, 784 cGy (range, 469-3146). A total of 43/46 treatment plans were judged to be compliant and ISBT–APBI was concluded to be reproducible. This study showed that multi-institutional ISBT–APBI treatment plan was reproducible for small breast patient with closed cavity

  2. Inverse planning in brachytherapy from radium to high rate 192 iridium afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahanas, M.; Mould, R.F.; Baltas, D.; Karauzakis, K.; Giannouli, S.; Baltas, D.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the inverse planning problem in brachytherapy, i.e. the problem to determine an optimal number of catheters, number of sources for low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) and the optimal dwell times for high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) necessary to obtain an optimal as possible dose distribution. Starting from the 1930s, inverse planning for LDR brachytherapy used geometrically derived rules to determine the optimal placement of sources in order to achieve a uniform dose distribution of a specific level in planes, spheres and cylinders. Rules and nomograms were derived which still are widely used. With the rapid development of 3D imaging technologies and the rapidly increasing computer power we have now entered the new era of computer-based inverse planning in brachytherapy. The inverse planning is now an optimisation process adapted to the individual geometry of the patient. New inverse planning optimisation algorithms are anatomy-based that consider the real anatomy of the tumour and the organs at risk (OAR). Computer-based inverse planning considers various effects such as stability of solutions for seed misplacements which cannot ever be solved analytically without gross simplifications. In the last few years multiobjective (MO) inverse planning algorithms have been developed which recognise the MO optimisation problem which is inherent in inverse planning in brachytherapy. Previous methods used a trial and error method to obtain a satisfactory solution. MO optimisation replaces this trial and error process by presenting a representative set of dose distributions that can be obtained. With MO optimisation it is possible to obtain information that can be used to obtain the optimum number of catheters, their position and the optimum distribution of dwell times for HDR brachytherapy. For LDR brachytherapy also the stability of solutions due to seed migration can also be improved. A spectrum of alternative solutions is available and the treatment planner

  3. Computerized planning and dosimetry for brachytherapy in carcinomas cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizilbash, N.A.; Jabeen, K.; Hussain, R.

    1996-01-01

    A project on the use of computerize planning and dosimetry for brachytherapy in carcinoma of cervix was started at NORI (Nuclear Medicine, Oncology and Radiotherapy Institute, Islamabad) in september 1990. A total number of 182 patients were included in the study over a period of three years. The treatment of all these patients was done by external radiation as well as the intracavitary therapy. Planning and dosimetry was done according to ICRU 38 recommendations. 70 patients were planned with two computers TP-II (Dr. J. Cunningham's software) and PC based system (Dr. Kallinger's software, BTI system). From the results of the two computers TP-II and PC, it can be seen that the difference in a absorbed dose for all recommended points in not going to harm the patient. The dose to the bladder and the rectum in our studies is quite low because of the low activity in the ovoid sources. (author)

  4. The dose distribution of low dose rate Cs-137 in intracavitary brachytherapy: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation, treatment planning calculation and polymer gel measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, M; Love, P A; Verhaegen, F; Nalder, C; Bidmead, A M; Leach, M; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the dose distribution delivered by low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques and polymer gel dosimetry. The results obtained were compared with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The 20 mm and the 30 mm diameter Selectron vaginal applicator set (Nucletron) were used for this study. A homogeneous and a heterogeneous-with an air cavity-polymer gel phantom was used to measure the dose distribution from these sources. The same geometrical set-up was used for the MC calculations. Beyond the applicator tip, differences in dose as large as 20% were found between the MC and TPS. This is attributed to the presence of stainless steel in the applicator and source set, which are not considered by the TPS calculations. Beyond the air cavity, differences in dose of around 5% were noted, due to the TPS assuming a homogeneous water medium. The polymer gel results were in good agreement with the MC calculations for all the cases investigated

  5. Direct reconstruction and associated uncertainties of 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy cervix patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awunor, O. A.; Dixon, B.; Walker, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper details a practical method for the direct reconstruction of high dose rate 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of brachytherapy cervix patients. It also details the uncertainties associated with such a process. Eight Nucletron interstitial ring applicators—Ø26 mm (×4), Ø30 mm (×3) and Ø34 mm (×1), and one 60 mm intrauterine tube were used in this study. RTQA2 and XRQA2 gafchromic films were irradiated at pre-programmed dwell positions with three successive 192Ir sources and used to derive the coordinates of the source dwell positions. The source was observed to deviate significantly from its expected position by up to 6.1 mm in all ring sizes. Significant inter applicator differences of up to 2.6 mm were observed between a subset of ring applicators. Also, the measured data were observed to differ significantly from commercially available source path models provided by Nucletron with differences of up to 3.7 mm across all ring applicator sizes. The total expanded uncertainty (k = 2) averaged over all measured dwell positions in the rings was observed to be 1.1 ± 0.1 mm (Ø26 mm and Ø30 mm rings) and 1.0 ± 0.3 mm (Ø34 mm ring) respectively, and when transferred to the treatment planning system, equated to maximum %dose changes of 1.9%, 13.2% and 1.5% at regions representative of the parametrium, lateral fornix and organs at risk respectively.

  6. Preparation of a program for the independent verification of the brachytherapy planning systems calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V Carmona, V.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Richart Sancho, J.; Ballester, F.; Pujades-Claumarchirant, M.C.; Munoz, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work a program is presented that independently checks for each patient the treatment planning system calculations in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate brachytherapy. The treatment planning system output text files are automatically loaded in this program in order to get the source coordinates, the desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell times when it is the case. The source strength and the reference dates are introduced by the user. The program allows implementing the recommendations about independent verification of the clinical brachytherapy dosimetry in a simple and accurate way, in few minutes. (Author).

  7. Impact of 'optimized' treatment planning for tandem and ring, and tandem and ovoids, using high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Peters, Nancy E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Fowler, Jack F.; Buchler, Dolores A.; Stitt, Judith A.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Different treatment techniques are used in high dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer. We have investigated the differences between 'optimized' and 'nonoptimized' therapy using both a tandem and ring (T/R) applicator, and a tandem and ovoids (T/O), applicator. Methods and Materials: HDR afterloading brachytherapy using the Madison System for Stage IB cervical cancer was simulated for 10 different patients using both a T/R applicator and a T/O applicator. A treatment course consists of external beam irradiation and five insertions of HDR afterloading brachytherapy. Full dosimetry calculations were performed at the initial insertion for both applicators and used as a reference for the following four insertions of the appropriate applicator. Forty dosimetry calculations were performed to determine the dose delivered to Point M (similar to Point A), Point E (obturator lymph nodes), vaginal surface, bladder, and rectum. 'Optimized' doses were specified to Point M and to the vaginal surface. 'Nonoptimized' doses were specified to Point M only. Using the linear-quadratic equation, calculations have been performed to convert the delivered dose using HDR to the biologically equivalent doses at the conventional low dose rate (LDR) at 0.60 Gy/h. Results: Major differences between 'optimized' and 'nonoptimized' LDR equivalent doses were found at the vaginal surface, bladder, and rectum. Overdoses at the vaginal surface, bladder, and rectum were calculated to be 208%, nil, and 42%, respectively, for the T/R applicator with 'nonoptimization'. However, for the T/O applicator, the overdoses were smaller, being nil, 32%, and 27%, respectively, with 'nonoptimization'. Conclusion: Doses given in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy border on tissue tolerance. 'Optimization' of either applicator decreases the risk of a dose that may have potential for complications. Optimization of a tandem and ovoids best ensures

  8. Using the computed tomography in comparison to the orthogonal radiography based treatment planning in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in cervical uteri cancer patients; a single institution feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Yasir A; El-Sayed, Mohamed E; El-Taher, Zeinab H; Zaza, Khaled O; Moftah, Belal A; Hassouna, Ashraf H; Ghassal, Noor M

    2008-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an integral part in the treatment of cervical uteri cancer patients. Orthogonal treatment planning is the standard mode of calculation based on reference points. Introduction of the innovative 3-D computer based treatment planning allows accurate calculation based on volumetric information as regards the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Also provide dose volume histogram (DVH) for proper estimation of the dose in relation to the volume. To correlate and compare the information obtained from the two approaches for high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical uteri cancer; the orthogonal conventional method and the computerized tomography (CT) three dimensions (3D) based calculation method in relation to the target and organ at risk (OAR). From 6 patients of cervical uteri cancer, 21 applications with orthogonal planning using the Brachy Vision treatment planning system version 7.3.10 were performed. In 10 applications; comparison between orthogonal and CT based planning was done. In orthogonal planning; the dose to point A, rectum and bladder were defined according to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendation. From the CT based planning the target volume and dose volume histogram lpar;DVH) were calculated for the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum and bladder. From these two sets, information was obtained and compared and mean values were derived. For dose prescription at point A, an average of 63.5% of CTV received the prescribed dose. The mean ICRU dose to the bladder point is 2.9 Gy+/-1.2 SD (Standard Deviation) and 17% of the bladder volume derived from CT was encompassed by 2.9 Gy isodose line. The mean ICRU dose at the rectum point is 3.4 Gy+/-1.2 SD and 21% of the rectum volume from CT was encompassed by 3.4 Gy isodose line. The maximum dose to the rectum and the bladder derived from the CT and compared to the maximal dose at ICRU is 1.7 and 2.8 times higher than the orthogonal reference points; with the corresponding p

  9. Using the Computed Tomography in Comparison to the Orthogonal Radiography Based Treatment Planning in High dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy in Cervical Uteri Cancer Patients; A Single Institution Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAHADUR, Y.A.; EL-SAYED, M.E.; HASSOUNA, A.H.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.; GHASSAL, N.M.; ZAZA, Kh.O.M.D.; OFTAH, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an integral part in the treatment of cervical uteri cancer patients. Orthogonal treatment planning is the standard mode of calculation based on reference points. Introduction of the innovative 3-D computer based treatment planning allows accurate calculation based on volumetric information as regards the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Also provide dose volume histogram (DVH) for proper estimation of the dose in relation to the volume. Aim: To correlate and compare the information obtained from the two approaches for high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical uteri cancer; the orthogonal conventional method and the computerized tomography (CT) three dimensions (3D) based calculation method in relation to the target and organ at risk (OAR). Methods: From 6 patients of cervical uteri cancer, 21 applications with orthogonal planning using the Brachy Vision treatment planning system version 7.3.10 were performed. In 10 applications; comparison between orthogonal and CT based planning was done. In orthogonal planning; the dose to point A, rectum and bladder were defined according to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendation. From the CT based planning the target volume and dose volume histogram (DVH) were calculated for the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum and bladder. From these two sets, information was obtained and compared and mean values were derived. Results: For dose prescription at point A, an average of 63.5% of CTV received the prescribed dose. The mean ICRU dose to the bladder point is 2.9 Gy±l .2 SD (Standard Deviation) and 17% of the bladder volume derived from CT was encompassed by 2.9 Gy isodose line. The mean ICRU dose at the rectum point is 3.4 Gy±1.2 SD and 21% of the rectum volume from CT was encompassed by 3.4 Gy isodose line. The maximum dose to the rectum and the bladder derived from the CT and compared to the maximal dose at ICRU is 1.7 and 2.8 times higher than the orthogonal reference points; with the

  10. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  11. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  12. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  13. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Baltas, D. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, 15701 Athens (Greece); Karabis, A. [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens 10676 (Greece); Mavroidis, P. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, 17176 (Sweden); Zamboglou, N.; Tselis, N. [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Shi, C. [St. Vincent' s Medical Center, 2800 Main Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut 06606 (United States); Papanikolaou, N. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  14. Automation of brachytherapy planning based on RADPLAN system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Helder Rodrigues da; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2000-01-01

    RADPLAN is a software to automate the clinical planning of doses in brachytherapy managing the radionuclide source position and time. It intends to be a important tools to assist cancer treatment in the radiotherapy services. It evaluates the tridimensional isodoses for a set of radioactive sources implanted on tissue or placed inside a body cavity. RADPLAN allows visualization of virtual frames in which isodose curves overlap medical images produced in computerized tomography), X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance equipment. In this work, the software function is explained and a hypothetic case of medical information management is presented, specifically illustrations of isodoses curves obtained for a spatial distribution of Ir 192 wires implanted in a breast. (author)

  15. Verification of dosimetry planning in brachytherapy in format Dicom and EUD calculation of Risk in bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Hernandez, M. J.; Sendon del Rio, J. R.; Ayala Lazaro, R.; Jimenez Rojas, M. R.; Gomez Cores, S.; Polo Cezon, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    This work Describes a program that automates the verification of the schedules in brachytherapy (configuration and dosimetric treatment parameters) for sources of Ir-192 (mHDR v2) and Co-60 (Co0.A86) from the plan exported in DICOM format data. (Author)

  16. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, B.L.; den Hertog, D.; Hoffmann, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or

  17. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  18. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R., E-mail: ccg.andreza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  19. Computed tomography-based treatment planning for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using the tandem and ring applicator: influence of applicator choice on organ dose and inter-fraction adaptive planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional planning for high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in cervical cancer has been highly recommended by consensus guidelines such as the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO. In this document, we describe our experience with computed tomography (CT-based planning using the tandem/ring applicator. We discuss the influence of applicator geometry on doses to organs at risk (OARs, namely the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Through example cases with dose prescribed to point A, we demonstrate how adaptive planning can help achieve constraints to the OARs as per guidelines.

  20. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  1. A 3D computer graphics approach to brachytherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Frank; Wawro, Martin; Wilke, Carsten

    2004-06-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) can significantly reduce the risk of restenosis after interventional treatment of stenotic arteries, if planned and applied correctly. In order to facilitate computer-based IVB planning, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the stenotic artery based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) sequences is desirable. For this purpose, the frames of the IVUS sequence are properly aligned in space, possible gaps inbetween the IVUS frames are filled by interpolation with radial basis functions known from scattered data interpolation. The alignment procedure uses additional information which is obtained from biplane X-ray angiography performed simultaneously during the capturing of the IVUS sequence. After IVUS images and biplane angiography data are acquired from the patient, the vessel-wall borders and the IVUS catheter are detected by an active contour algorithm. Next, the twist (relative orientation) between adjacent IVUS frames is determined by a sequential triangulation method. The absolute orientation of each frame is established by a stochastic analysis based on anatomical landmarks. Finally, the reconstructed 3D vessel model is visualized by methods of combined volume and polygon rendering. The reconstruction is then used for the computation of the radiation-distribution within the tissue, emitted from a beta-radiation source. All these steps are performed during the percutaneous intervention.

  2. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel

  3. Intraoperative HDR brachytherapy for rectal cancer using a flexible intraoperative template: standard plans versus individual planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Hanssens, Patrick E.J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    HDR intraoperative brachytherapy (IOBT) is applied to locally advanced rectal tumors using a 5 mm thick flexible intraoperative template (FIT). To reduce the procedure time, treatment planning is performed using standard plans that neglect the curvature of the FIT. We have calculated the individual treatment plan, based on the real geometry of the FIT, and the dose at clips placed during surgery. A mean treatment dose of 9.55±0.21 Gy was found for the individual plan, compared to the prescribed 10 Gy (P<0.0001). The mean central dose was 10.03±0.10 Gy in the standard plan and 9.20±0.32 Gy in the individual plan (P<0.0001). The mean dose at the corners of the FIT was 10.3 Gy in the standard plan and ranged between 10.3 and 10.5 Gy in the individual plan. In 63% of the clips, the dose was larger than 15.0 Gy, which is equivalent to a gap between the FIT and the target smaller than 5 mm. In 18% of the clips, the dose was smaller than 13.0 Gy indicating that locally the gap was larger than 5 mm. Clinical practice will have to prove if these small dose deviations influence the clinical outcome

  4. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External ... In all cases of brachytherapy, the source of radiation is encapsulated ... non-radioactive metallic capsule. This prevents the radioactive materials ...

  5. Auger Electron Therapy And Brachytherapy Tumor Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, B.H.; Shani, G.

    2002-01-01

    Auger Electron Therapy (AET) is a binary approach for improving cancer radiotherapy. It involves the selective targeting of an atom to tumor cells using physiological pathway. The atom is then irradiated by a specific radiation that produces secondary radiation called Auger electrons. One of the problems associated with the clinical application of AET, is that the energy of the photons required for stimulating photoelectric absorption in most of the available high Z target atoms, is too low to achieve penetration through normal surrounding tissues to the depth of the tumor, when an external source is used. The solution is therefore the use of a brachytherapy technique. There are two other problems associated with the use of radiation as a cancer treatment. The first is the limitation on radiation dose to the normal tissue within the treatment volume. The second problem is the limitation imposed by the miniscule size of the critical target of the cell, namely the DNA (0.25% of the cell mass). The solution to the first problem can be achieved by using the brachytherapy technique. The second problem can be resolved by placing the radiation source in close position to the DNA. AET, as we apply it, provides the two solutions to the two problems. When a photon is absorbed by an electron in the K or L shell of an high Z atom, the electron is ejected from the atom, creating a vacancy in the shell. This vacancy is immediately filled with an electron from an upper shell. The energy difference between the two shells is sometimes emitted as an x-ray, however, frequently the energy is transferred to an outer shell electron that is emitted as an Auger electron. These electrons are emitted at energies of up to ∼30 keV and therefore have a very short range in the cell. They will deposit all their energy within 20-30 nm from the point of emission. i.e. all the energy is deposited in the DNA. In our work indium is used as the high Z atom

  6. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cohen, Gil' ad N. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  7. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S.; Dumas, I.; Lhomme, C.; Morice, P.; Barillot, I.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  8. Methods for Cf-252 cervix cancer therapy and treatment planning for GYN malignancies in Lexington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, C.W.; Yoneda, J.; Beach, J.L.; Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the clinical physics methods and treatment planning techniques used in both the external beam and brachytherapy treatment of GYN malignancies in the Radiotherapy Department of the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Specific description of the departmental implant suite and brachytherapy procedures are included. The optimization of brachytherapy applicator placement, source arrangement, and normal and tumor total dose and dose distributions are presented. Quality assurance protocols for teletherapy and brachytherapy and patient and staff safety procedures with Cf-252 are discussed

  9. WE-DE-201-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): A Fast Multi-Target Inverse Treatment Planning Strategy Optimizing Dosimetric Measures for High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthier, C [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institut/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hesser, J [University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Inverse treatment planning (ITP) for interstitial HDR brachytherapy of gynecologic cancers seeks to maximize coverage of the clinical target volumes (tumor and vagina) while respecting dose-volume-histogram related dosimetric measures (DMs) for organs at risk (OARs). Commercially available ITP tools do not support DM-based planning because it is computationally too expensive to solve. In this study we present a novel approach that allows fast ITP for gynecologic cancers based on DMs for the first time. Methods: This novel strategy is an optimization model based on a smooth DM-based objective function. The smooth approximation is achieved by utilizing a logistic function for the evaluation of DMs. The resulting nonconvex and constrained optimization problem is then optimized with a BFGS algorithm. The model was evaluated using the implant geometry extracted from 20 patient treatment plans under an IRB-approved retrospective study. For each plan, the final DMs were evaluated and compared to the original clinical plans. The CTVs were the contoured tumor volume and the contoured surface of the vagina. Statistical significance was evaluated with a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: As did the clinical plans, all generated plans fulfilled the defined DMs for OARs. The proposed strategy showed a statistically significant improvement (p<0.001) in coverage of the tumor and vagina, with absolute improvements of related DMs of (6.9 +/− 7.9)% and (28.2 +/− 12.0)%, respectively. This was achieved with a statistically significant (p<0.01) decrease of the high-dose-related DM for the tumor. The runtime of the optimization was (2.3 +/− 2.0) seconds. Conclusion: We demonstrated using clinical data that our novel approach allows rapid DM-based optimization with improved coverage of CTVs with fewer hot spots. Being up to three orders of magnitude faster than the current clinical practice, the method dramatically shortens planning time.

  10. WE-DE-201-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): A Fast Multi-Target Inverse Treatment Planning Strategy Optimizing Dosimetric Measures for High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthier, C; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Hesser, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Inverse treatment planning (ITP) for interstitial HDR brachytherapy of gynecologic cancers seeks to maximize coverage of the clinical target volumes (tumor and vagina) while respecting dose-volume-histogram related dosimetric measures (DMs) for organs at risk (OARs). Commercially available ITP tools do not support DM-based planning because it is computationally too expensive to solve. In this study we present a novel approach that allows fast ITP for gynecologic cancers based on DMs for the first time. Methods: This novel strategy is an optimization model based on a smooth DM-based objective function. The smooth approximation is achieved by utilizing a logistic function for the evaluation of DMs. The resulting nonconvex and constrained optimization problem is then optimized with a BFGS algorithm. The model was evaluated using the implant geometry extracted from 20 patient treatment plans under an IRB-approved retrospective study. For each plan, the final DMs were evaluated and compared to the original clinical plans. The CTVs were the contoured tumor volume and the contoured surface of the vagina. Statistical significance was evaluated with a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: As did the clinical plans, all generated plans fulfilled the defined DMs for OARs. The proposed strategy showed a statistically significant improvement (p<0.001) in coverage of the tumor and vagina, with absolute improvements of related DMs of (6.9 +/− 7.9)% and (28.2 +/− 12.0)%, respectively. This was achieved with a statistically significant (p<0.01) decrease of the high-dose-related DM for the tumor. The runtime of the optimization was (2.3 +/− 2.0) seconds. Conclusion: We demonstrated using clinical data that our novel approach allows rapid DM-based optimization with improved coverage of CTVs with fewer hot spots. Being up to three orders of magnitude faster than the current clinical practice, the method dramatically shortens planning time.

  11. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  12. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  13. Computerized radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laarse, R. van der.

    1981-01-01

    Following a general introduction, a chain consisting of three computer programs which has been developed for treatment planning of external beam radiotherapy without manual intervention is described. New score functions used for determination of optimal incidence directions are presented and the calculation of the position of the isocentre for each optimum combination of incidence directions is explained. A description of how a set of applicators, covering fields with dimensions of 4 to 20 cm, for the 6 to 20 MeV electron beams of a MEL SL75-20 linear accelerator was developed, is given. A computer program for three dimensional electron beam treatment planning is presented. A microprocessor based treatment planning system for the Selectron remote controlled afterloading system for intracavitary radiotherapy is described. The main differences in treatment planning procedures for external beam therapy with neutrons instead of photons is discussed. A microprocessor based densitometer for plotting isodensity lines in film dosimetry is described. A computer program for dose planning of brachytherapy is presented. Finally a general discussion about the different aspects of computerized treatment planning as presented in this thesis is given. (Auth.)

  14. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eva K.; Fung, Albert Y.C.; Zaider, Marco; Brooks, J. Paul

    2002-01-01

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  15. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eva K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fung, Albert Y.C.; Zaider, Marco [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Brooks, J. Paul [School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2002-06-07

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  16. Custom-made micro applicators for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of chronic psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we present the treatment of the psoriatic nail beds of patients refractory to standard therapies using high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. The custom-made micro applicators (CMMA were designed and constructed for radiation dose delivery to small curvy targets with complicated topology. The role of the HDR brachytherapy treatment was to stimulate the T cells for an increased immune response. Material and methods: The patient diagnosed with psoriatic nail beds refractory to standard therapies received monthly subunguinal injections that caused significant pain and discomfort in both hands. The clinical target was defined as the length from the fingertip to the distal interphalangeal joint. For the accurate and reproducible setup in the multi-fractional treatment delivery, the CMMAs were designed. Five needles were embedded into the dense plastic mesh and covered with 5 mm bolus material for each micro applicator. Five CMMAs were designed, resulting in the usage of 25 catheters in total. Results: The prescription dose was planned to the depth of the anterior surface of the distal phalanx, allowing for the sparing of the surrounding tissue. The total number of the active dwell positions was 145 with step size of 5 mm. The total treatment time was 115 seconds with a 7.36 Ci activity of the 192Ir source. The treatment resulted in good pain control. The patient did not require further injections to the nail bed. After this initial treatment, additional two patients with similar symptoms received HDR brachytherapy. The treatment outcome was favorable in all cases. Conclusions : The first HDR brachytherapy treatment of psoriasis of the nail bed is presented. The initial experience revealed that brachytherapy treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in adequate control of the disease. A larger cohort of patients will be required for additional conclusions related to the long-term clinical benefits.

  17. A method to combine three dimensional dose distributions for external beam and brachytherapy radiation treatments for gynecological neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, V.; Sahijdak, W.M.; Orton, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation treatment of gynecological neoplasms, such as cervical carcinoma, usually combines external radiation therapy with one or more intracavitary brachytherapy applications. Although the dose from external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy can be calculated and displayed in 3D individually, the dose distributions are not combined. At most, combined point doses are calculated for select points using various time-dose models. In this study, we present a methodology to combine external beam and brachytherapy treatments for gynecological neoplasms. Material and Methods: Three dimensional bio-effect treatment planning to obtain complication probability has been outlined. CT scans of the patient's pelvis with the gynecological applicator in place are used to outline normal tissue and tumor volumes. 3D external beam and brachytherapy treatment plans are developed separately and an external beam dose matrix and a brachytherapy dose matrix was calculated. The dose in each voxel was assumed to be homogeneous. The physical dose in each voxel of the dose matrix was then converted into extrapolated response dose (ERD) based on the linear quadratic model that accounts for the dose per fraction, number of fractions, dose rate, and complete or incomplete repair of sublethal damage (time between fractions). The net biological dose delivered was obtained by summing the ERD grids from external beam and brachytherapy since there was complete repair of sublethal damage between external beam and brachytherapy treatments. The normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability were obtained using the biological dose matrix based on the critical element model. Results: The outlined method of combining external beam and brachytherapy treatments was implemented on gynecological treatments using an applicator for brachytherapy treatments. Conclusion: Implementation of the biological dose calculation that combine different modalities is extremely useful

  18. A multicentre ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for cervix HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Diez, Patricia; Gandon, Laura; Wynn-Jones, Andrea; Bownes, Peter; Lee, Chris; Aird, Edwin; Bidmead, Margaret; Lowe, Gerry; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To undertake the first multicentre fully ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for HDR cervix brachytherapy, comparing planned and delivered dose distributions around clinical treatment applicators, with review of local procedures. Materials and methods: A film-dosimetry audit was performed at 46 centres, including imaging, applicator reconstruction, treatment planning and delivery. Film dose maps were calculated using triple-channel dosimetry and compared to RTDose data from treatment planning systems. Deviations between plan and measurement were quantified at prescription Point A and using gamma analysis. Local procedures were also discussed. Results: The mean difference between planned and measured dose at Point A was −0.6% for plastic applicators and −3.0% for metal applicators, at standard uncertainty 3.0% (k = 1). Isodose distributions agreed within 1 mm over a dose range 2–16 Gy. Mean gamma passing rates exceeded 97% for plastic and metal applicators at 3% (local) 2 mm criteria. Two errors were found: one dose normalisation error and one applicator library misaligned with the imaged applicator. Suggestions for quality improvement were also made. Conclusions: The concept of ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for HDR brachytherapy has been successfully implemented in a multicentre environment, providing evidence that a high level of accuracy in brachytherapy dosimetry can be achieved

  19. Estimating statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo efficiency-gain in the context of a correlated sampling Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy treatment planning with non-normal dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D; Sampson, Andrew J; Deniz, Daniel; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Williamson, Jeffrey; Malusek, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    Correlated sampling Monte Carlo methods can shorten computing times in brachytherapy treatment planning. Monte Carlo efficiency is typically estimated via efficiency gain, defined as the reduction in computing time by correlated sampling relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods when equal statistical uncertainties have been achieved. The determination of the efficiency gain uncertainty arising from random effects, however, is not a straightforward task specially when the error distribution is non-normal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the F distribution and standardized uncertainty propagation methods (widely used in metrology to estimate uncertainty of physical measurements) for predicting confidence intervals about efficiency gain estimates derived from single Monte Carlo runs using fixed-collision correlated sampling in a simplified brachytherapy geometry. A bootstrap based algorithm was used to simulate the probability distribution of the efficiency gain estimates and the shortest 95% confidence interval was estimated from this distribution. It was found that the corresponding relative uncertainty was as large as 37% for this particular problem. The uncertainty propagation framework predicted confidence intervals reasonably well; however its main disadvantage was that uncertainties of input quantities had to be calculated in a separate run via a Monte Carlo method. The F distribution noticeably underestimated the confidence interval. These discrepancies were influenced by several photons with large statistical weights which made extremely large contributions to the scored absorbed dose difference. The mechanism of acquiring high statistical weights in the fixed-collision correlated sampling method was explained and a mitigation strategy was proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dosimetric comparison between a planning system and Radiochromic-EBT2 films in surface brachytherapy treatments of high rate; Comparacion dosimetrica entre un sistema de planificacion y peliculas radiocromicas EBT2 en tratamientos de braquiterapia superficial de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Ramos, S. M.; Carrasco Herrera, M. a.; Vicent, D.; Rodriguez, C.; Herrador, M.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study a situation in which, the accuracy of the calculation of the planner may be limited, superficial brachytherapy treatment. It has relative to the dose obtained with the planner with that obtained with film radiochromic EBT2. (Author)

  1. Comparison of different application systems and CT- assisted treatment planning procedures in primary endometrium cancer: Is it technically possible to include the whole uterus volume in the volume treated by brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, U.; Knocke, Th.; Fellner, C.; Poetter, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is regarded as the definitive component of treatment for inoperable patients with endometrium cancer. In published series the whole uterus has been claimed to represent the target volume independently of the individual tumor spread. The purpose of this work is to compare different planning and application procedures and to analyze the target volumes (whole uterus), treatment volumes and their respective relation for the given various conditions. Material and Methods: In ten patients with primary endometrium cancer the correlation between target- and treatment volume was analysed based on standard one-channel applicators or individual Heyman applicators. A comparative analysis of target volumes resulting from two different planning procedures of Heyman applications was performed. CT was carried out after insertion of the Heyman ovoids. Target volume was estimated by measuring the uterus size at different cross sections of the CT images. Dose calculation was performed with (PLATO-system) or without (NPS-system) transferring these data directly to the planning system. We report on the differences in treatment volumes resulting from the two application and planning systems. Results: The mean value of the uterus volume was 180 ccm (range 57 ccm to 316 ccm). Four out of 10 patients had an asymmetric uterus configuration with a side-difference (in longitudinal or transversal direction) of more than 1 cm. On average 70% (range 48-95%) of the uterus volume was included by the treatment volume when Heymann applicators were used compared to 45 % (range 25-89%) when standard one channel applicators were used. This represents an improvement of 25% (range from 11%-35%). By utilizing the more sophisticated way of treatment planning a more adequate coverage of the uterus volume was achieved in five out of ten patients. The treated volume increased on the average by 20 % (range 11 %-32%). In three cases changes in the irradiation volume were less than 5%. In

  2. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm 3 NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR 192 Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility ( 2 =1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for 192 Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2±0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0±0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments

  3. Implementation of three-dimensional planning in brachytherapy of high dose rate for gynecology therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Camila Pessoa de

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to implement the three-dimensional (3D) planning for gynecological brachytherapy treatments. For this purpose, tests of acceptance and commissioning of brachytherapy equipment were performed to establish a quality and periodic assurance program. For this purpose, an important step was searching for a material to be used as a dummy source, since the applicators do not have any specific dummy. In addition, the validation of the use of applicators library was made for reconstruction in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to validate 3D planning, comparison of doses in dose assessment points used in bidimensional (2D) plans have been performed with volumetric doses to adjacent organs to the tumor. Finally, a protocol was established for 3D brachytherapy planning alternately using magnetic resonance image (MRI) and CT images, making evaluation of the dose in the tumor through the recording of MR and CT images. It was not possible to find a suitable material that could be used as dummy in MRI. However, the acquisition of the license's library for the applicators made possible the 3D planning based on MRI. No correlation was found between volumetric and specific doses analyzed, showing the importance of the implementation of 3D planning. The average ratio between D 2cc and ICRU Bladder dose was 1,74, 22% higher than the ratio found by others authors. For the rectum, D 2cc was less than dose point for 60% of fractions; the average difference was 12,5%. The average ratio between D 2cc and point dose rectum, 0,85, is equivalent to the value showed by Kim et al, 0,91. The D 2cc for sigmoid was 69% higher than point dose used, unless it was not possible compare this value, since the sigmoid point used in the 2D procedures is not used in others institutes. Relative dose in 2 cc of sigmoid was 57% of the prescription dose, the same value was found by in literature. This work enabled the implementation of a viable

  4. Importance of the neutrons kerma coefficient in the planning of Brachytherapy treatments with Cf-252 sources; Importancia del coeficiente de kerma de neutrones en la planeacion de tratamientos de Braquiterapia con fuentes de Cf-252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyocac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, 09000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [UNAM, 04500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: lpg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Cf-252 is a fast neutrons emitting radioisotope by spontaneous fission that can be used as sealed source in medicine applications, industry and research. Commercially its offer sources of different sizes, compact and with a fast neutrons emission of the order of 10{sup 6} n/s-{mu}g and an energy spectra that presents respectively maxim and average energy in 2.1 MeV and 0.7 MeV. In medicine new applications are being developed for the treatment of patient with hypoxic and voluminous tumors, where the therapy with photons has not given positive results, as well as for the protocols of therapy treatment by boron neutron capture, where very small sources of Cf-252 will be used with the interstitial brachytherapy technique of high and low dose rate. In this work an analysis of how the small differences that exist in the elementary composition of 4 wicked tumors, 4 ICRU healthy tissues and 3 substitute materials of ICRU tissue used in dosimetry are presented, its generate changes in the neutrons kerma coefficient in function of the energy and consequently in the absorbed dose in the interval of 11 eV to 29 MeV. These differences can produce maximum variations of the neutron kerma coefficients ratio for E{sub n} > 1 keV of the one: 15% tumor/ICRU guest healthy tissue, 12% ICRU tumor/muscle, 12% ICRU healthy tissues ICRU/ICRU muscle, 22% substitutes tissue/tumor and 22% ICRU substitutes tissue/muscle. Also, it was found that the average value of the neutrons kerma coefficient for the 4 wicked tumors is from 6% to 7% smaller that the average value for the soft tissue in the interval energy of interest for therapy with fast neutrons with E{sub n} > 1 MeV. These results have a special importance during the planning process of brachytherapy treatments with sources of {sup 252}Cf, to optimize and to individualize the patients treatments. (Author)

  5. [New calculation algorithms in brachytherapy for iridium 192 treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, C; Dumas, I; Martinetti, F; Chargari, C; Haie-Meder, C; Lefkopoulos, D

    2018-05-18

    Since 1995, the brachytherapy dosimetry protocols follow the methodology recommended by the Task Group 43. This methodology, which has the advantage of being fast, is based on several approximations that are not always valid in clinical conditions. Model-based dose calculation algorithms have recently emerged in treatment planning stations and are considered as a major evolution by allowing for consideration of the patient's finite dimensions, tissue heterogeneities and the presence of high atomic number materials in applicators. In 2012, a report from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Task Group 186 reviews these models and makes recommendations for their clinical implementation. This review focuses on the use of model-based dose calculation algorithms in the context of iridium 192 treatments. After a description of these algorithms and their clinical implementation, a summary of the main questions raised by these new methods is performed. Considerations regarding the choice of the medium used for the dose specification and the recommended methodology for assigning materials characteristics are especially described. In the last part, recent concrete examples from the literature illustrate the capabilities of these new algorithms on clinical cases. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  7. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula; Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Belinato, Walmir

