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Sample records for brachytherapy society guideline

  1. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Seth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Beyer, David C; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Goldsmith, Brian J; Horwitz, Eric M; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Lee, W Robert; Nag, Subir; Suh, W Warren; Potters, Louis

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  2. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the performance of high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hayes, John K; Hsu, I-Chow J; Morris, David E; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Tward, Jonathan D; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  3. Brachytherapy for Patients With Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Joint Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joseph; Rumble, R Bryan; Kollmeier, Marisa; Heath, Elisabeth; Efstathiou, Jason; Dorff, Tanya; Berman, Barry; Feifer, Andrew; Jacques, Arthur; Loblaw, D Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Purpose To jointly update the Cancer Care Ontario guideline on brachytherapy for patients with prostate cancer to account for new evidence. Methods An Update Panel conducted a targeted systematic literature review and identified more recent randomized controlled trials comparing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with brachytherapy in men with prostate cancer. Results Five randomized controlled trials provided the evidence for this update. Recommendations For patients with low-risk prostate cancer who require or choose active treatment, low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) alone, EBRT alone, and/or radical prostatectomy (RP) should be offered to eligible patients. For patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer choosing EBRT with or without androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or high-dose rate [HDR]) should be offered to eligible patients. For low-intermediate risk prostate cancer (Gleason 7, prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/mL or Gleason 6, prostate-specific antigen, 10 to 20 ng/mL), LDR brachytherapy alone may be offered as monotherapy. For patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving EBRT and androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or HDR) should be offered to eligible patients. Iodine-125 and palladium-103 are each reasonable isotope options for patients receiving LDR brachytherapy; no recommendation can be made for or against using cesium-131 or HDR monotherapy. Patients should be encouraged to participate in clinical trials to test novel or targeted approaches to this disease. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/Brachytherapy-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  4. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  5. Vaginal brachytherapy for postoperative endometrial cancer: 2014 Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Grover, Surbhi; Erickson, Beth A; Viswanathan, Akila N; Small, Christina; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    Report current practice patterns for postoperative endometrial cancer emphasizing vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). A 38-item survey was e-mailed to 1,598 American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members and 4,329 US radiation oncologists in 2014 totaling 5,710 recipients. Responses of practitioners who had delivered VBT in the previous 12 months were included in the analysis. Responses were tabulated to determine relative frequency distributions. χ(2) analysis was used to compare current results with those from the 2003 ABS survey. A total of 331 respondents initiated the VBT survey, of whom 289 (87.3%) administered VBT in the prior 12 months. Lymph node dissection and number of nodes removed influenced treatment decisions for 90.5% and 69.8%, respectively. High-dose-rate was used by 96.2%. The most common vaginal length treated was 4 cm (31.0%). Three-dimensional planning was used by 83.2% with 73.4% of those for the first fraction only. Doses to normal tissues were reported by 79.8%. About half optimized to the location of dose specification and/or normal tissues. As monotherapy, the most common prescriptions were 7 Gy for three fractions to 0.5-cm depth and 6 Gy for five fractions to the surface. As a boost, the most common prescriptions were 5 Gy for three fractions to 0.5-cm depth and 6 Gy for three fractions to the vaginal surface. Optimization points were placed at the apex and lateral vagina by 73.1%. Secondary quality assurance checks were performed by 98.9%. VBT is a common adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer patients, most commonly with HDR. Fractionation and planning processes are variable but generally align with ABS recommendations. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. A patient receiving LDR brachytherapy will stay overnight at the hospital. This is so the delivery device can remain in place throughout the treatment period. Pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy is delivered in a similar way, ...

  7. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  8. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

  9. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  10. Ethical guidelines to publication of chemical research. American Chemical Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The guidelines embodied in this document were revised by the editors of the Publication Division of the American Chemical Society in January 1994 and endorsed by the Society Committee on Publications.

  11. Canadian Thoracic Society Guidelines for Occupational Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Tarlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide broad guidelines and principles to help primary care physicians, occupational physicians, allergists and respirologists with the recognition, diagnosis and management of patients with occupational asthma (OA.

  12. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered.

  13. Society of Hair Testing guidelines for drug testing in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gail A A; Kronstrand, Robert; Kintz, Pascal

    2012-05-10

    The Society of Hair Testing (SoHT) Guidelines for Drug Testing in Hair provide laboratories with recommended best practice guidelines whether they are currently offering drug testing in hair, or plan to offer a hair testing service in the future. The guidelines include reference to recommended sample collection and storage procedures, through sample preparation, pre-treatment and analysis and the use of cut-offs.

  14. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  15. 6th Annual Conference of Indian Brachytherapy Society 2016 (IBSCON 2016) Proceedings

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Venkatesan; Kuppusamy, Thayalan; Bhalavat, Rajendra L.; ,; Prahlad H Yathiraj; Kumar, Uday P.; Sharan, Krishna; Singh, Anshul; Reddy, Anusha; Fernandes, Donald; Vidyasagar, M.S.; Kumar, Rishabh; Kala, Prachi; Mandal, Sanjeet; Vibhay, Pareek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the incidence, severity, and time of onset of late toxicities in patients of endometrial adenocarcinoma (EA) treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) + brachytherapy (BT), or vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) alone. Material and methods Archives of a single institution from 2008-2015 were studied. The indications for EBRT and VBT were based on standard recommendations. EBRT was planned to 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks/3DCRT with 4-field ‘box’ technique on a dual energy linear a...

  16. Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Guidelines for Cardiac Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Korean Society of Cariovascular Imaging Guidelines Committee, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University Heath System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Sejong Hospital and Sejong Heart Institute, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yeon Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsug Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (KOCSI) has issued a guideline for the use of cardiac CT imaging in order to assist clinicians and patients in providing adequate level of medical service. In order to establish a guideline founded on evidence based medicine, it was designed based on comprehensive data such as questionnaires conducted in international and domestic hospitals, intensive journal reviews, and with experts in cardiac radiology. The recommendations of this guideline should not be used as an absolute standard and medical professionals can always refer to methods non-adherent to this guideline when it is considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation. The guideline has its limitation and should be revised appropriately with the advancement medical equipment technology and public health care system. The guideline should not be served as a measure for standard of care. KOCSI strongly disapproves the use of the guideline to be used as the standard of expected practice in medical litigation processes.

  17. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K., E-mail: tarun.podder@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Caldwell, Barrett [Schools of Industrial Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Crass, Jostin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Imaging Research, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computer Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Meltsner, Michael A. [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3508 GA (Netherlands); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Salcudean, Tim [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Song, Danny Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce R. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  18. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: report of Task Group 192.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun K; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A; Crass, Jostin B; Dicker, Adam P; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A; Moerland, Marinus A; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3-6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests should

  19. High-risk CTV delineation for cervix brachytherapy: Application of GEC-ESTRO guidelines in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, Shalini K; Lim, Karen; Bell, Lauren; Veera, Jacqueline; Ohanessian, Lucy; Juresic, Ewa; Borok, Nira; Chan, Phillip; Chee, Raphael; Do, Viet; Govindarajulu, Geetha; Sridharan, Swetha; Johnson, Carol; Moses, Daniel; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Holloway, Lois

    2017-02-01

    Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer using MRI has been implemented in Australia and New Zealand. The aims of this study were to measure variability in High-risk CTV (HR-CTV) delineation and evaluate dosimetric consequences of this. Nine radiation oncologists, one radiation therapist and two radiologists contoured HR-CTV on 3T MRI datasets from ten consecutive patients undergoing cervical brachytherapy at a single institution. Contour comparisons were performed using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and Mean Absolute Surface Distance (MASD). Two reference contours were created for brachytherapy planning: a Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) and a consensus contour (CONSENSUS). Optimized plans (8 Gy) for both these contours were applied to individual participant's contours to assess D90 and D100 coverage of HR CTV. To compare variability in dosimetry, relative standard deviation (rSD) was calculated. Good concordance (mean DSC≥0.7, MASD≤5 mm) was achieved in 8/10 cases when compared to the STAPLE reference and 6/10 cases when compared to the CONSENSUS reference. Greatest variation was visually seen in the cranio-caudal direction. The average mean rSD across all patients was 27% and 34% for the STAPLE HR-CTV D90 and D100, respectively, and 28% and 35% for the CONSENSUS HR-CTV D90 and D100. Delineation uncertainty resulted in an average dosimetric uncertainty of ±1.5-1.6 Gy per fraction based on an 8 Gy prescribed fraction. Delineation of HR-CTV for cervical cancer brachytherapy was consistent amongst observers, suggesting similar interpretation of GEC-ESTRO guidelines. Despite the good concordance, there was dosimetric variation noted, which could be clinically significant. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A McKim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information.

  1. Guidelines by the AAPM and GEC-ESTRO on the use of innovative brachytherapy devices and applications: Report of Task Group 167.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; DeWerd, Larry A; Dezarn, William A; Thompson Heaton, H; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Meigooni, Ali S; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rusch, Thomas W; Siebert, Frank-André; Venselaar, Jack L M

    2016-06-01

    Although a multicenter, Phase III, prospective, randomized trial is the gold standard for evidence-based medicine, it is rarely used in the evaluation of innovative devices because of many practical and ethical reasons. It is usually sufficient to compare the dose distributions and dose rates for determining the equivalence of the innovative treatment modality to an existing one. Thus, quantitative evaluation of the dosimetric characteristics of innovative radiotherapy devices or applications is a critical part in which physicists should be actively involved. The physicist's role, along with physician colleagues, in this process is highlighted for innovative brachytherapy devices and applications and includes evaluation of (1) dosimetric considerations for clinical implementation (including calibrations, dose calculations, and radiobiological aspects) to comply with existing societal dosimetric prerequisites for sources in routine clinical use, (2) risks and benefits from a regulatory and safety perspective, and (3) resource assessment and preparedness. Further, it is suggested that any developed calibration methods be traceable to a primary standards dosimetry laboratory (PSDL) such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the U.S. or to other PSDLs located elsewhere such as in Europe. Clinical users should follow standards as approved by their country's regulatory agencies that approved such a brachytherapy device. Integration of this system into the medical source calibration infrastructure of secondary standard dosimetry laboratories such as the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories in the U.S. is encouraged before a source is introduced into widespread routine clinical use. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) have developed guidelines for the safe and consistent application of brachytherapy using innovative devices and

  2. The International Liver Transplant Society Guideline on Living Liver Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charles M; Durand, Francois; Heimbach, Julie K; Kim-Schluger, Leona; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lerut, Jan; Lo, Chung-Mau; Quintini, Cristiano; Pomfret, Elizabeth Anne

    2016-06-01

    The following guideline represents the position of the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS) on key preoperative, operative, and postoperative aspects surrounding living liver donation. These recommendations were developed from experts in the field from around the world. The authors conducted an analysis of the National Library of Medicine indexed literature on "living donor liver transplantation" [Medline search] using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Writing was guided by the ILTS Policy on the Development and Use of Practice Guidelines (www.ilts.org). ILTS members, and many more nonmembers, were invited to comment. Recommendations have been based on information available at the time of final submission (March 2016). The lack of randomized controlled trials in this field to date is acknowledged and is reflected in the grading of evidence. Intended for use by physicians, these recommendations support specific approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of care.

  3. Colon capsule endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, C; Hassan, C; Galmiche, J P; Neuhaus, H; Dumonceau, J M; Adler, S; Epstein, O; Gay, G; Pennazio, M; Rex, D K; Benamouzig, R; de Franchis, R; Delvaux, M; Devière, J; Eliakim, R; Fraser, C; Hagenmuller, F; Herrerias, J M; Keuchel, M; Macrae, F; Munoz-Navas, M; Ponchon, T; Quintero, E; Riccioni, M E; Rondonotti, E; Marmo, R; Sung, J J; Tajiri, H; Toth, E; Triantafyllou, K; Van Gossum, A; Costamagna, G

    2012-05-01

    PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an innovative noninvasive, and painless ingestible capsule technique that allows exploration of the colon without the need for sedation and gas insufflation. Although it is already available in European and other countries, the clinical indications for CCE as well as the reporting and work-up of detected findings have not yet been standardized. The aim of this evidence-based and consensus-based guideline, commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to furnish healthcare providers with a comprehensive framework for potential implementation of this technique in a clinical setting.

  4. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  5. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 4, Interprofessional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Reeves, Scott; Sargeant, Joan; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, interprofessional education (IPE), which is a common intervention in health professions education. IPE is an opportunity for individuals of multiple professions to interact to learn together, to break down professional silos, and to achieve interprofessional learning outcomes in the service of high-value patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe IPE, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report IPE efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of IPE.

  6. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 3, Educational Meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, educational meetings, which is a common intervention in health professions' education. An educational meeting is an opportunity for clinicians to assemble to discuss and apply important information relevant to patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe proper educational meeting terminology and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report educational meeting efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of educational meetings.

  7. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 2, Practice Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, practice facilitation, which is a common strategy in primary care to help practices develop capacity and infrastructure to support their ability to improve patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe practice facilitation, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report practice facilitation efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of practice facilitation.

  8. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  9. Summary of the British Thoracic Society guidelines for advanced diagnostic and therapeutic flexible bronchoscopy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Rand, I A; Barber, P V; Goldring, J; Lewis, R A; Mandal, S; Munavvar, M; Rintoul, R C; Shah, P L; Singh, S; Slade, M G; Woolley, A

    2011-11-01

    This new guideline covers the rapidly advancing field of interventional bronchoscopy using flexible bronchoscopy. It includes the use of more complex diagnostic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound, interventions for the relief of central airway obstruction due to malignancy and the recent development of endobronchial therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The guideline aims to help all those who undertake flexible bronchoscopy to understand more about this important area. It also aims to inform respiratory physicians and other specialists dealing with lung cancer of the procedures possible in the management and palliation of central airway obstruction. The guideline covers transbronchial needle aspiration and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, electrocautery/diathermy, argon plasma coagulation and thermal laser, cryotherapy, cryoextraction, photodynamic therapy, brachytherapy, tracheobronchial stenting, electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy, endobronchial valves for emphysema and bronchial thermoplasty for asthma.

  10. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease : European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). Th

  11. Innovations in American Society of Clinical Oncology Practice Guideline Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerfield, Mark R; Bohlke, Kari; Browman, George P; Denduluri, Neelima; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hayes, Daniel F; Khorana, Alok A; Miller, Robert S; Mohile, Supriya G; Oliver, Thomas K; Ortiz, Eduardo; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-10

    Since the beginning of its guidelines program in 1993, ASCO has continually sought ways to produce a greater number of guidelines while maintaining its commitment to using the rigorous development methods that minimize the biases that threaten the validity of practice recommendations. ASCO is implementing a range of guideline development and implementation innovations. In this article, we describe innovations that are designed to (1) integrate consideration of multiple chronic conditions into practice guidelines; (2) keep more of its guidelines current by applying evolving signals or (more) rapid, for-cause updating approaches; (3) increase the number of high-quality guidelines available to its membership through endorsement and adaptation of other groups' products; (4) improve coverage of its members' guideline needs through a new topic nomination process; and (5) enhance dissemination and promote implementation of ASCO guidelines in the oncology practice community through a network of volunteer ambassadors. We close with a summary of ASCO's plans to facilitate the integration of data from its rapid learning system, CancerLinQ, into ASCO guidelines and to develop tactics through which guideline recommendations can be embedded in clinicians' workflow in digital form. We highlight the challenges inherent in reconciling the need to provide clinicians with more interactive, point-of-care guidance with ASCO's abiding commitment to methodologic rigor in guideline development.

  12. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  13. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 1, Performance Measurement and Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Miller, Nicole E; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, performance measurement and feedback, which is a common intervention in health professions education. In the form of a summary report, performance measurement and feedback is an opportunity for clinicians to view data about the care they provide compared with some standard and often with peer and benchmark comparisons. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with the US and Canadian experts, we describe proper terminology for performance measurement and feedback and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report efforts with performance measurement and feedback. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of performance measurement and feedback.

  14. Pulsed-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Francesca; Caiazzo, Rossella; Benevento, Ilaria; Musio, Daniela; Rubini, Filippo; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most frequent gynecologic malignancy. The aim of this review is to outline clinical practice recommendations, to suggest a technical solution, and to advise doses selection for pulsed-dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy in EC. Electronic bibliographic databases, including PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Meeting Library, were searched for articles in English. Clinical guidelines and systematic reviews were also considered. The appropriate therapeutic approach should consider risk factors for tumor relapse and PDR brachytherapy and have a convincing role in this multidisciplinary scenario. Performing PDR brachytherapy in EC requires robust training and experience. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Guidelines for Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, Ian G; Basmadjian, Arsene; Bewick, David; Choy, Jonathan B; Cujec, Bibiana; Jassal, Davinder S; MacKenzie, Scott; Nair, Parvathy; Rudski, Lawrence G; Yu, Eric; Tam, James W

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada were jointly developed and published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Society of Echocardiography in 2005. Since their publication, recognition of the importance of echocardiography to patient care has increased, along with the use of focused, point-of-care echocardiography by physicians of diverse clinical backgrounds and variable training. New guidelines for physician training and maintenance of competence in adult echocardiography were required to ensure that physicians providing either focused, point-of-care echocardiography or comprehensive echocardiography are appropriately trained and proficient in their use of echocardiography. In addition, revision of the guidelines was required to address technological advances and the desire to standardize echocardiography training across the country to facilitate the national recognition of a physician's expertise in echocardiography. This paper summarizes the new Guidelines for Physician Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography, which are considerably more comprehensive than earlier guidelines and address many important issues not previously covered. These guidelines provide a blueprint for physician training despite different clinical backgrounds and help standardize physician training and training programs across the country. Adherence to the guidelines will ensure that physicians providing echocardiography have acquired sufficient expertise required for their specific practice. The document will also provide a framework for other national societies to standardize their training programs in echocardiography and will provide a benchmark by which competency in adult echocardiography may be measured.

  16. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Lorraine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA. Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future.

  17. Summary of the Updated American Geriatrics Society/British Geriatrics Society clinical practice guideline for prevention of falls in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The following article is a summary of the American Geriatrics Society/British Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Prevention of Falls in Older Persons (2010). This article provides additional discussion of the guideline process and the differences between the current guideline and the 2001 version and includes the guidelines' recommendations, algorithm, and acknowledgments. The complete guideline is published on the American Geriatrics Society's Web site (http://www.americangeriatrics.org/health_care_professionals/clinical_practice/clinical_guidelines_recommendations/2010/). © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Guidelines on chemotherapy in advanced stage gynecological malignancies: an evaluation of 224 professional societies and organizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos P Polyzos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are important for guiding practice, but it is unclear if they are commensurate with the available evidence. METHODS: We examined guidelines produced by cancer and gynecological societies and organizations and evaluated their coverage of and stance towards chemotherapy for advanced stage disease among 4 gynecological malignancies (breast, ovarian, cervical, endometrial cancer where the evidence for the use of chemotherapy is very different (substantial and conclusive for breast and ovarian cancer, limited and suggesting no major benefit for cervical and endometrial cancer. Eligible societies and organizations were identified through systematic internet searches (last update June 2009. Pertinent websites were scrutinized for presence of clinical practice guidelines, and relative guidelines were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 224 identified eligible societies and organizations, 69 (31% provided any sort of guidelines, while recommendations for chemotherapy on advanced stage gynecological malignancies were available in 20 of them. Only 14 had developed their own guideline, and only 5 had developed guidelines for all 4 malignancies. Use of levels of evidence and grades of recommendations, and aspects of the production, implementation, and timeliness of the guidelines did not differ significantly across malignancies. Guidelines on breast and ovarian cancer utilized significantly more randomized trials and meta-analyses. Guidelines differed across malignancies on their coverage of disease-free survival (p = 0.033, response rates (p = 0.024, symptoms relief (p = 0.005, quality of life (p = 0.001 and toxicity (p = 0.039, with breast and ovarian cancer guidelines typically covering more frequently these outcomes. All guidelines explicitly or implicitly endorsed the use of chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical practice guidelines are provided by the minority of professional societies and organizations

  19. Saudi Oncology Society clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouki Bazarbashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of renal cell carcinoma is presented. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system, 7th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, Timothy D; Alhazzani, Waleed; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interventions that lead to earlier liberation from mechanical ventilation can improve patient outcomes. This guideline, a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST), provides evidence-based recommendations to o...

  1. Evaluation and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berglund, L.; Brunzell, J.D.; Goldberg, A.C.; Goldberg, I.J.; Sacks, F.; Murad, M.H.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate

  2. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saslow, D.; Boetes, C.; Burke, W.; Harms, S.; Leach, M.O.; Lehman, C.D.; Morris, E.; Pisano, E.; Schnall, M.; Sener, S.; Smith, R.A.; Warner, E.; Yaffe, M.; Andrews, K.S.; Russell, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at differen

  3. European Society of Gynaecological Oncology Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Vulvar Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, Maaike H. M.; Planchamp, Francois; Baldwin, Peter; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Brannstrom, Mats; Landoni, Fabio; Mahner, Sven; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Mirza, Mansoor; Petersen, Cordula; Querleu, Denis; Regauer, Sigrid; Rob, Lukas; Rouzier, Roman; Ulrikh, Elena; van der Velden, Jacobus; Vergote, Ignace; Woelber, Linn; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines as part of European Society of Gynaecological Oncology's mission to improve the quality of care for women with gynecologic cancers across Europe. Methods The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology

  4. Canadian Thoracic Society: Presenting a New Process for Clinical Practice Guideline Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A key mandate of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS is to promote evidence-based respiratory care through clinical practice guidelines (CPGs. To improve the quality and validity of the production, dissemination and implementation of its CPGs, the CTS has revised its guideline process and has created the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee to oversee this process. The present document outlines the basic methodological tools and principles of the new CTS guideline production process. Important features include standard methods for choosing and formulating optimal questions and for finding, appraising, and summarizing the evidence; use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system for rating the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations; use of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation instrument for quality control during and after guideline development and for appraisal of other guidelines; use of the ADAPTE process for adaptation of existing guidelines to the local context; and use of the GuideLine Implementability Appraisal tool to augment implementability of guidelines. The CTS has also committed to develop guidelines in new areas, an annual guideline review cycle, and a new formal process for dissemination and implementation. Ultimately, it is anticipated that these changes will have a significant impact on the quality of care and clinical outcomes of individuals suffering from respiratory diseases across Canada.

  5. The Saudi Thoracic Society guidelines for influenza vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed O Zeitouni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses are responsible for the influenza outbreaks that lead to significant burden and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the core proteins, influenza viruses are classified into three types, A, B, and C, of which only A and B cause significant human disease and so the vaccine is directed against these two subtypes only. The effectiveness of the vaccine depends on boosting the immune system against the serotypes included within it. As influenza viruses undergo periodic changes in their antigen, the vaccine is modified annually to ensure susceptibility. In contrast to other countries, Saudi Arabia faces a unique and challenging situation due to Hajj and Umrah seasons, when millions of people gather at the holy places in Mecca and Madinah, during which influenza outbreaks are commonly found. Such challenges making the adoption of strict vaccination strategy in Saudi Arabia is of great importance. All efforts were made to develop this guideline in an easy-to-read form, making it very handy and easy to use by health care workers. The guideline was designed to provide recommendations for problems frequently encountered in real life, with special consideration for special situations such as Hajj and Umrah seasons and pregnancy.

  6. The Saudi Thoracic Society guidelines for influenza vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Mohammed O; Al Barrak, Ali M; Al-Moamary, Mohamed S; Alharbi, Nasser S; Idrees, Majdy M; Al Shimemeri, Abdullah A; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses are responsible for the influenza outbreaks that lead to significant burden and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the core proteins, influenza viruses are classified into three types, A, B, and C, of which only A and B cause significant human disease and so the vaccine is directed against these two subtypes only. The effectiveness of the vaccine depends on boosting the immune system against the serotypes included within it. As influenza viruses undergo periodic changes in their antigen, the vaccine is modified annually to ensure susceptibility. In contrast to other countries, Saudi Arabia faces a unique and challenging situation due to Hajj and Umrah seasons, when millions of people gather at the holy places in Mecca and Madinah, during which influenza outbreaks are commonly found. Such challenges making the adoption of strict vaccination strategy in Saudi Arabia is of great importance. All efforts were made to develop this guideline in an easy-to-read form, making it very handy and easy to use by health care workers. The guideline was designed to provide recommendations for problems frequently encountered in real life, with special consideration for special situations such as Hajj and Umrah seasons and pregnancy.

  7. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizoph......These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment...... efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5) ( Bandelow et al. 2008a ,b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242, see Table 1 ). This second part of the updated guidelines covers long-term treatment as well as the management of relevant side effects...

  8. Impact of delineation uncertainties on dose to organs at risk in CT-guided intracavitary brachytherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duane, Frances K

    2014-08-07

    This study quantifies the inter- and intraobserver variations in contouring the organs at risk (OARs) in CT-guided brachytherapy (BT) for the treatment of cervical carcinoma. The dosimetric consequences are reported in accordance with the current Gynecological Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie\\/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology guidelines.

  9. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael;

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...

  10. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad L; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur A; McCord, Seth

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several parameters related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. This is an updated version of original WMS Practice Guidelines for Spine Immobilization in the Austere Environment published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):241-252. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations about their role in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. This is an updated version of the original WMS Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(2):146-155. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 Guideline Update: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers, Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Diane Lougheed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.

  13. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Grant S; Eifling, Kurt P; Ellis, Mark A; Gaudio, Flavio G; Otten, Edward M; Grissom, Colin K

    2013-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the recognition, prevention, and treatment of heat-related illness. We present a review of the classifications, pathophysiology, and evidence-based guidelines for planning and preventive measures as well as best-practice recommendations for both field- and hospital-based therapeutic management of heat-related illness. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality. © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia, part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were...... efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management...

  15. European Hernia Society guidelines on the closure of abdominal wall incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muysoms, F E; Antoniou, S A; Bury, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The material and the surgical technique used to close an abdominal wall incision are important determinants of the risk of developing an incisional hernia. Optimising closure of abdominal wall incisions holds a potential to prevent patients suffering from incisional hernias...... and for important costs savings in health care. METHODS: The European Hernia Society formed a Guidelines Development Group to provide guidelines for all surgical specialists who perform abdominal incisions in adult patients on the materials and methods used to close the abdominal wall. The guidelines were developed...... using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach and methodological guidance was taken from Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The literature search included publications up to April 2014. The guidelines were written using the AGREE II...

  16. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alotaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors.

  17. Official American Thoracic Society/Japanese Respiratory Society Clinical Practice Guidelines: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Francis X; Gupta, Nishant; Finlay, Geraldine R; Young, Lisa R; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Glasgow, Connie G; Steagall, Wendy K; Johnson, Simon R; Sahn, Steven A; Ryu, Jay H; Strange, Charlie; Seyama, Kuniaki; Sullivan, Eugene J; Kotloff, Robert M; Downey, Gregory P; Chapman, Jeffrey T; Han, MeiLan K; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Henske, Elizabeth P; Bissler, John J; Colby, Thomas V; Kinder, Brent W; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Brown, Kevin K; Cordier, Jean F; Meyer, Cristopher; Cottin, Vincent; Brozek, Jan L; Smith, Karen; Wilson, Kevin C; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-15

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic lung disease that primarily affects women. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of LAM. Systematic reviews were performed to summarize evidence pertinent to our questions. The evidence was summarized and discussed by a multidisciplinary panel. Evidence-based recommendations were then formulated, written, and graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. After considering the panel's confidence in the estimated effects, the balance of desirable (i.e., benefits) and undesirable (i.e., harms and burdens) consequences of treatment, patient values and preferences, cost, and feasibility, recommendations were formulated for or against specific interventions. These included recommendations for sirolimus treatment and vascular endothelial growth factor D testing and recommendations against doxycycline and hormonal therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with LAM are provided. Frequent reassessment and updating will be needed.

  18. Introducing the Canadian Thoracic Society Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS is leveraging its strengths in guideline production to enable respiratory guideline implementation in Canada. The authors describe the new CTS Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation, which has three spheres of action: guideline production, implementation infrastructure and knowledge translation (KT methodological support. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research ‘Knowledge-to-Action’ process was adopted as the model of choice for conceptualizing KT interventions. Within the framework, new evidence for formatting guideline recommendations to enhance the intrinsic implementability of future guidelines were applied. Clinical assemblies will consider implementability early in the guideline production cycle when selecting clinical questions, and new practice guidelines will include a section dedicated to KT. The framework describes the development of a web-based repository and communication forum to inventory existing KT resources and to facilitate collaboration and communication among implementation stakeholders through an online discussion board. A national forum for presentation and peer-review of proposed KT projects is described. The framework outlines expert methodological support for KT planning, development and evaluation including a practical guide for implementers and a novel ‘Clinical Assembly – KT Action Team’, and in-kind logistical support and assistance in securing peer-reviewed funding.

  19. Introducing the Canadian Thoracic Society framework for guideline dissemination and implementation, with concurrent evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Licskai, Christopher; Van Dam, Anne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is leveraging its strengths in guideline production to enable respiratory guideline implementation in Canada. The authors describe the new CTS Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation, which has three spheres of action: guideline production, implementation infrastructure and knowledge translation (KT) methodological support. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research 'Knowledge-to-Action' process was adopted as the model of choice for conceptualizing KT interventions. Within the framework, new evidence for formatting guideline recommendations to enhance the intrinsic implementability of future guidelines were applied. Clinical assemblies will consider implementability early in the guideline production cycle when selecting clinical questions, and new practice guidelines will include a section dedicated to KT. The framework describes the development of a web-based repository and communication forum to inventory existing KT resources and to facilitate collaboration and communication among implementation stakeholders through an online discussion board. A national forum for presentation and peer-review of proposed KT projects is described. The framework outlines expert methodological support for KT planning, development and evaluation including a practical guide for implementers and a novel 'Clinical Assembly-KT Action Team', and in-kind logistical support and assistance in securing peer-reviewed funding.

  20. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  1. The British Thoracic Society guidelines on the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David R; Callister, Matthew E J

    2015-08-01

    The British Thoracic Society guideline for the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules is published as a supplement to this edition of the journal. It provides recommendations for the management of an individual with single or multiple pulmonary nodules and is a comprehensive reference text.

  2. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. American Geriatrics Society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes.

  4. How we developed and use the American Society for Apheresis guidelines for therapeutic apheresis procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaz, Beth H; Schwartz, Joseph; Winters, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The decision to treat a patient with therapeutic apheresis depends on multiple factors, such as what does the patient most likely have, is the diagnosis amenable to apheresis treatment, what is the harm-versus-benefit ratio of apheresis treatment in this patient, and what are the internal and external issues associated with receiving apheresis treatment? The "Guidelines on the Use of Therapeutic Apheresis in Clinical Practice-Evidence-based Approach from the Writing Committee of the American Society for Apheresis" addresses these issues and helps aid in clinical decision making. The development and application of these Guidelines as well as potential new applications will be discussed in this article. © 2013 AABB.

  5. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pappas, P.G.; Kauffman, C.A.; Andes, D.; Benjamin Jr., D.K.; Calandra, T.; Edwards, J.E.; Filler, S.G.; Fisher, J.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Reboli, A.C.; Rex, J.H.; Walsh, T.J.; Sobel, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases

  6. Essentials from the 2015 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Boesecke, C; Gisler, V

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines are intended for all clinicians involved in the care of HIV-positive persons, and are available in print, online, and as a free App for download for iPhone and Android. GUIDELINE HIGHLIGHTS: The 2015 version of the EACS guidelines...

  7. [Consideration of Rehabilitation within High Class Quality Guidelines, Registered by the German Association of the Scientific Medical Professional Societies (AWMF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, W H; Beindorf, G; Glattacker, M

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed documents aiming at guiding decisions in specific areas of health care. Therefore, incorporating rehabilitation in guidelines adressing chronic diseases is of major importance. As information regarding consideration of rehabilitation in guidelines is lacking, the intention of our study was to analyse to what degree rehabilitation experts participated in guideline development and whether guidelines for chronic diseases include relevant information and recommendations concerning rehabilitation.In order to answer these questions we investigated 97 guidelines of high class quality, registered by the German Association of the Scientific Medical Professional Societies (AWMF). 36 out of these guidelines addressed chronic health conditions in which rehabilitation may be of relevance. Guidelines identified were analysed using a set of defined criteria.In 11 out of the 36 guidelines one or more medical rehabilitation societies participated in the development process, 17 include a chapter on rehabilitation issues, and 20 information concerning indication for rehabilitation processes. 24 guidelines consider rehabilitation in their recommendations.There is substantial variance concerning inclusion of rehabilitation in German guidelines on chronic diseases. Rehabilitation societies are encouraged to strive for stronger integration of rehabilitation into guidelines of other societies.

  8. Guideline for dialysate quality of Spanish Society of Nephrology (second edition, 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Rafael; García Maset, Rafael; Gonzalez Parra, Emilio; Solozábal Campos, Carlos; Ramírez Chamond, Rafael; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Sobrino Pérez, Pedro Enrique; Gallego Pereira, Ovidio; Dominguez, Jon; de la Cueva Matute, Enrique; Ferllen, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    A Best Practice Guideline about Dialysis fluid purity was developed under the leadership of the Spanish Society of Nephrology in 2004. The second edition revised Guideline considered new evidences and International Standard. The Guideline has established recommendations for standards for preparing dialysate: water, concentrates and hemodialysis proportioning systems. This Guideline is based on the ISO13959, European Pharmacopoeia, the Real Farmacopea Española, the AAMI Standards and Recommended Practices, European Best Practice Guidelines for Haemodialysis, literature reviews, according to their level of evidence, and the opinion of the expert Spanish group. Two levels of quality of water were defined: purified water and high purified water (ultra pure) and for dialysate: ultra pure dialysate. Regular use of ultra pure dialysate is recommended for all type of hemodialysis to prevent and delay the occurrence of complications: inflammation, malnutrition, anaemia and amiloidosis. Water, concentrates and dialysate quality requirements are defined as maximum allowable contaminant levels: chemicals (4.1.2), conductivity, microbial and endotoxins (4.1.1): Monitoring frequency, maintenance and corrective actions were specified. Methods of sampling and analysis were described in appendix (anexos). For microbiological monitoring, R2A medium is recommended, incubated during 7-14 days at a temperature of 17-23°C. The dialysate quality assurance process involves all dialysis staff members and requires strict protocols. The physician in charge of hemodialysis has the ultimate responsibility for dialysate quality. All suggestions and questions about this Guideline are wellcome to www.senefro.org.

  9. Wilderness Medical Society consensus guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2010-06-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations for their roles in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to the prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Diagnosis and management of hymenoptera venom allergy: British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M T; Ewan, P W; Diwakar, L; Durham, S R; Frew, A J; Leech, S C; Nasser, S M

    2011-09-01

    This guidance for the management of patients with hymenoptera venom allergy has been prepared by the Standards of Care Committee (SOCC) of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI). The guideline is based on evidence as well as on expert opinion and is for use by both adult physicians and pediatricians practising allergy. During the development of these guidelines, all BSACI members were included in the consultation process using a web-based system. Their comments and suggestions were carefully considered by the SOCC. Where evidence was lacking, consensus was reached by the experts on the committee. Included in this guideline are epidemiology, risk factors, clinical features, diagnostic tests, natural history of hymenoptera venom allergy and guidance on undertaking venom immunotherapy (VIT). There are also separate sections on children, elevated baseline tryptase and mastocytosis and mechanisms underlying VIT. Finally, we have made recommendations for potential areas of future research.

  11. Acute adult asthma--assessment of severity and management and comparison with British Thoracic Society Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S R; Davidson, A C

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the accuracy of clinical severity assessment of asthmatics and to compare emergency and subsequent ward management with British Thoracic Society (BTS) Guidelines, the records of all patients admitted for severe asthma (46) over a 5-month period to a District General Hospital were inspected. Variations from recommended management were revealed. Appropriate oxygen administration was often not provided in casually and patients frequently left hospital before their discharge criteria were attained: recommended diurnal variations in peak flow were exceeded in 26%. Eleven per cent of discharges were against medical advice, making provision of adequate management logistically difficult. Adherence to BTS guidelines on the need for arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis would have led to a failure to detect significant hypoxaemia in 25% of cases. This study identified substantial variations from BTS management guidelines. It is suggested that oximetry is necessary on arrival to guide selection for arterial blood gas analysis.

  12. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Companion: Bridging Guidelines to Your Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Jonathan G; Chan, Michael; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Harkness, Karen; Heckman, George A; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Moe, Gordon W; O'Meara, Eileen; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Grzeslo, Adam; Hamilton, Peter G; Koshman, Sheri L; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley

    2016-03-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Program has generated annual HF updates, including formal recommendations and supporting Practical Tips since 2006. Many clinicians indicate they routinely use the Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF Guidelines in their daily practice. However, many questions surrounding the actual implementation of the Guidelines into their daily practice remain. A consensus-based approach was used, including feedback from the Primary and Secondary HF Panels. This companion is intended to answer several key questions brought forth by HF practitioners such as appropriate timelines for initial assessments and subsequent reassessments of patients, the order in which medications should be added, how newer medications should be included in treatment algorithms, and when left ventricular function should be reassessed. A new treatment algorithm for HF with reduced ejection fraction is included. Several other practical issues are addressed such as an approach to management of hyperkalemia/hypokalemia, treatment of gout, when medications can be stopped, and whether a target blood pressure or heart rate is suggested. Finally, elements and teaching of self-care are described. This tool will hopefully function to allow better integration of the HF Guidelines into clinical practice.

  13. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, J M; Riphaus, A; Aparicio, J R; Beilenhoff, U; Knape, J T A; Ortmann, M; Paspatis, G; Ponsioen, C Y; Racz, I; Schreiber, F; Vilmann, P; Wehrmann, T; Wientjes, C; Walder, B

    2010-11-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.

  14. [Prolonged weaning: S2k-guideline published by the German Respiratory Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofer, B; Geiseler, J; Dellweg, D; Moerer, O; Barchfeld, T; Fuchs, H; Karg, O; Rosseau, S; Sitter, H; Weber-Carstens, S; Westhoff, M; Windisch, W

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is an essential part of modern intensive care medicine. MV is performed in patients with severe respiratory failure caused by insufficiency of the respiratory muscles and/or lung parenchymal disease when/after other treatments, i. e. oxygen, body position, secretion management, medication or non invasive ventilation have failed.In the majority of ICU patients weaning is routine and does not present any problems. Nevertheless 40-50 % of the time during mechanical ventilation is spent on weaning. About 20 % of patients need continued MV despite resolution of the conditions which originally precipitated the need for MV.There maybe a combination of reasons; chronic lung disease, comorbidities, age and conditions acquired in ICU (critical care neuromyopathy, psychological problems). According to an International Consensus Conference the criteria for "prolonged weaning" are fulfilled if patients fail at least three weaning attempts or require more than 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Prolonged weaning is a challenge. An inter- and multi-disciplinary approach is essential for weaning success. Complex, difficult to wean patients who fulfill the criteria for "prolonged weaning" can still be successfully weaned in specialised weaning units in about 50% of cases.In patients with unsuccessful weaning, invasive mechanical ventilation has to be arranged either at home or in a long term care facility.This S2-guideline was developed because of the growing number of patients requiring prolonged weaning. It is an initiative of the German Respiratory Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e. V., DGP) in cooperation with other societies engaged in the field.The guideline is based on a systematic literature review of other guidelines, the Cochrane Library and PubMed.The consensus project was chaired by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der

  15. Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent. PMID:22962670

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, Richard S.; Arslanian, Silva A.; Ehrmann, David A.; Hoeger, Kathleen M.; Murad, M. Hassan; Pasquali, Renato; Welt, Corrine K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Participants: An Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer developed the guideline. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Consensus Process: One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Two systematic reviews were conducted to summarize supporting evidence. Conclusions: We suggest using the Rotterdam criteria for diagnosing PCOS (presence of two of the following criteria: androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, or polycystic ovaries). Establishing a diagnosis of PCOS is problematic in adolescents and menopausal women. Hyperandrogenism is central to the presentation in adolescents, whereas there is no consistent phenotype in postmenopausal women. Evaluation of women with PCOS should exclude alternate androgen-excess disorders and risk factors for endometrial cancer, mood disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Hormonal contraceptives are the first-line management for menstrual abnormalities and hirsutism/acne in PCOS. Clomiphene is currently the first-line therapy for infertility; metformin is beneficial for metabolic/glycemic abnormalities and for improving menstrual irregularities, but it has limited or no benefit in treating hirsutism, acne, or infertility. Hormonal contraceptives and metformin are the treatment options in adolescents with PCOS. The role of weight loss in improving PCOS status per se is uncertain, but lifestyle intervention is beneficial in overweight

  17. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Updated Society for Vascular Surgery guidelines for management of extracranial carotid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotta, John J; Aburahma, Ali; Ascher, Enrico; Eskandari, Mark; Faries, Peter; Lal, Brajesh K

    2011-09-01

    Management of carotid bifurcation stenosis is a cornerstone of stroke prevention and has been the subject of extensive clinical investigation, including multiple controlled randomized trials. The appropriate treatment of patients with carotid bifurcation disease is of major interest to the community of vascular surgeons. In 2008, the Society for Vascular Surgery published guidelines for treatment of carotid artery disease. At the time, only one randomized trial, comparing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid stenting (CAS), had been published. Since that publication, four major randomized trials comparing CEA and CAS have been published, and the role of medical management has been re-emphasized. The current publication updates and expands the 2008 guidelines with specific emphasis on six areas: imaging in identification and characterization of carotid stenosis, medical therapy (as stand-alone management and also in conjunction with intervention in patients with carotid bifurcation stenosis), risk stratification to select patients for appropriate interventional management (CEA or CAS), technical standards for performing CEA and CAS, the relative roles of CEA and CAS, and management of unusual conditions associated with extracranial carotid pathology. Recommendations are made using the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system, as has been done with other Society for Vascular Surgery guideline documents.[corrected] The perioperative risk of stroke and death in asymptomatic patients must be management as the first-line therapy.