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a 192 Ir and a 125 I radioactive sources. The 192 Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The 125 I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of 125 I and one of 192 Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the 192 Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the 125 I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  8. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, IPENCNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a {sup 192}Ir and a {sup 125}I radioactive sources. The {sup 192}Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The {sup 125}I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of {sup 125}I and one of {sup 192}Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the {sup 192}Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the {sup 125}I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  9. Interactive, multi-modality image registrations for combined MRI/MRSI-planned HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Reed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the steps and criteria involved in the series of image registrations used clinically during the planning and dose delivery of focal high dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy of the prostate. Material and methods: Three imaging modalities – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI, and Computed Tomography (CT – were used at different steps during the process. MRSI is used for identification of dominant intraprosatic lesions (DIL. A series of rigid and nonrigid transformations were applied to the data to correct for endorectal-coil-induced deformations and for alignment with the planning CT. Mutual information was calculated as a morphing metric. An inverse planning optimization algorithm was applied to boost dose to the DIL while providing protection to the urethra, penile bulb, rectum, and bladder. Six prostate cancer patients were treated using this protocol. Results: The morphing algorithm successfully modeled the probe-induced prostatic distortion. Mutual information calculated between the morphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe showed a significant (p = 0.0071 increase to that calculated between the unmorphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe. Both mutual information and visual inspection serve as effective diagnostics of image morphing. The entire procedure adds less than thirty minutes to the treatment planning. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the utility of image transformations and registrations to HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

  10. SU-F-T-55: Reproducibility of Interstitial HDR Brachytherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Ellis, R; Traughber, B; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating gynecological cancers with interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires precise reconstruction of catheter positions to obtain accurate dosimetric plans. In this study, we investigated the degree of reproducibility of dosimetric plans for Syed HDR brachytherapy. Methods: We randomly selected five patients having cervix-vaginal cancer who were recently treated in our clinic with interstitial HDR brachytherapy with a prescription dose of 25–30 Gy in five fractions. Interstitial needles/catheters were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and intra-operative 3T MRI scan was performed to confirm the desired catheter placement for adequate target volume coverage. A CT scan was performed and fused with the MRI for delineating high-risk CTV (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR-CTV) and OARs. HDR treatment plans were generated using Oncentra planning software. A single plan was used for all five fractions of treatment for each patient. For this study, we took the original clinical plan and removed all the reconstructed catheters from the plan keeping the original contours unchanged. Then, we manually reconstructed all the catheters and entered the same dwell time from the first original clinical plan. The dosimetric parameters studied were: D90 for HR-CTV and IR-CV, and D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid and bowel. Results: The mean of absolute differences in dosimetric coverage (D90) were (range): 1.3% (1.0–2.0%) and 2.0% (0.9–3.6%) for HR-CTV and IR-CTV, respectively. In case of OARs, the mean of absolute variations in D2cc were (range): 4.7% (0.7–8.9%) for bladder, 1.60% (0.3–3.2%) for rectum, 1.6% (0–3.9%) for sigmoid, and 1.8% (0–5.1%) for bowel. Conclusion: Overall, the reproducibility of interstitial HDR plans was within clinically acceptable limit. Observed maximum variation in D2cc for bladder. If number of catchers and dwell points were relatively low or any one catheter was heavily loaded, then reproducibility of the plan

  11. Novel use of ViewRay MRI guidance for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Huaising C; Huang, Jessie Y; Miller, Jessica R; Das, Rupak K; Wallace, Charles R; De Costa, Anna-Maria A; Francis, David M; Straub, Margaret R; Anderson, Bethany M; Bradley, Kristin A

    To characterize image quality and feasibility of using ViewRay MRI (VR)-guided brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Cervical cancer patients receiving intracavitary brachytherapy with tandem and ovoids, planned using 0.35T VR MRI at our institution, were included in this series. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), visible gross tumor volume, bladder, sigmoid, bowel, and rectum contours for each fraction of brachytherapy were evaluated for dosimetric parameters. Typically, five brachytherapy treatments were planned using the T2 sequence on diagnostic MRI for the first and third fractions, and a noncontrast true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence on VR or CT scan for the remaining fractions. Most patients received 5.5 Gy × 5 fractions using high-dose-rate Ir-192 following 45 Gy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy. The plan was initiated at 5.5 Gy to point A and subsequently optimized and prescribed to the HR-CTV. The goal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for the combined external beam and brachytherapy dose was 85 Gy. Soft-tissue visualization using contrast-to-noise ratios to distinguish normal tissues from tumor at their interface was compared between diagnostic MRI, CT, and VR. One hundred and forty-two fractions of intracavitary brachytherapy were performed from April 2015 to January 2017 on 29 cervical cancer patients, ranging from stages IB1 to IVA. The median HR-CTV was 27.78 cc, with median D 90 HR-CTV of 6.1 Gy. The median time from instrument placement to start of treatment using VR was 65 min (scan time 2 min), compared to 105 min using diagnostic MRI (scan time 11 min) (t-test, p < 0.01). The contrast-to-noise ratio of tumor to cervix in both diagnostic MRI and VR had significantly higher values compared to CT (ANOVA and t-tests, p < 0.01). We report the first clinical use of VR-guided brachytherapy. Time to treatment using this approach was shorter compared to diagnostic MRI. VR also provided significant

  12. A study on a comparative analysis of 2D and 3D planning using CT simulator for transbronchial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Dong Rin; Kim, Dae Sup; Back, Geum Mun

    2013-01-01

    Transbronchial brachytherapy used in the two-dimensional treatment planning difficult to identify the location of the tumor in the affected area to determine the process analysis. In this study, we have done a comparative analysis for the patient's treatment planning using a CT simulator. The analysis was performed by the patients who visited the hospital to June 2012. The patient carried out CT-image by CT simulator, and we were plan to compare with a two-dimensional and three dimensional treatment planning using a Oncentra Brachy planning system (Nucletron, Netherlands). The location of the catheter was confirmed the each time on a treatment planning for fractionated transbronchial brachytherapy. GTV volumes were 3.5 cm 3 and 3.3 cm 3 . Also easy to determine the dose distribution of the tumor, the errors of a dose delivery were confirmed dose distribution of the prescribed dose for GTV. In the first treatment was 92% and the second was 88%. In order to compensate for the problem through a two-dimensional treatment planning, it is necessary to be tested process for the accurate identification and analysis of the treatment volume and dose distribution. Quantitatively determine the dose delivery error process that is reflected to the treatment planning is required

  13. A study on a comparative analysis of 2D and 3D planning using CT simulator for transbronchial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong Rin; Kim, Dae Sup; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Transbronchial brachytherapy used in the two-dimensional treatment planning difficult to identify the location of the tumor in the affected area to determine the process analysis. In this study, we have done a comparative analysis for the patient's treatment planning using a CT simulator. The analysis was performed by the patients who visited the hospital to June 2012. The patient carried out CT-image by CT simulator, and we were plan to compare with a two-dimensional and three dimensional treatment planning using a Oncentra Brachy planning system (Nucletron, Netherlands). The location of the catheter was confirmed the each time on a treatment planning for fractionated transbronchial brachytherapy. GTV volumes were 3.5 cm{sup 3} and 3.3 cm{sup 3}. Also easy to determine the dose distribution of the tumor, the errors of a dose delivery were confirmed dose distribution of the prescribed dose for GTV. In the first treatment was 92% and the second was 88%. In order to compensate for the problem through a two-dimensional treatment planning, it is necessary to be tested process for the accurate identification and analysis of the treatment volume and dose distribution. Quantitatively determine the dose delivery error process that is reflected to the treatment planning is required.

  14. Evaluation of radiation doses on critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Taciana; Jansem, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one type of treatment of the cervix carcinoma. During the planning for this therapy, especial attention is given to proximal normal organs such as bladder and rectum. In fact, due to their radiosensibility and localization, bladder and rectum are considered as critical organs. In this work we have studied the influence of the positioning of patient legs in the dose delivered to these critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy. (author)

  15. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  16. MRI-assisted versus conventional treatment planning in brachytherapy of cervical and endometrial carcinoma: The impact of individual anatomy on dose distribution in target volume and organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, Joern; Sauer, Otto A.; Herbolsheimer, Michael; Oppitz, Ulrich; Flentje, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Dose prescription and definition of target volume in brachytherapy of cervical and endometrial cancer are calculated to standard points as Manchester point A or point My(ometrium) in most centers. Calculation of doses to organs at risk mainly relies on ICRU-report 38. But standard dose prescription neglects individual patient anatomy. While MRI and CT had widespread impact on individual planning in external beam radiotherapy, there is still a minor influence on brachytherapy. The impact of individual anatomy on dose distribution in target volume and organs at risk demonstrates the objective of individual brachytherapy planning. Materials and Methods: 8 patients with cervical and 4 patients with endometrial carcinoma underwent MRI of the pelvis with in-situ applicators (ring-tandem applicators for cervical carcinoma and modified Heyman-capsules for endometrial carcinoma). T1w slices were angulated coronal and sagittal to get rectangular reproductions to applicator axis. Orthogonal or isocentric X-ray films for conventional treatment planning were done. MRI-information on target and organs at risk was transformed into coordinates relative to applicator axis and dose calculation on the database of conventional treatment planning was performed by Nucletron Planning System PLATO. Isodoses were projected into MRI slices. Prescribed dose to patients with cervical cancer was 8.5 Gy to point A resp. 10 Gy to point My (2cm below fundal myometrium and 2cm lateral applicator axis) in endometrial cancer. Results: Dose prescription to Manchester point A or point My represented in only 50% of cases uterine serosa. Instead of 2cm lateral of applicator axis, uterine surface ranged from 1.0 cm to 3.9 cm at the level of point A (mean 2.25 cm coronal and 1.77 cm sagittal) and from 1.5 cm to 4.4 cm at the level of point My (mean 2.7 cm coronal and 2.1 cm sagittal). Uterine volume ranged from 69 cc to 277 cc, mean volume was 150cc. Dose-volume histograms of patients with

  17. Underuse of brachytherapy for the treatment of dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer. An Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Guido, Alessandra; Hassan, Cesare; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Arcelli, Alessandra; Farioli, Andrea; Giaccherini, Lucia; Galuppi, Andrea; Mandolesi, Daniele; Cellini, Francesco; Mantello, Giovanna; Macchia, Gabriella; de Bortoli, Nicola; Repici, Alessandro; Valentini, Vincenzo; Bazzoli, Franco; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    International guidelines strongly recommend brachytherapy as valid alternative or in addition to stenting in patients with dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer. However, for not well understood reasons, brachytherapy is definitively underused for the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia. Aim of the current survey was to investigate the use of brachytherapy for the treatment of malignant dysphagia in Italy. A structured questionnaire was submitted to the 1510 members of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncologists (AIRO). These members refer to 177 centres of radiotherapy across Italy and in 68 (38.4%) of them brachytherapy is routinely performed. Of the 1510 invited members, 178 completed the survey (11.7%). The answers provided by the 178 participants allowed to get information on 40 out of 68 brachytherapy centres (58.8%). Seven out of 40 (17.5%) centres perform brachytherapy of the oesophagus, in 3 out of 40 (7.5%) centres brachytherapy represents the first line of treatment. The main reason why brachytherapy is not routinely performed is the lack of experience. Despite the strong recommendations of the international guidelines and the wide diffusion of brachytherapy centres across Italy, only very few of them routinely considered brachytherapy for the treatment of dysphagia due to esophageal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, Michael G; Ohanessian, Lucy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Patel, Virendra; Holloway, Lois C

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy

  19. Brachytherapy for treatment of cervix cancer in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignon, T.; Ratovonarivo, H.; Rafaramino, F.; Ruggieri, S.

    1993-01-01

    From March 1986 to June 1988, 60 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated by radiotherapy alone or combined radiotherapy and surgery at the only radiotherapy-oncology department of Madagascar in Antananarivo. There were 20 stage IB, 28 stage II, 5 stage III and 7 cases where initial stage before surgery was unknown. After a limited pre-therapeutic investigation, treatment for stage IB consisted of utero-vaginal brachytherapy followed by a colpo-hysterectomy and external iliac lymphadenectomy. Others received combined external radiotherapy and brachytherapy according to the Fletcher guidelines, although 30 patients also received surgery. An obsolete and inefficient cobalt unit with lack of computerized dosimetry made the management of therapeutic schemas difficult. Nineteen patients (31.6%) were not available for follow-up immediately after the end of the treatment and one patient died from intestinal occlusion during brachytherapy. The overall rate of severe complications was 4.8%. There were 12 recurrences which occurred in stage II or in patients with unknown initial staging. At the time of analysis, 25 patients were alive: 15 stage I and 10 stage II. In this country, cervical carcinomas are the most frequent tumors: only the rehabilitation of radiotherapy facilities will allow results to be improved

  20. Treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas of children through brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeia, F.T.; Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Pereira, A.J.; Peres, O.; Camargo, B.; Bianchi, A.

    1988-01-01

    Twelve children were treated from January 1979 to June 1986 and the age range was three months to 14 years. Ten patients had implanted sources in the tumour tissue and two had a surface radioactive applicator. Eleven children had local control of disease, four with long term survival (longer than 50 months), good cosmetic and functional results and seven with shorter follow-up (minimal 17 months). Only one local relapse occurred in the irradiated area, five months after treatment. Brachytherapy may be an useful modality of treatment in pediatric oncology making possible the reduction of external therapy dose, minimizing the late effects of treatment, with better survival. (author)

  1. [Technique of intraoperative planning in prostatic brachytherapy with permanent implants of 125I or 103Pd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Gómez, Pedro José; Juan Rijo, Germán; Hevia Suarez, Miguel; Abascal García, José María; Abascal García, Ramón

    2002-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent 125I or 123Pd seeds implantation is a therapeutic option for organ-confined prostate cancer. We analyze the technique based on previous planning, our current intraoperative planning procedure and the reasons that moved us to introduce this change. Changes in prostate volume and spatial localization observed between previous planning and intraoperative images, and possible difficulties for seed implantation due to pubic arch interference are some of the reasons that induce us to change technique. Before the operation, we calculate the prostatic volume by transrectal ultrasound; with this information we determine the total implant activity following Wu's nomogram, and per-seed activity; therefore, it is an individual process for each patient. We perform a peripheral implant, placing 75-80% of the seeds within the peripheral prostatic zone, generally through 12-15 needles, the rest of the seeds are placed in the central prostatic zone using a maximum of 3-4 needles in high volume prostates. The day of intervention, after positioning and catheter insertion, volumetry is re-checked. Ultrasound images (from base to apex every 5 mm) are transferred to the planner were a suitable seed distribution is determined. Implantation is then performed placing all needles unloaded, and then intraoperative post-planning to allow us to check implant precision is performed after cistoscopically check that there is no urethral or bladder penetration by any needle. We finish with the insertion of seeds into the prostate. Total time for the procedure is around 90 minutes. Intraoperative planning is an additional step for the treatment of prostate cancer with permanent seeds brachytherapy, which avoids the disadvantages of previous planning and improves tumor inclusion in the ideal irradiation dose area, which will translate into better local disease control.

  2. Ultrasound-guided interstitial brachytherapy in the treatment of advanced vaginal recurrences from cervical and endometrial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitmann, H.D.; Knocke, T.H.; Waldhaeusl, C.; Poetter, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-01

    Background: in advanced vaginal recurrences of cervical and endometrial carcinomas therapeutic options are rare because of preceding therapy. Patients and methods: 23 patients developing advanced vaginal recurrences of cervical and endometrial carcinomas were included. 15 patients started with external-beam therapy to the pelvis and eight patients after preceding radiotherapy underwent brachytherapy alone. All patients had ultrasound-guided implantation of transvaginal or transperineal interstitial needles for brachytherapy. Median prescribed total dose was 64 Gy. Results: 18 patients (78%) achieved complete remission. Six patients are alive without tumor and one with tumor after a median follow-up of 64 months. 14 patients died of tumor and two of intercurrent disease. 5-year disease-specific survival and local control rate were 43% and 47%, respectively, in patients with complete remission. Univariate analysis found time to relapse > 2 years, initial diameter {<=} 4 cm, initial volume < 15 cm{sup 3}, no extension to the pelvic side wall, volume before brachytherapy < 7.5 cm{sup 3}, brachytherapy coverage index > 0.8, and prescribed total dose > 64 Gy being positive predictors for local control and survival. Conclusion: the use of ultrasound guidance for placement of interstitial needles in template-based brachytherapy of advanced recurrent gynecologic malignancies is a feasible, safe, and cheap method with encouraging results. Today, ultrasound imaging can be also used to some extent for treatment planning which requires further development. Patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors can be defined. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of CT- and radiograph-based post-implant dosimetry for transperineal 125I prostate brachytherapy using single seeds and a commercial treatment-planning software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, F.A.; Kohr, P.; Kovacs, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: the objective of this investigation was a direct comparison of the dosimetry of CT-based and radiograph-based postplanning procedures for seed implants. Patients and methods: CT- and radiograph-based postplans were carried out for eight iodine-125 ( 125 I) seed implant patients with a commercial treatment-planning system (TPS). To assess a direct comparison of the dosimetric indices (D90, V100, V400), the radiograph-based seed coordinates were transformed to the coordinate system of the CT postplan. Afterwards, the CT-based seed positions were replaced by the radiograph-based coordinates in the TPS and the dose distribution was recalculated. Results: the computations demonstrated that the radiograph-based dosimetric values for the prostate (D p 90, V p 100, and V p 400) were on average lower than the values of the CT postplan. Normalized to the CT postplan the following mean values were found: D p 90: 90.6% (standard deviation [SD]: 9.0%), V p 100: 86.1% (SD: 14.7%), and V p 400: 79.4% (SD: 14.4%). For three out of the eight patients the D p 90 decreased to 90% of the initial CT postplan values. The reason for this dosimetric difference is supposed to be evoked by an error of the reconstruction software used. It was detected that the TPS algorithm assigned some sources to wrong coordinates, partly out of the prostate gland. Conclusion: the radiograph-based postplanning technique of the investigated TPS should only be used in combination with CT postplanning. Furthermore, complex testing procedures of reconstruction algorithms are recommended to minimize calculation errors. (orig.)

  4. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): Concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Limbergen, Erik van; Barillot, Isabelle; Brabandere, Marisol De; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    . Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO Working Group (I): concepts and terms in 3D image-based 3D treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy with emphasis on MRI assessment of GTV and CTV. Radiother Oncol 2005;74:235-245]). It is expected that the therapeutic ratio including target coverage and sparing of organs at risk can be significantly improved, if radiation dose is prescribed to a 3D image-based CTV taking into account dose volume constraints for OAR. However, prospective use of these recommendations in the clinical context is warranted, to further explore and develop the potential of 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy

  5. I-125 ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: validation of a commercial 3D ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent dose calculation software with GafChromic® EBT3 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Corde, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions for different Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaques loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds using GafChromic(®) EBT3 films, in order to verify the dose distributions in the Plaque Simulator™ (PS) ophthalmic 3D treatment planning system. The brachytherapy module of RADCALC(®) was used to independently check the dose distributions calculated by PS. Correction factors were derived from the measured data to be used in PS to account for the effect of the stainless steel ROPES plaque backing on the 3D dose distribution. Using GafChromic(®) EBT3 films inserted in a specially designed Solid Water™ eye ball phantom, dose distributions were measured three-dimensionally both along and perpendicular to I-125 (model 6711) loaded ROPES eye plaque's central axis (CAX) with 2 mm depth increments. Each measurement was performed in full scatter conditions both with and without the stainless steel plaque backing attached to the eye plaque, to assess its effect on the dose distributions. Results were compared to the dose distributions calculated by Plaque Simulator™ and checked independently with RADCALC(®). The EBT3 film measurements without the stainless steel backing were found to agree with PS and RADCALC(®) to within 2% and 4%, respectively, on the plaque CAX. Also, RADCALC(®) was found to agree with PS to within 2%. The CAX depth doses measured using EBT3 film with the stainless steel backing were observed to result in a 4% decrease relative to when the backing was not present. Within experimental uncertainty, the 4% decrease was found to be constant with depth and independent of plaque size. Using a constant dose correction factor of T = 0.96 in PS, where the calculated dose for the full water scattering medium is reduced by 4% in every voxel in the dose grid, the effect of the plaque backing was accurately modeled in the planning system. Off-axis profiles

  6. I-125 ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: Validation of a commercial 3D ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent dose calculation software with GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poder, Joel; Corde, Stéphanie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions for different Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaques loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds using GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films, in order to verify the dose distributions in the Plaque Simulator™ (PS) ophthalmic 3D treatment planning system. The brachytherapy module of RADCALC{sup ®} was used to independently check the dose distributions calculated by PS. Correction factors were derived from the measured data to be used in PS to account for the effect of the stainless steel ROPES plaque backing on the 3D dose distribution.Methods: Using GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films inserted in a specially designed Solid Water™ eye ball phantom, dose distributions were measured three-dimensionally both along and perpendicular to I-125 (model 6711) loaded ROPES eye plaque's central axis (CAX) with 2 mm depth increments. Each measurement was performed in full scatter conditions both with and without the stainless steel plaque backing attached to the eye plaque, to assess its effect on the dose distributions. Results were compared to the dose distributions calculated by Plaque Simulator™ and checked independently with RADCALC{sup ®}.Results: The EBT3 film measurements without the stainless steel backing were found to agree with PS and RADCALC{sup ®} to within 2% and 4%, respectively, on the plaque CAX. Also, RADCALC{sup ®} was found to agree with PS to within 2%. The CAX depth doses measured using EBT3 film with the stainless steel backing were observed to result in a 4% decrease relative to when the backing was not present. Within experimental uncertainty, the 4% decrease was found to be constant with depth and independent of plaque size. Using a constant dose correction factor of T= 0.96 in PS, where the calculated dose for the full water scattering medium is reduced by 4% in every voxel in the dose grid, the effect of the plaque backing was

  7. Is there any advantage of CT based 3-dimensional conformal planning over conventional orthogonal x-ray based planning in HDR brachytherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Idris, N.R.; Zakaria, A.B.; Khairul, N.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional brachytherapy dose calculation is based on a particular brachytherapy rule or individual dosimetry based on the reconstruction of the sources from the orthogonal films. In the recent years many centers are using CT based 3D conformal brachytherapy in order to improve the dosimetric outcome of a given plan. Here we would like to present our experience on the use of both techniques to deliver HDR interstitial brachytherapy as boost in early breast cancer. From January 2001 to January 2003, we treated 4 breast cancer patients using conventional orthogonal x-rays and CT scan in 3 cases for the treatment plan. All patients received an external beam radiotherapy dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions over 4.5 weeks to the whole breast using 6 MV photon beam. Subsequently the primary lesion was supplimented with HDR brachytherapy to a dose of 2.5 Gy BID for 3 consecutive days using a (192)Ir microSelectronHDR. The dose prescription was individualized to encompass the tumor volume with a 10 mm margin. The differences of the dosimetric outcome were compared. All patients completed above schedule of radiotherapy. The primary was implanted with single plane in 3 patients and multiplane implant in 4 patients. Orthogonal x-ray based localization was performed in 4 patients and CT scan based localization in 3 cases. Three patients were implanted single plane and 4 patients with multiplane implants with a median catheter number of 9 (range 6-14). The 3D conformal dose optimization was performed using Nucletron planning system (Plato). The mean 100% and 150% isodose volume was 67.3 cm 3 and 31.25cm 3 respectively. The identification of primary tumor volume, organ at risk, and identification of afterloading catheters were superior in CT based plan than conventional planning. CT scan based 3D conformal brachytherapy planning give better identification of tumor volume and its curvature, decrease the time to identify the sources and evaluate the radiation dose to organs at

  8. Treatment of localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy: six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Pablo; Dourado, Leandro; Giudice, Carlos; Villamil, Wenceslao; Palacios, Victor; Sardi, Mabel; Damia, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    The usage of ultrasound scan to perform prostate biopsy punctures, the new radiation therapies and the more accurate selection of patients has allowed brachytherapy to play an important role in the treatment of the localized pathology. The objective of this paper is to review the results obtained when treating the localized prostate cancer by using brachytherapy with mud 125. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and July 2006, 100 prostate cancer patients were treated at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, using brachytherapy with mud 125. One of the patients was treated with a combined therapy (brachytherapy + external radiotherapy). For that reason, the patient was not taken into consideration for this paper. The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The tumoral stages were T1c in 81% of the patients and T2a in 19% of them. The PSA was always below 15 ng/ml, with an average of 8.92 ng/ml; inferior to 10 ng/ml in 72 patients and between 10 and 15 ng/m ml in 28 of them. The average prostate volume was 34.68 c.c. (18.70 c.c.-58.00 c.c.). The combined Gleason score was below 6 (except for three patients with Gleason 7 who had a PSA below 10, stage T1c). The dose used was 16,000 cGy as recommended by the TG43. The energy charge of each seed was between 0.28 and 0.40 mci. Thirty days later, a prostate axial computer tomography was carried out every 3 mm. with a scanning set every 5 mm. to perform a dosimetric control of the implant. Results: The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The control computer tomography showed an adequate dosimetric coverage for the entire prostate volume, with a maximum urethral dose not above 400 Gy and a maximum rectal dose below 100 Gy. The PSA of all patients decreased to a normal level 6 months after the treatment started. The average follow-up of the 71 patients able to be tested from an oncological perspective lasted 31.15 months, with a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 72 months. Currently, seven patients of those tested (9.86%) manifest

  9. Brachytherapy as sole treatment modality in initial cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia Z, A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate brachytherapy as the only treatment modality in inoperable early cervix carcinoma patients (carcinoma in situ, IA and IBocc). In a retrospective analysis 36 patients were treated with intracavitary irradiation between 1984 and 1988 in the Radiotherapy Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases. Distribution by stage was; carcinoma in situ: one patient (2,47%), IA: six patients (16,6%), IBooc: twenty-nine patients (80,7%). Histology revealed epidermoid carcinoma in all cases. Mean age 55 years (range: 32-78). Treatment consisted in: two intracavitary applications of Radium, for 120 hours each, with a month interval, in 30 patients (carcinoma in situ: one, IA: four, IBocc: twenty-five patients), two applications of 72 hours each, with 15 days interval in four patients (IA: one, IBocc: 3) and one single intracavitary radium application in two patients (IA and IBocc). Local control was complete in all carcinoma in situ and IA patients. Only 1 of 29 patients with IBocc stage failed to respond, in spite of having received two applications, this shows that local response is independent of the number of insertions. Incidence of complications was low, and resolved with medical treatment. One patient had rectal adenocarcinoma 3 years after treatment -it was considered as radio induced neoplasm, since time of appearance was more than two years and localization was within irradiated area. Two patients died form intercurrent diseases, one (IBocc) from persistent diseases. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Three years survival was: 100% for carcinoma in situ and IA 86,2% for IBocc. Five years survival was 80% for IA and IBocc. Brachytherapy as unique modality of treatment is highly effective in initial cervix carcinoma stages. (author). 41 refs., 14 tabs., 2 figs., 1 ill

  10. SU-F-T-48: Clinical Implementation of Brachytherapy Planning System for COMS Eye Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C; Islam, M; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To commission the Brachytherapy Planning (BP) system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) for the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaques by evaluating dose differences against original plans from Nucletron Planning System (NPS). Methods: NPS system is the primary planning software for COMS-plaques at our facility; however, Brachytherapy Planning 11.0.47 (Varian Medical Systems) is used for secondary check and for seed placement configurations not originally commissioned. Dose comparisons of BP and NPS plans were performed for prescription of 8500 cGy at 5 mm depth and doses to normal structures: opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk and lens. Plans were calculated for Iodine-125 seeds (OncoSeeds, Model 6711) using COMS-plaques of 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 mm diameters. An in-house program based on inverse-square was utilized to calculate point doses for comparison as well. Results: The highest dose difference between BP and NPS was 3.7% for the prescription point for all plaques. Doses for BP were higher than doses reported by NPS for all points. The largest percent differences for apex, opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk, and lens were 3.2%, 0.9%, 13.5%, 20.5%, 15.7% and 2.2%, respectively. The dose calculated by the in-house program was 1.3% higher at the prescription point, and were as high as 42.1%, for points away from the plaque (i.e. opposite retina) when compared to NPS. Conclusion: Doses to the tumor, lens, retina, and optic nerve are paramount for a successful treatment and vision preservation. Both systems are based on TG-43 calculations and assume water medium tissue homogeneity (ρe=1, water medium). Variations seen may result from the different task group versions and/or mathematical algorithms of the software. BP was commissioned to serve as a backup system and it also enables dose calculation in cases where seeds don’t follow conventional placement configuration.

  11. SU-F-T-48: Clinical Implementation of Brachytherapy Planning System for COMS Eye Plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C; Islam, M; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To commission the Brachytherapy Planning (BP) system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) for the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaques by evaluating dose differences against original plans from Nucletron Planning System (NPS). Methods: NPS system is the primary planning software for COMS-plaques at our facility; however, Brachytherapy Planning 11.0.47 (Varian Medical Systems) is used for secondary check and for seed placement configurations not originally commissioned. Dose comparisons of BP and NPS plans were performed for prescription of 8500 cGy at 5 mm depth and doses to normal structures: opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk and lens. Plans were calculated for Iodine-125 seeds (OncoSeeds, Model 6711) using COMS-plaques of 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 mm diameters. An in-house program based on inverse-square was utilized to calculate point doses for comparison as well. Results: The highest dose difference between BP and NPS was 3.7% for the prescription point for all plaques. Doses for BP were higher than doses reported by NPS for all points. The largest percent differences for apex, opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk, and lens were 3.2%, 0.9%, 13.5%, 20.5%, 15.7% and 2.2%, respectively. The dose calculated by the in-house program was 1.3% higher at the prescription point, and were as high as 42.1%, for points away from the plaque (i.e. opposite retina) when compared to NPS. Conclusion: Doses to the tumor, lens, retina, and optic nerve are paramount for a successful treatment and vision preservation. Both systems are based on TG-43 calculations and assume water medium tissue homogeneity (ρe=1, water medium). Variations seen may result from the different task group versions and/or mathematical algorithms of the software. BP was commissioned to serve as a backup system and it also enables dose calculation in cases where seeds don’t follow conventional placement configuration.

  12. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of base of tongue carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Major, T.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, F. [Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery, St. Rokus Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, E.; Kasler, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck, Maxillofacial and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2004-12-01

    Background and purpose: to date none of the studies examined the feasibility and efficacy of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the tongue base. Therefore the aim of this study was to contribute to this issue. Patients and methods: between 1992 and 2000 37 patients (mean age 55 years) with T1-4 and NO-3 carcinoma of the base of tongue were presented. Neck dissection was carried out in twelve cases (32%). 30 patients with advanced stage received brachytherapy boost after 50-66.5 Gy (mean, 60 Gy) locoregional external beam irradiation (EBI) and 7 patients with early stage (T1-2, NO) were managed locally with wide tumor excision and sole brachytherapy. 4 of them underwent neck dissection and the others were subjected to 50 Gy regional EBI. The mean dose of boost and sole brachytherapy was 18 Gy and 28 Gy, respectively. Results: the median follow-up time for surviving patients was 51 months. The 7 sole brachytherapy patients are living with no evidence of disease. For patients treated with EBI and brachytherapy boost, the 5-year actuarial rate of local, locoregional recurrence-free and overall survival was 60%, 52% and 46%, respectively. For all patients in univariate analysis larger tumor size (T4 vs. T1-3) was significant negative predictor of local (RR: 7.23) and locoregional control (RR: 3.87), but nodal involvement was not. Delayed soft tissue ulceration and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 4 (13%) EBI and brachytherapy treated patients. None of the sole brachytherapy patients experienced severe late radiation toxicity. Conclusion: EBI combined with interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost result in acceptable local tumor control with low incidence of late side effects in patients with advanced disease. Fractionated sole HDR brachytherapy following tumor excision is a feasible treatment option for patients with early stage cancer and gives excellent local results. (orig.)

  13. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new treatment option permitting dose distribution optimization in interstitial implants. It possesses the advantage of equipment simplification and radiation protection to the staff, compared to the manually afterloading technique. This study pre...

  14. Verification and optimization of HDR surface mould brachytherapy plans using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film: the ideal geometric case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolewski, Matthew; Haque, Mamoon

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Surface mould brachytherapy is used to treat superficial cancers due to conformal dose distributions and rapid dose fall-off with depth. In this work, we determine the effect of varying catheter number and prescription distance on dose distributions for surface mould plans using radiochromic film. Eight surface mould plans were generated using PLATO BPS (Version 14.3.2). Measurements were taken with Gafchromic EBT2 film over depths of 5-30 mm with an Ir-192 HDR source. Films were scanned using an Epson Expression 10000 XL flatbed scanner and analysed using RIT 113 software. The EBT2 films showed good agreement with an average difference of 2.8% compared to the planning system. The dose gradient in the interval ranging ±5 mm from the prescription point showed an 80% increase from the plan with maximum catheters (II) to the minimum (3). The size and extent of local dose maxima increased when fewer catheters were used. Increasing prescription distance decreased the dose gradient with a 20% reduction in dose occurring 4 mm superficially to the prescription point when prescription distance increased from 5 to 20 mm. Gafchromic EBT2 was used successfully to evaluate surface mould brachytherapy plans and is a useful tool for dose verification checks. High dose regions ne,u' to the catheter plane can be reduced by using a larger number of catheters and the prescription distance should be adjusted as a function of treatment depth varied by mould thickness.

  15. IPIP: A new approach to inverse planning for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing dosimetric indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean; Goldberg, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Many planning methods for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy require an iterative approach. A set of computational parameters are hypothesized that will give a dose plan that meets dosimetric criteria. A dose plan is computed using these parameters, and if any dosimetric criteria are not met, the process is iterated until a suitable dose plan is found. In this way, the dose distribution is controlled by abstract parameters. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing the dose distribution based on dosimetric criteria. Methods: The authors developed inverse planning by integer program (IPIP), an optimization model for computing HDR brachytherapy dose plans and a fast heuristic for it. They used their heuristic to compute dose plans for 20 anonymized prostate cancer image data sets from patients previously treated at their clinic database. Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to dosimetric criteria. Results: Dose plans computed from IPIP satisfied all given dosimetric criteria for the target and healthy tissue after a single iteration. The average target coverage was 95%. The average computation time for IPIP was 30.1 s on an Intel(R) Core TM 2 Duo CPU 1.67 GHz processor with 3 Gib RAM. Conclusions: IPIP is an HDR brachytherapy planning system that directly incorporates dosimetric criteria. The authors have demonstrated that IPIP has clinically acceptable performance for the prostate cases and dosimetric criteria used in this study, in both dosimetry and runtime. Further study is required to determine if IPIP performs well for a more general group of patients and dosimetric criteria, including other cancer sites such as GYN.