  19. Review of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Practice guidelines for management of heart failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colan, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    In 2004, practice guidelines for the management of heart failure in children by Rosenthal and colleagues were published in conjunction with the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. These guidelines have not been updated or reviewed since that time. In general, there has been considerable controversy as to the utility and purpose of clinical practice guidelines, but there is general recognition that the relentless progress of medicine leads to the progressive irrelevance of clinical practice guidelines that do not undergo periodic review and updating. Paediatrics and paediatric cardiology, in particular, have had comparatively minimal participation in the clinical practice guidelines realm. As a result, most clinical practice guidelines either specifically exclude paediatrics from consideration, as has been the case for the guidelines related to cardiac failure in adults, or else involve clinical practice guidelines committees that include one or two paediatric cardiologists and produce guidelines that cannot reasonably be considered a consensus paediatric opinion. These circumstances raise a legitimate question as to whether the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation paediatric heart failure guidelines should be re-reviewed. The time, effort, and expense involved in producing clinical practice guidelines should be considered before recommending an update to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Paediatric Heart Failure guidelines. There are specific areas of rapid change in the evaluation and management of heart failure in children that are undoubtedly worthy of updating. These domains include areas such as use of serum and imaging biomarkers, wearable and implantable monitoring devices, and acute heart failure management and mechanical circulatory support. At the time the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines were published, echocardiographic tissue Doppler, 3 dimensional

  20. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2013 for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Kato, Hidenori; Kubushiro, Kaneyuki; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Ino, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The third version of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms was published in 2013. The guidelines comprise nine chapters and nine algorithms. Each chapter includes a clinical question, recommendations, background, objectives, explanations, and references. This revision was intended to collect up-to-date international evidence. The highlights of this revision are to (1) newly specify costs and conflicts of interest; (2) describe the clinical significance of pelvic lymph node dissection and para-aortic lymphadenectomy, including variant histologic types; (3) describe more clearly the indications for laparoscopic surgery as the standard treatment; (4) provide guidelines for post-treatment hormone replacement therapy; (5) clearly differentiate treatment of advanced or recurrent cancer between the initial treatment and the treatment carried out after the primary operation; (6) collectively describe fertility-sparing therapy for both atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrioid adenocarcinoma (corresponding to G1) and newly describe relapse therapy after fertility-preserving treatment; and (7) newly describe the treatment of trophoblastic disease. Overall, the objective of these guidelines is to clearly delineate the standard of care for uterine body neoplasms in Japan with the goal of ensuring a high standard of care for all Japanese women diagnosed with uterine body neoplasms.

  1. 2016 Focused Update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macle, Laurent; Cairns, John; Leblanc, Kori; Tsang, Teresa; Skanes, Allan; Cox, Jafna L; Healey, Jeff S; Bell, Alan; Pilote, Louise; Andrade, Jason G; Mitchell, L Brent; Atzema, Clare; Gladstone, David; Sharma, Mike; Verma, Subodh; Connolly, Stuart; Dorian, Paul; Parkash, Ratika; Talajic, Mario; Nattel, Stanley; Verma, Atul

    2016-10-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in AF management. This 2016 Focused Update deals with: (1) the management of antithrombotic therapy for AF patients in the context of the various clinical presentations of coronary artery disease; (2) real-life data with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (3) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (4) digoxin as a rate control agent; (5) perioperative anticoagulation management; and (6) AF surgical therapy including the prevention and treatment of AF after cardiac surgery. The recommendations were developed with the same methodology used for the initial 2010 guidelines and the 2012 and 2014 Focused Updates. Using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) standards, individual studies and literature were reviewed for quality and bias; the literature review process and evidence tables are included in the Supplementary Material, and on the CCS Web site. The section on concomitant AF and coronary artery disease was developed in collaboration with the CCS Antiplatelet Guidelines Committee. Details of the updated recommendations are presented, along with their background and rationale. This document is linked to an updated summary of all CCS AF Guidelines recommendations, from 2010 to the present 2016 Focused Update.

  2. Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology Guideline for Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a nation-wide randomized controlled trial involving more than 50,000 current and former heavy smokers ages 55 to 74, compared the effects of two screening procedures (low-dose helical CT and standard chest radiography) on lung cancer mortality and found 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose CT. Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology (KSTR) planned to establish an effective guideline for lung cancer screening with low-dose CT to improve health of Korean people and to reduce harms from misuse of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT. KSTR guideline for lung cancer screening with low-dose CT established based on objective medical evidences obtained by NLST.

  3. Using Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Professional Guidelines: A Case Study of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Family-Centered Care Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A; Davidson, Judy E; Nunnally, Mark E; Wickline, Mary A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-08-01

    To explore the importance, challenges, and opportunities using qualitative research to enhance development of clinical practice guidelines, using recent guidelines for family-centered care in the ICU as an example. In developing the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for family-centered care in the neonatal ICU, PICU, and adult ICU, we developed an innovative adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations approach to explicitly incorporate qualitative research. Using Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies principles, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to establish family-centered domains and outcomes. Thematic analyses were undertaken on study findings and used to support Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome question development. We identified and employed three approaches using qualitative research in these guidelines. First, previously published qualitative research was used to identify important domains for the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome questions. Second, this qualitative research was used to identify and prioritize key outcomes to be evaluated. Finally, we used qualitative methods, member checking with patients and families, to validate the process and outcome of the guideline development. In this, a novel report, we provide direction for standardizing the use of qualitative evidence in future guidelines. Recommendations are made to incorporate qualitative literature review and appraisal, include qualitative methodologists in guideline taskforce teams, and develop training for evaluation of qualitative research into guideline development procedures. Effective methods of involving patients and families as members of guideline development represent opportunities for future work.

  4. [Spanish Society of Anaesthesia (SEDAR) guidelines for pre-anaesthesia checking procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinello, F; Ariño, J J; Bartolomé Ruibal, A; de la Pinta, J C; de la Quintana, F B; Espinosa, M E; Gilsanz, F; Gómez-Arnau, J; González Arévalo, A; López-Quero, L; López-Romero, J L; Moret, E; Mourelle, I; Pensado, A; Planas, A; Perez-Cerdá, F; Rincón, R

    2012-04-01

    We present this document as a guide to preparing a specific institutional pre-anaesthesia checklist, as recommended in the Helsinki declaration on patient safety in anaesthesiology. Also, the recently recommended WHO "safe surgery check-list" includes a check-list for anaesthesia. A working group was established in accordance with the charter of the Spanish Society of Anaesthesiology and Resuscitation (Sociedad Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación [SEDAR]). The new patient safety culture introduced into medicine, and the recommendations of European anaesthesia societies has led us to design and update protocols in order to improve results in this important part of our speciality. We have prepared these recommendations or guidelines using, as examples, updates of pre-anaesthesia check-lists by other American (ASA), British, or Canadian societies of anaesthesia. With that aim, we enlisted the help of anaesthesia ventilator experts and the participation and advice of experienced anaesthesiologists from all parts of Spain. After various corrections and modifications, the document was available at www.sedar.es, so that any anaesthesiologist could propose any correction, or give their opinion. Finally, these guidelines have been approved by the SEDAR Board of Directors, before it was sent for publication in this journal. The aims of this document are to provide: a guideline applicable to all anaesthesia machines, a descriptive pre-anaesthesia check-list that include everything necessary for the anaesthesia procedure, and a resumed check-list to be available in all the anaesthesia machines or other equivalent, but prepared for each institution, which should include anaesthetic equipment and drugs. So, in order to ensure the aims and requirements of the European Board of Anaesthesiology, the European Society of Anaesthesiology, and the WHO are met, each institution should have a protocol for checking equipment and drugs. These guidelines are applicable to any

  5. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline: prophylaxis of post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, J-M; Andriulli, A; Deviere, J; Mariani, A; Rigaux, J; Baron, T H; Testoni, P A

    2010-06-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) are both patient-related and procedure-related. Identification of patients at high risk for PEP is important in order to target prophylactic measures. Prevention of PEP includes administration of nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), use of specific cannulation techniques, and placement of temporary pancreatic stents. The aim of this guideline commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to provide practical, graded, recommendations for the prevention of PEP.

  6. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugge, William R; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  7. 2014 Korean guidelines for appropriate utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: A joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeon Yee E. [Dept. of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Eui Young [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-04-15

    The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasing for the assessment of certain cardiovascular diseases, due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there has been no guideline for the use of CMR in Korean people. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates, and patients to improve the overall performances in medical system. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines, we hope to contribute to the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  8. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee E. [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang 411-706 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Jin Oh [Cardiovascular Center, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui-Young [Division of Cardiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  9. SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbara, Suhny; Blanke, Philipp; Maroules, Christopher D; Cheezum, Michael; Choi, Andrew D; Han, B Kelly; Marwan, Mohamed; Naoum, Chris; Norgaard, Bjarne L; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Schoenhagen, Paul; Villines, Todd; Leipsic, Jonathon

    In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

  10. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-09-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. Copyright © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, J M; Riphaus, A; Aparicio, J R; Beilenhoff, U; Knape, J T A; Ortmann, M; Paspatis, G; Ponsioen, C Y; Racz, I; Schreiber, F; Vilmann, P; Wehrmann, T; Wientjes, C; Walder, B

    2010-12-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anaesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.The guideline is published simultaneously in the Journals Endoscopy and European Journal of Anaesthesiology.

  13. Atopic dermatitis guideline. Position paper from the Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías, A; Olmos, C; de Falco, A

    2014-01-01

    As in other regions, the incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America has been increasing in recent years. Although there are several clinical guidelines, many of their recommendations cannot be universal since they depend on the characteristics of each region. Thus, we decided to create a consensus guideline on atopic dermatitis applicable in Latin America and other tropical regions, taking into account socio-economic, geographical, cultural and health care system characteristics. The Latin American Society of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (SLAAI) conducted a systematic search for articles related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of dermatitis using various electronic resources such as Google, Pubmed, EMBASE (Ovid) and Cochrane data base. We have also looked for all published articles in Latin America on the subject using LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) database. Each section was reviewed by at least two members of the committee, and the final version was subsequently approved by all of them, using the Delphi methodology for consensus building. Afterward, the final document was shared for external evaluation with physicians, specialists (allergists, dermatologists and pediatricians), patients and academic institutions such as universities and scientific societies related to the topic. All recommendations made by these groups were taken into account for the final drafting of the document. There are few original studies conducted in Latin America about dermatitis; however, we were able to create a practical guideline for Latin America taking into account the particularities of the region. Moreover, the integral management was highlighted including many of the recommendations from different participants in the health care of this disease (patients, families, primary care physicians and specialists). This practical guide presents a concise approach to the diagnosis and management of atopic dermatitis that can be

  14. Comparison of application of 2013 ACC/AHA guideline and 2011 European Society of Cardiology guideline for the management of dyslipidemias for primary prevention in a Turkish cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Y?lmaz, Mustafa; Atar, ?lyas; Has?rc?, Senem; Akyol, Kadirhan; Tekin, Abdullah; Kara?a?lar, Emir; ?ift?i, Or?un; M?derriso?lu, Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a major global cause of death. The common approach in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is to identify patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease. This article analyzes and compares the application of 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline and the 2011 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guideline for the management of dyslipidemias for primary prevention in Turkish population. M...

  15. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. This is an updated version of the original Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for the Out-of-Hospital Evaluation and Treatment of Accidental Hypothermia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(4):425-445. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 2004 Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy guidelines for renal anemia in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejyo, Fumitake; Saito, Akira; Akizawa, Tadao; Akiba, Takashi; Sakai, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Masashi; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Hirakata, Hideki; Bessho, Masami

    2004-12-01

    The guideline committee of Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT), chaired by Professor F. Gejyo of Niigata University, now publishes an original Japanese guideline entitled 'Guidelines for Renal Anemia in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients'. It includes the re-evaluation of the usage of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) with the medical and economical arguments regarding the prognosis and the quality of life of Japanese hemodialysis patients. This guideline consists of 7 sections. The first section comprises the general definition and the differential diagnosis of anemia. The hemoglobin (Hb) level of the Japanese population seemed to be low when compared with that of the European and American populations. The second section describes the target Hb level in hemodialysis patients. Multivariate analysis of the data that were collected from dialysis institutions throughout the country showed that an Hb level of 10-11 g/dL (Ht level 30-33%) at the first dialysis session in a week is the ideal range for chronic hemodialysis patients in terms of the 3-5 year survival rate. The supine position at blood sampling and the sampling timing at the first dialysis session in a week might affect the lower setting of target Hb hematocrit (Ht), compared to that of European and American guidelines. However, we particularly recommended that an Hb level of 11-12 g/dL (Ht level from 33 to 36%) at the first dialysis session in a week is desirable in relatively young patients. In the third section, the markers of iron deficiency are discussed. The Transferin saturation test (TSAT) and serum ferritin were emphasized as the standard markers. The routes of administration of rHuEPO and its dosages are written in the fourth section. The subcutaneous route was associated with the occurrence of secondary red cell aplasia due to anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, secondary red cell aplasia was seldom observed in the venous injection. From this fact we recommend venous injection for chronic

  17. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper D; Thomsen, Frederik B; Nerstrøm, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers previously graded...... as Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) are now considered as 7 (3 + 4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A matched-pair analysis was conducted. In all, 215 patients with Gleason score 6 or 7 (3 + 4) prostate cancer on biopsy who underwent RP before 31 December 2005 (pre-ISUP group), were matched 1:1 by biopsy Gleason score......, clinical tumour category, PSA level, and margin status to patients undergoing RP between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011 (post-ISUP group). Patients were followed until BCR defined as a PSA level of ≥0.2 ng/mL. Risk of BCR was analysed in a competing-risk model. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 9...

  18. Italian Society for the Study of Diabetes (SID)/Italian Endocrinological Society (SIE) guidelines on the treatment of hyperglycemia in Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, M G; Giorgino, F; Pezzino, V; Scaroni, C; Avogaro, A

    2016-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common feature associated with states of increased growth hormone secretion and glucocorticoid levels. The purpose of these guidelines is to assist clinicians and other health care providers to take evidence-based therapeutic decisions for the treatment of hyperglycemia in patients with growth hormone and corticosteroid excess. Both the SID and SIE appointed members to represent each society and to collaborate in Guidelines writing. Members were chosen for their specific knowledge in the field. Each member agreed to produce-and regularly update-conflicts of interest. The authors of these guidelines prepared their contributions following the recommendations for the development of Guidelines, using the standard classes of recommendation shown below. All members of the writing committee provided editing and systematic review of each part of the manuscript, and discussed the grading of evidence. Consensus was guided by a systematic review of all available trials and by interactive discussions.

  19. Southern African HIV Clinicians Society adult antiretroviral therapy guidelines: Update on when to initiate antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Meintjes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The most recent version of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society’s adult antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines was published in December 2014. In the 27 August 2015 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, two seminal randomised controlled trials that addressed the optimal timing of ART in HIV-infected patients with high CD4 counts were published: Strategic timing of antiretroviral therapy (START and TEMPRANO ANRS 12136 (Early antiretroviral treatment and/or early isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults. The findings of these two trials were consistent: there was significant individual clinical benefit from starting ART immediately in patients with CD4 counts higher than 500 cells/μL rather than deferring until a certain lower CD4 threshold or clinical indication was met. The findings add to prior evidence showing that ART reduces the risk of onward HIV transmission. Therefore, early ART initiation has the public health benefits of potentially reducing both HIV incidence and morbidity. Given this new and important evidence, the Society took the decision to provide a specific update on the section of the adult ART guidelines relating to when ART should be initiated.

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Pediatric Chronic Home Invasive Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterni, Laura M; Collaco, Joseph M; Baker, Christopher D; Carroll, John L; Sharma, Girish D; Brozek, Jan L; Finder, Jonathan D; Ackerman, Veda L; Arens, Raanan; Boroughs, Deborah S; Carter, Jodi; Daigle, Karen L; Dougherty, Joan; Gozal, David; Kevill, Katharine; Kravitz, Richard M; Kriseman, Tony; MacLusky, Ian; Rivera-Spoljaric, Katherine; Tori, Alvaro J; Ferkol, Thomas; Halbower, Ann C

    2016-04-15

    Children with chronic invasive ventilator dependence living at home are a diverse group of children with special health care needs. Medical oversight, equipment management, and community resources vary widely. There are no clinical practice guidelines available to health care professionals for the safe hospital discharge and home management of these complex children. To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the hospital discharge and home/community management of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The Pediatric Assembly of the American Thoracic Society assembled an interdisciplinary workgroup with expertise in the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The experts developed four questions of clinical importance and used an evidence-based strategy to identify relevant medical evidence. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to formulate and grade recommendations. Clinical practice recommendations for the management of children with chronic ventilator dependence at home are provided, and the evidence supporting each recommendation is discussed. Collaborative generalist and subspecialist comanagement is the Medical Home model most likely to be successful for the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Standardized hospital discharge criteria are suggested. An awake, trained caregiver should be present at all times, and at least two family caregivers should be trained specifically for the child's care. Standardized equipment for monitoring, emergency preparedness, and airway clearance are outlined. The recommendations presented are based on the current evidence and expert opinion and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies become available.

  1. An official American thoracic society workshop report: developing performance measures from clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Wilson, Kevin C; Au, David H; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Feemster, Laura C; Mularski, Richard A; Slatore, Christopher G; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-05-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care.

  2. Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnostic Evaluation of Infants with Recurrent or Persistent Wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Clement L; Esther, Charles R; Debley, Jason S; Sockrider, Marianna; Yilmaz, Ozge; Amin, Nikhil; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia; Davis, Stephanie D; Durand, Manuel; Ewig, Jeffrey M; Yuksel, Hasan; Lombardi, Enrico; Noah, Terry L; Radford, Peggy; Ranganathan, Sarath; Teper, Alejandro; Weinberger, Miles; Brozek, Jan; Wilson, Kevin C

    2016-08-01

    Infantile wheezing is a common problem, but there are no guidelines for the evaluation of infants with recurrent or persistent wheezing that is not relieved or prevented by standard therapies. An American Thoracic Society-sanctioned guideline development committee selected clinical questions related to uncertainties or controversies in the diagnostic evaluation of wheezing infants. Members of the committee conducted pragmatic evidence syntheses, which followed the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The evidence syntheses were used to inform the formulation and grading of recommendations. The pragmatic evidence syntheses identified few studies that addressed the clinical questions. The studies that were identified constituted very low-quality evidence, consisting almost exclusively of case series with risk of selection bias, indirect patient populations, and imprecise estimates. The committee made conditional recommendations to perform bronchoscopic airway survey, bronchoalveolar lavage, esophageal pH monitoring, and a swallowing study. It also made conditional recommendations against empiric food avoidance, upper gastrointestinal radiography, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy. Finally, the committee recommended additional research about the roles of infant pulmonary function testing and food avoidance or dietary changes, based on allergy testing. Although infantile wheezing is common, there is a paucity of evidence to guide clinicians in selecting diagnostic tests for recurrent or persistent wheezing. Our committee made several conditional recommendations to guide clinicians; however, additional research that measures clinical outcomes is needed to improve our confidence in the effects of various diagnostic interventions and to allow advice to be provided with greater confidence.

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  4. Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Sarkar, Chitra; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Chatterjee, Sandip; Shirsat, Neelam; Muzumdar, Dattatreya; Pungavkar, Sona; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Jalali, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    The high success rate in the management medulloblastoma achieved in the western world is not exactly mirrored in developing countries including India. Socio-demographic differences, health-care disparity, and lack in uniformity of care with resultant widespread variations in the clinical practice are some of the reasons that may partly explain this difference in outcomes. Patients with medulloblastoma require a multi-disciplinary team approach involving but not limited to neuro-radiology, neurosurgery; neuropathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, pediatric medical oncology and rehabilitative services for optimizing outcomes. The Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology (ISNO) constituted an expert multi-disciplinary panel with adequate representation from all stakeholders to prepare national consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma. Minimum desirable, as well as preferable though optional recommendations (as appropriate), were developed and adopted for the pre-surgical work-up including neuroimaging; neurosurgical management including surgical principles, techniques, and complications; neuropathology reporting and molecular testing; contemporary risk-stratification in the molecular era; appropriate adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy and chemotherapy); and follow-up schedule in medulloblastoma. The current document represents a broad consensus reached amongst various stakeholders within the neuro-oncology community involved in the contemporary curative-intent management of children with medulloblastoma. It provides both general as well as specific guidelines and recommendations to be adopted by physicians and health care providers across India to achieve uniformity of care, improve disease-related outcomes, and compare results between institutions within the country.

  5. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  6. British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines for the management of egg allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A T; Skypala, I; Leech, S C; Ewan, P W; Dugué, P; Brathwaite, N; Huber, P A J; Nasser, S M

    2010-08-01

    This guideline advises on the management of patients with egg allergy. Most commonly, egg allergy presents in infancy, with a prevalence of approximately 2% in children and 0.1% in adults. A clear clinical history and the detection of egg white-specific IgE (by skin prick test or serum assay) will confirm the diagnosis in most cases. Egg avoidance advice is the cornerstone of management. Egg allergy often resolves and re-introduction can be achieved at home if reactions have been mild and there is no asthma. Patients with a history of severe reactions or asthma should have reintroduction guided by a specialist. All children with egg allergy should receive measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination. Influenza and yellow fever vaccines should only be considered in egg-allergic patients under the guidance of an allergy specialist. This guideline was prepared by the Standards of Care Committee (SOCC) of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI) and is intended for allergists and others with a special interest in allergy. The recommendations are evidence-based but where evidence was lacking consensus was reached by the panel of specialists on the committee. The document encompasses epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and co-morbid associations.

  7. International Society Of Neuropathology--Haarlem consensus guidelines for nervous system tumor classification and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N; Perry, Arie; Burger, Peter; Ellison, David W; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas; Aldape, Kenneth; Brat, Daniel; Collins, V Peter; Eberhart, Charles; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Fuller, Gregory N; Giangaspero, Felice; Giannini, Caterina; Hawkins, Cynthia; Kleihues, Paul; Korshunov, Andrey; Kros, Johan M; Beatriz Lopes, M; Ng, Ho-Keung; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Paulus, Werner; Pietsch, Torsten; Rosenblum, Marc; Rushing, Elisabeth; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Wiestler, Otmar; Wesseling, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Major discoveries in the biology of nervous system tumors have raised the question of how non-histological data such as molecular information can be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors. To address this question, a meeting of neuropathologists with expertise in molecular diagnosis was held in Haarlem, the Netherlands, under the sponsorship of the International Society of Neuropathology (ISN). Prior to the meeting, participants solicited input from clinical colleagues in diverse neuro-oncological specialties. The present "white paper" catalogs the recommendations of the meeting, at which a consensus was reached that incorporation of molecular information into the next WHO classification should follow a set of provided "ISN-Haarlem" guidelines. Salient recommendations include that (i) diagnostic entities should be defined as narrowly as possible to optimize interobserver reproducibility, clinicopathological predictions and therapeutic planning; (ii) diagnoses should be "layered" with histologic classification, WHO grade and molecular information listed below an "integrated diagnosis"; (iii) determinations should be made for each tumor entity as to whether molecular information is required, suggested or not needed for its definition; (iv) some pediatric entities should be separated from their adult counterparts; (v) input for guiding decisions regarding tumor classification should be solicited from experts in complementary disciplines of neuro-oncology; and (iv) entity-specific molecular testing and reporting formats should be followed in diagnostic reports. It is hoped that these guidelines will facilitate the forthcoming update of the fourth edition of the WHO classification of central nervous system tumors.

  8. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerk, C; Mitchell, V S; McNarry, A F; Mendonca, C; Bhagrath, R; Patel, A; O'Sullivan, E P; Woodall, N M; Ahmad, I

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team.

  9. Staging of uterine cervical cancer with MRI: guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balleyguier, Corinne [Radiology Department, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Sala, E. [Radiology Department, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cunha, T. da [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Lisbon (Portugal); Bergman, A. [Department of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital (Sweden); Brkljacic, B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital ' ' Dubrava' ' , Zagreb (Croatia); Danza, F. [Dipartimento di Bioimmaginie Scienze Radiologiche, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Forstner, R. [Zentralroentgeninstitut, Landeskliniken Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Hamm, B. [Department of Radiology, Charite Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Kubik-Huch, R. [Institut Radiologie, Kantonsspital Baden, Baden (Switzerland); Lopez, C.; Manfredi, R. [Department of Radiology, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Rome (Italy); McHugo, J. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Oleaga, L. [Radiology Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Togashi, K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kinkel, K. [Institut de Radiologie, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with uterine cervical cancer, and to provide the radiologist with a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences. Methods: Guidelines for uterine cervical cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 11 leading institutions and a critical review of the literature. The results indicated that high field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) should include at least two T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, axial oblique or coronal oblique orientation (short and long axis of the uterine cervix) of the pelvic content. Axial T1-weighted sequence is useful to detect suspicious pelvic and abdominal lymph nodes, and images from symphysis to the left renal vein are required. The intravenous administration of Gadolinium-chelates is optional but is often required for small lesions (<2 cm) and for follow-up after treatment. Diffusion-weighted sequences are optional but are recommended to help evaluate lymph nodes and to detect a residual lesion after chemoradiotherapy. Expert consensus and literature review lead to an optimized MRI protocol to stage uterine cervical cancer. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for preoperative staging and follow-up in patients with uterine cervical cancer. (orig.)

  10. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis: an electronic guideline implementability appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Sutter Petra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines are intended to improve healthcare. However, even if guidelines are excellent, their implementation is not assured. In subfertility care, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE guidelines have been inventoried, and their methodological quality has been assessed. To improve the impact of the ESHRE guidelines and to improve European subfertility care, it is important to optimise the implementability of guidelines. We therefore investigated the implementation barriers of the ESHRE guideline with the best methodological quality and evaluated the used instrument for usability and feasibility. Methods We reviewed the ESHRE guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis to assess its implementability. We used an electronic version of the guideline implementability appraisal (eGLIA instrument. This eGLIA tool consists of 31 questions grouped into 10 dimensions. Seven items address the guideline as a whole, and 24 items assess the individual recommendations in the guideline. The eGLIA instrument identifies factors that influence the implementability of the guideline recommendations. These factors can be divided into facilitators that promote implementation and barriers that oppose implementation. A panel of 10 experts from three European countries appraised all 36 recommendations of the guideline. They discussed discrepancies in a teleconference and completed a questionnaire to evaluate the ease of use and overall utility of the eGLIA instrument. Results Two of the 36 guideline recommendations were straightforward to implement. Five recommendations were considered simply statements because they contained no actions. The remaining 29 recommendations were implementable with some adjustments. We found facilitators of the guideline implementability in the quality of decidability, presentation and formatting, apparent validity, and novelty or innovation of the recommendations

  11. Guidelines for trials of behavioral treatments for recurrent headache, first edition: American Headache Society Behavioral Clinical Trials Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzien, Donald B; Andrasik, Frank; Freidenberg, Brian M; Houle, Timothy T; Lake, Alvin E; Lipchik, Gay L; Holroyd, Kenneth A; Lipton, Richard B; McCrory, Douglas C; Nash, Justin M; Nicholson, Robert A; Powers, Scott W; Rains, Jeanetta C; Wittrock, David A

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines for design of clinical trials evaluating behavioral headache treatments were developed to facilitate production of quality research evaluating behavioral therapies for management of primary headache disorders. These guidelines were produced by a Workgroup of headache researchers under auspices of the American Headache Society. The guidelines are complementary to and modeled after guidelines for pharmacological trials published by the International Headache Society, but they address methodologic considerations unique to behavioral and other nonpharmacological treatments. Explicit guidelines for evaluating behavioral headache therapies are needed as the optimal methodology for behavioral (and other nonpharmacologic) trials necessarily differs from the preferred methodology for drug trials. In addition, trials comparing and integrating drug and behavioral therapies present methodological challenges not addressed by guidelines for pharmacologic research. These guidelines address patient selection, trial design for behavioral treatments and for comparisons across multiple treatment modalities (eg, behavioral vs pharmacologic), evaluation of results, and research ethics. Although developed specifically for behavioral therapies, the guidelines may apply to the design of clinical trials evaluating many forms of nonpharmacologic therapies for headache.

  12. EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hanada, Keiji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations.

  13. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 Guideline Update: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers, Children and Adults: Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Diane Lougheed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.

  14. [French Society of Vascular Medicine good medical practice guidelines on safety and environment in vascular medicine: Treatment of varicose veins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordana, P; Miserey, G

    2014-12-01

    These guidelines proposed by the French Society of Vascular Medicine define the optimal environment for vascular medicine practice: outpatient clinic; equipment, layout and maintenance of the care center; infection risk prevention (hand hygiene, individual protective measures, exposure to blood, ultrasound apparatus, etc.); common interventions and techniques (liquid and foam sclerotherapy, endovenous thermal treatments). These guidelines do not include phlebectomy and use of ultrasound contrast agents.

  15. [Guidelines for intensive care in cardiac surgery patients: haemodynamic monitoring and cardio-circulatory treatment guidelines of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery and the German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, M; Alms, A; Braun, J; Dongas, A; Erb, J; Goetz, A; Göpfert, M; Gogarten, W; Grosse, J; Heller, A; Heringlake, M; Kastrup, M; Kröner, A; Loer, S; Marggraf, G; Markewitz, A; Reuter, M; Schmitt, D V; Schirmer, U; Wiesenack, C; Zwissler, B; Spies, C

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring and adequate volume-therapy, as well as the treatment with positive inotropic drugs and vasopressors, are the basic principles of the postoperative intensive care treatment of patient after cardiothoracic surgery. The goal of these S3 guidelines is to evaluate the recommendations in regard to evidence based medicine and to define therapy goals for monitoring and therapy. In context with the clinical situation the evaluation of the different hemodynamic parameters allows the development of a therapeutic concept and the definition of goal criteria to evaluate the effect of treatment. Up to now there are only guidelines for subareas of postoperative treatment of cardiothoracic surgical patients, like the use of a pulmonary artery catheter or the transesophageal echocardiography. The German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery and the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine made an approach to ensure and improve the quality of the postoperative intensive care medicine after cardiothoracic surgery by the development of S3 consensus-based treatment guidelines. Goal of this guideline is to assess available monitoring methods and their risks as well as the differentiated therapy of volume-replacement, positive inotropic support and vasoactive drugs, the therapy with vasodilators, inodilators and calcium-sensitizers and the use of intra-aortic balloon pumps. The guideline has been developed according to the recommendations for the development of guidelines by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF). The presented key messages of the guidelines were approved after two consensus meetings under the moderation of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF).

  16. The ASM Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Microbiology: A Case Study of the Advocacy Role of Societies in Reform Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Rachel E A; Merkel, Susan; Chang, Amy

    2015-05-01

    A number of national reports, including Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action, have called for drastic changes in how undergraduate biology is taught. To that end, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has developed new Curriculum Guidelines for undergraduate microbiology that outline a comprehensive curriculum for any undergraduate introductory microbiology course or program of study. Designed to foster enduring understanding of core microbiology concepts, the Guidelines work synergistically with backwards course design to focus teaching on student-centered goals and priorities. In order to qualitatively assess how the ASM Curriculum Guidelines are used by educators and learn more about the needs of microbiology educators, the ASM Education Board distributed two surveys to the ASM education community. In this report, we discuss the results of these surveys (353 responses). We found that the ASM Curriculum Guidelines are being implemented in many different types of courses at all undergraduate levels. Educators indicated that the ASM Curriculum Guidelines were very helpful when planning courses and assessments. We discuss some specific ways in which the ASM Curriculum Guidelines have been used in undergraduate classrooms. The survey identified some barriers that microbiology educators faced when trying to adopt the ASM Curriculum Guidelines, including lack of time, lack of financial resources, and lack of supporting resources. Given the self-reported challenges to implementing the ASM Curriculum Guidelines in undergraduate classrooms, we identify here some activities related to the ASM Curriculum Guidelines that the ASM Education Board has initiated to assist educators in the implementation process.

  17. Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) guidelines 2010 for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Itabashi, Michio; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Ito, Yoshinori; Ajioka, Yoichi; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Igarashi, Masahiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishiguro, Megumi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Kokudo, Norihiro; Muro, Kei; Ochiai, Atsushi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ohkura, Yasuo; Saito, Yutaka; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Ueno, Hideki; Yoshino, Takayuki; Fujimori, Takahiro; Koinuma, Nobuo; Morita, Takayuki; Nishimura, Genichi; Sakata, Yuh; Takahashi, Keiichi; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Tsuruta, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiko; Kotake, Kenjiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of death in Japan, where it accounts for the largest number of deaths from malignant neoplasms in women and the third largest number in men. Many new treatment methods have been developed over the last few decades. The Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) guidelines 2010 for the treatment of colorectal cancer (JSCCR Guidelines 2010) have been prepared to show standard treatment strategies for colorectal cancer, to eliminate disparities among institutions in terms of treatment, to eliminate unnecessary treatment and insufficient treatment, and to deepen mutual understanding between health-care professionals and patients by making these Guidelines available to the general public. These Guidelines have been prepared by consensuses reached by the JSCCR Guideline Committee, based on a careful review of the evidence retrieved by literature searches and in view of the medical health insurance system and actual clinical practice settings in Japan. Therefore, these Guidelines can be used as a tool for treating colorectal cancer in actual clinical practice settings. More specifically, they can be used as a guide to obtaining informed consent from patients and choosing the method of treatment for each patient. As a result of the discussions held by the Guideline Committee, controversial issues were selected as Clinical Questions, and recommendations were made. Each recommendation is accompanied by a classification of the evidence and a classification of recommendation categories based on the consensus reached by the Guideline Committee members. Here we present the English version of the JSCCR Guidelines 2010.

  18. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  19. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  20. Are we meeting the British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines for cholecystectomy post-gallstone pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Lee R; Neophytou, Chris; Leeder, Paul C; Awan, Altaf K

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to audit the current management of patients suffering with gallstone pancreatitis (GSP) at a university teaching hospital for compliance with the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) guidelines regarding cholecystectomy post-GSP. Data were collected on all patients identified via the hospital coding department that presented with GSP between January 2011 and November 2013. Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis were excluded. The primary outcome was the length of time in days from diagnosis of GSP to cholecystectomy. Secondary outcomes included readmission with gallstone-related disease prior to definitive management and admitting speciality. One hundred and fifty-eight patients were identified with a presentation of GSP during the study period. Thirty-nine patients were treated conservatively. One hundred and six patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy a median (interquartile range) interval of 33.5 days (64 days) post-admission. Patients with a severe attack as classified by the Glasgow severity score (n = 16) waited a median of 79.5 days (71.5) for cholecystectomy. Only 32% (n = 34) of patients with mild disease underwent cholecystectomy during the index admission or within 2 weeks. When grouped by admitting speciality, patients admitted initially under hepatobiliary surgery waited significantly fewer days for definitive treatment compared with other specialities (P gallstone-related pathology prior to undergoing cholecystectomy. Only 32.1% were treated as per BSG guidelines. About 19.8% (n = 21) of the patients suffered further morbidity as a result of a delayed operation and there is a clear difference between admitting speciality and the median time to operation. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerk, C.; Mitchell, V. S.; McNarry, A. F.; Mendonca, C.; Bhagrath, R.; Patel, A.; O'Sullivan, E. P.; Woodall, N. M.; Ahmad, I.

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  2. British Society for Histocompatibility & Immunogenetics and British Transplantation Society guidelines for the detection and characterisation of clinically relevant antibodies in allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, W M; Harmer, A; Briggs, D; Dyer, P; Fuggle, S V; Martin, S; Sinnott, P; Smith, J; Taylor, C J; Vaughan, R

    2010-12-01

    Ongoing technological developments in antibody detection and characterisation allowing relative quantitation of HLA-specific antibody levels, combined with crossmatch results, now allow a graded assessment of patient potential donor immunological risk for allotransplantation, rather than a simple 'positive' or 'negative' categorization of crossmatch results. These developments have driven a thorough revision of the British Society for Histocompatibility & Immunogenetics and British Transplantation Society Guidelines for the Detection and Characterisation of Clinically Relevant Antibodies in Allotransplantation. These newly published revised Guidelines contain a number of recommendations as to best practice for antibody detection and crossmatching for the transplantation of a wide range of solid organs and tissues. These recommendations are briefly summarized in this article.

  3. Standardized terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology: the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Martha B; Centeno, Barbara A; Ali, Syed Z; Genevay, Muriel; Stelow, Ed; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Max Schmidt, C; Brugge, William; Layfield, Lester

    2014-04-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy treatment and management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18-month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology web site (www.papsociety.org). This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on a proposed standardized terminology scheme for pancreatobiliary specimens that correlate cytological diagnosis with biological behavior and increasingly conservative patient management of surveillance only. The proposed terminology scheme recommends a six-tiered system: Nondiagnostic, Negative, Atypical, Neoplastic (benign or other), Suspicious and Positive. Unique to this scheme is the "Neoplastic" category separated into "benign" (serous cystadenoma), or "Other" (premalignant mucinous cysts, neuroendocrine tumors, and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms). The positive or malignant category is reserved for high-grade, aggressive malignancies including ductal adenocarcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, pancreatoblastoma, lymphoma, and metastases. Interpretation categories do not have to be used. Some pathology laboratory information systems require an interpretation category, which places the cytological diagnosis into a general category. This proposed scheme provides terminology that standardizes the category of the various diseases of the pancreas, some of which are difficult to diagnose specifically by cytology. In addition, this terminology scheme attempts to provide maximum flexibility

  4. Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) Guidelines 2014 for treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Itabashi, Michio; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Ito, Yoshinori; Ajioka, Yoichi; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Igarashi, Masahiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Ishiguro, Megumi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Kokudo, Norihiro; Muro, Kei; Ochiai, Atsushi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ohkura, Yasuo; Saito, Yutaka; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Ueno, Hideki; Yoshino, Takayuki; Boku, Narikazu; Fujimori, Takahiro; Koinuma, Nobuo; Morita, Takayuki; Nishimura, Genichi; Sakata, Yuh; Takahashi, Keiichi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiko; Kotake, Kenjiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of death in Japan, where it accounts for the largest number of deaths from malignant neoplasms among women and the third largest number among men. Many new methods of treatment have been developed during recent decades. The Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum Guidelines 2014 for treatment of colorectal cancer (JSCCR Guidelines 2014) have been prepared as standard treatment strategies for colorectal cancer, to eliminate treatment disparities among institutions, to eliminate unnecessary treatment and insufficient treatment, and to deepen mutual understanding among health-care professionals and patients by making these guidelines available to the general public. These guidelines have been prepared as a result of consensuses reached by the JSCCR Guideline Committee on the basis of careful review of evidence retrieved by literature searches and taking into consideration the medical health insurance system and actual clinical practice in Japan. They can, therefore, be used as a guide for treating colorectal cancer in clinical practice. More specifically, they can be used as a guide to obtaining informed consent from patients and choosing the method of treatment for each patient. As a result of the discussions of the Guideline Committee, controversial issues were selected as clinical questions, and recommendations were made. Each recommendation is accompanied by a classification of the evidence and a classification of recommendation categories, on the basis of consensus reached by Guideline Committee members. Here we present the English version of the JSCCR Guidelines 2014.

  5. Official Executive Summary of an American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). METHODS: A mult...

  6. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and pa...

  7. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Shindel, Alan W; Adaikan, P Ganesan; Becher, Edgardo; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and partn

  8. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Grant S; Eifling, Kurt P; Ellis, Mark A; Gaudio, Flavio G; Otten, Edward M; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the recognition, prevention, and treatment of heat illness. We present a review of the classifications, pathophysiology, and evidence-based guidelines for planning and preventive measures as well as best practice recommendations for both field and hospital-based therapeutic management of heat illness. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence, and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Heat-Related Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(4):351-361. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Staging of endometrial cancer with MRI: Guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinkel, K. [Geneva University Hospital and Institut de Radiologie, Clinique des Grangettes, Chene-Bougeries/Geneva (Switzerland); Clinique des Grangettes, Institut de radiologie, Chene-Bougerie/Geneva (Switzerland); Forstner, R. [LandesklinikenSalzburg, Zentralroentgeninstitut, Salzburg (Austria); Danza, F.M. [Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Dipartimento di Bioimmagini e scienze radiologiche, Rome (Italy); Oleaga, L. [Hospital Clinic, Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Cunha, T.M. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Bergman, A. [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Barentsz, J.O. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Balleyguier, C. [Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Brkljacic, B. [University Hospital ' ' Dubrava' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zagreb (Croatia); University of Zagreb, Medical School, Zagreb (Croatia); Spencer, J.A. [St James' s Institute of Oncology, Department of Clinical Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to define guidelines for endometrial cancer staging with MRI. The technique included critical review and expert consensus of MRI protocols by the female imaging subcommittee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology, from ten European institutions, and published literature between 1999 and 2008. The results indicated that high field MRI should include at least two T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, axial oblique or coronal oblique orientation (short and long axis of the uterine body) of the pelvic content. High-resolution post-contrast images acquired at 2 min {+-} 30 s after intravenous contrast injection are suggested to be optimal for the diagnosis of myometrial invasion. If cervical invasion is suspected, additional slice orientation perpendicular to the axis of the endocervical channel is recommended. Due to the limited sensitivity of MRI to detect lymph node metastasis without lymph node-specific contrast agents, retroperitoneal lymph node screening with pre-contrast sequences up to the level of the kidneys is optional. The likelihood of lymph node invasion and the need for staging lymphadenectomy are also indicated by high-grade histology at endometrial tissue sampling and by deep myometrial or cervical invasion detected by MRI. In conclusion, expert consensus and literature review lead to an optimized MRI protocol to stage endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  11. Guidelines for the diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of canine superficial bacterial folliculitis (Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is usually caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and routinely treated with systemic antimicrobial agents. Infection is a consequence of reduced immunity associated with alterations of the skin barrier and underlying diseases that may be di...... will improve antimicrobial use and reduce selection of MRSP and other multidrug-resistant bacteria affecting animal and human health....... of an internationally available resource guiding practitioners in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of SBF. DEVELOPMENT OF THE GUIDELINES: The guidelines were developed by the Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases, with consultation and advice...... on infection control. Guidance is given for topical and systemic modalities, including approaches suitable for MRSP. Systemic drugs are classified in three tiers. Tier one drugs are used when diagnosis is clear cut and risk factors for antimicrobial drug resistance are not present. Otherwise, tier two drugs...

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : A Clinical Practice Guideline Update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Steven E.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Denberg, Tom; Schuenemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Description: This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and

  13. Management of fever in children: summary of the Italian Pediatric Society guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Elena; Principi, Nicola; Longhi, Riccardo; Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Becherucci, Paolo; Bonsignori, Francesca; Esposito, Susanna; Festini, Filippo; Galli, Luisa; Lucchesi, Bice; Mugelli, Alessandro; de Martino, Maurizio

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the Italian Pediatric Society guideline on the management of the signs and symptoms of fever in children, prepared as part of the National Guideline Program (NGLP). Relevant publications in English and Italian were identified through searches of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception through December 31, 2007. Based on the consensus of a multidisciplinary expert panel, the strength of the recommendations was categorized into 5 grades (A-E) according to NGLP methodology. In the health care setting, axillary measurement of body temperature using a digital thermometer is recommended in children aged or =4 weeks, axillary measurement using a digital thermometer or tympanic measurement using an infrared thermometer is recommended. When body temperature is measured at home by parents or care-givers, axillary measurement using a digital thermometer is recommended for all children. Children who are afebrile when seen by the clinician but are reported to have had fever by their caregivers should be considered febrile. In special circumstances, high fever may be a predictive factor for severe bacterial infection. Use of physical methods of reducing fever is discouraged, except in the case of hyperthermia. Use of antipyretics-paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen-is recommended only when fever is associated with discomfort. Combined or alternating use of antipyretics is discouraged. The dose of antipyretic should be based on the child's weight rather than age. Whenever possible, oral administration of paracetamol is preferable to rectal administration. Use of ibuprofen is not recommended in febrile children with chickenpox or dehydration. Use of ibuprofen or paracetamol is not contraindicated in febrile children with asthma. There is insufficient evidence to form any recommendations concerning fever in children with other chronic conditions, but caution is advised in cases of severe hepatic/renal failure or

  14. SU-F-BRA-04: Prostate HDR Brachytherapy with Multichannel Robotic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, F Maria; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Yu, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is gradually becoming popular in treating patients with prostate cancers. However, placement of the HDR needles at desired locations into the patient is challenging. Application of robotic system may improve the accuracy of the clinical procedure. This experimental study is to evaluate the feasibility of using a multichannel robotic system for prostate HDR brachytherapy. Methods: In this experimental study, the robotic system employed was a 6-DOF Multichannel Image-guided Robotic Assistant for Brachytherapy (MIRAB), which was designed and fabricated for prostate seed implantation. The MIRAB has the provision of rotating 16 needles while inserting them. Ten prostate HDR brachytherapy needles were simultaneously inserted using MIRAB into a commercially available prostate phantom. After inserting the needles into the prostate phantom at desired locations, 2mm thick CT slices were obtained for dosimetric planning. HDR plan was generated using Oncetra planning system with a total prescription dose of 34Gy in 4 fractions. Plan quality was evaluated considering dose coverage to prostate and planning target volume (PTV), with 3mm margin around prostate, as well as the dose limit to the organs at risk (OARs) following the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines. Results: From the CT scan, it is observed that the needles were inserted straight into the desired locations and they were adequately spaced and distributed for a clinically acceptable HDR plan. Coverage to PTV and prostate were about 91% (V100= 91%) and 96% (V100=96%), respectively. Dose to 1cc of urethra, rectum, and bladder were within the ABS specified limits. Conclusion: The MIRAB was able to insert multiple needles simultaneously into the prostate precisely. By controlling the MIRAB to insert all the ten utilized needles into the prostate phantom, we could achieve the robotic HDR brachytherapy successfully. Further study for assessing the system

  15. Prophylaxis of post-ERCP pancreatitis: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline - updated June 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Andriulli, Angelo; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Mariani, Alberto; Meister, Tobias; Deviere, Jacques; Marek, Tomasz; Baron, Todd H; Hassan, Cesare; Testoni, Pier A; Kapral, Christine

    2014-09-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the prophylaxis of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (post-ERCP) pancreatitis. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends routine rectal administration of 100 mg of diclofenac or indomethacin immediately before or after ERCP in all patients without contraindication. In addition to this, in the case of high risk for post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP), the placement of a 5-Fr prophylactic pancreatic stent should be strongly considered. Sublingually administered glyceryl trinitrate or 250 µg somatostatin given in bolus injection might be considered as an option in high risk cases if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are contraindicated and if prophylactic pancreatic stenting is not possible or successful. 2 ESGE recommends keeping the number of cannulation attempts as low as possible. 3 ESGE suggests restricting the use of a pancreatic guidewire as a backup technique for biliary cannulation to cases with repeated inadvertent cannulation of the pancreatic duct; if this method is used, deep biliary cannulation should be attempted using a guidewire rather than the contrast-assisted method and a prophylactic pancreatic stent should be placed. 4 ESGE suggests that needle-knife fistulotomy should be the preferred precut technique in patients with a bile duct dilated down to the papilla. Conventional precut and transpancreatic sphincterotomy present similar success and complication rates; if conventional precut is selected and pancreatic cannulation is easily obtained, ESGE suggests attempting to place a small-diameter (3-Fr or 5-Fr) pancreatic stent to guide the cut and leaving the pancreatic stent in place at the end of ERCP for a minimum of 12 - 24 hours. 4 ESGE does not recommend endoscopic papillary balloon dilation as an alternative to sphincterotomy in routine ERCP, but it may be advantageous in selected patients; if this

  16. An official American Thoracic Society/Society of Thoracic Radiology clinical practice guideline: evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ann N; Bull, Todd M; Jaeschke, Roman; Lockwood, Charles J; Boiselle, Phillip M; Hurwitz, Lynne M; James, Andra H; McCullough, Laurence B; Menda, Yusuf; Paidas, Michael J; Royal, Henry D; Tapson, Victor F; Winer-Muram, Helen T; Chervenak, Frank A; Cody, Dianna D; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Stave, Christopher D; Tuttle, Brandi D

    2011-11-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality in the developed world. Along with appropriate prophylaxis and therapy, prevention of death from PE in pregnancy requires a high index of clinical suspicion followed by a timely and accurate diagnostic approach. To provide guidance on this important health issue, a multidisciplinary panel of major medical stakeholders was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In formulation of the recommended diagnostic algorithm, the important outcomes were defined to be diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic yield; the panel placed a high value on minimizing cumulative radiation dose when determining the recommended sequence of tests. Overall, the quality of the underlying evidence for all recommendations was rated as very low or low, with some of the evidence considered for recommendations extrapolated from studies of the general population. Despite the low-quality evidence, strong recommendations were made for three specific scenarios: performance of chest radiography (CXR) as the first radiation-associated procedure; use of lung scintigraphy as the preferred test in the setting of a normal CXR; and performance of computed-tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) rather than digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in a pregnant woman with a nondiagnostic ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) result. The recommendations presented in this guideline are based upon the currently available evidence; availability of new clinical research data and development and dissemination of new technologies will necessitate a revision and update.

  17. A Summary of the Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines on Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Montori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for about 95% of cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH. Newborns are currently being screened for the classical forms of this disease throughout the United States and in 12 other countries. As such, it seems important to develop the best practice guidelines for treating not only infants and children, but affected adults as well. This report gives a brief overview of the most recent expert opinion and clinical practice guidelines for CAH as formulated by The Endocrine Society Task Force.

  18. Official American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinsohn, David M; Leonard, Michael K; LoBue, Philip A; Cohn, David L; Daley, Charles L; Desmond, Ed; Keane, Joseph; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Loeffler, Ann M; Mazurek, Gerald H; O'Brien, Richard J; Pai, Madhukar; Richeldi, Luca; Salfinger, Max; Shinnick, Thomas M; Sterling, Timothy R; Warshauer, David M; Woods, Gail L

    2017-01-15

    Individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may develop symptoms and signs of disease (tuberculosis disease) or may have no clinical evidence of disease (latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI]). Tuberculosis disease is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet many questions related to its diagnosis remain. A task force supported by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America searched, selected, and synthesized relevant evidence. The evidence was then used as the basis for recommendations about the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and LTBI in adults and children. The recommendations were formulated, written, and graded using the Grading, Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Twenty-three evidence-based recommendations about diagnostic testing for latent tuberculosis infection, pulmonary tuberculosis, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are provided. Six of the recommendations are strong, whereas the remaining 17 are conditional. These guidelines are not intended to impose a standard of care. They provide the basis for rational decisions in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling unique individual clinical circumstances. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) Criteria and Society of Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) 2008 Guidelines in Non-Operative Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbel, Krzysztof; Kozinoga, Mateusz; Stoliński, Łukasz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2014-07-28

    According to the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a curvature of more than 10° Cobb angle, affecting 2-3% of pediatric population. Idiopathic scoliosis accounts for 80% of all scoliosis cases. Non-operative principles in the therapy of idiopathic scoliosis, including Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) criteria and guidelines proposed by the experts of the Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORTS) were presented. The possibility to carry out quality of life assessments in a conservative procedure was also demonstrated. Based on the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis, SRS criteria, SOSORT 2008 experts' opinion and the knowledge of the possibilities of psychological assessment of conservative IS treatment, rules were proposed regarding nonsurgical IS therapy procedures, with special consideration being paid to the proper treatment start time (age, Risser test, biological maturity, Cobb angle), possibility of curvature progression, the importance of physiotherapy and psychological assessment. The knowledge of SRS criteria and SOSORT guidelines regarding the conservative treatment of IS are essential for proper treatment (the right time to start treatment), and supports establishment of interdisciplinary treatment teams, consisting of a physician, a physiotherapist, an orthopedic technician and a psychologist.

  20. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guidelines on postoperative delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoper......The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care......, postoperative detection of delirium and management of delirious patients. The scope of this guideline is not to cover ICU delirium. Considering that many medical disciplines are involved in the treatment of surgical patients, a team-based approach should be implemented into daily practice. This guideline...

  1. Dosimetric analysis of Co-60 source based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: A case series of ten patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Batra, Manika; Bagdare, Priyusha; Kaushik, Sandeep; Tyagi, Atul; Naik, Ayush; Bhandari, Virendra; Gupta, Krishna Lal

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the dosimetric parameters of Co-60 based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy plans for patients of carcinoma uterine cervix. Co-60 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit has been introduced in past few years and is gaining importance owing to its long half life, economical benefits and comparable clinical outcome compared to Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. A study was conducted on ten patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix (Ca Cx). Computed tomography (CT) images were taken after three channel applicator insertions. The planning for 7 Gray per fraction (7 Gy/#) was done for Co-60 HDR brachytherapy unit following the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines. All the patients were treated with 3# with one week interval between fractions. The mean dose to high risk clinical target volumes (HRCTV) for D90 (dose to 90% volume) was found to be 102.05% (Standard Deviation (SD): 3.07). The mean D2cc (dose to 2 cubic centimeter volume) of the bladder, rectum and sigmoid were found to be 15.9 Gy (SD: 0.58), 11.5 Gy (SD: 0.91) and 4.1 Gy (SD: 1.52), respectively. The target coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were achieved as per the ABS guidelines. Hence, it can be concluded that the Co-60 HDR brachytherapy unit is a good choice especially for the centers with a small number of brachytherapy procedures as no frequent source replacement is required like in an Ir-192 HDR unit.

  2. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico; Sanders, Robert D.; Audisio, Riccardo; Borozdina, Anastasia; Cherubini, Antonio; Jones, Christina; Kehlet, Henrik; Maclullich, Alasdair; Radtke, Finn; Riese, Florian; Slooter, Arjen J C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/173059740; Veyckemans, Francis; Kramer, Sylvia; Neuner, Bruno; Weiss, Bjoern; Spies, Claudia D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoperati

  3. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 5: Minimum Technical Standards for Pediatric Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, John; Pearl, Phillip L; Sullivan, Lucy; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria S; Cheek, Janna; Stecker, Mark; San-Juan, Daniel; Selioutski, Olga; Sinha, Saurabh R; Drislane, Frank W; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating the current electroencephalography technology and practice. It was previously published as Guideline 2. Similar to the prior guideline, it delineates the aspects of Guideline 1 that should be modified for neonates and young children. Recording conditions for photic stimulation and hyperventilation are revised to enhance the provocation of epileptiform discharges. Revisions recognize the difficulties involved in performing an EEG under sedation in young children. Recommended neonatal EEG montages are displayed for the reduced set of electrodes only since the montages in Guideline 3 should be used for a 21-electrode 10-20 system array. Neonatal documentation is updated to use current American Academy of Pediatrics term "postmenstrual age" rather than "conceptional age." Finally, because therapeutic hypothermia alters the prognostic value of neonatal EEG, the necessity of documenting the patient's temperature at the time of recording is emphasized.

  4. European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the clinical management and treatment of HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clumeck, N; Pozniak, A; Raffi, F

    2008-01-01

    virological failure and the treatment of HIV during pregnancy. In Europe, there is a wide range of clinical practices in antiretroviral therapy depending on various factors such as drug registration, national policies, local availability, reimbursement and access to treatment. These can vary greatly from one......A working group of the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) have developed these guidelines for European clinicians to help them in the treatment of adults with HIV infection. This third version of the guidelines includes, as new topics, the assessment of patients at initial and subsequent clinic...... visits as well as post-exposure prophylaxis. A revision of the 2005 guidelines based on current data includes changes in the sections on primary HIV infection, when to initiate therapy, which drug combinations are preferred as initial combination regimens for antiretroviral-naïve patients, how to manage...

  5. Management of Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody Euthyroid Women in Pregnancy: Comparison of the American Thyroid Association and the Endocrine Society Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of thyroid autoantibodies is relatively high in women of childbearing age. There is evidence that positive thyroperoxidase antibody even in euthyroid women may increase the risk of spontaneous and recurrent pregnancy loss and preterm delivery. However, the evidence is not enough to justify recommendation on the screening of pregnant women for thyroid autoantibodies or LT4 supplementation for reducing maternal or fetal complications. In this paper we reviewed the related evidence and compared the new guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and Endocrine Society with respect to the screening and management of positive thyroperoxidase antibody in euthyroid pregnant women. As there was no major contradiction or disagreement between the two guidelines, either one of two guidelines may be used by clinicians for the appropriate management of thyroid autoimmunity during pregnancy.

  6. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of glomerulonephritis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of adult nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of glomerular disease in adults and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas for which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation also is addressed. The relevance of treatment recommendations to the Canadian practitioner is discussed.

  7. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of nephrotic syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of pediatric nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of childhood nephrotic syndrome and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas in which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the length of corticosteroid therapy for the initial presentation and relapses, definitions of steroid resistance, and choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation is also addressed.

  8. An Update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation (PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley E. Althof, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Development of guidelines is an evolutionary process that continually reviews data and incorporates the best new research. We expect that ongoing research will lead to a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology as well as new efficacious and safe treatments for this sexual dysfunction. We again recommend that these guidelines be reevaluated and updated by the ISSM in 4 years. Althof SE, McMahon CG, Waldinger MD, Serefoglu EC, Shindel AW, Adaikan PG, Becher E, Dean J, Giuliano F, Hellstrom WJG, Giraldi A, Glina S, Incrocci L, Jannini E, McCabe M, Parish S, Rowland D, Segraves RT, Sharlip I, and Torres LO. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE. Sex Med 2014;2:60–90.

  9. 2010 Guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the Management of Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern-En Chiang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerosis-related mortality and morbidity. In this document, the Hypertension Committee of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology provides new guidelines for hypertension management. The key messages are as follows. (1 The life-time risk for hypertension is 90%. (2 Both the increase in the prevalence rate and the relative risk of hypertension for causing cardiovascular events are higher in Asians than in Caucasians. (3 The control rate has been improved significantly in Taiwan from 2.4% to 21% in men, and from 5% to 29% in women in recent years (1995-2002. (4 Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP = 130/80 mmHg are thresholds of treatment for high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, stroke, established coronary heart disease, and coronary heart disease equivalents (carotid artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. (5 Ambulatory and home BP monitoring correlate more closely with end-organ damage and have a stronger relationship with cardiovascular events than office BP monitoring, but the feasibility of home monitoring makes it a more attractive alternative. (6 Patients with masked hypertension have higher cardiovascular risk than those with white-coat hypertension. (7 Lifestyle changes should be encouraged in all patients, and include the following six items: S-ABCDE (Salt restriction; Alcohol limitation; Body weight reduction; Cessation of smoking; Diet adaptation; Exercise adoption. (8 When pharmacological therapy is needed, physicians should consider “PROCEED” (Previous experience of patient; Risk factors; Organ damage; Contraindication or unfavorable conditions; Expert or doctor judgment; Expense or cost; Delivery and compliance to decide the optimal treatment. (9 The main benefits of antihypertensive agents are derived from lowering of BP per se, and are generally independent of the drugs being used, except

  10. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  11. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  12. Papillary cannulation and sphincterotomy techniques at ERCP: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Pier Alberto; Mariani, Alberto; Aabakken, Lars; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Bories, Erwan; Costamagna, Guido; Devière, Jacques; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Giovannini, Marc; Gyokeres, Tibor; Hafner, Michael; Halttunen, Jorma; Hassan, Cesare; Lopes, Luis; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Tham, Tony C; Tringali, Andrea; van Hooft, Jeanin; Williams, Earl J

    2016-07-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It provides practical advice on how to achieve successful cannulation and sphincterotomy at minimum risk to the patient. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE suggests that difficult biliary cannulation is defined by the presence of one or more of the following: more than 5 contacts with the papilla whilst attempting to cannulate; more than 5 minutes spent attempting to cannulate following visualization of the papilla; more than one unintended pancreatic duct cannulation or opacification (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). 2 ESGE recommends the guidewire-assisted technique for primary biliary cannulation, since it reduces the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). 3 ESGE recommends using pancreatic guidewire (PGW)-assisted biliary cannulation in patients where biliary cannulation is difficult and repeated unintentional access to the main pancreatic duct occurs (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). ESGE recommends attempting prophylactic pancreatic stenting in all patients with PGW-assisted attempts at biliary cannulation (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). 4 ESGE recommends needle-knife fistulotomy as the preferred technique for precutting (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). ESGE suggests that precutting should be used only by endoscopists who achieve selective biliary cannulation in more than 80 % of cases using standard cannulation techniques (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). When access to the pancreatic duct is easy to obtain, ESGE suggests placement of a pancreatic stent prior to precutting (moderate quality evidence, weak recommendation). 5 ESGE recommends that in patients with a small papilla

  13. Brachytherapy applications and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Written by the foremost experts in the field, this volume is a comprehensive text and practical reference on contemporary brachytherapy. The book provides detailed, site-specific information on applications and techniques of brachytherapy in the head and neck, central nervous system, breast, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, as well as on gynecologic brachytherapy, low dose rate and high dose rate sarcoma brachytherapy, vascular brachytherapy, and pediatric applications. The book thoroughly describes and compares the four major techniques used in brachytherapy-intraca

  14. Quality assurance in brachytherapy. Proposal of guidelines concerning clinical, technological and physical dosimetric aspects; Assicurazione di qualita' in brachiterapia: proposta di linee guida in relazione agli aspetti clinici, tecnologici e fisico-sanitari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The report is an up-dating of the guidelines presented by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy (ISTISAN report 96/39). The study points out the necessity of a strong cooperation among the different professionals involved in brachytherapy procedures. Minimal requirements for quality control institutional protocols are also presented and discussed. [Italian] Il documento costituisce un'integrazione delle linee guida italiane elaborate dal gruppo di studio Assicurazione di qualita' in radioterapia dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita' (ISTISAN 96/39). Un rilievo ancora maggiore e' stato dato alla necessita' di una stretta collaborazione tra le figure professionali operanti nel campo della brachiterapia. Queste linee guida riportano anche i requisiti essenziali di un programma locale di controlli di qualita' in brachiterapia.

  15. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Beriwal, Sushil [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lee Burnett, Omer [University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); D' Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh [London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Ellen L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Lilie L. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mayr, Nina A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petric, Primoz [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Loyola University Strich School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  16. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia....... Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels...... of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation...

  17. Australasian Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (AuSPEN) adult vitamin guidelines for parenteral nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osland, Emma J; Ali, Azmat; Nguyen, Truc; Davis, Melvyn; Gillanders, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This work represents the second part of a progressive review of AuSPEN's 1999 Guidelines for Provision of Micronutrient Supplementation in adult patients receiving parenteral nutrition...

  18. Guidelines for laparoscopic (TAPP) and endoscopic (TEP) treatment of inguinal hernia [International Endohernia Society (IEHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bittner, R; Arregui, M E; Bisgaard, T

    2011-01-01

    This study describes unsedated transnasal oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (UT-OGD) in the office setting. Evaluation of national guidelines regarding primary endoscopy for the investigation of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms was also a focus of this study....

  19. How well are European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines adhered to in patients with syncope?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, C

    2010-01-01

    The ESC guidelines on syncope were published in 2001 and updated in 2004. Adherence to the recommendations enables early stratification of low and high risk patients and prevents unnecessary investigations and admissions. Vasovagal syncope (VVS) is the commonest cause of syncope in all age groups and a low risk condition. The study objective was to determine whether the ESC guidelines were adhered to prior to referral to a syncope unit; 100 consecutive patients with unexplained syncope (52 +\\/- 23 (15-91) years); 53 female. Sixty-six patients had VVS. Forty nine (75%) of patients with VVS had undergone unnecessary investigations prior to diagnosis and 31 (47%) were admitted to hospital for investigation. Research from other countries confirms that adherence to the ESC guidelines expediates accurate diagnosis, improves resource utilization and reduces health care cost. Greater awareness amongst Irish practitioners of guidelines may improve syncope management and reduce costs.

  20. British Society of Gastroenterology guidelines on the diagnosis and management of Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Ragunath, Krish; Ang, Yeng; Kang, Jin-Yong; Watson, Peter; Trudgill, Nigel; Patel, Praful; Kaye, Philip V; Sanders, Scott; O'Donovan, Maria; Bird-Lieberman, Elizabeth; Bhandari, Pradeep; Jankowski, Janusz A; Attwood, Stephen; Parsons, Simon L; Loft, Duncan; Lagergren, Jesper; Moayyedi, Paul; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; de Caestecker, John

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines provide a practical and evidence-based resource for the management of patients with Barrett's oesophagus and related early neoplasia. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument was followed to provide a methodological strategy for the guideline development. A systematic review of the literature was performed for English language articles published up until December 2012 in order to address controversial issues in Barrett's oesophagus including definition, screening and diagnosis, surveillance, pathological grading for dysplasia, management of dysplasia, and early cancer including training requirements. The rigour and quality of the studies was evaluated using the SIGN checklist system. Recommendations on each topic were scored by each author using a five-tier system (A+, strong agreement, to D+, strongly disagree). Statements that failed to reach substantial agreement among authors, defined as >80% agreement (A or A+), were revisited and modified until substantial agreement (>80%) was reached. In formulating these guidelines, we took into consideration benefits and risks for the population and national health system, as well as patient perspectives. For the first time, we have suggested stratification of patients according to their estimated cancer risk based on clinical and histopathological criteria. In order to improve communication between clinicians, we recommend the use of minimum datasets for reporting endoscopic and pathological findings. We advocate endoscopic therapy for high-grade dysplasia and early cancer, which should be performed in high-volume centres. We hope that these guidelines will standardise and improve management for patients with Barrett's oesophagus and related neoplasia.

  1. American Thoracic Society documents: an official American Thoracic Society/Society of Thoracic Radiology Clinical Practice Guideline--Evaluation of Suspected Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ann N; Bull, Todd M; Jaeschke, Roman; Lockwood, Charles J; Boiselle, Phillip M; Hurwitz, Lynne M; James, Andra H; McCullough, Laurence B; Menda, Yusuf; Paidas, Michael J; Royal, Henry D; Tapson, Victor F; Winer-Muram, Helen T; Chervenak, Frank A; Cody, Dianna D; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Stave, Christopher D; Tuttle, Brandi D

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality in the developed world. Along with appropriate prophylaxis and therapy, prevention of death from PE in pregnancy requires a high index of clinical suspicion followed by a timely and accurate diagnostic approach. To provide guidance on this important health issue, a multidisciplinary panel of major medical stakeholders was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In formulation of the recommended diagnostic algorithm, the important outcomes were defined to be diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic yield; the panel placed a high value on minimizing cumulative radiation dose when determining the recommended sequence of tests. Overall, the quality of the underlying evidence for all recommendations was rated as very low or low with some of the evidence considered for recommendations extrapolated from studies of the general population. Despite the low quality evidence, strong recommendations were made for three specific scenarios: performance of chest radiography (CXR) as the first radiation-associated procedure; use of lung scintigraphy as the preferred test in the setting of a normal CXR; and performance of computed-tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) rather than digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in a pregnant woman with a nondiagnostic ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) result. The recommendations presented in this guideline are based upon the currently available evidence; availability of new clinical research data and development and dissemination of new technologies will necessitate a revision and update. © RSNA, 2011

  2. Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guideline on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Frances; Memtsoudis, Stavros; Krishna Ramachandran, Satya; Nagappa, Mahesh; Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Patrawala, Sara; Lam, David; Kumar, Anjana; Joshi, Girish P; Fleetham, John; Ayas, Najib; Collop, Nancy; Doufas, Anthony; Eikermann, Matthias; Englesakis, Marina; Gali, Bhargavi; Gay, Peter; Hernandes, Adrian; Kaw, Roop; Kezirian, Eric; Malhotra, Atul; Mokhlesi, Babak; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Stierer, Tracey; Wappler, Frank; Hillman, David R; Auckley, Dennis

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients' conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  3. An Update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation (PE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Shindel, Alan W; Adaikan, P Ganesan; Becher, Edgardo; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne JG; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and partner, assessment, and pharmacological, psychological, and combined treatments. It concluded by recognizing the continually evolving nature of clinical research and recommended a subsequent guideline review and revision every fourth year. Consistent with that recommendation, the ISSM organized a second multidisciplinary panel of experts in April 2013, which met for 2 days in Bangalore, India. This manuscript updates the previous guidelines and reports on the recommendations of the panel of experts. Aim The aim of this study was to develop clearly worded, practical, evidenced-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of PE for family practice clinicians as well as sexual medicine experts. Method A comprehensive literature review was performed. Results This article contains the report of the second ISSM PE Guidelines Committee. It offers a new unified definition of PE and updates the previous treatment recommendations. Brief assessment procedures are delineated, and validated diagnostic and treatment questionnaires are reviewed. Finally, the best practices treatment recommendations are presented to guide clinicians, both familiar and unfamiliar with PE, in facilitating treatment of their patients. Conclusion Development of guidelines is an evolutionary process that continually reviews data and incorporates the best new research. We expect that ongoing research will lead to a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology as well as new efficacious and safe treatments for this sexual dysfunction. We again recommend that these guidelines be reevaluated and updated by the ISSM in 4 years. Althof SE, McMahon CG, Waldinger MD, Serefoglu EC, Shindel AW, Adaikan PG

  4. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  5. [Endoprosthesis Infections - Guidelines for Antibiotic Therapy Common Guidelines of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology and the Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, D; Balejová, M; Horníková, M; Chrdle, A; Mallátová, N; Nyč, O; Chmelík, V; Gallo, J; Jahoda, D; Stehlík, J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This study aims to articulate regional guidelines for curative and suppressive antibiotic therapy of total joint replacement infections. MATERIAL AND METHODS When developing the standard, used as source materials were the published foreign guidelines for antibiotic therapy of prosthetic joint infections, the analysis of resistance of bacterial strains conducted in the Hospital in České Budějovice, a.s. and the assessment of strain resistance for the Czech Republic published by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net). Considered was also the availability of individual antibiotics in the Czech Republic and restricted prescription according to the Summary of Product Characteristics as specified in the State Institute for Drug Control marketing authorisation. The expert group composed of orthopaedists, microbiologists and infectious disease specialists elaborated the basic antibiotic guideline for choosing an appropriate antibiotic/antifungal drug based on the usual susceptibility, its dose and dosage interval for initial and continuation therapy. The comments of individual specialists were gradually incorporated therein and in case of doubts majority rule was applied. The drafted document was sent for peer reviews to clinical orthopaedic, infectious disease and microbiological centres, whose comments were also incorporated and the finalised document was submitted for evaluation to specialised medical societies. RESULTS The outcome is the submitted guideline for antibiotic curative and suppressive therapy suitable for managing the prosthetic joint infections, which was approved by the committee of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology andthe Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně. DISCUSION Curative therapy of total joint replacement infections consists primarily in surgical treatment and has to be accompanied by adequate antibiotic therapy administered

  6. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - First Revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.Y.K. van den Bergh; R.D.M. Hadden; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation, and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) have been previously published in European Journal of Neurology and Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System. Objectives: To revise these guidelines. M

  7. Diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralnek, Ian M; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel; Sanders, David S; Kurien, Matthew; Rotondano, Gianluca; Hucl, Tomas; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Marmo, Riccardo; Racz, Istvan; Arezzo, Alberto; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Lesur, Gilles; de Franchis, Roberto; Aabakken, Lars; Veitch, Andrew; Radaelli, Franco; Salgueiro, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Maia, Luís; Zullo, Angelo; Cipolletta, Livio; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH). Main Recommendations MR1. ESGE recommends immediate assessment of hemodynamic status in patients who present with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH), with prompt intravascular volume replacement initially using crystalloid fluids if hemodynamic instability exists (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR2. ESGE recommends a restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy that aims for a target hemoglobin between 7 g/dL and 9 g/dL. A higher target hemoglobin should be considered in patients with significant co-morbidity (e. g., ischemic cardiovascular disease) (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR3. ESGE recommends the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS) for pre-endoscopy risk stratification. Outpatients determined to be at very low risk, based upon a GBS score of 0 - 1, do not require early endoscopy nor hospital admission. Discharged patients should be informed of the risk of recurrent bleeding and be advised to maintain contact with the discharging hospital (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR4. ESGE recommends initiating high dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPI), intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion (80 mg then 8 mg/hour), in patients presenting with acute UGIH awaiting upper endoscopy. However, PPI infusion should not delay the performance of early endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR5. ESGE does not recommend the routine use of nasogastric or orogastric aspiration/lavage in patients presenting with acute UGIH (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR6. ESGE recommends intravenous erythromycin (single dose, 250 mg given 30 - 120 minutes prior to upper gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) in patients with clinically severe

  8. Cancer screening in the United States, 2016: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A; Andrews, Kimberly; Brooks, Durado; DeSantis, Carol E; Fedewa, Stacey A; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Each year the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, we summarize current ACS cancer screening guidelines, including the update of the breast cancer screening guideline, discuss quality issues in colorectal cancer screening and new developments in lung cancer screening, and provide the latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey.

  9. European Society of Contact Dermatitis guideline for diagnostic patch testing -- recommendations on best practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeanne D; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Agner, Tove

    2015-01-01

    The present guideline summarizes all aspects of patch testing for the diagnosis of contact allergy in patients suspected of suffering, or having been suffering, from allergic contact dermatitis or other delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and mucosal conditions. Sections with brief descriptions...... and discussions of different pertinent topics are followed by a highlighted short practical recommendation. Topics comprise, after an introduction with important definitions, materials, technique, modifications of epicutaneous testing, individual factors influencing the patch test outcome or necessitating special...

  10. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spada, Cristiano; Barbaro, Federico; Petruzziello, Lucio [Catholic University, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Rome (Italy); Stoker, Jaap; Haan, Margriet C. de [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alarcon, Onofre [Universidad de La Laguna, Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Facultad de Medicina, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bellini, Davide; Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza University of Rome, I.C.O.T. Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy); Bretthauer, Michael [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Health Economy and Health Management, University of Oslo, and Department of Transplantation Medicine, Gastroenterology Unit, Oslo (Norway); Dumonceau, Jean-Marc [Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferlitsch, Monika [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vienna (Austria); Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Plumb, Andrew; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hellstrom, Mikael [Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Kuipers, Ernst J. [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lefere, Philippe [Virtual Colonoscopy Teaching Centre, Hooglede (Belgium); AZ Delta, Roeselare (Belgium); Mang, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Neri, Emanuele [University of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo-Torino (Italy); Hassan, Cesare [Catholic University, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Rome (Italy); Ospedale Nuovo Regina Margherita, Department of Gastroenterology, Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-03

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality [1, 2]. CRC screening by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) has been shown to reduce CRC mortality [3, 4], and is currently used in several European countries. Colonoscopy is highly effective for detecting advanced neoplasia, and endoscopic polypectomy reduces subsequent CRCspecific incidence and mortality [5]. In Europe, colonoscopy is mainly used to investigate FOBT-positive or symptomatic patients, or as a preventive strategy in those with increased CRC risk [6]. Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that is highly accurate for detecting colorectal cancer (CRC) and adenomatous polyps. The technique is standardized [7], and CTC is more easily performed than barium enema. Evidence-based data suggest that CTC is the natural replacement for barium enema and a complementary rather than an alternative examination to colonoscopy. However, the clinical scenarios for which CTC is indicated remain unclear. To address this uncertainty - 20 years after the first presentation of CTC at a radiological meeting [8] - the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) decided to produce a common guideline regarding indications for CTC in clinical practice. Technical and quality issues of CTC have been deliberately excluded from this work as these have already been discussed separately [7].

  11. Practice guidelines for the therapy of essential thrombocythemia. A statement from the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Gugliotta, Luigi;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Italian Society of Hematology (SIE) and the two affiliated Societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned a project to develop guidelines for the therapy of essential thrombocythemia (ET) using evidence-based knowledge and consensus formation techniques. DESIGN AND METHODS...

  12. Guidelines for the intravenous application of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (alteplase), the second edition, October 2012: a guideline from the Japan Stroke Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kimura, Kazumi; Kondo, Rei; Mori, Etsuro; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Tanahashi, Norio; Yasaka, Masahiro; Katayama, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Susumu; Ogawa, Akira; Sasaki, Makoto; Suga, Sadao; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2013-07-01

    In Japan, intravenous alteplase, a recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), was approved for an indication of ischemic stroke in 2005 on the basis of the results of a clinical trial with a unique dose of the drug (0.6 mg/kg). The Japan Stroke Society published the guidelines for intravenous application of rt-PA and organized training sessions for proper use all over Japan in an effort to promote the safe, widespread use of intravenous alteplase. Seven years following its approval, clinical experience with intravenous alteplase has accumulated, additional evidence of intravenous alteplase has been found in Japan and overseas, and the medical environment has substantially changed, including approvals for new drugs and medical devices. Notably, the use of alteplase in the extended therapeutic time window (within 4.5 hours of symptom onset) became covered by insurance in Japan in August 2012. To address these changing situations, we have decided to prepare the revised guidelines. In preparing the second edition, we took care to make its contents more practical by emphasizing information needed in clinical practice. While the first edition was developed with emphasis on safety in light of limited clinical experience with intravenous alteplase in Japan in 2005, this second edition is a substantial revision of the first edition mainly in terms of eligibility criteria, on the basis of accumulated evidence and the clinical experience.

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulin G in women with reproductive failure: The Korean Society for Reproductive Immunology practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nayoung; Han, Ae Ra; Park, Chan Woo; Park, Dong Wook; Park, Joon Cheol; Kim, Na Young; Lim, Kyung Sil; Shin, Ji Eun; Joo, Chang Woo; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Jae Won; Lee, Sung Ki

    2017-03-01

    The task force of the Korean Society for Reproductive Immunology recommends intravenous immunoglobulin G treatment in women with reproductive failure, including recurrent pregnancy loss and/or repeated implantation failure, who show cellular immune factors such as abnormal natural killer cell levels, natural killer cell cytotoxicity, and/or type 1 T helper immunity.

  14. European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Stergiou, George; O'Brien, Eoin; Asmar, Roland; Beilin, Lawrence; Bilo, Grzegorz; Clement, Denis; de la Sierra, Alejandro; de Leeuw, Peter; Dolan, Eamon; Fagard, Robert; Graves, John; Head, Geoffrey A; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Lurbe, Empar; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mengden, Thomas; Myers, Martin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M; Shennan, Andrew; Staessen, Jan A; vanMontfrans, Gert; Verdecchia, Paolo; Waeber, Bernard; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in both clinical practice and hypertension research, a group of scientists, participating in the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability, in year 2013 published

  15. Diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: Movement Disorder Society Task Force guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvan, I.; Goldman, J.G.; Tröster, A.I.; Schmand, B.A.; Weintraub, D.; Petersen, R.C.; Mollenhauer, B.; Adler, C.H.; Marder, K.; Williams-Gray, C.H.; Aarsland, D.; Kulisevsky, J.; Rodriguez-Oroz, M.C.; Burn, D.J.; Barker, R.A.; Emre, M.

    2012-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment is common in nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and may be a harbinger of dementia. In view of its importance, the Movement Disorder Society commissioned a task force to delineate diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in PD. The proposed diagnostic cr

  16. A critical review of the American Pain Society clinical practice guidelines for interventional techniques: part 2. Therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Datta, Sukdeb; Gupta, Sanjeeva; Munglani, Rajesh; Bryce, David A; Ward, Stephen P; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Sharma, Manohar Lal; Helm, Standiford; Fellows, Bert; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are a constructive response to the reality that practicing physicians require assistance in assimilating and applying the exponentially expanding, often contradictory, body of medical knowledge. They attempt to define practices that meet the needs of most patients under most circumstances. Ideally, specific clinical recommendations contained within practice guidelines are systematically developed by expert panels who have access to all the available evidence, have an understanding of the clinical problem, and have clinical experience with the procedure being assessed, as well as knowledge of relevant research methods. The recent development of American Pain Society (APS) guidelines has created substantial controversy because of their perceived lack of objective analysis and recommendations perceived to be biased due to conflicts of interest. To formally and carefully assess the APS guidelines' evidence synthesis for low back pain for therapeutic interventions using the same methodology utilized by the APS authors. The interventions examined were therapeutic interventions for managing low back pain, including epidural injections, adhesiolysis, facet joint interventions, and spinal cord stimulation. A literature search by 2 authors was carried out utilizing appropriate databases from 1966 through July 2008. Articles in which conflicts arose were reviewed and mediated by a third author to arrive at a consensus. Selections of manuscripts and methodologic quality assessment was also performed by at least 2 authors utilizing the same criteria applied in the APS guidelines. The guideline reassessment process included the evaluation of individual studies and systematic reviews and their translation into practice recommendations. The conclusions of APS and our critical assessment based on grading of good, fair, and poor, agreed that there is fair evidence for spinal cord stimulation in post lumbar surgery syndrome, and poor evidence for lumbar

  17. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this ev......Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim...... of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anaesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE...

  18. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evi......Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim...... of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE...

  19. Guidelines for the recording and evaluation of pharmaco-sleep studies in man: the International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Marc; Wilson, Frederick J; Roth, Thomas; Ruigt, Gé S F; Anderer, Peter; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M; Bes, Frederik W; Brunovsky, Martin; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Freeman, Jon; van Gerven, Joop M A; Gruber, Georg; Kemp, Bob; Klösch, Gerhard; Ma, Junshui; Penzel, Thomas; Peterson, Barry T; Schulz, Hartmut; Staner, Luc; Saletu, Bernd; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG) presents guidelines summarising the requirements for the recording and computerised evaluation of pharmaco-sleep data in man. Over the past years, technical and data-processing methods have advanced steadily, thus enhancing data quality and expanding the palette of sleep assessment tools that can be used to investigate the activity of drugs on the central nervous system (CNS), determine the time course of effects and pharmacodynamic properties of novel therapeutics, hence enabling the study of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, and evaluate the CNS penetration or toxicity of compounds. However, despite the presence of robust guidelines on the scoring of polysomnography -recordings, a review of the literature reveals inconsistent -aspects in the operating procedures from one study to another. While this fact does not invalidate results, the lack of standardisation constitutes a regrettable shortcoming, especially in the context of drug development programmes. The present guidelines are intended to assist investigators, who are using pharmaco-sleep measures in clinical research, in an effort to provide clear and concise recommendations and thereby to standardise methodology and facilitate comparability of data across laboratories. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Guidelines for the recording and evaluation of pharmaco-EEG data in man: the International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Marc; Wilson, Frederick J; Ruigt, Gé S F; Brunovsky, Martin; Prichep, Leslie S; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M

    2012-01-01

    The International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG) presents updated guidelines summarising the requirements for the recording and computerised evaluation of pharmaco-EEG data in man. Since the publication of the first pharmaco-EEG guidelines in 1982, technical and data processing methods have advanced steadily, thus enhancing data quality and expanding the palette of tools available to investigate the action of drugs on the central nervous system (CNS), determine the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of novel therapeutics and evaluate the CNS penetration or toxicity of compounds. However, a review of the literature reveals inconsistent operating procedures from one study to another. While this fact does not invalidate results per se, the lack of standardisation constitutes a regrettable shortcoming, especially in the context of drug development programmes. Moreover, this shortcoming hampers reliable comparisons between outcomes of studies from different laboratories and hence also prevents pooling of data which is a requirement for sufficiently powering the validation of novel analytical algorithms and EEG-based biomarkers. The present updated guidelines reflect the consensus of a global panel of EEG experts and are intended to assist investigators using pharmaco-EEG in clinical research, by providing clear and concise recommendations and thereby enabling standardisation of methodology and facilitating comparability of data across laboratories. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. 2016 Guidelines for the management of thyroid storm from The Japan Thyroid Association and Japan Endocrine Society (First edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tetsurou; Isozaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Wakino, Shu; Iburi, Tadao; Tsuboi, Kumiko; Kanamoto, Naotetsu; Otani, Hajime; Furukawa, Yasushi; Teramukai, Satoshi; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-12-30

    Thyroid storm is an endocrine emergency which is characterized by multiple organ failure due to severe thyrotoxicosis, often associated with triggering illnesses. Early suspicion, prompt diagnosis and intensive treatment will improve survival in thyroid storm patients. Because of its rarity and high mortality, prospective intervention studies for the treatment of thyroid storm are difficult to carry out. We, the Japan Thyroid Association and Japan Endocrine Society taskforce committee, previously developed new diagnostic criteria and conducted nationwide surveys for thyroid storm in Japan. Detailed analyses of clinical data from 356 patients revealed that the mortality in Japan was still high (∼11%) and that multiple organ failure and acute heart failure were common causes of death. In addition, multimodal treatment with antithyroid drugs, inorganic iodide, corticosteroids and beta-adrenergic antagonists has been suggested to improve mortality of these patients. Based on the evidence obtained by nationwide surveys and additional literature searches, we herein established clinical guidelines for the management of thyroid storm. The present guideline includes 15 recommendations for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis and organ failure in the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, and hepato-gastrointestinal tract, admission criteria for the intensive care unit, and prognostic evaluation. We also proposed preventive approaches to thyroid storm, roles of definitive therapy, and future prospective trial plans for the treatment of thyroid storm. We hope that this guideline will be useful for many physicians all over the world as well as in Japan in the management of thyroid storm and the improvement of its outcome.

  2. Pharmacological Management of Chronic Neuropathic Pain – Consensus Statement and Guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Moulin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NeP, generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin. Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP.

  3. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guideline: the use of electrosurgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J F; Beilenhoff, U; Neumann, C S; Dumonceau, J M

    2010-09-01

    Electrosurgery is used in the majority of endoscopic therapeutic procedures. An understanding of the fundamental electrosurgical principles and various settings available on electrosurgical units is essential for the safe and effective use of electrosurgery during endoscopy. The aims of these technical guidelines are to: (1) expose physical principles relevant to the understanding of electrosurgery during endoscopy; (2) describe and provide practical recommendations regarding electrosurgical units that are commonly in use; (3) discuss the clinical relevance of technologies recently implemented in newer electrosurgical units; and (4) review factors relevant to commonly performed therapeutic procedures, including polypectomy, sphincterotomy, contact thermal hemostasis, and argon plasma coagulation.

  4. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines for the diagnosis of coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, S; Koletzko, S; Korponay-Szabó, I R

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease (CD) from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) were published in 1990. Since then, the autoantigen in CD, tissue transglutaminase, has been identified; the perception of CD has changed from that of a rather...... uncommon enteropathy to a common multiorgan disease strongly dependent on the haplotypes human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8; and CD-specific antibody tests have improved....

  5. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jonathan P; Hallstrand, Teal S; Mastronarde, John G; Kaminsky, David A; Rundell, Kenneth W; Hull, James H; Storms, William W; Weiler, John M; Cheek, Fern M; Wilson, Kevin C; Anderson, Sandra D

    2013-05-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) describes acute airway narrowing that occurs as a result of exercise. EIB occurs in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma, but may also occur in individuals without known asthma. To provide clinicians with practical guidance, a multidisciplinary panel of stakeholders was convened to review the pathogenesis of EIB and to develop evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of EIB. The evidence was appraised and recommendations were formulated using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Recommendations for the treatment of EIB were developed. The quality of evidence supporting the recommendations was variable, ranging from low to high. A strong recommendation was made for using a short-acting β(2)-agonist before exercise in all patients with EIB. For patients who continue to have symptoms of EIB despite the administration of a short-acting β(2)-agonist before exercise, strong recommendations were made for a daily inhaled corticosteroid, a daily leukotriene receptor antagonist, or a mast cell stabilizing agent before exercise. The recommendations in this Guideline reflect the currently available evidence. New clinical research data will necessitate a revision and update in the future.