  16. SU-E-T-279: Realization of Three-Dimensional Conformal Dose Planning in Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z; Jiang, S; Yang, Z [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Bai, H; Zhang, X [Seeds biological Pharmacy Ltd, Tianjin (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Successful clinical treatment in prostate brachytherapy is largely dependent on the effectiveness of pre-surgery dose planning. Conventional dose planning method could hardly arrive at a satisfy result. In this abstract, a three-dimensional conformal localized dose planning method is put forward to ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of pre-implantation dose planning. Methods: Using Monte Carlo method, the pre-calculated 3-D dose map for single source is obtained. As for multiple seeds dose distribution, the maps are combined linearly to acquire the 3-D distribution. The 3-D dose distribution is exhibited in the form of isodose surface together with reconstructed 3-D organs group real-timely. Then it is possible to observe the dose exposure to target volume and normal tissues intuitively, thus achieving maximum dose irradiation to treatment target and minimum healthy tissues damage. In addition, the exfoliation display of different isodose surfaces can be realized applying multi-values contour extraction algorithm based on voxels. The needles could be displayed in the system by tracking the position of the implanted seeds in real time to conduct block research in optimizing insertion trajectory. Results: This study extends dose planning from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, realizing the three-dimensional conformal irradiation, which could eliminate the limitations of 2-D images and two-dimensional dose planning. A software platform is developed using VC++ and Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to perform dose planning. The 3-D model reconstruction time is within three seconds (on a Intel Core i5 PC). Block research could be conducted to avoid inaccurate insertion into sensitive organs or internal obstructions. Experiments on eight prostate cancer cases prove that this study could make the dose planning results more reasonable. Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal dose planning method could improve the rationality of dose planning by safely reducing

  17. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  18. The initial experience of electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar Ajay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of people are diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC worldwide each year. While surgical approaches are the standard treatment, some patients are appropriate candidates for radiation therapy for NMSC. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy using surface applicators has shown efficacy in the treatment of NMSC and shortens the radiation treatment schedule by using a condensed hypofractionated approach. An electronic brachytherapy (EBT system permits treatment of NMSC without the use of a radioactive isotope. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from patients treated from July 2009 through March 2010. Pre-treatment biopsy was performed to confirm a malignant cutaneous diagnosis. A CT scan was performed to assess lesion depth for treatment planning, and an appropriate size of surface applicator was selected to provide an acceptable margin. An HDR EBT system delivered a dose of 40.0 Gy in eight fractions twice weekly with 48 hours between fractions, prescribed to a depth of 3-7 mm. Treatment feasibility, acute safety, efficacy outcomes, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age 72.5 years with 44 cutaneous malignancies were treated. Of 44 lesions treated, 39 (89% were T1, 1 (2% Tis, 1 (2% T2, and 3 (7% lesions were recurrent. Lesion locations included the nose for 16 lesions (36.4%, ear 5 (11%, scalp 5 (11%, face 14 (32%, and an extremity for 4 (9%. Median follow-up was 4.1 months. No severe toxicities occurred. Cosmesis ratings were good to excellent for 100% of the lesions at follow-up. Conclusions The early outcomes of EBT for the treatment of NMSC appear to show acceptable acute safety and favorable cosmetic outcomes. Using a hypofractionated approach, EBT provides a convenient treatment schedule.

  19. Introduction of a hybrid treatment delivery system used for quality assurance in multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Karoline; Kreppner, Stephan; Lotter, Michael; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav; Bert, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    Multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy (iBT) is a treatment option for breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery. Typically, only a few additional quality interventions after the first irradiation have been introduced to ensure the planned treatment delivery. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to show the possibilities of an electromagnetic tracking (EMT) system integrated into the afterloader for quality assurance (QA) in high-dose rate (HDR) iBT of patients with breast cancer. The hybrid afterloader system equipped with an electromagnetic sensor was used for all phantom and patient measurements. Phantom measurements were conducted to estimate the quality of different evaluation schemes. After a coherent point drift registration of the EMT traces to the reconstructed catheters based on computed tomograms the dwell positions (DP) were defined. Different fitting and interpolation methods were analyzed for the reconstruction of DPs. All estimated DPs were compared to the DPs defined in treatment planning. Until now, the implant geometry of 20 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was acquired and explored. Regarding the reconstruction techniques, both fitting and interpolation were able to detect manually introduced shifts and swaps. Nonetheless, interpolation showed superior results (RMSE  =  1.27 mm), whereas fitting seemed to be more stable to distortion and motion. The EMT system proved to be beneficial for QA in brachytherapy and furthermore, clinical feasibility was proven.

  20. Teaching Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda

    1993-01-01

    Describes approach to teaching treatment planning that author has used successfully in both seminars and graduate courses. Clarifies nature and importance of systematic treatment planning, then describes context in which treatment planning seems more effectively taught, and concludes with step-by-step plan for teaching treatment planning.…

  1. Simultaneous treatment of tongue cancer with interstitial brachytherapy and bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarai, Jiro; Itagaki, Takatomo; Yamaguchi, Kouichi

    1983-01-01

    During a period of 5 years, from 1977 to 1982, twenty five patients with tongue cancer were treated by radium needle implantation and bleomycin at Yamagata University Hospital. In this paper, authors analysed seventeen patients followed over two years. All had biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. According to the TNM system (UICC, 1978), primary tumor was classified into 4 cases of T1, 8 cases of T2 and 5 cases of T3. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a high local control rate and reduce subsequent regional lymphnode metastasis. Our curative treatment method was simultaneous combination of 70 Gy of brachy-therapy and 40 mg of bleomycin. The results of this study were as follows: 1. A control rate in the primary lesion was 91% (10/11) in survivors having survived more than 2 years. 2. Radioosteonecrosis of mandible was found in 6% (1/17) and transient ulcer formation in the primary site was observed in 35% (6/17) of patients treated. However, all patients were cured by conservative treatment. 3. This treatment method did not reduce subsequent lymph node metastasis. (author)

  2. Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Daniel R.; Wallner, Kent; Ford, Eric; Mueller, Amy; Merrick, Gregory; Maki, Jeffrey; Sutlief, Steven; Butler, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90 o intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm (±2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm (±2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30

  3. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, D L; Yoo, S

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the gre...

  4. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  5. Postenucleation orbits in retinoblastoma: treatment with 125I brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Clare; Sealy, Ross; Hering, Egbert; Hough, Jan; Knowles, Ruth; Lecuona, Karin; Reddi, V. Bala

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Children with retinoblastoma that extends into or through the choroid, sclera, or optic nerve are at risk of developing orbital disease, as well as metastases. Previously, these enucleated orbits were treated with external beam radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy. 125 I brachytherapy for tumors in and around the eye was pioneered by Sealy in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1974. In 1983, he developed a technique to irradiate the contents of the orbit while limiting the dose to the bony orbit and eyelids. Methods and Materials: Six nylon tubes containing 125 I seeds were implanted through the eyelids around the periphery of the orbit. Each contained a metal gutter that screens the outer part of the seeds from the bony orbit. A seventh unscreened tube was placed in the center, and a metal disc with 125 I seeds on its posterior surface was secured beneath the eyelids. Between 1983 and 2000, 57 orbits were treated in 56 children with retinoblastoma. Thirty-six were treated prophylactically and 21, with tumor at the resection line of the nerve, extrascleral tumor, or metastases, were treated therapeutically. They received a median dose of 34 Gy in 70 h; 30 also received chemotherapy. Children with tumor at the resection line of the nerve also received treatment to the craniospinal axis. Results: The median follow-up of the 35 patients treated prophylactically was 35 months (range 0-187). Seven patients died, 6 of metastases, at a median of 10 months (range 4-29) after the implant. Eight of the 13 patients with microscopic extraocular tumor survived a median of 29 months (range 5-156). None of the 8 patients presenting with orbital tumor or metastases survived. No orbital recurrences developed in any of the patients. Cosmesis was considerably improved compared with previous forms of irradiation. Conclusion: Orbital brachytherapy is an effective method of irradiating the orbit to prevent recurrent tumor, the treatment time is short, and the cosmesis is much more

  6. Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy for High-Dose-Rate Treatment of Cervical Cancer. I: Theoretical Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dae Yup; Webster, Matthew J.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Choi, Dongju; Song, Bongyong; Devic, Slobodan; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that utilization of the direction-modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) concept can significantly improve treatment plan quality in the setting of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The new, MRI-compatible, tandem design has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm diameter, grooved along a nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod (ρ = 18.0 g/cm 3 ), enclosed in Delrin tubing (polyoxymethylene, ρ = 1.41 g/cm 3 ), with a total thickness of 6.4 mm. The Monte Carlo N-Particle code was used to calculate the anisotropic 192 Ir dose distributions. An in-house-developed inverse planning platform, geared with simulated annealing and constrained-gradient optimization algorithms, was used to replan 15 patient cases (total 75 plans) treated with a conventional tandem and ovoids (T and O) applicator. Prescription dose was 6 Gy. For replanning, we replaced the conventional tandem with that of the new DMBT tandem for optimization but left the ovoids in place and kept the dwell positions as originally planned. All DMBT plans were normalized to match the high-risk clinical target volume V100 coverage of the T and O plans. Results: In general there were marked improvements in plan quality for the DMBT plans. On average, D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were reduced by 0.59 ± 0.87 Gy (8.5% ± 28.7%), 0.48 ± 0.55 Gy (21.1% ± 27.2%), and 0.10 ± 0.38 Gy (40.6% ± 214.9%) among the 75 plans, with best single-plan reductions of 3.20 Gy (40.8%), 2.38 Gy (40.07%), and 1.26 Gy (27.5%), respectively. The high-risk clinical target volume D90 was similar, with 6.55 ± 0.96 Gy and 6.59 ± 1.06 Gy for T and O and DMBT, respectively. Conclusions: Application of the DMBT concept to cervical cancer allowed for improved organ at risk sparing while achieving similar target coverage on a sizeable patient population, as intended, by maximally utilizing the anatomic information contained in 3-dimensional imaging. A

  7. New inverse planning technology for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy: Description and evaluation within a clinical frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, Petra; Poetter, Richard; Baltas, Dimos; Karabis, Andreas; Fidarova, Elena; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new inverse planning technology based on the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimisation (HIPO) algorithm for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional manual optimisation as applied in recent clinical practice based on long-term intracavitary cervical cancer brachytherapy experience. Materials and methods: The clinically applied treatment plans of 10 tandem/ring (T/R) and 10 cases with additional needles (T/R + N) planned with PLATO v14.3 were included. Standard loading patterns were manually optimised to reach an optimal coverage with 7 Gy per fraction to the High Risk CTV and to fulfil dose constraints for organs at risk. For each of these patients an inverse plan was retrospectively created with Oncentra GYN v0.9.14. Anatomy based automatic source activation was based on the topography of target and organs. The HIPO algorithm included individual gradient and modification restrictions for the T/R and needle dwell times to preserve the spatial high-dose distribution as known from the long-term clinical experience in the standard cervical cancer brachytherapy and with manual planning. Results: HIPO could achieve a better target coverage (V100) for all T/R and 7 T/R + N patients. Changes in the shape of the overdose volume (V200/400) were limited. The D 2cc per fraction for bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon was on average lower by 0.2 Gy, 0.4 Gy, 0.2 Gy, respectively, for T/R patients and 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 0.3 Gy for T/R + N patients (a decrease from 4.5 to 4 Gy per fraction means a total dose reduction of 5 Gy EQD2 for a 4-fraction schedule). In general the dwell times in the additional needles were lower compared to manual planning. The sparing factors were always better for HIPO plans. Additionally, in 7 T/R and 7 T/R + N patients all three D 0.1cc , D 1cc and D 2cc for vagina wall were lower and a smaller area of vagina was covered by the reference dose in HIPO plans. Overall loading

  8. Clinical Outcomes of Computed Tomography–Based Volumetric Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Carmona, Ruben; McMurtrie, Riley M.; Einck, John; Mell, Loren K.; McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Harrison, Terry; Mundt, Arno J.; Yashar, Catheryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A report of clinical outcomes of a computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) technique for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical carcinoma diagnosed between 2007 and 2014 were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT. All patients underwent planning CT simulation at each implantation. A high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) encompassing any visible tumor and the entire cervix was contoured on the simulation CT. When available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at implantation to assist with tumor delineation. The prescription dose was prescribed to the HRCTV. Results: The median follow-up time was 17 months. Thirteen patients (17%) had an MRI done before brachytherapy, and 16 patients (21%) were treated without MRI guidance. The mean EBRT/IGBT sum 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) delivered to the 90% volume of the HRCTV was 86.3 Gy. The mean maximum EQD2s delivered to 2 cm 3 of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 67.5 Gy, 66.2 Gy, and 75.3 Gy, respectively. The 2-year cumulative incidences of local, locoregional, and distant failure were 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-14.8%), 15.1% (95% CI: 5.4%-29.4%), and 24.3% (95% CI: 12.1%-38.9%), respectively. The 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 75% (95% CI, 61%-91%) and 73% (95% CI, 60%-90%), respectively. Twenty-nine patients (38%) experienced grade ≥2 acute toxicity, with 5 cases of acute grade 3 toxicity and no grade ≥4 toxicities. One patient experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. No other late grade ≥3 events were observed. Conclusions: This is the largest report to date of CT/MRI-based IGBT for the treatment of cervical cancer. The results are promising, with excellent local control and acceptable

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Computed Tomography–Based Volumetric Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Daniel R., E-mail: drsimpson@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Carmona, Ruben; McMurtrie, Riley M.; Einck, John; Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Harrison, Terry [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mundt, Arno J.; Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A report of clinical outcomes of a computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) technique for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical carcinoma diagnosed between 2007 and 2014 were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT. All patients underwent planning CT simulation at each implantation. A high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) encompassing any visible tumor and the entire cervix was contoured on the simulation CT. When available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at implantation to assist with tumor delineation. The prescription dose was prescribed to the HRCTV. Results: The median follow-up time was 17 months. Thirteen patients (17%) had an MRI done before brachytherapy, and 16 patients (21%) were treated without MRI guidance. The mean EBRT/IGBT sum 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) delivered to the 90% volume of the HRCTV was 86.3 Gy. The mean maximum EQD2s delivered to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 67.5 Gy, 66.2 Gy, and 75.3 Gy, respectively. The 2-year cumulative incidences of local, locoregional, and distant failure were 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-14.8%), 15.1% (95% CI: 5.4%-29.4%), and 24.3% (95% CI: 12.1%-38.9%), respectively. The 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 75% (95% CI, 61%-91%) and 73% (95% CI, 60%-90%), respectively. Twenty-nine patients (38%) experienced grade ≥2 acute toxicity, with 5 cases of acute grade 3 toxicity and no grade ≥4 toxicities. One patient experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. No other late grade ≥3 events were observed. Conclusions: This is the largest report to date of CT/MRI-based IGBT for the treatment of cervical cancer. The results are promising, with excellent local control and acceptable

  10. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment; Braquiterapia no tratamento do rabdomiossarcoma da infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-07-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold{sup 198}, Cesium{sup 137} and Iridium{sup 192}. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  11. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  12. Brachytherapy for head and neck cancer. Treatment results and future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Ro-ichi; Miura, Masahiko; Ayukawa, Fumio; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Following the increasing desire of many patients to keep the form and function of speech and swallowing, interstitial brachytherapy has become the main treatment for head and neck cancer. In addition, aged and physically handicapped patients who are refused general anesthesia have come to be referred to our clinic to receive less invasive and curative treatment. In the field of brachytherapy for head and neck cancers, less complicated and more superior treatment results have been achieved following the introduction of spacers, computer dosimetry and so on. As a result of these efforts, treatment results have come to fulfill the desire of patients and their families. During the past 43 years from 1962 to 2005, we have treated over 2, 100 patients of head and neck cancer including 850 with stage I·II oral tongue carcinoma by brachytherapy and acquired a lot of important and precious data including the treatment results, multiple primary cancers as well as radiation-induced cancers. (author)

  13. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Majdoub, Faycal; Neudorfer, Clemens; Maarouf, Mohammad [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias; Deckert, Martina [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Hellmich, Martin [University Hospital of Cologne, Institute of Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, Cologne (Germany); Buehrle, Christian [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using {sup 125}iodine seeds ({sup 125}I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with {sup 125}I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.) [German] Die Behandlung oligodendroglialer Hirntumoren durch die interstitielle Brachytherapie

  14. Preparation of a program for the independent verification of the brachytherapy planning systems calculations; Confeccion de un programa para la verificacion independiente de los calculos de los sistemas de planificacion en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Carmona, V.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Richart Sancho, J.; Ballester, F.; Pujades-Claumarchirant, M.C.; Munoz, M.

    2010-07-01

    In this work a program is presented that independently checks for each patient the treatment planning system calculations in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate brachytherapy. The treatment planning system output text files are automatically loaded in this program in order to get the source coordinates, the desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell times when it is the case. The source strength and the reference dates are introduced by the user. The program allows implementing the recommendations about independent verification of the clinical brachytherapy dosimetry in a simple and accurate way, in few minutes. (Author).

  15. SU-C-202-02: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Adaptive Daily Planning for Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerschaert, R; Paul, A; Zhuang, L [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Nalichowski, A [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Burmeister, J; Miller, A [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate adaptive daily planning for cervical cancer patients who underwent high-dose-rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT). Methods: This study included 22 cervical cancer patients who underwent 5 fractions of HDR ICBT. Regions of interest (ROIs) including high-risk clinical tumor volume (HR-CTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were manually contoured on daily CT images. All patients were treated with adaptive daily plans, which involved ROI delineation and dose optimization at each treatment fraction. Single treatment plans were retrospectively generated by applying the first treatment fraction’s dwell times adjusted for decay and dwell positions of the applicator to subsequent treatment fractions. Various existing similarity metrics were calculated for the ROIs to quantify interfractional organ variations. A novel similarity score (JRARM) was established, which combined both volumetric overlap metrics (DSC, JSC, and RVD) and distance metrics (ASD, MSD, and RMSD). Linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between inter-fractional organ variations of various similarity metrics and D2cc variations from both plans. Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests were used to assess adaptive daily plans and single plans by comparing EQD2 D2cc (α/β=3) for OARs. Results: For inter-fractional organ variations, the sigmoid demonstrated the greatest variations based on the JRARM and DSC similarity metrics. Comparisons between paired ROIs showed differences in JRARM scores and DSCs at each treatment fraction. RVD, MSD, and RMSD were found to be significantly correlated to D2cc variations for bladder and sigmoid. The comparison between plans found that adaptive daily planning provided lower EQD2 D2cc of OARs than single planning, specifically for the sigmoid (p=0.015). Conclusion: Substantial inter-fractional organ motion can occur during HDR-BT, which may significantly affect D2cc of OARs. Adaptive daily planning provides improved dose sparing for OARs

  16. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  17. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Antony L; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J

    2013-01-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit. (paper)

  18. SU-F-T-26: A Study of the Consistency of Brachytherapy Treatments for Vaginal Cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojaei, M; Pella, S; Dumitru, N [21st Century Oncology, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate to treatment consistency over the total number of fractions when treatment what HDR brachytherapy using the ML cylinders. At the same time the dosimetric impact on the critical organs is monitored over the total number of fractions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 10 patients treated with Cylinder applicators, from 2015–2016 were considered for this study. The CT scans of these patients, taken before each treatment were separately imported in to the treatment planning system and paired with the initial CT scan after completing the contouring. Two sets of CT images were fused together with respective to the applicator, using landmark registration. The doses of each plan were imported as well and a cumulative dosimetric analysis was made for bladder, bowels, and rectum and PTV. Results: No contour of any of the OAR was exactly similar when CT images were fused on each other. The PTV volumes vary from fraction to fraction. There was always a difference between the doses received by the OARs between treatments. The maximum dose varied between 5% and 30% in rectum and bladder. The minimum dose varied between 5% and 8% in rectum and bladder. The average dose varied between 15% and 20% in rectum and bladder. Deviation in placement were noticed between fractions. Conclusion: The variation in volumes of OARs and isodoses near the OARs, indicate that the estimated doses to OARs on the planning system may not be the same dose delivered to the patient in all the fractions. There are no major differences between the prescribed dose and the delivered dose over the total number of fractions. In some cases the critical organs will benefit if the consecutive plans will made after the CT scans will be registered with the initial scan and then planned.

  19. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  20. Film based verification of calculation algorithms used for brachytherapy planning-getting ready for upcoming challenges of MBDCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zwierzchowski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Well-known defect of TG-43 based algorithms used in brachytherapy is a lack of information about interaction cross-sections, which are determined not only by electron density but also by atomic number. TG-186 recommendations with using of MBDCA (model-based dose calculation algorithm, accurate tissues segmentation, and the structure’s elemental composition continue to create difficulties in brachytherapy dosimetry. For the clinical use of new algorithms, it is necessary to introduce reliable and repeatable methods of treatment planning systems (TPS verification. The aim of this study is the verification of calculation algorithm used in TPS for shielded vaginal applicators as well as developing verification procedures for current and further use, based on the film dosimetry method. Material and methods : Calibration data was collected by separately irradiating 14 sheets of Gafchromic® EBT films with the doses from 0.25 Gy to 8.0 Gy using HDR 192Ir source. Standard vaginal cylinders of three diameters were used in the water phantom. Measurements were performed without any shields and with three shields combination. Gamma analyses were performed using the VeriSoft® package. Results : Calibration curve was determined as third-degree polynomial type. For all used diameters of unshielded cylinder and for all shields combinations, Gamma analysis were performed and showed that over 90% of analyzed points meets Gamma criteria (3%, 3 mm. Conclusions : Gamma analysis showed good agreement between dose distributions calculated using TPS and measured by Gafchromic films, thus showing the viability of using film dosimetry in brachytherapy.

  1. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes...

  2. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ping; Baumann, René; Dunst, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immed...

  3. Combination of biodegradable stent placement and single-dose brachytherapy is associated with an unacceptably high complication rate in the treatment of dysphagia from esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike M. C.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Wijrdeman, Harm K.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Fockens, Paul; Reerink, Onne; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: For the palliative treatment of dysphagia, esophageal stent placement provides immediate improvement, whereas brachytherapy offers better long-term relief. Objective: To evaluate safety and efficacy of concurrent brachytherapy and biodegradable stent placement. Design: Prospective,

  4. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  5. WE-DE-201-02: A Statistical Analysis Tool for Plan Quality Verification in HDR Brachytherapy Forward Planning for Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R; Zhu, X; Li, S; Zheng, D; Lei, Y; Wang, S; Verma, V; Bennion, N; Wahl, A; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy forward planning is principally an iterative process; hence, plan quality is affected by planners’ experiences and limited planning time. Thus, this may lead to sporadic errors and inconsistencies in planning. A statistical tool based on previous approved clinical treatment plans would help to maintain the consistency of planning quality and improve the efficiency of second checking. Methods: An independent dose calculation tool was developed from commercial software. Thirty-three previously approved cervical HDR plans with the same prescription dose (550cGy), applicator type, and treatment protocol were examined, and ICRU defined reference point doses (bladder, vaginal mucosa, rectum, and points A/B) along with dwell times were collected. Dose calculation tool then calculated appropriate range with a 95% confidence interval for each parameter obtained, which would be used as the benchmark for evaluation of those parameters in future HDR treatment plans. Model quality was verified using five randomly selected approved plans from the same dataset. Results: Dose variations appears to be larger at the reference point of bladder and mucosa as compared with rectum. Most reference point doses from verification plans fell between the predicted range, except the doses of two points of rectum and two points of reference position A (owing to rectal anatomical variations & clinical adjustment in prescription points, respectively). Similar results were obtained for tandem and ring dwell times despite relatively larger uncertainties. Conclusion: This statistical tool provides an insight into clinically acceptable range of cervical HDR plans, which could be useful in plan checking and identifying potential planning errors, thus improving the consistency of plan quality.

  6. Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR - BT) brachytherapy in treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast became widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of RT after breast conservation is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 45 to 50 Gy. Initially brachytherapy for breast cancer was used in addition of external radiation to boost a portion of the breast to higher doses. However, over the past 10 years, the application of brachytherapy in breast cancer has changed. In early stage breast cancer, research has shown that the area that requires radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from returning is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Because this typically includes only a part of the breast, brachytherapy is now being used to treat the targeted portion of the breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose so that treatment is completed in four to five days. Another indications for PDR - BT as a part of treatment in locally advanced breast cancer or as a palliative treatment are discussed in the paper, too. Preliminary results with PDR - BT boost technique are promising. However, more experience and longer follow-up are required to define whether these methods might improve local tumor control for breast cancer patients. In this article the current status, indications, technical aspects and published results of PDR brachytherapy (PDR - BT) in breast cancer treatment are reviewed. (author)

  7. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R.; Ha, Sung W.

    2003-01-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a 90 Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter

  8. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R. [College of Medicine, Florida Univ., Florida (United States); Ha, Sung W. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a {sub 90}Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter.

  9. Biological effective dose evaluation in gynaecological brachytherapy: LDR and HDR treatments, dependence on radiobiological parameters, and treatment optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C; Botta, F; Conte, L; Vanoli, P; Cerizza, L

    2008-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the biological efficacy of different high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) treatments of gynaecological lesions, to identify the causes of possible nonuniformity and to optimise treatment through customised calculation. The study considered 110 patients treated between 2001 and 2006 with external beam radiation therapy and/or brachytherapy with either LDR (afterloader Selectron, (137)Cs) or HDR (afterloader microSelectron Classic, (192)Ir). The treatments were compared in terms of biologically effective dose (BED) to the tumour and to the rectum (linear-quadratic model) by using statistical tests for comparisons between independent samples. The difference between the two treatments was statistically significant in one case only. However, within each technique, we identified considerable nonuniformity in therapeutic efficacy due to differences in fractionation schemes and overall treatment time. To solve this problem, we created a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing calculation of the optimal treatment for each patient: best efficacy (BED(tumour)) without exceeding toxicity threshold (BED(rectum)). The efficacy of a treatment may vary as a result of several factors. Customised radiobiological evaluation is a useful adjunct to clinical evaluation in planning equivalent treatments that satisfy all dosimetric constraints.

  10. Computed Tomography–Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Treating Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.zolciak@wp.pl [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Gruszczynska, Ewelina; Bijok, Michal [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Jonska-Gmyrek, Joanna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Dabkowski, Mateusz [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Staniaszek, Jagna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Michalski, Wojciech [Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Adam; Milanowska, Katarzyna [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of computed tomography (CT)–planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for treating cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: CT-planned HDR BT was performed according to the adapted Group European de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) recommendations in 216 consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB to IVA, who were treated with conformal external beam radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy. We analyzed outcomes and late side effects evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Subjective, Objective, Management, Analysis evaluation scoring system and compared them with the results from a historical group. Results: The median age was 56 years (range, 32-83 years). The median follow-up time for living patients was 52 months (range 37-63 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence function for the local recurrence rate for patients with FIGO II and III was 5.5% and 20%, respectively (P=.001). The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 66.4% and 58.5%, respectively. The relative risk of failure for OS and DFS for FIGO III in relation to FIGO II was 2.24 (P=.003) and 2.6 (P=.000) and for lymph node enlargement was 2.3 (P=.002) and 2 (P=.006), respectively. In 2 patients, rectovaginal fistula occurred, and in 1 patient, vesicovaginal fistula occurred without local progression. Comparison of late adverse effects in patients treated according to the GEC-ESTRO recommendations and in the historical group revealed a reduction in fistula formation of 59% and also a reduction in rectal grade 3 to 4 late toxicity of >59%. Conclusions: This is the largest report with mature data of CT-planned BT HDR for the treatment of cervical cancer with good local control and

  11. Assessment of I-125 seed implant accuracy when using the live-planning technique for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorrees Joshua

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low risk prostate cancers are commonly treated with low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy involving I-125 seeds. The implementation of a ‘live-planning’ technique at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH in 2007 enabled the completion of the whole procedure (i.e. scanning, planning and implant in one sitting. ‘Live-planning’ has the advantage of a more reliable delivery of the planned treatment compared to the ‘traditional pre-plan’ technique (where patient is scanned and planned in the weeks prior to implant. During live planning, the actual implanted needle positions are updated real-time on the treatment planning system and the dosimetry is automatically recalculated. The aim of this investigation was to assess the differences and clinical relevance between the planned dosimetry and the updated real-time implant dosimetry. Methods A number of 162 patients were included in this dosimetric study. A paired t-test was performed on the D90, V100, V150 and V200 target parameters and the differences between the planned and implanted dose distributions were analysed. Similarly, dosimetric differences for the organs at risk (OAR were also evaluated. Results Small differences between the primary dosimetric parameters for the target were found. Still, the incidence of hotspots was increased with approximately 20% for V200. Statistically significant increases were observed in the doses delivered to the OAR between the planned and implanted data; however, these increases were consistently below 3% thus probably without clinical consequences. Conclusions The current study assessed the accuracy of prostate implants with I-125 seeds when compared to initial plans. The results confirmed the precision of the implant technique which RAH has in place. Nevertheless, geographical misses, anatomical restrictions and needle displacements during implant can have repercussions for centres without live-planning option if dosimetric changes are not

  12. Who Really Benefits from 3D-Based Planning of Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Yun Hee; Choi, Hoon Sik; Lee, Jong Hak; Choi, Won Jun; Shin, Jeong Kyu; Song, Jin Ho

    2018-04-30

    Although intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) is essential for the radiation therapy of cervical cancer, few institutions in Korea perform 3-dimensional (3D)-based ICR. To identify patients who would benefit from 3D-based ICR, dosimetric parameters for tumor targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared between 2-dimensional (2D)- and 3D-based ICR. Twenty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following 3D-based ICR were retrospectively evaluated. New 2D-based plans based on the Manchester system were developed. Tumor size was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean high risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 value was about 10% lower for 2D- than for 3D-based plans (88.4% vs. 97.7%; P = 0.068). Tumor coverage did not differ between 2D- and 3D-based plans in patients with tumors ≤ 4 cm at the time of brachytherapy, but the mean HR-CTV D90 values in patients with tumors > 4 cm were significantly higher for 3D-based plans than for 2D-based plans (96.0% vs. 78.1%; P = 0.017). Similar results were found for patients with tumors > 5 cm initially. Other dosimetric parameters for OARs were similar between 2D- and 3D-based plans, except that mean sigmoid D2cc was higher for 2D- than for 3D-based plans (67.5% vs. 58.8%; P = 0.043). These findings indicate that 3D-based ICR plans improve tumor coverage while satisfying the dose constraints for OARs. 3D-based ICR should be considered in patients with tumors > 4 cm size at the time of brachytherapy or > 5 cm initially.

  13. Verification of dosimetry planning in brachytherapy in format Dicom and EUD calculation of Risk in bodies; Verificacion de la planificacion dosimetria en braquiterapia en formato Dicom y calculo del EUD en organos de riesgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, M. J.; Sendon del Rio, J. R.; Ayala Lazaro, R.; Jimenez Rojas, M. R.; Gomez Cores, S.; Polo Cezon, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    This work Describes a program that automates the verification of the schedules in brachytherapy (configuration and dosimetric treatment parameters) for sources of Ir-192 (mHDR v2) and Co-60 (Co0.A86) from the plan exported in DICOM format data. (Author)

  14. Staff dose of hospitalization in the treatment of patients in ophthalmic brachytherapy with 125 I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terron Leon, J. A.; Gomez Palacios, M.; Moreno Reyes, J. C.; Perales Molina, A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work, therefore, has been the evaluation of the dose levels which nursing staff can receive in care for ophthalmic brachytherapy patients treated with 125 I from measurements made on the same, evaluating, in an experimental way, job security following the PR rules laid down for these treatments. (Author)

  15. SU-F-T-29: The Important of Each Fraction Image-Guided Planning for Postoperative HDR-Brachytherapy in Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriyasang, D; Pattaranutaporn, P; Manokhoon, K [Ramathibodi Hospital, Rachatewi, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cylindrical applicators are often used for postoperative HDRbrachytherapy in endometrial carcinoma. It has been considered that dosimetric variation between fractions for this treatment is minimal and might not be necessary to perform treatment planning for every fractions. At our institute, it is traditional to perform treatment planning with CT simulation on the first fraction and uses this plan for the rest of treatment. This study was aim to evaluate the errors of critical structure doses between the fractions when simulation and planning were done for first fraction only. Methods: Treatment plans of 10 endometrial carcinoma patients who received postoperative HDR-brachytherapy and underwent CT-simulation for every HDR-fractions at our department were retrospectively reviewed. All of these patients were treated with cylindrical applicator and prescribed dose 15Gy in 3 fractions to 0.5cm from vaginal surface. The treatment plan from the first fraction was used to simulate in second and third CT-simulation. Radiation dose for critical structures in term of Dose-to-2cc (D2cc) were evaluated and compared between planning CT. Results: The D2cc for bladder and rectum were evaluated. For bladder, the mean error of D2cc estimation for second and third fractions was 7.6% (0.1–20.1%, SD=5.7). And the mean error for D2cc of rectum was 8.5% (0.1–29.4%, SD=8.5). Conclusion: The critical structure doses could be significant difference between fractions which may affects treatment outcomes or toxicities. From our data, image-guided brachytherapy at least with CT-Simulation should be done for every treatment fractions.

  16. Inverse planning for interstitial gynecologic template brachytherapy: truly anatomy-based planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, Etienne; Hsu, I-Chou; Pouliot, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Commercially available optimization schemes generally result in an undesirable dose distribution, because of the particular shapes of tumors extending laterally from the tandem. Dose distribution is therefore manually obtained by adjusting relative dwell time values until an acceptable solution is found. The objective of this work is to present the clinical application of an inverse planning dose optimization tool for the automatic determination of source dwell time values in the treatment of interstitial gynecologic templates. Methods and Materials: In cases where the tumor extends beyond the range of the tandem-ovoid applicator, catheters as well as the tandem are inserted into the paravaginal and parametrial region in an attempt to cover the tumor volume. CT scans of these patients are then used for CT-based dose planning. Dose distribution is obtained manually by varying the relative dwell times until adequate dose coverage is achieved. This manual planning is performed by an experienced physician. In parallel, our in-house inverse planning based on simulated annealing is used to automatically determine which of all possible dwell positions will become active and to calculate the dwell time values needed to fulfill dose constraints applied to the tumor volume and to each organ at risk. To compare the results of these planning methods, dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were generated for the target and each organ at risk. Results: This procedure has been applied for the dose planning of 12 consecutive interstitial gynecologic templates cases. For all cases, once the anatomy was contoured, the routine of inverse planning based on simulated annealing found the solution to the dose constraints within 1 min of CPU time. In comparison, manual planning took more than 45 min. The inverse planning-generated plans showed improved protection to organs at risk for the same coverage compared to manual planning. Conclusion: This inverse planning tool

  17. The effect of rib and lung heterogeneities on the computed dose to lung in Ir-192 High-Dose-Rate breast brachytherapy: Monte Carlo versus a treatment planning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Salehi Yazdi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breasts, ribs, and lungs, revealed an average overestimation of the dose by a factor of 8% in the lung for TPS calculations. Therefore, the accuracy of the TPS results may be limited to regions near the implants where the treatment is planned, and is a more conservative approach for regions at boundaries with curvatures or tissues with a different material than that in the breast.