  6. Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamič, M; Pavlović, M D; Troilius Rubin, A; Palmetun-Ekbäck, M; Boixeda, P

    2015-09-01

    Lasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. These guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. Lasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Value of American Thoracic Society guidelines in predicting infection or colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms in critically ill patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence rate of infection by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs can affect the accuracy of etiological diagnosis when using American Thoracic Society (ATS guidelines. We determined the accuracy of the ATS guidelines in predicting infection or colonization by MDROs over 18 months at a single ICU in eastern China. METHODS: This prospective observational study examined consecutive patients who were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU in Nanjing, China. MDROs were defined as bacteria that were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii. Screening for MDROs was performed at ICU admission and discharge. Risk factors for infection or colonization with MDROs were recorded, and the accuracy of the ATS guidelines in predicting infection or colonization with MDROs was documented. RESULTS: There were 610 patients, 225 (37% of whom were colonized or infected with MDROs at ICU admission, and this increased to 311 (51% at discharge. At admission, the sensitivity (70.0%, specificity (31.6%, positive predictive value (38.2%, and negative predictive value (63.5%, all based on ATS guidelines for infection or colonization with MDROs were low. The negative predictive value was greater in patients from departments with MDRO infection rates of 31-40% than in patients from departments with MDRO infection rates of 30% or less and from departments with MDRO infection rates more than 40%. CONCLUSION: ATS criteria were not reliable in predicting infection or colonization with MDROs in our ICU. The negative predictive value was greater in patients from departments with intermediate rates of MDRO infection than in patients from departments with low or high rates of MDRO infection. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01667991.

  8. Cancer screening in the United States, 2017: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A; Andrews, Kimberly S; Brooks, Durado; Fedewa, Stacey A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Each year, the American Cancer Society publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, the authors summarize current American Cancer Society cancer screening guidelines, describe an update of their guideline for using human papillomavirus vaccination for cancer prevention, describe updates in US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for breast and colorectal cancer screening, discuss interim findings from the UK Collaborative Trial on Ovarian Cancer Screening, and provide the latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:100-121. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines on the prevention and management of metabolic diseases in HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Battegay, M; Behrens, G

    2008-01-01

    on an individual's absolute risk of ischaemic heart disease and should be comprehensive in nature. Lifestyle interventions should focus on counselling to stop smoking, modify diet and take regular exercise. A healthy diet, exercise and maintaining normal body weight tend to reduce dyslipidaemia; if not effective......-infected persons should be screened at regular intervals for a history of metabolic disease, dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and alteration of body composition; cardiovascular risk and renal function should also be assessed. Efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease will vary in intensity depending....... Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension follow guidelines used in the general population. When using medical interventions to prevent and/or treat metabolic disease(s), impairment of the efficacy of ART should be avoided by considering the possibility of pharmacokinetic...

  10. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Bai, Julio C; Biagi, Federico; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Ciclitira, Paul J; Green, Peter H R; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Holdoway, Anne; van Heel, David A; Kaukinen, Katri; Leffler, Daniel A; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E A; McGough, Norma; Davidson, Mike; Murray, Joseph A; Swift, Gillian L; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD. PMID:24917550

  11. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Bai, Julio C; Biagi, Federico; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Ciclitira, Paul J; Green, Peter H R; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Holdoway, Anne; van Heel, David A; Kaukinen, Katri; Leffler, Daniel A; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E A; McGough, Norma; Davidson, Mike; Murray, Joseph A; Swift, Gillian L; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S

    2014-08-01

    A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD.

  12. Guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Editorial Office of Asian Agricultural Research Asian Agricultural Research, Agricultural Economist and Research Fellow, Sharon, Standing Director of Association of Agricultural Science Societies, 545 Pawtucket Ave. Suite 300A, Pawtucket, RI 02860, USA

  13. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...... in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications....

  14. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Guidelines on Endovascular Treatment in Aortoiliac Arterial Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Michele, E-mail: michele.rossi@uniroma1.it [Sant’Andrea University Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Iezzi, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.iezzi.md@gmail.com [“Sacro Cuore” Catholic University, Radiology Department (Italy)

    2013-11-06

    PurposeThese guidelines are intended for use in assessing the standard for technical success and safety in aorto-iliac percutaneous endovascular interventions.MethodsAny recommendation contained in the text comes from the highest level and extension of literature review available to date.ResultsThe success of endovascular procedures is strictly related to an accurate planning based mainly on CT- or MR-angiography. TASC II A through C lesions have an endovascular-first option Pre-procedure ASA antiplatelet therapy is advisable in all cases. The application of stents improves the immediate hemodynamic and most likely long-term clinical results. Cumulative mean complication rate is 7.51 % according to the most relevant literature. Most of the complications can be managed by means of percutaneous techniques.ConclusionThe design and quality of devices, as well as the easy and accuracy of performing these procedures, have improved over the last decades, leading to the preferential treatment of aorto-iliac steno-obstructive disease via endovascular means, often as first-line therapy, with high technical success rate and low morbidity. This is mirrored by the decreasing number of patients undergoing surgical grafts over the last years with patency, limb salvage, and survival rates equivalent to open reconstruction.

  15. The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update: focus on rehabilitation and exercise and surgical coronary revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve E; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert S; Nigam, Anil; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Van Le, Vy; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides focused discussions on the management recommendations on 2 topics: (1) exercise and rehabilitation; and (2) surgical coronary revascularization in patients with heart failure. First, all patients with stable New York Heart Association class I-III symptoms should be considered for enrollment in a tailored exercise training program, to improve exercise tolerance and quality of life. Second, selected patients with suitable coronary anatomy should be considered for bypass graft surgery. As in previous updates, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2013 Update also includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers manage their patients with heart failure.

  16. Primary care summary of the British Thoracic Society Guideline on the management of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adam T; Pasteur, Mark; Cornford, Charles; Welham, Sally; Bilton, Diana

    2011-06-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) has recently published a guideline for the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis in children and adults. This paper summarises the key recommendations applicable to the primary care setting. The key points are: • Think of the diagnosis of bronchiectasis in adults and children who present with a chronic productive cough or unexplained haemoptysis, and in children with asthma which responds poorly to treatment; • High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scanning is needed to confirm the diagnosis • Sputum culture should be obtained at the start of an exacerbation prior to initiating treatment with antibiotics; Treatment should be started whilst awaiting the sputum result and should be continued for 14 days; • Patients with bronchiectasis have significant morbidity. Management in primary care is aimed at improving morbidity, and includes; patient education, treatment and monitoring, as well as appropriate referral to secondary care including assessment for long term antibiotics.

  17. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Risk Assessment and Management for Patients Who Undergo Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Parlow, Joel; MacDonald, Paul; Lyons, Kristin; McMullen, Michael; Srinathan, Sadeesh; Graham, Michelle; Tandon, Vikas; Styles, Kim; Bessissow, Amal; Sessler, Daniel I; Bryson, Gregory; Devereaux, P J

    2017-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines Committee and key Canadian opinion leaders believed there was a need for up to date guidelines that used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system of evidence assessment for patients who undergo noncardiac surgery. Strong recommendations included: 1) measuring brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal fragment of proBNP (NT-proBNP) before surgery to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation in patients who are 65 years of age or older, are 45-64 years of age with significant cardiovascular disease, or have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥ 1; 2) against performing preoperative resting echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiography, exercise or cardiopulmonary exercise testing, or pharmacological stress echocardiography or radionuclide imaging to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation; 3) against the initiation or continuation of acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of perioperative cardiac events, except in patients with a recent coronary artery stent or who will undergo carotid endarterectomy; 4) against α2 agonist or β-blocker initiation within 24 hours before surgery; 5) withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker starting 24 hours before surgery; 6) facilitating smoking cessation before surgery; 7) measuring daily troponin for 48 to 72 hours after surgery in patients with an elevated NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery or if there is no NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery, in those who have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥1, age 45-64 years with significant cardiovascular disease, or age 65 years or older; and 8) initiating of long-term acetylsalicylic acid and statin therapy in patients who suffer myocardial injury/infarction after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. S3-Guideline on allergy prevention: 2014 update: Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and the German Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Torsten; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Beyer, Kirsten; Bufe, Albrecht; Friedrichs, Frank; Gieler, Uwe; Gronke, Gerald; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hellermann, Mechthild; Kleinheinz, Andreas; Klimek, Ludger; Koletzko, Sibylle; Kopp, Matthias; Lau, Susanne; Müsken, Horst; Reese, Imke; Schmidt, Sabine; Schnadt, Sabine; Sitter, Helmut; Strömer, Klaus; Vagts, Jennifer; Vogelberg, Christian; Wahn, Ulrich; Werfel, Thomas; Worm, Margitta; Muche-Borowski, Cathleen

    The continued high prevalence of allergic diseases in Western industrialized nations combined with the limited options for causal therapy make evidence-based primary prevention necessary. The recommendations last published in the S3-guideline on allergy prevention in 2009 have been revised and a consensus reached on the basis of an up-to-date systematic literature search. Evidence was sought for the period between May 2008 and May 2013 in the Cochrane and MEDLINE electronic databases, as well as in the reference lists of recent review articles. In addition, experts were surveyed for their opinions. The relevance of retrieved literature was checked by means of two filter processes: firstly according to title and abstract, and secondly based on the full text of the articles. Included studies were given an evidence grade, and a bias potential (low/high) was specified for study quality. A formal consensus on the revised recommendations was reached by representatives of the relevant specialist societies and (self-help) organizations (nominal group process). Of 3,284 hits, 165 studies (one meta-analysis, 15 systematic reviews, 31 randomized controlled trials, 65 cohort studies, 12 case-control studies and 41 cross-sectional studies) were included and evaluated. Recommendations on the following remain largely unaltered: full breastfeeding for 4 months as a means of allergy prevention (hypoallergenic infant formula in the case of infants at risk); avoidance of overweight; fish consumption (during pregnancy/lactation and in the introduction of solid foods for infants); vaccination according to the recommendations of the German Standing Committee on Vaccination (Ständige Impfkommission, STIKO); avoidance of air pollutants and tobacco exposure and avoidance of indoor conditions conducive to the development of mold. The assertion that a reduction in house-dust mite allergen content as a primary preventive measure is not recommended also remains unchanged. The introduction of

  19. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty R; Temel, Jennifer S; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Firn, Janice I; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Phillips, Tanyanika; Stovall, Ellen L; Zimmermann, Camilla; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncology clinicians, patients, family and friend caregivers, and palliative care specialists to update the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care for all patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of members of the ASCO Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to develop an update. The 2012 PCO was based on a review of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the National Cancer Institute Physicians Data Query and additional trials. The panel conducted an updated systematic review seeking randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, as well as secondary analyses of RCTs in the 2012 PCO, published from March 2010 to January 2016. Results The guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Nine RCTs, one quasiexperimental trial, and five secondary analyses from RCTs in the 2012 PCO on providing palliative care services to patients with cancer and/or their caregivers, including family caregivers, were found to inform the update. Recommendations Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Referral of patients to interdisciplinary palliative care teams is optimal, and services may complement existing programs. Providers may refer family and friend caregivers of patients with early or advanced cancer to palliative care services.

  20. The UK joint specialist societies guideline on the diagnosis and management of acute meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in immunocompetent adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, F; Heyderman, R S; Michael, B D; Defres, S; Beeching, N J; Borrow, R; Glennie, L; Gaillemin, O; Wyncoll, D; Kaczmarski, E; Nadel, S; Thwaites, G; Cohen, J; Davies, N W S; Miller, A; Rhodes, A; Read, R C; Solomon, T

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis and meningococcal sepsis are rare conditions with high case fatality rates. Early recognition and prompt treatment saves lives. In 1999 the British Infection Society produced a consensus statement for the management of immunocompetent adults with meningitis and meningococcal sepsis. Since 1999 there have been many changes. We therefore set out to produce revised guidelines which provide a standardised evidence-based approach to the management of acute community acquired meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in adults. A working party consisting of infectious diseases physicians, neurologists, acute physicians, intensivists, microbiologists, public health experts and patient group representatives was formed. Key questions were identified and the literature reviewed. All recommendations were graded and agreed upon by the working party. The guidelines, which for the first time include viral meningitis, are written in accordance with the AGREE 2 tool and recommendations graded according to the GRADE system. Main changes from the original statement include the indications for pre-hospital antibiotics, timing of the lumbar puncture and the indications for neuroimaging. The list of investigations has been updated and more emphasis is placed on molecular diagnosis. Approaches to both antibiotic and steroid therapy have been revised. Several recommendations have been given regarding the follow-up of patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Breeding soundness evaluations of 3,648 yearling beef bulls using the 1993 Society for Theriogenology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S P; Spitzer, J C; Hopkins, F M; Higdon, H L; Bridges, W C

    2002-09-01

    Our objective was to perform a retrospective analysis of breeding soundness evaluations (BSEs) as classified by the 1993 Society for Theriogenology (SFT) guidelines [Chenoweth et al., Guidelines for using the bull breeding soundness evaluation form, in: Theriogenology Handbook, 1993, pp. B-10]. Data included BSE information obtained from five performance-testing stations in South Carolina (SC1, SC2, SC3) and Tennessee (TN1, TN2) from 1986 through 1999 on 3648 Angus, Brangus, Charolais, Chianina, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Polled Hereford, Santa Gertrudis, Simbrah, and Simmental bulls. Analyses were simplified by classifying all bulls as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory potential breeders. Of the 3648 bulls evaluated, 76.2% were classified as satisfactory potential breeders. Of all bulls evaluated, 4.0% were unsatisfactory due to inadequate spermatozoal motility, 7.0% due to inadequate spermatozoal morphology and 2.6% due to a combination of inadequate motility and morphology. Unsatisfactory classifications due to non-spermatozoal parameters out of all bulls were 10.2%, with 7.1% for inadequate scrotal circumference and 3.1% for physical abnormalities. For satisfactory and unsatisfactory bulls, respectively, means and standard deviations were 35.8 +/- 2.7 and 33.0 +/- 4.1 cm (P < 0.001) for scrotal circumference, 63 +/- 18 and 35 +/- 24% (P < 0.001) for percent motility, and 86 +/- 7 and 63 +/- 21% (P < 0.001) for percent normal morphology.

  2. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the KDIGO clinical practice guideline for CKD evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

    2015-02-01

    We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to 3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is 60mg/mmol or proteinuria with protein excretion > 1g/d as the referral threshold for proteinuria.

  3. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for chronic heart failure - A national survey of the cardiologists in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the awareness of and attitudes towards the 2005 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for Heart Failure (HF) of the cardiologists in Pakistan and assess barriers to adherence to guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in person from March to July 2009 to all cardiologists practicing in 4 major cities in Pakistan (Karachi, Lahore, Quetta and Peshawar). A validated, semi-structured questionnaire assessing ESC 2005 Guidelines for HF was used to obtain information from cardiologists. It included questions about awareness and relevance of HF guidelines (See Additional File 1). Respondents' management choices were compared with those of an expert panel based on the guidelines for three fictitious patient cases. Cardiologists were also asked about major barriers to adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 372 cardiologists were approached; 305 consented to participate (overall response rate, 82.0%). The survey showed a very high awareness of CHF guidelines; 97.4% aware of any guideline. About 13.8% considered ESC guidelines as relevant or very relevant for guiding treatment decisions while 92.8% chose AHA guidelines in relevance. 87.2% of respondents perceived that they adhered to the HF guidelines. For the patient cases, the proportions of respondents who made recommendations that completely matched those of the guidelines were 7% (Scenario 1), 0% (Scenario 2) and 20% (Scenario 3). Respondents considered patient compliance (59%) and cost/health economics (50%) as major barriers to guideline implementation. Conclusion We found important self reported departures from recommended HF management guidelines among cardiologists of Pakistan. PMID:22093082

  4. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines for chronic heart failure - A national survey of the cardiologists in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukat Sana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the awareness of and attitudes towards the 2005 European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines for Heart Failure (HF of the cardiologists in Pakistan and assess barriers to adherence to guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in person from March to July 2009 to all cardiologists practicing in 4 major cities in Pakistan (Karachi, Lahore, Quetta and Peshawar. A validated, semi-structured questionnaire assessing ESC 2005 Guidelines for HF was used to obtain information from cardiologists. It included questions about awareness and relevance of HF guidelines (See Additional File 1. Respondents' management choices were compared with those of an expert panel based on the guidelines for three fictitious patient cases. Cardiologists were also asked about major barriers to adherence to guidelines. Additional file 1 Questionnaire. Description: Questionnaire that was administered to participants. Click here for file Results A total of 372 cardiologists were approached; 305 consented to participate (overall response rate, 82.0%. The survey showed a very high awareness of CHF guidelines; 97.4% aware of any guideline. About 13.8% considered ESC guidelines as relevant or very relevant for guiding treatment decisions while 92.8% chose AHA guidelines in relevance. 87.2% of respondents perceived that they adhered to the HF guidelines. For the patient cases, the proportions of respondents who made recommendations that completely matched those of the guidelines were 7% (Scenario 1, 0% (Scenario 2 and 20% (Scenario 3. Respondents considered patient compliance (59% and cost/health economics (50% as major barriers to guideline implementation. Conclusion We found important self reported departures from recommended HF management guidelines among cardiologists of Pakistan.

  5. The role of vaginal cuff brachytherapy in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Block, Alec M; Siddiqui, Zaid A; Small, William

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the data, rationale, and recommendations of vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in the post-operative treatment of endometrial cancer patients. The authors performed a thorough review of the medical literature regarding the use of adjuvant VBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Relevant data are presented in this review. Additionally, personal and institutional practices from the authors are incorporated where relevant. VBT for the adjuvant treatment of early stage endometrial cancer patients results in a low rate of recurrence (0-3.1%) with very low rates of toxicity. PORTEC-2 supports the use of adjuvant VBT versus external beam radiotherapy specifically for high-intermediate risk endometrial cancer patients. VBT has low rates of acute and chronic gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity and very low rates of second primary malignancy. The primary toxicity of VBT is vaginal atrophy and stenosis with controversy regarding the use of vaginal dilators for prevention. Data support that patients prefer to be involved in the decision making process for their adjuvant therapy, and patients have a lower minimal desired benefit of adjuvant VBT than do physicians. Guidelines exist from the American Brachytherapy Society and American Society of Radiation Oncology with support from the Society for Gynecologic Oncologists regarding the use of adjuvant VBT. VBT decreases the risk of recurrence with minimal toxicity in the adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy should be discussed in a multi-disciplinary setting with detailed counseling of the risks and benefits with the patient so that she ultimately makes an informed decision regarding her adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of the Treatment Implications of American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 and Eighth Joint National Committee Guidelines: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Venkatesh L; Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D

    2014-08-01

    Multiple guidelines and statements related to hypertension have recently been published. Much discord has arisen from discrepant treatment and target systolic blood pressure thresholds for individuals aged 60 to 79 years of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013. We sought to evaluate the public health implications of these differences using data from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles. NHANES is an ongoing survey designed to allow characterization of the US population and subpopulations. We found that only .2.4% (95% confidence interval, 1.5.3.2%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years had indications for antihypertensive treatment under the more stringent American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 guideline but not under Eighth Joint National Committee. About 65.7% (95% confidence interval, 62.4.69.0%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years had indications for treatment under both guidelines. Furthermore, those with indications for treatment under American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 but not under Eighth Joint National Committee generally had higher systolic blood pressure and less favorable lipid profiles compared with those with indications for treatment under both guidelines. Importantly, a larger group, comprising 21.0% (95% confidence interval, 18.7.23.2%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years, had either untreated or inadequately treated hypertension and represents an important group for continued efforts.

  7. [Diagnostics and therapy of chronic stable coronary artery disease : new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, A; Sechtem, U

    2014-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease published in 2013 give practical recommendations for diagnostics and therapy. The approach depends on the clinical picture and symptoms of the patient, the severity and extent of ischemia, the degree and location of coronary stenoses, additional cardiac findings and finally on non-cardiac comorbidities. The selection of suitable diagnostic tools is based on the tabulated pretest probability for the presence of coronary artery disease which plays an important and central role in the diagnostic algorithm. An invasive approach is recommended only in patients with severe angina, i.e. a Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina grading scale of ≥ CCS3 or in patients who are at high risk for death or myocardial infarction based on the results of the test used for detection of ischemia. Detailed therapeutic recommendations are given for medicinal and interventional or surgical therapy. Medicinal therapy includes drugs both for relief of symptoms and prevention of cardiovascular events. Recommendations are also given for the use of new antianginal drugs. A PCI is only indicated in vessels causing ischemia which can be verified by using fractional flow reserve measurements. The indications for PCI now also include patients with a low SYNTAX score and multivessel disease or left main stenosis; however, the optimal strategy should be individually determined in heart team discussions.

  8. 1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on processes and skills for education in cardiology in Brazil--executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marcos Roberto de; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Köhler, Ilmar; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Schneider, Jamil Cherem; Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ferreira, João Fernando Monteiro; Morais, Nelson Siqueira de

    2012-02-01

    This article summarizes the "1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on Processes and Skills for Education in Cardiology in Brazil," which can be found in full at: . The guideline establishes the education time required in Internal Medicine and Cardiology with Specialization through theoretical and practical training. These requirements must be available at the center forming Specialists in Cardiology and the Cardiology contents.

  9. [Treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease--position statement of the Croatian Society for Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation and review of the KDIGO and ERPB guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rački, Sanjin; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar; Ljutić, Dragan; Lovčić, Vesna; Prkačin, Ingrid; Radić, Josipa; Vujičić, Božidar; Bubić, Ivan; Jakić, Marko; Belavić, Žarko; Sefer, Siniša; Pehai, Mario; Klarić, Dragan; Gulin, Marijana

    2014-04-01

    Renal anemia is the result of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and deteriorates with disease progression. Anemia may be the first sign of kidney disease. In all patients with anemia and CKD, diagnostic evaluation is required. Prior to diagnosing renal anemia, it is necessary to eliminate the other possible causes. Direct correlation between the concentration of hemoglobin and the stage of renal failure is well known. Early development of anemia is common in diabetic patients. Correction of anemia may slow the progression of CKD. Anemia is an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD. Treatment of anemia in patients with CKD is based on current guidelines. Recently, the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group has produced comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia in CKD patients and ERBP (European Renal Best Practice) group its position statement and comments on the KDIGO guidelines. The Croatian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation (HDNDT) has already published its own guidelines based on the recommendations and positive experience of European and international professional societies, as well as on own experience. The latest version of Croatian guidelines was published in 2008. Since then, on the basis of research and clinical practice, there have been numerous changes in the modern understanding of the treatment of anemia in CKD. Consequently, HDNDT hereby publishes a review of the recent recommendations of international professional societies, expressing the attitude about treating anemia in CKD as a basis for new guidelines tailored to the present time.

  10. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology Position Statement on Dyslipidemia Management: differences between the European and American Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention.

  11. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en.

  12. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-11-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention.

  13. [Spanish interdisciplinary committee for cardiovascular disease prevention and the spanish society of cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and american guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-04-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention.

  14. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: Figure 1 provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; Figure 2 illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; Figures 3-6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; Table 10 provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and Table 12 lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided.

  15. European Society of Cardiology 2009 guidelines for preoperative cardiac risk assessment and perioperative cardiac management in noncardiac surgery. Key messages for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne E. Hoeks

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing noncardiac surgery are at risk of adverse perioperative and long-term outcome. When considering a patient for noncardiac surgery, a careful preoperative clinical risk evaluation and subsequent risk-reduction strategies are essential to reduce postoperative complications. To assist physicians with decision making, clinical guidelines are developed. The aim of clinical guidelines is to improve patient care by providing recommendations about appropriate healthcare in specific circumstances. Development of clinical guidelines is an important component in improving the quality of care. By translating the best available scientific evidence into specific recommendations, guidelines can serve as a useful tool to achieve effective and efficient patient care. In 2009, the first European Society of Cardiology guidelines on perioperative care were developed. This decisionmaking process integrates clinical markers, early coronary evaluation, functional capacity, and the type of surgery involved.

  16. American Cancer Society Guidelines on nutrition and physical activity for cancer prevention: reducing the risk of cancer with healthy food choices and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Lawrence H; Doyle, Colleen; McCullough, Marji; Rock, Cheryl L; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Bandera, Elisa V; Gapstur, Susan; Patel, Alpa V; Andrews, Kimberly; Gansler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines to serve as a foundation for its communication, policy, and community strategies and, ultimately, to affect dietary and physical activity patterns among Americans. These Guidelines, published approximately every 5 years, are developed by a national panel of experts in cancer research, prevention, epidemiology, public health, and policy, and they reflect the most current scientific evidence related to dietary and activity patterns and cancer risk. The ACS Guidelines focus on recommendations for individual choices regarding diet and physical activity patterns, but those choices occur within a community context that either facilitates or creates barriers to healthy behaviors. Therefore, this committee presents recommendations for community action to accompany the 4 recommendations for individual choices to reduce cancer risk. These recommendations for community action recognize that a supportive social and physical environment is indispensable if individuals at all levels of society are to have genuine opportunities to choose healthy behaviors. The ACS Guidelines are consistent with guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association for the prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes, as well as for general health promotion, as defined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.

  17. Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of implantable cardiac electronic device infection. Report of a joint Working Party project on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC, host organization), British Heart Rhythm Society (BHRS), British Cardiovascular Society (BCS), British Heart Valve Society (BHVS) and British Society for Echocardiography (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoe, Jonathan A T; Barlow, Gavin; Chambers, John B; Gammage, Michael; Guleri, Achyut; Howard, Philip; Olson, Ewan; Perry, John D; Prendergast, Bernard D; Spry, Michael J; Steeds, Richard P; Tayebjee, Muzahir H; Watkin, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Infections related to implantable cardiac electronic devices (ICEDs), including pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, are increasing in incidence in the USA and are likely to increase in the UK, because more devices are being implanted. These devices have both intravascular and extravascular components and infection can involve the generator, device leads and native cardiac structures or various combinations. ICED infections can be life-threatening, particularly when associated with endocardial infection, and all-cause mortality of up to 35% has been reported. Like infective endocarditis, ICED infections can be difficult to diagnose and manage. This guideline aims to (i) improve the quality of care provided to patients with ICEDs, (ii) provide an educational resource for all relevant healthcare professionals, (iii) encourage a multidisciplinary approach to ICED infection management, (iv) promote a standardized approach to the diagnosis, management, surveillance and prevention of ICED infection through pragmatic evidence-rated recommendations, and (v) advise on future research projects/audit. The guideline is intended to assist in the clinical care of patients with suspected or confirmed ICED infection in the UK, to inform local infection prevention and treatment policies and guidelines and to be used in the development of educational and training material by the relevant professional societies. The questions covered by the guideline are presented at the beginning of each section.

  18. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age surgery when

  19. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO: 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lupo Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for

  20. [Treatment of arterial hypertension in pregnancy in relation to current guidelines of the Polish Society of Arterial Hypertension from 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2012-10-01

    Arterial hypertension concerns 7-10% of pregnancies and leads to an increased risk of complications for both, the mother and the child. This rate will probably rise in the years to come due to the notable tendency among women to delay the decision to become pregnant - values of blood pressure and occurrence of arterial hypertension increase with age, as well as due to the growing problem of obesity resulting from inappropriate dietary habits and lack of regular everyday physical activity. Difficulties with management of that clinical condition are partly related with lack of unified and widely accepted guidelines. Different opinions in the subject of terminology and classification of pregnancy hypertension or indications for pharmacotherapy as well as choice of the optimal antihypertensive drug, emerge from objective causes such as combination of various pathogenetic factors typical for arterial hypertension itself and those connected with pregnancy elsewhere stressed priorities of therapy from the point of view of the health of the mother and of the fetus, as well as lack of randomized clinical trials due to obvious ethical purposes, but also from the fact that pregnancy hypertension is a focus of attention for different specialists - obstetricians, hypertensiologists and perinatologists. A good cooperation regarding experience and information among all of these specializations would be the most beneficial for pregnant women and their children. Lack of new modern antihypertensive agents, safe and effective in pregnancy while the older ones are being withdrawn from the market as their production is no longer cost-effective for pharmacological companies, has become an increasing problem in many countries, and Poland among them. The aim of the following publication was to present the statement on management of pregnancy hypertension from the current guidelines of the Polish Society of Arterial Hypertension 2011 to gynecologists and obstetricians, with a commentary

  1. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  3. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in our knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  4. British Society of Gastroenterology/Association of Coloproctologists of Great Britain and Ireland guidelines for the management of large non-pedunculated colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Matthew D; Chattree, Amit; Barbour, Jamie A; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Bhandari, Pradeep; Saunders, Brian P; Veitch, Andrew M; Anderson, John; Rembacken, Bjorn J; Loughrey, Maurice B; Pullan, Rupert; Garrett, William V; Lewis, Gethin; Dolwani, Sunil

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide an evidence-based framework for the management of patients with large non-pedunculated colorectal polyps (LNPCPs), in addition to identifying key performance indicators (KPIs) that permit the audit of quality outcomes. These are areas not previously covered by British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) Guidelines.A National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) compliant BSG guideline development process was used throughout and the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool was used to structure the guideline development process. A systematic review of literature was conducted for English language articles up to May 2014 concerning the assessment and management of LNPCPs. Quality of evaluated studies was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist System. Proposed recommendation statements were evaluated by each member of the Guideline Development Group (GDG) on a scale from 1 (strongly agree) to 5 (strongly disagree) with >80% agreement required for consensus to be reached. Where consensus was not reached a modified Delphi process was used to re-evaluate and modify proposed statements until consensus was reached or the statement discarded. A round table meeting was subsequently held to finalise recommendations and to evaluate the strength of evidence discussed. The GRADE tool was used to assess the strength of evidence and strength of recommendation for finalised statements.KPIs, a training framework and potential research questions for the management of LNPCPs were also developed. It is hoped that these guidelines will improve the assessment and management of LNPCPs.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: the clinical utility of bronchoalveolar lavage cellular analysis in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Keith C; Raghu, Ganesh; Baughman, Robert P; Brown, Kevin K; Costabel, Ulrich; du Bois, Roland M; Drent, Marjolein; Haslam, Patricia L; Kim, Dong Soon; Nagai, Sonoko; Rottoli, Paola; Saltini, Cesare; Selman, Moisés; Strange, Charlie; Wood, Brent

    2012-05-01

    The clinical utility of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cell analysis for the diagnosis and management of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been a subject of debate and controversy. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) sponsored a committee of international experts to examine all relevant literature on BAL in ILD and provide recommendations concerning the use of BAL in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected ILD. To provide recommendations for (1) the performance and processing of BAL and (2) the interpretation of BAL nucleated immune cell patterns and other BAL characteristics in patients with suspected ILD. A pragmatic systematic review was performed to identify unique citations related to BAL in patients with ILD that were published between 1970 and 2006. The search was updated during the guideline development process to include published literature through March 2011. This is the evidence upon which the committee's conclusions and recommendations are based. Recommendations for the performance and processing of BAL, as well as the interpretation of BAL findings, were formulated by the committee. When used in conjunction with comprehensive clinical information and adequate thoracic imaging such as high-resolution computed tomography of the thorax, BAL cell patterns and other characteristics frequently provide useful information for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected ILD.

  6. Utilization of ancillary studies in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lester J. Layfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing and post-biopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussion of the draft document at several national and international meetings and synthesis of selected online comments of the draft document. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. Currently, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH appears to be the most clinically relevant ancillary technique for cytology of bile duct strictures. The addition of FISH analysis to routine cytologic evaluation appears to yield the highest sensitivity without loss in specificity. Loss of immunohistochemical staining for the protein product of the SMAD4 gene and positive staining for mesothelin support a diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical markers for endocrine and exocrine differentiation are sufficient for a diagnosis of endocrine and acinar tumors. Nuclear staining for beta-catenin supports a diagnosis of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm. Cyst fluid analysis for amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen aids in the pre-operative classification of pancreatic cysts. A number of gene mutations (KRAS, GNAS, von Hippel-Lindau, RNF43 and CTNNB1 may be of aid in the diagnosis of cystic neoplasms. Other ancillary techniques do not appear to improve diagnostic sensitivity sufficiently to justify their increased costs.

  7. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report. A Framework for Addressing Multimorbidity in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Disease, Critical Illness, and Sleep Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kevin C; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Boyd, Cynthia M; Brozek, Jan L; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Goodman, Richard A; Joo, Min J; Lareau, Suzanne; Mularski, Richard A; Patel, Minal R; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shanawani, Hasan; Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna; Sufian, Beth; Thomson, Carey C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-03-01

    Coexistence of multiple chronic conditions (i.e., multimorbidity) is the most common chronic health problem in adults. However, clinical practice guidelines have primarily focused on patients with a single disease, resulting in uncertainty about the care of patients with multimorbidity. The American Thoracic Society convened a workshop with the goal of establishing a strategy to address multimorbidity within clinical practice guidelines. In this Workshop Report, we describe a framework that addresses multimorbidity in each of the key steps of guideline development: topic selection, panel composition, identifying clinical questions, searching for and synthesizing evidence, rating the quality of that evidence, summarizing benefits and harms, formulating recommendations, and rating the strength of the recommendations. For the consideration of multimorbidity in guidelines to be successful and sustainable, the process must be both feasible and pragmatic. It is likely that this will be achieved best by the step-wise addition and refinement of the various components of the framework.

  8. American Society for Apheresis guidelines on the use of apheresis in clinical practice: practical, concise, evidence-based recommendations for the apheresis practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Jeffrey L

    2014-08-01

    The 6th Guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis in clinical practice published by the American Society of Apheresis provide practical, concise, and evidence based guidance for the apheresis medicine practitioner. The overall format of the Guidelines has remained unchanged with the 6th edition, compared to the 5th edition, with enhancements in the committee process of creating the guidelines. Because of changes in the writing committee structure, a number of changes have occurred in the ASFA category and recommendation grade for the use of apheresis in the treatment for a number of previously categorized clinical indications. In addition, eight new indications for apheresis, twenty three new clinical situations for previously categorized diseases, and ten new apheresis treatments for previously categorized disorders have been added. The 6th Guidelines continue to be an invaluable resource for those involved in apheresis medicine.

  9. The clinical assessment, treatment, and prevention of lyme disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and babesiosis: clinical practice guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Shapiro, Eugene D; Halperin, John J; Steere, Allen C; Klempner, Mark S; Krause, Peter J; Bakken, Johan S; Strle, Franc; Stanek, Gerold; Bockenstedt, Linda; Fish, Durland; Dumler, J Stephen; Nadelman, Robert B

    2006-11-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (formerly known as human granulocytic ehrlichiosis), and babesiosis were prepared by an expert panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous treatment guidelines published in 2000 (Clin Infect Dis 2000; 31[Suppl 1]:1-14). The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. For each of these Ixodes tickborne infections, information is provided about prevention, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. Tables list the doses and durations of antimicrobial therapy recommended for treatment and prevention of Lyme disease and provide a partial list of therapies to be avoided. A definition of post-Lyme disease syndrome is proposed.

  10. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2015 for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Okamoto, Aikou; Ito, Kiyoshi; Morishige, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Nao; Kaneuchi, Masanori; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The fourth edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer was published in 2015. The guidelines contain seven chapters and six flow charts. The major changes in this new edition are as follows-(1) the format has been changed from reviews to clinical questions (CQ), and the guidelines for optimal clinical practice in Japan are now shown as 41 CQs and answers; (2) the 'flow charts' have been improved and placed near the beginning of the guidelines; (3) the 'basic points', including tumor staging, histological classification, surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and palliative care, are described before the chapter; (4) the FIGO surgical staging of ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, and primary peritoneal cancer was revised in 2014 and the guideline has been revised accordingly to take the updated version of this classification into account; (5) the procedures for examination and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are described; (6) information on molecular targeting therapy has been added; (7) guidelines for the treatment of recurrent cancer based on tumor markers alone are described, as well as guidelines for providing hormone replacement therapy after treatment.

  11. Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines for atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities: management of asymptomatic disease and claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Michael S; Pomposelli, Frank B; Clair, Daniel G; Geraghty, Patrick J; McKinsey, James F; Mills, Joseph L; Moneta, Gregory L; Murad, M Hassan; Powell, Richard J; Reed, Amy B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) continues to grow in global prevalence and consumes an increasing amount of resources in the United States health care system. Overall rates of intervention for PAD have been rising steadily in recent years. Changing demographics, evolution of technologies, and an expanding database of outcomes studies are primary forces influencing clinical decision making in PAD. The management of PAD is multidisciplinary, involving primary care physicians and vascular specialists with varying expertise in diagnostic and treatment modalities. PAD represents a broad spectrum of disease from asymptomatic through severe limb ischemia. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Practice Guidelines committee reviewed the evidence supporting clinical care in the treatment of asymptomatic PAD and intermittent claudication (IC). The committee made specific practice recommendations using the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. There are limited Level I data available for many of the critical questions in the field, demonstrating the urgent need for comparative effectiveness research in PAD. Emphasis is placed on risk factor modification, medical therapies, and broader use of exercise programs to improve cardiovascular health and functional performance. Screening for PAD appears of unproven benefit at present. Revascularization for IC is an appropriate therapy for selected patients with disabling symptoms, after a careful risk-benefit analysis. Treatment should be individualized based on comorbid conditions, degree of functional impairment, and anatomic factors. Invasive treatments for IC should provide predictable functional improvements with reasonable durability. A minimum threshold of a >50% likelihood of sustained efficacy for at least 2 years is suggested as a benchmark. Anatomic patency (freedom from restenosis) is considered a prerequisite for sustained efficacy of revascularization in IC

  12. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma in Japan: Consensus-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines proposed by the Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH) 2010 updated version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Masatoshi; Izumi, Namiki; Kokudo, Norihiro; Matsui, Osamu; Sakamoto, Michiie; Nakashima, Osamu; Kojiro, Masamichi; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death not only in Japan but also worldwide. Clinical practice guidelines for HCC were first published in 2001 by the European Society of Study of the Liver (EASL) followed by the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) published in 2005 and updated in 2010. However, these guidelines have proven to be somewhat unsuitable for Japanese patients. In 2005, supported by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for HCC were compiled in Japan. In 2009, a revised version of evidence-based guidelines was published. Based on both 'evidence-based' guidelines and the consensus of an expert panel on HCC, the Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH) published the Consensus-Based Clinical Practice Manual in 2007 and updated in 2010. In this article, the 2010 updated version of this manual, especially issues on prevention, surveillance, pathology, diagnosis, staging, and treatment algorithm are summarized.

  13. Validation of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines risk prediction model for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesendorp, Pieter A; Schinkel, Arend F L; Liebregts, Max; Theuns, Dominic A M J; van Cleemput, Johan; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Willems, Rik; Michels, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The recently released 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) use a new clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death (SCD), based on the HCM Risk-SCD study. Our study is the first external and independent validation of this new risk prediction model. The study population consisted of a consecutive cohort of 706 patients with HCM without prior SCD event, from 2 tertiary referral centers. The primary end point was a composite of SCD and appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, identical to the HCM Risk-SCD end point. The 5-year SCD risk was calculated using the HCM Risk-SCD formula. Receiver operating characteristic curves and C-statistics were calculated for the 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines, and risk stratification methods of the 2003 American College of Cardiology/European Society of Cardiology guidelines and 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines. During follow-up of 7.7±5.3 years, SCD occurred in 42 (5.9%) of 706 patients (ages 49±16 years; 34% women). The C-statistic of the new model was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.57-0.82; P=0.008), which performed significantly better than the conventional risk factor models based on the 2003 guidelines (C-statistic of 0.55: 95% CI, 0.47-0.63; P=0.3), and 2011 guidelines (C-statistic of 0.60: 95% CI, 0.50-0.70; P=0.07). The HCM Risk-SCD model improves the risk stratification of patients with HCM for primary prevention of SCD, and calculating an individual risk estimate contributes to the clinical decision-making process. Improved risk stratification is important for the decision making before implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for the primary prevention of SCD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  15. Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  17. Management of pulmonary nodules in head and neck cancer patients - Our experience and interpretation of the British Thoracic Society Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard; King, Matthew; Reid, Helen; Murchison, John T; Evans, Andrew; Nixon, Iain J

    2017-08-01

    and purpose of the study: The frequency of lung nodules in the head and neck cancer population is unknown, currently the only guidance available recommends following local policy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pulmonary nodules in our head and neck cancer group and interpret the recently updated British Thoracic Society (BTS) Lung Nodule Guidelines in a head and neck cancer setting. 100 patients were diagnosed with head and neck cancer between July 2013-March 2014, clinico-pathological, demographic and radiological data was extracted from the electronic records. Images with lung findings were re-reviewed by a single consultant radiologist for patients with lung pathology on the initial staging CT report. Twenty patients (20%) had discreet pulmonary findings on CT. Eleven (11%) had lung nodules, 6 (6%) had lesions suspicious for metastasis and 3 (3%) had co-incidental bronchogenic primary cancers. These patients were re-imaged between 6 and 18 months and in 1 patient the previously identified 7 mm nodule had progressed to 16 mm at 1 year. There was no set follow up imaging protocol used. The MDT in NHS Lothian has reviewed the BTS guidance and now has a local policy for the management of lung nodules in head and neck cancer patients. Lung Nodules in the head and neck cancer population are common >10%. Higher risk patients with larger nodules should be risk assessed with validated assessment tools. PET-CT has a place in the assessment of lung nodules when risk of malignancy is high. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading - a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kasper D; Thomsen, Frederik B; Nerstrøm, Camilla; Røder, Martin A; Iversen, Peter; Toft, Birgitte G; Vainer, Ben; Brasso, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers previously graded as Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) are now considered as 7 (3 + 4). A matched-pair analysis was conducted. In all, 215 patients with Gleason score 6 or 7 (3 + 4) prostate cancer on biopsy who underwent RP before 31 December 2005 (pre-ISUP group), were matched 1:1 by biopsy Gleason score, clinical tumour category, PSA level, and margin status to patients undergoing RP between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011 (post-ISUP group). Patients were followed until BCR defined as a PSA level of ≥0.2 ng/mL. Risk of BCR was analysed in a competing-risk model. The median follow-up was 9.5 years in the pre-ISUP group and 4.8 years in the post-ISUP group. The 5-year cumulative incidences of BCR were 34.0% and 13.9% in the pre-ISUP and post-ISUP groups, respectively (P ISUP Gleason score 6 and post-ISUP Gleason score 7 (3 + 4) (P = 0.34). In a multiple Cox-proportional hazard regression model, ISUP 2005 grading was a strong prognostic factor for BCR within 5 years of RP (hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.54; P < 0.001). The revision of the Gleason grading system has reduced the risk of BCR after RP in patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 and 7 (3 + 4). This may have consequences when comparing outcomes across studies and historical periods and may affect future treatment recommendations. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cancer screening in the United States, 2015: a review of current American cancer society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Brooks, Durado; Doroshenk, Mary; Fedewa, Stacey; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection along with a report on data and trends in cancer screening rates and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, we summarize current ACS cancer screening guidelines. The latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) also is described, as are several issues related to screening coverage under the Affordable Care Act, including the expansion of the Medicaid program.

  20. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This "Practice Guideline" was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) - a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of the

  1. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Areia, M; de Vries, A C; Marcos-Pinto, R; Monteiro-Soares, M; O'Connor, A; Pereira, C; Pimentel-Nunes, P; Correia, R; Ensari, A; Dumonceau, J M; Machado, J C; Macedo, G; Malfertheiner, P; Matysiak-Budnik, T; Megraud, F; Miki, K; O'Morain, C; Peek, R M; Ponchon, T; Ristimaki, A; Rembacken, B; Carneiro, F; Kuipers, E J

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods.

  2. Update with level 1 studies of the European Hernia Society guidelines on the treatment of inguinal hernia in adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miserez, M; Peeters, E; Aufenacker, T

    2014-01-01

    that the future of guideline implementation will strongly depend on the development of easy to use decision support algorithms tailored to the individual patient and on evaluating the effect of guideline implementation on surgical outcome. At the 35th International Congress of the EHS in Gdansk, Poland (May 12...

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Peter G.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Andes, David R.; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Marr, Kieren A.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. PMID:26679628

  4. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of dementias in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihl, Ralf; Bunevicius, Robertas; Frölich, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define a practice guideline for biological treatment of dementias for general practitioners in primary care. METHODS: This paper is a short and practical summary of the World Federation of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the Biological treatment of Alzheimer's disease a...

  5. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  6. [Opinion of the Czech Atherosclerosis Society's committee (CSAT) on the ESC/EAS guidelines related to the diagnostics and treatment of dyslipidemias issued in 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soška, V; Vaverková, H; Vráblík, M; Bláha, V; Cífková, R; Freiberger, T; Kraml, P; Piťha, J; Rosolová, H; Stulc, T; Urbanová, Z

    2013-02-01

    This position statement of the Executive Committee of the Czech Society for Atherosclerosis (CSAT) summarizes the most important aspects and novelties of the latest European guidelines for the management of dyslipidemia. In particular the position statement comments on: cardiovascular risk stratification, indications for plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels assessment as well as target lipid values, evaluation of current options for both lifestyle and pharmacological treatment of lipid metabolism disorders and, also, recommendation for laboratory monitoring of patients treated with lipid lowering agents. The statement deals with actual concepts of management of dyslipiemia in everyday practice, e.g. therapy of dyslipidemia in special patients´ groups. This statement does not replace the latest guidelines but focuses on the changes from the former guidelines for dyslipidemia management, published by CSAT in 2007.

  7. Methodology for Developing Evidence-Based Clinical Imaging Guidelines: Joint Recommendations by Korean Society of Radiology and National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Min; Jung, Seung Eun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yong, Hwan Seok; Sheen, Seungsoo

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure. PMID:28096730

  8. Report from AmSECT’s International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion: American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology Standards and Guidelines for Perfusion Practice: 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert A.; Bronson, Shahna L.; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Fitzgerald, David C.; Likosky, Donald S.; Mellas, Nicholas B.; Shann, Kenneth G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: One of the roles of a professional society is to develop standards and guidelines of practice as an instrument to guide safe and effective patient care. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) first published its Essentials for Perfusion Practice, Clinical Function: Conduct of Extracorporeal Circulation in 1993. The International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion (ICEBP), a committee within AmSECT, was tasked with updating this document in 2010. The aim of this report is to describe the method of development and content of AmSECT’s new professional standards and guidelines. The ICEBP committee independently evaluated and provided input regarding the current “Essentials and Guidelines.” Structural changes were made to the entire document, and a draft document was developed, presented, and circulated to the AmSECT Board of Directors and broader membership for comment. Informed by these reviews, a revised document was then presented to the Society for a membership vote. The final document consists of 15 areas of practice covered by 50 Standards and 38 Guidelines (see Appendix 1) with the first standard focusing on the development of institutional protocols to support their implementation and use. A majority of the membership voted to accept the document (81.2% of the voting membership accepting, 18.8% rejecting). After an audit of the balloting process by AmSECT’s Ethics Committee, the results were reported to the membership and the document was officially adopted on July 24, 2013. The Standards and Guidelines will serve as a useful guide for cardiac surgical teams that wish to develop institution-specific standards and guidelines to improve the reliability, safety, and effectiveness of adult cardiopulmonary bypass. The ICEBP recognizes that the development of a Standards and Guidelines statement alone will not change care. Safe, reliable, and effective care will be best served through the development and implementation of

  9. A guide to guidelines for professional societies and other developers of recommendations: introduction to integrating and coordinating efforts in COPD guideline development. An official ATS/ERS workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schünemann, Holger J; Woodhead, Mark; Anzueto, Antonio; Buist, A Sonia; Macnee, William; Rabe, Klaus F; Heffner, John

    2012-12-01

    Organizations around the world are recognizing that guidelines should be based on the best available evidence, that the development of recommendations needs to be transparent, and that appropriate processes should be followed. In June 2007, we convened an American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS)-sponsored workshop with over 60 representatives from 36 international organizations to provide advice to guideline developers about the required steps and processes for guideline development using the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an example. Following the workshop, participants completed a series of 14 review articles that underwent peer review and incorporated key new literature until June 2011 for most articles in this series. The review articles evaluate the guideline cycle including: priority setting, question formulation, managing conflict of interest, defining appropriate outcomes, stakeholder involvement, grading the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations, integration of values and preferences, considering resource use, reporting of guidelines, implementation, and adaptation. In this Introduction we frame the background and methods of these reviews and provide the key conclusions of the workshop. A summary of the workshop's conclusions and recommendations was published in The Lancet. Given the enormous resources that are spent on research and the importance of providing the best guidance to healthcare decision makers, attributing appropriate funds to research syntheses and transparent, independent guidance for the development of evidence-based guidelines is justified. Furthermore, given the immense amount of work that is required, individuals and organizations need to collaborate to achieve the best possible and cost-effective coordination of these efforts.

  10. Screening Tool for Older Persons' Appropriate Prescriptions for Japanese: Report of the Japan Geriatrics Society Working Group on "Guidelines for medical treatment and its safety in the elderly".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Taro; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Tomita, Naoki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ohrui, Takashi; Eto, Masato; Takeya, Yasushi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi; Sudo, Noriko; Arai, Hidenori; Aoki, Hiroaki; Horie, Shigeo; Ishii, Shinya; Iwasaki, Koh; Takayama, Shin; Suzuki, Yusuke; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizokami, Fumihiro; Furuta, Katsunori; Toba, Kenji; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, the Japan Geriatrics Society published a list of potentially inappropriate medication that was an extract from the "Guidelines for medical treatment and its safety in the elderly 2005." The 2005 guidelines are due for a revision, and a new comprehensive list of potentially inappropriate medications is required. A total of 15 diseases, conditions and special areas related to their clinical care were selected. We originated clinical questions and keywords for these 15 areas, carried out a systematic review using these search criteria, and formulated guidelines applying the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system advocated by Minds2014. If we did not find good evidence despite the drug being clinically important, we looked for evidence of efficacy and for disease-specific guidelines, and incorporated them into our guidelines. We selected 2098 articles (140 articles per area), and extracted another 186 articles through a manual search. We further added guidelines based on disease entity and made two lists, one of "drugs to be prescribed with special caution" and the other of "drugs to consider starting," primarily considering individuals aged 75 years or older or those who are frail or in need of special care. New lists of potentially inappropriate medications and potential prescribing omissions called "Screening Tool for Older Person's Appropriate Prescriptions for Japanese" were constructed. We anticipate that future studies will highlight more evidence regarding the safety of high-quality drugs, further improving the provision of appropriate medical care for the elderly. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016: 16: 983-1001. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevention of venous thromboembolism, 2nd edition: Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Soo-Mee; Jang, Moon Ju; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Yhim, Ho-Young; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Nam, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, Hun Gyu; Bae, Sung Hwa; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Yang-Ki; Kim, Inho; Choi, Won-Il; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Nan Hee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo; Oh, Doyeun

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, we proposed the first Korean Guidelines for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE). It was applicable to Korean patients, by modifying the contents of the second edition of the Japanese guidelines for the prevention of VTE and the 8th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. From 2007 to 2011, we conducted a nationwide study regarding the incidence of VTE after major surgery using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) database. In addition, we have considered the 9th edition of the ACCP Evidenced-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines, published in 2012. It emphasized the importance of clinically relevant events as opposed to asymptomatic outcomes with preferences for both thrombotic and bleeding outcomes. Thus, in the development of the new Korean guidelines, three major points were addressed: 1) the new guidelines stratify patients into 4 risk groups (very low, low, moderate, and high) according to the actual incidence of symptomatic VTE from the HIRA databases; 2) the recommended optimal VTE prophylaxis for each group was modified according to condition-specific thrombotic and bleeding risks; 3) guidelines are intended for general information only, are not medical advice, and do not replace professional medical care and/or physician advice.

  13. Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Weinberger, Steven E; Hanania, Nicola A; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Denberg, Tom; Schünemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-08-02

    This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) 50% predicted. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 7: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians should prescribe continuous oxygen therapy in patients with COPD who have severe resting hypoxemia (Pao(2) ≤55 mm Hg or Spo(2)

  14. Summary of the Dutch S3-guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis 2011. Dutch Society of Dermatology and Venereology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweegers, J; de Jong, E M G J; Nijsten, T E C; de Bes, J; te Booij, M; Borgonjen, R J; van Cranenburgh, O D; van Deutekom, H; van Everdingen, J J E; de Groot, M; Van Hees, C L M; Hulshuizen, H; Koek, M B G; de Korte, W J A; de Korte, J; Lecluse, L L A; Pasch, M C; Poblete-Gutiérrez, P A; Prens, E P; Seyger, M M B; Thio, H B; Torcque, L A; de Vries, A C Q; van de Kerkhof, P C M; Spuls, Ph I

    2014-03-17

    This document provides a summary of the Dutch S3-guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis. These guidelines were finalized in December 2011 and contain unique chapters on the treatment of psoriasis of the face and flexures, childhood psoriasis as well as the patient's perspective on treatment. They also cover the topical treatment of psoriasis, photo(chemo)therapy, conventional systemic therapy and biological therapy.

  15. Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada: recommendations of a joint Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Anthony J; Bewick, David; Chan, K L; Cujec, Bibiana; Dumesnil, J G; Honos, George; Munt, Brad; Sasson, Zion; Tam, James; Tomlinson, Charles; Aboguddah, Ayman; Ahmed, Shaheeda; Ali, Mohamed; Arsenault, Marie; Ascah, Kathryn; Ashton, Tom; Baird, Michael; Basmadjian, Arsene; Beique, Francois; Blakeley, Michael; Blais, Marie-Josee; Burggraf, Gary; Burwash, Ian; Cochrane, Jessica; Fagan, Susan; Giannoccaro, Peter; Hughes, William; Jones, Alan; Jue, John; Koilpillai, Chris; Leblanc, Marie-Helene; Londry, Colleen; Morgan, Dennis; O'Reilly, Michael; Sawchuk, Corey; Siu, Samuel; Sochowski, Randy; Tremblay, Guy; Welikovitch, Lisa; Yu, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Recognizing the central role of echocardiographic examinations in the assessment of most cardiac disorders and the need to ensure the provision of these services in a highly reliable, timely, economical and safe manner, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Society of Echocardiography undertook a comprehensive review of all aspects influencing the provision of echocardiographic services in Canada. Five regional panels were established to develop preliminary recommendations in the five component areas, which included the echocardiographic examination, the echocardiographic laboratory and report, the physician, the sonographer and indications for examinations. Membership in the panels was structured to recognize the regional professional diversity of individuals involved in the provision of echocardiography. In addition, a focus group of cardiac sonograhers was recruited to review aspects of the document impacting on sonographer responsibilities and qualification. The document is intended to be used as a comprehensive and practical reference for all of those involved in the provision of echocardiography in Canada.

  16. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  17. [Evidence-based recommendations on diagnostics and therapy of axial spondyloarthritis : S3 guidelines of the German Society of Rheumatology (DGRh) in cooperation with the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiltz, U; Rudwaleit, M; Sieper, J; Braun, J

    2017-03-01

    The clinical course of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) is variable and characterized by chronic back pain and extraspinal manifestations, such as asymmetrical arthritis, dactylitis and enthesitis. Extra-articular manifestations in the eyes (anterior uveitis), skin (psoriasis) and intestines (chronic inflammatory bowel disease) are also frequent manifestations in patients with SpA. Due to the heterogeneity of disease manifestations and the partial concentration on structural alterations in the sacroiliac joints visible in X‑ray images, the diagnosis is often delayed for many years. An important step in the direction of improved early recognition of axial SpA was establishment of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) classification criteria published in 2009, which focused on the initally deep-seated back pain and chronicity in relatively young patients as well as the importance of magnetic resonance imaging and HLA B 27 determination in the early stages of the disease. In order to achieve the foundations for an effective and timely therapy of affected patients, in 2014 on the initiative of the German Society of Rheumatology, S3 guidelines on axial SpA including Bechterew's disease and early forms were formulated in cooperation with other specialist societies. This article gives an overview of the contents of the S3 guidelines on axial SpA.

  18. Guidelines for biomarker testing in metastatic melanoma: a National Consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Algarra, S; Fernández-Figueras, M T; López-Martín, J A; Santos-Briz, A; Arance, A; Lozano, M D; Berrocal, A; Ríos-Martín, J J; Espinosa, E; Rodríguez-Peralto, J L

    2014-04-01

    This consensus statement, conceived as a joint initiative of the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), makes diagnostic and treatment recommendations for the management of patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma based on the current scientific evidence on biomarker use. This document thus provides an opportunity to improve healthcare efficiency and resource use, which will benefit these patients. Based on the data available so far, this expert group recommends routinely testing patients with metastatic melanoma for BRAF mutation status, as the result affects the subsequent therapeutic management of these patients. The analysis of genetic alterations in KIT may be reasonable in patients with primary tumours in acral or mucosal sites or on chronically sun-exposed skin, in an advanced condition, but not in patients with other types of melanomas. This panel believes that testing for other genetic alterations, such as NRAS mutation status in patients not carrying BRAF mutations, GNAQ/GNA11 mutational analysis or genetic alterations in PTEN, is not currently indicated as routine clinical practice, because the results do not influence treatment planning in these patients at the present time. Other important issues addressed in this document are the organisational requirements and quality controls needed for proper testing of these biomarkers, and the legal implications to be borne in mind.

  19. Update on Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Consensus Guideline of the Working Group of Ocular Health (Spanish Society of Diabetes and Spanish Vitreous and Retina Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Corcóstegui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A group of members of the Spanish Retina and Vitreous Society (SERV and of the Working Group of Ocular Health of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED updated knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR based on recent evidence reported in the literature. A synthesis of this consensus forms the basis of the present review, which is intended to inform clinicians on current advances in the field of DR and their clinical applicability to patients with this disease. Aspects presented in this article include screening procedures of DR, new technologies in the early diagnosis of DR, control of risk factors in the different stages of the disease, indications of panretinal laser photocoagulation, efficacy of intravitreal antiangiogenic agents and steroids, and surgical options for treating DR-related complications. Practical information regarding periodicity of screening procedures in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, ophthalmological controls according to the stage of retinopathy and complications, and criteria and degree of urgency for referral of a DR patient to the ophthalmologist are also presented.

  20. Learning, techniques, and complications of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowski, M; Larghi, A; Weynand, B; Boustière, C; Giovannini, M; Pujol, B; Dumonceau, J-M

    2012-02-01

    This article is the second of a two-part publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) about endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling, including EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and EUS-guided Trucut biopsy. The first part (the Clinical Guideline) focused on the results obtained with EUS-guided sampling, and the role of this technique in patient management, and made recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use. The current Technical Guideline discusses issues related to learning, techniques, and complications of EUS-guided sampling, and to processing of specimens. Technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., rapid on-site cytopathological evaluation, needle diameter, microcore isolation for histopathological examination, and adequate number of needle passes) are discussed and recommendations are made for various settings, including solid and cystic pancreatic lesions, submucosal tumors, and lymph nodes. The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes gastroenterologists, oncologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technical Guideline should be most useful to endoscopists who perform EUS-guided sampling. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the Molecular Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During an Outbreak in Korea in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyukmin; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Mi Na; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-05-01

    For two months between May and July 2015, a nationwide outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in Korea. On June 3, 2015, the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS-CoV Laboratory Response Task Force (LR-TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories to set up the diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection. Based on the WHO interim recommendations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of United States guidelines for MERS-CoV laboratory testing, and other available resources, the KSLM MERS-CoV LR-TF provided the first version of the laboratory practice guidelines for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV to the clinical laboratories on June 12, 2015. The guidelines described here are an updated version that includes case definition, indications for testing, specimen type and protocols for specimen collection, specimen packing and transport, specimen handling and nucleic acid extraction, molecular detection of MERS-CoV, interpretation of results and reporting, and laboratory safety. The KSLM guidelines mainly focus on the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV, reflecting the unique situation in Korea and the state of knowledge at the time of publication.

  2. API consensus guidelines for use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (API-ART guidelines). Endorsed by the AIDS Society of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S B; Pujari, S N; Joshi, S R; Patel, A K

    2006-01-01

    With rational use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been transformed into a chronic manageable illness like diabetes and hypertension. These guidelines provide information on state of art, evidence based approach for use of ART in Indian context. When to initiate ART? Antiretroviral therapy is indicated for all symptomatic HIV infected persons regardless of CD4 counts and plasma viral load (PVL) levels. In asymptomatic patients, ART should be offered when the CD4 counts ART. What to start with? A non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based regimen is recommended for antiretroviral naïve patients. The choice between nevirapine and efavirenz is based on differences in adverse events profiles; cost and availability of convenient fixed dose combinations and need for concomitant use of rifampicin. A backbone of 2-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is combined with the NNRTI. Various combinations and ART strategies not to be used in clinical practice has been enlisted. How to follow up? Recommendations have been made for baseline evaluation and monitoring of patients on ART. These include guidelines on laboratory and clinical evaluation. A plasma viral load at 6 months after initiation of first-line ART is strongly recommended. Yearly estimation of lipid profile has been recommended. How to identify and manage ART failure? The guidelines recognize the issue of identifying ART failure late if only CD4 counts are used for monitoring. In the absence of resistance testing various second-line regimens have been enlisted. A boosted protease inhibitor based regimen is recommended in this situation to be combined with 2-NRTIs. Special situations Recommendations have been made for use of ART in HIV-TB, HIV-HBV, and HIV-HCV co-infected patients. In patients with active TB and a CD4 count ART is recommended as soon as the anti-TB treatment is tolerated. Efavirenz is the only ARV drug, which can be

  3. Strategies to enhance rational use of antibiotics in hospital : a guideline by the German Society for Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de With, K.; Allerberger, F.; Amann, S.; Apfalter, P.; Brodt, H. -R.; Eckmanns, T.; Fellhauer, M.; Geiss, H. K.; Janata, O.; Krause, R.; Lemmen, S.; Meyer, E.; Mittermayer, H.; Porsche, U.; Presterl, E.; Reuter, S.; Sinha, B.; Strauss, R.; Wechsler-Foerdoes, A.; Wenisch, C.; Kern, W. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the time of increasing resistance and paucity of new drug development there is a growing need for strategies to enhance rational use of antibiotics in German and Austrian hospitals. An evidence-based guideline on recommendations for implementation of antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programmes was de

  4. [Interpretation and consideration of the Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines for atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities management of asymptomatic disease and claudication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenyang; Li, Weihao

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities (ASO-LE) has the third highest rate among systematic atherosclerosis obliterans, ranking after coronary heart disease and stoke, and the disease burden of ASO-LE has been continuously increasing. Invasive revascularizations, which is presented by endovascular therapy technique, has undergone a dramatic development in the past couples of decades. However, controversy concerned about the surgical management and operative indications has heated up in the meanwhile. Thus Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) published the practice guidelines for ASO-LE with asymptomatic disease and claudication in March, 2015. At the first time the guideline definitely opposed the aggressive invasive revascularization for ASO-LE patients with asymptomatic disease or claudication under satisfied tolerance. Instead, it posed the extreme emphasis on the pharmacotherapy with risk reduction of atherosclerosis at the core and the exercise therapy with supervised or home-based exercise program at the core for ASO-LE patients with asymptomatic disease and claudication.

  5. Evidence- and consensus-based practice guidelines for the therapy of primary myelodysplastic syndromes. A statement from the Italian Society of Hematology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Amadori, Sergio; Barosi, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Novel therapeutic agents and strategies have been introduced into the management of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in the last years. This has led to more treatment options and a better chance of long-term survival for MDS patients, but also to uncertainty regarding...... the optimal use and possible side effects of these treatments. The Italian Society of Hematology commissioned a project to develop guidelines for the therapy of MDS using evidence-based knowledge and consensus-formation techniques. DESIGN AND METHODS: An Advisory Council (AC) shaped the project around...... a series of key clinical questions, performed a systematic search for evidence and graded the available evidence according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). A list of clinical questions was mailed to each of 10 senior hematologists composing the Expert Panel (EP): the panelists...

  6. Standards, options and recommendations for brachytherapy of prostate cancer: efficacy and toxicity; Standards, options et recommandations pour la curietherapie des patients atteints de cancer de la prostate: efficacite et toxicite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pommier, P. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Villers, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Huriez, 59 - Lille (France); Bataillard, A. [Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer, FNCLCC, 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2001-12-01

    Context. - The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR) collaborative project was initiated in 1993 by the Federation of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), with the 20 French Regional Cancer Centres, several French public university and general hospitals, as well as private clinics and medical specialty societies. Its main objective is the development of serviceable clinical practice guidelines in order to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. The methodology is based on a literature review, followed by a critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts. Draft guidelines are produced, then validated by specialists in cancer care delivery. Objectives. - Produce technical practice guidelines for the brachytherapy of prostate cancer using the methodology developed by the Standards, Options and Recommendations project. Methods. - The FNCLCC and the French Urology Association (AFU) first designated the multidisciplinary group of experts. Available data were collected by a search of Medline and lists selected by experts in the group. A first draft of the guidelines was written, they validated by independent reviewers. Results. - The main recommendations are: 1/ Brachytherapy with permanent seeds alone is a possible curative treatment for prostate cancer patients with the following prognosis factors: tumour stage T1 or T2a (TNM 1992), Gleason score {<=} 6 and PSA < 10 {mu}g/L. 2/ Combined treatment with brachytherapy and hormonal therapy could be more efficient than brachytherapy alone for prostate cancer patients with Gleason score > 7 and/or PSA > 10. 3/ Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy can be proposed to prostate cancer patients with intermediate prognosis. 4/ Before and after seed implantation, risks of infection must be prevented by appropriate antibiotic therapy (recommendation). 5/ Brachytherapy must not be performed within 2 months of trans-urethral prostate resection. 6

  7. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This “Practice Guideline” was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) – a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of

  8. [Differences between the 2013 and 2014 hypertension guidelines.: Position of the Central American and Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Salinas, Alberto; Wyss, Fernando; Coca, Antonio; Ramírez, Agustín J; Valdez, Osiris; Valerio, Luis F

    2015-03-01

    Between the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 the most internationally influential hypertension guidelines were published. Although there are no major differences between them, there are discrepancies that can have an impact on treatment and prognosis for individuals with hypertension. This article analyzes the main controversial elements in the guides and presents the recommendations of the Sociedad Centroamericana y del Caribe de Hipertensión y Prevención Cardiovascular (Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention). The main differences are found a) in the categorization of prehypertension, b) in the use of global cardiovascular risk in the decision to begin antihypertensive treatment, c) in the validity of beta-blockers as first-line drugs in treating uncomplicated hypertension, and d) the increase in the therapeutic goal of maintaining values between global cardiovascular risk. Finally, seven recommendations by the Society based on the analysis are included.

  9. Patient-centred care of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and risk of sudden cardiac death: What do the 2015 European Society of Cardiology guidelines add?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norekvål, Tone M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Nurses and allied professionals are at the forefront of care delivery in patients with arrythmogenic risk and have a responsibility to deliver care that is focused on their individual needs. The 2015 European Society of Cardiology guideline on prevention of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death heralds a step-change in patient and family focus and interdisciplinary involvement. This development reflects a recognition within the European Society of Cardiology that chronic care of patients with cardiovascular conditions can be improved by involving all stakeholders, making use of multidisciplinary interventions, and placing the patient at the centre of the care process. In this article, taskforce contributors discuss the latest evidence and highlight some of the most pertinent issues for nurses involved in patient-centred care of patients and families with ventricular arrhythmias and/or risk of sudden death.

  10. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sungjae; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tanaka, Eiichi; Sumida, Iori; Tamari, Keisuke; Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    We have retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. From 1997 to 2012, salvage HDR brachytherapy was performed in 43 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 41-88 years). HDR brachytherapy was performed by interstitial brachytherapy in 34 patients (79%) and by intracavity brachytherapy in nine patients (21%). Seventeen (40%) of the 43 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy. The median followup period was 58 months (range, 6-179 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates (LC) were 84%, 52%, and 78%, respectively. Patients who received brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy experienced no nodal recurrence (0 of 17 patients), whereas 23% of the patients (6 of 26 patients) who received brachytherapy alone experienced nodal recurrence (p = 0.047). The pathologic grade at the time of initial surgery (G1-2 vs. G3) was found to be a significant prognostic factor for both OS and PFS. The respective 5-year OS was 96% vs. 40% (p endometrial cancer. Pathologic grade, age, and modality were significant prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Appropriateness of indication and diagnostic yield of colonoscopy: First report based on the 2000 guidelines of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iqbal Siddique; Krishna Mohan; Fuad Hasan; Anjum Memon; Istvan Patty; Basil Al-Nakib

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the appropriateness of referrals and to determine the diagnostic yield of colonoscopy according to the 2000 guidelines of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE).METHODS: A total of 736 consecutive patients (415males, 321 females; mean age 43.6±16.6 years)undergoing colonoscopy during October 2001-March2002 Were prospectively enrolled in the study. The 2000ASGE guidelines were used to assess the appropriateness of the indications for the procedure. Diagnostic yield was defined as the ratio between significant findings detected on colonoscopy and the total number of procedures performed for that indication.RESULTS: The large majority (64%) of patients had colonoscopy for an indication that was considered"generally indicated"; it was "generally not indicated" for20%, and it was "not listed" for 16% in the guidelines.The diagnostic yield of colonoscopy was highest for the "generally indicated" (38%) followed by "not listed"(13%) and "generally not indicated" (5%) categories.In the multivariable analysis, the diagnostic yield was independently associated with the appropriateness of indication that was "generally indicated" (odds ratio=12.3) and referrals by gastroenterologist (odds ratio = 1.9).CONCLUSION: There is a high likelihood of inappropriate referrals for colonoscopy in an open-access endoscopy system. The diagnostic yield of the procedure is dependent on the appropriateness of indication and referring physician's specialty. Certain indications "not listed" in the guidelines have an intermediate diagnostic yield and further studies are required to evaluate whether they should be included in future revisions of the ASGE guidelines.

  12. South Korean armed forces in their relationship with civil society: a brief empirical guidelines to compare with Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Fernando Velarde

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The theme about the Armed Forces and his relation with the civil society is a reflection that must be seriously considered within the Social Sciences, also is a very rich theme from the point of view of transpacific relations, because in globalization times, not only trade and ideas cross the national boundaries, but also security national concepts and the military cooperation. This article more than anything tries to explain from a viewpoint of documentary research, the relations between Civil Society and armed forces in South Korea, as a short approach to future researches and like analysis model.

  13. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  14. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat

    2014-01-01

    , and valid biomarkers have yet to be identified to provide a practical base for disease management. The European Society of Retina Specialists offers expert guidance for diagnostic and therapeutic management of neovascular AMD supporting healthcare givers and doctors in providing the best state...

  15. Recommendations for harmonization of data collection and analysis of developmental neurotoxicity endpoints in regulatory guideline studies: Proceedings of workshops presented at Society of Toxicology and joint Teratology Society and Neurobehavioral Teratology Society meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Abby A; Sheets, Larry P; Raffaele, Kathleen; Moser, Virginia; Hofstra, Angela; Hoberman, Alan; Makris, Susan L; Garman, Robert; Bolon, Brad; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Auer, Roland; Lau, Edmund; Vidmar, Thomas; Bowers, Wayne J

    2017-09-01

    The potential for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) of environmental chemicals may be evaluated using specific test guidelines from the US Environmental Protection Agency or the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). These guidelines generate neurobehavioral, neuropathological, and morphometric data that are evaluated by regulatory agencies globally. Data from these DNT guideline studies, or the more recent OECD extended one-generation reproductive toxicity guideline, play a pivotal role in children's health risk assessment in different world areas. Data from the same study may be interpreted differently by regulatory authorities in different countries resulting in inconsistent evaluations that may lead to inconsistencies in risk assessment decisions internationally, resulting in regional differences in public health protection or in commercial trade barriers. These issues of data interpretation and reporting are also relevant to juvenile and pre-postnatal studies conducted more routinely for pharmaceuticals and veterinary medicines. There is a need for development of recommendations geared toward the operational needs of the regulatory scientific reviewers who apply these studies in risk assessments, as well as the scientists who generate DNT data sets. The workshops summarized here draw upon the experience of the authors representing government, industry, contract research organizations, and academia to discuss the scientific issues that have emerged from diverse regulatory evaluations. Although various regulatory bodies have different risk management decisions and labeling requirements that are difficult to harmonize, the workshops provided an opportunity to work toward more harmonized scientific approaches for evaluating DNT data within the context of different regulatory frameworks. Five speakers and their coauthors with neurotoxicology, neuropathology, and regulatory toxicology expertise discussed issues of variability, data reporting

  16. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervenis, Christos; Xynos, Evaghelos; Sotiropoulos, George; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    There is discrepancy and failure to adhere to current international guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in hospitals in Greece and Cyprus. The aim of the present document is to provide a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of metastastic CRC, considering both special characteristics of our Healthcare System and international guidelines. Following discussion and online communication among the members of an executive team chosen by the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO), a consensus for metastastic CRC disease was developed. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology on two voting rounds by invited multidisciplinary international experts on CRC. Statements reaching level of agreement by ≥80% were considered as having achieved large consensus, whereas statements reaching 60-80% moderate consensus. One hundred and nine statements were developed. Ninety experts voted for those statements. The median rate of abstain per statement was 18.5% (range: 0-54%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a large consensus. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. R0 resection is the only intervention that may offer substantial improvement in the oncological outcomes.

  17. Prevention and Monitoring of Cardiac Dysfunction in Survivors of Adult Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenian, Saro H; Lacchetti, Christina; Barac, Ana; Carver, Joseph; Constine, Louis S; Denduluri, Neelima; Dent, Susan; Douglas, Pamela S; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Ewer, Michael; Fabian, Carol; Hudson, Melissa; Jessup, Mariell; Jones, Lee W; Ky, Bonnie; Mayer, Erica L; Moslehi, Javid; Oeffinger, Kevin; Ray, Katharine; Ruddy, Kathryn; Lenihan, Daniel

    2016-12-05

    Purpose Cardiac dysfunction is a serious adverse effect of certain cancer-directed therapies that can interfere with the efficacy of treatment, decrease quality of life, or impact the actual survival of the patient with cancer. The purpose of this effort was to develop recommendations for prevention and monitoring of cardiac dysfunction in survivors of adult-onset cancers. Methods Recommendations were developed by an expert panel with multidisciplinary representation using a systematic review (1996 to 2016) of meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials, observational studies, and clinical experience. Study quality was assessed using established methods, per study design. The guideline recommendations were crafted in part using the Guidelines Into Decision Support methodology. Results A total of 104 studies met eligibility criteria and compose the evidentiary basis for the recommendations. The strength of the recommendations in these guidelines is based on the quality, amount, and consistency of the evidence and the balance between benefits and harms. Recommendations It is important for health care providers to initiate the discussion regarding the potential for cardiac dysfunction in individuals in whom the risk is sufficiently high before beginning therapy. Certain higher risk populations of survivors of cancer may benefit from prevention and screening strategies implemented during cancer-directed therapies. Clinical suspicion for cardiac disease should be high and threshold for cardiac evaluation should be low in any survivor who has received potentially cardiotoxic therapy. For certain higher risk survivors of cancer, routine surveillance with cardiac imaging may be warranted after completion of cancer-directed therapy, so that appropriate interventions can be initiated to halt or even reverse the progression of cardiac dysfunction.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: classification, evaluation, and management of childhood interstitial lung disease in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R; Hagood, James S; Young, Lisa R; Brody, Alan S; Castile, Robert G; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M; Redding, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient's or family's quality of life, and death. No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having "childhood ILD syndrome"; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential.

  19. Clinical efficacy of carbapenems on hospital-acquired pneumonia in accordance with the Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for management of HAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masaru; Kaneko, Takeshi; Goto, Hideto; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Fujisawa, Shin; Ono, Shigeru; Morita, Satoshi; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Watanuki, Yuji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is the second most common cause of hospital-acquired infection and is the leading cause of death. In 2002, the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) published guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP (JRS GL 2002). In these guidelines, treatment with carbapenems is recommended for all disease types of HAP, excluding cases of mild or moderate pneumonia with no risk factors, and cases with early-onset ventilation-acquired pneumonia. To evaluate the efficacy of carbapenems on HAP in accordance with JRS GL 2002, we conducted a prospective study of HAP patients treated with carbapenems based on JRS GL 2002. The results of this study were also analyzed based on the revised guidelines published in June 2008 (JRS GL 2008), and the validity of the new guidelines was examined. Of the 33 subjects, 19 were judged as responders to the treatment, corresponding to a response rate of 57.6%. There were 3 deaths, corresponding to a mortality rate of 9.1%. The efficacy of carbapenems for the treatment of HAP based on JRS GL 2002 was confirmed. The severity rating system in JRS GL 2002 has a tendency to overestimate the severity of the cases and may lead to overtreatment in some cases. On the other hand, the severity rating system by JRS GL 2008 seemed to be more accurate and closely correlated with the efficacy of the treatment. It is suggested that JRS GL 2008 is more useful in clinical practice for accurately judging the severity of the disease and initiating appropriate subsequent antibiotic therapy.

  20. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  1. 2016 European Society of Hypertension guidelines for the management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurbe, Empar; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Dominiczak, Anna; Erdine, Serap; Hirth, Asle; Invitti, Cecilia; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Mancia, Giuseppe; Pall, Denes; Rascher, Wolfgang; Redon, Josep; Schaefer, Franz; Seeman, Tomas; Sinha, Manish; Stabouli, Stella; Webb, Nicholas J; Wühl, Elke; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Increasing prevalence of hypertension (HTN) in children and adolescents has become a significant public health issue driving a considerable amount of research. Aspects discussed in this document include advances in the definition of HTN in 16 year or older, clinical significance of isolated systolic HTN in youth, the importance of out of office and central blood pressure measurement, new risk factors for HTN, methods to assess vascular phenotypes, clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and treatment strategies among others. The recommendations of the present document synthesize a considerable amount of scientific data and clinical experience and represent the best clinical wisdom upon which physicians, nurses and families should base their decisions. In addition, as they call attention to the burden of HTN in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, these guidelines should encourage public policy makers to develop a global effort to improve identification and treatment of high blood pressure among children and adolescents.

  2. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of large hemispheric infarction : a statement for health care professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the German Society for Neuro-intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbey, Michel T; Bösel, Julian; Rhoney, Denise H; Rincon, Fred; Staykov, Dimitre; Amar, Arun P; Varelas, Panayiotis N; Jüttler, Eric; Olson, DaiWai; Huttner, Hagen B; Zweckberger, Klaus; Sheth, Kevin N; Dohmen, Christian; Brambrink, Ansgar M; Mayer, Stephan A; Zaidat, Osama O; Hacke, Werner; Schwab, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Large hemispheric infarction (LHI), also known as malignant middle cerebral infarction, is a devastating disease associated with significant disability and mortality. Clinicians and family members are often faced with a paucity of high quality clinical data as they attempt to determine the most appropriate course of treatment for patients with LHI, and current stroke guidelines do not provide a detailed approach regarding the day-to-day management of these complicated patients. To address this need, the Neurocritical Care Society organized an international multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of LHI. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. The panel devised a series of clinical questions related to LHI, and assessed the quality of data related to these questions using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation guideline system. They then developed recommendations (denoted as strong or weak) based on the quality of the evidence, as well as the balance of benefits and harms of the studied interventions, the values and preferences of patients, and resource considerations.

  3. WE-E-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy I: Overview of Clinical Application and QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, B [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Showalter, T

    2014-06-15

    With the increased usage of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the introduction of dedicated image guided brachytherapy suites, it is necessary to review the processes and procedures associated with safely delivering these treatments in the expedited time scales that dedicated treatment suites afford. The speakers will present the clinical aspects of switching from LDR to HDR treatments, including guidelines for patient selection, and the clinical outcomes comparing LDR to HDR. The speakers will also discuss the HDR treatment process itself, because the shortened clinical timeline involved with a streamlined scan/plan/treat workflow can introduce other issues. Safety and QA aspects involved with the streamlined process, including increased personnel required for parallel tasks, and possible interfering tasks causing delays in patient treatments will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical aspects of HDR Brachytherapy, including common clinical indications, patient selection, and the evolving evidence in support of this therapeutic modality To review the current prominent clinical trials for HDR brachytherapy To interpret the established guidelines for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance for implementation into practical clinical settings. To introduce the basic requirements for image guided brachytherapy.

  4. How to manage recurrent falls in clinical practice: guidelines of the French Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchet, Olivier; Dubost, V; Revel Delhom, C; Berrut, G; Belmin, J

    2011-01-01

    Health care professionals need a simple and pragmatic clinical approach for the management of recurrent fallers in clinical routine. To develop clinical practice recommendations with the aim to assist health care professionals, especially in primary care in the management of recurrent falls. A systematic English and French review was conducted using Medline, Embase, Pascal and Cochrane literature. Search included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and transversal studies published until July 31, 2008. The following Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms were used: "aged OR aged, 80 and over", "frail elderly", "Accidental Fall", "Mental Recall", and "Recurrent falls". The guidelines were elaborated according the Haute Autorite de Sante methods by a multidisciplinary working group comprising experts and practitioners. A fall is an event that results in a person coming to rest inadvertently on the ground or floor or other lower level and should be considered as a recurrent event as soon as a subject reported at least two falls in a 12-month period. Recurrent falls impose a prompt and appropriate management with the first aim to systematically evaluate the severity of falls. The evaluation of fall severity should be based on a standardized questionnaire and physical examination. It is recommended not to perform cerebral imaging in the absence of specific indication based on the clinical examination and to reevaluate the subject within a week after the fall. Prior to any intervention and after an evaluation of signs of severity, it is recommended to systematically assess the risk factors for falls. This evaluation should be based on the use of validated and standardized tests. The education of recurrent fallers and their care givers is required in order to implement appropriate intervention. In the event of a gait and/or balance disorders, it is recommended to prescribe physiotherapy. A regular physical activity

  5. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B F; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P; Buschmann, Michael D

    2011-04-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character.

  6. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline: Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Eddy; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Goligher, Ewan C; Hodgson, Carol L; Munshi, Laveena; Walkey, Allan J; Adhikari, Neill K J; Amato, Marcelo B P; Branson, Richard; Brower, Roy G; Ferguson, Niall D; Gajic, Ognjen; Gattinoni, Luciano; Hess, Dean; Mancebo, Jordi; Meade, Maureen O; McAuley, Daniel F; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Rubin, Eileen; Seckel, Maureen; Slutsky, Arthur S; Talmor, Daniel; Thompson, B Taylor; Wunsch, Hannah; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Brozek, Jan; Brochard, Laurent J

    2017-05-01

    This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of mechanical ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A multidisciplinary panel conducted systematic reviews and metaanalyses of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations. For all patients with ARDS, the recommendation is strong for mechanical ventilation using lower tidal volumes (4-8 ml/kg predicted body weight) and lower inspiratory pressures (plateau pressure < 30 cm H2O) (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong for prone positioning for more than 12 h/d (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with moderate or severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong against routine use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (high confidence in effect estimates) and conditional for higher positive end-expiratory pressure (moderate confidence in effect estimates) and recruitment maneuvers (low confidence in effect estimates). Additional evidence is necessary to make a definitive recommendation for or against the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe ARDS. The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected ventilatory interventions for adult patients with ARDS. Clinicians managing patients with ARDS should personalize decisions for their patients, particularly regarding the conditional recommendations in this guideline.

  7. Post-brushing and fine-needle aspiration biopsy follow-up and treatment options for patients with pancreatobiliary lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. I. Kurtycz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology, ancillary testing and post-procedure management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature and discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the PSC web site (www.papsociety.org. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on the follow-up and treatment options for patients after procedures performed for obtaining cytology samples for the evaluation of biliary strictures and solid and cystic masses in the pancreas. These recommendations follow the six-tiered terminology and nomenclature scheme proposed by committee III.

  8. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis in Neurocritical Care Patients: An Evidence-Based Guideline: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Paul; Bautista, Cynthia; Jichici, Draga; Burns, Joseph; Chhangani, Sanjeev; DeFilippis, Michele; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Kim, Keri; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Mack, William; Meyer, Kim

    2016-02-01

    The risk of death from venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high in intensive care unit patients with neurological diagnoses. This is due to an increased risk of venous stasis secondary to paralysis as well as an increased prevalence of underlying pathologies that cause endothelial activation and create an increased risk of embolus formation. In many of these diseases, there is an associated risk from bleeding because of standard VTE prophylaxis. There is a paucity of prospective studies examining different VTE prophylaxis strategies in the neurologically ill. The lack of a solid evidentiary base has posed challenges for the establishment of consistent and evidence-based clinical practice standards. In response to this need for guidance, the Neurocritical Care Society set out to develop and evidence-based guideline using GRADE to safely reduce VTE and its associated complications.

  9. Practice parameters for early colon cancer management: Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (Società Italiana di Chirurgia Colo-Rettale; SICCR) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, F; Arezzo, A; Agresta, F; Coco, C; Faletti, R; Krivocapic, Z; Rotondano, G; Santoro, G A; Vettoretto, N; De Franciscis, S; Belli, A; Romano, G M

    2015-10-01

    Early colon cancer (ECC) has been defined as a carcinoma with invasion limited to the submucosa regardless of lymph node status and according to the Royal College of Pathologists as TNM stage T1 NX M0. As the potential risk of lymph node metastasis ranges from 6 to 17% and the preoperative assessment of lymph node metastasis is not reliable, the management of ECC is still controversial, varying from endoscopic to radical resection. A meeting on recent advances on the management of colorectal polyps endorsed by the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR) took place in April 2014, in Genoa (Italy). Based on this material the SICCR decided to issue guidelines updating the evidence and to write a position statement paper in order to define the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for ECC treatment in context of the Italian healthcare system.