  18. High dose rate brachytherapy in treatment of high grade astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Alejo, R.; Delgado, J.M.; Cerro, E. del; Torres, J.J.; Martinez, R.

    1996-01-01

    From May 1994 to June 1995, 18 patients with high grade astrocytomas were entered prospectively on a selective protocol combining surgery, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic interstitial implantation with HDR Iridium 192 and chemotherapy. Only those patients with tumor size 100cc or less average dimension, high grade astrocytoma, Karnofsky 70 or greater, unilateral, circumscribed, unifocal, tumor stable or responding to external radiation and supratentorial were included in the study. Ages ranged from 16 to 69 years. There were 13 males and 5 females. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 3 patients, subtotal resection in 11, and gross total resection in 4 patients. Focal external beam radiation portals included the contrast enhancing mass on CT scan plus a 3 cm margin. The protocol called for minimum tumor dose of 60 Gy to be given in 2 Gy daily fractions. An interstitial brachytherapy boost was to be performed two weeks after the conclusion of external beam radiation. The dose was 30 Gy in 4 fractions. The authors analyze on basis on their personal experience, the possibilities and the limits offered by this therapeutic procedure in neuro-oncology. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically possible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to be effective and may provide for an increase in tumor control in selected cases

  19. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of uterine cervix: twenty-year experience with cobalt after-loading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalaei, A; Mohammadianpanah, M; Omidvari, S; Ahmadloo, N

    2006-01-01

    This retrospective analysis aims to report results of patients with cancer of uterine cervix treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, using manual treatment planning. From 1975 to 1995, 237 patients with FIGO stages IIB-IVA and mean age of 54.31 years were treated. EBR dose to the whole pelvis was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Brachytherapy with HDR after-loading cobalt source (Cathetron) was performed following EBR completion with a dose of 30 Gy in three weekly fractions of 10 Gy to point A. Survival, local control, and genitourinary and gastrointestinal complications were assessed. In a median follow-up of 60.2 months, the 10-year overall and disease-free survival rate was 62.4%. Local recurrence was seen in 12.2% of patients. Distant metastases to the lymph nodes, peritoneum, lung, liver, and bone occurred in 25.3% of patients. Less than 6% of patients experienced severe genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity that were relieved by surgical intervention. No treatment-related mortality was seen. This series suggests that 50 Gy to the whole pelvis together with three fractions of 10 Gy to point A with HDR brachytherapy is an effective fractionation schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cancer of cervix. To decrease the complications, newer devices and treatment planning may be beneficial.

  20. SU-F-T-18: The Importance of Immobilization Devices in Brachytherapy Treatments of Vaginal Cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojaei, M; Dumitru, N; Pella, S [21st Century Oncology, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High dose rate brachytherapy is a highly localized radiation therapy that has a very high dose gradient. Thus one of the most important parts of the treatment is the immobilization. The smallest movement of the patient or applicator can result in dose variation to the surrounding tissues as well as to the tumor to be treated. We will revise the ML Cylinder treatments and their localization challenges. Methods: A retrospective study of 25 patients with 5 treatments each looking into the applicator’s placement in regard to the organs at risk. Motion possibilities for each applicator intra and inter fractionation with their dosimetric implications were covered and measured in regard with their dose variance. The localization immobilization devices used were assessed for the capability to prevent motion before and during the treatment delivery. Results: We focused on the 100% isodose on central axis and a 15 degree displacement due to possible rotation analyzing the dose variations to the bladder and rectum walls. The average dose variation for bladder was 15% of the accepted tolerance, with a minimum variance of 11.1% and a maximum one of 23.14% on the central axis. For the off axis measurements we found an average variation of 16.84% of the accepted tolerance, with a minimum variance of 11.47% and a maximum one of 27.69%. For the rectum we focused on the rectum wall closest to the 120% isodose line. The average dose variation was 19.4%, minimum 11.3% and a maximum of 34.02% from the accepted tolerance values Conclusion: Improved immobilization devices are recommended. For inter-fractionation, localization devices are recommended in place with consistent planning in regards with the initial fraction. Many of the present immobilization devices produced for external radiotherapy can be used to improve the localization of HDR applicators during transportation of the patient and during treatment.

  1. Hyperthermia treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagendijk, J.J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of hyperthermia, the treatment of tumours with elevated temperatures in the range of 40-44 deg. C with treatment times over 30 min, greatly benefits from the development of hyperthermia treatment planning. This review briefly describes the state of the art in hyperthermia technology, followed by an overview of the developments in hyperthermia treatment planning. It particularly highlights the significant problems encountered with heating realistic tissue volumes and shows how treatment planning can help in designing better heating technology. Hyperthermia treatment planning will ultimately provide information about the actual temperature distributions obtained and thus the tumour control probabilities to be expected. This will improve our understanding of the present clinical results of thermoradiotherapy and thermochemotherapy, and will greatly help both in optimizing clinical heating technology and in designing optimal clinical trials. (author)

  2. Surgery and postoperative brachytherapy for treatment of small volume uterine cervix cancer: an alternative to the standard association of utero vaginal brachytherapy + surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallocher, O.; Thomas, L.; Pigneux, J.; Stocke, E.; Bussieres, E.; Avril, A.; Floquet, A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. -Evaluate the results of the treatment of small uterine cervix cancer with the association of surgery and postoperative vaginal brachytherapy, without unfavourable prognostic factors. Patients and methods. -After radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy, 29 women (mean age: 44 years) with carcinoma < 25 mm (26 stage IB1, 3 IIA, mean size: 15 mm) were treated by post-operative prophylactic vaginal brachytherapy using low dose rate. Ovarian transposition was performed at the surgical time in 14 young women (mean age 35 years). Results. - The actuarial specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 100% and 90% respectively, with a mean follow-up 75 months. Only one local recurrence was observed. The rate of grade 1 post-operative complication was 7%. The conservation rate of the ovarian function was 85% for young women. Conclusion. -Treatment of small volume uterine cervix cancer using first surgery and post-operative vaginal brachytherapy is a reliable therapeutic option. The results in terms of specific survival and complications are the same with those after standard association of preoperative utero-vaginal brachytherapy and surgery. (authors)

  3. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192 Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate

  4. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  5. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  6. Development of prostate voxel models for brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adriano M.; Reis, Lucas P.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animation movies to computer games allow the creation of new voxel anthropomorphic phantoms with better resolution and thus, more anatomical details. These phantoms can be used in nuclear applications, especially in radiation protection for estimating doses in cases of occupational or accidental radioactive incidents, and in medical and biological applications. For dose estimates, the phantoms are coupled to a Monte Carlo code, which will be responsible for the transport of radiation in this environment. This study aimed to develop a computational tool to estimate the isodose curves in the prostate after brachytherapy seed implants. For this, we have created a model called FANTPROST in the shape of a 48 mm side cube, with a standard prostate inserted in the center of this cube with different distributions of brachytherapy seeds in this volume. The prostate, according to this model, was obtained from the phantom voxels MASH2 developed by Numerical Dosimetry Group, Department of Nuclear Energy - Federal University of Pernambuco. The modeling of the seeds, added to FANTPROST, was done through the use of geometric information of Iodine-125 Amersham 6711 commercial seed. The simulations were performed by the code MCNP5 for spatial distributions containing different amounts of seeds within the FANTPROST. The obtained curves allowed an estimation of the behavior of the maximum dose that decreases with distance, showing that this tool can be used for a more accurate analysis of the effects produced by the presence of such seeds in the prostate and its vicinity. (author)

  7. Outcome of treatment of upper third vaginal recurrences of cervical and endometrial carcinomas with interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charra, C.; Roy, P.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Ardiet, J.M.; Gerard, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe an original brachytherapy technique using a dedicated intravaginal template for the treatment of vaginal vault recurrences and to evaluate the results of such a treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 1993, 78 patients with isolated recurrence of cervical or endometrial carcinoma located in the vaginal vault have been treated in Lyon. Initial treatment was surgery alone in 49 cases and irradiation with surgery in 37 cases. Treatment of the vaginal recurrence was performed with interstitial Iridium 192 brachytherapy combined with pelvic external beam radiation therapy in 34 patients. The tumor was implanted with a dedicated intravaginal plastic template. Six parallel metallic needles were implanted in the vaginal vault and afterloaded with Iridium 192 wires of 4 to 6 cm long. The mucosa of the upper half of the vagina received the same dose as the one encompassing the tumor on the 85% isodose of the Paris system. Results: At 5 years the local control rate was 70% and the overall survival rate 56%. Grade 3 complications occurred in 10% of the cases and only in patients who had received irradiation during the initial treatment of the primary tumor. Conclusions: This brachytherapy technique makes it possible to perform Iridium 192 implants in a difficult situation with a favorable long-term control rate and an acceptable rate of complications

  8. Three-dimensional (3D) real-time conformal brachytherapy - a novel solution for prostate cancer treatment Part I. Rationale and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fijalkowski, M.; Bialas, B.; Maciejewski, B.; Bystrzycka, J.; Slosarek, K.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the system for conformal real-time high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been developed and dedicated in general for the treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of this paper is to present the 3D-conformal real-time brachytherapy technique introduced to clinical practice at the Institute of Oncology in Gliwice. Equipment and technique of 3D-conformal real time brachytherapy (3D-CBRT) is presented in detail and compared with conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Step-by-step procedures of treatment planning are described, including own modifications. The 3D-CBRT offers the following advantages: (1) on-line continuous visualization of the prostate and acquisition of the series of NS images during the entire procedure of planning and treatment; (2) high precision of definition and contouring the target volume and the healthy organs at risk (urethra, rectum, bladder) based on 3D transrectal continuous ultrasound images; (3) interactive on-line dose optimization with real-time corrections of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) till optimal dose distribution is achieved; (4) possibility to overcome internal prostate motion and set-up inaccuracies by stable positioning of the prostate with needles fixed to the template; (5) significant shortening of overall treatment time; (6) cost reduction - the treatment can be provided as an outpatient procedure. The 3D- real time CBRT can be advertised as an ideal conformal boost dose technique integrated or interdigitated with pelvic conformal external beam radiotherapy or as a monotherapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  9. Dosimetric comparison of vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dosimetric study to compare high dose rate (HDR vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy plan versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT boost plan for doses delivered to target volume and organs at risk (OAR in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT. Materials and Methods: Fifteen postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma suitable for vaginal ovoid brachytherapy following WPRT of 46 Gy/23 fractions/4.5 weeks were included. All were treated with brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy each. The equivalent dose for IMRT was calculated by computing biologically effective dose of brachytherapy by linear quadratic model. Dose of brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy was equivalent to IMRT dose of 26 Gy/13 fractions. Doses to target volume and OAR were compared between HDR and IMRT plans. Results: Target volume was well covered with both HDR and IMRT plans, but dose with brachytherapy was much higher (P < 0.05. Mean doses, doses to 0.1, 1, 2, and 5cc, 1/3 rd , 1/2, and 2/3 rd volume of bladder and rectum were significantly lower with HDR plans. Conclusion: In postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma, HDR brachytherapy following WPRT appears to be better than IMRT for tumor coverage and reducing dose to critical organs.

  10. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  11. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  12. MO-AB-BRA-03: Development of Novel Real Time in Vivo EPID Treatment Verification for Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, G; Podesta, M [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Reniers, B [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, F [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments are employed worldwide to treat a wide variety of cancers. However, in vivo dose verification remains a challenge with no commercial dosimetry system available to verify the treatment dose delivered to the patient. We propose a novel dosimetry system that couples an independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform and an amorphous silicon Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to provide real time treatment verification. Methods: MC calculations predict the EPID response to the photon fluence emitted by the HDR source by simulating the patient, the source dwell positions and times, and treatment complexities such as tissue compositions/densities and different applicators. Simulated results are then compared against EPID measurements acquired with ∼0.14s time resolution which allows dose measurements for each dwell position. The EPID has been calibrated using an Ir-192 HDR source and experiments were performed using different phantoms, including tissue equivalent materials (PMMA, lung and bone). A source positioning accuracy of 0.2 mm, without including the afterloader uncertainty, was ensured using a robotic arm moving the source. Results: An EPID can acquire 3D Cartesian source positions and its response varies significantly due to differences in the material composition/density of the irradiated object, allowing detection of changes in patient geometry. The panel time resolution allows dose rate and dwell time measurements. Moreover, predicted EPID images obtained from clinical treatment plans provide anatomical information that can be related to the patient anatomy, mostly bone and air cavities, localizing the source inside of the patient using its anatomy as reference. Conclusion: Results obtained show the feasibility of the proposed dose verification system that is capable to verify all the brachytherapy treatment steps in real time providing data about treatment delivery quality and also applicator

  13. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D. L.; Yoo, S.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the greedy algorithm can solve the optimization problem efficiently and arrives at a clinically acceptable solution in less than 10 seconds. Our study was inclusive, that is there was no combination of sources that clearly stood out from the others and could therefore be considered the preferred set of sources for treatment planning. Source strengths of 0.2 mCi (low), 0.4 mCi (medium), and 0.6 mCi (high) of 125 I in four different combinations were used for the multi-strength source study. The combination of high- and medium-strength sources achieved a more uniform target dose distribution due to few source implants whereas the combination of low-and medium-strength sources achieved better sparing of sensitive tissues including that of the single-strength 0.4 mCi base case. 125 I at 0.4 mCi and 192 Ir at 0.12 mCi and 0.25 mCi source strengths were used for the multi-specie source study. This study also proved inconclusive , Treatment plans using a combination of two 0

  14. Clinical Use of the Utrecht Applicator for Combined Intracavitary/Interstitial Brachytherapy Treatment in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Moerland, Marinus A.; Roesink, Judith M.; Tersteeg, Robbert J.H.A.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate the benefit of the Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator for combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) approach, using magnetic resonance imaging—guided brachytherapy, over the intracavitary approach alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and to analyze the clinical use of needles. Methods and Materials: This study includes the first 20 patients treated with the new applicator. Brachytherapy consisted of two pulsed dose rate applications, and the second application was performed with the IC/IS approach. The number of needles, chosen guiding holes through the ovoids, and insertion depths were based on the dose distribution and dosimetric shortcomings of the first application (IC alone). We investigated the dosimetric gain by comparing the clinical interstitial optimized plan (IC/IS clinical ) with an additionally generated optimized plan without needle use (IC study ). Furthermore, we studied the relation of the inserted needles and their source loading patterns with the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Results: A total of 54 needles (range, 1–6 per application) were applied with an average depth of 25 mm. The chosen needle positions corresponded with the location of the HR-CTV extensions. The total and individual needle treatment times per application were on average 19% (range, 4–35%) and 7% (range, 2–14%) of the implant treatment time, respectively. The total (external-beam radiotherapy + brachytherapy) D90 HR-CTV for the IC study and the IC/IS clinical were on average 79.5 (SD 7.4) Gy α/β10 and 83.9 (SD 6.7) Gy α/β10 , respectively, with an average gain of 4.4 (SD 2.3) Gy α/β10 for the second application. Conclusions: Needle placement was feasible in all patients and resulted in a gain in dose and better coverage of HR-CTV. Defining the location of HR-CTV protrusions and analyzing the associated needles has given us deeper understanding of the possibilities in magnetic

  15. Organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer: Brachytherapy, an alternative to cystectomy and combined modality treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris; Horenblas, Simon; Dom, Paul; Moonen, Luc; Bartelink, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our long-term results of bladder preservation with brachytherapy in the treatment of bladder cancer. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 2000, 108 patients with T1-G3 and T2-T3a stages of bladder cancer were treated with a transurethral resection (TUR) and a course of external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions) followed by brachytherapy (40 Gy). All tumors were solitary lesions with a diameter ≤5 cm. Median follow-up was 54 months (range, 1-178 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 62% and 50%, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 73% and 67%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate was 73% at 5 and 73% at 10 years, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for patients with a preserved bladder were 68% and 59%, respectively. Of all long-term surviving patients, 90% preserved their native bladders. The treatment was well tolerated. Acute toxicity was mild. Two patients experienced serious late toxicity: 1 patient developed a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula and the other a stricture of the urethra and ureters. Conclusion: For patients with solitary, organ confined invasive bladder cancer ≤5 cm, bladder preservation with brachytherapy is an excellent alternative to radical cystectomy and combined modality treatment

  16. LOW POWER BRACHYTHERAPY IN COMBINED TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH INTERMEDIATE RISK OF LOCALIZED PROST ATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Biryukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Estimation of the effectiveness of low power brachytherapy sources I-125 in the combined treatment in group of patients of intermediate risk of localized prostate cancer.Material and methods. The study included 126 patients with prostate cancer of intermediate risk. 104 patients (83,9% were conducted low power brachytherapy I‑125 in combination with hormone therapy by analogues of LHWG. 22 patients (16.1% received external beam irradiation in combination with brachytherapy I‑125 and hormonal treatment. Relapse-free survival of patients was evaluated in accordance with the criteria Phoenix (Nadir PSA + ng/ml. Evaluation of side effects of radiation treatment were carried out according to the RTOG criteria.Results. PSA relapse-free survival in the group of brachytherapy and hormone treatment at the time of observation 5 years amounted to 97.1%. In the group of combined radiation therapy with brachytherapy, and hormonal treatment PSA relapse-free survival rate was 95.5%.In both groups, relapse-free survival was noted in 96,8% of cases. Tumor-specific and overall survival in bothgroups was 100%. The major complications of treatment in both groups were radiation urethritis 1 to 2 degrees in 9.5% of cases (12 patients, urethral stricture in 5 patients (3.9% of cases, acute urinary retention in 1 patient (0.8% of cases and late radiation rectitis of 2 degree in 1.58% of cases (2 patients.Conclusions. It is possible to draw tentative conclusions about the high rate of survival without progression in both treatment groups on the background of the relatively low frequency of adverse reactions. It is necessary further follow-up for patients with estimating of survival for a longer period.

  17. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  18. Lung-conserving treatment of a pulmonary oligometastasis with a wedge resection and 131Cs brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, A Gabriella; Parikh, Apurva; Yondorf, Menachem; Trichter, Samuel; Gupta, Divya; Port, Jeffrey; Parashar, Bhupesh

    2013-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas most frequently metastasize to the lung. Surgical resection of pulmonary metastases is the primary treatment modality. Although lobectomy is widely acknowledged as the standard procedure to treat primary pulmonary tumors, the standard for pulmonary metastases is not well defined; furthermore, compromised lung function may tip the scales in favor of a less invasive approach. Here, we report the results of a patient treated with wedge resection and intraoperative cesium-131 ((131)Cs). A 58-year-old African American female was diagnosed with the American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage IIA mixed uterine leiomyosarcoma and underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by adjuvant external beam radiotherapy to a total dose of 45 Gy and vaginal brachytherapy to a total dose of 20 Gy. At 2 years, a routine CT scan of the chest revealed metastasis to right upper lobe of the lung. The patient's poor pulmonary function, related to a 45 pack-year smoking history and chronic emphysema, precluded a lobectomy. After the patient underwent a lung-sparing wedge resection of the pulmonary right upper lobe metastasis and intraoperative brachytherapy with (131)Cs seeds to a total dose of 80 Gy, she remained disease free in the implanted area. At a 2-year followup, imaging continued to reveal 100% local control of the area treated with wedge resection and intraoperative (131)Cs brachytherapy. The patient had no complications from this treatment. Such treatment approach may become an attractive option in patients with oligometastatic disease and compromised pulmonary function. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and characterization of composite microspheres for brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Di; Huang Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Wang Deping; Gu Yifei

    2012-01-01

    Composite microspheres were prepared by coating yttrium–aluminum–silicate (YAS) glass microspheres (20–30 μm) with a layer of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and evaluated for potential use in brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. After neutron activation to form the β-emitting 90 Y radionuclide, the composite microspheres can be injected into a patient to destroy cancerous tumors; at the same time, the composite microspheres can generate heat upon application of a magnetic field to also destroy the tumors. The results showed that the composite microspheres were chemically durable when immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF), with ∼ 0.25% weight loss and ∼ 3.2% yttrium dissolved into the SBF after 30 days at 37 °C. The composite microspheres also showed ferromagnetic properties as a result of the Fe 3 O 4 coating; when immersed in water at 20 °C (20 mg in 1 mL of water), the application of an alternating magnetic field produced a temperature increase from 20 °C to 38−46 °C depending on the thickness of the Fe 3 O 4 coating. The results indicate that these composite microspheres have promising potential in combined brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancerous tumors. - Highlights: ► Composite microspheres for brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. ► Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles coated on the yttrium–aluminum–silicate glass microspheres. ► Microspheres are chemically stable in SBF. ► Microspheres can generate heat for hyperthermia under an alternating magnetic field. ► Microspheres can emit β-rays for brachytherapy after neutron activation.

  20. Implications for dosimetric changes when introducing MR-guided brachytherapy for small volume cervix cancer: a comparison of CT and MR-based treatments in a single centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, Claire; Govindarajulu, Geetha; Sridharan, Swetha; Capp, Anne; O'Brien, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate cervix brachytherapy dosimetry with the introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) based treatment planning and volumetric prescriptions and propose a method for plan evaluation in the transition period. The treatment records of 69 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Forty one patients were treated using computed tomography (CT)-based, Point A-based prescriptions and 28 patients were treated using magnetic resonance (MR)-based, volumetric prescriptions. Plans were assessed for dose to Point A and organs at risk (OAR) with additional high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) dose assessment for MR-based brachytherapy plans. ICRU-38 point doses and GEC-ESTRO recommended volumetric doses (D2 cc for OAR and D 100 , D 98 and D 90 for HR-CTV) were also considered. For patients with small HR-CTV sizes, introduction of MR-based volumetric brachytherapy produced a change in dose delivered to Point A and OAR. Point A doses fell by 4.8 Gy (p = 0.0002) and ICRU and D 2cc doses for OAR also reduced (p < 0.01). Mean Point A doses for MR-based brachytherapy treatment plans were closer to those of HR-CTV D 100 for volumes less than 20 cm 3 and HR-CTV D 98 for volumes between 20 and 35 cm 3 , with a significant difference (p < 0.0001) between Point A and HR-CTV D 90 doses in these ranges. In order to maintain brachytherapy dose consistency across varying HR-CTV sizes there must be a relationship between the volume of the HR-CTV and the prescription dose. Rather than adopting a ‘one size fits all’ approach during the transition to volume-based prescriptions, this audit has shown that separating prescription volumes into HR-CTV size categories of less than 20 cm 3 , between 20 and 35 cm 3 , and more than 35 cm 3 the HR-CTV can provide dose uniformity across all volumes and can be directly linked to traditional Point A prescriptions.

  1. Erectile function after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Anderson, Richard L.; Kurko, Brian S.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to determine the effect of multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and materials: A total of 226 patients with preimplant erectile function determined by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003 for clinical Stage T1c-T2c (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Of the 226 patients, 132 were potent before treatment and, of those, 128 (97%) completed and returned the IIEF questionnaire after brachytherapy. The median follow-up was 29.1 months. Potency was defined as an IIEF score of ≥13. The clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age; preimplant IIEF score; clinical T stage; pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level; Gleason score; elapsed time after implantation; preimplant nocturnal erections; body mass index; presence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus; tobacco consumption; the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose (V 100/150/200 ); the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate gland (D 90 ); androgen deprivation therapy; supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); isotope; prostate volume; planning volume; and radiation dose to the proximal penis. Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 50.5%. For patients who maintained adequate posttreatment erectile function, the preimplant IIEF score was 29, and in patients with brachytherapy-related ED, the preimplant IIEF score was 25. The median time to the onset of ED was 5.4 months. After brachytherapy, the median IIEF score was 20 in potent patients and 3 in impotent patients. On univariate analysis, the preimplant IIEF score, patient age, presence of nocturnal

  2. Combination of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of advanced scalp angiosarcoma - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentil, Andre Cavalcanti; Lima Junior, Carlos Genesio Bezerra; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Pereira, Adelino Jose; Pellizon, Antonio Carlos Assis

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient with an extensive angiosarcoma of the scalp that was submitted only to radiotherapy with a combination of orthovoltage roentgentherapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy, using a mould. The clinical and technical features as well as the therapeutic outcome are presented, and the usefulness and peculiarities of high-dose rate brachytherapy for this particular indication is discussed. A comparative analysis of the difficulties and limitations of employing low-dose rate brachytherapy is also presented. The authors concluded that high-dose rate brachytherapy might be an useful, practical and safe option to treat neoplastic lesions of the scalp, and an alternative treatment to electrontherapy. (author)

  3. Brachytherapy with cobalt plaques in the conservative treatment of intraocular tumors. The Brazilian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Trippe, N.; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Fogarolli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Baraldi, H.E.; Chojniak, M.M.; Erwene, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To show the retrospective results of intraocular tumors, including uveal melanomas and retinoblastomas treated by exclusive brachytherapy with cobalt plaques. The goal was to keep the vision function with not compromising the chance of cure. Materials and Methods: From December 1989 to December 1993, 76 cases of intraocular tumors, being 56 adult patients with uveal melanomas and 20 children with retinoblastoma, were treated with exclusive intraocular brachytherapy through cobalt plaques. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy, calculated at the apex of the lesion for retinoblastomas and 100 Gy for melanomas. The selection criteria included those introcular lesions with diameter until 15 mm. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months, of the 56 patients with uveal melanomas, 41 (73,3%) had their vision preserved with no evidence of disease, while 15 (26,4%) had local failure and were underwent to enucleation. With the medium follow up of 27 months, of the 20 patients with retinoblastoma, 17 (85,5%) had their vision preserved with no evidence of disease, while 3 (15%) had local failure and were underwent to enucleation. All patients are alive with no evidence of systemic disease. Conclusion: When well indicated, the conservative treatment of intraocular tumors with brachytherapy is a good alternative to enucleation and must be done by a multidisciplinary and well trained medical team

  4. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-01

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning—Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)—for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  5. Completion of treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The outline of the lecture included the following topics: entering prescription; plan printout; print and transfer DDR; segment BEV; export to R and V; physician approval; and second check. Considerable attention, analysis and discussion. The summary is as follows: Treatment planning completion is a very responsible process which requires maximum attention; Should be independently checked by the planner, physicist, radiation oncologist and a therapist; Should not be done in a last minute rush; Proper communication between team members; Properly set procedure should prevent propagation of an error by one individual to the treatment: the error should be caught by somebody else. (P.A.)

  6. Comparison of CT-based volumetric dosimetry with traditional prescription points in the treatment of cervical cancer with PDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrey, Nicola; Nilsson, Sanna; Moutrie, Zoe; Chan, Philip; Cheuk, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    The traditional use of two-dimensional geometric prescription points in intracavitary brachytherapy planning for locally advanced cervical cancer is increasingly being replaced by three-dimensional (3D) planning. This study aimed to directly compare the two planning methods to validate that CT planning provides superior dosimetry for both tumour and organs at risk (OARs) in our department. The CT planning data of 10 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer was audited. For each CT dataset, two new brachytherapy plans were created, comparing the dosimetry of conventional American Brachytherapy Society points and 3D-optimised volumes created for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) and OARs. Total biologically equivalent doses for these structures were calculated using the modified EQD2 formula and comparative dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis performed. DVH analysis revealed that for the 3D-optimised plans, the prescription aim of D90 ≥ 100% was achieved for the HR CTV in all 10 patients. However, when prescribing to point A, only 50% of the plans achieved the minimum required dose to the HR CTV. Rectal and bladder dose constraints were met for all 3D-optimised plans but exceeded in two and one of the conventional plans, respectively. This study confirms that the regionally relevant practice of CT-based 3D-optimised planning results in improved tumour dose coverage compared with traditional points-based planning methods and also improves dose to the rectum and bladder.

  7. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  8. Poster - 07: Investigations of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine for HDR Brachytherapy Scalp Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawston-Grant, Brie; Morrison, Hali; Sloboda, Ron; Menon, Geetha [Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To present an investigation of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine (ACE) in Oncentraê Brachy (OcB) v4.5 using a tissue equivalent phantom modeling scalp brachytherapy (BT) treatments. Methods: A slab phantom modeling the skin, skull, brain and mold was used. A dose of 400cGy was prescribed to just above the skull layer using TG-43 and was delivered using an HDR afterloader. Measurements were made using Gafchromic™ EBT3 film at four depths within the phantom. The TG-43 planned and film measured doses were compared to the standard (sACE) and high (hACE) accuracy ACE options in OcB between the surface and below the skull. Results: The average difference between the TG-43 calculated and film measured doses was −11.25±3.38% when there was no air gap between the mold and skin; sACE and hACE doses were on average lower than TG-43 calculated doses by 3.41±0.03% and 2.45±0.03%, respectively. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, the difference between the TG-43 calculated and measured doses was −8.28±5.76%; sACE and hACE calculations yielded average doses 1.87±0.03% and 1.78±0.04% greater than TG-43, respectively. Conclusions: TG-43, sACE, and hACE were found to overestimate doses below the skull layer compared to film. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, sACE and hACE more accurately predicted the film dose to the skin surface than TG-43. More clinical variations and their implications are currently being investigated.

  9. Poster - 07: Investigations of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine for HDR Brachytherapy Scalp Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawston-Grant, Brie; Morrison, Hali; Sloboda, Ron; Menon, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present an investigation of the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine (ACE) in Oncentraê Brachy (OcB) v4.5 using a tissue equivalent phantom modeling scalp brachytherapy (BT) treatments. Methods: A slab phantom modeling the skin, skull, brain and mold was used. A dose of 400cGy was prescribed to just above the skull layer using TG-43 and was delivered using an HDR afterloader. Measurements were made using Gafchromic™ EBT3 film at four depths within the phantom. The TG-43 planned and film measured doses were compared to the standard (sACE) and high (hACE) accuracy ACE options in OcB between the surface and below the skull. Results: The average difference between the TG-43 calculated and film measured doses was −11.25±3.38% when there was no air gap between the mold and skin; sACE and hACE doses were on average lower than TG-43 calculated doses by 3.41±0.03% and 2.45±0.03%, respectively. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, the difference between the TG-43 calculated and measured doses was −8.28±5.76%; sACE and hACE calculations yielded average doses 1.87±0.03% and 1.78±0.04% greater than TG-43, respectively. Conclusions: TG-43, sACE, and hACE were found to overestimate doses below the skull layer compared to film. With a 3mm air gap between the mold and skin, sACE and hACE more accurately predicted the film dose to the skin surface than TG-43. More clinical variations and their implications are currently being investigated.

  10. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue ≥41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T max ≤ 47 deg. C, T rectum ≤ 41.5 deg. C, and T bladder ≤ 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360 0 or 2 x 180 0 output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180 0 , 270 0 , or 360 0 output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m -3 s -1 ) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm 3 ) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T 90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM 43deg.C ) at 1 kg m -3 s -1 with 10/14 patients ≥41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T 90 ≥ 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show

  11. Dosimetry of a 90Y-hydroxide liquid brachytherapy treatment approach to canine osteosarcoma using PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jien Jie; Gonzalez, Arnulfo; Lenox, Mark W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Frank, R. Keith; Simon, Jaime; Stearns, Stan; Ruoff, Catherine M.; Wendt, Richard E.; Akabani, Gamal

    2015-01-01

    A new treatment strategy based on direct injections of 90 Y-hydroxide into the tumor bed in dogs with osteosarcoma was studied. Direct injections of the radiopharmaceutical into the tumor bed were made according to a pretreatment plan established using 18 F-FDG images. Using a special drill, cannulas were inserted going through tissue, tumor and bone. Using these cannulas, direct injections of the radiopharmaceutical were made. The in vivo biodistribution of 90 Y-hydroxide and the anatomical tumor bed were imaged using a time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT scanner. The material properties of the tissues were estimated from corresponding CT numbers using an electron-density calibration. Radiation absorbed dose estimates were calculated using Monte Carlo methods where the biodistribution of the pharmaceutical from PET images was sampled using a collapsing 3-D rejection technique. Dose distributions in the tumor bed and surrounding tissues were calculated, showing significant heterogeneity with multiple hot spots at injection sites. Dose volume histograms showed that approximately 33.9% of bone and tumor and 70.2% of bone marrow and trabecular bone received an absorbed dose over 200 Gy; approximately 3.2% of bone and tumor and 31.0% of bone marrow and trabecular bone received a total dose of over 1000 Gy. - Graphical abstract: Treatment of canine osteosarcoma using 90 Y-hydroxide using localized liquid brachytherapy. A 3-D co-registered PET/CT image showing the distribution of 90 Y in the left tibia of a dog with osteosarcoma. Multiple high activity hotspots are shown within bone marrow and isolated hotspots within the tumor bed, corresponding to the sites of administration. Absorbed doses were estimated to be as high as 2000 Gy to tumor. - Highlights: • A liquid brachytherapy treatment of canine osteosarcoma using 90 Y hydroxyapatite is presented. • Dosimetry of 90 Y hydroxyapatite liquid brachytherapy was carried out using PET-CT. • Activity distribution correlated

  12. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  13. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Results: Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Conclusion: Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern

  14. Feasibility and safety of GliaSite brachytherapy in treatment of CNS tumors following neurosurgical resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernicke A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate feasibility and safety of GliaSite brachytherapy for treatment of central nervous system (CNS tumors following neurosurgical resection. We report mature results of long-term follow-up, outcomes and toxicity. Materials and Methods: In the period from 2004 to 2007, 10 consecutive adult patients with recurrent, newly diagnosed, and metastatic brain malignancies underwent GliaSite brachytherapy following maximally safe neurosurgical resection. While 6/10 (60% patients were treated for recurrence, having previously been treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, 4/10 (40% received radiotherapy (RT for the first time. A median dose of 52.0 Gy (range, 45.0 - 60.0 Gy was prescribed to 0.5 cm - 1.0 cm from the balloon surface. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG criteria were used to assess toxicities associated with this technique. Follow-up was assessed with MRI scans and was available on all enrolled patients. Results: Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 18 - 57 months. Mean size of GliaSite balloon was 3.4 cm (range, 2.0 - 4.0 cm. Median survival was 14.0 months for the entire cohort after the treatment. The 17.6 and 16.0 months average survival for newly diagnosed and recurrent high grade gliomas (HGG, respectively, translated into a three-month improvement in survival in patients with newly diagnosed HGG compared to historical controls (P = 0.033. There were no RTOG grades 3 or 4 acute or late toxicities. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI imaging did not identify radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Our data indicate that treatment with GliaSite brachytherapy is feasible, safe and renders acceptable local control, acute and long-term toxicities. We are embarking on testing larger numbers of patients with this treatment modality.