  10. Practice parameters for early rectal cancer management: Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (Società Italiana di Chirurgia Colo-Rettale; SICCR) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezzo, A; Bianco, F; Agresta, F; Coco, C; Faletti, R; Krivocapic, Z; Rotondano, G; Santoro, G A; Vettoretto, N; De Franciscis, S; Belli, A; Romano, G M

    2015-10-01

    The introduction of new technologies for diagnosis and screening programs led to an increasing rate of early detection of colorectal cancer. This, associated with the evolution of endoscopic techniques of local excision, led to the assessment of new strategies to reduce morbidity related to treatment, especially for early rectal cancer (ERC). Nevertheless, the definition of ERC and its staging and treatment algorithm are still under debate. The Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery developed practice guidelines to provide recommendations on the diagnosis, staging and treatment of ERC. A systematic review on the topic was performed by a multidisciplinary group of experts selected based on their clinical and scientific expertise in endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, magnetic resonance and surgery, with the aid of an external international audit.

  11. Clinical evaluation, imaging studies, indications for cytologic study and preprocedural requirements for duct brushing studies and pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Adler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and fine-needle aspiration (FNA biopsy, techniques for EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature to be used for pancreaticobiliary disease, ancillary testing and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on expertise of the authors, literature review, discussions of the draft document at national and international meetings and synthesis of online comments of the draft document. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions. This document summarizes recommendations for the clinical and imaging work-up of pancreatic and biliary tract lesions along with indications for cytologic study of these lesions. Prebrushing and FNA requirements are also discussed.

  12. Radioactive seed migration following parotid gland interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of pulmonary seed migration after parotid brachytherapy using a novel migrated seed detection technique. Patients diagnosed with parotid cancer who underwent permanent parotid brachytherapy from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Head and neck CT scans and chest X-rays were evaluated during routine follow-up. Mimics software and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and migrated seed detection from the original implanted region, respectively. Postimplant dosimetry analysis was performed after seeds migration if the seeds were still in their emitting count. Adverse clinical sequelae from seed embolization to the lung were documented. The radioactive seed implants were identified on chest X-rays in 6 patients. The incidence rate of seed migration in 321 parotid brachytherapy patients was 1.87% (6/321) and that of individual seed migration was 0.04% (6/15218 seeds). All migrated seeds were originally from the retromandibular region. No adverse dosimetric consequences were found in the target region. Pulmonary symptoms were not reported by any patient in this study. In our patient set, migration of radioactive seeds with an initial radioactivity of 0.6-0.7 mCi to the chest following parotid brachytherapy was rare. Late migration of a single seed from the central target region did not affect the dosimetry significantly, and patients did not have severe short-term complications. This study proposed a novel technique to localize the anatomical origin of the migrated seeds during brachytherapy. Our evidence suggested that placement of seeds adjacent to blood vessels was associated with an increased likelihood of seed migration to the lungs. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology (SFORL), short version. Diagnosis of local recurrence and metachronous locations in head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, C; Barry, B; De Raucourt, D; Choussy, O; Dessard-Diana, B; Hans, S; Lafarge, D

    2015-11-01

    Surveillance is fundamental to the management of head and neck cancer. The present guidelines of the French ENT society (SFORL) were drawn up by a group of experts in the field, and are intended to specify the modalities of management, based on a review of the literature and, where data are lacking, to provide expert opinion. The present paper deals with guidelines for the diagnosis of local and regional recurrence and metachronous head and neck locations. Locoregional recurrence usually occurs within 3 years of primary treatment and is mainly related to the characteristics of the primary tumor and the treatment measures taken. Laryngeal location, safe primary resection margins, low level of lymph node invasion, unimodal primary treatment and early diagnosis of recurrence are factors of good prognosis. Systematic imaging surveillance may be considered for patients for whom a curative technique exists and when surveillance is difficult. The role of PET-scanning remains to be determined. Metachronous locations are frequent, even in the late course; prolonged surveillance is appropriate. The best preventive measure is cessation of alcohol abuse and smoking. Patient education is primordial.

  14. Testing for inherited thrombophilia and consequences for antithrombotic prophylaxis in patients with venous thromboembolism and their relatives. A review of the Guidelines from Scientific Societies and Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Valerio; Rossi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    The clinical penetrance of venous thromboembolism (VTE) susceptibility genes is variable, being lower in heterozygous carriers of factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210A (mild thrombophilia), and higher in the rare carriers of deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C or S, and those with multiple or homozygous abnormalities (high-risk thrombophilia). The absolute risk of VTE is low, and the utility of laboratory investigation for inherited thrombophilia in patients with VTE and their asymptomatic relatives has been largely debated, leading to the production of several Guidelines from Scientific Societies and Working Groups. The risk for VTE largely depends on the family history of VTE. Therefore, indiscriminate search for carriers is of no utility, and targeted screening is potentially more fruitful. In patients with VTE inherited thrombophilia is not scored as a determinant of recurrence, playing a minor role in the decision of prolonging anticoagulation; indeed, a few guidelines consider testing worthwhile to identify carriers of high-risk thrombophilia, particularly those with a family history of VTE. The identification of the asymptomatic carrier relatives of the probands with VTE and thrombophilia could reduce cases of provoked VTE, offering them primary antithrombotic prophylaxis during risk situations. In most guidelines, this is considered justified only for relatives of probands with a deficiency of natural anticoagulants or multiple abnormalities. Counselling the asymptomatic female relatives of individuals with VTE and/or thrombophilia before pregnancy or the prescription of hormonal treatments should be administered with consideration of the risk driven by the type of thrombophilia and the family history of VTE.

  15. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety, obsessive-compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorders - first revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Zohar, Joseph; Hollander, Eric; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Zohar, Joseph; Hollander, Eric; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bandelow, Borwin; Allgulander, Christer; Ayuso-Gutierrez, José; Baldwin, David S; Buenvicius, Robertas; Cassano, Giovanni; Fineberg, Naomi; Gabriels, Loes; Hindmarch, Ian; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Klein, Donald F; Lader, Malcolm; Lecrubier, Yves; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Liebowitz, Michael R; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Marazziti, Donatella; Miguel, Euripedes C; Oh, Kang Seob; Preter, Maurice; Rupprecht, Rainer; Sato, Mitsumoto; Starcevic, Vladan; Stein, Dan J; van Ameringen, Michael; Vega, Johann

    2008-01-01

    In this report, which is an update of a guideline published in 2002 (Bandelow et al. 2002, World J Biol Psychiatry 3:171), recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are presented. Since the publication of the first version of this guideline, a substantial number of new randomized controlled studies of anxiolytics have been published. In particular, more relapse prevention studies are now available that show sustained efficacy of anxiolytic drugs. The recommendations, developed by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Task Force for the Pharmacological Treatment of Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive and Post-traumatic Stress Disorders, a consensus panel of 30 international experts, are now based on 510 published randomized, placebo- or comparator-controlled clinical studies (RCTs) and 130 open studies and case reports. First-line treatments for these disorders are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and the calcium channel modulator pregabalin. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are equally effective for some disorders, but many are less well tolerated than the SSRIs/SNRIs. In treatment-resistant cases, benzodiazepines may be used when the patient does not have a history of substance abuse disorders. Potential treatment options for patients unresponsive to standard treatments are described in this overview. Although these guidelines focus on medications, non-pharmacological were also considered. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and other variants of behaviour therapy have been sufficiently investigated in controlled studies in patients with anxiety disorders, OCD, and PTSD to support them being recommended either alone or in combination with the above medicines.

  16. An official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: sleep apnea, sleepiness, and driving risk in noncommercial drivers. An update of a 1994 Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Kingman P; Brown, Daniel B; Collop, Nancy; George, Charles; Grunstein, Ronald; Han, Fang; Kline, Lawrence; Malhotra, Atul; Pack, Alan; Phillips, Barbara; Rodenstein, Daniel; Schwab, Richard; Weaver, Terri; Wilson, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Sleepiness may account for up to 20% of crashes on monotonous roads, especially highways. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common medical disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness, increasing the risk for drowsy driving two to three times. The purpose of these guidelines is to update the 1994 American Thoracic Society Statement that described the relationships among sleepiness, sleep apnea, and driving risk. A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of sleepy driving due to OSA. Pragmatic systematic reviews were performed, and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to formulate and grade the recommendations. Critical outcomes included crash-related mortality and real crashes, whereas important outcomes included near-miss crashes and driving performance. A strong recommendation was made for treatment of confirmed OSA with continuous positive airway pressure to reduce driving risk, rather than no treatment, which was supported by moderate-quality evidence. Weak recommendations were made for expeditious diagnostic evaluation and initiation of treatment and against the use of stimulant medications or empiric continuous positive airway pressure to reduce driving risk. The weak recommendations were supported by very low-quality evidence. Additional suggestions included routinely determining the driving risk, inquiring about additional causes of sleepiness, educating patients about the risks of excessive sleepiness, and encouraging clinicians to become familiar with relevant laws. The recommendations presented in this guideline are based on the current evidence, and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies becomes available.

  17. Guidelines on the safety of light-based home-use hair removal devices from the European Society for Laser Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, G; Ash, C; Dierickx, C; Fritz, K; Bjerring, P; Haedersdal, M

    2012-07-01

    In the past 5 years since their US introduction, there has been a rapid proliferation of light-based hair removal devices intended for home-use. In the last 2 years in Europe, sales already run into many tens of thousands of units with well-known multi-national companies entering the market. These guidelines provide a definition of light-based home-use technology, to inform healthcare professionals about home-use light-based technology and encourage manufacturers wishing to sell in Europe to adopt 'best practice'. The review presents the current status on standards and regulation issues and considers home-use safety issues, encompassing human, device and electrical safety, given risks to the eyes and skin from optical radiation both to the consumer and persons in the vicinity. Proposed technical measurement methodology is considered with focus on recognized critical parameters for the safe use of light-based hair removal technology including recording the technical performance and safety claims of a range of home-use hair removal devices. The literature review emphasizes potential adverse incidents and safety aspects of treating cosmetic conditions, such as unwanted hair growth. Although some regulations exist, they differ from region to region and there is a specific need for international common principles and guidelines relating to the manufacture, marketing and use of intense pulsed light and laser devices, including manufacturing standards for home-use products intended, amongst others, for cosmetic hair removal and photo-rejuvenation procedures. In these guidelines, the European Society for Laser Dermatology (ESLD) provides a professional view of what 'best practice' may imply for manufacturers and consumers alike.

  18. Clinical practice guideline for the use of antimicrobial agents in neutropenic patients with cancer: 2010 update by the infectious diseases society of america.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifeld, Alison G; Bow, Eric J; Sepkowitz, Kent A; Boeckh, Michael J; Ito, James I; Mullen, Craig A; Raad, Issam I; Rolston, Kenneth V; Young, Jo-Anne H; Wingard, John R

    2011-02-15

    This document updates and expands the initial Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Fever and Neutropenia Guideline that was published in 1997 and first updated in 2002. It is intended as a guide for the use of antimicrobial agents in managing patients with cancer who experience chemotherapy-induced fever and neutropenia. Recent advances in antimicrobial drug development and technology, clinical trial results, and extensive clinical experience have informed the approaches and recommendations herein. Because the previous iteration of this guideline in 2002, we have a developed a clearer definition of which populations of patients with cancer may benefit most from antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral prophylaxis. Furthermore, categorizing neutropenic patients as being at high risk or low risk for infection according to presenting signs and symptoms, underlying cancer, type of therapy, and medical comorbidities has become essential to the treatment algorithm. Risk stratification is a recommended starting point for managing patients with fever and neutropenia. In addition, earlier detection of invasive fungal infections has led to debate regarding optimal use of empirical or preemptive antifungal therapy, although algorithms are still evolving. What has not changed is the indication for immediate empirical antibiotic therapy. It remains true that all patients who present with fever and neutropenia should be treated swiftly and broadly with antibiotics to treat both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. Finally, we note that all Panel members are from institutions in the United States or Canada; thus, these guidelines were developed in the context of North American practices. Some recommendations may not be as applicable outside of North America, in areas where differences in available antibiotics, in the predominant pathogens, and/or in health care-associated economic conditions exist. Regardless of venue, clinical vigilance and immediate treatment are

  19. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline update on chemotherapy for stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzoli, Christopher G; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H; Laskin, Janessa L; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J; Strawn, John R; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-12-20

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy.

  20. The Spanish Society of Neurology's official clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy. Special considerations in epilepsy: comorbidities, women of childbearing age, and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Llerda, J A; Suller Marti, A; de la Peña Mayor, P; Martínez Ferri, M; Poza Aldea, J J; Gomez Alonso, J; Mercadé Cerdá, J M

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of some population groups (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly) may limit epilepsy management. Antiepileptic treatment in these patients may require adjustments. We searched articles in Pubmed, clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy, and recommendations by the most relevant medical societies regarding epilepsy in special situations (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly). Evidence and recommendations are classified according to the prognostic criteria of Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (2001) and the European Federation of Neurological Societies (2004) for therapeutic interventions. Epilepsy treatment in special cases of comorbidities must be selected properly to improve efficacy with the fewest side effects. Adjusting antiepileptic medication and/or hormone therapy is necessary for proper seizure management in catamenial epilepsy. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects and may affect fetal growth and/or cognitive development. Postpartum breastfeeding is recommended, with monitoring for adverse effects if sedative AEDs are used. Finally, the elderly are prone to epilepsy, and diagnostic and treatment characteristics in this group differ from those of other age groups. Although therapeutic limitations may be more frequent in older patients due to comorbidities, they usually respond better to lower doses of AEDs than do other age groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Methodological background and strategy for the 2012-2013 updated consensus definitions and clinical practice guidelines from the abdominal compartment society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Roberts, Derek J; Jaeschke, Roman; De Waele, Jan J; De Keulenaer, Bart L; Duchesne, Juan; Bjorck, Martin; Leppäniemi, Ari; Ejike, Janeth C; Sugrue, Michael; Cheatham, Michael L; Ivatury, Rao; Ball, Chad G; Reintam Blaser, Annika; Regli, Adrian; Balogh, Zsolt; D'Amours, Scott; De Laet, Inneke; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The Abdominal Compartment Society (www.wsacs.org) previously created highly cited Consensus Definitions/Management Guidelines related to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Implicit in this previous work, was a commitment to regularly reassess and update in relation to evolving research. Two years preceding the Fifth World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome, an International Guidelines committee began preparation. An oversight/steering committee formulated key clinical questions regarding IAH/ /ACS based on polling of the Executive to redundancy, structured according to the Patient, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) format. Scientific consultations were obtained from Methodological GRADE experts and a series of educational teleconferences were conducted to educate scientific review teams from among the wscacs. org membership. Each team conducted systematic or structured reviews to identify relevant studies and prepared evidence summaries and draft Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) recommendations. The evidence and draft recommendations were presented and debated in person over four days. Updated consensus definitions and management statements were derived using a modified Delphi method. A writingcommittee subsequently compiled the results utilizing frequent Internet discussion and Delphi voting methods to compile a robust online Master Report and a concise peer-reviewed summarizing publication. A dedicated Paediatric Guidelines Subcommittee reviewed all recommendations and either accepted or revised them for appropriateness in children. Of the original 12 IAH/ACS definitions proposed in 2006, three (25%) were accepted unanimously, with four (33%) accepted by > 80%, and four (33%) accepted by > 50%, but required discussion to produce revised definitions. One (8%) was rejected by > 50%. In addition to previous 2006 definitions, the panel also defined the open abdomen

  2. The Royal College of Radiologists' audit of prostate brachytherapy in the year 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A J; Drinkwater, K J; Laing, R W; Nobes, J P; Locke, I

    2015-06-01

    This audit provides a comprehensive overview of UK prostate brachytherapy practice in the year 2012, measured against existing standards, immediately before the introduction of new Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) guidelines. This audit allows comparison with European and North American brachytherapy practice and for the impact of the RCR 2012 guidelines to be assessed in the future. A web-based data collection tool was developed by the RCR Clinical Audit Committee and sent to audit leads at all cancer centres in the UK. Standards were developed based on available guidelines in use at the start of 2012 covering case mix and dosimetry. Further questions were included to reflect areas of anticipated change with the implementation of the 2012 guidelines. Audit findings were compared with similar audits of practice in Europe, the USA and Latin America. Forty-nine of 59 cancer centres submitted data. Twenty-nine centres reported carrying out prostate brachytherapy; of these, 25 (86%) provided data regarding the number of implants, staffing, dosimetry, medication and anaesthesia and follow-up. Audit standards achieved excellent compliance in most areas, although were low in post-implant dosimetry and in post-implant scanning at 30 days. This audit provides a comprehensive picture of prostate brachytherapy in the UK in 2012. Patterns of care of prostate brachytherapy are similar to practice in the USA and Europe. The number of prostate brachytherapy implants carried out in the UK has grown significantly since a previous RCR audit in 2005 and it is important that centres maintain minimum numbers of cases to ensure that experience can be maintained and compliance to guidelines achieved. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Permanent implant prostate cancer brachytherapy: 2013 state-of-the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosset, J-M; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D; Delannes, M; Pommier, P; Pierrat, N; Nickers, P; Thomas, L; Chauveinc, L

    2013-04-01

    With an experience of more than 25 years for the pioneers (and more than 14 years in France), permanent implant brachytherapy using iodine 125 seeds (essentially) is now recognized as a valuable alternative therapy for localized low-risk prostate cancer patients. The possible extension of the indications of exclusive brachytherapy towards selected patients in the intermediate-risk group has now been confirmed by several studies. Moreover, for the other patients in the intermediate-risk group and for the patients in the high-risk group, brachytherapy, as an addition to external radiotherapy, could represent one of the best ways to escalate the dose. Different permanent implant brachytherapy techniques have been proposed; preplanning or real-time procedure, loose or stranded seeds (or both), manual or automatic injection of the seeds. The main point here is the ability to perfectly master the procedure and to comply with the dosimetric constraints, which have been recently redefined by the international societies, such as the GEC-ESTRO group. Mid- and long-term results, which are now available in the literature, indicate relapse-free survival rates of about 90% at 5-10 years, the best results being obtained with satisfactory dosimetric data. Comparative data have shown that the incontinence and impotence rates after brachytherapy seemed to be significantly inferior to what is currently observed after surgery. However, a risk of about 3 to 5% of urinary retention is usually reported after brachytherapy, as well as an irritative urinary syndrome, which may significantly alter the quality of life of the patients, and last several months. In spite of those drawbacks, with excellent long-term results, low rates of incontinence and impotence, and emerging new indications (focal brachytherapy, salvage brachytherapy after localized failure of an external irradiation), permanent implant prostate brachytherapy can be expected to be proposed to an increasing number of patients

  4. A Customized Finger Brachytherapy Carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa, Supneet Singh; Duggal, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, radiation therapy has been used with increasing frequency in the management of neoplasms of the head and neck region. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation treatment in which sealed radioactive sources are used to deliver the dose a short distance by interstitial (direct insertion into tissue), intracavitary (placement within a cavity) or surface application (molds). Mold brachytherapy is radiation delivered via a custom-fabricated carriers, designed to provide a more consta...

  5. Clinical management of primary non-acute promyelocytic leukemia acute myeloid leukemia: Practice Guidelines by the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology, and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Enrica; Barosi, Giovanni; Bosi, Alberto; Ferrara, Felicetto; Locatelli, Franco; Marchetti, Monia; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mecucci, Cristina; Vignetti, Marco; Tura, Sante

    2009-01-01

    As many options are now available to treat patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia, the Italian Society of Hematology and two affiliated societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned project to an Expert Panel aimed at developing clinical practice guidelines for acute myeloid leukemia treatment. After systematic comprehensive literature review, the Expert Panel formulated recommendations for the management of primary acute myeloid leukemia (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia) and graded them according to the supporting evidence. When evidence was lacking, consensus-based statements have been added. First-line therapy for all newly diagnosed patients eligible for intensive treatment should include one cycle of induction with standard dose cytarabine and an anthracycline. After achieving complete remission, patients aged less than 60 years should receive consolidation therapy including high-dose cytarabine. Myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-compatible sibling should be performed in first complete remission: 1) in children with intermediate-high risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy; 2) in adults less than 40 years with an intermediate-risk; in those aged less than 55 years with either high-risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy. Stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor is recommended to be performed in first complete remission in adults 30 years old or younger, and in children with very high-risk disease lacking a sibling donor. Alternative donor stem cell transplantation is an option in high-risk patients without a matched donor who urgently need transplantation. Patients aged less than 60 years, who either are not candidate for allogeneic stem cell transplantation or lack a donor, are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation. We describe the results of a systematic literature review and an

  6. Assessment of the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or invasive procedures: Guidelines of the Italian Society for Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmi, Benilde; Alatri, Adriano; Cattaneo, Marco; Gresele, Paolo; Marietta, Marco; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Tripodi, Armando; Ansaloni, Luca; Fusari, Maurizio; Taddei, Stefania

    2009-11-01

    SYNOPSIS OF RECOMMENDATIONS: The Italian Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (SISET: Società Italiana per lo Studio dell' Emostasi e della Trombosi) promoted the development of a series of guidelines which would adopt evidence-based medicine methodology on clinically relevant problems in the field of haemostasis and thrombosis. The objective of the present guidelines is to provide recommendations for the pre-operative and pre-procedural assessment of the bleeding risk with the aim of reducing the incidence of preventable bleeding complications and limiting laboratory tests to the those necessary. The predictive value of haemostatic tests for bleeding complications after surgery or invasive procedures has been evaluated in prospective or retrospective cohort studies only. All retrieved studies were of low methodological quality with a high potential for bias because none conducted a blinded outcome assessment. In addition, different criteria for the severity of bleeding events and different reference values of the laboratory tests were adopted. The low methodological quality limits the validity of the results of these studies. Some of the clinical queries proposed by the working group were not addressed by the studies available in the literature. The areas with evidence, although of low quality, are the following: general surgery in adults (for history, PT, APTT, platelet count and bleeding time), neurosurgery in adults (for history, PT, APTT, platelet count), adenotonsillectomy in children (for history, PT, APTT, platelet count and bleeding time), invasive procedures in adults (for PT, APTT, platelet count), dental extractions (for the bleeding time only), cataract extraction (for platelet count). No studies are available in children for major surgery other than adenotonsillectomy, neurosurgery and invasive procedures.

  7. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping

  8. Best practice guidelines for the management of frailty: a British Geriatrics Society, Age UK and Royal College of General Practitioners report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Gill; Clegg, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Older people are majority users of health and social care services in the UK and internationally. Many older people who access these services have frailty, which is a state of vulnerability to adverse outcomes. The existing health care response to frailty is mainly secondary care-based and reactive to the acute health crises of falls, delirium and immobility. A more proactive, integrated, person-centred and community-based response to frailty is required. The British Geriatrics Society Fit for Frailty guideline is consensus best practice guidance for the management of frailty in community and outpatient settings. The BGS recommends that all encounters between health and social care staff and older people in community and outpatient settings should include an assessment for frailty. A gait speed 10s; and a score of ≥3 on the PRISMA 7 questionnaire can indicate frailty. The common clinical presentations of frailty (falls, delirium, sudden immobility) can also be used to indicate the possible presence of frailty. The BGS recommends an holistic medical review based on the principles of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) for all older people identified with frailty. This will: diagnose medical illnesses to optimise treatment; apply evidence-based medication review checklists (e.g. STOPP/START criteria); include discussion with older people and carers to define the impact of illness; work with the older person to create an individualised care and support plan. The BGS does not recommend population screening for frailty using currently available instruments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Current role of MDCT in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (2011). A clinical guideline of the Austrian Societies of Cardiology and Radiology; Aktueller Stellenwert der MSCTA in der Koronargefaessdiagnostik (2011). Klinischer Leitfaden der Oesterreichischen Gesellschaften fuer Kardiologie und Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergan, K. [Salzburger Landeskliniken, Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniv. (Austria). Universitaetsinst. fuer Radiologie; Globits, S. [Landesklinikum St. Poelten (Austria). 3. Medizinische Abt./Kardiologie; Loewe, C. [Medizinische Univ. Wien (AT). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik] (and others)

    2011-10-15

    The clinical guideline of the Austrian Societies for Cardiology and Radiology on the actual role of MDCT in the diagnosis of coronary artery diseases includes the following issues: CT calcium scoring; CT angiography (CTA) of the coronaries; actually recommended application of MDCR; generally inappropriate use of the technique for specific patients; radiation exposure; structural and organizational framework.

  10. Liberation From Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults: Executive Summary of an Official American College of Chest Physicians/American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P; Morris, Peter E; Ouellette, Daniel R; Alhazzani, Waleed; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; Hough, Catherine L; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Patel, Sheena; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Wilson, Kevin C; Truwit, Jonathon D

    2017-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). A multidisciplinary panel posed six clinical questions in a population, intervention, comparator, outcomes (PICO) format. A comprehensive literature search and evidence synthesis was performed for each question, which included appraising the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The Evidence-to-Decision framework was applied to each question, requiring the panel to evaluate and weigh the importance of the problem, confidence in the evidence, certainty about how much the public values the main outcomes, magnitude and balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, resources and costs associated with the intervention, impact on health disparities, and acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated and graded initially by subcommittees and then modified following full panel discussions. The recommendations were confirmed by confidential electronic voting; approval required that at least 80% of the panel members agree with the recommendation. The panel provides recommendations regarding liberation from mechanical ventilation. The details regarding the evidence and rationale for each recommendation are presented in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and CHEST. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Official Executive Summary of an American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline: Liberation from Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P; Morris, Peter E; Ouellette, Daniel R; Alhazzani, Waleed; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; L Hough, Catherine; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Patel, Sheena; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Wilson, Kevin C; Truwit, Jonathon D

    2017-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society and the American College of Chest Physicians. A multidisciplinary panel posed six clinical questions in a Population, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcomes format. A comprehensive literature search and evidence synthesis was performed for each question, which included appraising the certainty in the evidence (i.e., the quality of evidence) using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The Evidence-to-Decision framework was applied to each question, requiring the panel to evaluate and weigh the importance of the problem, the confidence in the evidence, the certainty about how much the public values the main outcomes, the magnitude and balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, the resources and costs associated with the intervention, the impact on health disparities, and the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated and graded initially by subcommittees and then modified after full-panel discussions. The recommendations were confirmed by confidential electronic voting; approval required that at least 80% of the panel members agree with the recommendation. The panel provides recommendations regarding liberation from mechanical ventilation. The details regarding the evidence and rationale for each recommendation are presented in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and Chest.

  12. Improved outcomes with European Society of Cardiology guideline-adherent antithrombotic treatment in high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation: a report from the EORP-AF General Pilot Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Laroche, Cécile; Popescu, Mircea Iaochim; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Vitali-Serdoz, Laura; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Crijns, Harry J G M; Oliveira, Mario Martins; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Guideline-adherent therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has been associated with better outcomes, in terms of thromboembolism (TE) and bleeding. In this report from the EuroObservational Research Programme-Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot General Registry, we describe the associated baseline features of 'high risk' AF patients in relation to guideline-adherent antithrombotic treatment, i.e. whether they were adherent, over-treated, or under-treated based on the 2012 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Secondly, we assessed the predictors of guideline-adherent antithrombotic treatment. Thirdly, we evaluated outcomes for all-cause mortality, TE, bleeding, and the composite endpoint of 'any TE, cardiovascular death or bleeding' in relation to whether they were ESC guideline-adherent treatment. From the EORP-AF cohort, the follow-up dataset of 2634 subjects was used to assess the impact of guideline adherence or non-adherence. Of these, 1602 (60.6%) were guideline adherent, whilst 458 (17.3%) were under-treated, and 574 (21.7%) were over-treated. Non-guideline-adherent treatment can be related to region of Europe as well as associated clinical features, but not age, AF type, symptoms, or echocardiography indices. Over-treatment per se was associated with symptoms, using the EHRA score, as well as other comorbidities. Guideline-adherent antithrombotic management based on the ESC guidelines is associated with significantly better outcomes. Specifically, the endpoint of 'all cause death and any TE' is increased by >60% by undertreatment [hazard ratio (HR) 1.679 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.202-2.347)] or over-treatment [HR 1.622 (95% CI 1.173-2.23)]. For the composite endpoint of 'cardiovascular death, any TE or bleeding', over-treatment increased risk by >70% [HR 1.722 (95% CI 1.200-2.470)]. Even in this cohort with high overall rates of oral anticoagulation use, ESC guideline-adherent antithrombotic management is associated with

  13. American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) guidelines for responsible opioid prescribing in chronic non-cancer pain: Part I--evidence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Abdi, Salahadin; Atluri, Sairam; Balog, Carl C; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Boswell, Mark V; Brown, Keith R; Bruel, Brian M; Bryce, David A; Burks, Patricia A; Burton, Allen W; Calodney, Aaron K; Caraway, David L; Cash, Kimberly A; Christo, Paul J; Damron, Kim S; Datta, Sukdeb; Deer, Timothy R; Diwan, Sudhir; Eriator, Ike; Falco, Frank J E; Fellows, Bert; Geffert, Stephanie; Gharibo, Christopher G; Glaser, Scott E; Grider, Jay S; Hameed, Haroon; Hameed, Mariam; Hansen, Hans; Harned, Michael E; Hayek, Salim M; Helm, Standiford; Hirsch, Joshua A; Janata, Jeffrey W; Kaye, Alan D; Kaye, Adam M; Kloth, David S; Koyyalagunta, Dhanalakshmi; Lee, Marion; Malla, Yogesh; Manchikanti, Kavita N; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Parr, Allan T; Pasupuleti, Ramarao; Patel, Vikram B; Sehgal, Nalini; Silverman, Sanford M; Singh, Vijay; Smith, Howard S; Snook, Lee T; Solanki, Daneshvari R; Tracy, Deborah H; Vallejo, Ricardo; Wargo, Bradley W

    2012-07-01

    Opioid abuse has continued to increase at an alarming rate since the 1990 s. As documented by different medical specialties, medical boards, advocacy groups, and the Drug Enforcement Administration, available evidence suggests a wide variance in chronic opioid therapy of 90 days or longer in chronic non-cancer pain. Part 1 describes evidence assessment. The objectives of opioid guidelines as issued by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) are to provide guidance for the use of opioids for the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain, to produce consistency in the application of an opioid philosophy among the many diverse groups involved, to improve the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain, and to reduce the incidence of abuse and drug diversion. The focus of these guidelines is to curtail the abuse of opioids without jeopardizing non-cancer pain management with opioids. 1) There is good evidence that non-medical use of opioids is extensive; one-third of chronic pain patients may not use prescribed opioids as prescribed or may abuse them, and illicit drug use is significantly higher in these patients. 2) There is good evidence that opioid prescriptions are increasing rapidly, as the majority of prescriptions are from non-pain physicians, many patients are on long-acting opioids, and many patients are provided with combinations of long-acting and short-acting opioids. 3) There is good evidence that the increased supply of opioids, use of high dose opioids, doctor shoppers, and patients with multiple comorbid factors contribute to the majority of the fatalities. 4) There is fair evidence that long-acting opioids and a combination of long-acting and short-acting opioids contribute to increasing fatalities and that even low-doses of 40 mg or 50 mg of daily morphine equivalent doses may be responsible for emergency room admissions with overdoses and deaths. 5) There is good evidence that approximately 60% of fatalities originate from opioids

  14. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) in critically ill patients (Part I): Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annane, Djillali; Pastores, Stephen M; Rochwerg, Bram; Arlt, Wiebke; Balk, Robert A; Beishuizen, Albertus; Briegel, Josef; Carcillo, Joseph; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Cooper, Mark S; Marik, Paul E; Umberto Meduri, Gianfranco; Olsen, Keith M; Rodgers, Sophia; Russell, James A; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-09-21

    To update the 2008 consensus statements for the diagnosis and management of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) in adult and pediatric patients. A multispecialty task force of 16 international experts in Critical Care Medicine, endocrinology, and guideline methods, all of them members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and/or the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. The recommendations were based on the summarized evidence from the 2008 document in addition to more recent findings from an updated systematic review of relevant studies from 2008 to 2017 and were formulated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. The strength of each recommendation was classified as strong or conditional, and the quality of evidence was rated from high to very low based on factors including the individual study design, the risk of bias, the consistency of the results, and the directness and precision of the evidence. Recommendation approval required the agreement of at least 80% of the task force members. The task force was unable to reach agreement on a single test that can reliably diagnose CIRCI, although delta cortisol (change in baseline cortisol at 60 min of <9 µg/dl) after cosyntropin (250 µg) administration and a random plasma cortisol of <10 µg/dl may be used by clinicians. We suggest against using plasma free cortisol or salivary cortisol level over plasma total cortisol (conditional, very low quality of evidence). For treatment of specific conditions, we suggest using intravenous (IV) hydrocortisone <400 mg/day for ≥3 days at full dose in patients with septic shock that is not responsive to fluid and moderate- to high-dose vasopressor therapy (conditional, low quality of evidence). We suggest not using corticosteroids in adult patients with sepsis without shock (conditional recommendation, moderate quality of evidence). We suggest the use of IV methylprednisolone 1

  15. [Epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with nosocomial pneumonia. S-3 Guideline of the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, the German Society for Infectious Diseases, the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology, the German Respiratory Society and the Paul-Ehrlich-Society for Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalhoff, K; Abele-Horn, M; Andreas, S; Bauer, T; von Baum, H; Deja, M; Ewig, S; Gastmeier, P; Gatermann, S; Gerlach, H; Grabein, B; Höffken, G; Kern, W V; Kramme, E; Lange, C; Lorenz, J; Mayer, K; Nachtigall, I; Pletz, M; Rohde, G; Rosseau, S; Schaaf, B; Schaumann, R; Schreiter, D; Schütte, H; Seifert, H; Sitter, H; Spies, C; Welte, T

    2012-12-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia (HAP) is a frequent complication of hospital care. Most data are available on ventilator-associated pneumonia. However infections on general wards are also increasing. A central issue are infections with multi drug resistant (MDR) pathogens which are difficult to treat particularly in the empirical setting potentially leading to inappropriate use of antimicrobial therapy. This guideline was compiled by an interdisciplinary group on the basis of a systematic literature review. Recommendations are made according to GRADE giving guidance for the diagnosis and therapy of HAP on the basis of quality of evidence and benefit/risk ratio. The guideline has two parts. First an update on epidemiology, spectrum of pathogens and antiinfectives is provided. In the second part recommendations for the management of diagnosis and treatment are given. Proper microbiologic work up is emphasized for knowledge of the local patterns of microbiology and drug susceptibility. Moreover this is the optimal basis for deescalation in the individual patient. The intensity of antimicrobial therapy is guided by the risk of infections with MDR. Structured deescalation concepts and strict limitation of treatment duration should lead to reduced selection pressure.

  16. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthøj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia.

  17. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia, part 2: update 2012 on the long-term treatment of schizophrenia and management of antipsychotic-induced side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthoj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    Abstract These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5) ( Bandelow et al. 2008a ,b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242, see Table 1 ). This second part of the updated guidelines covers long-term treatment as well as the management of relevant side effects. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of adults suffering from schizophrenia.

  18. European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Complications in Children With Neurological Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Claudio; van Wynckel, Myriam; Hulst, Jessie; Broekaert, Ilse; Bronsky, Jiri; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Mis, Nataša F; Hojsak, Iva; Orel, Rok; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Schaeppi, Michela; Thapar, Nikhil; Wilschanski, Michael; Sullivan, Peter; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    Feeding difficulties are frequent in children with neurological impairments and can be associated with undernutrition, growth failure, micronutrients deficiencies, osteopenia, and nutritional comorbidities. Gastrointestinal problems including gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, and dysphagia are also frequent in this population and affect quality of life and nutritional status. There is currently a lack of a systematic approach to the care of these patients. With this report, European Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition aims to develop uniform guidelines for the management of the gastroenterological and nutritional problems in children with neurological impairment. Thirty-one clinical questions addressing the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of common gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in neurological impaired children were formulated. Questions aimed to assess the nutritional management including nutritional status, identifying undernutrition, monitoring nutritional status, and defining nutritional requirements; to classify gastrointestinal issues including oropharyngeal dysfunctions, motor and sensory function, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and constipation; to evaluate the indications for nutritional rehabilitation including enteral feeding and percutaneous gastrostomy/jejunostomy; to define indications for surgical interventions (eg, Nissen Fundoplication, esophagogastric disconnection); and finally to consider ethical issues related to digestive and nutritional problems in the severely neurologically impaired children. A systematic literature search was performed from 1980 to October 2015 using MEDLINE. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation was applied to evaluate the outcomes. During 2 consensus meetings, all recommendations were discussed and finalized. The group members voted on each recommendation using the nominal voting technique. Expert opinion was applied to

  19. Cancer screening in the United States, 2013: a review of current American Cancer Society guidelines, current issues in cancer screening, and new guidance on cervical cancer screening and lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A; Brooks, Durado; Cokkinides, Vilma; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W

    2013-01-01

    Each year the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its recommendations for early cancer detection, a report on data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, current ACS cancer screening guidelines are summarized, as are updated guidelines on cervical cancer screening and lung cancer screening with low-dose helical computed tomography. The latest data on the use of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey also are described, as are several issues related to screening coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010.

  20. Brachytherapy volume visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Timothy M.; Webber, Richard L.; Hemler, Paul F.; Bettermann, Wolfram; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2000-04-01

    Conventional localization schemes for brachytherapy seed implants using biplane or stereoscopic projection radio- graphs can suffer form scaling distortions and poor visibility of implanted seeds, resulting in compromised source tracking and dosimetric inaccuracies. This paper proposes an alternative method for improving the visualization and thus, localization, of radiotherapy implants by synthesizing, form as few as two radiographic projections, a 3D image free of divergence artifacts. The result produces more accurate seed localization leading to improved dosimetric accuracy. Two alternative approaches are compared. The first uses orthogonal merging. The second employs the technique of tuned-aperture computed tomography (TACT), whereby 3D reconstruction is performed by shifting and adding of well-sampled projections relative to a fiducial reference system. Phantom results using nonlinear visualization methods demonstrate the applicability of localizing individual seeds for both approaches. Geometric errors are eliminated by a calibration scheme derived from the fiducial pattern that is imaged concurrently with the subject. Both merging and TACT approaches enhance seed localization by improving visualization of the seed distribution over biplanar radiographs. Unlike current methods, both alternatives demonstrate continuos one-to-one source tracking in 3D, although elimination of scaling artifacts requires more than two projections when using the merging method.

  1. Critical Appraisal of Microbiology Guidelines Endorsed by two Professional Organisations: Société Française De Microbiologie (SFM) and American Society of Microbiology (ASM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonfrède, Michèle; Couaillac, Jean Paul; Augereau, Christine; Lepargneur, Jean Pierre; Watine, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    Medical practice guidelines (GLs) being tools that are mainly designed to evaluate medical professionals, it sounds logical, and fair, that professionals should in turn evaluate GLs. Microbiology being a medical discipline, we used the AGREE instrument, i.e. an established evaluation tool for GLs, in order to evaluate the quality of two major microbiology guidelines, i.e. the SFM GLs and the ASM GLs). Both guidelines remain sub-optimal in their levels of quality, and obtain scores that are not very different from the average scores obtained by many other guidelines in various medical disciplines. We therefore believe that both guidelines need to be modified before they can be recommended without provisos. A higher degree of multi-disciplinary work, including a more formal implication of methodologists, as well as of infectious disease clinicians, and of economists, might perhaps enable future editions of these guidelines to reach higher levels of quality.

  2. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  3. Brachytherapy in Gynecologic Cancers: Why Is It Underused?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kathy; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-04-01

    Despite its established efficacy, brachytherapy is underused in the management of cervical and vaginal cancers in some parts of the world. Possible reasons for the underutilization of brachytherapy include the adoption of less invasive techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy; reimbursement policies favoring these techniques over brachytherapy; poor physician or patient access to brachytherapy; inadequate maintenance of brachytherapy skills among practicing radiation oncologists; transitioning to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with increased time requirements; and insufficient training of radiation oncology residents.

  4. Identification of individuals at risk for Lynch syndrome using targeted evaluations and genetic testing: National Society of Genetic Counselors and the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer joint practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Scott M; Burt, Randall; Church, James; Erdman, Steve; Hampel, Heather; Holter, Spring; Jasperson, Kory; Kalady, Matt F; Haidle, Joy Larsen; Lynch, Henry T; Palaniappan, Selvi; Wise, Paul E; Senter, Leigha

    2012-08-01

    Identifying individuals who have Lynch syndrome (LS) involves a complex diagnostic work up that includes taking a detailed family history and a combination of various genetic and immunohistochemical tests. The National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CGA-ICC) have come together to publish this clinical practice testing guideline for the evaluation of LS. The purpose of this practice guideline is to provide guidance and a testing algorithm for LS as well as recommendations on when to offer testing. This guideline does not replace a consultation with a genetics professional. This guideline includes explanations in support of this and a summary of background data. While this guideline is not intended to serve as a review of LS, it includes a discussion of background information on LS, and cites a number of key publications which should be reviewed for a more in-depth understanding of LS. These guidelines are intended for genetic counselors, geneticists, gastroenterologists, surgeons, medical oncologists, obstetricians and gynecologists, nurses and other healthcare providers who evaluate patients for LS.

  5. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik;

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and th...

  6. Review of American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Clinical Guidelines for Nutrition Support in Cancer Patients: nutrition screening and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2008-01-01

    It is clear that cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may or may not be indicated in these patients depending on individual patient characteristics. This review article, the first in a series of articles to examine the A.S.P.E.N. Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients Cancer Guidelines, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in cancer patients. This first article will provide background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients as well as discuss the role of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in the care of cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the Clinical Guidelines, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequent published studies. Future articles will explore the guidelines related to nutrition support in oncology patients receiving anticancer therapies.

  7. European Federation of Neurological Societies Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society (Reprinted from Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System, vol 10, pg 220-228, 2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.C. Hughes; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; E. Evers; R.D.M. Hadden; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P. van den Bergh; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik; M.M. Mehndiratta; R. Hughes; J.B. Winer; R. de Haan; M. Vermeulen; P. Agarwal

    2006-01-01

    Numerous sets of diagnostic criteria have sought to define chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and randomized trials and systematic reviews of treatment have been published. The objective is to prepare consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation and treatment o

  8. Brachytherapy in the Management of Uveal Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuray Tuncer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular tumor in adults. Clinical studies have shown similar patient survival rates after treatment of medium-sized melanomas when comparing plaque brachytherapy with radioactive iodine-125 versus enucleation. This finding further emphasizes the importance of this globe-sparing treatment. Brachytherapy is a special local radiotherapy technique that aims to deliver high-dose radiation directly to the tumor by sparing the periocular structures. Brachytherapy is still the most widely used treatment for uveal melanoma. Iodine-125 and ruthenium-106 are the most common radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. After brachytherapy, sight-threatening complications occur unavoidably in many patients. Brachytherapy is mostly associated with long-term complications. Radiation retinopathy and cataract formation are the most common treatment-related complications. Brachytherapy provides local tumor control (ocular salvage in about 90% of patients. Adjunctive transpupillary thermotherapy (sandwich therapy improves the control rate of local tumors to 97%. About 10% of patients treated with brachytherapy subsequently require enucleation because of local tumor recurrence or neovascular glaucoma at 5 years of follow-up. Metastatic disease occurs in 10% of patients with medium-sized melanoma at 5-year follow-up. This rate increases to 55% at 10-year follow-up in patients with large melanomas (thickness >8 mm. Thus, it is very important to inform the patients under the light of these data prior to brachytherapy. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 43-8

  9. [Guidelines: Antibiotic treatment of infections of the head and neck: consensus report on behalf of the presidency of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery edited by P. Federspil, Homburg/Saar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, P

    2009-04-01

    In 1999 the following guidelines were elaborated by a consensus conference of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery with delegates of 10 further societies and complemented by a Delphi procedure. In 2002 and 2008 up-dates were performed by the members of the consensus conference, the chair of the study group of ENT infectiology of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the presidency of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. The guidelines concern the antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections of the ears, nose and throat, taking the expected spectrum of pathogens, the microbiological and clinical efficacy and the containment of costs into consideration. After specification of the basic principles, the various infections with their causative pathogens and the antibiotics coming into question for therapy are tabulated and a differentiation is made between the antibiotic or the antibiotics of first choice and alternatives. The different dosages of oral and parenteral antibiotics for adults and children are indicated. In the appendix the different groups of antibiotics are characterized concerning their antibacterial spectrum and pharmacokinetics and in particular the differences between the older and newer representatives of the groups are pointed out.

  10. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Patil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods: This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results: Sixty-six (62.9% of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5% were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8% than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%. The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%, lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%, and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%. Conclusion: Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice.

  11. Abridged version of the AWMF guideline for the medical clinical diagnostics of indoor mould exposure: S2K Guideline of the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventive Medicine (GHUP) in collaboration with the German Association of Allergists (AeDA), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the German Society for Occupational and Environmental Medicine (DGAUM), the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH), the German Society for Pneumology and Respiratory Medicine (DGP), the German Mycological Society (DMykG), the Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the German Federal Association of Pediatric Pneumology (BAPP), and the Austrian Society for Medical Mycology (ÖGMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Heinzow, Birger; Aurbach, Ute; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bufe, Albrecht; Buzina, Walter; Cornely, Oliver A; Engelhart, Steffen; Fischer, Guido; Gabrio, Thomas; Heinz, Werner; Herr, Caroline E W; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Köberle, Martin; Lichtnecker, Herbert; Lob-Corzilius, Thomas; Merget, Rolf; Mülleneisen, Norbert; Nowak, Dennis; Rabe, Uta; Raulf, Monika; Seidl, Hans Peter; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Szewszyk, Regine; Thomas, Peter; Valtanen, Kerttu; Hurraß, Julia

    2017-01-01

    This article is an abridged version of the AWMF mould guideline "Medical clinical diagnostics of indoor mould exposure" presented in April 2016 by the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventive Medicine (Gesellschaft für Hygiene, Umweltmedizin und Präventivmedizin, GHUP), in collaboration with the above-mentioned scientific medical societies, German and Austrian societies, medical associations and experts. Indoor mould growth is a potential health risk, even if a quantitative and/or causal relationship between the occurrence of individual mould species and health problems has yet to be established. Apart from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and mould-caused mycoses, only sufficient evidence for an association between moisture/mould damage and the following health effects has been established: allergic respiratory disease, asthma (manifestation, progression and exacerbation), allergic rhinitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis (extrinsic allergic alveolitis), and increased likelihood of respiratory infections/bronchitis. In this context the sensitizing potential of moulds is obviously low compared to other environmental allergens. Recent studies show a comparatively low sensitizing prevalence of 3-10% in the general population across Europe. Limited or suspected evidence for an association exist with respect to mucous membrane irritation and atopic eczema (manifestation, progression and exacerbation). Inadequate or insufficient evidence for an association exist for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in children, rheumatism/arthritis, sarcoidosis and cancer. The risk of infection posed by moulds regularly occurring indoors is low for healthy persons; most species are in risk group 1 and a few in risk group 2 (Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus) of the German Biological Agents Act (Biostoffverordnung). Only moulds that are potentially able to form toxins can be triggers of toxic reactions

  12. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  13. Intravascular brachytherapy for peripheral vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA through balloon dilatation with or without stenting, i.e. vessel expansion through balloons with or without of implantation of small tubes, called stents, are used in the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD. The intravascular vessel irradiation, called intravascular brachytherapy, promises a reduction in the rate of repeated stenosis (rate of restenosis after PTA. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of brachytherapy in PAOD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in August 2007 in the most important medical electronic databases for publications beginning from 2002. The medical evaluation included randomized controlled trials (RCT. The information synthesis was performed using meta-analysis. Health economic modeling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economical assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG-2007. Results: Medical evaluation: Twelve publications about seven RCT on brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy were included in the medical evaluation. Two RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six and/or twelve months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after successful balloon dilatation, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.84. At five years, time to recurrence of restenosis was significantly delayed after brachytherapy. One RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after PTA with optional stenting, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.95. One RCT observed a significantly higher rate of late thrombotic occlusions after brachytherapy in the subgroup of stented patients. A single RCT for brachytherapy

  14. Guideline for wireless capsule endoscopy in children and adolescents: a consensus document by the SEGHNP (Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) and the SEPD (Spanish Society for Digestive Diseases)

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Argüelles-Arias; Ester Donat; Ignacio Fernández-Urien; Fernando Alberca; Federico Argüelles-Martín; María José Martínez; Manuel Molina; Vicente Varea; Juan Manuel Herrerías-Gutiérrez; Carmen Ribes-Koninckx

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Capsule endoscopy (CE) in children has limitations based mainly on age. The objective of this consensus was reviewing the scientific evidence. Material and methods: Some experts from the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology (SEPD) and Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (SEGHNP) were invited to answer different issues about CE in children. These sections were: a) Indications, contraindications and limitations; b) efficacy of CE in different c...

  15. American Brachytherapy Task Group Report: Adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy for early-stage endometrial cancer: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Block, Alec M; Alektiar, Kaled M; Gaffney, David K; Jones, Ellen; Klopp, Ann; Viswanathan, Akila N; Small, William

    This article aims to review the risk stratification of endometrial cancer, treatment rationale, outcomes, treatment planning, and treatment recommendations of vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in the postoperative management of endometrial cancer patients. The authors performed a thorough review of the literature and reference pertinent articles pertaining to the aims of this review. Adjuvant VBT for early-stage endometrial cancer patients results in very low rates of vaginal recurrence (0-3.1%) with low rates of late toxicity which are primarily vaginal in nature. Post-Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer 2 (PORTEC-2) supports that VBT results in noninferior rates of vaginal recurrence compared to external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of high-intermediate risk patients. VBT as a boost after external beam radiotherapy, in combination with chemotherapy, and for high-risk histologies have shown excellent results as well though randomized data do not exist supporting VBT boost. There are many different applicators, dose-fractionation schedules, and treatment planning techniques which all result in favorable clinical outcomes and low rates of toxicity. Recommendations have been published by the American Brachytherapy Society and the American Society of Radiation Oncology to help guide practitioners in the use of VBT. Data support that patients and physicians prefer joint decision making regarding the use of VBT, and patients often desire additional treatment for a marginal benefit in risk of recurrence. Discussions regarding adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer are best performed in a multidisciplinary setting, and patients should be counseled properly regarding the risks and benefits of adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline: Liberation from Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Adults. Rehabilitation Protocols, Ventilator Liberation Protocols, and Cuff Leak Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Timothy D; Alhazzani, Waleed; Kress, John P; Ouellette, Daniel R; Schmidt, Gregory A; Truwit, Jonathon D; Burns, Suzanne M; Epstein, Scott K; Esteban, Andres; Fan, Eddy; Ferrer, Miguel; Fraser, Gilles L; Gong, Michelle Ng; Hough, Catherine L; Mehta, Sangeeta; Nanchal, Rahul; Patel, Sheena; Pawlik, Amy J; Schweickert, William D; Sessler, Curtis N; Strøm, Thomas; Wilson, Kevin C; Morris, Peter E

    2017-01-01

    Interventions that lead to earlier liberation from mechanical ventilation can improve patient outcomes. This guideline, a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society and the American College of Chest Physicians, provides evidence-based recommendations to optimize liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. Two methodologists performed evidence syntheses to summarize available evidence relevant to key questions about liberation from mechanical ventilation. The methodologists appraised the certainty in the evidence (i.e., the quality of evidence) using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach and summarized the results in evidence profiles. The guideline panel then formulated recommendations after considering the balance of desirable consequences (benefits) versus undesirable consequences (burdens, adverse effects, and costs), the certainty in the evidence, and the feasibility and acceptability of various interventions. Recommendations were rated as strong or conditional. The guideline panel made four conditional recommendations related to rehabilitation protocols, ventilator liberation protocols, and cuff leak tests. The recommendations were for acutely hospitalized adults mechanically ventilated for more than 24 hours to receive protocolized rehabilitation directed toward early mobilization, be managed with a ventilator liberation protocol, be assessed with a cuff leak test if they meet extubation criteria but are deemed high risk for postextubation stridor, and be administered systemic steroids for at least 4 hours before extubation if they fail the cuff leak test. The American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians recommendations are intended to support healthcare professionals in their decisions related to liberating critically ill adults from mechanical ventilation.

  17. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  18. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor

  19. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor vol

  20. Haemorrhagia post partum; an implementation study on the evidence-based guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the MOET (Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma-course) instructions; the Fluxim study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the most important causes of maternal mortality and severe morbidity worldwide is post partum haemorrhage (PPH). Factors as substandard care are frequently reported in the international literature and there are similar reports in the Netherlands. The incidence of PPH in the Dutch population is 5% containing 10.000 women a year. The introduction of an evidence-based guideline on PPH by the Dutch society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the initiation of the MOET course (Managing Obstetrics Emergencies and Trauma) did not lead to a reduction of PPH. This implies the possibility of an incomplete implementation of both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop and test a tailored strategy to implement both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions Methods/Design One step in the development procedure is to evaluate the implementation of the guideline and MOET-instructions in the current care. Therefore measurement of the actual care will be performed in a representative sample of 20 hospitals. This will be done by prospective observation of the third stage of labour of 320 women with a high risk of PPH using quality indicators extracted from the NVOG guideline and MOET instructions. In the next step barriers and facilitators for guideline adherence will be analyzed by performance of semi structured interviews with 30 professionals and 10 patients, followed by a questionnaire study among all Dutch gynaecologists and midwives to quantify the barriers mentioned. Based on the outcomes, a tailored strategy to implement the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions will be developed and tested in a feasibility study in 4 hospitals, including effect-, process- and cost evaluation. Discussion This study will provide insight into current Dutch practice, in particular to what extent the PPH guidelines of the NVOG and the MOET-instructions have been implemented in the actual care, and into the barriers and

  1. Haemorrhagia post partum; an implementation study on the evidence-based guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG and the MOET (Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma-course instructions; the Fluxim study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grol Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most important causes of maternal mortality and severe morbidity worldwide is post partum haemorrhage (PPH. Factors as substandard care are frequently reported in the international literature and there are similar reports in the Netherlands. The incidence of PPH in the Dutch population is 5% containing 10.000 women a year. The introduction of an evidence-based guideline on PPH by the Dutch society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG and the initiation of the MOET course (Managing Obstetrics Emergencies and Trauma did not lead to a reduction of PPH. This implies the possibility of an incomplete implementation of both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop and test a tailored strategy to implement both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions Methods/Design One step in the development procedure is to evaluate the implementation of the guideline and MOET-instructions in the current care. Therefore measurement of the actual care will be performed in a representative sample of 20 hospitals. This will be done by prospective observation of the third stage of labour of 320 women with a high risk of PPH using quality indicators extracted from the NVOG guideline and MOET instructions. In the next step barriers and facilitators for guideline adherence will be analyzed by performance of semi structured interviews with 30 professionals and 10 patients, followed by a questionnaire study among all Dutch gynaecologists and midwives to quantify the barriers mentioned. Based on the outcomes, a tailored strategy to implement the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions will be developed and tested in a feasibility study in 4 hospitals, including effect-, process- and cost evaluation. Discussion This study will provide insight into current Dutch practice, in particular to what extent the PPH guidelines of the NVOG and the MOET-instructions have been implemented in the actual care, and into

  2. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Külpmann, Rüdiger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems in hospitals” ( in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  3. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    The present guideline (S2k) on allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) was established by the German, Austrian and Swiss professional associations for allergy in consensus with the scientific specialist societies and professional associations in the fields of otolaryngology, dermatology and venereology, pediatric and adolescent medicine, pneumology as well as a German patient organization (German Allergy and Asthma Association; Deutscher Allergie- und Asthmabund, DAAB) according to the criteria of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF). AIT is a therapy with disease-modifying effects. By administering allergen extracts, specific blocking antibodies, toler-ance-inducing cells and mediators are activated. These prevent further exacerbation of the allergen-triggered immune response, block the specific immune response and attenuate the inflammatory response in tissue. Products for SCIT or SLIT cannot be compared at present due to their heterogeneous composition, nor can allergen concentrations given by different manufacturers be compared meaningfully due to the varying methods used to measure their active ingredients. Non-modified allergens are used for SCIT in the form of aqueous or physically adsorbed (depot) extracts, as well as chemically modified allergens (allergoids) as depot extracts. Allergen extracts for SLIT are used in the form of aqueous solutions or tablets. The clinical efficacy of AIT is measured using various scores as primary and secondary study endpoints. The EMA stipulates combined symptom and medication scores as primary endpoint. A harmonization of clinical endpoints, e. g., by using the combined symptom and medication scores (CSMS) recommended by the EAACI, is desirable in the future in order to permit the comparison of results from different studies. The current CONSORT recommendations from the ARIA/GA2LEN group specify standards for the

  4. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process. A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and (192)Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α∕β = 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively. For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes∕fraction (min∕fx) assuming a 10 Ci(192)Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min∕fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min∕fx more. If an additional 20 min∕fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D90

  5. Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Di Saverio (Salomone); F. Coccolini (Federico); M. Galati (Marica); N. Smerieri (Nazareno); W.L. Biffl (Walter); L. Ansaloni (Luca); G. Tugnoli (Gregorio); G.C. Velmahos (George ); M. Sartelli (Massimo); C. Bendinelli (Cino); G.P. Fraga (Gustavo); M.D. Kelly (Michael ); F.A. Moore (Frederick); V. Mandala; V. Mandalà (Vincenzo); M. Masetti (Michele); E. Jovine (Elio); A.D. Pinna (Antonio ); A.B. Peitzman (Andrew); A. Leppaniemi (Ari); P.H. Sugarbaker (Paul ); H. van Goor (Harry); E.E. Moore (Ernest); J. Jeekel (Hans); F. Catena (Fausto)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for laparoscopy.Re

  6. Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Di Saverio (Salomone); F. Coccolini (Federico); M. Galati (Marica); N. Smerieri (Nazareno); W.L. Biffl (Walter); L. Ansaloni (Luca); G. Tugnoli (Gregorio); G.C. Velmahos (George ); M. Sartelli (Massimo); C. Bendinelli (Cino); G.P. Fraga (Gustavo); M.D. Kelly (Michael ); F.A. Moore (Frederick); V. Mandala; V. Mandalà (Vincenzo); M. Masetti (Michele); E. Jovine (Elio); A.D. Pinna (Antonio ); A.B. Peitzman (Andrew); A. Leppaniemi (Ari); P.H. Sugarbaker (Paul ); H. van Goor (Harry); E.E. Moore (Ernest); J. Jeekel (Hans); F. Catena (Fausto)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for laparoscopy.Re

  7. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Update 2010 on the treatment of acute bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunze, Heinz; Vieta, Eduard; Goodwin, Guy M;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: These guidelines are based on a first edition that was published in 2002, and have been edited and updated with the available scientific evidence until September 2009. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute bipo...

  8. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Update 2010 on the treatment of acute bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunze, Heinz; Vieta, Eduard; Goodwin, Guy M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: These guidelines are based on a first edition that was published in 2002, and have been edited and updated with the available scientific evidence until September 2009. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute bipo...

  9. Management of sepsis in neutropenic patients: guidelines from the infectious diseases working party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penack, O; Buchheidt, D; Christopeit, M; von Lilienfeld-Toal, M; Massenkeil, G; Hentrich, M; Salwender, H; Wolf, H-H; Ostermann, H

    2011-05-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in neutropenic cancer patients. Early initiation of effective causative therapy as well as intensive adjunctive therapy is mandatory to improve outcome. We give recommendations for the management of adults with neutropenia and sepsis. The guidelines are written for clinicians involved in care of cancer patients and focus on pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of sepsis during neutropenia.

  10. Commentary: Science, Technology, and Society in Guidelines for Using Technology to Prepare Social Studies Teachers--A Reply to Hicks et al. and Crocco and Leo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a response to both the "Guidelines for Using Technology to Prepare Social Studies Teachers" published in this journal by Hicks, Lee, Berson, Bolick, and Diem (2014) and the rejoinder by Crocco and Leo (2015). The author agrees with Crocco and Leo's assessment that removing the principal regarding science, technology, and…

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of rectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Tekkis, Paris; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Vini, Louiza; Chrysou, Evangelia; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Triantopoulou, Charina; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Karachaliou, Niki; Ziras, Nikolaos; Zoras, Odysseas; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer management, accurate staging by magnetic resonance imaging, neo-adjuvant treatment with the use of radiotherapy, and total mesorectal excision have resulted in remarkable improvement in the oncological outcomes. However, there is substantial discrepancy in the therapeutic approach and failure to adhere to international guidelines among different Greek-Cypriot hospitals. The present guidelines aim to aid the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, considering both the local special characteristics of our healthcare system and the international relevant agreements (ESMO, EURECCA). Following background discussion and online communication sessions for feedback among the members of an executive team, a consensus rectal cancer management was obtained. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology voting system on two rounds to achieve further consensus by invited multidisciplinary international experts on colorectal cancer. Statements were considered of high, moderate or low consensus if they were voted by ≥80%, 60-80%, or Guidelines and algorithms of diagnosis and treatment were proposed. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized.

  12. Osteoporosis: therapeutic guidelines. Guidelines for practice management of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sana N; Craig, Latasha; Wild, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic guidelines of osteoporosis are reviewed from North American Menopause Society, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the National Osteoporosis Foundation. The various guidelines are compared and discussed.

  13. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient--2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B; Garvey, W Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-03-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues.

  14. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  15. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  16. HAP and VAP clinical practice guidelines by Infectious Diseases Society of America-What′s new?%2016年美国感染病学会 HAP/VAP指南:新在何处?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄勇波; 黎毅敏

    2016-01-01

    医院获得性肺炎(hospital acquired pneumonia,HAP)和呼吸机相关性肺炎(ventilator associated pneumonia,VAP)是重症患者最常见的院内感染性疾病,可导致患者医疗费用增加,住院时间延长和死亡率增加。2016年美国感染病学会和美国胸科协会在2005年发表的HAP/VAP指南基础上,总结和分析新出现的临床研究结果,利用新近发展的循证指南方法学,对HAP/VAP的诊断和治疗指南进行了更新。本文将对新版指南的重要更新进行简要介绍。%Hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) remain the most frequent nosocomial infection in critical ill patients and bring about higher hospitalization cost, longer length of stay in hospital and increased mortality. In 2016, with advances in evidence-based guideline methodology and analysis of new studies related to the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP, Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and American Thoracic Society (ATS) have collaborated to create updated guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP based on last HAP/VAP guidelines published in 2005. Here, we will make a brief introduction of important updates of these new guidelines.

  17. The treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy with clindamycin to reduce the risk of infection-related preterm birth: a response to the Danish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology guideline group's clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Ronald F; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Larsson, Per G; Jørgensen, Jan S

    2017-02-01

    Preterm birth is the major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Infection/inflammation is responsible for a significant percentage of preterm birth, particularly at early gestations. A recent clinical recommendation by a guidelines group of the Danish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology advised against the use of clindamycin for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy to reduce the risk of spontaneous preterm birth based on lack of evidence of efficacy. We believe that the evidence for the use of clindamycin for this indication is robust and that this recommendation was reached erroneously on the basis of flawed inclusion criteria: the inclusion of an unpublished study with poorly diagnosed bacterial vaginosis and the exclusion of an important pivotal study on the use of clindamycin in early pregnancy for the prevention of preterm birth. Had these errors been corrected, the conclusions would have been different. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Dosimetry for the brachytherapy; Dosimetrie fuer die Brachytherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Fachbereich ' Dosimetrie fuer Strahlentherapie und Roentgendiagnostik' ; Schneider, Thorsten [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Brachytherapie'

    2013-06-15

    The authors describe the calibration of high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir sources for the use in brachytherapy by means of the air-kerma power, which is determined in the PTB by means of an ionization chamber. For this a primary normal for the representation of the water energy dose was constructed. Furthermore the representation of the reference air-kerma rate for low-dose-rate sources in the PTB by means of a large-volume parallel-plate extrapolation chamber is described. (HSI)

  19. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings - Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first "Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals" (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section "Ventilation and air conditioning technology" attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  20. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals” (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care. PMID:26958457

  1. Management of sepsis in neutropenic patients: 2014 updated guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penack, Olaf; Becker, Carolin; Buchheidt, Dieter; Christopeit, Maximilian; Kiehl, Michael; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Hentrich, Marcus; Reinwald, Marc; Salwender, Hans; Schalk, Enrico; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Weber, Thomas; Ostermann, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality during the neutropenic phase after intensive cytotoxic therapies for malignancies. Improved management of sepsis during neutropenia may reduce the mortality of cancer therapies. Clinical guidelines on sepsis treatment have been published by others. However, optimal management may differ between neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients. Our aim is to give evidence-based recommendations for haematologist, oncologists and intensive care physicians on how to manage adult patients with neutropenia and sepsis.

  2. Heart Failure in Non-Caucasians, Women, and Older Adults: A White Paper on Special Populations From the Heart Failure Society of America Guideline Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Monica; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Albert, Nancy M; Krishnamani, Rajan; Rich, Michael W; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Walsh, Mary Norine; Westlake Canary, Cheryl A; Allen, Larry A; Bonnell, Mark R; Carson, Peter E; Chan, Michael C; Dickinson, Michael G; Dries, Daniel L; Ewald, Gregory A; Fang, James C; Hernandez, Adrian F; Hershberger, Ray E; Katz, Stuart D; Moore, Stephanie; Rodgers, Jo E; Rogers, Joseph G; Vest, Amanda R; Whellan, David J; Givertz, Michael M

    2015-08-01

    The presentation, natural history, clinical outcomes, and response to therapy in patients with heart failure differ in some ways across populations. Women, older adults, and non-Caucasian racial or ethnic groups compose a substantial proportion of the overall heart failure population, but they have typically been underrepresented in clinical trials. As a result, uncertainty exists about the efficacy of some guideline-directed medical therapies and devices in specific populations, which may result in the under- or overtreatment of these patients. Even when guideline-based treatments are prescribed, socioeconomic, physical, or psychologic factors may affect non-Caucasian and older adult patient groups to a different extent and affect the application, effectiveness, and tolerability of these therapies. Individualized therapy based on tailored biology (genetics, proteomics, metabolomics), socioeconomic and cultural considerations, and individual goals and preferences may be the optimal approach for managing diverse patients. This comprehensive approach to personalized medicine is evolving, but in the interim, the scientific community should continue efforts focused on intensifying research in special populations, prescribing guideline-directed medical therapy unless contraindicated, and implementing evidence-based strategies including patient and family education and multidisciplinary team care in the management of patients.

  3. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lyndsay N.; McShane, Lisa M.; Andre, Fabrice; Collyar, Deborah E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mennel, Robert G.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Bast, Robert C.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. Methods A literature search and prospectively defined study selection sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through 2014. Outcomes of interest included overall survival and disease-free or recurrence-free survival. Expert panel members used informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 50 relevant studies. One randomized clinical trial and 18 prospective-retrospective studies were found to have evaluated the clinical utility, as defined by the guideline, of specific biomarkers for guiding decisions on the need for adjuvant systemic therapy. No studies that met guideline criteria for clinical utility were found to guide choice of specific treatments or regimens. Recommendations In addition to estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, the panel found sufficient evidence of clinical utility for the biomarker assays Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, PAM50, Breast Cancer Index, and urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in specific subgroups of breast cancer. No biomarker except for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 was found to guide choices of specific treatment regimens. Treatment decisions should also consider disease stage, comorbidities, and patient preferences. PMID:26858339

  4. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with brachytherapy: patient selection and technique considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifiletti DM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel M Trifiletti,1 Kara D Romano,1 Shayna L Showalter,2 Kelli A Reardon,1 Bruce Libby,1 Timothy N Showalter11Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI through breast brachytherapy is a relatively recent development in breast radiotherapy that has gained international favor because of its reduction in treatment duration and normal tissue irradiation while maintaining favorable cancer-specific and cosmetic outcomes. Despite the fact that several large national trials have not reported final results yet, many providers are currently offering APBI to select patients and APBI is listed as a treatment option for selecting patients in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Multiple consensus guidelines exist in selecting patients for APBI, some with conflicting recommendations. In this review, the existing patient selection guidelines are reported, compared, and critiqued, grouping them in helpful subcategories. Unique patient and technical selection factors for APBI with brachytherapy are explored.Keywords: breast cancer, APBI, breast brachytherapy

  5. Methodology for commissioning a brachytherapy treatment planning system in the era of 3D planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Claire

    2010-12-01

    To describe the steps undertaken to commission a 3D high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS). Emphasis was placed on validating previously published recommendations, in addition to checking 3D parameters such as treatment optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Commissioning was performed of the brachytherapy module of the Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (version 3.2). Commissioning test results were compared to an independent external beam TPS (Varian Eclipse v 8.6) and the previously commissioned Nucletron Plato (v 14.3.7) brachytherapy treatment planning system, with point doses also independently verified using the brachytherapy module in RadCalc (v 6.0) independent point dose calculation software. Tests were divided into eight categories: (i) Image import accuracy, (ii) Reconstruction accuracy, (iii) Source configuration data check, (iv) Dose calculation accuracy, (v) Treatment optimization validation, (vi) DVH reproducibility, (vii) Treatment export check and (viii) Printout consistency. Point dose agreement between Oncentra, Plato and RadCalc was better than 5% with source data and dose calculation protocols following the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) guidelines. Testing of image accuracy (import and reconstruction), along with validation of automated treatment optimization and DVH analysis generated a more comprehensive set of testing procedures than previously listed in published recommendations.

  6. Comparison between National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the diagnosis and management of stable angina: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, R Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cardiologists in the UK use clinical practice guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) to aid clinical decision-making. This review compares their recommendations regarding stable angina. NICE's diagnostic algorithm changed clinical practice in the UK, with most cardiologists moving from the exercise ECG towards newer, more accurate imaging modalities such as CT and MRI for diagnostic testing in patients with a low or medium probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), and directly to invasive coronary angiography in patients with a high probability of CAD. ESC guidelines are based around stress imaging for most patient groups. Both guidelines stress the importance of optimal medical therapy for patients with stable angina. NICE recommends coronary artery bypass graft surgery to improve prognosis for patients with left main stem and/or proximal 3-vessel disease, whereas the ESC also includes proximal left anterior descending artery disease among its indications for revascularisation to improve prognosis, particularly if there is evidence of myocardial ischaemia. The relation between disease complexity and 5-year clinical outcomes after revascularisation in patients with left main stem and/or 3-vessel CAD has been integrated into ESC guidance through the use of the SYNTAX score to aid treatment selection in this group of patients. Patients with stable angina who have disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery are less likely to undergo myocardial revascularisation if they are managed according to NICE's guidance compared with the ESC's guidance.

  7. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Huang, Bin [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Divison of Cancer Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Tucker, Thomas C. [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  8. Pain management for blunt thoracic trauma: A joint practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Trauma Anesthesiology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvagno, Samuel Michael; Smith, Charles E; Varon, Albert J; Hasenboehler, Erik A; Sultan, Shahnaz; Shaefer, Gregory; To, Kathleen B; Fox, Adam D; Alley, Darrell E R; Ditillo, Michael; Joseph, Bellal A; Robinson, Bryce R H; Haut, Elliot R

    2016-11-01

    Thoracic trauma is the second most prevalent nonintentional injury in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity. Analgesia for blunt thoracic trauma was first addressed by the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) with a practice management guideline published in 2005. Since that time, it was hypothesized that there have been advances in the analgesic management for blunt thoracic trauma. As a result, updated guidelines for this topic using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) framework recently adopted by EAST are presented. Five systematic reviews were conducted using multiple databases. The search retrieved articles regarding analgesia for blunt thoracic trauma from January1967 to August 2015. Critical outcomes of interest were analgesia, postoperative pulmonary complications, changes in pulmonary function tests, need for endotracheal intubation, and mortality. Important outcomes of interest examined included hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. Seventy articles were identified. Of these, 28 articles were selected to construct the guidelines. The overall risk of bias for all studies was high. The majority of included studies examined epidural analgesia. Epidural analgesia was associated with lower short-term pain scores in most studies, but the quality and quantity of evidence were very low, and no firm evidence of benefit or harm was found when this modality was compared with other analgesic interventions. The quality of evidence for paravertebral block, intrapleural analgesia, multimodal analgesia, and intercostal nerve blocks was very low as assessed by GRADE. The limitations with the available literature precluded the formulation of strong recommendations by our panel. We propose two evidence-based recommendations regarding analgesia for patients with blunt thoracic trauma. The overall risk of bias for all studies was high. The limitations with the available literature

  9. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Stefano; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Piazzalunga, Dario; Agazzi, Roberto; Arici, Claudio; Barozzi, Marco; Bellanova, Giovanni; Belluati, Alberto; Berlot, Giorgio; Biffl, Walter; Camagni, Stefania; Campanati, Luca; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Colaianni, Nicola; De Masi, Salvatore; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dodi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Faustinelli, Giovanni; Gambale, Giorgio; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Lotti, Marco; Marchesi, Gianmariano; Massè, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Tiziana; Nardi, Giuseppe; Niola, Raffaella; Nita, Gabriela Elisa; Pisano, Michele; Poiasina, Elia; Poletti, Eugenio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Rispoli, Gennaro; Rizzi, Luigi; Sonzogni, Valter; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2014-03-07

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  10. Guideline for wireless capsule endoscopy in children and adolescents: a consensus document by the SEGHNP (Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the SEPD (Spanish Society for Digestive Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Capsule endoscopy (CE in children has limitations based mainly on age. The objective of this consensus was reviewing the scientific evidence. Material and methods: Some experts from the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology (SEPD and Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (SEGHNP were invited to answer different issues about CE in children. These sections were: a Indications, contraindications and limitations; b efficacy of CE in different clinical scenarios; c CE performance; d CE-related complications; e Patency capsule; and f colon capsule endoscopy. They reviewed relevant questions on each topic. Results: The main indication is Crohn's disease (CD. There is no contraindication for the age and in the event that the patient not to swallow it, it should be administered under deep sedation with endoscopy and specific device. The CE is useful in CD, for the management of OGIB in children and in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (in this indication has the most effectiveness. The main complication is retention, which should be specially taken into account in cases of CD already diagnosed with malnutrition. A preparation regimen based on a low volume of polyethylene glycol (PEG the day before plus simethicone on the same day is the best one in terms of cleanliness although does not improve the results of the CE procedure. Conclusions: CE is safe and useful in children. Indications are similar to those of adults, the main one is CD to establish both a diagnosis and disease extension. Moreover, only few limitations are detected in children.

  11. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  12. [Sk2 guidelines"diagnosis and therapy of snoring in adults" : compiled by the sleep medicine working group of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, B A; Dreher, A; Heiser, C; Herzog, M; Kühnel, T; Maurer, J T; Pistner, H; Sitter, H; Steffen, A; Verse, T

    2013-11-01

    These guidelines aim to facilitate high quality medical care of adults with snoring problems. The guidelines were devised for application in both in- and outpatient environments and are directed primarily at all those concerned with the diagnosis and therapy of snoring. According to the AWMF three-level concept, these represent S2k guidelines.A satisfactory definition of snoring does not currently exist. Snoring is the result of vibration of soft tissue structures in narrow regions of the upper airway during breathing while asleep. Ultimately, these vibrations are caused by the sleep-associated decrease in muscle tone in the area of the upper airway dilator muscles. A multitude of risk factors for snoring have been described and its occurrence is multifactorial. Data relating to the frequency of snoring vary widely, depending on the way in which the data are collected. Snoring is usually observed in middle-aged individuals and affected males predominate. Clinical diagnosis of snoring should comprise a free evaluation of the patient's medical history. Where possible this should also involve their bed partner and the case history can be complimented by questionnaires. To determine the airflow relevant structures, a clinical examination of the nose should be performed. This examination may also include nasal endoscopy. Examination of the oropharynx is particularly important and should be performed. The larynx and the hypopharynx should be examined. The size of the tongue and the condition of the mucous membranes should be recorded as part of the oral cavity examination, as should the results of a dental assessment. Facial skeleton morphology should be assessed for orientation purposes. Technical examinations may be advisable in individual cases. In the instance of suspected sleep-related breathing disorders, relevant comorbidities or where treatment for snoring has been requested, an objective sleep medicine examination should be performed. Snoring is not-at least as

  13. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ying [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone

  14. Brachytherapy in breast cancer: an effective alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast conserving surgery (BCS with following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT of the conserved breast has become widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of EBRT after BCS is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 42.5 to 50 Gy. An additional dose is given to treated volume as a boost to a portion of the breast. In the early stage of breast cancer, research has shown that the area requiring radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from local recurrence is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI is an approach that treats only the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin rather than the whole breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose in four to five days. There has been a growing interest for APBI and various approaches have been developed under phase I-III clinical studies; these include multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy, balloon catheter brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-EBRT and intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT. Balloon-based brachytherapy approaches include MammoSite, Axxent electronic brachytherapy, Contura, hybrid brachytherapy devices. Another indication for breast brachytherapy is reirradiation of local recurrence after mastectomy. Published results of brachytherapy are very promising. We discuss the current status, indications, and technical aspects of breast cancer brachytherapy.

  15. Guidelines on the safety of light-based home-use hair removal devices from the European Society for Laser Dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham; Ash, C; Dierickx, C

    2012-01-01

    In the past 5 years since their US introduction, there has been a rapid proliferation of light-based hair removal devices intended for home-use. In the last 2 years in Europe, sales already run into many tens of thousands of units with well-known multi-national companies entering the market....... These guidelines provide a definition of light-based home-use technology, to inform healthcare professionals about home-use light-based technology and encourage manufacturers wishing to sell in Europe to adopt 'best practice'. The review presents the current status on standards and regulation issues and considers...... home-use safety issues, encompassing human, device and electrical safety, given risks to the eyes and skin from optical radiation both to the consumer and persons in the vicinity. Proposed technical measurement methodology is considered with focus on recognized critical parameters for the safe use...

  16. Screening for renal insufficiency following ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) guidelines with on-site creatinine measurements in an outpatient setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledermann, H.P.; Mengiardi, B.; Schmid, A. [IMAMED Radiologie Nordwest, Basel (Switzerland); Froehlich, J.M. [Guerbet AG, Medical Affairs, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Bern, Radiology Department, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    To report the results and implications for workflow following introduction of ESUR guidelines to screen for potential renal insufficiency (RI) in private practice with on-site creatinine measurements. A total of 1,766 consecutive outpatients scheduled for contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) completed the ESUR questionnaire enquiring about kidney disease, renal surgery, proteinuria, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gout or use of nephrotoxic drugs. Patients with positive risk factors underwent on-site creatinine measurement and calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Attending radiologists adapted subsequent imaging depending on renal function and presence of risk factors. One or more ESUR risk factors were present in 796 (45.1%) patients, including hypertension (37.7%), nephrotoxic medication (21.3%), diabetes mellitus (8.0%), proteinuria (3.9%), renal disease (4.1%), gout (3.1%) and renal surgery (2.6%). Pre-procedural creatinine measurements revealed severe RI (eGFR < 30 ml min{sup -1} 1.73 m{sup -2}) in 10 (1.3%) and moderate RI (eGFR 30-59 ml min{sup -1} 1.73 m{sup -2}) in 106 (13.8%). Imaging work-up was adapted in 132 (16.6%) as follows: reduction of contrast material dose (n = 85), CT without contrast (n = 40), changeover to MRI (n = 3) or scintigraphy (n = 4). Screening for RI following ESUR guidelines requires creatinine measurements in nearly half of outpatients scheduled for CECT and reveals moderate to severe renal impairment in 6.6%. (orig.)

  17. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Schnitt, Stuart J. [Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Giuliano, Armando E. [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Khan, Seema A. [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Horton, Janet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Klimberg, Suzanne [Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, Arkansas (United States); Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Houssami, Nehmat [School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Johnson, Peggy L. [Advocate in Science, Susan G. Komen, Wichita, Kansas (United States); Morrow, Monica, E-mail: morrowm@mskcc.org [Breast Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  18. Incidence and prediction of seed migration to the chest after iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junqing; Yang, Weizhu; Jiang, Na; Zheng, Qubin; Huang, Jingyao; Huang, Ning; Li, Ang; Jiang, Han

    2017-08-08

    The aims were to determine the incidence of seed migration to the chest and to analyze the predictive factors after iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Three hundred ninety-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent iodine-125 seed brachytherapy. After seed implantation, chest X-ray radiograph or computerized tomography were undertaken to assess the occurrence and location of seed migration at 3 months after brachytherapy. The incidence of seed migration to the lung and heart was calculated. A statistical analysis of the influences of seed loss to the chest was performed between patients with and without seed migration. A total of 13,977 seeds were implanted in 399 patients. One hundred fifty of the 13,977 (1.07%) seeds migrated to the chest in 81 of the 399 (20.30%) patients. Of all the migrated seeds, 112 (74.67%) migrated to the lungs in 59 (67.82%) patients, and 38 (25.33%) seeds migrated to the heart in 28 (47.46%) patients. No case exhibited clinical symptoms related to the migrated seeds. The number of seeds implanted and the number of seed implantations were significantly associated with seed migration. The occurrence of seed migration to the lungs and heart was evaluated. Furthermore, the number of seeds implanted and the number of seed implantation procedures are significant predictors of seed migration. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study using Henschke applicator for cervical brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cathay General Hospital, 280 Renai Rd. Sec.4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ching-Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cathay General Hospital, 280 Renai Rd. Sec.4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tung, Chuan-Jong, E-mail: cjtung@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    In recent years the Henschke applicator has been widely used for gynecologic patients treated by brachytherapy in Taiwan. However, the commercial brachytherapy planning system did not properly evaluate the dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator. Since the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology advised that the effect of source shielding should be incorporated into the brachytherapy planning system, it required calculation and comparison of the dose distribution around the applicator. This study used the Monte Carlo MCNP code to simulate the dose distribution in a water phantom that contained the Henschke applicator with one tandem and two ovoids. Three dwell positions of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source were simulated by including and excluding the applicator. The mesh tally option of the MCNP was applied to facilitate the calculation of a large number of tallies in the phantom. The voxel size effect and the charge particle equilibrium were studied by comparing the results calculated with different tally options. The calculated results showed that the brachytherapy planning system overestimated the rectal dose and that the shielding material in the applicator contributed more than 40% to the rectal dose.

  20. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-02-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.

  1. EVALUATION OF BRACHYTHERAPY FACILITY SHIELDING STATUS IN KOREA OBTAINED FROM RADIATION SAFETY REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI HYUN KEUM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-eight radiation safety reports for brachytherapy equipment were evaluated to determine the current status of brachytherapy units in Korea and to assess how radiation oncology departments in Korea complete radiation safety reports. The following data was collected: radiation safety report publication year, brachytherapy unit manufacturer, type and activity of the source that was used, affiliation of the drafter, exposure rate constant, the treatment time used to calculate workload and the HVL values used to calculate shielding design goal values. A significant number of the reports (47.4% included the personal information of the drafter. The treatment time estimates varied widely from 12 to 2,400 min/week. There was acceptable variation in the exposure rate constant values (ranging between 0.469 and 0.592 (R-m2/Ci·hr, as well as in the HVLs of concrete, steel and lead for Iridium-192 sources that were used to calculate shielding design goal values. There is a need for standard guidelines for completing radiation safety reports that realistically reflect the current clinical situation of radiation oncology departments in Korea. The present study may be useful for formulating these guidelines.

  2. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  3. Guidelines for the prevention of invasive mould diseases caused by filamentous fungi by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camps, I; Aguado, J M; Almirante, B; Bouza, E; Ferrer-Barbera, C F; Len, O; Lopez-Cerero, L; Rodríguez-Tudela, J L; Ruiz, M; Solé, A; Vallejo, C; Vazquez, L; Zaragoza, R; Cuenca-Estrella, M

    2011-04-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) caused by filamentous fungi still have high rates of mortality, associated with difficulties in early detection of the infection and therapeutic limitations. Consequently, a useful approach is to prevent patients at risk of fungal infection from coming into contact with conidia of Aspergillus and other mould species. This document describes the recommendations for preventing IFI caused by filamentous fungi worked out by Spanish experts from different medical and professional fields. The article reviews the incidence of IFI in different risk populations, and questions related to environmental measures for prevention, control of hospital infections, additional procedures for prevention, prevention of IFI outside of hospital facilities and antifungal prophylaxis are also analysed. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  4. Hidradenitis suppurativa: guidelines of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Venereology (SIDeMaST) for the use of anti-TNF-α agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, M; Bettoli, V; Chimenti, S; Chiricozzi, A; Naldi, L; Virgili, A; Girolomoni, G; Monfrecola, G

    2015-12-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by nodules, abscesses and sinus tracts, primarily affecting the intertriginous areas. The occlusion of the upper part of the folliculopilosebaceous unit, leading to rupture of the sebofollicular canal with the consequent development of perifollicular lympho-histiocytic inflammation, is believed to be the initial pathogenic event in HS. Giving the chronic nature of HS, its destructive impact on social, working and daily life of patients, its management is often frustrating both for patients and physicians. The HS treatment choices are influenced by disease severity and its individual subjective impact. In this article, the Board of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Venereology (SIDeMaST) on HS has prepared a document focusing on the role of biologic drugs (anti-TNF-α) in HS management, providing also a flow-chart for HS handling and the inclusion and exclusion criteria for HS treatment with anti-TNF-α.

  5. [General and ethical considerations for the informed consent process: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Jean-Baptiste; Polomeni, Alice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Informed consent is not restricted to clinical research and must be applied to high-risk care such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. If standardized informed consent might improve inequalities in medical practices between different transplantation centers, it is strongly recommended that it be adapted with an honest dialogue between physicians and patients and physicians and donors. In an attempt to harmonize clinical practices among French hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) held its sixth annual workshop series in September 2015 in Lille. This event brought together practitioners from across the country. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the French law concerning patients' rights and ethical practices for an informed consent process to be applied to care or research.