  15. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  16. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craciunescu, O; Todor, D; Leeuw, A de

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy

  17. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. Methods: The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. Results: The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with ±5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within ±5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs to be

  18. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States); Department of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. Methods: The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. Results: The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with {+-}5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within {+-}5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs

  19. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S

    2010-10-01

    The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with +/- 5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within +/- 5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs to be measured for each case with

  20. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids: Feasibility and Early Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping, E-mail: ping.jiang@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Baumann, René [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Geenen, Matthias [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, Lubinus Clinic Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Siebert, Frank-André [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Niehoff, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Community Clinic Köln, Köln (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Witten/Herdecke, Witten (Germany); Bertolini, Julia; Druecke, Daniel [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immediate perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy; 3 patients had been previously treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy and presented with recurrences in the pretreated areas. Two or more different treatment modalities had been tried in all patients and had failed to achieve remission. After (re-)excision of the keloids, a single brachytherapy tube was placed subcutaneously before closing the wound. The target volume covered the scar in total length. Brachytherapy was given in 3 fractions with a single dose of 6 Gy in 5 mm tissue depth. The first fraction was given within 6 hours after surgery, the other 2 fractions on the first postoperative day. Thus, a total dose of 18 Gy in 3 fractions was administered within 36 hours after the resection. Results: The treatment was feasible in all patients. No procedure-related complications (eg, secondary infections) occurred. Nineteen patients had keloid-related symptoms before treatment like pain and pruritus; disappearance of symptoms was noticed in all patients after treatment. After a median follow-up of 29.4 months (range, 7.9-72.4 months), 2 keloid recurrences and 2 mildly hypertrophied scars were observed. The local control rate was 94%. Pigmentary abnormalities were detected in 3 patients, and an additional 6 patients had a mild delay in the wound-healing process. Conclusions: The early results of this study prove the feasibility and the efficacy of brachytherapy for the prevention of keloids. The results also suggest that brachytherapy may be advantageous in the management of high-risk keloids or as salvage treatment for failure after external beam therapy.

  1. Inter fraction variations in rectum and bladder volumes and dose distributions during high dose rate brachytherapy treatment of the uterine cervix investigated by repetitive CT-examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Dale, Einar; Skjoensberg, Ane; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variation of dose to organs at risk for patients receiving fractionated high dose rate gynaecological brachytherapy by using CT-based 3D treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVH). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix underwent three to six CT examinations (mean 4.9) during their course of high-dose-rate brachytherapy using radiographically compatible applicators. The rectal and bladder walls were delineated and DVHs were calculated. Results: Inter fraction variation of the bladder volume (CV mean =44.1%) was significantly larger than the inter fraction variation of the mean dose (CV mean =19.9%, P=0.005) and the maximum dose (CV mean =17.5%, P=0.003) of the bladder wall. The same trend was seen for rectum, although the figures were not significantly different. Performing CT examinations at four of seven brachytherapy fractions reduced the uncertainty to 4 and 7% for the bladder and rectal doses, respectively. A linear regression analysis showed a significant, negative relationship between time after treatment start and the whole bladder volume (P=0.018), whereas no correlation was found for the rectum. For both rectum and bladder a linear regression analysis revealed a significant, negative relationship between the whole volume and median dose (P<0.05). Conclusion: Preferably a CT examination should be provided at every fraction. However, this is logistically unfeasible in most institutions. To obtain reliable DVHs the patients will in the future undergo 3-4 CT examinations during the course of brachytherapy at our institution. Since this study showed an association between large bladder volumes and dose reductions, the patients will be treated with a standardized bladder volume

  2. Results of the European research project 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment with 3D Brachytherapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solc, J.; Sochor, V.; Selbach, H.-J.; Aubineau-Laniec, I.; Lourenco, V.; Gabris, F.; Grindborg, J.-E.; Kosunen, A.; Jarvinen, H.; Sipila, P.; Gouldstone, C.; Sander, T.; Sharpe, P.; Zeman, J.; Portugal, L.; Rodrigues, M.; Carlsson Tedgren, A.; Pooter de, M

    2011-01-01

    The project iMERA + T2.J06 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment using 3D brachytherapy' was solved in the period 2008-2011 in collaboration of metrology institutes from 10 European Union countries, including participation of the Czech Republic. Its main objective was to create a means to ensure metrological quantity absorbed dose in water from brachyterapeutical (BT) sources enabling more accurate assessment of therapeutic benefit than using existing dosimetry protocols that are based on the quantity kerma in the air. This project is discussed on the poster.

  3. Computed tomography in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, C.M.; Lee, K.R.; Dwyer, S.; Zellmer, D.; Cook, P.

    1983-01-01

    CT scanning adds to the ability to evaluate brachytherapy techniques. It provides an additional method in the assessment of patients who are candidates for or who are being treated by brachytherapy. The CT scan can give information regarding the position of the sources and their relation to the tumor and normal structures with greater ease than do orthogonal views. This makes it possible to accurately calculate areas of high or low dose. Potential areas of overdose can be recognized, thereby decreasing the chances of postbrachytherapy complications. CT scanning can be used at various levels of complexity in dosimetry evaluation. Adequate brachytherapy dosimetry information is obtainable from CT slices through one or more levels of the implanted volume. In some instances it is possible to obtain additional information by reconstructing the scans in other planes, e.g., coronal or sagittal. Three-dimensional viewing of the implant is desirable, but it should be pointed out that this approach is time-consuming and beyond the capabilities of most institutions at present. It will be necessary to continue work on three-dimensional treatment planning to make it readily available

  4. Pulse dose-rate brachytherapy and treatment of uterine cervix cancer: impact of a 3D or a 2D dosimetric support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournat, H.; Chilles, A.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D.; Ahmad, F.; Metayer, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate two dosimetric supports used in pulse dose rate brachytherapy (P.D.R.): coverage of target volumes, dose to organs at risk, residual tumor after surgery, survival. Patients and methods Twenty patients treated for uterine cervix tumor first by brachytherapy P.D.R. had a dosimetric CT-scan after implantation. For 9 patients, the treatment was planned from standard radiographies and then reported on CT-scan images. For 11 patients, it was directly planned from CT-scan. Six weeks after, 18 patients underwent surgery. Results With a median follow-up of 22 months, 2 year actuarial survival was 89%. Six patients developed grade II urinary or gynecological complications (LENT SOMA scale). No residual tumor was found for 12 patients (7 with a 3D treatment and 5 a 2 D treatment). Ninety-five percent of C.T.V.H.R. received 53 Gy (2D treatment) or 63 Gy (3D treatment). Two cm 3 of bladder wall received 63 Gy (2D) or 74 Gy (3D) although 2 cm 3 of rectal wall received 37 Gy (2D) and 35 Gy (3D). Conclusion Using CT-scan made us improve the coverage of the uterine cervix but increase the dose received by the bladder, without increasing the rate of histological remission after surgery. We should be prudent before changing our practice. (authors)

  5. Estimating statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo efficiency-gain in the context of a correlated sampling Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy treatment planning with non-normal dose distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhopadhyay, N. D.; Sampson, A. J.; Deniz, D.; Carlsson, G. A.; Williamson, J.; Malušek, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2012), s. 315-323 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Monte Carlo * correlated sampling * efficiency * uncertainty * bootstrap Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.179, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969804311004775

  6. Computational and Experimental Evaluations of a Novel Thermo-Brachytherapy Seed for Treatment of Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, Gregory R.

    of this seed was also quantified by Monte Carlo studies in the software package MCNP5. Experimental and computational analyses agree that the proposed seeds may heat a defined target with safe and attainable seed spacing and magnetic field parameters. These studies also point to the use of a ferrite-based ferrimagnetic core within the seeds, a design that would deliver hyperthermia of acceptable quality even for the high rate of blood perfusion in prostate tissue. The loss of radiation coverage due to the ISA effect of distributions of TB and HT-only seeds may be rectified by slightly increasing the prescribed dose in standard dose superposition-based treatment planning software. A systematic approach of combining LDR prostate brachytherapy with hyperthermia is thus described, and its ability to provide sufficient and uniform temperature distributions in realistic patient-specific implants evaluated. Potential improvements to the previously reported TB seed design are discussed based on quantitative evaluation of its operation and performance.

  7. Treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontenla, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    All aspects of treatment planning in radiotherapy are discussed in detail. Included are, among others, machine data and their acquisition, photon dose calculations and tests thereof, criteria of acceptability, sources of uncertainties, from 2D to 3D and from 3D to IMRT, dosimetric measurements for RTP validation, frequency of QA tests and suggested tolerances for TPS, time and staff requirements, model based segmentation, multi-dimensional radiotherapy (MD C RT), and biological IMRT process. (P.A.)

  8. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Poetter, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on 'Radiotherapy and Oncology'. These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted.

  9. Clinical Significance of Accounting for Tissue Heterogeneity in Permanent Breast Seed Implant Brachytherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, Shahram [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fleury, Emmanuelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lai, Priscilla [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Merino, Tomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiotherapy Unit, School of Medicine, Departamento de Hemato-oncologia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lechtman, Eli [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kiss, Alex [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); McCann, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: j.p.pignol@erasmusmc.nl [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Oncology Department, Erasmus Medical Center, Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF) method provides heterogeneity correction for the fast calculation TG43 formalism in seed brachytherapy. This study compared ICF-corrected plans to their standard TG43 counterparts, looking at their capacity to assess inadequate coverage and/or risk of any skin toxicities for patients who received permanent breast seed implant (PBSI). Methods and Materials: Two-month postimplant computed tomography scans and plans of 140 PBSI patients were used to calculate dose distributions by using the TG43 and the ICF methods. Multiple dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of clinical target volume (CTV) and skin were extracted and compared for both ICF and TG43 dose distributions. Short-term (desquamation and erythema) and long-term (telangiectasia) skin toxicity data were available on 125 and 110 of the patients, respectively, at the time of the study. The predictive value of each DVH parameter of skin was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each toxicity endpoint. Results: Dose-volume histogram parameters of CTV, calculated using the ICF method, showed an overall decrease compared to TG43, whereas those of skin showed an increase, confirming previously reported findings of the impact of heterogeneity with low-energy sources. The ICF methodology enabled us to distinguish patients for whom the CTV V{sub 100} and V{sub 90} are up to 19% lower compared to TG43, which could present a risk of recurrence not detected when heterogeneity are not accounted for. The ICF method also led to an increase in the prediction of desquamation, erythema, and telangiectasia for 91% of skin DVH parameters studied. Conclusions: The ICF methodology has the advantage of distinguishing any inadequate dose coverage of CTV due to breast heterogeneity, which can be missed by TG43. Use of ICF correction also led to an increase in prediction accuracy of skin toxicities in most cases.

  10. Multilayer conformal applicator for microwave heating and brachytherapy treatment of superficial tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, T; Stauffer, P R; Neuman, D G; Schlorff, J L

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and perform preliminary functionality evaluations of a multilayer conformal applicator with provisions for thermal monitoring, tight conformity and simultaneous microwave heating and brachytherapy treatment of large-area contoured surfaces. The multilayer conformal applicator consists of thermal monitoring catheters for fibre-optic monitoring of skin temperatures, a waterbolus, a PCB microwave antenna array, a dielectric spacer for brachytherapy considerations, brachytherapy catheters for delivering HDR radiation and an inflatable air bladder for improving conformity to contoured surfaces. The applicator also includes an elastic attachment structure to hold the applicator securely in place on the patient. The conformity of the applicator to irregular surfaces was evaluated through CT imaging of the applicator fitted onto a life-sized human torso phantom. The fluid flow dynamics of the waterbolus, which impact the effectiveness of temperature control, were evaluated with thermometry during a 19 degrees C step change temperature of the circulating water. CT imaging showed improved conformity to the torso phantom surface following the application of gentle inward pressure from inflating the outer air bladder. Only a small number of 1-5 mm sized air gaps separated the conformal applicator and tissue surface. Thermometry testing of the bolus fluid flow dynamics demonstrated temperature uniformity within +/-0.82 degrees C across a 19 x 34 x 0.6 cm area bolus and +/-0.85 degrees C across a large 42 x 32 x 0.6 cm area bolus. CT scans of the applicator confirmed that the applicator conforms well to complex body contours and should maintain good conformity and positional stability even when worn on a mobile patient. Thermometry testing of two different waterbolus geometries demonstrated that uniform circulation and temperature control can be maintained throughout large, complex bolus shapes.

  11. Role of brachytherapy in treatment of epidermoid carcinomas of the vallecula after conservative supraglottic laryngectomy followed by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clippe, Sebastien; Pommier, Pascal; Poupart, Marc; Ceruse, Philippe; Rosenbusch, Thomas; Ramade, Antoine; Montbarbon, Xavier; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Carrie, Christian; Ardiet, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To evaluate survival and functional results of the treatment of carcinomas of the vallecula using surgery, irradiation, and interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 36 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vallecula were treated with horizontal supraglottic functional laryngectomy, external beam radiotherapy (median dose 54 Gy), and additional interstitial brachytherapy (median dose 16 Gy). Results were compared with a previous series of 22 patients treated without brachytherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 61.3%. The 5-year specific survival rate was 86%, with 2 local failures (local control rate 94.4%) and 4 isolated distant metastases. Ten patients developed a second primary. The overall survival was 34% for 22 patients previously treated without brachytherapy. Severe toxicities occurred in 9 patients: death (related to larynx edema or inhalation, n=1), soft tissue necrosis (n=1), aspiration pneumonia (n=1), mandibular necrosis (n=2), pharyngocutaneous fistula (n=2), and laryngeal edema (n=2). All the patients fed orally with no definitive gastrostomy or tracheotomy. Conclusion: Additional brachytherapy for vallecula carcinoma seems to improve locoregional control and overall survival dramatically. Functional results were also excellent. To our knowledge, this original therapeutic schedule has never been previously described

  12. Effect of demographic factors on brachytherapy treatment results in patients with endometrial cancer 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczyk, Mieczysława U; Chmaj-Wierzchowska, Karolina; Klofik, Joanna; Sajdak, Stefan; Opala, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 20 female cancers in Europe is of the endometrium. Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynaecologic cancer. Considering the fact that an upward tendency has recently been observed in morbidity due to this type of cancer, this is a serious medical problem. The presented report describes the results of the analysis of selected demographic factors and their effect on the incidence of endometrial cancer. Analysis of the results of treatment of endometrial cancer during 1995-2010 was also an objective of the study. Based on medical records obtained from the HDR Laboratory of Brachytherapy at the Gynaecological & Obstetrics Clinical Hospital, University of Medical Sciences in Poznań, the results of treatment of patients with endometrial cancer by brachytherapy were analyzed. The analysis covered a group of 400 patients. More than a half of the patients completed their education on the level of elementary or secondary school. Taking into consideration the weight of the patients, it appeared that most women had excessive body weight. Most frequently, concomitant hypertension was observed. Moreover, the age at menarche was 12 and 13. Demographic factors exert a significant effect on the incidence of endometrial cancer. 1. Overweight and obesity are important risk factors of endometrial cancer. 2. A strong relationship is observed between the occurrence of hypertension or diabetes, and the development of endometrial cancer. 3. Women who come from the rural environment and continue to live in this environment are more likely to contract endometrial cancer.

  13. WE-DE-201-11: Sensitivity and Specificity of Verification Methods Based On Total Reference Air Kerma (TRAK) Or On User Provided Dose Points for Graphically Planned Skin HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, A; Devlin, P; Bhagwat, M; Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Cormack, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of a novel verification methodology for image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy plans using a TRAK-based reasonableness test, compared to a typical manual verification methodology. Methods: Two methodologies were used to flag treatment plans necessitating additional review due to a potential discrepancy of 3 mm between planned dose and clinical target in the skin. Manual verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between the average dose to points positioned at time of planning representative of the prescribed depth and the expected prescription dose. Automatic verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between TRAK of the clinical plan and its expected value, which was calculated using standard plans with varying curvatures, ranging from flat to cylindrically circumferential. A plan was flagged if a discrepancy >10% was observed. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using as a criteria for true positive that >10% of plan dwells had a distance to prescription dose >1 mm different than prescription depth (3 mm + size of applicator). All HDR image-based skin brachytherapy plans treated at our institution in 2013 were analyzed. Results: 108 surface applicator plans to treat skin of the face, scalp, limbs, feet, hands or abdomen were analyzed. Median number of catheters was 19 (range, 4 to 71) and median number of dwells was 257 (range, 20 to 1100). Sensitivity/specificity were 57%/78% for manual and 70%/89% for automatic verification. Conclusion: A check based on expected TRAK value is feasible for irregularly shaped, image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy. This test yielded higher sensitivity and specificity than a test based on the identification of representative points, and can be implemented with a dedicated calculation code or with pre-calculated lookup tables of ideally shaped, uniform surface applicators.

  14. WE-DE-201-11: Sensitivity and Specificity of Verification Methods Based On Total Reference Air Kerma (TRAK) Or On User Provided Dose Points for Graphically Planned Skin HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, A; Devlin, P; Bhagwat, M; Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Cormack, R [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of a novel verification methodology for image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy plans using a TRAK-based reasonableness test, compared to a typical manual verification methodology. Methods: Two methodologies were used to flag treatment plans necessitating additional review due to a potential discrepancy of 3 mm between planned dose and clinical target in the skin. Manual verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between the average dose to points positioned at time of planning representative of the prescribed depth and the expected prescription dose. Automatic verification was used to calculate the discrepancy between TRAK of the clinical plan and its expected value, which was calculated using standard plans with varying curvatures, ranging from flat to cylindrically circumferential. A plan was flagged if a discrepancy >10% was observed. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using as a criteria for true positive that >10% of plan dwells had a distance to prescription dose >1 mm different than prescription depth (3 mm + size of applicator). All HDR image-based skin brachytherapy plans treated at our institution in 2013 were analyzed. Results: 108 surface applicator plans to treat skin of the face, scalp, limbs, feet, hands or abdomen were analyzed. Median number of catheters was 19 (range, 4 to 71) and median number of dwells was 257 (range, 20 to 1100). Sensitivity/specificity were 57%/78% for manual and 70%/89% for automatic verification. Conclusion: A check based on expected TRAK value is feasible for irregularly shaped, image-guided skin HDR brachytherapy. This test yielded higher sensitivity and specificity than a test based on the identification of representative points, and can be implemented with a dedicated calculation code or with pre-calculated lookup tables of ideally shaped, uniform surface applicators.

  15. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  16. MO-FG-BRA-01: Development of An Image-Guided Dosimetric Planning System for Injectable Brachytherapy Using ELP Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafata, K [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schaal, J; Liu, W [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop, validate, and evaluate a methodology for determining dosimetry for intratumoral injections of elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP) brachytherapy nanoparticles. These organic-polymer-based nanoparticles are injectable, biodegradable, and genetically tunable. We present a genetically encoded polymer-solution, composed of novel radiolabeled-ELP nanoparticles that are custom-designed to self-assemble into a local source upon intratumoral injection. Our preliminary results of a small animal study demonstrate 100% tumor response, effective radionuclide retention-rates, strong in vivo stability, and no polymer-induced toxicities. While our approach is therefore highly promising for improved brachytherapy, the current workflow lacks a dosimetry framework. Methods: We are developing a robust software framework that provides image-guided dosimetric-planning capabilities for ELP brachytherapy. The user graphically places ELP injection sites within a µCT-planning-image, and independently defines each injection volume, concentration, and radioisotope to be used. The resulting internal dosimetry is then pre-determined by first modeling post-injection ELP advection-diffusion, and then calculating the resulting dose distribution based on a point- dose-kernel-convolution algorithm. We have experimentally measured ELP steady-state concentrations via µSPECT acquisition, and validated our dose calculation algorithm against Monte Carlo simulations of several radioactivity distributions. Finally, we have investigated potential advantages and limitations of various ELP injection parameters. Results: The µSPECT results demonstrated inhomogeneous steady-state distributions of ELP in tissue, and Monte Carlo radioactivity distributions were designed accordingly. Our algorithm yielded a root-mean-square-error of less than 2% for each distribution tested (average root-mean-square-error was 0.73%). Dose-Volume-Histogram analysis of five different plans showed how strategic

  17. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Stephen R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: UMahmood@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  18. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Stephen R.; Walker, Gary V.; Koshy, Matthew; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mahmood, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  19. Endoluminal brachytherapy in the treatment of oesophageal cancer: technique description, case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Castilla

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Endoesophageal brachytherapy is a useful technique for the palliative treatment of dysphagia in advanced oesophageal cancer. This technique offers good results on dysphagia control and quality of life. We report the case of a patient treated with this technique presenting complete response to the dysphagia. We describe endoesophageal brachyterapy technique and we comment on the literature.

  20. Placement of empty catheters for an HDR-emulating LDR prostate brachytherapy technique: comparison to standard intraoperative planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermayr, Thomas R; Nguyen, Paul L; Murciano-Goroff, Yonina R; Kovtun, Konstantin A; Neubauer Sugar, Emily; Cail, Daniel W; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Cormack, Robert A; Buzurovic, Ivan; Wolfsberger, Luciant T; O'Leary, Michael P; Steele, Graeme S; Devlin, Philip M; Orio, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether placing empty catheters within the prostate and then inverse planning iodine-125 seed locations within those catheters (High Dose Rate-Emulating Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy [HELP] technique) would improve concordance between planned and achieved dosimetry compared with a standard intraoperative technique. We examined 30 consecutive low dose rate prostate cases performed by standard intraoperative technique of planning followed by needle placement/seed deposition and compared them to 30 consecutive low dose rate prostate cases performed by the HELP technique. The primary endpoint was concordance between planned percentage of the clinical target volume that receives at least 100% of the prescribed dose/dose that covers 90% of the volume of the clinical target volume (V100/D90) and the actual V100/D90 achieved at Postoperative Day 1. The HELP technique had superior concordance between the planned target dosimetry and what was actually achieved at Day 1 and Day 30. Specifically, target D90 at Day 1 was on average 33.7 Gy less than planned for the standard intraoperative technique but was only 10.5 Gy less than planned for the HELP technique (p 0.05). Placing empty needles first and optimizing the plan to the known positions of the needles resulted in improved concordance between the planned and the achieved dosimetry to the target, possibly because of elimination of errors in needle placement. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of interactive planned and dynamic dose calculated prostate seed brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Gert J; van den Berg, Hetty A; Hurkmans, Coen W; Stijns, Pascal E; Weterings, Jan H

    2006-09-01

    To compare the dosimetrical results of an interactive planning procedure and a procedure based on dynamic dose calculation for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Between 6/2000 and 11/2005, 510 patients underwent (125)I implants for T1-T2 prostate cancer. Before 4/2003, 187 patients were treated using an interactive technique that included needle updating. After that period, 323 patients were treated with a more refined dynamic technique that included constant updating of the deposited seed position. The comparison is based on postimplant dose - volume parameters such as the V(100) and d(90) for the target, V(100)(r) for the rectum and d(10)(u) for the urethra. Furthermore, the target volume ratios (TVR identical with V(100)(body)/V(100)), and the homogeneity indices (HI identical with [V(100)-V(150)]/V(100)) were calculated as additional quality parameters. The dose outside the target volume was significantly reduced, the V(100)(r) decreased from 1.4 cm(3) for the interactive technique to 0.6 cm(3) for the dynamic technique. Similarly the mean TVR reduced from 1.66 to 1.44. In addition, the mean V(100) increased from 92% for the interactive procedure to 95% for the dynamic procedure. More importantly, the percentage of patients with a V(100) < 80% reduced from 5% to 1%. A slight decline was observed with regard to the d(10)(u) (136% vs. 140%) and the HI (0.58 vs. 0.51). The dynamic implant procedure resulted in improved implants. Almost ideal dose coverage was achieved, while minimizing the dose outside the prostate.

  2. Dosimetric comparison of interactive planned and dynamic dose calculated prostate seed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Gert J.; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Stijns, Pascal E.; Weterings, Jan H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetrical results of an interactive planning procedure and a procedure based on dynamic dose calculation for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Materials and methods: Between 6/2000 and 11/2005, 510 patients underwent 125 I implants for T1-T2 prostate cancer. Before 4/2003, 187 patients were treated using an interactive technique that included needle updating. After that period, 323 patients were treated with a more refined dynamic technique that included constant updating of the deposited seed position. The comparison is based on postimplant dose-volume parameters such as the V 100 and d 90 for the target, V 100 r for the rectum and d 10 u for the urethra. Furthermore, the target volume ratios (TVR=V 100 body /V 100 ), and the homogeneity indices (HI=[V 100 -V 150 ]/V 100 ) were calculated as additional quality parameters. Results: The dose outside the target volume was significantly reduced, the V 100 r decreased from 1.4cm 3 for the interactive technique to 0.6cm 3 for the dynamic technique. Similarly the mean TVR reduced from 1.66 to 1.44. In addition, the mean V 100 increased from 92% for the interactive procedure to 95% for the dynamic procedure. More importantly, the percentage of patients with a V 100 10 u (136% vs. 140%) and the HI (0.58 vs. 0.51). Conclusion: The dynamic implant procedure resulted in improved implants. Almost ideal dose coverage was achieved, while minimizing the dose outside the prostate

  3. Evaluation of failure modes of computerized planning phase of interstitial implants with high dose rate brachytherapy using HFMEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biazotto, Bruna; Tokarski, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the failure modes of the computerized planning step in interstitial implants with high dose rate brachytherapy. The prospective tool of risk management Health Care Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) was used. Twelve subprocesses were identified, and 33 failure modes of which 21 justified new safety actions, and 9 of them were intolerable risks. The method proved itself useful in identifying failure modes, but laborious and subjective in their assessment. The main risks were due to human factors, which require training and commitment of management to their mitigation. (author)

  4. Brachytherapy Combined With Surgery for Conservative Treatment of Children With Bladder Neck and/or Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chargari, Cyrus, E-mail: cyrus.chargari@gustaveroussy.fr [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Bretigny-sur-Orge (France); French Military Health Service Academy, Ecole du Val-de-Grâce, Paris (France); Haie-Meder, Christine [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Guérin, Florent [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bicêtre Hospital, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Minard-Colin, Véronique [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lambert, Guénolée de [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bicêtre Hospital, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Mazeron, Renaud; Escande, Alexandre; Marsolat, Fanny; Dumas, Isabelle [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Deutsch, Eric [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Faculté de Médecine Paris Sud, Université Paris Sud, Université Paris Saclay, Paris (France); Valteau-Couanet, Dominique [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); and others

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a conservative strategy based on partial surgery combined with brachytherapy in a prospective cohort of children with bladder–prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (BP RMS). Methods and Materials: We prospectively documented the outcome of children treated in our department between 1991 and 2015 for BP RMS and undergoing a multimodal approach combining conservative surgery (partial cystectomy and/or partial prostatectomy) and perioperative interstitial low-dose-rate or pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy. Before brachytherapy, children had received chemotherapy with modalities depending on their risk group of treatment. Results: A total of 100 patients were identified, with a median age of 28 months (range, 5.6 months-14 years). According to the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) group, 84 were IRS-III, and 12 were IRS-IV tumors. Four patients were treated at relapse. The median number of chemotherapy cycles before local therapy was 6 (range, 4-13). After surgery, 63 patients had a macroscopic tumor residuum. Five patients underwent a brachytherapy boost before pelvic external beam radiation therapy because of nodal involvement, and 95 had exclusive brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 64 months (range, 6 months-24.5 years). Five-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 84% (95% confidence interval 80%-88%) and 91% (95% confidence interval 87%-95%), respectively. At last follow-up most survivors presented with only mild to moderate genitourinary sequelae and a normal diurnal urinary continence. Five patients required a secondary total cystectomy: 3 for a nonfunctional bladder and 2 for relapse. Conclusion: Brachytherapy is effective as part of a conservative strategy for BP RMS, with a relatively low delayed toxicity as compared with previously published studies using external beam radiation therapy. Longer follow-up is required to ensure that the functional results are maintained over time.

  5. Brachytherapy Combined With Surgery for Conservative Treatment of Children With Bladder Neck and/or Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Haie-Meder, Christine; Guérin, Florent; Minard-Colin, Véronique; Lambert, Guénolée de; Mazeron, Renaud; Escande, Alexandre; Marsolat, Fanny; Dumas, Isabelle; Deutsch, Eric; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a conservative strategy based on partial surgery combined with brachytherapy in a prospective cohort of children with bladder–prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (BP RMS). Methods and Materials: We prospectively documented the outcome of children treated in our department between 1991 and 2015 for BP RMS and undergoing a multimodal approach combining conservative surgery (partial cystectomy and/or partial prostatectomy) and perioperative interstitial low-dose-rate or pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy. Before brachytherapy, children had received chemotherapy with modalities depending on their risk group of treatment. Results: A total of 100 patients were identified, with a median age of 28 months (range, 5.6 months-14 years). According to the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) group, 84 were IRS-III, and 12 were IRS-IV tumors. Four patients were treated at relapse. The median number of chemotherapy cycles before local therapy was 6 (range, 4-13). After surgery, 63 patients had a macroscopic tumor residuum. Five patients underwent a brachytherapy boost before pelvic external beam radiation therapy because of nodal involvement, and 95 had exclusive brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 64 months (range, 6 months-24.5 years). Five-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 84% (95% confidence interval 80%-88%) and 91% (95% confidence interval 87%-95%), respectively. At last follow-up most survivors presented with only mild to moderate genitourinary sequelae and a normal diurnal urinary continence. Five patients required a secondary total cystectomy: 3 for a nonfunctional bladder and 2 for relapse. Conclusion: Brachytherapy is effective as part of a conservative strategy for BP RMS, with a relatively low delayed toxicity as compared with previously published studies using external beam radiation therapy. Longer follow-up is required to ensure that the functional results are maintained over time.

  6. Meta-analysis of comparison between brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaodong; Jiang Qing; Yuan Gengbiao; Wang Jiawu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effect of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer using a Meta-analysis. Methods: The published data with randomized control trials (RCT) on comparison of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in PubMed, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBMdisc), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Ovid and Cochrane library were searched and screened. The quality of the studies included was evaluated and the data with 5-year event free survival rate for comparison were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 (Cochrane reviews software). Results: From six trials, there were 5903 patients that were eligible for the analysis, in which 3323 patients were treated by brachytherapy and other 2580 by radical prostatectomy. The odds ratio of all trials was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69-1.45, P=0.99) and there was no significant difference of 5-year event free survival rate between two treatment groups. Conclusion: This Meta analysis shows that brachytherapy may have comparable treatment effect than radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  7. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  8. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters

  9. Needle displacement during HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damore, Steven J.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Sharma, Anil

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We used clinical patient data to examine implant displacement between high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy fractions for prostate cancer to determine its impact on treatment delivery. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the verification films taken prior to each fraction for 96 consecutive patients treated with HDR brachytherapy boosts as part of their radiation therapy for definitive treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer at our institution. Patients were treated with 18-24 Gy in 4 fractions of HDR delivered in 40 hours followed by 36-39.6 Gy external beam radiation to the prostate. We determined the mean and maximum displacement distances of marker seeds placed in the prostate and of the implanted needles between HDR fractions. Results: Mean and maximum displacement distances between fractions were documented up to 7.6 mm and 28.5 mm, respectively, for the implant needles and 3.6 mm and 11.4 mm, respectively, for the gold marker seeds. All displacement of implant needles occurred in the caudal direction. At least 1 cm caudal displacement of needles occurred prior to 15.5% all fractions. Manual adjustment of needles was required prior to 15% of fractions, and adjustment of the CLP only was required in 24%. Most of the displacement for both the marker seeds and needles occurred between the first and second fractions. Conclusions: There is significant caudal displacement of interstitial implant needles between HDR fractions in our prostate cancer patients. Obtaining verification films and making adjustments in the treatment volume prior to each fraction is necessary to avoid significant inaccuracies in treatment delivery

  10. Image Guided Cervical Brachytherapy: 2014 Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Surbhi, E-mail: Surbhi.grover@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Cho, Linda P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham & Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department Radiation Oncology, Froedtert Hospital and Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Small, Christina [Department of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Small, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham & Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To provide an update of the 2007 American brachytherapy survey on image-based brachytherapy, which showed that in the setting of treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy, although computed tomography (CT) was often used for treatment planning, most brachytherapists used point A for dose specification. Methods and Materials: A 45-question electronic survey on cervical cancer brachytherapy practice patterns was sent to all American Brachytherapy Society members and additional radiation oncologists and physicists based in the United States between January and September 2014. Responses from the 2007 survey and the present survey were compared using the χ{sup 2} test. Results: There were 370 respondents. Of those, only respondents, not in training, who treat more than 1 cervical cancer patient per year and practice in the United States, were included in the analysis (219). For dose specification to the target (cervix and tumor), 95% always use CT, and 34% always use MRI. However, 46% use point A only for dose specification to the target. There was a lot of variation in parameters used for dose evaluation of target volume and normal tissues. Compared with the 2007 survey, use of MRI has increased from 2% to 34% (P<.0001) for dose specification to the target. Use of volume-based dose delineation to the target has increased from 14% to 52% (P<.0001). Conclusion: Although use of image-based brachytherapy has increased in the United States since the 2007 survey, there is room for further growth, particularly with the use of MRI. This increase may be in part due to educational initiatives. However, there is still significant heterogeneity in brachytherapy practice in the United States, and future efforts should be geared toward standardizing treatment.

  11. Toward a 'all high rate' brachytherapy: organisation, biology and perspectives after treatment of 192 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Ferre, M.; Gautier, M.; Marcie, S.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of radiation protection regulations aimed at reducing the exposure to ionizing radiation from care-givers, low dose rate brachytherapy is usually replaced by a pulsed rate brachytherapy. The center Antoine Lacassagne has directed the outset to the use of a high-dose rate brachytherapy. The implications in terms of organization, biology and the prospects for such a change are the principal questions studied. (N.C.)

  12. Treatment planning source assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta Larrieu, O.; Blaumann, H.; Longhino, J.

    2000-01-01

    The reactor RA-6 NCT system was improved during the last year mainly in two aspects: the facility itself getting lower contamination factors and using better measurements techniques to obtain lower uncertainties in its characterization. In this job we show the different steps to get the source to be used in the treatment planning code representing the NCT facility. The first one was to compare the dosimetry in a water phantom between the calculation using the entire facility including core, filter and shields and a surface source at the end of the beam. The second one was to transform this particle by particle source in a distribution one regarding the minimum spatial, energy and angular resolution to get similar results. Finally we compare calculation and experimental values with and without the water phantom to adjust the distribution source. The results are discussed. (author)

  13. Urethra-Sparing, Intraoperative, Real-Time Planned, Permanent-Seed Prostate Brachytherapy: Toxicity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David; Le, Hoa Phong; Larouche, Renee-Xaviere; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Hervieux, Yannick; Delouya, Guila [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the toxicity outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing {sup 125}I permanent-seed brachytherapy (BT) according to a urethra-sparing, intraoperative (IO), real-time planned conformal technique. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed on 250 patients treated consecutively for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2005 and 2009. The planned goal was urethral V{sub 150} = 0. Acute and late genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI), and erectile toxicities were scored with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Median follow-up time for patients with at least 2 years of follow-up (n = 130) was 34.4 months (range, 24-56.9 months). Results: Mean IO urethra V{sub 150} was 0.018% {+-} 0.08%. Mean prostate D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} on day-30 computed tomography scan were 158.0 {+-} 27.0 Gy and 92.1% {+-} 7.2%, respectively. Mean IPSS peak was 9.5 {+-} 6.3 1 month after BT (mean difference from baseline IPSS, 5.3). No acute GI toxicity was observed in 86.8% of patients. The 3-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity-free survival was 77.4% {+-} 4.0%, with Grade 3 late GU toxicity encountered in only 3 patients. Three-year Grade 1 late GI toxicity-free survival was 86.1% {+-} 3.2%. No patient presented Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicity. Of patients with normal sexual status at baseline, 20.7% manifested Grade {>=}2 erectile dysfunction after BT. On multivariate analysis, elevated baseline IPSS (p = 0.016) and high-activity sources (median 0.61 mCi) (p = 0.033) predicted increased Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity. Conclusions: Urethra-sparing IO BT results in low acute and late GU toxicity compared with the literature. High seed activity and elevated IPSS at baseline increased long-term GU toxicity.