  6. ACR appropriateness criteria: Permanent source brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian J; Taira, Al V; Nguyen, Paul L; Assimos, Dean G; D'Amico, Anthony V; Gottschalk, Alexander R; Gustafson, Gary S; Keole, Sameer R; Liauw, Stanley L; Lloyd, Shane; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Movsas, Benjamin; Prestidge, Bradley R; Showalter, Timothy N; Vapiwala, Neha

    To provide updated American College of Radiology (ACR) appropriateness criteria for transrectal ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent source brachytherapy. The ACR appropriateness criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) is a treatment option for appropriately selected patients with localized prostate cancer with low to very high risk disease. PPB monotherapy remains an appropriate and effective curative treatment for low-risk prostate cancer patients demonstrating excellent long-term cancer control and acceptable morbidity. PPB monotherapy can be considered for select intermediate-risk patients with multiparametric MRI useful in evaluation of such patients. High-risk patients treated with PPB should receive supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) along with androgen deprivation. Similarly, patients with involved pelvic lymph nodes may also be considered for such combined treatment but reported long-term outcomes are limited. Computed tomography-based postimplant dosimetry completed within 60 days of PPB is essential for quality assurance. PPB may be considered for treatment of local recurrence after EBRT but is associated with an increased risk of toxicity. Updated appropriateness criteria for patient evaluation, selection, treatment, and postimplant dosimetry are given. These criteria are intended to be advisory only with the final responsibility for patient care residing with the treating

  7. Executive summary of the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection: Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cueto, Marina; Aliaga, Luis; Alós, Juan-Ignacio; Canut, Andres; Los-Arcos, Ibai; Martínez, Jose Antonio; Mensa, Jose; Pintado, Vicente; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Yuste, Jose Ramon; Pigrau, Carles

    2016-12-22

    Most urinary tract infections (UTI) are uncomplicated infections occurring in young women. An extensive evaluation is not required in the majority of cases, and they can be safely managed as outpatients with oral antibiotics. Escherichia coli is by far the most common uropathogen, accounting for >80% of all cases. Other major clinical problems associated with UTI include asymptomatic bacteriuria, and patients with complicated UTI. Complicated UTIs are a heterogeneous group associated with conditions that increase the risk of acquiring infection or treatment failure. Distinguishing between complicated and uncomplicated UTI is important, as it influences the initial evaluation, choice, and duration of antimicrobial therapy. Diagnosis is especially challenging in the elderly and in patients with in-dwelling catheters. The increasing prevalence of resistant uropathogens, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and other multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms further compromises treatment of both complicated and uncomplicated UTIs. The aim of these Clinical Guidelines is to provide a set of recommendations for improving the diagnosis and treatment of UTI.

  8. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Gary H; Somerfield, Mark R; Bosserman, Linda D; Perkins, Cheryl L; Weaver, Donald L; Giuliano, Armando E

    2016-12-12

    Purpose To provide current recommendations on the use of sentinel node biopsy (SNB) for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines from 2012 through July 2016. An Update Panel reviewed the identified abstracts. Results Of the eight publications identified and reviewed, none prompted a change in the 2014 recommendations, which are reaffirmed by the updated literature review. Conclusion Women without sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastases should not receive axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Women with one to two metastatic SLNs who are planning to undergo breast-conserving surgery with whole-breast radiotherapy should not undergo ALND (in most cases). Women with SLN metastases who will undergo mastectomy should be offered ALND. These three recommendations are based on randomized controlled trials. Women with operable breast cancer and multicentric tumors, with ductal carcinoma in situ, who will undergo mastectomy, who previously underwent breast and/or axillary surgery, or who received preoperative/neoadjuvant systemic therapy may be offered SNB. Women who have large or locally advanced invasive breast cancer (tumor size T3/T4), inflammatory breast cancer, or ductal carcinoma in situ (when breast-conserving surgery is planned) or are pregnant should not undergo SNB.

  9. Genetic counseling and testing for Alzheimer disease: joint practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jill S; Hahn, Susan E; Catania, Jennifer Williamson; LaRusse-Eckert, Susan; Butson, Melissa Barber; Rumbaugh, Malia; Strecker, Michelle N; Roberts, J Scott; Burke, Wylie; Mayeux, Richard; Bird, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia. It occurs worldwide and affects all ethnic groups. The incidence of Alzheimer disease is increasing due, in part, to increased life expectancy and the aging baby boomer generation. The average lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer disease is 10-12%. This risk at least doubles with the presence of a first-degree relative with the disorder. Despite its limited utility, patients express concern over their risk and, in some instances, request testing. Furthermore, research has demonstrated that testing individuals for apolipoprotein E can be valuable and safe in certain contexts. However, because of the complicated genetic nature of the disorder, few clinicians are prepared to address the genetic risks of Alzheimer disease with their patients. Given the increased awareness in family history thanks to family history campaigns, the increasing incidence of Alzheimer disease, and the availability of direct to consumer testing, patient requests for information is increasing. This practice guideline provides clinicians with a framework for assessing their patients' genetic risk for Alzheimer disease, identifying which individuals may benefit from genetic testing, and providing the key elements of genetic counseling for AD.

  10. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record...

  11. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in...

  12. After Guidelines, What?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent survey, Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members indicated that they feel our association should be involved in the production of guidelines (1. There is evidence in the literature that suggests guidelines can have some effect in changing behaviour, although this is variable and modest at best. Certainly, the production of guidelines is not without costs, particularly in time spent by experts in reviewing the literature and producing them. For good reasons, delays frequently occur in their production, often leading to recommendations that may be outdated. People sometimes forget that one of the most important reasons for producing guidelines is to identify questions that require future research.

  13. Update on the 2012 Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Guidelines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: position on the use of tofacitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Cruz, Bóris Afonso; de Albuquerque, Cleandro Pires; Gonçalves, Deborah Pereira; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Pereira, Ivanio Alves; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pinheiro, Geraldo da Rocha Castelar; Bertolo, Manoel Barros; Pinto, Maria Raquel da Costa; Louzada-Junior, Paulo; Xavier, Ricardo Machado; Giorgi, Rina Dalva Neubarth; Lima, Rodrigo Aires Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, tofacitinib, a target-specific, synthetic disease modifying anti rheumatic drug (DMARD) and a selective inhibitor of Janus kinase (JAK) was approved for use in Brazil. This position paper aims to update the recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology (SBR) on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Brazil, specifically regarding the use of target-specific synthetic DMARDs. The method of this recommendation consisted of a literature review of scientific papers held on the Medline database. After this review, a text was produced, answering questions in Pico structure, considering efficacy and safety issues of tofacitinib use for RA treatment in different scenarios (such as first-line treatment after failure with methotrexate [MTX] or other conventional synthetic DMARDs after failure with biological therapy). Based on existing evidence, and considering the available data on efficacy, safety and cost of medications available to treat the disease in Brazil, the RA Commission of SBR, after a process of discussion and voting on proposals, established the following position on the use of tofacitinib for treatment of RA in Brazil: "Tofacitinib, alone or in combination with MTX, is an alternative for RA patients with moderate or high activity after failure of at least two different synthetic DMARDs and one biological DMARD." The level of agreement with this recommendation was 7.5. This position may be reviewed in the coming years, in the face of a greater experience with the use of this medication.

  14. Guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis in clinical practice-evidence-based approach from the Writing Committee of the American Society for Apheresis: the sixth special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Winters, Jeffrey L; Padmanabhan, Anand; Balogun, Rasheed A; Delaney, Meghan; Linenberger, Michael L; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Williams, Mark E; Wu, Yanyun; Shaz, Beth H

    2013-07-01

    The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) JCA Special Issue Writing Committee is charged with reviewing, updating and categorizating indications for therapeutic apheresis. Beginning with the 2007 ASFA Special Issue (Fourth Edition), the committee has incorporated systematic review and evidence-based approach in the grading and categorization of indications. This Sixth Edition of the ASFA Special Issue has further improved the process of using evidence-based medicine in the recommendations by consistently applying the category and GRADE system definitions, but eliminating the "level of evidence" criteria (from the University HealthCare Consortium) utilized in prior editions given redundancy between GRADE and University HealthCare Consortium systems. The general layout and concept of a fact sheet that was utilized in the Fourth and Fifth Editions, has been largely maintained in this edition. Each fact sheet succinctly summarizes the evidence for the use of therapeutic apheresis in a specific disease entity. This article consists of 78 fact sheets (increased from 2010) for therapeutic indications in ASFA categories I through IV, with many diseases categorized having multiple clinical presentations/situations which are individually graded and categorized.

  15. [Clinical practice guidelines for evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to endocrine and nutritional conditions. Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes García, Rebeca; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; García Martín, Antonia; Romero Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Luque Fernández, Inés; Varsavsky, Mariela; Guadalix Iglesias, Sonsoles; Cano Rodriguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros Pomar, María Dolores; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Rozas Moreno, Pedro; Cortés Berdonces, María; Fernández García, Diego; Calleja Canelas, Amparo; Palma Moya, Mercedes; Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jimenez Moleón, José J; Muñoz Torres, Manuel

    2012-03-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to endocrine diseases and nutritional conditions. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, a methodologist, and a documentalist. Recommendations were formulated according to the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed), using the following terms associated to the name of each condition: AND "osteoporosis", "fractures", "bone mineral density", and "treatment". Papers in English with publication date before 18 October 2011 were included. Current evidence for each disease was reviewed by two group members, and doubts related to the review process or development of recommendations were resolved by the methodologist. Finally, recommendations were discussed in a meeting of the Working Group. The document provides evidence-based practical recommendations for evaluation and management of endocrine and nutritional diseases associated to low bone mass or an increased risk of fracture. For each disease, the associated risk of low bone mass and fragility fractures is given, recommendations for bone mass assessment are provided, and treatment options that have shown to be effective for increasing bone mass and/or to decreasing fragility fractures are listed. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. [Information and consent forms for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and recipients: Guidelines from the Franchophone society of bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Bénédicte; Thibert, Jean-Baptiste; Bancillon, Nelly; Desbos, Anna; Fawaz, Abir; Fournier, Isabelle; Genty, Carole; Issarni, Dominique; Leveille, Sandrine; Premel, Christelle; Polomeni, Alice; Renault, Myriam; Tarillon, Sylvie; Wallart, Anne; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Within the context of the SFGM-TC's 6th workshop series on the harmonization of clinical practices, our workshop proposes a standardization of the informed consent process for hematopoietic stem cell donors and recipients leading up to an autologous or allogenic transplantation. All informed consent was for bone marrow or peripheral stem cell donors, and mononuclear/lymphocyte donors according to usual procedures. The informed consent for autologous and allogenic related or unrelated adults and pediatric transplantation patients have been included. A first step has been conducted for collecting in advance the informed consent forms used routinely in all francophone transplantation centers. In a second step, a comprehensive version has been re-written by a multidisciplinary team. For the purposes of understanding the risks and advantages, language has been carefully considered and streamlined. In the third step, texts were sent to stem cell transplantation experts, experts at the French biomedical agency (agence de la biomédecine [ABM]), law specialists, members of the ethical committee of the French society of hematology and several transplant recipients to be edited and proofread.

  17. Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnacht, Martin; Arlt, Wiebke; Bancos, Irina; Dralle, Henning; Newell-Price, John; Sahdev, Anju; Tabarin, Antoine; Terzolo, Massimo; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-08-01

    : By definition, an adrenal incidentaloma is an asymptomatic adrenal mass detected on imaging not performed for suspected adrenal disease. In most cases, adrenal incidentalomas are nonfunctioning adrenocortical adenomas, but may also represent conditions requiring therapeutic intervention (e.g. adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, hormone-producing adenoma or metastasis). The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with best possible evidence-based recommendations for clinical management of patients with adrenal incidentalomas based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We predefined four main clinical questions crucial for the management of adrenal incidentaloma patients, addressing these four with systematic literature searches: (A) How to assess risk of malignancy?; (B) How to define and manage low-level autonomous cortisol secretion, formerly called 'subclinical' Cushing's syndrome?; (C) Who should have surgical treatment and how should it be performed?; (D) What follow-up is indicated if the adrenal incidentaloma is not surgically removed? SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS: (i) At the time of initial detection of an adrenal mass establishing whether the mass is benign or malignant is an important aim to avoid cumbersome and expensive follow-up imaging in those with benign disease. (ii) To exclude cortisol excess, a 1mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test should be performed (applying a cut-off value of serum cortisol ≤50nmol/L (1.8µg/dL)). (iii) For patients without clinical signs of overt Cushing's syndrome but serum cortisol levels post 1mg dexamethasone >138nmol/L (>5µg/dL), we propose the term 'autonomous cortisol secretion'. (iv) All patients with '(possible) autonomous cortisol' secretion should be screened for hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, to ensure these are appropriately treated. (v) Surgical treatment should be considered in an individualized approach in patients with

  18. Guidelines on the Use of Therapeutic Apheresis in Clinical Practice-Evidence-Based Approach from the Writing Committee of the American Society for Apheresis: The Seventh Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Padmanabhan, Anand; Aqui, Nicole; Balogun, Rasheed A; Connelly-Smith, Laura; Delaney, Meghan; Dunbar, Nancy M; Witt, Volker; Wu, Yanyun; Shaz, Beth H

    2016-06-01

    The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) Journal of Clinical Apheresis (JCA) Special Issue Writing Committee is charged with reviewing, updating, and categorizing indications for the evidence-based use of therapeutic apheresis in human disease. Since the 2007 JCA Special Issue (Fourth Edition), the Committee has incorporated systematic review and evidence-based approaches in the grading and categorization of apheresis indications. This Seventh Edition of the JCA Special Issue continues to maintain this methodology and rigor to make recommendations on the use of apheresis in a wide variety of diseases/conditions. The JCA Seventh Edition, like its predecessor, has consistently applied the category and grading system definitions in the fact sheets. The general layout and concept of a fact sheet that was used since the fourth edition has largely been maintained in this edition. Each fact sheet succinctly summarizes the evidence for the use of therapeutic apheresis in a specific disease entity. The Seventh Edition discusses 87 fact sheets (14 new fact sheets since the Sixth Edition) for therapeutic apheresis diseases and medical conditions, with 179 indications, which are separately graded and categorized within the listed fact sheets. Several diseases that are Category IV which have been described in detail in previous editions and do not have significant new evidence since the last publication are summarized in a separate table. The Seventh Edition of the JCA Special Issue serves as a key resource that guides the utilization of therapeutic apheresis in the treatment of human disease. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:149-162, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Interstitial hyperthermia in combination with brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, C T; Douple, E B; Strohbehn, J W; Eaton, W L; Trembly, B S; Wong, T Z

    1983-07-01

    Flexible coaxial cables were modified to serve as microwave antennas operating at a frequency of 915 MHz. These antennas were inserted into nylon afterloading tubes that had been implanted in tumors using conventional interstitial implantation techniques for iridium-192 seed brachytherapy. The tumor volume was heated to 42-45 degrees C within 15 minutes and heating was continued for a total of 1 hour per treatment. Immediately following a conventional brachytherapy dose and removal of the iridium seeds the tumors were heated again in a second treatment. This interstitial technique for delivering local hyperthermia should be compatible with most brachytherapy methods. The technique has proved so far to be practical and without complications. Temperature distributions obtained in tissue phantoms and a patient are described.

  20. Pairing smoking-cessation services with lung cancer screening: A clinical guideline from the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucito, Lisa M; Czabafy, Sharon; Hendricks, Peter S; Kotsen, Chris; Richardson, Donna; Toll, Benjamin A

    2016-04-15

    Smoking cessation is crucial for reducing cancer risk and premature mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT), and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently approved lung screening as a benefit for patients ages 55 to 77 years who have a 30 pack-year history. The Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT) and the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence (ATTUD) developed the guideline described in this commentary based on an illustrative literature review to present the evidence for smoking-cessation health benefits in this high-risk group and to provide clinical recommendations for integrating evidence-based smoking-cessation treatment with lung cancer screening. Unfortunately, extant data on lung cancer screening participants were scarce at the time this guideline was written. However, in this review, the authors summarize the sufficient evidence on the benefits of smoking cessation and the efficacy of smoking-cessation interventions for smokers ages 55 to 77 years to provide smoking-cessation interventions for smokers who seek lung cancer screening. It is concluded that smokers who present for lung cancer screening should be encouraged to quit smoking at each visit. Access to evidence-based smoking-cessation interventions should be provided to all smokers regardless of scan results, and motivation to quit should not be a necessary precondition for treatment. Follow-up contacts to support smoking-cessation efforts should be arranged for smokers. Evidence-based behavioral strategies should be used at each visit to motivate smokers who are unwilling to try quitting/reducing smoking or to try evidence-based treatments that may lead to eventual cessation.

  1. Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion triage in Korean women: Revisiting the 2012 American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology screening guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Ji Yeon; Min, Kyung-Jin; Yang, Sun Young; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Hong, Jin Hwa

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether triage for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) from the updated American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology cervical cancer screening guidelines is applicable in Korean women. We investigated women with ASC-US or LSIL including referred from local hospitals visited for cervical cancer screening at Korea University Guro Hospital from February 2004 to December 2014. Detailed information on the results of Papanicolaou (Pap) smears, human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA tests, and cervical biopsies were collected through chart review. Cervical biopsy results were compared in eligible women according to individual Pap smear findings and HPV DNA status. Of 216,723 possible cases, 3,196 were included. There were 212 (6.6%) women with ASC-US and 500 (15.6%) with LSIL. The risk of ≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 was significantly higher in women who were ASC-US/HPV+ than ASC-US/HPV- and LSIL/HPV+ than LSIL/HPV- (93.3% vs. 6.7% and 96.7% vs. 3.3%, P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). The risk of ≥CIN 3 was also significantly higher in women who were ASC-US/HPV+ than ASC-US/HPV- and LSIL/HPV+ than LSIL/HPV- (97.0% vs. 3.0% and 93.0% vs. 7.0%, P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). Age-stratified analysis revealed that more CIN 2 or CIN 3 was diagnosed in women aged 30 to 70 with ASC-US or LSIL when HPV DNA was present. Observation with Pap and HPV DNA tests rather than immediate colposcopy is a reasonable strategy for ASC-US or LSIL when the HPV DNA test is negative, especially in women aged 30 to 70. Reflection of these results should be considered in future Korean screening guidelines.

  2. Diretrizes da World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP para tratamento biológico de transtornos depressivos unipolares, 1ª parte: tratamento agudo e de continuação do transtorno depressivo maior World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP Guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders, part 1: acute and continuation treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bauer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Estas diretrizes práticas para o tratamento biológico de transtornos depressivos unipolares foram desenvolvidas por uma Força-Tarefa internacional da Federação Mundial de Sociedades de Psiquiatria Biológica (WFSBP. O objetivo ao desenvolver tais diretrizes foi rever sistematicamente todas as evidências existentes referentes ao tratamento de transtornos depressivos unipolares e produzir uma série de recomendações práticas com significado clínico e científico, baseadas nas evidências existentes. Têm como objetivo seu uso por todos os médicos que atendam e tratem pacientes com essas afecções. Os dados usados para o desenvolvimento das diretrizes foram extraídos primariamente de várias diretrizes e painéis nacionais de tratamento para transtornos depressivos, bem como de metanálises e revisões sobre a eficácia dos antidepressivos e outras intervenções de tratamento biológico identificadas por uma busca no banco de dados MEDLINE e Cochrane Library. A literatura identificada foi avaliada quanto à força das evidências sobre sua eficácia e, então, categorizada em quatro níveis de evidências (A a D. Esta primeira parte das diretrizes abrange definição, classificação, epidemiologia e evolução dos transtornos depressivos unipolares, bem como tratamento das fases aguda e de manutenção. As diretrizes se referem primariamente ao tratamento biológico (incluindo antidepressivos, outros medicamentos psicofarmacológicos e hormonais, eletroconvulsoterapia, fototerapia, estratégias terapêuticas complementares e novas de adultos jovens e também, embora em menor grau, de crianças, adolescentes e adultos idosos.These practice guidelines for the biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP. The goal for developing these guidelines was to systematically review all available evidence pertaining to the

  3. ENT COBRA (Consortium for Brachytherapy Data Analysis): interdisciplinary standardized data collection system for head and neck patients treated with interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Aim of the COBRA (Consortium for Brachytherapy Data Analysis) project is to create a multicenter group (consortium) and a web-based system for standardized data collection. Material and methods GEC-ESTRO (Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology) Head and Neck (H&N) Working Group participated in the project and in the implementation of the consortium agreement, the ontology (data-set) and the necessary COBRA software services as well as the peer ...

  4. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhart, K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF. In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources.

  5. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG)) and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, K.; Brunkhorst, F. M.; Bone, H.-G.; Bardutzky, J.; Dempfle, C.-E.; Forst, H.; Gastmeier, P.; Gerlach, H.; Gründling, M.; John, S.; Kern, W.; Kreymann, G.; Krüger, W.; Kujath, P.; Marggraf, G.; Martin, J.; Mayer, K.; Meier-Hellmann, A.; Oppert, M.; Putensen, C.; Quintel, M.; Ragaller, M.; Rossaint, R.; Seifert, H.; Spies, C.; Stüber, F.; Weiler, N.; Weimann, A.; Werdan, K.; Welte, T.

    2010-01-01

    Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge) on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care) of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF). In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources. PMID:20628653

  6. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  7. 欧洲2015年儿童泌尿系感染诊治指南解读%Introduction of European Association of Urology/European Society for Paediatric Urology guidelines on urina-ry tract infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管娜

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection(UTI)is common in children. Among the children with UTI,some children at high risk will develop renal scarring that may lead to end stage renal disease. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treat-ment is very important. However,controversy on diagnosis and treatment of UTI still exists. European Association of Urology/ European Society for Paediatric Urology delivered new guideline for diagnosis and treatment of children with UTI in 2015.%泌尿系感染(UTI)是儿童常见的细菌感染性疾病,其中一些高危患儿可出现肾瘢痕,进而可致终末期肾脏病,恰当诊断和治疗 UTI 对于改善患儿预后十分重要。关于儿童 UTI 的诊断和治疗尚存争议。2015年,欧洲泌尿系学会/欧洲儿童泌尿系学会发布了新的儿童 UTI 诊治指南。

  8. MO-D-BRD-00: Electronic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  9. CT-based interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach (Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT-based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT-based treatment planning has been developed and clinical evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron PLATO BPS treatment planning system for optimization and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are used for optimization of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram based analysis of the dose distribution (COIN analysis) enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumor sites in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results: The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using first a quality assurance phantom and second, a simulated interstitial implant of 12 needles. These were compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs. Both methods gave comparable results with regard to accuracy, but the CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility was proved in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumors, in pretreated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumor volumes treated were in the range 5.1 to 2,741 cm{sup 3}. Analysis of implant quality showed a slightly significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences with respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions: The Offenbach system, incorporating the PROMETHEUS software for interstitial HDR brachytherapy has proved to be extremely valuable

  10. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor [Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Acoustic MedSystems, Inc., Champaign, Illinois 61820-3979 (United States); Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada) and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-2682 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  11. Prostate cancer brachytherapy; Braquiterapia de cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F. [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Oncologia. Dep. de Radioterapia; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Disciplina de Urologia]. E-mail: cevitabr@mandic.com.br

    1999-07-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with {sup 125}I/Pd{sup 103} seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy.

  12. Refining prostate seed brachytherapy: Comparing high-, intermediate-, and low-activity seeds for I-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Pascal; Carrier, Jean-François; Larouche, Renée-Xavière; Hervieux, Yannick; Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the difference in prostate coverage and dose to the rectum in men with prostate carcinoma treated with permanent seed brachytherapy with different seed activities. Forty-nine patients treated with iodine-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy with low-activity seeds of 0.30-0.37 mCi were identified. For each of these patients, 2 patients with similar prostate volume (±2 cc) were paired: one treated with intermediate seed activity (0.44-0.46 mCi) and one with high seed activity (0.60-0.66 mCi). The doses to prostate and rectum were compared using CT on Day 30. A total of 147 patients divided into the three seed activity groups were analyzed. Mean prostate volume was 35.7 cc (standard deviation [SD], 11.70). Compared with low-activity seeds, implants with high-activity seeds consisted of an average of 22 seeds and 4.7 needles less. The dose to the prostate (prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose [V100], prostate volume receiving 150% of the prescribed dose, and minimal dose covering 90% of the prostate volume expressed in Gy) was not higher on Day 30 (p = 0.58-0.97). The mean volume (in cubic centimeters) of rectal wall receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) increased with activity: low activity, 0.34 cc (SD, 0.49), intermediate activity, 0.47 cc (SD, 0.48), and high activity, 0.72 cc (SD, 0.79) (p = 0.009). There was a trend (p = 0.073) toward a higher frequency of clinically unfavorable rectal dosimetry (V100 > 1.3 cc) in patients with high-activity seeds (16.7%) compared with low-activity (6.3%) or intermediate-activity (4.2%) seeds. High-activity seeds do not result in a higher dose to the prostate but in a higher dose to the rectum. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  14. Clinical implementation of MR‐guided vaginal cylinder brachytherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owrangi, Amir M; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M; Cao, Yue; Maturen, Katherine E; Young, Lisa; Zhu, Tong; Prisciandaro, Joann I

    2015-01-01

    ...)‐guided vaginal brachytherapy using commercially available solid applicator models. To test the fidelity of solid applicator models to digitize vaginal cylinder applicators, three datasets were evaluated...

  15. State-of-the-art: prostate LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgaris, S; Nobes, J P; Laing, R W; Langley, S E M

    2008-01-01

    This article on low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy reviews long-term results, patient selection and quality of life issues. Mature results from the United States and United Kingdom are reported and issues regarding definitions of biochemical failure are discussed. Latest data comparing brachytherapy with radical prostatectomy or no definitive treatment and also the risk of secondary malignancies after prostate brachytherapy are presented. Urological parameters of patient selection and quality of life issues concerning urinary, sexual and bowel function are reviewed. The position of prostate brachytherapy next to surgery as a first-line treatment modality is demonstrated.

  16. An open-source genetic algorithm for determining optimal seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Madamesila, J; Beauchamp, A; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    An open source optimizer that generates seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy was designed, tested, and validated. The optimizer was a simple genetic algorithm (SGA) that, given a set of prostate and urethra contours, determines the optimal seed distribution in terms of coverage of the prostate with the prescribed dose while avoiding hotspots within the urethra. The algorithm was validated in a retrospective study on 45 previously contoured low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Dosimetric indices were evaluated to ensure solutions adhered to clinical standards. The SGA performance was further benchmarked by comparing solutions obtained from a commercial optimizer (inverse planning simulated annealing [IPSA]) with the same cohort of 45 patients. Clinically acceptable target coverage by the prescribed dose (V100) was obtained for both SGA and IPSA, with a mean ± standard deviation of 98 ± 2% and 99.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. For the prostate D90, SGA and IPSA yielded 177 ± 8 Gy and 186 ± 7 Gy, respectively, which were both clinically acceptable. Both algorithms yielded reasonable dose to the rectum, with V100 open source SGA was validated that provides a research tool for the brachytherapy community. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Register today for the 49th Annual Autism Society National Conference Please plan on joining us ... Today Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage II endometrial carcinoma: Is brachytherapy alone sufficient for local control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydar, Ima; DeWees, Todd; Powell, Matthew; Mutch, David G; Grigsby, Perry W; Schwarz, Julie K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate recurrence patterns and overall survival in patients treated with adjuvant radiation after surgical staging for Stage II endometrial carcinoma. Secondary goals include identification of prognostic factors for recurrence and toxicity assessment. The medical records of 41 patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy at Washington University School of Medicine after surgical staging for endometrial cancer (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, peritoneal cytology, lymph node dissection) were reviewed. Nineteen were treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy (VB), and 22 patients were treated with postoperative VB alone. Median followup for all patients was 41 months. Median patient age was 59 years (range, 42-87 years). All tumors were of endometrioid histology. There were 20 Grade 1 tumors, 13 Grade 2 tumors, and 8 Grade 3 tumors. For all patients, the 5-year overall survival was 69.8%, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival was 89.0%. There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival (p = 0.510) or freedom from vaginal (p = 0.840), distant (p = 0.133), or any recurrence (p = 0.275) with respect to modality of treatment (external beam radiotherapy and VB vs. VB alone). There were no pelvic lymph node recurrences. In the univariate analysis, there were no risk factors influencing overall survival or recurrences. One patient experienced a toxicity requiring hospital admission. She was treated with pelvic external beam radiation plus brachytherapy. VB alone results in excellent local control for patients with Stage II endometrial cancer after surgical staging. Long-term toxicities are rare and more common in the group of patients who were treated with pelvic external beam plus brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparison of inverse optimization algorithms for HDR/PDR prostate brachytherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkla, Anna M; van der Laarse, Rob; Kaljouw, Emmie; Pieters, Bradley R; Koedooder, Kees; van Wieringen, Niek; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical optimization (GrO) is a common method for high-dose-rate/pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment planning. New methods performing inverse optimization of the dose distribution have been developed over the past years. The purpose is to compare GrO and two established inverse methods, inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) and hybrid inverse treatment planning and optimization (HIPO), and one new method, enhanced geometric optimization-interactive inverse planning (EGO-IIP), in terms of speed and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. For 26 prostate cancer patients treated with a PDR brachytherapy boost, an experienced treatment planner optimized the dose distributions using four different methods: GrO, IPSA, HIPO, and EGO-IIP. Relevant DVH parameters (prostate-V100%, D90%, V150%; urethra-D(0.1cm3) and D(1.0cm3); rectum-D(0.1cm3) and D(2.0cm3); bladder-D(2.0cm3)) were evaluated and their compliance to the constraints. Treatment planning time was also recorded. All inverse methods resulted in shorter planning time (mean, 4-6.7 min), as compared with GrO (mean, 7.6 min). In terms of DVH parameters, none of the inverse methods outperformed the others. However, all inverse methods improved on compliance to the planning constraints as compared with GrO. On average, EGO-IIP and GrO resulted in highest D90%, and the IPSA plans resulted in lowest bladder D2.0cm3 and urethra D(1.0cm3). Inverse planning methods decrease planning time as compared with GrO for PDR/high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy. DVH parameters are comparable for all methods. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  1. Adjuvant brachytherapy for endometrial cancer: advantages of the vaginal mold technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, Clement; Dumas, Isabelle; Tailleur, Anne; Morice, Philippe; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of endometrial carcinoma in the adjuvant setting includes in most cases vaginal brachytherapy. In our institution, we use the customized vaginal mold technique. Herein, we report the advantages of this personalized applicator in terms of target coverage, normal tissue preservation, the incidence of air pockets, and its potential impact on dosimetry. A total of 15 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff high-dose-rate brachytherapy with the mold applicator technique were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with either two or four fractions of 5 Gy prescribed to the clinical target volume, which consisted of an irradiation of the vaginal cuff and the upper third of the vagina. Target coverage; dose to organs at risk, in addition to the volume; and the dosimetric impact of air pockets surrounding the mold were evaluated. In 15 patients, a total of 27 air pockets were identified. The average number of air pockets per patient was 1.8 (range, 0-4), with the average total air pocket volume being 0.1 cc (range, 0.01-0.54). The average dose reduction at 5mm from the air pocket was 26% (range, 6-45%). The minimal clinical target volume coverage reported was 95% and the maximal dose received by 2 cc of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid never exceeded 110% of the prescribed dose. Vaginal cuff high-dose-rate brachytherapy using the molded applicator provides personalized tailored treatment in terms of anatomical conformity. This translates into a dosimetrical advantage with smaller and fewer air pockets than reported in the literature with the use of cylinders. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Guidelines for heart transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, N; Kirkels, J.H.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A.P.W.M.; Brügemann, J; Erasmus, M.E.; Klautz, R. J. M.; Verwey, H.F; Oomen, A.; Peels, C.H.; Golüke, A.E.J.; Nicastia, D.; Koole, M.A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic surgery (NVVC and NVT).

  3. Guidelines for heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkels, J. H.; Klopping, C.; Lahpor, J. R.; Caliskan, K.; Maat, A. P. W. M.; Brugemann, J.; Erasmus, M. E.; Klautz, R. J. M.; Verwey, H. F.; Oomen, A.; Peels, C. H.; Goluke, A. E. J.; Nicastia, D. M.; Koole, M. A. C.; Balk, A. H. M. M.; de Jonge, N.

    Based on the changes in the field of heart transplantation and the treatment and prognosis of patients with heart failure, these updated guidelines were composed by a committee under the supervision of both the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Association for Cardiothoracic

  4. Overview on the dosimetric uncertainty analysis for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources, in the light of the AAPM Task Group No 138 and GEC-ESTRO report

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Stump, Kurt E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) published a report pertaining to uncertainties in brachytherapy single-source dosimetry preceding clinical use. The International Organization for Standardization's Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and Technical Note 1297 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology are taken as reference standards for uncertainty formalism. Uncertainties involved in measurements or Monte Carlo methods to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions are provided with discussion of the components intrinsic to the overall dosimetric assessment. The uncertainty propagation from the primary calibration standard through transfer to the clinic for air-kerma strength is given with uncertainties in each of the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of the AAPM TG-43 dose-calculation formalism. For low-energy and high-energy brachytherapy sources of low dose-rate and high dose-rate, a combined dosimetric uncertainty AAPM and GEC-ESTRO for their members, and may also be used as guidance to manufacturers and regulatory agencies in developing good manufacturing practices for conventional brachytherapy sources used in routine clinical treatments.

  5. Physics and basic parameters of brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E J; Weinhous, M S

    1997-06-01

    Brachytherapy (short-distance therapy) is the therapeutic process whereby radioactive sources are placed into very close proximity to target tissue. Radioactive materials were so used beginning shortly after the discovery of radium by Marie and Pierre Curie in 1898. For the purposes of brachytherapy, radioactive materials are those that emit "rays" that can cause ionization (and hence DNA damage and the destruction of target cells). The potentially useful rays include beta, gamma, and other possibilities such as neutrons. Beta rays, properly beta particles, are simply high energy electrons. Gamma rays are high energy photons (part of the electromagnetic spectrum like visible light, but with much higher energy). These particles are produced during the radioactive decay of certain isotopes. The physics of those events and the parameters that apply to the therapeutic use of the isotopes are the primary topics of this report.

  6. The German S{sub 3} guideline prostate cancer. Aspects for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, Frederik [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Martin, Thomas [Group Practice for Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Bremen (Germany); Boehmer, Dirk [Charite Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Martens, Stefan [Marien-Krankenhaus Bergisch Gladbach (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Sedlmayer, Felix [Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Wirth, Manfred [Univ. Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Miller, Kurt [Charite - Univ. Medicine Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Heidenreich, Axel [Univ. Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept.of Urology; Schrader, Mark [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang [Charite - Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Wiegel, Thomas [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2010-10-15

    This report summarizes the relevant aspects of the S3 guideline prostate cancer for the radiationoncologist. Treatment decision and dose prescription are discussed, as well as technical performance of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The relevant literature is cited to allow an overview of the current recommendations. (orig.)

  7. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View, California (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  8. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  9. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  10. Feasibility and safety of outpatient brachytherapy in 37 patients with brain tumors using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Kazumi; Silvain, Daniel; Grace, Ana; Stubbs, James; Stea, Baldassarre

    2008-07-01

    Temporary, low dose rate brachytherapy to the margins of resected brain tumors, using a balloon catheter system (GliaSite Radiation Therapy System) and liquid I-125 radiation source (Iotrex), began in 2002 at the University of Arizona Medical Center. Initially, all patients were treated on an inpatient basis. For patient convenience, we converted to outpatient therapy. In this article we review the exposure data and safety history for the 37 patients treated as outpatients. Proper patient selection and instruction is crucial to having a successful outpatient brachytherapy program. A set of evaluation criteria and patient instructions were developed in compliance with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's document NUREG-1556 Volume 9 (Appendix U) and Arizona State Nuclear regulatory guidelines, which specify acceptable exposure rates for outpatient release in this setting. Of the 37 patients monitored, 26 patients were treated for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), six for primary GBM, and five for metastatic brain tumors. All 37 patients and their primary caregivers gave signed agreement to follow a specific set of instructions and were released for the duration of brachytherapy (3-7 days). The typical prescription dose was 60 Gy delivered at 0.5 cm from the balloon surface. Afterloaded activities in these patients ranged from 90.9 to 750.0 mCi and measured exposure rates at 1 m from the head were less than 14 mR/h. The mean exposure to the caretaker measured by personal radiation Landauer Luxel + whole body dosimeters for 25 caretakers was found to be 9.6 mR, which was significantly less than the mean calculated exposure of 136.8 mR. For properly selected patients, outpatient brachytherapy is simple and can be performed within established regulatory guidelines.

  11. A fibre optic dosimeter customised for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; Lambert, J.; Nakano, T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Law, S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Optical Fibre Technology Centre, University of Sydney, 206 National Innovation Centre, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 1430 (Australia); Elsey, J. [Bandwidth Foundry Pty Ltd, Australian Technology Park, NSW, 1430 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2007-04-15

    In-vivo dosimetry for brachytherapy cancer treatment requires a small dosimeter with a real time readout capability that can be inserted into the patient to determine the dose to critical organs. Fibre optic scintillation dosimeters, consisting of a plastic scintillator coupled to an optical fibre, are a promising dosimeter for this application. We have implemented specific design features to optimise the performance of the dosimeter for specific in-vivo dosimetry during brachytherapy. Two sizes of the BrachyFOD{sup TM} scintillation dosimeter have been developed, with external diameters of approximately 2 and 1 mm. We have determined their important dosimetric characteristics (depth dose relation, angular dependence, energy dependence). We have shown that the background signal created by Cerenkov and fibre fluorescence does not significantly affect the performance in most clinical geometries. The dosimeter design enables readout at less than 0.5 s intervals. The clinical demands of real time in-vivo brachytherapy dosimetry can uniquely be satisfied by the BrachyFOD{sup TM}.

  12. Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Jamie A; Stone, Nelson N; Skouteris, Vassilios M; Park, Janelle L; Stock, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    Low-dose rate brachytherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for men diagnosed with prostate cancer because of excellent long-term treatment outcomes in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. Largely due to patient lead advocacy for minimally invasive treatment options, high-quality prostate implants have become widely available in the US, Europe, and Japan. The reason that brachytherapy results are reproducible in several different practice settings is because numerous implant quality factors have been defined over the last 20 years, which can be applied objectively to judge the success of the intervention both during and after the procedure. In addition, recent long-term follow-up studies have clarified that the secondary cancer incidence of brachytherapy is not clinically meaningful. In terms of future directions, the study of radiation repair genetics may allow for the counseling physician to better estimate any given patients risk for side effects, thereby substantially reducing the therapeutic uncertainties faced by patients choosing a prostate cancer intervention.

  13. A robotic device for MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerburg, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the treatment options for prostate cancer is brachytherapy with iodine-125 sources. In prostate brachytherapy a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate with a steep dose fall off to critical surrounding organs. The implantation of the iodine sources is currently performed under

  14. A robotic device for MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerburg, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the treatment options for prostate cancer is brachytherapy with iodine-125 sources. In prostate brachytherapy a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate with a steep dose fall off to critical surrounding organs. The implantation of the iodine sources is currently performed under ultra

  15. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  16. Triple-tandem high-dose-rate brachytherapy for early-stage medically inoperable endometrial cancer: Initial report on acute toxicity and dosimetric comparison to stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Greg; Wu, Tianming; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may be appealing in medically inoperable endometrial cancer to avoid procedural risks. We performed a dosimetric comparison to triple-tandem, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Six consecutive clinical stage I, grade 1-2, medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients were treated with triple-tandem HDR brachytherapy. We report patient factors and acute toxicity. Also, we performed dosimetric comparison to SBRT using both 3D conformal arc (3DArc) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. D2cc values for normal tissues were calculated and compared to the HDR plans. Median age was 57 years. Patient comorbidities included morbid obesity, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and pulmonary emboli. In three patients who received prior external beam radiation (EBRT), median EBRT and HDR doses were 46 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The median dose with HDR brachytherapy monotherapy was 35 Gy. Acute toxicities during EBRT included gastrointestinal (3/3 with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (3/3 with grade 1-2). Acute toxicities during HDR brachytherapy were gastrointestinal (2/6 total with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (2/6 total with grade 1). The mean D2cc/Gy of prescription dose for rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 0.58, 0.40, and 0.47 respectively. Overall, doses to normal tissues were higher for SBRT plans as compared to HDR. Also, the R50 (ratio of the 50% prescription isodose volume to the PTV) was lowest with HDR brachytherapy. In medically inoperable, clinical stage I endometrial cancer patients with multiple comorbidities, definitive triple-tandem, HDR brachytherapy results in mild acute toxicity. In addition, HDR brachytherapy achieves relatively lower doses to surrounding normal tissues as compared to SBRT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  18. Receipt of vaginal brachytherapy is associated with improved survival in women with stage I endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterus: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewski, Nicholas R; Strohl, Anna E; Donnelly, Eric D; Kanis, Margaux J; Lurain, John R; Nieves-Neira, Wilberto; Strauss, Jonathan B

    2016-12-01

    Randomized controlled trials have consistently shown that the use of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for stage I endometrial cancer leads to a reduction in the incidence of pelvic recurrences without a corresponding reduction in overall mortality. It was hypothesized that a reduction in mortality associated with the receipt of RT could be identified in a large data set with greater statistical power. Women with surgically staged IA or IB endometrial adenocarcinoma who were treated with total hysterectomy between 2003 and 2011 were identified in the National Cancer Data Base. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were performed to analyze factors associated with the treatment type. A survival analysis was performed with log-rank testing, Cox proportional hazards regression, and Kaplan-Meier estimates. A total of 44,309 eligible women were identified (33,380 at stage IA and 10,929 at stage IB): 88.4% of the women with stage IA tumors and 51.6% of the women with stage IB tumors received no RT. Older age, comorbid disease, a higher histologic grade, and a larger tumor size were independently associated with an increase in mortality. The receipt of vaginal brachytherapy (VB) was independently associated with a reduction in mortality for both stage IA disease (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.97) and stage IB disease (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.51-0.74). Analyses of this large database support the utility of postoperative VB for many women with stage I endometrial cancer. Unfortunately, RT appears to be underused in this population. Greater adherence to consensus guidelines may lead to improved outcomes. Cancer 2016;122:3724-31. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  20. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected adults and adolescents: Updated Guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, and HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masur, Henry; Brooks, John T; Benson, Constance A; Holmes, King K; Pau, Alice K; Kaplan, Jonathan E

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, a revised and updated version of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institutes of Health/HIV Medicine Association Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents was released online. These guidelines, since their inception in 1989, have been widely accessed in the United States and abroad. These guidelines have focused on the management of HIV/AIDS-related opportunistic infections that occur in the United States. In other parts of the world, the spectrum of complications may be different and the resources available for diagnosis and management may not be identical to those in the United States. The sections that have been most extensively updated are those on immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human papillomavirus, and immunizations. The guidelines will not be published in hard copy form. This document will be revised as needed throughout each year as new data become available.

  1. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and