  14. Brachytherapy in the conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas extending to neurovascular structures: an analysis of 38 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.; Delannes, M.; Stoeckle, E.; Martel, P.; Pigneux, J.; Daly-Schveitzer, N.; Bui, B.N.; Chevreau, C.; Kantor, G.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the tolerance of neurovascular structures to brachytherapy, a retrospective review of our series was undertaken. Between May 1986 and January 1994, 85 patients with soft tissue sarcomas underwent conservative surgery and low-dose rate interstitial irradiation. Thirty-eight patients had tumors extending to neurovascular structures. Brachytherapy was part of initial treatment in 30 patients and was done in 7 cases for recurrent sarcomas. Afterloading catethers for brachytherapy were inserted intraoperatively and placed direct upon or under the neurovascular structures in the tumor bed. A mean dose of 20 Gy was delivered to the target volume. Thirty patients received 45 to 50 Gy of postoperative external irradiation. With a median follow-up of 39 months, the 3-year actuarial survival was 82.9%, the 3-year disease-free survival was 71.9% and the 3-year actuarial local control was 91%. The 3-year actuarial incidence of distant metastase was 28%. Acute side effects occurred in 12 patients requiring conservative surgical procedures in 6 cases. Significant late toxicity occurred in 8 patients : 2 lymphoedemas interfering with normal activity, 1 partial artery stenosis, 5 peripheral neuropathy (2 grade 2, 3 grade 3). Late toxicity has led to significant impairment of mobility in 4 patients. Limb preservation was achieved in every patient, no amputation was required. We conclude that integration of brachytherapy in the conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas extending to neurovascular structures can provide excellent local control with an acceptable level of toxicity

  15. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  16. Comparative studies on permanent prostate brachytherapy: pre-plan and real-time transrectal ultrasound guided iodine-125 seed implants at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalolo, L.T.

    2013-06-01

    This research was carried out to investigate and compare the real-time and pre-plan implant at the Radiotherapy Department of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Prowess Panther 4.5 treatment planning system and variseed 7.2 software were used for pre-plan and real-time implant respectively. The study was conducted for eighty three (83) patients treated for prostate cancer through real-time implant brachytherapy between september, 2008 to April, 2013. Thirty one patients (31) patients whose ultrasound images were available were selected for the pre-plan study. The slices of ultrasound images were re-drawn on transparent A-4 sheets and later on scanned, contoured and registered in the treatment planning system (prowess 4.5). After planning, the volume to be implanted, total number of needles, seeds and the total activity of the source were displayed. Comparison was done withe the pre-plan and real-time implant. In both cases the variation was below 5% as recommended in dosimetry. About 30% - 40% of the imported seeds were left un-used due to over-estimation of seeds ordered from the manufacturer (BARD Company-USA). Hence this work (pre-plan) aims to solve this problem. The comparison for dosimetric parameters was assessed for prostate, urethra and rectum as (V 95%, V 100%, V 150%, D90Gy, D90%), (D90Gy, D90%, D30Gy, D30% ) and (V 100%, D30Gy and D30%) respectively and the variation were within the limit of ± 5%. Comparison of dosimetric values for this work were done with other institutions, like Karolinska university hospital, Sweden, The institute of Curie/ hospital Cochin Group Paris-France and European recommendations. The values reported at Korle - Bu teaching hospital (this work) were in good agreement with the international guidelines. (au)

  17. Investigation of source position uncertainties & balloon deformation in MammoSite brachytherapy on treatment effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaleh, S.

    2010-01-01

    The MammoSite ® breast high dose rate brachytherapy is used in treatment of early-stage breast cancer. The tumour bed volume is irradiated with high dose per fraction in a relatively small number of fractions. Uncertainties in the source positioning and MammoSite balloon deformation will alter the prescribed dose within the treated volume. They may also expose the normal tissues in balloon proximity to excessive dose. The purpose of this work is to explore the impact of these two uncertainties on the MammoSite dose distribution in the breast using dose volume histograms and Monte Carlo simulations. The Lyman–Kutcher and relative seriality models were employed to estimate the normal tissues complications associated with the MammoSite dose distributions. The tumour control probability was calculated using the Poisson model. This study gives low probabilities for developing heart and lung complications. The probability of complications of the skin and normal breast tissues depends on the location of the source inside the balloon and the volume receiving high dose. Incorrect source position and balloon deformation had significant effect on the prescribed dose within the treated volume. A 4 mm balloon deformation resulted in reduction of the tumour control probability by 24%. Monte Carlo calculations using EGSnrc showed that a deviation of the source by 1 mm caused approximately 7% dose reduction in the treated target volume at 1 cm from the balloon surface. In conclusion, accurate positioning of the 192 Ir source at the balloon centre and minimal balloon deformation are critical for proper dose delivery with the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. On the basis of this study, we suggest that the MammoSite treatment protocols should allow for a balloon deformation of ≤2 mm and a maximum source deviation of ≤1 mm.

  18. Post-operative treatment of malignant salivary gland tumours of the palate with iodine-125 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Clare E.; Hering, Egbert; Hough, Jan; Knowles, Ruth; Munro, Roger; Hille, Jos

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: Malignant minor salivary gland tumours are usually small and clinically indistinguishable from benign lesions. Surgery is the treatment of choice with post-operative radiotherapy for involved margins or unfavourable histology. We assessed the results of a series of such patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy in the form of a temporary applicator or implant. Patients and methods: There were nine patients with T1/T2 tumours of the hard and/or soft palate that had been excised. All had close or involved margins. Six were treated with a dental applicator alone, two with an applicator and additional I-125 seeds in tubes and one with an implant alone. The applicator consists of two layers of plastic made from a dental impression enclosing a predetermined number of I-125 seeds, 9-39, glued to one surface and a layer of ash metal to protect the tongue. It was inserted 1-3 months post-operatively and delivered 35-62 Gy, median 56 Gy, at 5-7 mm depth over 58-156 h, median 120 h, at 0.26-0.67 Gy/h, median 0.45 Gy/h. Results: The patients have been followed up for 32-158 months, median 50 months, and there were no recurrences. The applicator was well tolerated. A confluent mucositis developed which lasted 3-4 weeks. One patient developed a mucosal ulcer which healed spontaneously. Conclusions: Brachytherapy is an effective way of delivering post-operative radiotherapy to the hard and soft palate in patients with malignant salivary gland tumours that have been incompletely excised or have unfavourable histology. Local control is excellent, treatment time is short and morbidity is minimal

  19. Radiation protection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1996-02-01

    It covers technical procedures in medical applications for cancer treatment. Radiation protection principles in brachytherapy. Medical uses in therapy for Sr-90, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Ir-192, Au-198, Bi-214, Pb-214. (The author)

  20. Does immediate postoperative brachytherapy allow to broaden the indications of conservative treatment in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floiras, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    A 1997 study of long-term outcomes in 109 patients with unilateral stage I or II breast cancer treated by brachytherapy between 1983 and 1985 found significantly lower recurrence rates than in a conservatively-treated group of patients managed at the same institution. The benefits of brachytherapy, of a booster dose after after surgery, and of adjuvant medical therapy are emphasized. (author)

  1. MO-B-BRC-01: Introduction [Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, J. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  2. Radiobiologically based treatment plan evaluation for prostate seed implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Stathakis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Accurate prostate low dose-rate brachytherapy treatment plan evaluation is important for future care decisions. Presently, an evaluation is based on dosimetric quantifiers for the tumor and organs at risk. However, these do not account for effects of varying dose-rate, tumor repopulation and other biological effects. In this work, incorporation of the biological response is used to obtain more clinically relevant treatment plan evaluation.Material and methods: Eleven patients were evaluated. Each patient received a 145 Gy implant. Iodine-125 seeds were used and the treatment plans were created on the Prowess system. Based on CT images the post-implant plan was created. In the post-plan, the tumor, urethra, bladder and rectum were contoured. The biologically effective dose was used to determine the tumor control probability and the normal tissue complication probabilities for the urethra, bladder, rectum and surrounding tissue. Results: The average tumor control probability and complication probabilities for the urethra, bladder, rectum and surrounding tissue were 99%, 29%, 0%, 12% and 6%, respectively. These measures provide a simpler means for evaluation and since they include radiobiological factors, they provide more reliable estimation of the treatment outcome. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to create more clinically relevant prostate seed-implant evaluation by incorporating radiobiological measures. This resulted in a simpler descriptor of treatment plan quality and was consistent with patient outcomes.

  3. The role of interstitial brachytherapy in the treatment of vaginal and vulvar malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, A.R.; Windschall, A.; Lotter, M.; Sauer, R.; Strnad, V.; Mehlhorn, G.; Beckmann, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Background: irradiation has established itself as a treatment for vulvar and vaginal malignancies. Due to the sensitive nature of the vulvar and vaginal tissues, interstitial brachytherapy (iBT) provides an effective, gentle and individualized therapy. Patients and Methods: patients with vulvar (nine of 22) and vaginal (13 of 22) malignancies were treated using interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-iBT). Twelve out of 22 patients were additionally treated using external-beam therapy to the pelvis and regional lymph nodes. The median total dose of PDR-iBT administered to patients with vulvar carcinoma was 55.0 Gy. The median total PDR dose administered to patients with vaginal malignancies amounted to 20.25 Gy. Results: the median follow-up time for patients with vulvar cancer was 19 months and for patients with vaginal malignancies 27 months. Acute mucositis or skin reactions during iBT were observed in 15 of 22 patients. Two of 22 patients showed delayed side effects. After 6 months, 77.8% of the patients with vulvar cancer (seven out of nine) and 100% of the patients with vaginal malignancies (13 out of 13) achieved complete local remission. One patient out of nine with vulvar carcinoma developed local recurrence, four out of nine regional recurrence, and two out of nine developed regional recurrence and had local tumor following therapy. In patients with malignancies of the vagina, no cases of local recurrence were observed, but distant metastases were found in five out of 13 patients. At the time of analysis, eleven out of 22 patients with vulvar or vaginal carcinoma were still alive. Conclusion: IBT achieved good local control without serious delayed side effects in both localizations. However, survival is limited by regional or distant metastases. (orig.)

  4. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Rukhsana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP, quality assurance tests (QA in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1 the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2 the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3 the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error: ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4 treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software: ± 3% or 1 mm; 5 the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm. Material and methods: Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2% and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy to a point P, at a distance of “r” in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. Results: All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in

  5. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sadiq R; Banu, Parvin A; Rukhsana, Naheed

    2011-06-01

    The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP), quality assurance tests (QA) in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit ® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1) the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2) the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3) the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error): ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4) treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software): ± 3% or 1 mm; 5) the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm). Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB) while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR) according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2%) and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy) to a point P, at a distance of "r" in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR) has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in delivering the treatment. Implications of these studies

  6. Dose accumulation of multiple high dose rate prostate brachytherapy treatments in two commercially available image registration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Yuen, Johnson; Howie, Andrew; Bece, Andrej; Bucci, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether deformable image registration (DIR) is required for dose accumulation of multiple high dose rate prostate brachytherapy (HDRPBT) plans treated with the same catheter pattern on two different CT datasets. DIR was applied to 20 HDRPBT patients' planning CT images who received two treatment fractions on sequential days, on two different CT datasets, with the same implant. Quality of DIR in Velocity and MIM image registration systems was assessed by calculating the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and mean distance to agreement (MDA) for the prostate, urethra and rectum contours. Accumulated doses from each system were then calculated using the same DIR technique and dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters compared to manual addition with no DIR. The average DSC was found to be 0.83 (Velocity) and 0.84 (MIM), 0.80 (Velocity) and 0.80 (MIM), 0.80 (Velocity) and 0.81 (MIM), for the prostate, rectum and urethra contours, respectively. The average difference in calculated DVH parameters between the two systems using dose accumulation was less than 1%, and there was no statistically significant difference found between deformably accumulated doses in the two systems versus manual DVH addition with no DIR. Contour propagation using DIR in velocity and MIM was shown to be at least equivalent to inter-observer contouring variability on CT. The results also indicate that dose accumulation through manual addition of DVH parameters may be sufficient for HDRPBT treatments treated with the same catheter pattern on two different CT datasets. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation of three-dimensional planning in brachytherapy of high dose rate for gynecology therapies; Implementacao de planejamento tridimensional em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose para tratamentos ginecologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, Camila Pessoa de

    2015-09-01

    This work aims to implement the three-dimensional (3D) planning for gynecological brachytherapy treatments. For this purpose, tests of acceptance and commissioning of brachytherapy equipment were performed to establish a quality and periodic assurance program. For this purpose, an important step was searching for a material to be used as a dummy source, since the applicators do not have any specific dummy. In addition, the validation of the use of applicators library was made for reconstruction in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to validate 3D planning, comparison of doses in dose assessment points used in bidimensional (2D) plans have been performed with volumetric doses to adjacent organs to the tumor. Finally, a protocol was established for 3D brachytherapy planning alternately using magnetic resonance image (MRI) and CT images, making evaluation of the dose in the tumor through the recording of MR and CT images. It was not possible to find a suitable material that could be used as dummy in MRI. However, the acquisition of the license's library for the applicators made possible the 3D planning based on MRI. No correlation was found between volumetric and specific doses analyzed, showing the importance of the implementation of 3D planning. The average ratio between D{sub 2cc} and ICRU{sub Bladder} dose was 1,74, 22% higher than the ratio found by others authors. For the rectum, D{sub 2cc} was less than dose point for 60% of fractions; the average difference was 12,5%. The average ratio between D{sub 2cc} and point dose rectum, 0,85, is equivalent to the value showed by Kim et al, 0,91. The D{sub 2cc} for sigmoid was 69% higher than point dose used, unless it was not possible compare this value, since the sigmoid point used in the 2D procedures is not used in others institutes. Relative dose in 2 cc of sigmoid was 57% of the prescription dose, the same value was found by in literature. This work enabled the

  8. Substantial advantage of CT-planned HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients compared to a historical series with regard to local control and toxicity?; Substantieller Vorteil durch CT-geplante HDR-Brachytherapie bei Zervixkarzinompatientinnen im Vergleich zu historischen Serien bezueglich lokaler Kontrolle und Toxizitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie der Uniklinik Koeln, Medizinische Fakultaet der Universitaet zu Koeln, CyberKnife Centrum, Koeln (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The primary radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with nodal positive and/or locally advanced cervical carcinoma. The therapy consists of percutaneous radiotherapy, simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and an intracervical brachytherapy. The application of highly standardized brachytherapy based on NMR imaging allowed an improved local contol and a considerable reduction of toxicity.

  9. 3D treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng B; Li, Sicong

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems have evolved and become crucial components of modern radiation therapy. The systems are computer-aided designing or planning softwares that speed up the treatment planning processes to arrive at the best dose plans for the patients undergoing radiation therapy. Furthermore, the systems provide new technology to solve problems that would not have been considered without the use of computers such as conformal radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The 3D treatment planning systems vary amongst the vendors and also the dose delivery systems they are designed to support. As such these systems have different planning tools to generate the treatment plans and convert the treatment plans into executable instructions that can be implemented by the dose delivery systems. The rapid advancements in computer technology and accelerators have facilitated constant upgrades and the introduction of different and unique dose delivery systems than the traditional C-arm type medical linear accelerators. The focus of this special issue is to gather relevant 3D treatment planning systems for the radiation oncology community to keep abreast of technology advancement by assess the planning tools available as well as those unique "tricks or tips" used to support the different dose delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative real-time planned conformal prostate brachytherapy: Post-implantation dosimetric outcome and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Sharma, Neha; Shippy, Alison M.; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the dosimetric outcome of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and materials: Five hundred and sixty-two patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning software that incorporates inverse planning optimization was used. Dose-volume constraints for this inverse-planning system included: prostate V100 ≥95%, maximal urethral dose ≤120%, and average rectal dose 3 of the rectum was exposed to the prescription dose, the incidence of late grade 2 toxicity rectal toxicity was 9% compared to 4% for smaller volumes of the rectum exposed to similar doses (p = 0.003). No dosimetric parameter in these patients with tight dose confines for the urethra influenced acute or late urinary toxicity. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning was associated with a 90% consistency of achieving the planned intraoperative dose constraints for target coverage and maintaining planned urethral and rectal constraints in a high percentage of implants. Rectal volumes of ≥2.5 cm 3 exposed to the prescription doses were associated with an increased incidence of grade 2 rectal bleeding. Further enhancements in imaging guidance for optimal seed deposition are needed to guarantee optimal dose distribution for all patients. Whether such improvements lead to further reduction in acute and late morbidities associated with therapy requires further study

  11. Methodology, results and experience of independent brachytherapy plan verifications based on DICOM standard; Implementacion, resultados y experiencia de una verificacion independiente de tratamientos de braquiterapia basada en el estandar DICOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrando Sanchez, A.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novals, J.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Cabello Murillo, E.; Diaz Fuentes, R.; Molina Lopez, M. Y.

    2013-09-01

    The use of a high dose rate source together with an afterloading treatment delivery in brachytherapy plans allows for dose modulation minimizing dose to staff. An independent verification of the exported data to the treatment station is required by local regulations (being also a widely accepted recommendation on the international literature). We have developed a methodology under home brew code to import DICOM treatment data onto an Excel spreadsheet that is able to calculate dose on given reference points using the TG-43 formalism of the AAPM3-5. It employs analytic fits of anisotropy factor and radial dose function for different sources. The end point implementations we present here allow merging in one step an independent verification and a treatment printout. The use of DICOM standard makes our code versatile and provides greater compatibility with respect to current treatment planning systems. (Author)

  12. 3D inverse treatment planning for the tandem and ovoid applicator in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, Kelly D.; Hsu, I. Chow Joe; Speight, Joycelyn; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional treatment planning systems and inverse planning optimization for brachytherapy are becoming commercially available. Guidelines for target delineation and dose constrictions have not been established using this new software. In this study we describe a method of target delineation for the tandem and ovoids applicator. We then compare inverse planning dose distributions with the traditional methods of prescribing dose. Methods and Materials: Target and organ-at-risk volumes were defined using systematic guidelines on 15 patients treated in our department with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer using tandem and ovoids. High-dose-rate distributions were created according to three different dose optimization protocols: inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA), point A, and point A with a normalization of 2 cc of the bladder receiving 80% of the dose (bladder-sparing method). An uniform cost function for dose constraints was applied to all IPSA generated plans, and no manual optimization was allowed for any planning method. Results: Guidelines for target and structure-at-risk volumes, as well as dose constraint cost functions, were established. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the IPSA algorithm indicated no difference in tumor coverage compared with point A optimization while decreasing dose to the bladder and rectum. The IPSA algorithm provided better target volume coverage compared with bladder-sparing method with equivalent doses to the bladder and rectum. Conclusion: This study uses a systematic approach for delineating target and organ-at-risk volumes and a uniform cost function for generating IPSA plans for cervical cancer using tandem and ovoids. Compared with conventional dose prescription methods, IPSA provides a consistent method of optimization that maintains or improves target coverage while decreasing dose to normal structures. Image-guided brachytherapy and inverse planning improve brachytherapy

  13. Endoluminal brachytherapy in the palliative treatment of advanced esophageal cancer, first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchali, A.; Dinges, S.; Ortner, M.; Schlenger, L.; Lochs, H.; Budach, V.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Dysphagia is the main problem in patients with advanced nonresectable esophageal cancer. Palliation can be achieved by several treatment ways. We want to evaluate the efficacy of endoluminal brachytherapy (BT) for improvement of dysphagia, performance status, time of local tumor progress, and survival time. Methods: 6 patients with esophageal cancer stage IV received a palliative treatment with 192 Ir HDR BT. The dose per fraction was 5 Gy, calculated 1 cm from the surface of the applicator, the total dose was 20 Gy (four weekly applications). Symptoms, performance status and life quality score were investigated before each application and each 4 weeks after treatment. The results were compared with 10 historical patients who were treated by implantation of nitinol stents (Ultraflex, Boston Scient. Inc.). Results: The tumor stages in the BT-group were T4, T3, T2 three, two and one, and in the stent group three, two and five, respectively. Dysphagia improved in median from grade 1.7 to grade 0.5 (BT group) and from grade 2.6 to grade 1.8 (stent group). Karnowski status improved in the BT group from 70 % to 85 %, but did not change in the stent group (75%). A strong correlation between improvement of dysphagia and life quality score could be found especially in patients with initial high grade dysphagia. The only side effect of BT mostly after the 3 rd application was esophagitis grade 1 in 3 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Relief of the esophagitis after conservative therapy could be achieved within 1 week. In the BT group 3 patients were alive without local progress after 20, 13 and 2 weeks. The other 3 patients died from local progress (2 patients, after 20, 20 weeks) or from metastasis (1 patient, after 11 weeks). All patients in the stent group died from local progress. The median survival time is 17 ± 5.2 weeks in BT group vs. 8.8 ± 8.6 weeks in the stent group. Conclusion: Endoluminal brachytherapy seems to be an effective and well tolerable

  14. Physical aspects of endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2001-11-01

    Restenosis is severely limiting the outcome of vascular interventions. In several clinical trials endovascular brachytherapy has shown to reduce the restenosis rate. Local radiotherapy to the injured vessel wall is a promising new type of treatment in order to inhibit a complex wound healing process resulting in cell proliferation and re-obstruction of the treated vessel. Treatment planning has to be based on the dose distribution in the vicinity of the sources used. Source strength was determined in terms of air kerma rate for gamma nuclides (Iridium-192) and absorbed dose to water at reference distance of 2 mm for beta nuclides (Strontium-90/Yttrium-90, Phosphor-32), respectively. Radial dose profiles and the Reference Isodose Length (RIL) were determined using the EGSnrc code and GafChromic film. Good agreement was found between both methods. In order to treat the entire clinical target length, the (RIL) is an essential value during treatment planning. Examples are described for different levels of treatment planing including recommendations for optimal choice and positioning of the radioactive devices inside the artery. IVUS based treatment planning is illustrated with superposition of isodoses on cross-sectional images. A calculation model for radioactive stents is presented in order to determine dose volume histograms in a retrospective analysis. Radiation protection issues for endovascular brachytherapy are discussed in detail. Personal dose for the involved personnel is estimated based on calculations and measurements. Beta ray dosimetry is performed with suitable detectors. In order to estimate the exposure to the patient the dose to organs at risk is calculated and compared to the dose from angiography. There is an additional radiation exposure to patients and personnel caused by endovascular brachytherapy, but the values are much smaller than those caused by diagnostic angiography. (author)

  15. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer, and the importance of brachytherapy timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Czyzewski, Ann; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1996-01-01

    LDR brachytherapy for the treatment of Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients suggest lower survival and pelvic control for the HDR approach. Potential reasons for this include very high pelvic control rates in the LDR group, different patient cohorts with a higher TBS in the HDR group and performing the first HDR insertion before adequate tumor shrinkage. This trend became apparent over one year ago and dramatic changes in the HDR approach for Stage IIIB patients were implemented. These changes include performing the first insertion after 45 to 50 Gy of EBR, dose escalation to an LDR equivalent of 90 Gy and performing HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy in tumors that are poorly regressing. It appears that timing of the first HDR insertion with the EBR may be critical, and HDR brachytherapy should start only after adequate tumor shrinkage, possibly 45 Gy at a minimum. Finally, the literature at this point does not indicate that HDR is inferior to LDR in the treatment of Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients, and a high TBS at presentation may warrant more aggressive therapy

  16. Long-term erectile function following permanent seed brachytherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Hindson, Benjamin R.; Beaufort, Catherine; Pharoah, Paul; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Erectile function (EF) is commonly affected following prostate cancer treatment. We aim to evaluate the long-term EF following seed brachytherapy (BT) treatment. Materials and methods: The study consisted of 366 patients treated with BT at our institution, who completed the IIEF-5 questionnaire and reported no or mild erectile dysfunction (ED) pre-BT. The probability of EF preservation post-BT was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier methods. The difference in EF preservation by patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors was assessed using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate the effect of each factor on EF preservation. Results: Of the 366 patients, 277 (76%) reported normal EF, and 89 (24%) reported mild ED. The patients were followed-up for a median of 41 months (range: 3–124), and the 5-year actuarial rate of EF preservation was 59%. Age at BT seed implant, presence of medical comorbidities, Gleason score and the biologically effective dose (BED) are associated with EF preservation (P < 0.005). The association for these four factors remains statistically significant in multivariate analysis, with Gleason score having the strongest effect (HR = 3.7; 95% CI = 2.6–5.4). Conclusion: The 5-year actuarial rate of EF preservation post-BT in our cohort is 59%, and is influenced by multiple factors

  17. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  18. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kohno, Mari; Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae; Nagata, Yasushi; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women’s Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  19. SU-E-T-09: A Clinical Implementation and Optimized Dosimetry Study of Freiberg Flap Skin Surface Treatment in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Wu, H; Durci, M [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This case study was designated to confirm the optimized plan was used to treat skin surface of left leg in three stages. 1. To evaluate dose distribution and plan quality by alternating of the source loading catheters pattern in flexible Freiberg Flap skin surface (FFSS) applicator. 2. To investigate any impact on Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) of large superficial surface target volume coverage. 3. To compare the dose distribution if it was treated with electron beam. Methods: The Freiburg Flap is a flexible mesh style surface mold for skin radiation or intraoperative surface treatments. The Freiburg Flap consists of multiple spheres that are attached to each other, holding and guiding up to 18 treatment catheters. The Freiburg Flap also ensures a constant distance of 5mm from the treatment catheter to the surface. Three treatment trials with individual planning optimization were employed: 18 channels, 9 channels of FF and 6 MeV electron beam. The comparisons were highlighted in target coverage, dose conformity and dose sparing of surrounding tissues. Results: The first 18 channels brachytherapy plan was generated with 18 catheters inside the skin-wrapped up flap (Figure 1A). A second 9 catheters plan was generated associated with the same calculation points which were assigned to match prescription for target coverage as 18 catheters plan (Figure 1B). The optimized inverse plan was employed to reduce the dose to adjacent structures such as tibia or fibula. The comparison of DVH’s was depicted on Figure 2. External beam of electron RT plan was depicted in Figure 3. Overcall comparisons among these three were illustrated in Conclusion: The 9-channel Freiburg flap flexible skin applicator offers a reasonably acceptable plan without compromising the coverage. Electron beam was discouraged to use to treat curved skin surface because of low target coverage and high dose in adjacent tissues.

  20. Inverse planning anatomy-based dose optimization for HDR-brachytherapy of the prostate using fast simulated annealing algorithm and dedicated objective function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean

    2001-01-01

    An anatomy-based dose optimization algorithm is developed to automatically and rapidly produce a highly conformal dose coverage of the target volume while minimizing urethra, bladder, and rectal doses in the delivery of an high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the treatment of prostate cancer. The dwell times are optimized using an inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA) governed entirely from the anatomy extracted from a CT and by a dedicated objective function (cost function) reflecting clinical prescription and constraints. With this inverse planning approach, the focus is on the physician's prescription and constraint instead of on the technical limitations. Consequently, the physician's control on the treatment is improved. The capacity of this algorithm to represent the physician's prescription is presented for a clinical prostate case. The computation time (CPU) for IPSA optimization is less than 1 min (41 s for 142 915 iterations) for a typical clinical case, allowing fast and practical dose optimization. The achievement of highly conformal dose coverage to the target volume opens the possibility to deliver a higher dose to the prostate without inducing overdosage of urethra and normal tissues surrounding the prostate. Moreover, using the same concept, it will be possible to deliver a boost dose to a delimited tumor volume within the prostate. Finally, this method can be easily extended to other anatomical sites

  1. Low-dose-rate intraoperative brachytherapy combined with external beam irradiation in the conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delannes, M.; Thomas, L.; Martel, P.; Bonnevialle, P.; Stoeckle, E.; Chevreau, Ch.; Bui, B.N.; Daly-Schveitzer, N.; Pigneux, J.; Kantor, G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas most often implies combination of surgical resection and irradiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate low-dose-rate intraoperative brachytherapy, delivered as a boost, in the local control of primary tumors, with special concern about treatment complications. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 1995, 112 patients underwent intraoperative implant. This report focuses on the group of 58 patients with primary sarcomas treated by combination of conservative surgery, intraoperative brachytherapy, and external irradiation. Most of the tumors were located in the lower limbs (46/58--79%). Median size of the tumor was 10 cm, most of the lesions being T2-T3 (51/58--88%), Grade 2 or 3 (48/58--83%). The mean brachytherapy dose was 20 Gy and external beam irradiation dose 45 Gy. In 36/58 cases, iridium wires had to be placed on contact with neurovascular structures. Results: With a median follow-up of 54 months, the 5-year actuarial survival was 64.9%, with a 5-year actuarial local control of 89%. Of the 6 patients with local relapse, 3 were salvaged. Acute side effects, essentially wound healing problems, occurred in 20/58 patients, late side effects in 16/58 patients (7 neuropathies G2 to G4). No amputation was required. The only significant factor correlated with early side effects was the location of the tumor in the lower limb (p = 0.003), and with late side effects the vicinity of the tumor with neurovascular structures (p = 0.009). Conclusion: Brachytherapy allows early delivery of a boost dose in a reduced volume of tissue, precisely mapped by the intraoperative procedure. Combined with external beam irradiation, it is a safe and efficient treatment technique leading to high local control rates and limited functional impairment

  2. MINERVA - a multi-modal radiation treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, C.A. E-mail: cew@enel.gov; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Cogliati, J.J.; Milvich, M.L.; Frederickson, C.; Perkins, M.; Harkin, G.J

    2004-11-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Montana State University have undertaken development of MINERVA, a patient-centric, multi-modal, radiation treatment planning system. This system can be used for planning and analyzing several radiotherapy modalities, either singly or combined, using common modality independent image and geometry construction and dose reporting and guiding. It employs an integrated, lightweight plugin architecture to accommodate multi-modal treatment planning using standard interface components. The MINERVA design also facilitates the future integration of improved planning technologies. The code is being developed with the Java Virtual Machine for interoperability. A full computation path has been established for molecular targeted radiotherapy treatment planning, with the associated transport plugin developed by researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Development of the neutron transport plugin module is proceeding rapidly, with completion expected later this year. Future development efforts will include development of deformable registration methods, improved segmentation methods for patient model definition, and three-dimensional visualization of the patient images, geometry, and dose data. Transport and source plugins will be created for additional treatment modalities, including brachytherapy, external beam proton radiotherapy, and the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc codes for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy.

  3. High dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, J.L.; Streeter, O.E.; Chawla, S.; Menendez, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: we examined the role of preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation and adjuvant high-dose rate brachytherapy on the management of prognostically unfavorable soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities. Our goal was to examine the effect of high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR IBT) on reducing the risk of local recurrence following limb-sparing resection, as well as shortening treatment duration. Materials and methods: eleven patients, ranging in age from 31 to 73 years old, with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity were treated at USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center during 1994 and 1995. All patients had biopsy proven soft tissue sarcoma, and all were suitable candidates for limb-sparing surgery. All lesions were greater than 5cm in size and were primarily high grade. Tumor histologies included malignant fibrous histiocytoma (45%), liposarcoma (18%) and leiomyosarcoma, synovial cell sarcoma and spindle cell sarcoma (36%). Sites of tumor origin were the lower extremity (55%), upper extremity (18%) and buttock (9%), 1 patient (9%) had lesions in both the upper and lower extremity. Patients received HDR IBT following combined chemotherapy and external beam irradiation (EBRT) and en bloc resection of the sarcoma. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisted of three to four cycles of either Ifosfamide/Mesna with or without Adriamycin, or Mesna, Adriamycin, Ifosfamide and Dacarbazine. One patient received Cis-platin in addition to Ifos/Adr. A minimum of two cycles of chemotherapy were administered prior to EBRT. Additional cycles of chemotherapy were completed concurrently with EBRT but prior to HDR IBT. Preoperative EBRT doses ranging from 40 to 59.4 Gy were given in daily fractions of 180 to 200cGy. Following en bloc resection, HDR IBT was administered using the Omnitron tm 2000 remote afterloading system. Doses ranging from 13 to 30 Gy were delivered to the surgical tumor bed at depths of 0.5mm to 0.75mm from the radioactive source. Results: median follow-up was

  4. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  5. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P .05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen

  6. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO); Programa de verificacion del calculo para un sistema de planificacion de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (PLATO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  7. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-07-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue >=41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax 200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM43 °C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients >=41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 >= 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to generate conformal therapeutic heating ranging from a single endocervical device targeting small volumes local to the cervix (directional interstitial applicators in the lateral periphery to target much larger volumes (6 cm radial), while preferentially limiting heating of the bladder and rectum.

  8. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer; Apport des techniques de curietherapie optimisee grace a l'imagerie tridimensionnelle dans la prise en charge des patientes atteintes d'un cancer du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Curietherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Dumas, I. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Physique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Lhomme, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service d' Ooncologie Gynecologique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Morice, P. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Chirurgie Oncologique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Barillot, I. [Centre Regional Universitaire de Cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, Hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France)

    2009-10-15

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  9. Development and characterisation of iridium-192 seeds for brachytherapy treatment of ocular tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleias Jr, F.S.; Zeituni, C.A.; Souza, C.D.; Rostelato, M.E.CM.; Mattos, F.R.; Banega, M.A.G.; Rodrigues, B.T.; Tiezzi, R.; Oliveira, T.B.; Feher, A.; Moura, J.A.; Costa, O.L.

    2014-01-01

    Even ocular tumors are not amongst the cases with a high incidence, they affect the population, particularly children. The Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP) in partnership with Escola Paulista de Medicina (UNIFESP), created a project to develop an alternative treatment for ophthalmic cancer that uses iridium-192 seeds in brachytherapy. This work aims to study and develop a seed of iridium-192 from a platinum-iridium alloy The prototype seed has a 3.0 mm long core sealed by a titanium capsule of 0.8 mm of outer diameter, 0.05 mm of wall thickness and 4.5 mm long. We developed a methodology that covered: characterisation of the material used in the core, creation of a device for neutron activation of the cores and leakage tests. The results show that this methodology is feasible. As a suggestion for future work, studies regarding metrology and dosimetry of these sources should be carried out. (authors)

  10. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients’ characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP

  11. Obstructive urination problems after high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost treatment for prostate cancer are avoidable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelj, Borut

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at improving treatment individualization in patients with prostate cancer treated with combination of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to boost the dose to prostate (HDRB-B), the objective was to evaluate factors that have potential impact on obstructive urination problems (OUP) after HDRB-B. In the follow-up study 88 patients consecutively treated with HDRB-B at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the period 2006-2011 were included. The observed outcome was deterioration of OUP (DOUP) during the follow-up period longer than 1 year. Univariate and multivariate relationship analysis between DOUP and potential risk factors (treatment factors, patients' characteristics) was carried out by using binary logistic regression. ROC curve was constructed on predicted values and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess the performance of the multivariate model. Analysis was carried out on 71 patients who completed 3 years of follow-up. DOUP was noted in 13/71 (18.3%) of them. The results of multivariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between DOUP and anti-coagulation treatment (OR 4.86, 95% C.I. limits: 1.21-19.61, p = 0.026). Also minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra volume was close to statistical significance (OR = 1.23; 95% C.I. limits: 0.98-1.07, p = 0.099). The value of AUC was 0.755. The study emphasized the relationship between DOUP and anticoagulation treatment, and suggested the multivariate model with fair predictive performance. This model potentially enables a reduction of DOUP after HDRB-B. It supports the belief that further research should be focused on urethral sphincter as a critical structure for OUP.

  12. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of rectum and bladder using image-based CT planning and orthogonal radiographs with ICRU 38 recommendations in intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to compare CT-based dosimetry with International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU 38 bladder and rectum reference points in patients of carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with intracavitary brachytherapy (ICA. Twenty-two consecutive patients were evaluated. Orthogonal radiographs and CT images were acquired and transferred to PLATO planning system. Bladder and rectal reference points were identified according to ICRU 38 recommendations. Dosimetry was carried out based on Manchester system. Patient treatment was done using 192 Iridium high dose rate (HDR remote after-loading machine based on the conventional radiograph-based dosimetry. ICRU rectal and bladder point doses from the radiograph plans were compared with D 2 , dose received by 2 cm 3 of the organ receiving maximum dose from CT plan. V 2 , volume of organ receiving dose more than the ICRU reference point, was evaluated. The mean (±standard deviation volume of rectum and bladder was 60 (±28 cm 3 and 138 (±41 cm 3 respectively. The mean reference volume in radiograph and CT plan was 105 (±7 cm 3 and 107 (±7 cm 3 respectively. It was found that 6 (±4 cm3 of rectum and 16 (±10 cm 3 of bladder received dose more than the prescription dose. V2 of rectum and bladder was 7 (±1.7 cm 3 and 20.8 (±6 cm 3 respectively. Mean D 2 of rectum and bladder was found to be 1.11 (±0.2 and 1.56 (±0.6 times the mean ICRU reference points respectively. This dosimteric study suggests that comparison of orthogonal X-ray-based and CT-based HDR ICA planning is feasible. ICRU rectal point dose correlates well with maximum rectal dose, while ICRU bladder point underestimates the maximum bladder dose.

  14. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto; D'Imperio, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  15. Iodine-125 brachytherapy as upfront and salvage treatment for brain metastases. A comparative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romagna, Alexander; Schwartz, Christoph; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Egensperger, Rupert [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Center for Neuropathology and Prion Research, Munich (Germany); Watson, Juliana; Belka, Claus; Nachbichler, Silke Birgit [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Radiation-Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Outcome and toxicity profiles of salvage stereotactic ablative radiation strategies for recurrent pre-irradiated brain metastases are poorly defined. This study compared risk-benefit profiles of upfront and salvage iodine-125 brachytherapy (SBT) for small brain metastases. As the applied SBT treatment algorithm required histologic proof of metastatic brain disease in all patients, we additionally aimed to elucidate the value of biopsy before SBT. Patients with small untreated (n = 20) or pre-irradiated (n =28) suspected metastases intended for upfront or salvage SBT, respectively, were consecutively included. Temporary iodine-125 implants were used (median reference dose: 50 Gy, median dose rate: 15 cGy/h). Cumulative biologically effective doses (BED) were calculated and used for risk assessment. Treatment toxicity was classified according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria. Upfront SBT was initiated in 20 patients and salvage SBT in 23. In 5 patients, salvage SBT was withheld because of proven radiation-induced lesions. Treatment groups exhibited similar epidemiologic data except for tumor size (which was slightly smaller in the salvage group). One-year local/distant tumor control rates after upfront and salvage SBT were similar (94 %/65 % vs. 87 %/57 %, p = 0.45, respectively). Grade I/II toxicity was suffered by 2 patients after salvage SBT (cumulative BED: 192.1 Gy{sub 3} and 249.6 Gy{sub 3}). No toxicity-related risk factors were identified. SBT combines diagnostic yield with effective treatment in selected patients. The low toxicity rate in the salvage group points to protective radiobiologic characteristics of continuous low-dose rate irradiation. Upfront and salvage SBT are similarly effective and safe. Histologic reevaluation should be reconsidered after previous radiotherapy to avoid under- or overtreatment. (orig.) [German] Daten zu Risiko und Effizienz ablativer

  16. Influence of external beam technique and brachytherapy quality assurance on the side effects in the combined external beam- and brachytherapy treatment of local advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.; Galalae, R.; Wirth, B.; Bertermann, H.; Wilhelm, R.; Kohr, P.; Kimmig, B.

    1996-01-01

    experience), so we did not changed the brachytherapy dose. After changing the external beam technique we treated 55 patients with a minimum follow up of 3 months. There were no major side effects, proctitis in 16,3%, dysuria in 12,7%. The results are significant better in favour of the changed treatment technique. Erectile dysfunction had 33% of the patients, all have been treated with hormone therapy before radiation treatment

  17. Treatment outcome with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early-stage oral tongue cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalavat Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Although radical radiotherapy is known to be equally effective for early-stage oral tongue cancers (T1-2 N0 with the added advantage of organ and function preservation, surgery remains the preferred treatment. We present outcome of patients treated with brachytherapy (BT either radical or boost. Materials and Methods : Fifty-seven patients (T1/T2 31/26 were studied. Seventeen patients (30% were treated with radical BT (50-67 Gy while 40 (70% with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT + BT (36-56 Gy + 15-38 Gy]. Low-dose-rate (LDR BT was delivered with 192 Ir wires, using plastic bead technique with varied dose rates (< 60 cGy/h in 29 patients, 60-90 cGy/h in 17, and> 90 cGy/h in 11. Results : The overall local control (LCR was achieved in 59.7% (34/57 patients. LCR for T1 and T2 was 67.8% and 50%, respectively. A total of 23 patients had failures [local: 20 (T1: 8; T2: 12 patients, node: 5 (T1:2; T2: 3, and local + nodal: 3]. Overall 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival (OAS were 51% and 67%, respectively and those for T1 and T2 was 64.5/77.4% and 38.5/54% respectively (P = 0.002. All 16 patients were salvaged. Median survival after salvage treatment was 13.5 months (6-100 months. Soft tissue necrosis was observed in 12.3% (7/57 and osteoradionecrosis in two patients. Conclusion : BT, as an integral part of radical radiation therapy in early-stage tongue cancers, appears to be an effective alternative treatment modality with preservation of the organ and function without jeopardizing the outcome.

  18. Treatment of Recurrent Bronchial Carcinoma: The Role of High-Dose-Rate Endoluminal Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Stoiber, Eva; Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Grehn, Christian; Becker, Heinrich D.; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study's aim was to assess outcome and toxicity of high-dose-rate endoluminal brachytherapy (HDREB) for recurrent bronchial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 2005, 41 patients were treated with HDREB for symptomatic recurrent bronchial carcinoma. All patients had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 56 Gy (range, 30-70 Gy). The median HDREB dose applied was 15 Gy (range, 5-29 Gy). The median time interval between primary EBRT and reirradiation was 9 months (range, 2-54 months). Results: After a median follow-up of 6.7 months, the 6-, 12-, and 24-month overall survival rates were 58%, 18%, and 7%, respectively. The median overall survival time was 6.7 months. Local remission was achieved in 73% of patients (n = 30). A total of 24% of patients (n = 10) showed no response or progressive disease within 8 weeks after treatment. In 1 patient, treatment response was not documented. The 6-, 12-, and 24-month local control rates were 38%, 17%, and 3%, respectively. The median local progression-free survival time was 4 months (range, 1-23 months). Prognostic factors were a total dose of ≥15 Gy of HDREB (p = 0.029) and a Karnofsky performance score of ≥80% (p = 0.0012). The cause of death was locoregional progression in 27% of patients (n = 11), distant metastases in 24% of patients (n = 10), fatal hemorrhage in 15% of patients (n = 6), and other causes in 29% of patients (n = 12). None of the patients with locally controlled disease showed grade 3 or 4 late effects. Conclusions: Palliative treatment of symptomatic, locally recurrent bronchial carcinoma with HDREB can effectively relieve symptoms in the majority of patients while causing only few complications. Still, time to progression is short.

  19. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  20. SU-E-T-421: Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of Xoft Electronic Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Superficial Skin Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoisak, J; Manger, R; Dragojevic, I

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) of the process for treating superficial skin cancers with the Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system, given the recent introduction of expanded quality control (QC) initiatives at our institution. Methods: A process map was developed listing all steps in superficial treatments with Xoft eBx, from the initial patient consult to the completion of the treatment course. The process map guided the FMEA to identify the failure modes for each step in the treatment workflow and assign Risk Priority Numbers (RPN), calculated as the product of the failure mode’s probability of occurrence (O), severity (S) and lack of detectability (D). FMEA was done with and without the inclusion of recent QC initiatives such as increased staffing, physics oversight, standardized source calibration, treatment planning and documentation. The failure modes with the highest RPNs were identified and contrasted before and after introduction of the QC initiatives. Results: Based on the FMEA, the failure modes with the highest RPN were related to source calibration, treatment planning, and patient setup/treatment delivery (Fig. 1). The introduction of additional physics oversight, standardized planning and safety initiatives such as checklists and time-outs reduced the RPNs of these failure modes. High-risk failure modes that could be mitigated with improved hardware and software interlocks were identified. Conclusion: The FMEA analysis identified the steps in the treatment process presenting the highest risk. The introduction of enhanced QC initiatives mitigated the risk of some of these failure modes by decreasing their probability of occurrence and increasing their detectability. This analysis demonstrates the importance of well-designed QC policies, procedures and oversight in a Xoft eBx programme for treatment of superficial skin cancers. Unresolved high risk failure modes highlight the need for non-procedural quality

  1. Exeresis and Brachytherapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Recurrence After Conservative Treatment for Breast Cancer: Results of a Ten-Year Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guix, Benjamin; Lejarcegui, Jose Antonio; Tello, Jose Ignacio; Zanon, Gabriel; Henriquez, Ivan; Finestres, Fernando; Martinez, Antonio; Fernandez-Ibiza, Jaume; Quinzanos, Luis; Palombo, Pau; Encinas, Xavier; Guix, Ines

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a pilot study assessing excision and brachytherapy as salvage treatment for local recurrence after conservative treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1990 and March 2001, 36 patients with breast-only recurrence less than 3 cm in diameter after conservative treatment for Stage I or II breast carcinoma were treated with local excision followed by high-dose rate brachytherapy implants (30 Gy in 12 fractions over a period of 5 days). No patient was lost to follow-up. Special attention was paid to local, regional, or distant recurrences; survival; cosmesis; and early and late side effects. Results: All patients completed treatment. During follow-up (range, 1-13 years), 8 patients presented metastases (2 regional and 6 distant) as their first site of failure, 1 had a differed local recurrence, and 1 died of the disease. Actuarial results at 10 years were as follows: local control, 89.4%; disease-free survival, 64.4%; and survival, 96.7%. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in 90.4%. No patient had Grade 3 or 4 early or late complications. Of the 11 patients followed up for at least 10 years, all but 1 still had their breast in place at the 10-year stage. Conclusions: High-dose rate brachytherapy is a safe, effective treatment for small-size, low-risk local recurrence after local excision in conservatively treated patients. The dose of 30 Gy of high-dose rate brachytherapy (12 fractions over a period of 5 days twice daily) was well tolerated. The excellent results support the use of breast preservation as salvage treatment in selected patients with local recurrence after conservative treatment for breast cancer.

  2. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas [Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9006@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  3. Brachytherapy of endometrial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.

    2003-01-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinomas rank third as tumoral sites en France. The tumors are confined to the uterus in 80% of the cases. Brachytherapy has a large place in the therapeutic strategy. The gold standard treatment remains extra-fascial hysterectomy with bilateral annexiectomy and bilateral internal iliac lymph node dissection. However, after surgery alone, the rate of locoregional relapses reaches 4-20%, which is reduced to 0-5% after postoperative brachytherapy of the vaginal cuff. This postoperative brachytherapy is delivered as outpatients treatment, by 3 or 4 fractions, at high dose rate. The utero-vaginal preoperative brachytherapy remains well adapted to the tumors which involve the uterine cervix. Patients presenting a localized tumor but not operable for general reasons (< 10%) can be treated with success by exclusive irradiation, which associates a pelvic irradiation followed by an utero-vaginal brachytherapy. A high local control of about 80-90% is obtained, a little lower than surgery, with a higher risk of late complications. Last but not least, local relapses in the vaginal cuff, or in the perimeatic area, can be treated by interstitial salvage brachytherapy, associated if possible with external beam irradiation. The local control is reached in half of the patients, but metastatic dissemination is frequent. We conclude that brachytherapy has a major role in the treatment of endometrial adenocarcinomas, in combination with surgery, or with external beam irradiation for not operable patients or in case of local relapses. It should use new technologies now available including computerized after-loaders and 3D dose calculation. (authors)

  4. Patterns of failure after use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in integration of extended-field chemo-IMRT and 3D-brachytherapy plannings for advanced cervical cancers with extensive lymph node metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Horng, Cheng-Fang; Lee, Pei-Ing; Chen, Fong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The study is to evaluate the patterns of failure, toxicities and long-term outcomes of aggressive treatment using 18 F-FDG PET/CT-guided chemoradiation plannings for advanced cervical cancer with extensive nodal extent that has been regarded as a systemic disease. We retrospectively reviewed 72 consecutive patients with 18 F-FDG PET/CT-detected widespread pelvic, para-aortic and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes treated with curative-intent PET-guided cisplatin-based extended-field dose-escalating intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and adaptive high-dose-rate intracavitary 3D-brachytherapy between 2002 and 2010. The failure sites were specifically localized by comparing recurrences on fusion of post-therapy recurrent 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans to the initial PET-guided radiation plannings for IMRT and brachytherapy. The median follow-up time for the 72 patients was 66 months (range, 3–142 months). The 5-year disease-free survival rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method for the patients with extensive N1 disease with the uppermost PET-positive pelvic-only nodes (26 patients), and the patients with M1 disease with the uppermost PET-positive para-aortic (31 patients) or supraclavicular (15 patients) nodes was 78.5 %, and 41.8–50 %, respectively (N1 vs. M1, p = 0.0465). Eight (11.1 %), 18 (25.0 %), and 3 (4.2 %) of the patients developed in-field recurrence, out-of-field and/or distant metastasis, and combined failure, respectively. The 6 (8.3 %) local failures around the uterine cervix were all at the junction between IMRT and brachytherapy in the parametrium. The rate of late grade 3/4 bladder and bowel toxicities was 4.2 and 9.7 %, respectively. When compared to conventional pelvic chemoradiation/2D-brachytherapy during 1990–2001, the adoption of 18 F-FDG PET-guided extended-field dose-escalating chemoradiation plannings in IMRT and 3D-brachytherapy after 2002 appeared to provide higher disease-free and overall survival rates with acceptable toxicities in

  5. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkfield, Karen M.; Chen Minghui; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D’Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3–2.5 and 1.2–2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  6. CT-image based conformal high-dose rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I - II breast cancer - introducing the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaszewska, M.; Skowronek, J.; Chichel, A.; Kanikowski, M.; Dymnicka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard treatment for the majority of patients with early breast cancer. With regard to boost technique some disagreements are found between groups that are emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment. We present the preliminary results in treating selected patients with early-stage breast cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HD R-BT) as a boost after breast conservation therapy (BCT). Materials/Methods: Between January 2006 and August 2007, a total of 58 female patients with first and second stage breast cancer underwent BCT. This therapeutic procedure involves BCS, whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and additional irradiation to the tumour bed (boost) using interstitial HDR-BT via flexible implant tubes. A 10 Gy boost dose was received by all patients. The treatment planning was based on CT-guided 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and critical structures localization (skin and ribs). The accuracy of tumour bed localization, the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were analyzed. Results: The evaluations of implant parameters involved the use of: dose volume histogram (DVH), the volume encompassed by the 100% reference isodose surface (V100%), the high dose volumecalculation (V150%, V200%, V300%), the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), and the conformity index (COIN). Our results were as follows: the mean PTV volume, the mean high dose volume (V150%; V200%; V300%), the DNR and COIN mean value were estimated at 57.38, 42.98, 21.38, 7.90, 0.52 and 0.83 respectively. Conclusions: CT-guided 3D HDR-BT is most appropriate for planning the boost procedure after BT especially in large breast volume, in cases with a deep seated tumour bed, as well as in patients with high risk for local recurrences. This technique reduces the

  7. Development of brachytherapy medium doserate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atang Susila; Ari Satmoko; Ahmad Rifai; Kristiyanti

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment for different types of cancers and it become a common treatment modality in most radiotherapy clinics. PRPN has had experience in development of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy for cervix cancer treatment. However the treatment process using LDR device needs 5 hours in time that the patient feel uncomfort. Therefore PRPN develops Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy with radiation activity not more than 5 Currie. The project is divided into two stages. Purchasing of TPS software and TDS design are held in 2010, and the construction will be in 2011. (author)

  8. {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy for the treatment of parotid gland cancers in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Song, T.; Zhang, J.; Yu, G.; Zhang, Y. [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2013-05-15

    Background and purpose: There is a lack of optimal treatment strategies for managing salivary gland cancers in children and adolescents. This study is aimed at assessing the effect of {sup 125}I seed implantation for the treatment of parotid cancers in children and adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 12 patients younger than 16 years with parotid gland malignant tumors underwent {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy between October 2003 and November 2008. All patients were assessed after treatment and at the local tumor control appointments. Facial nerve function, maxillofacial development, and radioactive side-effects were assessed. Results: The follow-up period ranged from 41-104 months. One patient with T4b died of pulmonary metastasis. The other patients were alive during the follow-up period. There were no serious radiation-related complications. The treatment did not affect facial nerve function and dentofacial growth in any of the children. Conclusion: For parotid gland cancers in children, {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy may be an acceptable treatment without serious complications and with satisfactory short-term effects. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of treatment using teletherapy (external beam radiation) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samea, Renato; Lourenco, Laercio Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Background - Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is still a difficult tumor to treat with very poor prognosis. Aim - To compare the response to teletherapy treatment (external beam radiotherapy) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods - Were studied 49 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus on clinical stage III (TNM-1999). They were separated into two groups. The first, underwent radiation therapy alone with linear accelerator of particles, average dose of 6000 cGy and the second to external beam radiation therapy at a dose of 5040 cGy combined with brachytherapy with Iridium 192 at a dose of 1500 cGy. Brachytherapy started one to two weeks after the end of teletherapy, and it was divided into three weekly applications of 500 cGy. Age, gender, race, habits (smoking and drinking), body mass index (BMI), complications with treatment benefits (pain relief and food satisfaction) and survival were analyzed. Results - The quality of life (food satisfaction, and pain palliation of dysphagia) were better in the group treated with external beam radiation therapy combined with brachytherapy. Survival was higher in the brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy alone. Conclusion - Although the cure rate of squamous cell cancer of the esophagus is almost nil when treated with irradiation alone, this therapy is a form of palliative treatment for most patients in whom surgical contraindication exists. (author)

  10. Comparison of treatment using teletherapy (external beam radiation) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samea, Renato; Lourenco, Laercio Gomes, E-mail: renatosamea@globo.com [Department of Surgical Oncology of Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Hospital, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Background - Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is still a difficult tumor to treat with very poor prognosis. Aim - To compare the response to teletherapy treatment (external beam radiotherapy) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods - Were studied 49 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus on clinical stage III (TNM-1999). They were separated into two groups. The first, underwent radiation therapy alone with linear accelerator of particles, average dose of 6000 cGy and the second to external beam radiation therapy at a dose of 5040 cGy combined with brachytherapy with Iridium 192 at a dose of 1500 cGy. Brachytherapy started one to two weeks after the end of teletherapy, and it was divided into three weekly applications of 500 cGy. Age, gender, race, habits (smoking and drinking), body mass index (BMI), complications with treatment benefits (pain relief and food satisfaction) and survival were analyzed. Results - The quality of life (food satisfaction, and pain palliation of dysphagia) were better in the group treated with external beam radiation therapy combined with brachytherapy. Survival was higher in the brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy alone. Conclusion - Although the cure rate of squamous cell cancer of the esophagus is almost nil when treated with irradiation alone, this therapy is a form of palliative treatment for most patients in whom surgical contraindication exists. (author)

  11. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  12. Interactively exploring optimized treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Isaac; Liu, H. Helen; Childress, Nathan; Liao Zhongxing

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A new paradigm for treatment planning is proposed that embodies the concept of interactively exploring the space of optimized plans. In this approach, treatment planning ignores the details of individual plans and instead presents the physician with clinical summaries of sets of solutions to well-defined clinical goals in which every solution has been optimized in advance by computer algorithms. Methods and materials: Before interactive planning, sets of optimized plans are created for a variety of treatment delivery options and critical structure dose-volume constraints. Then, the dose-volume parameters of the optimized plans are fit to linear functions. These linear functions are used to show in real time how the target dose-volume histogram (DVH) changes as the DVHs of the critical structures are changed interactively. A bitmap of the space of optimized plans is used to restrict the feasible solutions. The physician selects the critical structure dose-volume constraints that give the desired dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and then those constraints are used to create the corresponding optimized plan. Results: The method is demonstrated using prototype software, Treatment Plan Explorer (TPEx), and a clinical example of a patient with a tumor in the right lung. For this example, the delivery options included 4 open beams, 12 open beams, 4 wedged beams, and 12 wedged beams. Beam directions and relative weights were optimized for a range of critical structure dose-volume constraints for the lungs and esophagus. Cord dose was restricted to 45 Gy. Using the interactive interface, the physician explored how the tumor dose changed as critical structure dose-volume constraints were tightened or relaxed and selected the best compromise for each delivery option. The corresponding treatment plans were calculated and compared with the linear parameterization presented to the physician in TPEx. The linear fits were best for the maximum PTV dose and worst

  13. SU-G-TeP2-10: Feasibility of Newly Designed Applicator for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment of Patients with Vaginal Vault Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V; Wong, M; Chan, M; Cheung, S; Leung, R; Lee, K; Law, G; Tung, S [Tuen Mun Hospital (Hong Kong); Huang, X; Chui, E; Leung, K [The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kwong, D [The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dose of an in-house 3D-printed gynecology applicator (TMHGA) for vaginal vault recurrence of corpus cancer patients after operation for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment with commercially available applicators. Methods: A newly designed applicator is made from 3D-printing methods using ABSM30i. The isodose of the applicator is compared with Elekta multi-channel (MC) applicator and titanium Rotterdam applicator with coupling central tube and vaginal cylinder (RC). Three plans are created using three applicators in a CT set of water phantom. The applicators are anchored using the applicator library and implant library in the Elekta Oncentra treatment planning system (ver.4.5). The rectum is mimicked by creating a 2cm diameter cylinder, with a distance 1mm posteriorly away from the high risk CTV (HR-CTV). Similarly, the bladder is replicated by a 6cm diameter cylinder with distance 1mm anteriorly from the HR-CTV. Three plans are all normalized 1.5cm superior, 0.5cm anterior and 0.5cm posterior of the applicator surface. By fixing D90 of HR-CTV to 6Gy, the D2cc of rectum and bladder of three plans are compared. Results: The D2cc of the bladder for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 14.0% and 11.9% respectively. While the D2cc of the rectum for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 18.9% and 12.4% respectively. The total treatment time of TMHGA plan is shorter than MC and RC by 11.2% and 12.9%. Conclusion: The applicator created via 3D printing delivers a lower dose to the bladder and the rectum while keeping the same coverage to HR-CTV as other commercially available applicators. Additionally, the new applicator resulted in a reduction of treatment time, which is always welcome.

  14. SU-G-TeP2-10: Feasibility of Newly Designed Applicator for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment of Patients with Vaginal Vault Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V; Wong, M; Chan, M; Cheung, S; Leung, R; Lee, K; Law, G; Tung, S; Huang, X; Chui, E; Leung, K; Kwong, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose of an in-house 3D-printed gynecology applicator (TMHGA) for vaginal vault recurrence of corpus cancer patients after operation for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment with commercially available applicators. Methods: A newly designed applicator is made from 3D-printing methods using ABSM30i. The isodose of the applicator is compared with Elekta multi-channel (MC) applicator and titanium Rotterdam applicator with coupling central tube and vaginal cylinder (RC). Three plans are created using three applicators in a CT set of water phantom. The applicators are anchored using the applicator library and implant library in the Elekta Oncentra treatment planning system (ver.4.5). The rectum is mimicked by creating a 2cm diameter cylinder, with a distance 1mm posteriorly away from the high risk CTV (HR-CTV). Similarly, the bladder is replicated by a 6cm diameter cylinder with distance 1mm anteriorly from the HR-CTV. Three plans are all normalized 1.5cm superior, 0.5cm anterior and 0.5cm posterior of the applicator surface. By fixing D90 of HR-CTV to 6Gy, the D2cc of rectum and bladder of three plans are compared. Results: The D2cc of the bladder for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 14.0% and 11.9% respectively. While the D2cc of the rectum for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 18.9% and 12.4% respectively. The total treatment time of TMHGA plan is shorter than MC and RC by 11.2% and 12.9%. Conclusion: The applicator created via 3D printing delivers a lower dose to the bladder and the rectum while keeping the same coverage to HR-CTV as other commercially available applicators. Additionally, the new applicator resulted in a reduction of treatment time, which is always welcome.

  15. Endoluminal high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of primary and recurrent bronchogenic tree malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fortunato

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Locally advanced tumours as the initial form of presentation of tumours in the bronchial tree are not a rare event. Bronchogenic recurrence is frequent in the natural history of some tumours. The choice of therapeutic options from the raft available depends on such variables as initial therapy, place of recurrence, symptoms and patient's physical status. Aim: To demonstrate the advantages of endoluminal brachytherapy (EBT with high dose rate (HDR in primary and recurrent tumour of the bronchial tree. Material and methods: A retrospective study of seven patients (pts with primary tumours of the colon, trachea and lung. Tracheobronchial recurrence (trachea, two pts, bronchus, five pts occurred betweenMarch 2003 and September 2004. Patients under-went EBT with HDR for primary or recurrent therapy in association with external radiotherapy, laser therapy and chemotherapy with palliative or curative intention. EBT with HDR doses of 5 to 7 Gy in 2 to 4 fractions at 1 cm from the source axis were given. Treatment included endoluminal application of Ir192 with a French 6 catheter. Results: There was symptomatic relief related to reduction of tumour in six of the seven patients treated. In one of the six patients studied, there was progression of the local disease between the second and third fractions of the treatment (obstruction of the trachea. In a mean follow up of 17 (2-40 months between EBT and this study, three patients are alive, one has no evidence of disease while two have had bronchial recurrence, four patients have died, one after massive haemoptysis and three due to disease progression. Discussion and conclusions: Patients undergoing brachytherapy for symptomatic primary tumours or endobronchial recurrence show good tolerance, important symptom relief and improved quality of life. Despite the small size of our sample, it is clear that EBT with HDR plays an important role in the palliative/curative treatment of these patients

  16. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, Tarun; Yu Yan; Sherman, Jason; Rubens, Deborah; Strang, John; Messing, Edward; Ng, Wan-Sing

    2008-01-01

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  17. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun; Sherman, Jason; Rubens, Deborah; Messing, Edward; Strang, John; Ng, Wan-Sing; Yu, Yan

    2008-03-21

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  18. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using...

  19. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients

  20. SU-E-T-387: Evaluation of Effective Treatment Depth in Skin Cancer Treatments with Xoft Electronic Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragojevic, I; Hoisak, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in the percent depth dose (PDD) and effective depth of treatment based on exerted force by applicator on the skin during treatments of skin cancer with Xoft Electronic Brachytherapy. Methods: To simulate compressible tissue, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus was used. An ion chamber (Soft X-ray Chamber, PTW) and electrometer (Max 4000, Standard Imaging) were used for output measurements. Measurements were done for all available Xoft surface applicators (10, 20, 35, and 50mm cones) with plastic endcap. Fig1 shows the experimental setup. The PDD was measured first with no or minimal pressure of the applicator on the bolus, followed by increasing uniform pressure on the applicator applied with custom cerrobend weights. The measurements were used to calculate the effective PDD and effective depth. Results: Force applied with the applicator was plotted against the change in PDD relative to the PDD when no force is applied. For the 10mm cone, moderate force of 5N can change the PDD by more than 20%, (Fig2). The effect is also pronounced for the 20mm cone, while it is minimal for the 35 and 50mm cones. Even when only moderate force is applied, the effective prescription depth can be changed by a several millimeters, which is on the order of the typical prescription depth (Fig3). Conclusion: Based on the results of this simulation, excessive pressure applied on the patient’s skin by the applicator cone can drastically alter the PDD and effective treatment depth. The effect is most pronounced for the 10mm cone, and to a lesser extent, 20mm, which is significant as these cones tend to be used most frequently in the clinic. Applicator placement therefore may Result in significant consequences such as excessive dose to target, severe skin reaction, permanent discoloration, skin indentation, and poor overall cosmesis upon completion of treatment

  1. Protocol for quality control of scanners used in the simulation of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Jorge l; Alfonso, Rodolfo; Vega, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 is made in the INOR based on semi-orthogonal X-ray images. In the case of implants of molds for head and neck injuries for the purpose of strengthening the external radiation doses, reports valuable information can combine isodose distributions of both modalities. The CT imaging the patient with the applicator-placed cast, gives the possibility to obtain three-dimensional dose distributions in different anatomical views. The aim of this study was to implement the verification of post-plan dose distributions and the possibility of combined distributions. (author)

  2. TH-AB-BRA-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of MR-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Y; Barkati, M; Beliveau-Nadeau, D [CHUM Notre Dame Hospital, Montreal, QC, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective study on 16 patients that had both CT and T2-weighted MR scans done at first fraction using the Utrecht CT/MR applicator (Elekta Brachytherapy) in order to evaluate uncertainties associated with an MR-only planning workflow. Methods: MR-workflow uncertainties were classified in three categories: reconstruction, registration and contouring. A systematic comparison of the CT and MR contouring, manual reconstruction and optimization process was performed to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on the recommended GEC ESTRO DVH parameters: D90% and V100% for HR-CTV as well as D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowel. This comparison was done using the following four steps: 1. Catheter reconstruction done on MR images with original CT-plan contours and dwell times. 2. OAR contours adjusted on MR images with original CT-plan reconstruction and dwell times. 3. Both reconstruction and contours done on MR images with original CT-plan dwell times. 4. Entire MR-based workflow optimized dwell times reimported to the original CT-plan. Results: The MR-based reconstruction process showed average D2cc deviations of 4.5 ± 3.0%, 1.5 ± 2.0%, 2.5 ± 2.0% and 2.0 ± 1.0% for the bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowels respectively with a maximum of 10%, 6%, 6% and 4%. The HR-CTV’s D90% and V100% average deviations was found to be 4.0 ± 3.0%, and 2.0 ± 2.0% respectively with a maximum of 10% and 6%. Adjusting contours on MR-images was found to have a similar impact. Finally, the optimized MR-based workflow dwell times were found to still give acceptable plans when re-imported to the original CT-plan which validated the entire workflow. Conclusion: This work illustrates a systematic validation method for centers wanting to move towards an MR-only workflow. This work will be expanded to model based reconstruction, PD-weighted images and other types of applicators.

  3. TH-AB-BRA-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of MR-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamio, Y; Barkati, M; Beliveau-Nadeau, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective study on 16 patients that had both CT and T2-weighted MR scans done at first fraction using the Utrecht CT/MR applicator (Elekta Brachytherapy) in order to evaluate uncertainties associated with an MR-only planning workflow. Methods: MR-workflow uncertainties were classified in three categories: reconstruction, registration and contouring. A systematic comparison of the CT and MR contouring, manual reconstruction and optimization process was performed to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on the recommended GEC ESTRO DVH parameters: D90% and V100% for HR-CTV as well as D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowel. This comparison was done using the following four steps: 1. Catheter reconstruction done on MR images with original CT-plan contours and dwell times. 2. OAR contours adjusted on MR images with original CT-plan reconstruction and dwell times. 3. Both reconstruction and contours done on MR images with original CT-plan dwell times. 4. Entire MR-based workflow optimized dwell times reimported to the original CT-plan. Results: The MR-based reconstruction process showed average D2cc deviations of 4.5 ± 3.0%, 1.5 ± 2.0%, 2.5 ± 2.0% and 2.0 ± 1.0% for the bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon and small bowels respectively with a maximum of 10%, 6%, 6% and 4%. The HR-CTV’s D90% and V100% average deviations was found to be 4.0 ± 3.0%, and 2.0 ± 2.0% respectively with a maximum of 10% and 6%. Adjusting contours on MR-images was found to have a similar impact. Finally, the optimized MR-based workflow dwell times were found to still give acceptable plans when re-imported to the original CT-plan which validated the entire workflow. Conclusion: This work illustrates a systematic validation method for centers wanting to move towards an MR-only workflow. This work will be expanded to model based reconstruction, PD-weighted images and other types of applicators.

  4. SU-F-T-420: Dosimetry Comparison of Advanced External Beam Radiation Treatment Modalities to Brachytherapy Treatments in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwidu, U; Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shehadeh, M; AlKafi, M; Mahmood, R; Moftah, B [King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A retrospective comparison of dose distributions achievable by High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT), Helical TomoTherapy (TOMO), CyberKnife (CK) and RapidArc (RA) in locally advanced inoperable cervical cancer patients is presented. Methods: Five patients with advanced stage cervical carcinoma were selected for this study after a full course of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), chemotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy. To highlight any significant similarities/differences in dose distributions, high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) coverage, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and machine specific delivery limitations, we used D90 (dose received by 90% of the volume) as the parameter for HRCTV coverage as recommended by the GEC-ESTRO Working Group. We also compared both integral and differential dose volume histograms (DVH) between different dose distributions treatment modalities for HRCTV and OAR. Results: TOMO and RA provided the most conformal dose distributions to HRCTV. Median doses (in Gy) to organs at risk were; for rectal wall: 1.7±0.6, 2.5±0.6,1.2±0.3, and 1.5±0.6, and for bladder wall: 1.6±0.1, 2.4±0.4, 0.8±0.6, and 1.5±0.5, for HDRBT, TOMO, CK, and RA, respectively. Conclusion: Contemporary EBRT modalities might be able to replace brachytherapy treatments for cervix cancer. While brachytherapy dose distributions feature high dose gradients, EBRT modalities provide highly conformal dose distributions to the target. However, it is still not clear whether a highly conformal dose or high gradient dose is more clinically relevant for the HRCTV in cervix cancer patients.

  5. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todor, D.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  6. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todor, D. [Virginia Commonwealth University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  7. MO-E-BRD-03: Intra-Operative Breast Brachytherapy: Is One Stop Shopping Best?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, B.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  8. Re-evaluation of the shielding adequacy of the brachytherapy treatment room at Korle-Bu teaching hospital, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arwui, C. C.

    2009-06-01

    Staff and the general public's safety during the operation of the 137 Cs brachytherapy unit at the Korle Bu teaching hospital depends on the adequacy of the shielding of the facility. Shielding design of the brachytherapy unit at the hospital was based on postulated workload and postulated occupancy factors to critical locations at the facility where the public and staff may occupy. This facility has been in existence for the past twelve (12) years and has accumulated operational workload data which differs from the postulated one. A study was carried out to re-evaluate the integrity of the biological shielding of the 137 Cs brachytherapy unit. This study analyzed the accumulated workload data and used the information to perform shielding calculations to verify the adequacy of the biological shielding thicknesses to provide sufficient protection of staff and the public. Dose rate calculations were verified by measurements with calibrated dose rate meters. This provided the basis for determining the current state of protection and safety for staff and the general public. The results show that despite the variation in actual and postulated workloads, the dose rates were below the reference values of 0.5μSv/h for public areas and 7.5μSv/h for controlled areas. It was confirmed that the present shielding thickness of 535 mm can accommodate a high dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir source with activity in the range 370 - 570 GBq with an operational workload of 30 patients per week and an average treatment time of 10 minutes.

  9. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G; Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  10. HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerra, Arrate Querejeta; Mena, Estefanía Palacios; Fabregas, Joan Pera; Miguelez, Cristina Gutiérrez; Guedea, Ferran

    2010-03-01

    Lip cancer can be treated by surgery, external radiotherapy, and/or brachytherapy (BT). In recent years, BT has become increasingly favored for this type of cancer. The aim of the present study was to analyze local control and survival of patients treated at our institution between July 1989 and June 2008. We performed a retrospective study of 121 patients (109 males and 12 females) who underwent lip cancer brachytherapy from July 1989 to June 2008. Median age was 67 years and median follow-up was 31.8 months (range 20-188 months). Out of 121 patients, 100 (82.6%) were treated with low dose rate (LDR) BT while the remaining 21 patients (17.4%) received high dose rate (HDR) BT. The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%). Most cases were either stage T1 (62 patients; 51.2%), or T2 (44 cases; 36.4%). After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%. Local, regional, and distant control at 15 years were 90%, 92%, and 98.8%, respectively. Grade 3 mucosal toxicity was observed in 23% of patients treated with LDR compared to 33% of HDR patients, and grade 4 mucosal toxicity in 9% versus 0% in the HDR group. Our findings confirm that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for lip cancer. The results from our series are in line with those published elsewhere. Based on our limited data, HDR appears to be equally as good as LDR, although this needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  11. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery, School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John [CCSEO, Kingston General Hospital and Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  12. Effects of prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on doses in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shidong; Aref, Ibrahim; Walker, Eleanor; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviation (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach

  13. [Brachytherapy of brainstem tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julow, Jenö; Viola, Arpád; Major, Tibor; Valálik, István; Sági, Sarolta; Mangel, László; Kovács, Rita Beáta; Repa, Imre; Bajzik, Gábor; Németh, György

    2004-01-20

    The optimal therapy of brain stem tumours of different histopathology determines the expected length of survival. Authors report 125Iodine interstitial irradiation of brain stem tumours with stereotactic brachytherapy. Two patients having brain stem tumours were suffering from glioma or from metastases of a carcinoma. In Case 1 the tumour volume was 1.98 cm3 at the time of planning interstitial irradiation. The control MRI examination performed at 42 months post-op showed a postirradiation cyst size of 5.73 cm3 indicating 65.5% shrinkage. In Case 2 the shrinkage was more apparent as the tumour volume measured on the control MRI at 8 months post-op was only 0.16 cm3 indicating 97.4% shrinkage of the 6.05 cm3 target volume at the time of brachytherapy with the metastasis practically disappearing. Quick access to histopathological results of the stereotactic intraoperative biopsy made it possible to carry out the 125Iodine stereotactic brachytherapy immediately after the biopsy, resulting in less inconvenience for patients of a second possible intervention. The control MRI scans show significant shrinkage of tumours in both patients. The procedure can be performed as a biopsy. The CT and image fusion guided 125Iodine stereotactic brachytherapy can be well planned dosimetrically and is surgically precise.

  14. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhjem, Matthew C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic ± paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer

  15. About the value of Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy in the treatment of uveal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, G.; Mosboeck, G.; Stuecklschwaiger, G.; Muellner, K.; Lechner, H.; Faulborn, J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: to investigate the clinical course, sequelae and visual function of uveal melanomas treated with Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy. Patients and method: 47 patients who underwent Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy between 1985 and 2000 were evaluated using Kaplan Meier statistical method. Mean follow up interval was 22 month (range 8 - 152 months). Results: Local tumor control rate was 85 %, 5 years possibility to avoid enucleation was 75 %. The most important sequelae were radiation optic neuropathy (29 %), maculopathy (37 %) and radiation retinopathy (32 %). After terminating the study the 34 % of the patients achieved a visual acuity of 20/40 and more, another 34 % had a visual function of 20/200 and lower. Conclusion: Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy is our method of choice in small medium sized uveal melanomas and a maximum tumor prominence of 6 mm. Tumors have to be located in the midperiphery and outer periphery of the fundus including the ciliary body. In addition to the indications introduced by Lommatzsch we treated ciliary body melanomas with a tumor base more than 3 clock hours (by shifting the plaque) as an alternative therapy to enucleation. (author)

  16. A novel two-step optimization method for tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manju; Fields, Emma C; Todor, Dorin A

    2015-01-01

    To present a novel method allowing fast volumetric optimization of tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate treatments and to quantify its benefits. Twenty-seven CT-based treatment plans from 6 consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with four to five intracavitary tandem and ovoid insertions were used. Initial single-step optimized plans were manually optimized, approved, and delivered plans created with a goal to cover high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) with D90 >90% and minimize rectum, bladder, and sigmoid D2cc. For the two-step optimized (TSO) plan, each single-step optimized plan was replanned adding a structure created from prescription isodose line to the existent physician delineated HR-CTV, rectum, bladder, and sigmoid. New, more rigorous dose-volume histogram constraints for the critical organs at risks (OARs) were used for the optimization. HR-CTV D90 and OAR D2ccs were evaluated in both plans. TSO plans had consistently smaller D2ccs for all three OARs while preserving HR-CTV D90. On plans with "excellent" CTV coverage, average D90 of 96% (91-102%), sigmoid, bladder, and rectum D2cc, respectively, reduced on average by 37% (16-73%), 28% (20-47%), and 27% (15-45%). Similar reductions were obtained on plans with "good" coverage, average D90 of 93% (90-99%). For plans with "inferior" coverage, average D90 of 81%, the coverage increased to 87% with concurrent D2cc reductions of 31%, 18%, and 11% for sigmoid, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The TSO can be added with minimal planning time increase but with the potential of dramatic and systematic reductions in OAR D2ccs and in some cases with concurrent increase in target dose coverage. These single-fraction modifications would be magnified over the course of four to five intracavitary insertions and may have real clinical implications in terms of decreasing both acute and late toxicities. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a promising treatment option for the boost of oropharyngeal cancers not suitable for brachytherapy: a single-institutional experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamgani, A.; Tans, L.; Teguh, D.N.; Rooij, P. van; Zwijnenburg, E.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 2005 and 2010,

  18. Brachytherapy with cobalt plaques in the conservative treatment of intraocular tumors. The hospital A.C. camargo experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, N.; Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Fogarolli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Baraldi, H.E.; Chojniak, M.M.; Erwene, CM

    1996-01-01

    From December 1989 to December 1993, 76 cases of intraocular tumors, including 56 adult patients with uveal melanomas and 20 children with retinoblastoma, were treated with exclusive intraocular brachytherapy with Cobalt plaques. The goal was to keep the vision function and at same time not compromising the chance of cure. The dose prescribed was 40Gy, calculated at the apex of the lesion for retinoblastomas and 100 to 120Gy for uveal melanomas. With the minimum follow up of 24 months, of the 56 patients with uveal melanomas, 41 (73,3%) had their vision preserved and 15 (26,4%) had local failure and were underwent enucleation. With the medium follow up of 27 months, 17 (85,5%) of the patients with retinoblastoma had their vision preserved, while 3 (15%) had local failure and were treated by enucleation. The grade I and II complications occurred in 9 (42,8%) patients and 100% of them are with no evidence of systemic disease. When well indicated, the conservative treatment of intraocular tumors with brachytherapy is a good alternative to enucleation and must be done by a multidisciplinary and well trained medical professional group

  19. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck...... as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment......Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also pro-vide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing...

  20. SU-G-TeP1-01: A Simulation Study to Investigate Maximum Allowable Deformations of Implant Geometry Before Plan Objectives Are Violated in Prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babier, A [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In prostate HDR brachytherapy dose distributions are highly sensitive to changes in prostate volume and catheter displacements. We investigate the maximum deformations in implant geometry before planning objectives are violated. Methods: A typical prostate Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy reference plan was calculated on the Oncentra planning system, which used CT images from a tissue equivalent prostate phantom (CIRS Model 053S) embedded inside a pelvis wax phantom. The prostate was deformed and catheters were displaced in simulations using a code written in MATLAB. For each deformation dose distributions were calculated, based on TG43 methods, using the MATLAB code. The calculations were validated through comparison with Oncentra calculations for the reference plan, and agreed within 0.12%SD and 0.3%SD for dose and volume, respectively. Isotropic prostate volume deformations of up to +34% to −27% relative to its original volume, and longitudinal catheter displacements of 7.5 mm in superior and inferior directions were simulated. Planning objectives were based on American Brachytherapy Society guidelines for prostate and urethra volumes. A plan violated the planning objectives when less than 90% of the prostate volume received the prescribed dose or higher (V{sub 100}), or the urethral volume receiving 125% of prescribed dose or higher was more than 1 cc (U{sub 125}). Lastly, the dose homogeneity index (DHI=1-V{sub 150}/V{sub 100}) was evaluated; a plan was considered sub-optimal when the DHI fell below 0.62. Results and Conclusion: Planning objectives were violated when the prostate expanded by 10.7±0.5% or contracted by 11.0±0.2%; objectives were also violated when catheters were displaced by 4.15±0.15 mm and 3.70±0.15 mm in the superior and inferior directions, respectively. The DHI changes did not affect the plan optimality, except in the case of prostate compression. In general, catheter displacements have a significantly larger impact on plan

  1. Treatment of skin carcinomas of the face by high-dose-rate brachytherapy and custom-made surface molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guix, Benjamin; Finestres, Fernando; Tello, Jose-Ignacio; Palma, Cesar; Martinez, Antonio; Guix, Jose-Ramon; Guix, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results obtained in a prospective group of patients with basal or squamous cell skin carcinomas of the face treated by high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy via custom-made surface molds. Methods and Materials: A total of 136 patients with basal or squamous cell carcinomas of the face were treated between March 1992 and March 1997 by surface molds and HDR brachytherapy with iridium-192. Nineteen patients were treated with standard Brock applicators and 117 patients with custom-made polymethyl methacrylate applicators, built over a plaster mold obtained of the patient's face. Minimum dose administered to the tumor was 6000 to 6500 cGy in 33 to 36 fractions at 180 cGy/fraction in lesions of up to 4 cm. Lesions greater than 4 cm were boosted up to 7500-8000 cGy after a 3-week pause. Results: With the custom-made surface molds, the dose distribution was uniform in the surface of the skin and at 5 mm depth in the whole area of the applicator. Differences between the areas of maximum and minimum dose at this depth never reached values higher than 5% of the prescribed dose. At the edges of the custom-made molds dose gradient was sharp, with the detected dose at 5 mm from the applicator being negligible. All the patients were complete responders. There were 3 local recurrences, 1/73 patients treated for primary tumor and 2/63 patients treated for recurrent tumor. Actuarial local control at 5 years for all patients was 98%, for those patients with primary tumors 99%, and for recurrent patients 87%. The treatment tolerance was excellent in all cases. No severe, early, or late, complications were detected. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a highly effective treatment of skin carcinomas of the face. Custom-made molds, to be used in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy equipment, make possible a uniform dose distribution, with a sharp dose gradient in the limits of applicators. Custom-made surface molds are easy and safe to use, and they fit very accurately for

  2. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of uterine cervix cancer. Analysis of dose effectiveness and late complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Fogarolli, Ricardo Cesar; Gentil, Andre Cavalcanti; Salvajoli, Joao Victor

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis aims to report results of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From September 1992 to December 1996, 138 patients with FIGO Stages II and III and mean age of 56 years were treated. Median EBR to the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Parametrial boost was performed in 93% of patients, with a median dose of 14.4 Gy. Brachytherapy with HDR was performed during EBR or following its completion with a dose of 24 Gy in four weekly fractions of 6 Gy to point A. Median overall treatment time was of 60 days. Patient age, tumor stage, and overall treatment time were variables analyzed for survival and local control. Cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at rectal and bladder reference points were correlated with late complications in these organs and dose of EBR at parametrium was correlated with small bowel complications. Results: Median follow-up time was 38 months. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years was 53.7%, 52.7%, and 62%, respectively. By multivariate and univariate analysis, overall treatment time up to 50 days was the only statistically significant adverse variable for overall survival (p=0.003) and actuarial local control (p=0.008). The 5-year actuarial incidence of rectal, bladder, and small bowel late complications was 16%, 11%, and 14%, respectively. Patients treated with cumulative BED at rectum points above 110 Gy 3 and at bladder point above 125 Gy 3 had a higher but not statistically significant 5-year actuarial rate of complications at these organs (18% vs. 12%, p=0.49 and 17% vs. 9%, p=0.20, respectively). Patients who received parametrial doses larger than 59 Gy had a higher 5-year actuarial rate of complications in the small bowel; however, this was not statistically significant (19% vs. 10%, p=0.260). Conclusion: This series suggests that 45 Gy to the whole pelvis combined with

  3. Randomized comparison between intracoronary β-radiation brachytherapy and implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse in-stent restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukro, Christoph; Syeda, Bonni; Kirisits, Christian; Schmid, Rainer; Pichler, Philipp; Pokrajac, Boris; Lang, Irene; Poetter, Richard; Glogar, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intracoronary brachytherapy was the primary therapeutic option for the treatment of in-stent restenosis (ISR) during the last years. Especially for the treatment of diffuse ISR (lesions >10 mm), β-source brachytherapy was significantly superior to singular balloon angioplasty. Despite lacking clinical database, the implantation of drug eluting stents recently became a common procedure for the treatment of ISR. This randomized trial aimed to compare the efficacy of β-brachytherapy with β-radioisotopes 90 Sr/ 90 Y and paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of diffuse ISR. Material and methods: Thirty-seven patients with diffuse ISR were randomly assigned to β-brachytherapy after balloon angioplasty (Beta-Cath TM in 17 patients) or paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation (Taxus-Express2 TM in 20 patients). Six-month clinical follow-up was obtained for all patients, while angiographic follow-up was available for 30 patients. Results: Binary ISR (restenosis >50%) within target segment was observed in three patients treated with Beta-Cath TM , of which one needed target segment revascularisation for recurrent ISR, whereas no significant restenosis occurred in the patients treated with Taxus-Express2 TM (P = 0.037). No further major adverse cardiac (target segment revascularisation, myocardial infarction, death) was found in either group (P = NS). Stent implantation was the more time-saving (31 ± 11 min versus 60 ± 23 min, P TM arm, we found no difference in clinical outcome after implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse ISR when compared to β-brachytherapy

  4. TU-H-209-00: Planning and Delivering HDR APBI Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Learnings Objectives: Although brachytherapy is the oldest form of radiation therapy, the rapid advancement of the methods of dose calculation, treatment planning and treatment delivery pushes us to keep updating our knowledge and experience to new procedures all the time. Our purpose is to present the newest applicators used in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and the techniques of using them for a maximum effective treatment. Our objective will be to get the user familiar with the Savi, Contura and ML Mammosite from the detailed description and measurements to cavity eval and choice or size, to acceptance tests and use of each. At the end of the session the attendants will be able to assist at the scanning of the patient for the first treatment, decide on the proper localization and immobilization devices, import the scans in the treatment planning system, perform the structure segmentation, reconstruct the catheters and develop a treatment plan using inverse planning (IPSA) or volume optimization. The attendant should be able to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan according to the ABS protocols and B39 after this session. Our goal is that all the attendants to gain knowledge of all the quality assurance procedures required to be performed prior to a treatment, at the beginning of a treatment day, weekly, monthly and annualy on the remote afterloader, the treatment planning system and the secondary check system. We will provide tips for a consistent treatment delivery of the 10 fractions in a BID (twice daily) regimen.

  5. An analysis of acute complications and perioperative morbidity from high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute morbidity and mortality for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy performed in an outpatient setting in the treatment of gynecological malignancies, and to identify possible risk factors for adverse outcomes. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients with cervical (n=129) or uterine (n=42) carcinoma with an intact uterus were evaluated and treated from August 1989 through December 1994, with at least part of their therapy delivered with intracavitary HDR 192 Ir radiation. A total of 830 ICR insertions were performed with greater than 95% done on an outpatient basis under heavy intravenous sedation using fentanyl and midazolam. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were recorded for any event occurring within 30 days of the completion of therapy. Anesthesia risk was evaluated retrospectively in all patients based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) Physical Class System. Results: The uterine patients, many treated with radiation alone because of morbid obesity or medical inoperability, had a significantly higher perioperative morbidity and mortality rate as compared to the cervix patient cohort. Thirteen of the 42 (31%) uterine patients and 8 of the 129 (6%) cervix patients required hospitalization within 30 days of treatment completion (p 2) experienced greater morbidity and mortality, while the best predictor of complications in the cervix patients was age greater than 70 years. For the entire cohort of patients, no correlation was found between the 30 day morbidity and mortality and the doses of fentanyl and midazolam used or the length of the procedure. Conclusions: The acute complication rate from HDR brachytherapy performed on an outpatient basis with heavy intravenous sedation is acceptable for the great majority of patients who present for treatment. However, the high morbidity and mortality experienced by certain patient cohorts suggests that careful assessment of the risk/benefit ratio for treatment

  6. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  7. Clinical evaluation of treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, E W [Radiotherapy Department, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1966-06-15

    Since the start of radiotherapy, the aim of all radiotherapists has been to treat as many patients who suffer with malignant tumours as possible, so as to give an effective curative dose to the whole tumour, at the same time, doing as little damage as possible to normal tissues. Until 1945, damage to the skin was usually the limiting factor. Since the war, with the rapid development of more powerful X-ray machines and sources of irradiation, we have had at our disposal much more penetrating radiation, allowing us to give effective tumour doses, with little or no damage to the skin. However, with higher tumour doses, there is more likelihood of damage to structures in proximity to the tumour - i.e. bone, nerves, muscle, liver, kidney etc. This has focussed the interest of all radiologists on the need for careful planning, and physicists have worked out with great care the differential absorptions of X-rays on differing tissue, i. e. bone, muscle, fat etc., so that very accurate and correct treatment planning can now be undertaken. This entails a great deal of accurate and complicated work and has had to be done by our physicist colleagues, who may take hours or days to work out a complicated treatment plan. The acceptance of the plan as being the most suitable for a patient is governed by these factors: (a) The dose must be given to the whole tumour area; (b) The nearby structures, i. e. nerves, bowel, kidney etc. must not receive a dose which may cause serious damage; (c) All parts of the tumour must have an effective dose; (d) The integral dose must be such that the patient is not unduly upset. All these factors vary from patient to patient, and thus each plan has to be considered in conjunction with each individual patient so that, although patients have similar tumours, what may be an optimal plan for one may not be for another. Also clinicians themselves vary in their opinions on the size of tumour, general condition of the patient, and the amount of damage

  8. Treatment planning optimization for linear accelerator radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Mendenhall, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Linear accelerator radiosurgery uses multiple arcs delivered through circular collimators to produce a nominally spherical dose distribution. Production of dose distributions that conform to irregular lesions or conformally avoid critical neural structures requires a detailed understanding of the available treatment planning parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning parameters that may be manipulated within a single isocenter to provide conformal avoidance and dose conformation to ellipsoidal lesions include differential arc weighting and gantry start/stop angles. More irregular lesions require the use of multiple isocenters. Iterative manipulation of treatment planning variables can be difficult and computationally expensive, especially if the effects of these manipulations are not well defined. Effects of treatment parameter manipulation are explained and illustrated. This is followed by description of the University of Florida Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning Algorithm. This algorithm organizes the manipulations into a practical approach for radiosurgery treatment planning. Results: Iterative treatment planning parameters may be efficiently manipulated to achieve optimal treatment plans by following the University of Florida Treatment Planning Algorithm. The ability to produce conformal stereotactic treatment plans using the algorithm is demonstrated for a variety of clinical presentations. Conclusion: The standard dose distribution produced in linear accelerator radiosurgery is spherical, but manipulation of available treatment planning parameters may result in optimal dose conformation. The University of Florida Treatment Planning Algorithm organizes available treatment parameters to efficiently produce conformal radiosurgery treatment plans

  9. How one institution overcame the challenges to start an MRI-based brachytherapy program for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Harkenrider

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Adaptive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based brachytherapy results in improved local control and decreased high-grade toxicities compared to historical controls. Incorporating MRI into the workflow of a department can be a major challenge when initiating an MRI-based brachytherapy program. This project aims to describe the goals, challenges, and solutions when initiating an MRI-based cervical cancer brachytherapy program at our institution. Material and methods : We describe the 6-month multi-disciplinary planning phase to initiate an MRI-based brachytherapy program. We describe the specific challenges that were encountered prior to treating our first patient. Results : We describe the solutions that were realized and executed to solve the challenges that we faced to establish our MRI-based brachytherapy program. We emphasize detailed coordination of care, planning, and communication to make the workflow feasible. We detail the imaging and radiation physics solutions to safely deliver MRI-based brachytherapy. The focus of these efforts is always on the delivery of optimal, state of the art patient care and treatment delivery within the context of our available institutional resources. Conclusions : Previous publications have supported a transition to MRI-based brachytherapy, and this can be safely and efficiently accomplished as described in this manuscript.

  10. SU-E-T-285: Revisiting the Nomogram for Intra-Operative Planning Based Pd-103 Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, S; Cho, P [Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The seed implant technique at our institution involves using a published nomogram for seed ordering based on CT based volume studies of the prostate. Ultrasound volume studies are subsequently used in the operating room for planning a modified peripheral loading with urethra sparing seed implant. The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate modality for prostate volume measurement and creating an updated nomogram for intra-operative planning specific to our technique for pd-103 brachytherapy for efficient seed ordering. Methods: Prostate volumes based on pre-implant CT (Pre-CT), intra-operative ultrasound (TRUS), and post-implant CT (post-CT) studies as well as the total airkerma strength (AKS) of the implants were analyzed for 135 seed implant cases (69 monotherapy, 66 boost). Regression analysis was performed to derive the relationship between the total AKS and pre-CT and TRUS volumes. The correlation between TRUS and pre-CT volumes and TRUS and post-CT volumes were also studied. Results: Ultrasound based prostate volume exhibited a stronger correlation with total AKS than the pre-implant CT volume (R{sup 2} = 0.97 vs 0.88 for monotherapy and 0.96 vs 0.89 for boost). In general the pre-CT overestimated the prostate volume leading to ordering of a larger number of seeds and thus leading to higher number of unused/wasted seeds. Newly derived TRUS based nomogram was better suited for our technique than the published data. The post-implant CT volume closely followed the ultrasound volume (R{sup 2} = 0.88) as compared to pre-implant CT volumes (R{sup 2} = 0.57). Conclusion: In an era of costconscious health care where waste reduction is of utmost importance, an updated technique-specific nomogram is useful for ordering optimal number of seeds resulting in significant cost savings. In addition, our study shows that ultrasound based prostate volume is a better predictor for seed ordering for intra-operative planning than pre-implant CT.

  11. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nunez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G.

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs

  12. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  13. SU-E-T-375: Evaluation of a MapCHECK2(tm) Planar 2-D Diode Array for High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Delivery Verifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macey, N; Siebert, M; Shvydka, D; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Despite improvements of HDR brachytherapy delivery systems, verification of source position is still typically based on the length of the wire reeled out relative to the parked position. Yet, the majority of errors leading to medical events in HDR treatments continue to be classified as missed targets or wrong treatment sites. We investigate the feasibility of using dose maps acquired with a two-dimensional diode array to independently verify the source locations, dwell times, and dose during an HDR treatment. Methods: Custom correction factors were integrated into frame-by-frame raw counts recorded for a Varian VariSource™ HDR afterloader Ir-192 source located at various distances in air and in solid water from a MapCHECK2™ diode array. The resultant corrected counts were analyzed to determine the dwell position locations and doses delivered. The local maxima of polynomial equations fitted to the extracted dwell dose profiles provided the X and Y coordinates while the distance to the source was determined from evaluation of the full width at half maximum (FWHM). To verify the approach, the experiment was repeated as the source was moved through dwell positions at various distances along an inclined plane, mimicking a vaginal cylinder treatment. Results: Dose map analysis was utilized to provide the coordinates of the source and dose delivered over each dwell position. The accuracy in determining source dwell positions was found to be +/−1.0 mm of the preset values, and doses within +/−3% of those calculated by the BrachyVision™ treatment planning system for all measured distances. Conclusion: Frame-by-frame data furnished by a 2 -D diode array can be used to verify the dwell positions and doses delivered by the HDR source over the course of treatment. Our studies have verified that measurements provided by the MapCHECK2™ can be used as a routine QA tool for HDR treatment delivery verification.

  14. Effect of geometrical optimization on the treatment volumes and the dose homogeneity of biplane interstitial brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Yavuz; Esassolak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayhan; Aras, Arif; Olacak, Ibrahim; Haydaroglu, Ayfer

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The isodose distributions of HDR stepping source brachytherapy implants can be modified by changing dwell times and this procedure is called optimization. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of geometrical optimization on the brachytherapy volumes and the dose homogeneity inside the implant and to compare them with non-optimized counterparts. Material and methods: A set of biplane breast implants consisting of 84 different configurations have been digitized by the planning computer and volumetric analysis was performed for both non-optimized and geometrically optimized implants. Treated length (T L ), treated volume (V 100 ), irradiated volume (V 50 ), overdose volume (V 200 ) and quality index (QI) have been calculated for every non-optimized implant and compared to its corresponding geometrically optimized implant having a similar configuration and covering the same target length. Results: The mean T L was 74.48% of the active length (A L ) for non-optimized implants and was 91.87% for optimized implants (P 50 /V 100 value was 2.71 for non-optimized implants and 2.65 for optimized implants (P 200 /V 100 value was 0.09 for non-optimized implants and 0.10 for optimized implants (P < 0.001). Conclusions: By performing geometrical optimization it is possible to implant shorter needles for a given tumour to adequately cover the target volume with the reference isodose and thus surgical damage is reduced. The amount of healthy tissues outside the target receiving considerable radiation is significantly reduced due to the decrease in irradiated volume. Dose homogeneity inside the implant is significantly improved. Although there is a slight increase of overdose volume inside the implant, this increase is considered to be negligible in clinical applications

  15. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose–Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45–50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy for tumor; α/β = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV (± 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 (±30) cm 3 , and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 (±14) cm 3 . The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 (±13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 (±20) Gy, 76 (±16) Gy, 70 (±9) Gy, and 60 (±9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19–87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable

  16. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  17. Treatment planning with ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foss, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Ions have higher linear energy transfer (LET) near the end of their range and lower LET away from the end of their range. Mixing radiations of different LET complicates treatment planning because radiation kills cells in two statistically independent ways. In some cases, cells are killed by a single-particle, which causes a linear decrease in log survival at low dosage. When the linear decrease is subtracted from the log survival curve, the remaining curve has zero slope at zero dosage. This curve is the log survival curve for cells that are killed only by two or more particles. These two mechanisms are statistically independent. To calculate survival, these two kinds of doses must be accumulated separately. The effect of each accumulated dosage must be read from its survival curve, and the logarithms of the two effects added to get the log survival. Treatment plans for doses of protons, He 3 ions, and He 4 ions suggest that these ions will be useful therapeutic modalities

  18. Indications and technical aspects of brachytherapy in breast conserving treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erik Van, Limbergen

    2003-01-01

    Improved local control rates have been demonstrated in retrospective studies as well as in randomized trials on brachytherapy with increasing doses to the tumour bed. The higher local control obtained by interstitial breast implants, as compared to external photon or electron beam boosts, have been mainly attributed to the higher doses actually delivered to the tumour bed by these implants for the same nominal dose as compared to external beam radiotherapy (RT). On the other hand, poor cosmesis has also been correlated with radiation dose to the breast skin (radiation telangiectases), and breast tissue (retraction due to fibrosis), the latter depending not only on RT dose but also on the treated boost volume. For this reason, a possible benefit of interstitial implants will only be realized when the gain in local control goes together with minimal cosmetic damage. Therefore, the ballistic advantages of interstitial implants have to be maximally exploited: i.e. the treated volume should be maximally adapted to the target volume, and additional irradiation of the breast skin by the boost technique should be avoided. This paper deals in detail with the technical aspects of breast brachytherapy that seem to be relevant for high quality outcome. (author)

  19. Brachytherapy and percutaneous stenting in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma: A prospective randomised study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valek, Vlastimil; Kysela, Petr; Kala, Zdenek; Kiss, Igor; Tomasek, Jiri; Petera, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiation therapy including intraluminal brachyterapy with iridium-192 on survival of patients with malignant biliary strictures (cholangiocarcinoma, histologically improved) treated with metallic stent in a prospective randomised study. Method and materials: In the prospective randomised study, 21 patients with cholangiocarcinoma were treated with implantation of percutaneous stents followed with intraluminal Ir-192 brachytherapy (mean dose 30 Gy) and external radiotherapy (mean dose 50 Gy) and 21 patients were treated only with stents insertion. We did not find any statistically significant differences in age and tumor localization between these two groups of patients. Results: All the patients died. In the group of patients treated with brachytherapy and with stent implantation, the mean survival time was 387.9 days. In the group of patients treated only with stent insertion the mean survival was 298 days. In effort to eliminate possible effect of external radiotherapy we treated the control group of eight patients with cholangiocarcinoma by stent insertion and brachyterapy only. Conclusion: Our results show that combined radiation therapy could extend the survival in the patients with cholangiocarcinoma obstruction

  20. Does inverse planning applied to Iridium192 high dose rate prostate brachytherapy improve the optimization of the dose afforded by the Paris system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickers, Philippe; Lenaerts, Eric; Thissen, Benedicte; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of the work is to analyse for 192 Ir prostate brachytherapy (BT) some of the different steps in optimizing the dose delivered to the CTV, urethra and rectum. Materials and methods: Between 07/1998 and 12/2001, 166 patients were treated with 192 Ir wires providing a low dose rate, according to the Paris system philosophy and with the 2D version of the treatment planning Isis R . 40-45 Gy were delivered after an external beam radiotherapy of 40 Gy. The maximum tolerable doses for BT were 25 Gy to the anterior third of the rectum on the whole length of the implant (R dose) and 52 Gy to the urethra on a 1 cm length (U max ). A U max /CTV dose ratio >1.3 represented a pejorative value as the planned dose of 40-45 Gy could not be achieved. On the other side a ratio ≤1.25 was considered optimal and the intermediate values satisfactory. A R/CTV dose ratio 192 Ir sources. Results: At the end of a learning curve reaching a plateau after the first 71 patients, 90% of the implants with 192 Ir wires were stated at least satisfactory for a total rate of 82% for the whole population. When the 3D dosimetry for SST was used, the initial values >1.25 decreased significantly with optimization required on CTV contours and additional constraints on urethra while the R/CTV ratio was maintained under 0.55. For initial U max /CTV >1.3 or >1.25 but ≤1.3 indeed, the mean respective values of 1.41±0.16 and 1.28±0.01 decreased to 1.28±0.24 and 1.17±0.09 (P<0.001), allowing to increase the total dose to the CTV by 4 Gy. Conclusions: The Paris system which assumes a homogeneous distribution of a minimum number of catheters inside the CTV allowed to anticipate a satisfactory dosimetry in 82% of cases. However, this precision rate could be improved until 95% with an optimization approach based on an inverse planning philosophy. These new 3D optimization methods, ideally based on good quality implants at first allow to deliver the highest doses with

  1. Stent placement or brachytherapy for palliation of dysphagia from esophageal cancer: a prognostic model to guide treatment selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Homs, Marjolein Y. V.; Stokvis, Annemieke; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Siersema, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachytherapy was found to be preferable to metal stent placement for the palliation of dysphagia because of inoperable esophageal cancer in the randomized SIREC trial. The benefit of brachytherapy, however, only occurred after a relatively long survival. The objective is to develop a

  2. Limb sparing surgery and boost with high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy in treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, P.; Miziara, M.; Soares, C.; Fogaroli, R.; Baraldi, H.; Pellizoni, A.; Borba, G.

    2003-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma, a rare neoplasia with high aggressively, accounts for approximately 0,7% of the malignant tumors and occurs more often with youngest. Because of the potential risk of local recurrence, theoretically surgical resection, encompassing macroscopic tumor with a margin of macroscopically noninvolved tissue is the right way to perform, with a wide 'en bloc' resection, amputation, with bad functional results. The aim of conservative treatment is combined modality therapy as surgical resection and irradiation to obtain a local control rate as high as possible while preserving functional results. A retrospective review of 31 patients treated with high dose rate (HDR) Brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Cancer Institute. Methods: Between April 1995 and August 1999, 31 patients who underwent a combine therapy; examined the results on multivariate analysis of conservative surgery and brachytherapy follow/or not by external beam radiation (EBRT). The 31 patients treated, 17 ( 54,8%) females and 14(45,2%) males have a median age of 48 years ( range,19 to 77 years). Most of the tumors was located in the lower limb (17/31 - 54,8%) . The other sites were the upper limb (10/31-32,3%), thoracic wall and abdomen (3/31-9,7%).Classification of the tumors, according to the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) staging was T1 5 patients (16%), T2 (24/31-77%). Median size of the tumors was 9,2cm ( ranged, 2,5 to 24cm). Most of the tumors being malignant fibrous histiocytomas (9/31-29%) and the histological grade II (14/31-45%). Twenty-two (71%) patients had intraoperative implants and the insertion of the radioactive source was delayed 24 to 120 hours. Eight patients (25,8%) had postoperative and received HDRB 45 to 60 days after the surgery . Guide needles were placed in the tumor bed, perpendicular to the scar, systematically in a single plane, the implant volume being defined by radiotherapist . A minimum safety margin of 2 cm

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  4. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail.