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Sample records for brachytherapy seed reconstruction

  1. Radioactive seed migration following parotid gland interstitial brachytherapy.

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    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of pulmonary seed migration after parotid brachytherapy using a novel migrated seed detection technique. Patients diagnosed with parotid cancer who underwent permanent parotid brachytherapy from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Head and neck CT scans and chest X-rays were evaluated during routine follow-up. Mimics software and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and migrated seed detection from the original implanted region, respectively. Postimplant dosimetry analysis was performed after seeds migration if the seeds were still in their emitting count. Adverse clinical sequelae from seed embolization to the lung were documented. The radioactive seed implants were identified on chest X-rays in 6 patients. The incidence rate of seed migration in 321 parotid brachytherapy patients was 1.87% (6/321) and that of individual seed migration was 0.04% (6/15218 seeds). All migrated seeds were originally from the retromandibular region. No adverse dosimetric consequences were found in the target region. Pulmonary symptoms were not reported by any patient in this study. In our patient set, migration of radioactive seeds with an initial radioactivity of 0.6-0.7 mCi to the chest following parotid brachytherapy was rare. Late migration of a single seed from the central target region did not affect the dosimetry significantly, and patients did not have severe short-term complications. This study proposed a novel technique to localize the anatomical origin of the migrated seeds during brachytherapy. Our evidence suggested that placement of seeds adjacent to blood vessels was associated with an increased likelihood of seed migration to the lungs. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

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    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos, E-mail: nccf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  3. Flap reconstruction and interstitial brachytherapy in nonextremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vineeta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is an integral component of management of high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. Interstitial brachytherapy is used to deliver a boost or radical dose with several advantages over external beam radiotherapy. There has always been a concern to use brachytherapy with flap reconstruction of skin defects after wide excision. We preset our initial experience with interstitial brachytherapy in two patients of recurrent high-grade non-extremity sarcomas treated with surgical excision and soft tissue reconstruction of surgical defect.

  4. Refining prostate seed brachytherapy: Comparing high-, intermediate-, and low-activity seeds for I-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy.

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    Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Pascal; Carrier, Jean-François; Larouche, Renée-Xavière; Hervieux, Yannick; Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the difference in prostate coverage and dose to the rectum in men with prostate carcinoma treated with permanent seed brachytherapy with different seed activities. Forty-nine patients treated with iodine-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy with low-activity seeds of 0.30-0.37 mCi were identified. For each of these patients, 2 patients with similar prostate volume (±2 cc) were paired: one treated with intermediate seed activity (0.44-0.46 mCi) and one with high seed activity (0.60-0.66 mCi). The doses to prostate and rectum were compared using CT on Day 30. A total of 147 patients divided into the three seed activity groups were analyzed. Mean prostate volume was 35.7 cc (standard deviation [SD], 11.70). Compared with low-activity seeds, implants with high-activity seeds consisted of an average of 22 seeds and 4.7 needles less. The dose to the prostate (prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose [V100], prostate volume receiving 150% of the prescribed dose, and minimal dose covering 90% of the prostate volume expressed in Gy) was not higher on Day 30 (p = 0.58-0.97). The mean volume (in cubic centimeters) of rectal wall receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) increased with activity: low activity, 0.34 cc (SD, 0.49), intermediate activity, 0.47 cc (SD, 0.48), and high activity, 0.72 cc (SD, 0.79) (p = 0.009). There was a trend (p = 0.073) toward a higher frequency of clinically unfavorable rectal dosimetry (V100 > 1.3 cc) in patients with high-activity seeds (16.7%) compared with low-activity (6.3%) or intermediate-activity (4.2%) seeds. High-activity seeds do not result in a higher dose to the prostate but in a higher dose to the rectum. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear characterization of radioactive bioglass seed for brachytherapy studies

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    Nogueira, L.B.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: Lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: Campos@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze the isotopic compositions of the radioactive bioglass seeds for brachytherapy studies. Bioglass seeds were synthesized by sol-gel process, distributed in the seed samples, such as [Si: Ca: Ho], [Si: Ca: Ho: Zr], [Si: Ca: Ho: Ba], [Si: Ca: Sm] and [Si: Ca: Sm: Ba]. The bioglass seeds were irradiated at the TRIGA nuclear reactor - CDTN for a period of eight hours on a turntable around the reactor core for nuclear characterization studies. Nuclear characterization of the radioactive bioglass seeds by gamma spectrometry provided the gamma signatures of Sm-153 and Ho-166 followed by the Ba and Zr contrast agents. The gamma and X-ray spectra were plotted for analysis of the isotopic compositions of bioglass seeds. Gamma spectrum from the Ho-166 radioisotope and the X-ray spectrum of the Ba and Zr elements for [Si: Ca: Ho: Ba] and [Si: Ca: Ho: Zr] were showed. The particle ranges on ceramic; water and tissue were also analyzed using gamma and beta particle evaluations. The beta particle is absorbed around the seed, whereas the gamma particle can travel far from the seed position. Therefore, for small volume and consequentially small mass, the absorbed dose of beta particles close to the seed is very high. These results complement the study of the characterization and monitoring of bioglass seeds for brachytherapy implants. (author)

  6. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

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    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  7. Methodology of quality control for brachytherapy {sup 125}I seeds

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    Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Manzoli, Jose E.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmoura@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology of quality control of {sup 125}I seeds used for brachytherapy. The {sup 125}I seeds are millimeter titanium capsules widely used in permanent implants of prostate cancer, allowing a high dose within the tumour and a low dose on the surrounding tissues, with very low harm to the other tissues. Besides, with this procedure, the patients have a low impotence rate and a small incidence of urinary incontinence. To meet the medical standards, an efficient quality control is necessary, showing values with the minimum uncertainness possible, concerning the seeds dimensions and their respective activities. The medical needles are used to insert the seeds inside the prostate. The needles used in brachytherapy have an internal diameter of 1.0 mm, so it is necessary {sup 125}I seeds with an external maximum diameter of 0.85 mm. For the seeds and the spacer positioning on the planning sheet, the seeds must have a length between 4.5 and 5.0 mm. The activities must not vary more than 5% in each batch of {sup 125}I seeds. For this methodology, we used two ionization chamber detectors and one caliper. In this paper, the methodology using one control batch with 75 seeds manufactured by GE Health care Ltd is presented. (author)

  8. Incidence and prediction of seed migration to the chest after iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Lin, Junqing; Yang, Weizhu; Jiang, Na; Zheng, Qubin; Huang, Jingyao; Huang, Ning; Li, Ang; Jiang, Han

    2017-08-08

    The aims were to determine the incidence of seed migration to the chest and to analyze the predictive factors after iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Three hundred ninety-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent iodine-125 seed brachytherapy. After seed implantation, chest X-ray radiograph or computerized tomography were undertaken to assess the occurrence and location of seed migration at 3 months after brachytherapy. The incidence of seed migration to the lung and heart was calculated. A statistical analysis of the influences of seed loss to the chest was performed between patients with and without seed migration. A total of 13,977 seeds were implanted in 399 patients. One hundred fifty of the 13,977 (1.07%) seeds migrated to the chest in 81 of the 399 (20.30%) patients. Of all the migrated seeds, 112 (74.67%) migrated to the lungs in 59 (67.82%) patients, and 38 (25.33%) seeds migrated to the heart in 28 (47.46%) patients. No case exhibited clinical symptoms related to the migrated seeds. The number of seeds implanted and the number of seed implantations were significantly associated with seed migration. The occurrence of seed migration to the lungs and heart was evaluated. Furthermore, the number of seeds implanted and the number of seed implantation procedures are significant predictors of seed migration. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Seed Placement in Permanent Breast Seed Implant Brachytherapy: Are Concerns Over Accuracy Valid?

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    Morton, Daniel, E-mail: dmorton@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Hilts, Michelle [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Batchelar, Deidre [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate seed placement accuracy in permanent breast seed implant brachytherapy (PBSI), to identify any systematic errors and evaluate their effect on dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans and postimplant computed tomography scans for 20 PBSI patients were spatially registered and used to evaluate differences between planned and implanted seed positions, termed seed displacements. For each patient, the mean total and directional seed displacements were determined in both standard room coordinates and in needle coordinates relative to needle insertion angle. Seeds were labeled according to their proximity to the anatomy within the breast, to evaluate the influence of anatomic regions on seed placement. Dosimetry within an evaluative target volume (seroma + 5 mm), skin, breast, and ribs was evaluated to determine the impact of seed placement on the treatment. Results: The overall mean (±SD) difference between implanted and planned positions was 9 ± 5 mm for the aggregate seed population. No significant systematic directional displacements were observed for this whole population. However, for individual patients, systematic displacements were observed, implying that intrapatient offsets occur during the procedure. Mean displacements for seeds in the different anatomic areas were not found to be significantly different from the mean for the entire seed population. However, small directional trends were observed within the anatomy, potentially indicating some bias in the delivery. Despite observed differences between the planned and implanted seed positions, the median (range) V{sub 90} for the 20 patients was 97% (66%-100%), and acceptable dosimetry was achieved for critical structures. Conclusions: No significant trends or systematic errors were observed in the placement of seeds in PBSI, including seeds implanted directly into the seroma. Recorded seed displacements may be related to intrapatient setup adjustments. Despite observed seed

  10. Development of irradiation support devices for production of brachytherapy seeds

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    Mattos, Fabio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Souza, Carla D.; Moura, Joao A.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Karan Junior, Dib; Feher, Anselmo; Oliveira, Tiago B.; Benega, Marcos A.G., E-mail: tiagooliveira298@gmail.com, E-mail: mattos.fr@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jamoura@ipen.br, E-mail: ernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: s, E-mail: dib.karan@usp.br, E-mail: afeher@ipen.br, E-mail: marcosagbenega@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Ophthalmic tumors treatment with brachytherapy sources has been widely used as a primary or secondary therapy for non-malignant or malignant tumors, for example, choroid melanoma, and retinoblastoma. Ruthenium-106, Iodine-125, Palladium -103, Gold-198 and Iridium-192, are some radionuclides that can be applied for treatment of ocular tumors. These sources are in small sizes (a few millimeters) and different shapes (rods, wires, disks). To ensure high accuracy during treatment, they are positioned in eye applicators, specially designed to fit on the surface of tumor. The Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN) in a partnership with Paulista Medicine School (UNIFESP) created a project that aims to develop a prototype of Iridium-192 seeds for treatment of eye cancer. This seed consists in a core of Ir -Pt alloy (20%-80%) with a length of 3 mm, to be activated in IPEN's IEA-R1 Reactor, and a titanium capsule sealing the core. It was imperative to develop a sustainer device for irradiation. This piece is used to avoid overlapping of one cores and, therefore, avoiding the 'shadow effect' that does not allow full activation of each core due to the high density. (author)

  11. Effect of implanted brachytherapy seeds on optical fluence distribution: preliminary ex vivo study

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    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Ding, Meisong; Newman, Francis; Dole, Kenneth C.; Huang, Zheng; Blanc, Dominique

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has gradually found its place in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant human diseases. Currently, interstitial PDT is being explored as an alternative modality for newly diagnosed and recurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. The interstitial PDT for the treatment of prostate cancer might be considered to treat prostates with permanent radioactive seeds implantation. However, the effect of implanted brachytherapy seeds on the optical fluence distribution of PDT light has not been studied before. This study investigated, for the first time, the effect of brachytherapy seed on the optical fluence distribution of 760 nm light in ex vivo models (meat and canine prostate).

  12. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound for accurate visualization of brachytherapy seeds with the photoacoustic needle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, M.; Parameshwarappa, Vinay; Hendriksen, E.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2016-01-01

    An important problem in minimally invasive photoacoustic (PA) imaging of brachytherapy seeds is reflection artifacts caused by the high signal from the optical fiber/needle tip reflecting off the seed. The presence of these artifacts confounds interpretation of images. In this letter, we demonstrate

  13. Incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with loose 125I seeds

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    Shiraishi Yutaka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to determine the incidence of seed migration not only to the chest, but also to the abdomen and pelvis after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with loose 125I seeds. Methods We reviewed the records of 267 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with loose 125I seeds. After seed implantation, orthogonal chest radiographs, an abdominal radiograph, and a pelvic radiograph were undertaken routinely to document the occurrence and sites of seed migration. The incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was calculated. All patients who had seed migration to the abdomen and pelvis subsequently underwent a computed tomography scan to identify the exact location of the migrated seeds. Postimplant dosimetric analysis was undertaken, and dosimetric results were compared between patients with and without seed migration. Results A total of 19,236 seeds were implanted in 267 patients. Overall, 91 of 19,236 (0.47% seeds migrated in 66 of 267 (24.7% patients. Sixty-nine (0.36% seeds migrated to the chest in 54 (20.2% patients. Seven (0.036% seeds migrated to the abdomen in six (2.2% patients. Fifteen (0.078% seeds migrated to the pelvis in 15 (5.6% patients. Seed migration occurred predominantly within two weeks after seed implantation. None of the 66 patients had symptoms related to the migrated seeds. Postimplant prostate D90 was not significantly different between patients with and without seed migration. Conclusion We showed the incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen and pelvis. Seed migration did not have a significant effect on postimplant prostate D90.

  14. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a clinical ultrasound system

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    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-06-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a popular prostate cancer treatment option that involves the permanent implantation of radioactive seeds into the prostate. However, contemporary brachytherapy procedure is limited by the lack of an imaging system that can provide real-time seed-position feedback. While many other imaging systems have been proposed, photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a potential ideal modality to address this need, since it could easily be incorporated into the current ultrasound system used in the operating room. We present such a photoacoustic imaging system built around a clinical ultrasound system to achieve the task of visualizing and localizing seeds. We performed several experiments to analyze the effects of various parameters on the appearance of brachytherapy seeds in photoacoustic images. We also imaged multiple seeds in an ex vivo dog prostate phantom to demonstrate the possibility of using this system in a clinical setting. Although still in its infancy, these initial results of a photoacoustic imaging system for the application of prostate brachytherapy seed localization are highly promising.

  15. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-02-01

    Brachytherapy with iodine-labeled seeds (I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Twenty-three studies (824 patients' data) were included in the meta-analysis. I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P cancer patients after I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months, whereas a combined treatment with I-seeds brachytherapy and other therapies was associated with approximately 12 months' survival. The majority of patients who underwent I-seeds brachytherapy had their pain relieved.

  16. Dosimetric influence of seed spacers and end-weld thickness for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhus, Christopher S; Mikell, Justin K; Frank, Steven J; Mourtada, Firas; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the dosimetric influence of conventional spacers and a cobalt chloride complex contrast (C4) agent, a novel marker for MRI that can also serve as a seed spacer, adjacent to (103)Pd, (125)I, and (131)Cs sources for permanent prostate brachytherapy. Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport were used to estimate the dosimetric influence of brachytherapy end-weld thicknesses and spacers near the three sources. Single-source assessments and volumetric conditions simulating prior patient treatments were computed. Volume-dose distributions were imported to a treatment planning system for dose-volume histogram analyses. Single-source assessment revealed that brachytherapy spacers primarily attenuated the dose distribution along the source long axis. The magnitude of the attenuation at 1 cm on the long axis ranged from -10% to -5% for conventional spacers and approximately -2% for C4 spacers, with the largest attenuation for (103)Pd. Spacer perturbation of dose distributions was less than manufacturing tolerances for brachytherapy sources as gleaned by an analysis of end-weld thicknesses. Volumetric Monte Carlo assessment demonstrated that TG-43 techniques overestimated calculated doses by approximately 2%. Specific dose-volume histogram metrics for prostate implants were not perturbed by inclusion of conventional or C4 spacers in clinical models. Dosimetric perturbations of single-seed dose distributions by brachytherapy spacers exceeded 10% along the source long axes adjacent to the spacers. However, no dosimetric impact on volumetric parameters was noted for brachytherapy spacers adjacent to (103)Pd, (125)I, or (131)Cs sources in the context of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and removal of reflection artifacts in minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging for accurate visualization of brachytherapy seeds

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    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Parameshwarappa, Vinay; Hendriksen, Ellen; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2017-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by the high signal from the optical fiber/ needle tip reflecting off the seed is an important problem in minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds. The presence of these artifacts confounds the interpretation of images and reduces contrast. We apply a new method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify and reduce reflection artifacts generated in interstitial illumination imaging of brachytherapy seeds. We present the system comprising of a US imager and linear array, with illumination provided via a cutting needle. Non-radioactive brachytherapy seeds are implanted in a tissue mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissue. The PAFUSion-corrected imaging results successfully demonstrate that our approach can identify and strongly reduce reflection artifacts in the context of photoacoustic needle. The phantom result also shows that multi-spectral photoacoustics can separate signals between the seeds and other optical absorbers.

  18. Radiological response of lanthanum guiding seeds in brachytherapy implants; Resposta radiologica de sementes guia de lantanio em implantes braquiterapicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, L.S.R.; Machado, E.D.P., E-mail: lais26@globo.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Campos, T.P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Roberto, W.S. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica e Matematica

    2013-08-15

    Ceramic seeds with La-139 incorporated were synthesized to be used as radiological guides in brachytherapy implants. The synthesis was performed based on the sol-gel method. The seeds were subjected to characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. Furthermore, the contrast from a radiographic film was evaluated to lanthanum, samarium and holmium seeds. Radiological response on a phantom at different depths with lanthanum seeds and metal seeds was also investigated. Based on the values of contrast, the synthesized lanthanum seeds can be considered efficient as radiological guides when implanted together with pure Ho-165 and Sm-152 seeds. (author)

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds using a channel-domain ultrasound array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a technique commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer that relies on the precise placement of small radioactive seeds near the tumor location. The advantage of this technique over traditional radiation therapies is that treatment can be continuous and uniform, resulting in fewer clinic visits and a shorter treatment duration. Two important phases of this treatment are needle guidance for implantation, and post-placement verification for dosimetry. Ultrasound is a common imaging modality used for these purposes, but it can be difficult to distinguish the seeds from surrounding tissues, often requiring other imaging techniques such as MRI or CT. Photoacoustic imaging may offer a viable alternative. Using a photoacoustic system based on an L7- 4 array transducer and a realtime ultrasound array system capable of parallel channel data acquisition streamed to a multi-core computer via PCI-express, we have demonstrated imaging of these seeds at an ultrasound depth of 16 mm and laser penetration depths ranging up to 50 mm in chicken tissue with multiple optical wavelengths. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images are coregistered via an interlaced pulse sequence. Two laser pulses are used to form a photoacoustic image, and at these depths, the brachytherapy seeds are detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 26dB. To obtain this result, 1064nm light was used with a fluence of 100mJ/cm2, the ANSI limit for human skin exposure at this wavelength. This study demonstrates the potential for photoacoustic imaging as a candidate technology for brachytherapy seed placement guidance and verification.

  20. Embolized prostatic brachytherapy seeds mimicking acute chest pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Guragai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old male with a history of nonobstructive coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and prostate cancer presented to the hospital with 1-day history of pleuritic chest pain. Initial workup for acute coronary event was unremarkable. Chest X-ray revealed multiple small radial densities which were linear and hyperdense, consistent with embolization of metallic seeds to the pulmonary circulation. The patient was noted to have had radioactive metallic seeds implanted for prostate cancer 6 months ago. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolization of prostatic seeds is challenging as they frequently present with chest pain mimicking acute coronary syndromes.

  1. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound for accurate visualization of brachytherapy seeds with the photoacoustic needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Parameshwarappa, Vinay; Hendriksen, Ellen; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2016-12-01

    An important problem in minimally invasive photoacoustic (PA) imaging of brachytherapy seeds is reflection artifacts caused by the high signal from the optical fiber/needle tip reflecting off the seed. The presence of these artifacts confounds interpretation of images. In this letter, we demonstrate a recently developed concept called photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion) for the first time in the context of interstitial illumination PA imaging to identify and remove reflection artifacts. In this method, ultrasound (US) from the transducer is focused on the region of the optical fiber/needle tip identified in a first step using PA imaging. The image developed from the US diverging from the focus zone at the tip region visualizes only the reflections from seeds and other acoustic inhomogeneities, allowing identification of the reflection artifacts of the first step. These artifacts can then be removed from the PA image. Using PAFUSion, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts and thereby improved interstitial PA visualization of brachytherapy seeds in phantom and ex vivo measurements on porcine tissue.

  2. Seed loss in prostate brachytherapy. Operator dependency and impact on dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bared, Nancy; Sebbag, Natanel; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renee; Taussky, Daniel; Delouya, Guila [Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal - Hopital Notre-Dame, Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of our study was to review seed loss and its impact on dosimetry as well as the influence of the treating physician on seed loss and dosimetry in patients treated with prostate brachytherapy using permanent loose {sup 125}I implant. We analyzed 1087 consecutive patients treated by two physicians between July 2005 and April 2015 at a single institution. Pelvic fluoroscopic imaging was done 30 days post implant and a chest X-ray when seed loss was observed. Seed loss occurred in 19.4 % of patients: in 20.0 % of implants done by the most experienced physician and in 17.2 % by the less experienced physician (p = 0.4) and migration to the thorax occurred in 5.9 % (6.9 vs. 2.2 %, p = 0.004). The mean seed loss rate was 0.57 % [standard deviation (SD) 1.39] and the mean rate of seeds in the thorax was 0.14 % (SD 0.65). The most experienced physician had a higher mean number of seeds lost: 0.36 versus 0.25 (p = 0.055), and a higher mean number of seed migration to the thorax: 0.1 versus 0.02 (p < 0.001). When at least one seed was lost, a decrease of 4.2 Gy (p < 0.001) in the D90 and a decrease of 3.5 % (p = 0.002) in the V150 was observed. We found a significant decrease in V150 and D90 with the occurrence of seed loss. Furthermore, we found a difference in seed migration among the physicians demonstrating that seed loss is operator dependant. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten den Prozentsatz des Seed-Verlusts sowie den Einfluss von Arzterfahrung und Seed-Abgang auf die Dosimetrie bei Patienten, die mit einer Prostata-Brachytherapie mit permanent beweglichen {sup 125}I-Implantaten behandelt wurden. Eingeschlossen in diese Studie wurden alle zwischen Juli 2005 und April 2015 an unserem Krankenhaus von zwei Aerzten konsekutiv behandelten 1087 Patienten. Anhand fluoroskopischer Bilder wurden noch vorhandene Seeds 30 Tage nach dem Eingriff gezaehlt. Bei unvollstaendiger Seed-Anzahl wurde ein Thorax-Roentgenbild angefertigt. In 19% der Patienten ging mindestens ein

  3. Pediatric peri-operative fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent Wilms’ tumor using a reconstructed Freiburg flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Flower

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report peri-operative fractionated high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with a 3D customized Freiburg flap applicator to treat locally recurrent Wilms’ tumor, followed by immediate hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for a 16-year-old with a second recurrence of nephroblastoma (Wilms’ tumor. Material and methods: The tumor was excised and surgical bed was treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy using a Freiburg flap applicator. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed immediately after the removal of brachytherapy applicator. Results: The Freiburg flap was successfully reconstructed to enable delivery of conformable peri-operative HDR brachytherapy. The clinical target volume (CTV D90 was 26 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusions : Peri-operative fractionated HDR brachytherapy with a customized Freiburg flap applicator was delivered successfully across a large multi-disciplinary team.

  4. Consequences of random and systematic reconstruction uncertainties in 3D image based brachytherapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Lang, Stefan; Granfeldt, Jørgen; Pötter, Richard; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of random and systematic applicator reconstruction uncertainties on DVH parameters in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Dose plans were analysed for 20 cervical cancer patients with MRI based brachytherapy. Uncertainty of applicator reconstruction was modelled by translating and rotating the applicator. Changes in DVH parameters per mm of applicator displacement were evaluated for GTV, CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. These data were used to derive patient population based estimates of delivered dose relative to expected dose. Deviations of DVH parameters depend on direction of reconstruction uncertainty. The most sensitive organs are rectum and bladder where mean DVH parameter shifts are 5-6% per mm applicator displacement in ant-post direction. For other directions and other DVH parameters, mean shifts are below 4% per mm. By avoiding systematic reconstruction errors, uncertainties on DVH parameters can be kept below 10% in 90% of a patient population. Systematic errors of a few millimetres can lead to significant deviations. Comprehensive quality control of afterloader, applicators and imaging procedures should be applied to prevent systematic errors in applicator reconstruction. Random errors should be minimised by using small slice thickness. With careful reconstruction procedures, reliable DVH parameters for target and OAR's can be obtained.

  5. Späte Seed-Migration nach LDR-Brachytherapie der Prostata mit I125-Permanentimplantaten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maletzki P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hintergrund: Nach einer „Lowdose-rate“- (LDR Brachytherapie der Prostata kommt es häufig zu einer Seed-Migration. Trotz mehrerer Arbeiten über eine Seed-Migration in der frühen postoperativen Phase nach Seed-Implantation gibt es bisher nur wenige Daten über eine Seed-Migration mehrere Jahre nach erfolgter Intervention. Unser Ziel war eine Datenerhebung zur Inzidenz, Lokalisation, Symptomatik und therapeutischen Konsequenz einer späten Seed-Migration 3 Jahre nach Seed-Implantation. Methoden: Wir untersuchten retrospektiv 63 unselektionierte Patienten, die mittels transrektaler, Ultraschall-gesteuerter, transperinealer interstitieller LDR-Brachytherapie der Prostata zwischen 2001 und 2010 behandelt wurden. Es wurden hierbei verknüpfte („stranded“ Seeds verwendet. Am ersten Tag nach der Intervention erfolgte eine Symphysenzielaufnahme und 6 Wochen postoperativ eine erneute Symphysenzielaufnahme in Kombination mit einem CT/MRI des Beckens mit Bildfusionstechnik zur dosimetrischen Untersuchung. Die radiologische Spätkontrolle wurde mehr als 3 Jahre postoperativ mittels einer Symphysenzielaufnahme und eines Thorax-Röntgens durchgeführt. Ergebnisse: Mehr als 3 Jahre nach Brachytherapie zeigten 36 der 63 Patienten (57 % einen Seed-Verlust. Die Anzahl fehlender Seeds lag zwischen 1 und 9. Neben einer frühen Seed-Migration zeigte sich eine späte Seed-Migration bei 2 der 36 Patienten (6 % mit Migration in die Lunge, Leber und das kleine Becken. Alle Spätmigrationen waren asymptomatisch und ohne therapeutische Konsequenz. Diskussion: Neben häufig auftretenden Seed-Verlusten scheint eine Seed-Migration mehrere Jahre nach erfolgter Implantation eine seltene Erscheinung zu sein. Langzeitkontrollen mit ergänzenden radiologischen Nachuntersuchungen könnten dennoch hilfreich zur Dokumentation einer relevanten Seed-Migration sein.

  6. Mathematical formulation of (125)I seed dosimetry parameters and heterogeneity correction in lung permanent implant brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Hesameddin; Mehdizadeh, Ali Reza; Darvish, Leili; Akbari, Sadegh; Rezaei, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Precise determination of dose distribution around low-energy brachytherapy sources as well as considering tissue heterogeneity is crucial for optimized treatment planning. This study is aimed at determination and mathematically formulation of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) dosimetry parameters of 125I seed (model 6711) and calculation of dose difference caused by neglecting lung heterogeneity in permanent implant brachytherapy. Using MCNPX 2.6.0 code, 125I seed (model 6711) was simulated in a cubic water environment, and its dosimetry parameters mentioned in AAPM TG-43 protocol were obtained. After benchmarking of parameters and comparison with prior studies, mathematical equations were fitted to the data, and a specific set of 125I seeds was simulated on a plane in simulated lung and water environments. Appropriate photon histories were considered to achieve data with maximum accuracy (max error 1%). In the end, isodose curves, profiles, depth dose, and dose difference between lung and water environments were obtained. For 125I seed (model 6711), radial dose function and anisotropy functions were obtained precisely with R2 > 0.99, all in good agreement with previous studies and protocol. In addition, percentage dose difference between inhomogeneous lung and homogenous water environments in a 5 cm distance was calculated and presented as D (r) function with R2 > 0.99. Considering practical difficulties in dose calculations, 125I seed dosimetry parameters and lung heterogeneity corrections can be obtained precisely by MCNPX. Equations presented in this study are recommended to be considered in future studies based on lung permanent implantation.

  7. Computational and Experimental Evaluations of a Novel Thermo-Brachytherapy Seed for Treatment of Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, Gregory R.

    Hyperthermia has long been known as a radiation therapy sensitizer of high potential; however successful delivery of this modality and integrating it with radiation have often proved technically difficult. We present the dual-modality thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, based on the ubiquitous low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy permanent implant, as a simple and effective combination of hyperthermia and radiation therapy. Heat is generated from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic core within the seed, which produces Joule heating by eddy currents. A strategically-selected Curie temperature provides thermal self-regulation. In order to obtain a uniform and sufficiently high temperature distribution, additional hyperthermia-only (HT-only) seeds are proposed to be used in vacant spots within the needles used to implant the TB seeds; this permits a high seed density without the use of additional needles. Experimental and computational studies were done both to optimize the design of the TB and HT-only seeds and to quantitatively assess their ability to heat and irradiate defined, patient-specific targets. Experiments were performed with seed-sized ferromagnetic samples in tissue-mimicking phantoms heated by an industrial induction heater. The magnetic and thermal properties of the seeds were studied computationally in the finite element analysis (FEA) solver COMSOL Multiphysics, modelling realistic patient-specific seed distributions. These distributions were derived from LDR permanent prostate implants previously conducted at our institution; various modifications of the seeds' design were studied. The calculated temperature distributions were analyzed by generating temperature-volume histograms, which were used to quantify coverage and temperature homogeneity for a range of blood perfusion rates, as well as for a range of seed Curie temperatures and thermal power production rates. The impact of the interseed attenuation and scatter (ISA) effect on radiation dose distributions

  8. Dummy source digitization algorithm for reconstruction of flexible brachytherapy catheters with biplane images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálvölgyi, Jenö

    2014-03-01

    The traditional brachytherapy catheter reconstruction with biplane images is based on digitizing radio-opaque markers with a pointing device on a film or on a screen. An algorithm to automate digitization of radio-opaque marker coordinates on biplane images is presented. To obtain the marker coordinates in a proper sequence, instead of usual pair of reconstruction images, series of images were taken with insertion of radio-opaque markers consecutively into the catheters. The images were pre-processed to suppress the shield of anatomic structures. The determination of the marker coordinates is based on the detection of characteristic high gradient variation in pre-processed image profiles. The method was tested with six endometrial insertions performed with Simon-Norman catheters using our version of Heyman packing. 28 catheters of six treatment fractions were digitized, typically 10 markers per catheter. To obtain the marker coordinates, adjustment of two threshold levels on the pre-processed images were needed. The coordinates of the radio-opaque markers on the biplane projection images were obtained without positive or negative artefact. THE DUMMY SOURCE COORDINATES ON THE BIPLANE IMAGES WERE DIGITIZED IN A PROPER SEQUENCE: from the catheters' tip towards the end of the catheters. After the three-dimensional reconstruction of the catheters from the digitized coordinates, the geometry file was imported by the brachytherapy planning system for dose calculation. The method has the advantage to eliminate manual digitization of the dummy sources.

  9. SU-E-J-233: Effect of Brachytherapy Seed Artifacts in T2 and Proton Density Maps in MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fatemi-Ardekani, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims at investigating the influence of brachytherapy seeds on T2 and proton density (PD) maps generated from MR images. Proton density maps can be used to extract water content. Since dose absorbed in tissue surrounding low energy brachytherapy seeds are highly influenced by tissue composition, knowing the water content is a first step towards implementing a heterogeneity correction algorithm using MR images. Methods: An LDR brachytherapy (IsoAid Advantage Pd-103) seed was placed in the middle of an agar-based gel phantom and imaged using a 3T Philips MR scanner with a 168-channel head coil. A multiple echo sequence with TE=20, 40, 60, 80, 100 (ms) with large repetition time (TR=6259ms) was used to extract T2 and PD maps. Results: Seed artifacts were considerably reduced on T2 maps compared to PD maps. The variation of PD around the mean was obtained as −97% to 125% (±1%) while for T2 it was recorded as −71% to 24% (±1%). Conclusion: PD maps which are required for heterogeneity corrections are susceptible to artifacts from seeds. Seed artifacts on T2 maps, however, are significantly reduced due to not being sensitive to B0 field variation.

  10. SU-E-T-123: Anomalous Altitude Effect in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, E; Spencer, DP; Meyer, T [University of Calgary and Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent seed implant brachytherapy procedures require the measurement of the air kerma strength of seeds prior to implant. This is typically accomplished using a well-type ionization chamber. Previous measurements (Griffin et al., 2005; Bohm et al., 2005) of several low-energy seeds using the air-communicating HDR 1000 Plus chamber have demonstrated that the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P{sub TP}, may overcompensate for air density changes induced by altitude variations by up to 18%. The purpose of this work is to present empirical correction factors for two clinically-used seeds (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and Nucletron selectSeed {sup 125}I) for which empirical altitude correction factors do not yet exist in the literature when measured with the HDR 1000 Plus chamber. Methods: An in-house constructed pressure vessel containing the HDR 1000 Plus well chamber and a digital barometer/thermometer was pumped or evacuated, as appropriate, to a variety of pressures from 725 to 1075 mbar. Current measurements, corrected with P{sub TP}, were acquired for each seed at these pressures and normalized to the reading at ‘standard’ pressure (1013.25 mbar). Results: Measurements in this study have shown that utilization of P{sub TP} can overcompensate in the corrected current reading by up to 20% and 17% for the IsoAid Pd-103 and the Nucletron I-125 seed respectively. Compared to literature correction factors for other seed models, the correction factors in this study diverge by up to 2.6% and 3.0% for iodine (with silver) and palladium respectively, indicating the need for seed-specific factors. Conclusion: The use of seed specific altitude correction factors can reduce uncertainty in the determination of air kerma strength. The empirical correction factors determined in this work can be applied in clinical quality assurance measurements of air kerma strength for two previously unpublished seed designs (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and

  11. Dosimetry accuracy as a function of seed localization uncertainty in permanent prostate brachytherapy: increased seed number correlates with less variability in prostate dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Davis, Brian J.; Furutani, Keith M.; Herman, Michael G.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-06-01

    The variation of permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry as a function of seed localization uncertainty was investigated for I-125 implants with seed activities commonly employed in contemporary practice. Post-implant imaging and radiation dosimetry data from nine patients who underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy served as the source of clinical data for this simulation study. Gaussian noise with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm was applied to the seed coordinates for each patient dataset and 1000 simulations were performed at each noise level. Dose parameters, including D90, were computed for each case and compared with the actual dosimetry data. A total of 81 000 complete sets of post-brachytherapy dose volume statistics were computed. The results demonstrated that less than 5% deviation of prostate D90 can be expected when the seed localization uncertainty is 2 mm, whereas a seed localization uncertainty of 10 mm yielded an average decrease in D90 of 33 Gy. The mean normalized decrement in the prostate V100 was 10% at 5 mm uncertainty. Implants with greater seed number and larger prostate volume correlated with less sensitivity of D90 and V100 to seed localization uncertainty. Estimated target volume dose parameters tended to decrease with increasing seed localization uncertainty. The bladder V100 varied more significantly both in mean and standard deviation as compared to the urethra V100. A larger number of implanted seeds also correlated to less sensitivity of the bladder V100 to seed localization uncertainty. In contrast, the deviation of urethra V100 did not correlate with the number of implanted seeds or prostate volume.

  12. Dosimetric characteristics and a standard for the (198)gold seed used in interstitial brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauffy, Lucile S.

    Cancer of the prostate can be treated in different ways. One of them, brachytherapy, is an internal irradiation method consisting of the placement of radioactive sources, called seeds, into the tumor. This work deals with the dosimetry of the 198Au interstitial brachytherapy source. In order to facilitate its clinical use and to obtain the data to be employed in the latest treatment planning systems, new quantities and a potential calibration standard are studied. These quantities, based on dose rates, were recommended in 1995 by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43, AAPM TG-43, and have not previously been obtained for 198Au. They are measured in a solid water phantom using thermoluminescent detectors, and calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code, MCNP, and simple analytic models. In the last part of this work, the "198Au equivalent" activity of 137Cs and 192Ir surrogate seeds is calculated since the National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST, does not provide a standard for the short half-life 198Au source that would allow checking the activity of the seeds before use on patients. This calculation is done by simulating the response of the Sun Nuclear ionization chamber, model 1008, with MCNP 4C. The air kerma strength, Sk, per unit apparent activity is found equal to 2.0627 (MCNP) and 2.0889 U mCi-1 (measured). Sk per unit activity is 1.8050 U mCi-1 (MCNP). The dose rate constant per unit apparent activity, Λ/Aapp, is equal to 2.3099 (MCNP) and 2.2878 cGy h-1 mCi -1 (measured). This same quantity per unit air kerma strength is 1.1198 (MCNP) and 1.0952 cGy h-1 U-1 (measured). The values of the radial dose function, g(r), the anisotropy function, F(r,θ), the anisotropy factor, φan(r), and the anisotropy constant are also given. Finally, the "198Au equivalent" activity for the 192Ir surrogate seed is equal to 1.9549 times the real activity of the 192Ir seed, and that for the 137Cs surrogate seed is 1.4895 times its

  13. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O' Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  14. Robot-assisted thoracoscopic brachytherapy for lung cancer: comparison of the ZEUS robot, VATS, and manual seed implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guo-Wei; Pytel, Martin; Trejos, Ana Luisa; Hornblower, Victoria; Smallwood, Jennifer; Patel, Rajni; Fenster, Aaron; Malthaner, Richard A

    2007-09-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is becoming an accepted treatment option for lung cancer patients for whom surgery poses a high risk. Robotic surgery has the potential to deliver brachytherapy seeds into tumors while keeping surgeons at a safe distance from the radioactive source. Our aim was to compare the accuracy, number of attempts, and time needed to place seeds next to a target when using a manual technique, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and the ZEUS robot for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). A brachytherapy seed injector was developed and attached to one of the ZEUS robotic arms. Four subjects each inserted inactive dummy brachytherapy seeds into clear agar-gelatin cubes containing a 1.6-mm stainless steel ball target. Two orthogonal radiographs were taken of each agar cube, and the corresponding distances were measured in triplicate using ImageJ processing software. The mean distance between the center of each seed and the corresponding target was calculated using the Pythagorean theorem. Comparisons were made using analysis of variance, t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, as appropriate. A total of 384 tests (128 for each technique) were performed. The median accuracies for the manual technique, VATS, and ZEUS were 1.8 mm (range: 0.9-6.7 mm), 2.4 mm (range: 1.0-11.3 mm), and 3.6 mm (range: 1.3-16.7 mm), respectively (p ZEUS were 1 (range: 1-5), 4 (range: 1-14), and 3 (range: 1-20), respectively (p ZEUS were 3.0 s (range: 1-43 s), 86.5 s (range: 6-372 s), and 64.5 s (range: 5-356 s), respectively (p ZEUS robotic platform was able to place seeds beside a target within a clinically acceptable distance, with an acceptable amount of trauma and time required. It achieved results equal to or better than those obtained with VATS.

  15. Development of an encapsulation method using plasma arc welding to produce iodine-125 seeds for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, Anselmo; Calvo, Wilson A.P.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Somessari, Samir L.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Moura, Joao A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Souza, Carla D.; Rela, Paulo R., E-mail: afeher@ipen.b, E-mail: wapcalvo@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b, E-mail: somessar@ipen.b, E-mail: olcosta@ipen.b, E-mail: esmoura@ipen.b, E-mail: cdsouza@ipen.b, E-mail: prela@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The prostate cancer, which is the second cause of death by cancer in men, overcome only by lung cancer is public health problem in Brazil. Brachytherapy is among the possible available treatments for prostate cancer, in which small seeds containing Iodine-125 radioisotope are implanted into the prostate gland. The seed consists of a titanium sealed capsule with 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm length, containing a central silver wire with adsorbed Iodine-125. The Plasma Arc Welding (PAW) is one of the viable techniques for sealing process. The equipment used in this technique is less costly than in other processes, such as, Laser Beam Welding (LBW). The main purpose of this work was the development of an encapsulation method using PAW. The development of this work has presented the following phases: cutting and cleaning titanium tube, determination of the welding parameters, development of a titanium tube holding device for PAW, sealed sources validation according to ISO 2919 - Sealed Radioactive Sources - General Requirements and Classification, and metallographic assays. The developed procedure to seal Iodine-125 seeds using PAW has shown high efficiency, satisfying all the established requirements of ISO 2919. The results obtained in this work will give the possibility to establish a routine production process according to the orientations presented in resolution RDC 17 - Good Manufacturing Practices to Medical Products defined by the ANVISA - National Agency of Sanitary Surveillance. (author)

  16. Comparative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy with I-125 and Pd-103 seeds via SISCODES/MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Bruno Machado; Falcao, Patricia Lima, E-mail: bmtrindade@yahoo.com [Nucleo de Radiacoes Ionizantes - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (NRI/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Christovao, Marilia Tavares [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Trindade, Daniela de Fatima Maia [Centro Universitario Una, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: The present paper is aimed at presenting a comparative dosimetric study of prostate brachytherapy with I-125 and Pd-103 seeds. Materials and Methods: A protocol for both implants with 148 seeds was simulated on a heterogeneous three-dimensional pelvic phantom by means of the SISCODES/MCNP5 codes. Dose-volume histograms on prostate, rectum and bladder, dose indexes D10, D30, D90, D0.5cc, D2cc and D7cc, and representations of the spatial dose distribution were evaluated. Results: For a D90 index equivalent to the prescription dose, the initial activity of each I-125 seed was calculated as 0.42 mCi and of Pd-103 as 0.94 mCi. The maximum dose on the urethra was 90% and 108% of the prescription dose for I-125 and Pd-103, respectively. The D2cc for I-125 was 30 Gy on the rectum and 127 Gy on the bladder; for Pd-103 was 29 Gy on the rectum and 189 Gy on the bladder. The D10 on the pubic bone was 144 Gy for I-125 and 66 Gy for Pd-103. Conclusion: The results indicate that Pd-103 and I-125 implants could deposit the prescribed dose on the target volume. Among the findings of the present study, there is an excessive radiation exposure of the pelvic bones, particularly with the I-125 protocol. (author)

  17. CT-Guided 125I Seed Interstitial Brachytherapy as a Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Spinal Metastases after External Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical efficacy of CT-guided 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy in patients with recurrent spinal metastases after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Between August 2003 and September 2015, 26 spinal metastatic lesions (24 patients were reirradiated by this salvage therapy modality. Treatment for all patients was preplanned using a three-dimensional treatment planning system 3–5 days before 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy; dosimetry verification was performed immediately after seed implantation. Median actual D90 was 99 Gy (range, 90–176, and spinal cord median Dmax was 39 Gy (range, 6–110. Median local control (LC was 12 months (95% CI: 7.0–17.0. The 6- and 12-month LC rates were 52% and 40%, respectively. Median overall survival (OS was 11 months (95% CI: 7.7–14.3; 6-month and 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 65%, 37%, 14%, and 9%, respectively. Pain-free survival ranged from 2 to 42 months (median, 6; 95% CI: 4.6–7.4. Treatment was well-tolerated, with no radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or myelopathy reported. Reirradiation with CT-guided 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy appears to be feasible, safe, and effective as pain relief or salvage treatment for patients with recurrent spinal metastases after EBRT.

  18. An open-source genetic algorithm for determining optimal seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Madamesila, J; Beauchamp, A; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    An open source optimizer that generates seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy was designed, tested, and validated. The optimizer was a simple genetic algorithm (SGA) that, given a set of prostate and urethra contours, determines the optimal seed distribution in terms of coverage of the prostate with the prescribed dose while avoiding hotspots within the urethra. The algorithm was validated in a retrospective study on 45 previously contoured low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Dosimetric indices were evaluated to ensure solutions adhered to clinical standards. The SGA performance was further benchmarked by comparing solutions obtained from a commercial optimizer (inverse planning simulated annealing [IPSA]) with the same cohort of 45 patients. Clinically acceptable target coverage by the prescribed dose (V100) was obtained for both SGA and IPSA, with a mean ± standard deviation of 98 ± 2% and 99.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. For the prostate D90, SGA and IPSA yielded 177 ± 8 Gy and 186 ± 7 Gy, respectively, which were both clinically acceptable. Both algorithms yielded reasonable dose to the rectum, with V100 open source SGA was validated that provides a research tool for the brachytherapy community. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applicator reconstruction in MRI 3D image-based dose planning of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Søren; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Gelineck, John; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-05-01

    To elaborate a method for applicator reconstruction for MRI-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Custom-made plastic catheters with a copper sulphate solution were made for insertion in the source channels of MR-CT compatible applicators: plastic and titanium tandem ring applicators, and titanium needles. The applicators were CT and MR scanned in a phantom for accurate 3D assessment of applicator visibility and geometry. A reconstruction method was developed and evaluated in 19 patient MR examinations with ring applicator (plastic: 14, titanium: 5). MR applicator reconstruction uncertainties related to inter-observer variation were evaluated. The catheters were visible in the plastic applicator on T1-weighted images in phantom and in 14/14 clinical applications. On T2-weighted images, the catheters appeared weaker but still visible in phantom and in 13/14 MR clinical applications. In the titanium applicator, the catheters could not be separated from the artifacts from the applicator itself. However, these artifacts could be used to localize both titanium ring applicator (5/5 clinical applications) and needles (6/6 clinical applications). Standard deviations of inter-observer differences were below 2 mm in all directions. 3D applicator reconstruction based on MR imaging could be performed for plastic and titanium applicators. Plastic applicators proved well to be suited for MRI-based reconstruction. For improved practicability of titanium applicator reconstruction, development of MR applicator markers is essential. Reconstruction of titanium applicator and needles at 1.5 T MR requires geometric evaluations in phantoms before using the applicator in patients.

  20. A pilot study of intraluminal brachytherapy using (125)I seed strand for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma with obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, MinJie; Yan, ZhiPing; Luo, JianJun; Liu, QingXin; Zhang, Wen; Ma, JinQing; Zhang, ZiHan; Yu, TianZhu; Zhao, Qian; Liu, LingXiao

    To investigate the safety and feasibility of intraluminal brachytherapy using (125)I seed strand for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma with obstructive jaundice. From January 2010 to February 2015, 18 consecutive patients diagnosed with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, inoperable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma with obstructive jaundice were enrolled and underwent intraluminal brachytherapy using (125)I seed strand. Dose calculation was performed using a software. The procedure-related and radiation complications were assessed. Obstruction-free survival and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The technique successful rate of (125)I seed strand implantation was 100%. Successful bile drainage was achieved in all patients. The estimated mean accumulating dose (R = 5 mm, z = 0, 240 days) was 167.2 Gy, from 164.19 to 170.05 Gy. Two patients had adverse event of Grade 3, one of Grade 4. Stent dysfunction occurred in 1/18 (5.6%) patients. The mean and median obstruction-free survival time were 10.61 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.04, 14.18) and 7.26 months (95% CI: 2.14, 12.38). The mean and median overall survival time were 11.91 months (95% CI: 7.39, 16.43) and 7.26 months (95% CI: 2.14, 12.38). Intraluminal brachytherapy using (125)I seed strand may be consider as a safe treatment option for the therapy of locally advanced pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma complicated by obstructive jaundice with acceptable complication rates. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  2. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING COMPATIBLE ROBOTIC SYSTEM FOR FULLY AUTOMATED BRACHYTHERAPY SEED PLACEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Bagga, Herman; Kavoussi, Louis; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To introduce the development of the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible robotic system capable of automated brachytherapy seed placement. Methods An MRI-compatible robotic system was conceptualized and manufactured. The entire robot was built of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials. The key technology of the system is a unique pneumatic motor that was specifically developed for this application. Various preclinical experiments were performed to test the robot for precision and imager compatibility. Results The robot was fully operational within all closed-bore MRI scanners. Compatibility tests in scanners of up to 7 Tesla field intensity showed no interference of the robot with the imager. Precision tests in tissue mockups yielded a mean seed placement error of 0.72 ± 0.36 mm. Conclusions The robotic system is fully MRI compatible. The new technology allows for automated and highly accurate operation within MRI scanners and does not deteriorate the MRI quality. We believe that this robot may become a useful instrument for image-guided prostate interventions. PMID:17169653

  4. Computed tomography-guided implantation of 125 I seeds brachytherapy for recurrent multiple pulmonary oligometastases: initial experience and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT-guided percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy using 125 I radioactive seeds for multiple pulmonary metastatic tumors. Material and methods : Between September 2013 and December 2015, 22 patients with multiple pulmonary metastases, who after conventional chemotherapy and trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE therapy were considered unable to withstand stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, received CT-guided 125 I brachytherapy. Clinical data were studied retrospectively. A planning target volume of 90% (D90 was 120-160 Gy for 125 I seeds with an activity of 25.9 MBq. A CT-based evaluation performed 1, 2, and 6 months’ post-implantation enabled review of local control of tumors. Results : Twenty-two patients with 65 pulmonary metastases successfully completed treatment. The mean value for D90 for implantation for 125 I seeds was 132 Gy. Complete response (CR + partial response (PR was documented in 81.54%, 78.46%, and 78.46% of patients at 1, 2, and 6 months after implantation, respectively. Fourteen out of 22 patients had CR, 3 had PR, 2 had stable disease (SD, and 3 had progressive disease (PD. Most of the metastases (CR + PR + SD; 87.69% after 6 months were controlled by implantation. Conclusions : CT-guided 125 I brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for multiple pulmonary metastatic tumors, and can achieve good short-term local control, so long as the radiation dose is sufficient.

  5. Incorporating three-dimensional ultrasound into permanent breast seed implant brachytherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Daniel; Batchelar, Deidre; Hilts, Michelle; Berrang, Tanya; Crook, Juanita

    Planning permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy using CT alone may reduce treatment accuracy because of differences in seroma visualization compared with ultrasound (US). This study evaluates dosimetric effects of seroma delineation in PBSI and the potential impact of incorporating three-dimensional (3D) US into PBSI treatment planning. Spatially coregistered CT and 3D US images from 10 patients were retrospectively analyzed to simulate the PBSI procedure. Seromas contoured on CT and US defined clinical target volumes, CTVCT and CTVUS, which were expanded to create planning target volumes (PTVs). PBSI plans were generated using PTVCT alone, and the resulting coverage to PTVUS was evaluated. To assess the potential impact of transferring to an US-guided procedure, the CT-based plans were centered on CTVUS. The volume encompassed by both PTVs was used to evaluate how 3D US can affect the planning procedure. Median (range) PTVCTV100 was 95.6% (93.3-97.3%), resulting in PTVUS coverage of 91.5% (80.5-97.9%). Centering plans on CTVUS decreased PTVCTV100 by a mean of 10 ± 8%, and increased PTVUSV100 by 5 ± 4%. The combined PTVs were a mean 9±6% larger than PTVCT. Acceptable dosimetry to the combined PTVs resulted in sufficient coverage to individual PTVs but with a mean 11 ± 24% increase to skin dose and 6 ± 8% increase in breast V200. Differences in seroma visualization have dosimetric effects in PBSI. CT-based plans can underdose US-defined volumes and may not adequately translate to an US-guided procedure. Implementing 3D US into planning can potentially compensate for differences in delineation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Significance of Accounting for Tissue Heterogeneity in Permanent Breast Seed Implant Brachytherapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Fleury, Emmanuelle; Lai, Priscilla; Merino, Tomas; Lechtman, Eli; Kiss, Alex; McCann, Claire; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-15

    The inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF) method provides heterogeneity correction for the fast calculation TG43 formalism in seed brachytherapy. This study compared ICF-corrected plans to their standard TG43 counterparts, looking at their capacity to assess inadequate coverage and/or risk of any skin toxicities for patients who received permanent breast seed implant (PBSI). Two-month postimplant computed tomography scans and plans of 140 PBSI patients were used to calculate dose distributions by using the TG43 and the ICF methods. Multiple dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of clinical target volume (CTV) and skin were extracted and compared for both ICF and TG43 dose distributions. Short-term (desquamation and erythema) and long-term (telangiectasia) skin toxicity data were available on 125 and 110 of the patients, respectively, at the time of the study. The predictive value of each DVH parameter of skin was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each toxicity endpoint. Dose-volume histogram parameters of CTV, calculated using the ICF method, showed an overall decrease compared to TG43, whereas those of skin showed an increase, confirming previously reported findings of the impact of heterogeneity with low-energy sources. The ICF methodology enabled us to distinguish patients for whom the CTV V100 and V90 are up to 19% lower compared to TG43, which could present a risk of recurrence not detected when heterogeneity are not accounted for. The ICF method also led to an increase in the prediction of desquamation, erythema, and telangiectasia for 91% of skin DVH parameters studied. The ICF methodology has the advantage of distinguishing any inadequate dose coverage of CTV due to breast heterogeneity, which can be missed by TG43. Use of ICF correction also led to an increase in prediction accuracy of skin toxicities in most cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genebes, Caroline, E-mail: genebes.caroline@claudiusregaud.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Jonca, Frédéric [Department of Urology, Clinique Ambroise Paré, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard [Department of Urology and Andrology, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  8. Permanent 125I-seed prostate brachytherapy: early prostate specific antigen value as a predictor of PSA bounce occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate predictive factors for PSA bounce after 125I permanent seed prostate brachytherapy and identify criteria that distinguish between benign bounces and biochemical relapses. Materials and methods Men treated with exclusive permanent 125I seed brachytherapy from November 1999, with at least a 36 months follow-up were included. Bounce was defined as an increase ≥ 0.2 ng/ml above the nadir, followed by a spontaneous return to the nadir. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using the criteria of the Phoenix conference: nadir +2 ng/ml. Results 198 men were included. After a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 21 patients experienced a BF, and 35.9% had at least one bounce which occurred after a median period of 17 months after implantation (4-50). Bounce amplitude was 0.6 ng/ml (0.2-5.1), and duration was 13.6 months (4.0-44.9). In 12.5%, bounce magnitude exceeded the threshold defining BF. Age at the time of treatment and high PSA level assessed at 6 weeks were significantly correlated with bounce but not with BF. Bounce patients had a higher BF free survival than the others (100% versus 92%, p = 0,007). In case of PSA increase, PSA doubling time and velocity were not significantly different between bounce and BF patients. Bounces occurred significantly earlier than relapses and than nadir + 0.2 ng/ml in BF patients (17 vs 27.8 months, p brachytherapy and young age were significantly associated to a higher risk of bounces but not to BF. Long delays between brachytherapy and PSA increase are more indicative of BF. PMID:22449081

  9. Permanent 125I-seed prostate brachytherapy: early prostate specific antigen value as a predictor of PSA bounce occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazeron Renaud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate predictive factors for PSA bounce after 125I permanent seed prostate brachytherapy and identify criteria that distinguish between benign bounces and biochemical relapses. Materials and methods Men treated with exclusive permanent 125I seed brachytherapy from November 1999, with at least a 36 months follow-up were included. Bounce was defined as an increase ≥ 0.2 ng/ml above the nadir, followed by a spontaneous return to the nadir. Biochemical failure (BF was defined using the criteria of the Phoenix conference: nadir +2 ng/ml. Results 198 men were included. After a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 21 patients experienced a BF, and 35.9% had at least one bounce which occurred after a median period of 17 months after implantation (4-50. Bounce amplitude was 0.6 ng/ml (0.2-5.1, and duration was 13.6 months (4.0-44.9. In 12.5%, bounce magnitude exceeded the threshold defining BF. Age at the time of treatment and high PSA level assessed at 6 weeks were significantly correlated with bounce but not with BF. Bounce patients had a higher BF free survival than the others (100% versus 92%, p = 0,007. In case of PSA increase, PSA doubling time and velocity were not significantly different between bounce and BF patients. Bounces occurred significantly earlier than relapses and than nadir + 0.2 ng/ml in BF patients (17 vs 27.8 months, p Conclusion High PSA value assessed 6 weeks after brachytherapy and young age were significantly associated to a higher risk of bounces but not to BF. Long delays between brachytherapy and PSA increase are more indicative of BF.

  10. Development of computational models for the simulation of isodose curves on dosimetry films generated by iodine-125 brachytherapy seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adriano M.; Meira-Belo, Luiz C.; Reis, Sergio C.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The interstitial brachytherapy is one modality of radiotherapy in which radioactive sources are placed directly in the region to be treated or close to it. The seeds that are used in the treatment of prostate cancer are generally cylindrical radioactive sources, consisting of a ceramic or metal matrix, which acts as the carrier of the radionuclide and as the X-ray marker, encapsulated in a sealed titanium tube. This study aimed to develop a computational model to reproduce the film-seed geometry, in order to obtain the spatial regions of the isodose curves produced by the seed when it is put over the film surface. The seed modeled in this work was the OncoSeed 6711, a sealed source of iodine-125, which its isodose curves were obtained experimentally in previous work with the use of dosimetric films. For the films modeling, compositions and densities of the two types of dosimetric films were used: Agfa Personal Monitoring photographic film 2/10, manufactured by Agfa-Geavaert; and the model EBT radiochromic film, by International Specialty Products. The film-seed models were coupled to the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The results obtained by simulations showed to be in good agreement with experimental results performed in a previous work. This indicates that the computational model can be used in future studies for other seeds models. (author)

  11. {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy for the treatment of parotid gland cancers in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Song, T.; Zhang, J.; Yu, G.; Zhang, Y. [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2013-05-15

    Background and purpose: There is a lack of optimal treatment strategies for managing salivary gland cancers in children and adolescents. This study is aimed at assessing the effect of {sup 125}I seed implantation for the treatment of parotid cancers in children and adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 12 patients younger than 16 years with parotid gland malignant tumors underwent {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy between October 2003 and November 2008. All patients were assessed after treatment and at the local tumor control appointments. Facial nerve function, maxillofacial development, and radioactive side-effects were assessed. Results: The follow-up period ranged from 41-104 months. One patient with T4b died of pulmonary metastasis. The other patients were alive during the follow-up period. There were no serious radiation-related complications. The treatment did not affect facial nerve function and dentofacial growth in any of the children. Conclusion: For parotid gland cancers in children, {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy may be an acceptable treatment without serious complications and with satisfactory short-term effects. (orig.)

  12. An innovative seeding technique for photon conversion reconstruction at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Giordano, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of photons into electron-positron pairs in the detector material is a nuisance in the event reconstruction of high energy physics experiments, since the measurement of the electromagnetic component of interaction products results degraded. Nonetheless this unavoidable detector effect can be also extremely useful. The reconstruction of photon conversions can be used to probe the detector material and to accurately measure soft photons that come from radiative decays in heavy flavor physics. In fact a converted photon can be measured with very high momentum resolution by exploiting the excellent reconstruction of charged tracks of a tracking detector as the one of CMS at LHC. The main issue is that photon conversion tracks are difficult to reconstruct for standard reconstruction algorithms. They are typically soft and very displaced from primary interaction vertex. An innovative seeding technique that exploits the peculiar photon conversion topology, successfully applied in the ...

  13. Urethra-Sparing, Intraoperative, Real-Time Planned, Permanent-Seed Prostate Brachytherapy: Toxicity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David; Le, Hoa Phong; Larouche, Renee-Xaviere; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Hervieux, Yannick; Delouya, Guila [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the toxicity outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing {sup 125}I permanent-seed brachytherapy (BT) according to a urethra-sparing, intraoperative (IO), real-time planned conformal technique. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed on 250 patients treated consecutively for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2005 and 2009. The planned goal was urethral V{sub 150} = 0. Acute and late genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI), and erectile toxicities were scored with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Median follow-up time for patients with at least 2 years of follow-up (n = 130) was 34.4 months (range, 24-56.9 months). Results: Mean IO urethra V{sub 150} was 0.018% {+-} 0.08%. Mean prostate D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} on day-30 computed tomography scan were 158.0 {+-} 27.0 Gy and 92.1% {+-} 7.2%, respectively. Mean IPSS peak was 9.5 {+-} 6.3 1 month after BT (mean difference from baseline IPSS, 5.3). No acute GI toxicity was observed in 86.8% of patients. The 3-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity-free survival was 77.4% {+-} 4.0%, with Grade 3 late GU toxicity encountered in only 3 patients. Three-year Grade 1 late GI toxicity-free survival was 86.1% {+-} 3.2%. No patient presented Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicity. Of patients with normal sexual status at baseline, 20.7% manifested Grade {>=}2 erectile dysfunction after BT. On multivariate analysis, elevated baseline IPSS (p = 0.016) and high-activity sources (median 0.61 mCi) (p = 0.033) predicted increased Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity. Conclusions: Urethra-sparing IO BT results in low acute and late GU toxicity compared with the literature. High seed activity and elevated IPSS at baseline increased long-term GU toxicity.

  14. Truth Seeded Reconstruction for Fast Simulation in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland; Salzburger, Andreas

    The huge success of the ATLAS experiment for particle physics during Run 1 of the LHC would not have been possible without the production of vast amounts of simulated Monte Carlo data. However, the very detailed detector simulation is a highly CPU intensive task and thus resource shortages occurred. Motivated by this, great effort has been put into speeding up the simulation. As a result, other timeconsuming parts became visible. One of which is the track reconstruction. This thesis describes one potential solution to the CPU intensive reconstruction of simulated data: a newly designed truth seeded reconstruction. At its basics is the idea to skip the pattern recognition altogether, instead utilizing the available (truth) information from simulation to directly fit particle trajectories without searching for them. At the same time tracking effects of the standard reconstruction need to be emulated. This approach is validated thoroughly and no critical deviations of the results compared to the standard reconst...

  15. Obtention of brachytherapy seeds by sealing process using polymer; Obtencao de sementes de braquiterapia pelo processo de selagem com polimero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lana, Diogo Alberto P.D.; Ferraz, Wilmar B.; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation (titanium or stainless steel tube), a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. The usual sealing process of the seeds is done with laser welding, but this process can promote radionuclide volatilization. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin and characterizations of two epoxy resins. These resins were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Interactions of the resins and of the sealed seeds in a simulated body fluid (SBF) were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and by a counting gamma-rays. (author)

  16. Development of an automation system for iodine-125 brachytherapy seed production by ND:YAG laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Costa, Fabio E.; Calvo, Wilson A.P., E-mail: somessar@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an automation system for iodine-125 radioactive seed production by Nd:YAG laser welding, which has been used successfully in low dose rate brachytherapy treatment. This small seed consists of a welded titanium capsule, with 0.8 mm in diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing iodine-125 adsorbed onto a silver rod. The iodine-125 seeds are implanted into the human prostate to irradiate the tumor for cancer treatment. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center, at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 iodine-125 seeds per year, for the clinics and hospitals in the country. However, the Brazilian market potential is now over 8,000 iodine-125 seeds per month. The local production of these iodine-125 radioactive sources became a priority for the Institute, in order to reduce the price and the problems of prostate cancer management. It will permit to spread their use to a larger number of patients in Brazil. On the other hand, the industrial automation plays an important role for iodine-125 seeds in order to increase the productivity, with high quality and assurance, avoiding human factors, implementing and operating with good manufacturing practices. The technology consists of appliance electronic and electro-mechanical parts and components to control machines and processes. The automation system technology for iodine-125 seed production developed in this work was mainly assembled employing a Programmable Logic Controller, a stepper motor, an Nd:YAG laser welding machine and a supervisory. (author)

  17. Postoperative [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy in the treatment of acinic cell carcinoma of the parotid gland. With associated risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Ming-hui; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Shu-ming; Huang, Ming-wei; Shi, Yan [Peking Univ. School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2014-11-15

    This retrospective study was undertaken to analyze data from patients receiving iodine-125 ([{sup 125}I]) seed brachytherapy postoperatively for the treatment of acinic cell carcinoma (ACC) of the parotid gland along with the following risk factors: residual tumor, recurrent tumor, facial nerve invasion, positive resection margins, advanced tumor stage, or tumor spillage. Twenty-nine patients with ACC (17 females, 12 males; age range, 13-73 years; median age, 37.3 years) were included. Median follow-up was 58.2 months (range, 14-122 months). Patients received [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy (median actuarial D90, 177 Gy) 3-41 days (median, 14 days) following surgery. Radioactivity was 18.5-33.3 MBq per seed, and the prescription dose was 80-120 Gy. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year rates of local control were 93.1, 88.7, and 88.7 %, respectively; overall survival was 96.6, 92, and 92 %; disease-free survival was 93.1, 88.4, and 88.4 %; and freedom from distant metastasis was 96.6, 91.2, and 91.2 %. Lymph node metastases were absent in all patients, although two patients died with distant metastases. Facial nerve recovery was quick, and no severe radiotherapy-related complications were noted. Recurrence history, local recurrence, and distant metastasis significantly affected overall survival. Postoperative [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy is effective in treating ACC and has minor complications. Patients with a history of recurrence showed poor prognosis and were more likely to experience disease recurrence and develop metastases. (orig.) [German] Diese retrospektive Studie wurde durchgefuehrt, um die Daten von Patienten zu analysieren, die postoperativ eine Seed-Brachytherapie mit Iod-125 ([{sup 125}I]) zur Behandlung von Azinuszellkarzinomen der Ohrspeicheldruese mit begleitenden Risikofaktoren, wie Residualtumor, Rezidivtumor, Invasion in den N. facialis, positive (= nicht tumorfreie) Resektionsraender, fortgeschrittenes Tumorstadium oder lokale Verbreitung von Tumorzellen

  18. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  19. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner

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    Steiner, J; Matthews, K; Jia, G [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CT scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding

  20. Y-configured metallic stent combined with 125 I seed strands cavity brachytherapy for a patient with type IV Klatskin tumor

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    Jiao Dechao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case in an inoperable patient with type IV Klatskin tumor treated by the use of a novel, two piece, Y-configured self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS combined with two 125 I seed strands via bilateral approach. The placement of the Y-shaped SEMS was successful and resulted in adequate biliary drainage. After 2 months of intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT, both 125 I seed strands and temporary drainage catheter were removed after patency of the expanded stents was confirmed by the cholangiogram. This technique was feasible and could be considered for the treatment of patients with Bismuth type IV Klatskin tumors.

  1. SU-F-T-46: The Effect of Inter-Seed Attenuation and Tissue Composition in Prostate 125I Brachytherapy Dose Calculations

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    Tamura, K; Araki, F; Ohno, T [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the difference of dose distributions with/without the effect of inter-seed attenuation and tissue compositions in prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy dose calculations, using Monte Carlo simulations of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). Methods: The dose distributions in {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy were calculated using PHITS for non-simultaneous and simultaneous alignments of STM1251 sources in water or prostate phantom for six patients. The PHITS input file was created from DICOM-RT file which includes source coordinates and structures for clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of urethra and rectum, using in-house Matlab software. Photon and electron cutoff energies were set to 1 keV and 100 MeV, respectively. The dose distributions were calculated with the kerma approximation and the voxel size of 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3}. The number of incident photon was set to be the statistical uncertainty (1σ) of less than 1%. The effect of inter-seed attenuation and prostate tissue compositions was evaluated from dose volume histograms (DVHs) for each structure, by comparing to results of the AAPM TG-43 dose calculation (without the effect of inter-seed attenuation and prostate tissue compositions). Results: The dose reduction due to the inter-seed attenuation by source capsules was approximately 2% for CTV and OARs compared to those of TG-43. In additions, by considering prostate tissue composition, the D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} of CTV reduced by 6% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: It needs to consider the dose reduction due to the inter-seed attenuation and tissue composition in prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy dose calculations.

  2. SU-F-I-19: MRI Positive Contrast Visualization of Prostate Brachytherapy Seeds Using An Integrated Laplacian-Based Phase Processing

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    Soliman, A; Safigholi, H [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Nosrati, R [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada); Owrangi, A; Morton, G [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a new method that provides a positive contrast visualization of the prostate brachytherapy seeds using the phase information from MR images. Additionally, the feasibility of using the processed phase information to distinguish seeds from calcifications is explored. Methods: A gel phantom was constructed using 2% agar dissolved in 1 L of distilled water. Contrast agents were added to adjust the relaxation times. Four iodine-125 (Eckert & Ziegler SML86999) dummy seeds were placed at different orientations with respect to the main magnetic field (B0). Calcifications were obtained from a sheep femur cortical bone due to its close similarity to human bone tissue composition. Five samples of calcifications were shaped into different dimensions with lengths ranging between 1.2 – 6.1 mm.MR imaging was performed on a 3T Philips Achieva using an 8-channel head coil. Eight images were acquired at eight echo-times using a multi-gradient echo sequence. Spatial resolution was 0.7 × 0.7 × 2 mm, TR/TE/dTE = 20.0/2.3/2.3 ms and BW = 541 Hz/pixel. Complex images were acquired and fed into a two-step processing pipeline: the first includes phase unwrapping and background phase removal using Laplacian operator (Wei et al. 2013). The second step applies a specific phase mask on the resulting tissue phase from the first step to provide the desired positive contrast of the seeds and to, potentially, differentiate them from the calcifications. Results: The phase-processing was performed in less than 30 seconds. The proposed method has successfully resulted in a positive contrast of the brachytherapy seeds. Additionally, the final processed phase image showed difference between the appearance of seeds and calcifications. However, the shape of the seeds was slightly distorted compared to the original dimensions. Conclusion: It is feasible to provide a positive contrast of the seeds from MR images using Laplacian operator-based phase processing.

  3. Mathematical formulation of 125I seed dosimetry parameters and heterogeneity correction in lung permanent implant brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesameddin Mostaghimi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Considering practical difficulties in dose calculations, 125I seed dosimetry parameters and lung heterogeneity corrections can be obtained precisely by MCNPX. Equations presented in this study are recommended to be considered in future studies based on lung permanent implantation.

  4. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

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    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, C.-Y.; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 NE 10th Street, OUPB 1430, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)], E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu

    2009-09-21

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm{sup 3} on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  5. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  6. The Effect of Scattering from Leg Region on Organ Doses in Prostate Brachytherapy for 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs Seeds

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    Seyed Milad Vahabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dose calculation of tumor and surrounding tissues is essential during prostate brachytherapy. Three radioisotopes, namely, 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs, are extensively used in this method. In this study, we aimed to calculate the received doses by the prostate and critical organs using the aforementioned radioactive seeds and to investigate the effect of scattering contribution for the legs on dose calculations. Materials and Methods The doses to organs of interest were calculated using MCNPX code and ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantom. Results Doses to the prostate as a source of radiation for 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs were approximately 108.9, 97.7, and 81.5 Gy, respectively. Bladder, sigmoid colon, and testes received higher doses than other organs due to proximity to the prostate. Differences between the doses when tallying with the legs intact and with the legs voided were significant for testes, sigmoid colon contents, and sigmoid colon wall because of their proximity to the prostate. There was also a good consistency between our results and the data published by Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine for the prostate. Conclusion Scattering from leg region had a significant effect on doses to testes, sigmoid colon contents, and sigmoid colon wall in the pelvic region, and prostate and the other organs were unaffected. Brachytherapy treatment plans using 131Cs seeds allow for better sparing of critical tissues, with a comparable number of, or fewer, seeds required, compared to 125I seeds.

  7. An analysis of brachytherapy with computed tomography-guided permanent implantation of Iodine-125 seeds for recurrent nonkeratin nasopharyngeal carcinoma

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    Shen X

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xinying Shen,1,2 Yong Li,2 Yanfang Zhang,2 Jian Kong,2 Yanhao Li1 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Interventional Radiology, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, The Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China Background: 125I seed implantation is a new method in treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, and it is worthwhile to evaluate its feasibility. In this study, we performed brachytherapy with computed tomography (CT-guided permanent implantation of 125I seeds in the treatment of patients with the recurrence of NPC.Methods: A total 30 patients (20 male and ten female at the median age of 55 (range 25–80 years were diagnosed with recurrent nonkeratin NPC, with a total 38 lesions and a short disease-free interval (median ~11 months after primary radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Patients received CT scan, starting from 2 months after the treatment. Follow-up was conducted for ~2–38 months to observe the local control rate and overall survival rate. We also analyzed the possible correlation between survival periods and the status of recurrent tumors.Results: The local control rates at 6, 12, 24, 30, and 36 months after the procedure of 125I seed implantation were 86.8%, 73.7%, 26.3%, 15.8%, and 5.3%, respectively. The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 80.0% (24/30, 30.0% (9/30, and 6.7% (2/30, respectively, with a median survival period of 18 months (17.6±8.6 months. Interestingly, the survival periods of the patients who had primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy were 15.8±7.9 and 24.3±7.9 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that χ2 (log rank was 7.555, with very significant difference (P<0.01. The survival periods of patients in tumor stages I, II, III, and IV were 25.4±8.7, 19.8±9.4, 16.1±4.5, and 12.8±7.8 months, respectively, with

  8. Comparing the RTOG/EORTC and LENT-SOMA scoring systems for the evaluation of late skin toxicity after (125)I seed brachytherapy for parotid gland cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ming-Hui; Feng, Zhien; Li, Hua; Qin, Li-Zheng; Li, Jian-Hua; Huang, Xin; Xing, Ru-Dong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Han, Zheng-Xue

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scoring systems were compared for grading late skin effects after iodine-125 seed brachytherapy in parotid gland cancer patients. A total of 109 patients diagnosed with parotid gland carcinoma were treated postoperatively with iodine-125 seed brachytherapy at a dose of 100-120 Gy. After 6-24 months of followup, telangiectasia, skin pigmentation, atrophy, fibrosis, and ulceration were scored according to both RTOG and LENT-SOMA scale criteria. The strength of correlation between the scores and the interobserver variability were calculated. Of 109 patients, 22.9% had telangiectasia; 78.9%, pigmentation; 28.4%, fibrosis; 4.6%, edema; 0.9%, ulceration; 37.6%, retraction and/or atrophy; 22.9%, sensation change; and 11%, scaliness and/or roughness. Compared with RTOG, LENT-SOMA criteria resulted in the upgrading of pigmentation in 17% of cases, the downgrading of all instances of telangiectasia and the downgrading of one instance of Grade 4 ulceration to Grade 3. Between the two scales, fibrosis and atrophy correlated well (Spearman ρ, 0.992, 0.986). An additional 229 side effects were observed using LENT-SOMA criteria. The LENT-SOMA scale was more accurate than the RTOG scale for the evaluation of late skin and subcutaneous toxicity. The downgrading of telangiectasia and upgrading of pigmentation with the LENT-SOMA scale reflected the patients' conditions better than the scores obtained with the RTOG scale. The assessment of fibrosis and atrophy correlated well between the two scales. The use of the sum of the individual scores of the LENT-SOMA is therefore advocated. The addition of decreased sweating and the removal of the alopecia (scalp) metric should be considered to standardize the reporting of late radiation morbidity. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Expert consensus workshop report: Guideline for three-dimensional printing template-assisted computed tomography-guided 125I seeds interstitial implantation brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive 125I seeds (RIS interstitial implantation brachytherapy has been a first-line treatment for early-stage cancer of the prostate gland. However, its poor accuracy and homogeneity has limited its indication and hampered its popularization for a long time. Intriguingly, scholars based in China introduced computed tomography (CT-guided technology to improve the accuracy and homogeneity of RIS implantation and broadened the indications. Then, they creatively designed and introduced three-dimensional printing coplanar template (3D-PCT and 3D printing noncoplanar template (3D-PNCT into the practice of RIS implantation. Use of such templates makes RIS implantation more precise and efficacious and aids preoperative planning, real-time dose optimization, and postoperative planning. However, studies on the standard workflow for 3D-PT-assisted CT-guided RIS implantation have not been published. Therefore, the China Northern Radioactive Seeds Brachytherapy Group organized multidisciplinary experts to formulate the guideline for this emerging treatment modality. This guideline aims at standardizing 3D-PT-assisted CT-guided RIS implantation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes and for preventing and managing postoperative complications.

  10. Preimplant factors affecting postimplant CT-determined prostate volume and the CT/TRUS volume ratio after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with 125I free seeds

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    Asakura Hirotaka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to identify preimplant factors affecting postimplant prostate volume and the increase in prostate volume after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with 125I free seeds. Methods We reviewed the records of 180 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with 125I free seeds for clinical T1/T2 prostate cancer. Eighty-one (45% of the 180 patients underwent neoadjuvant hormonal therapy. No patient received supplemental external beam radiotherapy. Postimplant computed tomography was undertaken, and postimplant dosimetric analysis was performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preimplant factors affecting postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography and the increase in prostate volume after implantation. Results Preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, serum prostate-specific antigen, number of needles, and number of seeds implanted were significantly correlated with postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography. The increase in prostate volume after implantation was significantly higher in patients with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy than in those without. Preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, number of needles, and number of seeds implanted were significantly correlated with the increase in prostate volume after implantation. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy were significant independent factors affecting both postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography and the increase in prostate volume after implantation. Conclusions The results of the present study show that preimplant prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy are significant preimplant factors affecting both postimplant prostate volume by computed tomography and the increase in prostate volume after implantation.

  11. Poster - Thur Eve - 06: Comparison of an open source genetic algorithm to the commercially used IPSA for generation of seed distributions in LDR prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Khan, R

    2012-07-01

    In early stage prostate cancer, low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is a favorable treatment modality, where small radioactive seeds are permanently implanted throughout the prostate. Treatment centres currently rely on a commercial optimization algorithm, IPSA, to generate seed distributions for treatment plans. However, commercial software does not allow the user access to the source code, thus reducing the flexibility for treatment planning and impeding any implementation of new and, perhaps, improved clinical techniques. An open source genetic algorithm (GA) has been encoded in MATLAB to generate seed distributions for a simplified prostate and urethra model. To assess the quality of the seed distributions created by the GA, both the GA and IPSA were used to generate seed distributions for two clinically relevant scenarios and the quality of the GA distributions relative to IPSA distributions and clinically accepted standards for seed distributions was investigated. The first clinically relevant scenario involved generating seed distributions for three different prostate volumes (19.2 cc, 32.4 cc, and 54.7 cc). The second scenario involved generating distributions for three separate seed activities (0.397 mCi, 0.455 mCi, and 0.5 mCi). Both GA and IPSA met the clinically accepted criteria for the two scenarios, where distributions produced by the GA were comparable to IPSA in terms of full coverage of the prostate by the prescribed dose, and minimized dose to the urethra, which passed straight through the prostate. Further, the GA offered improved reduction of high dose regions (i.e hot spots) within the planned target volume. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. SU-F-T-61: Treatment Planning Observations for the CivaSheet Directional Brachytherapy Device Using VariSeed 9.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Rothley, DJ [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The VariSeed 9.0 brachytherapy TPS is recently available and has new features such as ability to rotate a brachytherapy source away from normal to the imaging plane. Consequently, a dosimetric analysis was performed for a directional brachytherapy source (CivaSheet) with tests of this functionality and experiences from clinical treatment planning were documented. These observations contribute to safe, practical, and accurate use of such new software features. Methods: Several tests were established to evaluate the new rotational feature, specific to the CivaSheet for the first patients treated using this new brachytherapy device. These included suitability of imaging slice-thickness and in-plane resolution, window/level adjustments for brachytherapy source visualization, commissioning the source physical length for performing rotations, and using different planar and 3D window views to identify source orientation. Additional CivaSheet-specific tests were performed to determine the dosimetric influence on target coverage: changing the source tilt angle, source positioning in the treatment plan based on the CivaSheet rectangular array of CivaDots, and influence of prescription depth on the necessary treatment margin for adequate target coverage. Results: Higher imaging-resolution produced better accuracy for source orientation and positioning, with sub-millimeter CT slice-thickness and in-plane resolution preferred. Source rotation was possible only in sagittal or coronal views. The process for validating source orientation required iteratively altering rotations then checking them in the 3D view, which was cumbersome given the absence of quantitative plan documentation to indicate orientation. Given the small Pd-103 source size, influence of source tilt within 30° was negligible for <1.0 cm. Influence of source position was important when the source was positioned in/out of the adjacent source plane, causing changes of 15%, 7%, and 3% at depths of 0.5, 0

  13. Twelve-Month Prostate-Specific Antigen Values and Perineural Invasion as Strong Independent Prognostic Variables of Long-Term Biochemical Outcome After Prostate Seed Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, William, E-mail: billyding888@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Chamberlain, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary' s Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States); Cunningham, James [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States); Yang Lixi [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Tay, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary' s Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (ptPSA) values at 12 months and other clinical parameters predict long-term PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) following prostate seed brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of 204 hormone-naieve patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, NV, and at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center in Carson City, NV, between 1998 and 2003, using I-125 or Pd-103 seed brachytherapy, were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment planning was done using a preplanned, modified peripheral loading technique. A total of 185 of 204 patients had PSA records at 12 months after implant. Variables included were age, initial pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, T stage, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group (RG), perineural invasion (PNI), external beam boost, dose, and ptPSA levels at 12 months with cutpoints at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml. Results: Median follow-up was 80 months, and median age was 69 years. The numbers of patients stratified by NCCN low, intermediate, and high RG were 110:65:10, respectively. Monotherapy and boost prescription doses were 145 Gy and 110 Gy for I-125, and 125 Gy and 100 Gy for Pd-103 seeds, respectively. The median dose (D90) was 95.4% of the prescribed dose. The 5-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml were 98.5%, 85.7%, 61.5%, and 22.2%, respectively. The 10-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1 and 1.01 to 2.00 ng/ml were 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, both ptPSA and PNI were significant independent predictors of PRFS. Hazard ratios (HR) for ptPSA levels at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml at 12 months were 1, 4.96, 27.57, and 65.10, respectively. PNI had an HR of 6.1 (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Presence of PNI and ptPSA values at 12 months are strong prognostic

  14. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D90 of 34Gy in 8.5Gy per fraction, and 145Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2Gy per fraction, EQD2) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The Dmean (EQD2) of rectum decreased 22.36Gy in HDR and 17.01Gy in LDR from 30.24Gy in VMAT, respectively. The Dmean (EQD2) of bladder decreased 6.91Gy in HDR and 2.53Gy in LDR from 13.46Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD2) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of loose versus stranded seeds on biochemical no evidence of disease in patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Christopher; Morris, W James; Hamm, Jeremy; Lapointe, Vincent; McKenzie, Michael; Pickles, Tom; Spadinger, Ingrid; Keyes, Mira

    2011-01-01

    The British Columbia Cancer Agency has been performing iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy since 1998, initially using loose seeds and phasing into the exclusive use of RAPIDStrand (RS) (Oncura Inc., Plymouth Meeting, PA) by November 2000. The aim of this study was to investigate rates of biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) in patients treated with loose seeds compared with RS from this population-based cohort. Between July 1998 and February 2006, 1500 implants were performed (327 loose and 1173 RS). Biochemical failure is reported using the Phoenix definition and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.4ng/mL at ≥48 months postimplant. Actuarial estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Analysis was repeated with the first 100 loose and stranded implants excluded to assess the learning curve effect. Log-rank test was used to evaluate differences in bNED. Variables showing association with bNED were included in a multivariate model. There was no difference between loose and stranded seeds. Estimated rate of bNED was 93.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.6-96.4) at 7 years for patients treated with loose seeds and 94.0% (95% CI, 91.8-96.2) for patients treated with RS according to Phoenix definition (p=0.846). Using the PSA >0.4ng/mL definition, estimated rates were 91.3% (95% CI, 88.0-94.6) and 91.9% (95% CI, 89.7-94.1) for loose and stranded seeds, respectively (p=0.871). Exclusion of the first 100 loose and stranded implants also revealed no difference in bNED. This study of 1500 patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy demonstrates no difference in bNED between loose and stranded seeds, using either Phoenix or PSA >0.4ng/mL definitions of biochemical failure. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction in ultrasound-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Shyam; Kung, Cynthia; Dehghan, Ehsan; Ravi, Ananth; Venugopal, Niranjan; Bonillas, Antonio; Stanton, Doug; Kruecker, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The accurate delivery of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is dependent on the correct identification of the position and shape of the treatment catheters. In many brachytherapy clinics, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is used to identify the catheters. However, manual catheter identification on TRUS images can be time consuming, subjective, and operator dependent because of calcifications and distal shadowing artifacts. We report the use of electromagnetic (EM) tracking technology to map the position and shape of catheters inserted in a tissue-mimicking phantom. The accuracy of the EM system was comprehensively quantified using a three-axis robotic system. In addition, EM tracks acquired from catheters in a phantom were compared with catheter positions determined from TRUS and CT images to compare EM system performance to standard clinical imaging modalities. The tracking experiments were performed in a controlled laboratory environment and also in a typical brachytherapy operating room to test for potential EM distortions. The robotic validation of the EM system yielded a mean accuracy of brachytherapy operating room. The achievable accuracy depends to a large extent on the calibration of the TRUS probe, geometry of the tracked devices relative to the EM field generator, and locations of surrounding clinical equipment. To address the issue of variable accuracy, a robust calibration algorithm has been developed and integrated into the workflow. The proposed mapping technique was also found to improve the workflow efficiency of catheter identification. The high baseline accuracy of the EM system, the consistent agreement between EM-tracked, TRUS- and CT-identified catheters, and the improved workflow efficiency illustrate the potential value of using EM tracking for catheter mapping in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group: considerations and pitfalls in commissioning and applicator reconstruction in 3D image-based treatment planning of cervix cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Kirisits, Christian; Berger, Daniel; Pérez-Calatayud, José; De Brabandere, Marisol; De Leeuw, Astrid; Dumas, Isabelle; Hudej, Robert; Lowe, Gerry; Wills, Rachel; Tanderup, Kari

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer is increasingly replacing X-ray based dose planning. In image-guided brachytherapy the geometry of the applicator is extracted from the patient 3D images and introduced into the treatment planning system; a process referred to as applicator reconstruction. Due to the steep brachytherapy dose gradients, reconstruction errors can lead to major dose deviations in target and organs at risk. Appropriate applicator commissioning and reconstruction methods must be implemented in order to minimise uncertainties and to avoid accidental errors. Applicator commissioning verifies the location of source positions in relation to the applicator by using auto-radiography and imaging. Sectional imaging can be utilised in the process, with CT imaging being the optimal modality. The results from the commissioning process can be stored as library applicators. The importance of proper commissioning is underlined by the fact that errors in library files result in systematic errors for clinical treatment plans. While the source channel is well visualised in CT images, applicator reconstruction is more challenging when using MR images. Availability of commercial dummy sources for MRI is limited, and image artifacts may occur with titanium applicators. The choice of MR sequence is essential for optimal visualisation of the applicator. Para-transverse imaging (oriented according to the applicator) with small slice thickness (< or =5 mm) is recommended or alternatively 3D MR sequences with isotropic voxel sizes. Preferably, contouring and reconstruction should be performed in the same image series in order to avoid fusion uncertainties. Clear and correct strategies for the applicator reconstruction will ensure that reconstruction uncertainties have limited impact on the delivered dose. Under well-controlled circumstances the reconstruction uncertainties are in general smaller than other brachytherapy uncertainties such as contouring and organ

  18. Monte Carlo investigation of I-125 interseed attenuation for standard and thinner seeds in prostate brachytherapy with phantom validation using a MOSFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J; Al-Qaisieh, B; Bownes, P; Henry, A; Thwaites, D

    2013-03-01

    In permanent seed implant prostate brachytherapy the actual dose delivered to the patient may be less than that calculated by TG-43U1 due to interseed attenuation (ISA) and differences between prostate tissue composition and water. In this study the magnitude of the ISA effect is assessed in a phantom and in clinical prostate postimplant cases. Results are compared for seed models 6711 and 9011 with 0.8 and 0.5 mm diameters, respectively. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was designed to perform ISA measurements in a simple eight-seed arrangement and at the center of an implant of 36 seeds. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and experimental measurements using a MOSFET dosimeter were used to measure dose rate and the ISA effect. MC simulations of 15 CT-based postimplant prostate treatment plans were performed to compare the clinical impact of ISA on dose to prostate, urethra, rectum, and the volume enclosed by the 100% isodose, for 6711 and 9011 seed models. In the phantom, ISA reduced the dose rate at the MOSFET position by 8.6%-18.3% (6711) and 7.8%-16.7% (9011) depending on the measurement configuration. MOSFET measured dose rates agreed with MC simulation predictions within the MOSFET measurement uncertainty, which ranged from 5.5% to 7.2% depending on the measurement configuration (k = 1, for the mean of four measurements). For 15 clinical implants, the mean ISA effect for 6711 was to reduce prostate D90 by 4.2 Gy (3%), prostate V100 by 0.5 cc (1.4%), urethra D10 by 11.3 Gy (4.4%), rectal D2cc by 5.5 Gy (4.6%), and the 100% isodose volume by 2.3 cc. For the 9011 seed the mean ISA effect reduced prostate D90 by 2.2 Gy (1.6%), prostate V100 by 0.3 cc (0.7%), urethra D10 by 8.0 Gy (3.2%), rectal D2cc by 3.1 Gy (2.7%), and the 100% isodose volume by 1.2 cc. Differences between the MC simulation and TG-43U1 consensus data for the 6711 seed model had a similar impact, reducing mean prostate D90 by 6 Gy (4.2%) and V100 by 0.6 cc (1.8%). ISA causes the delivered dose

  19. Measurement of the absorbed dose distribution near an 192Ir intravascular brachytherapy seed using a high-spatial-resolution gel dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massillon-JL, G.; Minniti, R.; Mitch, M. G.; Soares, C. G.

    2012-06-01

    The absorbed dose distribution at sub-millimeter distances from the Best single 192Ir intravascular brachytherapy seed was measured using a high-spatial-resolution gel dosimetry system. Two gel phantoms from the same batch were used; one for the seed irradiation and one for calibration. Since the response of this gel is energy independent for photons between 20 and 1250 keV, the gel was calibrated using a narrowly collimated 60Co gamma-ray beam (cross-sectional area ˜1 cm2). A small format laser computed tomography scanner was used to acquire the data. The measurements were carried out with a spatial resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions. The seed was calibrated at NIST in terms of air-kerma strength. The absorbed dose rate as well as the radial dose function, gL(r), was measured for radial distances between 0.6 and 12.6 mm from the seed center. The dose rate constant was measured, yielding a value of Λ = (1.122 ± 0.032) cGy h-1 U-1, which agrees with published data within the measurement uncertainty. For distances between 0.6 and 1.5 mm, gL(r) decreases from a maximum value of 1.06 down to 1.00; between 1.5 and 6.7 mm, an enhancement is clearly observed with a maximum value around 1.24 and beyond 6.7 mm, gL(r) has an approximately constant value around 1.0, which suggests that this seed can be considered as a point source only at distances larger than 6.7 mm. This latter observation agrees with data for the same seed reported previously using Gafchromic film MD-55-2. Additionally, published Monte Carlo (MC) calculations have predicted the observed behavior of the radial dose function resulting from the absorbed dose contributions of beta particles and electrons emitted by the 192Ir seed. Nonetheless, in the enhancement region, MC underestimates the dose by approximately 20%. This work suggests that beta particles and electrons emitted from the seed make a significant contribution to the total absorbed dose delivered at distances near the seed center (less

  20. New Algorithm of Seed Finding for Track Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Baranov Dmitry; Merts Sergei; Ososkov Gennady; Rogachevsky Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Event reconstruction is a fundamental problem in the high energy physics experiments. It consists of track finding and track fitting procedures in the experiment tracking detectors. This requires a tremendous search of detector responses belonging to each track aimed at obtaining so-called “seeds”, i.e. initial approximations of track parameters of charged particles. In the paper we propose a new algorithm of the seedfinding procedure for the BM@N experiment.

  1. New Algorithm of Seed Finding for Track Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranov Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Event reconstruction is a fundamental problem in the high energy physics experiments. It consists of track finding and track fitting procedures in the experiment tracking detectors. This requires a tremendous search of detector responses belonging to each track aimed at obtaining so-called “seeds”, i.e. initial approximations of track parameters of charged particles. In the paper we propose a new algorithm of the seedfinding procedure for the BM@N experiment.

  2. (106)Ruthenium brachytherapy for retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Hana; Moeckli, Raphaël; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Pica, Alessia; Zografos, Leonidas; Balmer, Aubin; Pampallona, Sandro; Munier, Francis L

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with (106)Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. A total of 63 tumors were treated with (106)Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. (106)Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which (106)Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which (106)Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. (106)Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with (106)Ru brachytherapy.

  3. The incidence of radioepidermitis and the dose-response relationship in parotid gland cancer patients treated with 125I seed brachytherapy. Incidence of radioepidermitis and the dose-response relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shu-ming; Huang, Ming-wei; Shi, Yan [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jian-Guo [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Beijing (China); Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fujian (China)

    2014-09-09

    We studied the incidence and dose-response relationship of radioepidermitis in parotid gland carcinoma patients treated with [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy in the hopes of designing an optimized pre-implant treatment plan that would reduce the incidence and severity of radioepidermitis in patients receiving this therapy. Between January 2007 and May 2010, 100 parotid gland cancer patients were treated postoperatively with [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy. The matched peripheral dose (MPD) was 80-140 Gy, and [{sup 125}I] seed activity was 0.7-0.8 mCi. The mean dose delivered to the skin was calculated in the post-implant CT on day 0 following implantation. Grades of acute and late dermatitis were evaluated at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months post-implantation. Most patients experienced grade 0-2 acute and late skin side effects (86 and 97 %, respectively), though a small subset developed severe complications. Most grade 1-3 effects resolved within 6 months of implantation, though some grade 1-3 effects and all grade 4 effects remained unchanged throughout the 18-month follow-up period. Grade 3 and 4 effects were most prominent (75 and 25 %, respectively) with doses of 110-140 Gy; doses higher than 140 Gy produced only grade 4 effects. [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy produced acceptable levels of acute and late radioepidermitis with a good clinical outcome. A mean dose under 100 Gy delivered to the skin was safe, though doses of 110-140 Gy should be given with caution and extra monitoring; doses greater than 140 Gy are dangerous and likely to produce grade 4-5 effects. (orig.) [German] Wir untersuchten die Inzidenz und die Dosis-Wirkung-Beziehung bei Patienten mit Ohrspeicheldruesenkrebs, die mit [{sup 125}I]-Seed-Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, in der Hoffnung, eine optimierte praeimplantologische Behandlung zu entwickeln, welche die Inzidenz und Schwere der Radioepidermitis bei Patienten, die diese Therapie erhalten haben, reduziert. Zwischen Januar 2007 und Mai 2010

  4. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  5. Improved dose calculation accuracy for low energy brachytherapy by optimizing dual energy CT imaging protocols for noise reduction using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics; Gaudreault, Mathieu [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); Laval Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie; Laval Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique; Elmpt, Wouter van [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Verhaegen, Frank [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Oncology

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction achievable from dual energy computed tomography (CT) imaging (DECT) using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative image reconstruction algorithms combined with increased imaging exposure. We evaluated the data in the context of imaging for brachytherapy dose calculation, where accurate quantification of electron density ρ{sub e} and effective atomic number Z{sub eff} is beneficial. A dual source CT scanner was used to scan a phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts. DECT scans were acquired at 80 kVp/140Sn kVp (where Sn stands for tin filtration) and 100 kVp/140Sn kVp, using the same values of the CT dose index CTDI{sub vol} for both settings as a measure for the radiation imaging exposure. Four CTDI{sub vol} levels were investigated. Images were reconstructed using FBP and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with strength 1,3 and 5. From DECT scans two material quantities were derived, Z{sub eff} and ρ{sub e}. DECT images were used to assign material types and the amount of improperly assigned voxels was quantified for each protocol. The dosimetric impact of improperly assigned voxels was evaluated with Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for an {sup 125}I source in numerical phantoms. Standard deviations for Z{sub eff} and ρ{sub e} were reduced up to a factor ∝2 when using SAFIRE with strength 5 compared to FBP. Standard deviations on Z{sub eff} and ρ{sub e} as low as 0.15 and 0.006 were achieved for the muscle insert representing typical soft tissue using a CTDI{sub vol} of 40 mGy and 3 mm slice thickness. Dose calculation accuracy was generally improved when using SAFIRE. Mean (maximum absolute) dose errors of up to 1.3% (21%) with FBP were reduced to less than 1% (6%) with SAFIRE at a CTDI{sub vol} of 10 mGy. Using a CTDI{sub vol} of 40mGy and SAFIRE yielded mean dose calculation errors of the order of 0.6% which was the MC dose calculation precision in this study and

  6. Radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds; Exposition radiologique de l'equipe operatoire au cours de curietherapies de prostate par implants permanents d'iode-125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagna, G.; Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Service de protection radiologique des armees (SPRA), 1 bis rue du Lieutenant Raoul Batany, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Gauron, C. [Institut national de recherche et de securite (INRS), Departement Etudes et Assistance Medicales, 30 rue Olivier Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14 (France)

    2011-04-15

    The French defense radiation protection service (SPRA) and the French national institute for research and safety (INRS) conducted a joint study to assess the radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds at the Val-de-Grace military hospital. The purpose of the study was the assessment of the effective doses, the equivalent doses to the extremities and lens received by a novice team, the different ambient dose equivalent rates measurements and the delineation of areas. After six brachy-therapies, all the recorded doses with whole-body InLight{sup R} OSL and nanoDot{sup R} dosimeters remained below the detection limit for the whole staff. The dose rate measured at the end of implantation by an AT1123{sup R} survey meter is about 170 {mu}Sv/h at the perineum of the patient. The controlled area limit is estimated to be about 20 cm from the patient perineum. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for the categorization of workers, the delineation of areas and the dose monitoring procedures. This study demonstrates that real-time ultrasound-guided trans-perineal prostate brachytherapy delivers low dose to the operators because of the radioactive source characteristics and the instrumentation providing an effective radiation protection for the surgical team. (authors)

  7. Multilayer cell-seeded polymer nanofiber constructs for soft-tissue reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Daniel A; Bowers, Daniel T; Hughley, Brian; Chance, Elizabeth W; Klembczyk, Kevin J; Brayman, Kenneth L; Park, Stephen S; Botchwey, Edward A

    2013-09-01

    rates demonstrated the excellent biocompatibility in vivo. Histological examination of the scaffolds demonstrated minimal inflammation. Cell seeding encouraged rapid vascularization of the nanofiber implants. Cells of donor origin (eGFP+) declined with the duration of implantation. Implant volume was not significantly affected for up to 8 weeks by the preseeding of cells (P > .05). Polymer nanofiber-based scaffolds mimic natural extracellular matrix. Preseeding the nanofiber construct with cells improved vascularization without notable effects on volume. An effect of cell preseeding on scaffold vascularization was evident beyond the presence of preseeded cells. This 3-dimensional, multilayer method of cell seeding throughout a 1-mm-thick construct is simple and feasible for clinical application. Further development of this technique may affect the clinical practice of facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons.

  8. Further study of Late Devonian seed plant Cosmosperma polyloba: its reconstruction and evolutionary significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Wang, Deming; Meng, Meicen; Xue, Jinzhuang

    2017-06-26

    The earliest seed plants in the Late Devonian (Famennian) are abundant and well known. However, most of them lack information regarding the frond system and reconstruction. Cosmosperma polyloba represents the first Devonian ovule in China and East Asia, and its cupules, isolated synangiate pollen organs and pinnules have been studied in the preceding years. New fossils of Cosmosperma were obtained from the type locality, i.e. the Leigutai Member of the Wutong Formation in Fanwan Village, Changxing County, Zhejiang Province, South China. The collection illustrates stems and fronds extensively covered in prickles, as well as fertile portions including uniovulate cupules and anisotomous branches bearing synangiate pollen organs. The stems are unbranched and bear fronds helically. Fronds are dimorphic, displaying bifurcate and trifurcate types, with the latter possibly connected to fertile rachises terminated by pollen organs. Tertiary and quaternary rachises possessing pinnules are arranged alternately (pinnately). The cupule is uniovulate and the ovule has four linear integumentary lobes fused in basal 1/3. The striations on the stems and rachises may indicate a Sparganum-type cortex. Cosmosperma further demonstrates diversification of frond branching patterns in the earliest seed plants. The less-fused cupule and integument of this plant are considered primitive among Devonian spermatophytes with uniovulate cupules. We tentatively reconstructed Cosmosperma with an upright, semi-self-supporting habit, and the prickles along stems and frond rachises were interpreted as characteristics facilitating supporting rather than defensive structures.

  9. 1{sup 25I} brachytherapy seeds implantation for inoperable low-grade leiomyosarcoma of inferior vena cava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuliang; Wang, Yongzheng; Liu, Bin; Li, Zheng; Wang, Wujie [The Second Hospital of Shandong Univ., Jinan (China)

    2013-04-15

    A 60-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and tenderness of five-day duration. Contrast enhanced CT showed a mass of 9 x 6 x 5.5 cm in size with almost complete obliteration of the inferior vena cava and massive extension to the extravascular space. CT-guided biopsy demonstrated a low-grade leiomyosarcoma. The patient underwent 1{sup 25I}odine seeds implantation in two sessions, and another balloon cavoplasty. Abdominal pain and tenderness gradually improved and the patient continues to remain as disease free state for three years after the procedures.

  10. Intraoperative localization of brachytherapy implants using intensity-based registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    KarimAghaloo, Z.; Abolmaesumi, P.; Ahmidi, N.; Chen, T. K.; Gobbi, D. G.; Fichtinger, G.

    2009-02-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will show the prostate boundary but not all the implanted seeds, while fluoroscopy will show all the seeds clearly but not the boundary. We propose an intensity-based registration between TRUS images and the implant reconstructed from fluoroscopy as a means of achieving accurate intra-operative dosimetry. The TRUS images are first filtered and compounded, and then registered to the fluoroscopy model via mutual information. A training phantom was implanted with 48 seeds and imaged. Various ultrasound filtering techniques were analyzed, and the best results were achieved with the Bayesian combination of adaptive thresholding, phase congruency, and compensation for the non-uniform ultrasound beam profile in the elevation and lateral directions. The average registration error between corresponding seeds relative to the ground truth was 0.78 mm. The effect of false positives and false negatives in ultrasound were investigated by masking true seeds in the fluoroscopy volume or adding false seeds. The registration error remained below 1.01 mm when the false positive rate was 31%, and 0.96 mm when the false negative rate was 31%. This fully automated method delivers excellent registration accuracy and robustness in phantom studies, and promises to demonstrate clinically adequate performance on human data as well.

  11. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with needles or special ...

  12. Implementation and Performance of the Seeded Reconstruction for the ATLAS Event Filter Selection Software

    CERN Document Server

    Santamarina-Rios, C; Dos Anjos, A; Armstrong, S; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, J A C; Bosman, M; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Comune, G; Crone, G; Damazio, D; De Santo, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Di Mattia, A; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Epp, B; Falciano, S; Garitaonandia, H; George, S; Gesualdi-Mello, A; Ghete, V; Goncalo, R; Haller, J; Kabana, S; Khomich, A; Kilvington, G; Kirkc, J; Konstantinidis, N P; Kootz, A; Lankford, AJ; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Maeno, T; Masik, J; Meessen, C; Moore, R; Morettini, P; Negri, A; Nikitin, N; Nisati, A; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, James L; Pinto, P; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Sánchez, C; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; De Seixas, J M; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sobreira, A; Soluk, R A; Stefanidis, E; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Thomas, E; Touchard, F; Usai, G; Venda-Pinto, B; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S J; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; 14th IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference 2005

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four LHC experiments that will start data taking in 2007, designed to cover a wide range of physics topics. The ATLAS trigger system has to cope with a rate of 40 MHz and 23 interactions per bunch crossing. It is divided in three different levels. The first one (hardware based) provides a signature that is confirmed by the the following trigger levels (software based) by running a sequence of algorithms and validating the signal step by step, looking only to the region of the space indicated by the first trigger level (seeding). In this paper, the performance of one of these sequences that run at the Event Filter level (third level) and is composed of clustering at the calorimeter, track reconstruction and matching.

  13. SU-G-IeP1-01: A Novel MRI Post-Processing Algorithm for Visualization of the Prostate LDR Brachytherapy Seeds and Calcifications Based On B0 Field Inhomogeneity Correction and Hough Transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosrati, R [Reyrson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Soliman, A; Owrangi, A [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ghugre, N [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Morton, G [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pejovic-Milic, A [Reyrson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, W [Reyrson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims at developing an MRI-only workflow for post-implant dosimetry of the prostate LDR brachytherapy seeds. The specific goal here is to develop a post-processing algorithm to produce positive contrast for the seeds and prostatic calcifications and differentiate between them on MR images. Methods: An agar-based phantom incorporating four dummy seeds (I-125) and five calcifications of different sizes (from sheep cortical bone) was constructed. Seeds were placed arbitrarily in the coronal plane. The phantom was scanned with 3T Philips Achieva MR scanner using an 8-channel head coil array. Multi-echo turbo spin echo (ME-TSE) and multi-echo gradient recalled echo (ME-GRE) sequences were acquired. Due to minimal susceptibility artifacts around seeds, ME-GRE sequence (flip angle=15; TR/TE=20/2.3/2.3; resolution=0.7×0.7×2mm3) was further processed.The induced field inhomogeneity due to the presence of titaniumencapsulated seeds was corrected using a B0 field map. B0 map was calculated using the ME-GRE sequence by calculating the phase difference at two different echo times. Initially, the product of the first echo and B0 map was calculated. The features corresponding to the seeds were then extracted in three steps: 1) the edge pixels were isolated using “Prewitt” operator; 2) the Hough transform was employed to detect ellipses approximately matching the dimensions of the seeds and 3) at the position and orientation of the detected ellipses an ellipse was drawn on the B0-corrected image. Results: The proposed B0-correction process produced positive contrast for the seeds and calcifications. The Hough transform based on Prewitt edge operator successfully identified all the seeds according to their ellipsoidal shape and dimensions in the edge image. Conclusion: The proposed post-processing algorithm successfully visualized the seeds and calcifications with positive contrast and differentiates between them according to their shapes. Further

  14. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, L.M., E-mail: moutinho@ua.pt [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Castro, I.F.C. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Peralta, L. [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M.C. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40–50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25–100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  15. Initial Survey Instructions for a spatial inventory of native sod, reconstructed prairie, and seeded introduced grasslands at Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial Survey Instructions for a spatial inventory of native sod, reconstructed prairie, and seeded introduced grasslands at Kulm Wetland Management District....

  16. Dosimetric results in implant and post-implant and low rate in brachytherapy prostate cancer with loose seeds and attached; Resultados dosimetricos en el implante y post-impante en braquiterapia de baja tasa en cancer de prostata con semillas sueltas y unidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan-Senabre, X. J.; Albert Antequera, M.; Lopez-Tarjuelo, J.; Santos Serra, A.; Perez-Mestre, M.; Sanchez Iglesias, A. L.; Conde Moreno, A. J.; Gonzalez Vidal, V.; Beltran Persiva, J.; Muelas Soria, R.; Ferrer Albiach, C.

    2015-07-01

    The objective is determine differences dosimetry statistics on the dosimetry of the implant and post-implant in brachytherapy of low rate with implants permanent in prostate using seed of 125-I loose and attached Both in lives and in the post-prostatic plans dosimetric coverage is good and restrictions in urethra and rectum for both groups of patients are met. Not migrating with joined is evident, as well as better dosimetric homogeneity. (Author)

  17. Monte Carlo calculation of dosimetric parameters of a {sup 125}I brachytherapy seed encapsulation with biocompatible polymer and a ceramic matrix as radiographic marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Lucas P.; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: lpr@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Dosimetria e Simulacao Computacional; Facure, Alessandro, E-mail: facure@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    For prostate cancer treatments, there is an increasing interest in the permanent radioactive seeds implant technique. Currently, in Brazil, the seeds are imported at high prices, which prohibit their use in public hospitals. One of the seed models that have been developed at CDTN has a ceramic matrix as a radioisotope carrier and a radiographic marker; the seed is encapsulated with biocompatible polymer. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to assess the dose distributions generated by the prototype seed model. The obtained data was assessed as described in the TG-43U1 report by the AAPM. The dosimetric parameters dose rate constant, {Lambda}, radial dose function, g{sub L}(r), and anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), were derived from simulations using the MCNP5 code. The function g(r) shows that the seed has a lower decrease in dose rate on its transverse axis when compared to the 6711 model (one of the most used seeds in permanent prostate implants). F(r,{theta}) shows that CDTN's seed anisotropy curves are smoother than the 6711 model curves for {theta}{<=}20 deg and 0.25{<=}r{<=}1 cm. As well, the {Lambda} value is 15% lower than the {Lambda} value of 6711. The results show that CDTN's seed model can deposit a more isotropic dose. Because of the model's characteristics, the seeds can be impregnated with iodine of lower specific activity which would help reducing costs. (author)

  18. Reconstructing past ecological networks: the reconfiguration of seed-dispersal interactions after megafaunal extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Mathias M; Galetti, Mauro; Donatti, Camila I; Pizo, Marco A; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Guimarães, Paulo R

    2014-08-01

    The late Quaternary megafaunal extinction impacted ecological communities worldwide, and affected key ecological processes such as seed dispersal. The traits of several species of large-seeded plants are thought to have evolved in response to interactions with extinct megafauna, but how these extinctions affected the organization of interactions in seed-dispersal systems is poorly understood. Here, we combined ecological and paleontological data and network analyses to investigate how the structure of a species-rich seed-dispersal network could have changed from the Pleistocene to the present and examine the possible consequences of such changes. Our results indicate that the seed-dispersal network was organized into modules across the different time periods but has been reconfigured in different ways over time. The episode of megafaunal extinction and the arrival of humans changed how seed dispersers were distributed among network modules. However, the recent introduction of livestock into the seed-dispersal system partially restored the original network organization by strengthening the modular configuration. Moreover, after megafaunal extinctions, introduced species and some smaller native mammals became key components for the structure of the seed-dispersal network. We hypothesize that such changes in network structure affected both animal and plant assemblages, potentially contributing to the shaping of modern ecological communities. The ongoing extinction of key large vertebrates will lead to a variety of context-dependent rearranged ecological networks, most certainly affecting ecological and evolutionary processes.

  19. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  20. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic tracking (EMT is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  1. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph Bert; Markus Kellermeier; Kari Tanderup

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  2. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...... in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications....

  3. Transperineal prostate brachytherapy, using I-125 seed with or without adjuvant androgen deprivation, in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer: study protocol for a phase III, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyakoda Keiko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal protocol for 125I-transperineal prostatic brachytherapy (TPPB in intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PCa patients remains controversial. Data on the efficacy of combining androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT with 125I-TPPB in this group remain limited and consequently the guidelines of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS provide no firm recommendations. Methods/Design Seed and Hormone for Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer (SHIP 0804 is a phase III, multicenter, randomized, controlled study that will investigate the impact of adjuvant ADT following neoadjuvant ADT and 125I-TPPB. Prior to the end of March, 2011, a total of 420 patients with intermediate-risk, localized PCa will be enrolled and randomized to one of two treatment arms. These patients will be recruited from 20 institutions, all of which have broad experience of 125I-TPPB. Pathological slides will be centrally reviewed to confirm patient eligibility. The patients will initially undergo 3-month ADT prior to 125I-TPPB. Those randomly assigned to adjuvant therapy will subsequently undergo 9 months of adjuvant ADT. All participants will be assessed at baseline and at the following intervals: every 3 months for the first 24 months following 125I-TPPB, every 6 months during the 24- to 60-month post-125I-TPPB interval, annually between 60 and 84 months post-125I-TPPB, and on the 10th anniversary of treatment. The primary endpoint is biochemical progression-free survival (BPFS. Secondary endpoints are overall survival (OS, clinical progression-free survival, disease-specific survival, salvage therapy non-adaptive interval, acceptability (assessed using the international prostate symptom score [IPSS], quality of life (QOL evaluation, and adverse events. In the correlative study (SHIP36B, we also evaluate biopsy results at 36 months following treatment to examine the relationship between the results and the eventual recurrence after completion of radiotherapy

  4. Toward reconstruction of the subcutaneous fat layer with the use of adipose-derived stromal cell-seeded collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Katharina; Jakubietz, Michael G; Jakubietz, Rafael G; Schmidt, Karsten; Muhr, Christian; Bauer-Kreisel, Petra; Blunk, Torsten

    2014-12-01

    Complex injuries of the upper and lower extremities often result in scarring and subsequent adhesion formation, which may cause severe pain and distinctly reduce range of motion. In revision surgery, replacement of the missing subcutaneous tissue is desirable to prevent new adhesions, to cushion scarred tendons and nerves and to regain tissue elasticity. Therefore, the objective of this study was the in vitro evaluation of cell-seeded collagen matrices to serve as the basis for the reconstruction of the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer. Five commercially available acellular dermal collagen matrices were seeded with human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASC). Size and shape stability of cell-matrix constructs were assessed and cell adhesion onto the matrix surface was evaluated histologically. Adipogenic differentiation of hASC on matrices was evaluated by means of histological staining, triglyceride quantification, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction gene expression analysis. The collagen matrix Permacol was the only cell-seeded material that exhibited excellent size and shape stability. For Permacol and Strattice, successful seeding with continuous cell layers on top of the matrices was observed. For both matrices, histological staining, triglyceride quantification and messenger RNA expression of adipogenic transcription factors indicated substantial adipogenic differentiation of hASC after long-term induction as well as after short-term induction of only 4 days. Of all matrices investigated, only Permacol exhibited adequate handling stability and the development of a thin adipose tissue layer on top of the matrix. Thus, this matrix appears promising to be used in the development of a subcutaneous cushioning layer after complex injuries involving large scar formation. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-G-JeP1-10: Feasibility of CyberKnife Tracking Using the Previously-Implanted Permanent Brachytherapy Seed Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, J; Cunha, J; Sudhyadhom, A; McGuinness, C; Roach, M; Descovich, M [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Robotic radiosurgery is a salvage treatment option for patients with recurrent prostate cancer. We explored the feasibility of tracking the bolus of permanent prostate implants (PPI) using image recognition software optimized to track spinal anatomy. Methods: Forty-five inert iodine seeds were implanted into a gelatin-based prostate phantom. Four superficial gold seeds were inserted to provide ground-truth alignment. A CT scan of the phantom (120 kVp, 1 mm slice thickness) was acquired and a single-energy iterative metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm was used to enhance the quality of the DRR used for tracking. CyberKnife treatment plans were generated from the MAR CT and regular CT (no-MAR) using spine tracking. The spine-tracking grid was centered on the bolus of seeds and resized to encompass the full seed cloud. A third plan was created from the regular CT scan, using fiducial tracking based on the 4 superficial gold seeds with identical align-center coordinates. The phantom was initially aligned using the fiducial-tracking plan. Then the MAR and no-MAR spine-tracking plans were loaded without moving the phantom. Differences in couch correction parameters were recorded in the case of perfect alignment and after the application of known rotations and translations (roll/pitch of 2 degrees; translations XYZ of 2 cm). Results: The spine tracking software was able to lock on to the bolus of seeds and provide couch corrections both in the MAR and no-MAR plans. In all cases, differences in the couch correction parameters from fiducial alignment were <0.5 mm in translations and <1 degree in rotations. Conclusion: We were able to successfully track the bolus of seeds with the spine-tracking grid in phantom experiments. For clinical applications, further investigation and developments to adapt the spine-tracking algorithm to optimize for PPI seed cloud tracking is needed to provide reliable tracking in patients. One of the authors (MD) has received research

  6. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-07

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  7. Advancements in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherapy makes it attractive for boosting limited size target volumes to very high doses while sparing normal tissues. Significant developments over the last decades have increased the use of 3D image guided procedures with the utilization of CT, MRI, US and PET. This has taken brachytherapy to a new level in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cold spot mapping inferred from MRI at time of failure predicts biopsy-proven local failure after permanent seed brachytherapy in prostate cancer patients: Implications for focal salvage brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crehange, Gilles; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Cunha, J. Adam; Pickett, Barby; Kurhanewicz, John; Hsu, I-Chow; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Pouliot, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To establish a method to evaluate dosimetry at the time of primary prostate permanent implant (pPPI) using MRI of the shrunken prostate at the time of failure (tf). To compare cold spot mapping with sextant-biopsy mapping at tf. Material and methods Twenty-four patients were referred for biopsy-proven local failure (LF) after pPPI. Multiparametric MRI and combined-sextant biopsy with a central review of the pathology at tf were systematically performed. A model of the shrinking pattern was defined as a Volumetric Change Factor (VCF) as a function of time from time of pPPI (t0). An isotropic expansion to both prostate volume (PV) and seed position (SP) coordinates determined at tf was performed using a validated algorithm using the VCF. Results pPPI CT-based evaluation (at 4 weeks) vs. MR-based evaluation: Mean D90% was 145.23 ± 19.16 Gy [100.0–167.5] vs. 85.28 ± 27.36 Gy [39–139] (p = 0.001), respectively. Mean V100% was 91.6 ± 7.9% [70–100%] vs. 73.1 ± 13.8% [55–98%] (p = 0.0006), respectively. Seventy-seven per cent of the pathologically positive sextants were classified as cold. Conclusions Patients with biopsy-proven LF had poorer implantation quality when evaluated by MRI several years after implantation. There is a strong relationship between microscopic involvement at tf and cold spots. PMID:24231238

  9. Dose reconstruction technique using non-rigid registration to evaluate spatial correspondence between high-dose region and late radiation toxicity: a case of tracheobronchial stenosis after external beam radiotherapy combined with endotracheal brachytherapy for tracheal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Kobayashi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Small organ subvolume irradiated by a high-dose has been emphasized to be associated with late complication after radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrate a potential use of surface-based, non-rigid registration to investigate how high-dose volume topographically correlates with the location of late radiation morbidity in a case of tracheobronchial radiation stenosis. Material and methods: An algorithm of point set registration was implemented to handle non-rigid registration between contour points on the organ surfaces. The framework estimated the global correspondence between the dose distribution and the varying anatomical structure. We applied it to an 80-year-old man who developed tracheobronchial stenosis 2 years after high-dose-rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDR-EBT (24 Gy in 6 Gy fractions and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT (40 Gy in 2 Gy fractions for early-stage tracheal cancer. Results and conclusions : Based on the transformation function computed by the non-rigid registration, irradiated dose distribution was reconstructed on the surface of post-treatment tracheobronchial stenosis. For expressing the equivalent dose in a fractional dose of 2 Gy in HDR-EBT, α/β of linear quadratic model was assumed as 3 Gy for the tracheal bronchus. The tracheobronchial surface irradiated by more than 100 Gy3 tended to develop severe stenosis, which attributed to a more than 50% decrease in the luminal area. The proposed dose reconstruction technique can be a powerful tool to predict late radiation toxicity with spatial consideration.

  10. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Oncology Department, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Co circumflex te du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  12. Brachytherapy in lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovirosa-Casino, Angeles; Planas-Toledano, Isabel; Ferre-Jorge, Jorge; Oliva-Díez, José María; Conill-Llobet, Carlos; Arenas-Prat, Meritxell

    2006-05-01

    Lip cancer is one of the most prevalent skin tumours of the head and neck. The characteristics of the tumour relate to their exophyitic growth in an area of easy visual acces which allows their diagnosis in early stages. As a result, there is a better prognosis with the present treatments. In early stages the treatment can be performed by surgery or by brachytherapy, and the results are similar on local control; nevertheless brachytherapy offers the best functional and esthetic results. We are reporting on a review of the literature in relation to indications, techniques and results of brachytherapy for lip cancer.

  13. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  14. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, James Edward; Yarney, Joel; Vanderpuye, Verna; Akpakli, Evans; Tagoe, Samuel; Sasu, Evans

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years). The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months). Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6%) experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2). One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3) following banding for hemorrhoids. Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively performed in a resource challenged environment if adequate training

  15. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edward Mensah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. Material and methods : A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results: The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years. The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months. Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6% experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2. One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3 following banding for hemorrhoids. Conclusions : Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively

  16. WE-AB-BRA-12: Post-Implant Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy by X-Ray and MRI Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Song, D; Lee, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Le, Y [Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For post-implant dosimetric assessment after prostate brachytherapy, CT-MR fusion approach has been advocated due to the superior accuracy on both seeds localization and soft tissue delineation. However, CT deposits additional radiation to the patient, and seed identification in CT requires manual review and correction. In this study, we propose an accurate, low-dose, and cost-effective post-implant dosimetry approach based on X-ray and MRI. Methods: Implanted seeds are reconstructed using only three X-ray fluoroscopy images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem. The reconstructed seeds are then registered to MR images using an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. MR images are first pre-processed by geometric and Gaussian filtering, yielding smooth candidate seed-only images. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine followed by local deformable registrations. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. Results: We tested our algorithm on twenty patient data sets. For quantitative evaluation, we obtained ground truth seed positions by fusing the post-implant CT-MR images. Seeds were semi-automatically extracted from CT and manually corrected and then registered to the MR images. Target registration error (TRE) was computed by measuring the Euclidean distances from the ground truth to the closest registered X-ray seeds. The overall TREs (mean±standard deviation in mm) are 1.6±1.1 (affine) and 1.3±0.8 (affine+deformable). The overall computation takes less than 1 minute. Conclusion: It has been reported that the CT-based seed localization error is ∼1.6mm and the seed localization uncertainty of 2mm results in less than 5% deviation of prostate D

  17. Dosimetric impact of contouring and needle reconstruction uncertainties in US-, CT- and MRI-based high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Susanne; Buus, Simon; Pedersen, Erik M; Bentzen, Lise; Tanderup, Kari

    2017-04-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of target contouring and needle reconstruction uncertainties in an US-, CT- and MRI-based HDR prostate BT treatment planning. US, CT, and MR images were acquired post-needle insertion in 22 HDR-BT procedures for 11 consecutive patients. Dose plans were simulated for an US-, CT- and MRI-based HDR-BT treatment planning procedure. Planning uncertainties in US- and CT-based plans were evaluated using MRI-based planning as reference. Target (CTV Prostate ) was re-contoured on MRI. Dose results were expressed in total equivalent dose given in 2Gy fractionation dose for EBRT (46Gy) plus 2 HDR-BT fractions. Uncertainties in US- and CT-based planning caused the planned CTV Prostate -D 90% to decrease with a mean of 2.9±5.0Gy (p=0.03) and 2.9±2.9Gy (p=0.001), respectively. The intra-observer contouring variation on MRI resulted in a mean variation of 1.6±1.5Gy in CTV Prostate -D 90% . Reconstruction uncertainties on US resulted in a dose variation of±3Gy to the urethra, whereas data for CT were not available for this. Uncertainties related to contouring and reconstruction in US- and CT-based HDR-BT treatment plans resulted in a systematic overestimation of the prescribed target dose. Inter-modality uncertainties (US and CT versus MR) were larger than MR intra-observer uncertainties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes...

  19. Intensity-based fluoroscopy and ultrasound registration for prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaloo, Zahra Karim

    Prostate cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer among men. Brachytherapy has emerged as one of the definitive treatment options for early stage prostate cancer which entails permanent implantation of radioactive seeds into the prostate to eradicate the cancer with ionizing radiation. Successful brachytherapy requires the ability to perform dosimetry -which requires seed localization- during the procedure but such function is not available today. If dosimetry could be performed intraoperatively, physicians could implant additional seeds into the under-dosed portions of the prostate while the patient is still on the operating table. This thesis addresses the brachytherapy seed localization problem with introducing intensity based registration between transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) that shows only the prostate and a 3D seed model drawn from fluoroscopy that shows only the implanted seeds. The TRUS images are first filtered and compounded, and then registered to the seed model by using mutual information. A training phantom was implanted with 48 seeds and imaged. Various ultrasound filtering techniques were analyzed. The effect of false positives and false negatives in ultrasound was investigated by randomly masking seeds from the fluoroscopy volume or adding seeds to that in random locations. Furthermore, the effect of sparse and dense ultrasound data was analyzed by running the registration for ultrasound data with different spacing. The registration error remained consistently below clinical threshold and capture range was significantly larger than the initial guess guaranteed by the clinical workflow. This fully automated method provided excellent registration accuracy and robustness in phantom studies and promises to demonstrate clinically adequate performance on human data.

  20. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh, P; Mourtada, F A; Taylor, R H; Anderson, J H

    1999-09-01

    We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of minimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program. Dose rate calculations are based on the dosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes determination of an optimal dwell-time sequence for a train of seeds that deliver radiation while stepping through the vessel lesion. The results illustrate the advantage of this strategy over the common approach of delivering radiation by positioning a single train of seeds along the whole lesion.

  1. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  2. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  3. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  4. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  5. Flat-panel cone-beam CT on a mobile isocentric C-arm for image-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Wong, John W.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2002-05-01

    Flat-panel imager (FPI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a strong candidate technology for intraoperative imaging in image-guided procedures such as brachytherapy. The soft-tissue imaging performance and potential navigational utility have been investigated using a computer-controlled benchtop system. These early results have driven the development of an isocentric C-arm for intraoperative FPI-CBCT, capable of collecting 94 projections over 180 degrees in 110 seconds. The C-arm system employs a large-area FPI with 400 micron pixel pitch and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator. Image acquisition, processing and reconstruction are orchestrated under a single Windows-based application. Reconstruction is performed by a modified Feldkamp algorithm implemented on a high-speed reconstruction engine. Non-idealities in the source and detector trajectories during orbital motion has been quantified and tested for stability. Cone-beam CT imaging performance was tested through both quantitative and qualitative methods. The system MTF was measured using a wire phantom and demonstrated frequency pass out to 0.6 mm-1. Voxel noise was measured at 2.7 percent in a uniform 12 cm diameter water bath. Anatomical phantoms were employed for qualitative evaluation of the imaging performance. Images of an anaesthetized rabbit demonstrated the capacity of the system to discern soft-tissue structures within a living subject while offering sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The dose delivered in each of the imaging procedures was estimated from in-air exposure measurements to be approximately 0.1 cGy. Imaging studies of an anthropomorphic prostate phantom were performed with and without radioactive seeds. Soft-tissue imaging performance and seed detection appear to satisfy the imaging and navigation requirements for image-guided brachytherapy. These investigations advance the development and evaluation of such technology for image-guided surgical procedures, including brachytherapy

  6. Brazilian demand for Iodine-125 seeds in cancer treatment after a decade of medical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Osvaldo L. da; Souza, Daiane C.B. de; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, João A.; Souza, Carla D.; Oliveira, Henrique B. de; Peleiras Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, CArlos A.; Rostelaro, Maria E.C.M., E-mail: olcosta@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Iodine-125 and palladium-103 are radionuclides employed to made medical devices used in cancer treatment known as brachytherapy seeds. These radioactive sealed sources are applied in brain and ophthalmic cancer as a temporary implant to irradiate the tumor and in permanent implants to prostatic cancer. Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) has the monopoly in Brazil of iodine-125 brachytherapy seeds distribution which is executed for Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Along a decade of use in Brazil more than 240 thousand seeds were implanted in patients or used to treat cancer tumors. In this article the Brazilian demand for iodine-125 brachytherapy seeds is analyzed. The demand behavior along a decade of using loose, strand, ophthalmic and brain brachytherapy seeds are shown. The annual quantity of seeds demanded by Brazil has dropped since 2012. The loose seeds which represented until 30% from total brachytherapy seeds used in Brazil decreased to less than 3%. The brain brachytherapy seeds had low demand along the decade and presented zero demand in several years. Concurrent treatment techniques are listed and main trends are discussed. The influence of Brazilian economic crisis and the demand behavior of the main hospitals and clinics that use Iodine-125 brachytherapy are shown. (author)

  7. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  8. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  9. Conformal treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, G. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Hebbinghaus, D. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Dennert, P. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Kohr, P. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Wilhelm, R. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Kimmig, B. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie)

    1996-09-01

    Quality of a brachytherapy application depends on the choice of the target volume, on the dose distribution homogeneity and radiation injury on critical tissue, which should be postulated by advanced brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Basic imaging method for conformal treatment planning is the cross-sectional imaging. The clinical applicatibility of a new type 3D planning system using CT and/or MRT-simulation or US-simulation for planning purposes was studied. The planning system developed at Kiel University differs from usual brachytherapy planning systems because of the obligatory use of cross-sectional imaging as basic imaging method for reconstruction of structures of interest. Dose distribution and normal anatomy can be visualized on each CT/MRT/US slice as well as coronal, sagittal, axial and free chosen reconstructions (3D), as well as dose-volume histogram curves and special colour-coded visualization of dose homogeneity in the target can be analyzed. Because of the experience in the clinical routine, as well as on the base of 30 simultaneous planning procedures on both 2D (semi-3D) and 3D planning systems we observed similar time consumption. Advantages of 3D planning were the better interpretation of target delineation, delineation of critical structures as well as dose distribution, causing more accurate volume optimisation of dose distribution. Conformal brachytherapy treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy means significant advantages for the clinical routine compared to 2D or semi-3D methods. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Qualitaet einer Brachytherapieapplikation ist abhaengig von der Zielvolumenwahl, der homogenen Dosisverteilung und der Schonung kritischer Organe. Diese Voraussetzungen koennen am besten mit Hilfe eines 3D-Planungssystem erfuellt werden. Als Planungsvorlage fuer die Konformationstherapieplanung sind am besten Schnittbilder (CT, MRT, US) geeignet. Es wurde die Anwendbarkeit eines auf CT- (oder MRT-)Simulation oder geeignete

  10. Which modality for prostate brachytherapy; Quelle modalite de curietherapie prostatique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-10-15

    Brachytherapy techniques by permanent implant of radioactive sources or by temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions are nowadays extensively used for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Long-term results (at 20 years) concerning large amount of patients have been published by major centers confirming both in terms of efficacy and toxicities that permanent implant of radioactive iodine-125 seeds yields at least the same good results of surgery and of external beam irradiation when proposed to patients affected by low-risk disease. For intermediate to high-risk tumors, HDR temporary implants are proposed as a boost for dose escalation. For both techniques, several topics still need to be clarified dealing with a recent enlargement of indications (HDR alone for low-risk, iodine-125 seeds boost for intermediate-high-risk cancers), or with technical aspects (loose seeds versus linked ones, number of fractions and dose for HDR protocols), while dosimetric issues have only recently been addressed by cooperatives groups. Last but not least, there is a real need to address and clearly characterize the correct definition of biochemical disease control both for iodine permanent implant and for HDR implant. New challenges are facing the prostate-brachytherapy community in the near future: local relapse after external beam radiotherapy are currently managed by several salvage treatments (prostatectomy, cryo, high intensity focused ultrasounds [HIFU]) but the role of reirradiation by brachytherapy is also actively investigated. Focal therapy has gained considerable interest in the last 5 years aiming at treating only the area of cancer foci inside the prostate and preserving nearby healthy tissues. Encouraging results have been obtained with the so-called 'minimally invasive' approaches and both permanent seed implantation and HDR brachytherapy techniques may be worthwhile testing in this setting because of their capability of exactly sculpting the dose inside the

  11. New era of electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prabhakar

    2017-04-28

    Traditional brachytherapy refers to the placement of radioactive sources on or inside the cancer tissues. Based on the type of sources, brachytherapy can be classified as radionuclide and electronic brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy uses miniaturized X-ray sources instead of radionuclides to deliver high doses of radiation. The advantages of electronic brachytherapy include low dose to organs at risk, reduced dose to treating staff, no leakage radiation in off state, less shielding, and no radioactive waste. Most of these systems operate between 50 and 100 kVp and are widely used in the treatment of skin cancer. Intrabeam, Xoft and Papillon systems are also used in the treatment of intra-operative radiotherapy to breast in addition to other treatment sites. The rapid fall-off in the dose due to its low energy is a highly desirable property in brachytherapy and results in a reduced dose to the surrounding normal tissues compared to the Ir-192 source. The Xoft Axxent brachytherapy system uses a 2.25 mm miniaturized X-ray tube and the source almost mimics the high dose rate Ir-192 source in terms of dose rate and it is the only electronic brachytherapy system specifically used in the treatment of cervical cancers. One of the limiting factors that impede the use of electronic brachytherapy for interstitial application is the source dimension. However, it is highly anticipated that the design of miniaturized X-ray tube closer to the dimension of an Ir-192 wire is not too far away, and the new era of electronic brachytherapy has just begun.

  12. New era of electronic brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Traditional brachytherapy refers to the placement of radioactive sources on or inside the cancer tissues. Based on the type of sources, brachytherapy can be classified as radionuclide and electronic brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy uses miniaturized X-ray sources instead of radionuclides to deliver high doses of radiation. The advantages of electronic brachytherapy include low dose to organs at risk, reduced dose to treating staff, no leakage radiation in off state, less shielding, and no radioactive waste. Most of these systems operate between 50 and 100 kVp and are widely used in the treatment of skin cancer. Intrabeam, Xoft and Papillon systems are also used in the treatment of intra-operative radiotherapy to breast in addition to other treatment sites. The rapid fall-off in the dose due to its low energy is a highly desirable property in brachytherapy and results in a reduced dose to the surrounding normal tissues compared to the Ir-192 source. The Xoft Axxent brachytherapy system uses a 2.25 mm miniaturized X-ray tube and the source almost mimics the high dose rate Ir-192 source in terms of dose rate and it is the only electronic brachytherapy system specifically used in the treatment of cervical cancers. One of the limiting factors that impede the use of electronic brachytherapy for interstitial application is the source dimension. However, it is highly anticipated that the design of miniaturized X-ray tube closer to the dimension of an Ir-192 wire is not too far away, and the new era of electronic brachytherapy has just begun. PMID:28529679

  13. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshabadi, Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Knaup, Courtney; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-02-01

    Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. (125)I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy (131)Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of (125)I, (103)Pd, and (131)Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. ProstaSeed (125)I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of (103)Pd and (131)Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed (125)I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, (131)Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the (103)Pd source. The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U) of (131)Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the (103)Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the (125)I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life.

  14. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bakhshabadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. 125 I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy 131 Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of 125 I, 103 Pd, and 131 Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. Material and methods: ProstaSeed 125 I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of 103 Pd and 131 Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed 125 I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Results : Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, 131 Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the 103 Pd source. Conclusions : The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U of 131 Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the 103 Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the 125 I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life.

  15. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  16. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yung Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Ko, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Koo; Choi, Moon Sik [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within {+-}10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author).

  17. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life. PMID:22394548

  18. Characterization and Schwann Cell Seeding of up to 15.0 cm Long Spider Silk Nerve Conduits for Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kornfeld

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nerve reconstruction of extended nerve defect injuries still remains challenging with respect to therapeutic options. The gold standard in nerve surgery is the autologous nerve graft. Due to the limitation of adequate donor nerves, surgical alternatives are needed. Nerve grafts made out of either natural or artificial materials represent this alternative. Several biomaterials are being explored and preclinical and clinical applications are ongoing. Unfortunately, nerve conduits with successful enhancement of axonal regeneration for nerve defects measuring over 4.0 cm are sparse and no conduits are available for nerve defects extending to 10.0 cm. In this study, spider silk nerve conduits seeded with Schwann cells were investigated for in vitro regeneration on defects measuring 4.0 cm, 10.0 cm and 15.0 cm in length. Schwann cells (SCs were isolated, cultured and purified. Cell purity was determined by immunofluorescence. Nerve grafts were constructed out of spider silk from Nephila edulis and decellularized ovine vessels. Finally, spider silk implants were seeded with purified Schwann cells. Cell attachment was observed within the first hour. After 7 and 21 days of culture, immunofluorescence for viability and determination of Schwann cell proliferation and migration throughout the conduits was performed. Analyses revealed that SCs maintained viable (>95% throughout the conduits independent of construct length. SC proliferation on the spider silk was determined from day 7 to day 21 with a proliferation index of 49.42% arithmetically averaged over all conduits. This indicates that spider silk nerve conduits represent a favorable environment for SC attachment, proliferation and distribution over a distance of least 15.0 cm in vitro. Thus spider silk nerve implants are a highly adequate biomaterial for nerve reconstruction.

  19. Characterization and Schwann Cell Seeding of up to 15.0 cm Long Spider Silk Nerve Conduits for Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Tim; Vogt, Peter M.; Bucan, Vesna; Peck, Claas-Tido; Reimers, Kerstin; Radtke, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Nerve reconstruction of extended nerve defect injuries still remains challenging with respect to therapeutic options. The gold standard in nerve surgery is the autologous nerve graft. Due to the limitation of adequate donor nerves, surgical alternatives are needed. Nerve grafts made out of either natural or artificial materials represent this alternative. Several biomaterials are being explored and preclinical and clinical applications are ongoing. Unfortunately, nerve conduits with successful enhancement of axonal regeneration for nerve defects measuring over 4.0 cm are sparse and no conduits are available for nerve defects extending to 10.0 cm. In this study, spider silk nerve conduits seeded with Schwann cells were investigated for in vitro regeneration on defects measuring 4.0 cm, 10.0 cm and 15.0 cm in length. Schwann cells (SCs) were isolated, cultured and purified. Cell purity was determined by immunofluorescence. Nerve grafts were constructed out of spider silk from Nephila edulis and decellularized ovine vessels. Finally, spider silk implants were seeded with purified Schwann cells. Cell attachment was observed within the first hour. After 7 and 21 days of culture, immunofluorescence for viability and determination of Schwann cell proliferation and migration throughout the conduits was performed. Analyses revealed that SCs maintained viable (>95%) throughout the conduits independent of construct length. SC proliferation on the spider silk was determined from day 7 to day 21 with a proliferation index of 49.42% arithmetically averaged over all conduits. This indicates that spider silk nerve conduits represent a favorable environment for SC attachment, proliferation and distribution over a distance of least 15.0 cm in vitro. Thus spider silk nerve implants are a highly adequate biomaterial for nerve reconstruction. PMID:27916868

  20. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  1. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  2. Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    As introduction a short overview of the history of brachytherapy (BT) is given, with a focus on the evolution in the photon sources that have been used over the years. A major step in this evolution was the introduction of the automatic afterloading devices, which could be compared to the introduction of linear accelerators in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The modern afterloaders allow for optimization of the dose delivery and the use of different dose rates (low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate) in function of tumor biology and patient comfort. Still today new sources are under investigation, and these developments together with the improvements in treatment planning and treatment techniques will enforce the role and place of BT as a valuable alternative for or supplementary to EBRT.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-guided transperineal prostate biopsy and brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Agnieszka Szot; Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; So, Minna; D'Amico, Anthony V; Tempany, Clare M

    2005-12-01

    Brachytherapy targeted to the peripheral zone with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance is a prostate cancer treatment option with potentially fewer complications than other treatments. Follow-up MRI when failure is suspected is, however, difficult because of radiation-induced changes. Furthermore, MR spectroscopy (MRS) is compromised by susceptibility artifacts from radioactive seeds in the peripheral zone. We report a case in which combined MRI/MRS was useful for the detection of prostate cancer in the transitional zone in patients previously treated with MR-guided brachytherapy. We propose that MRI/MRS can help detect recurrent prostate cancer, guide prostate biopsy, and help manage salvage treatment decisions.

  4. Development of prostate voxel models for brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adriano M.; Reis, Lucas P.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animation movies to computer games allow the creation of new voxel anthropomorphic phantoms with better resolution and thus, more anatomical details. These phantoms can be used in nuclear applications, especially in radiation protection for estimating doses in cases of occupational or accidental radioactive incidents, and in medical and biological applications. For dose estimates, the phantoms are coupled to a Monte Carlo code, which will be responsible for the transport of radiation in this environment. This study aimed to develop a computational tool to estimate the isodose curves in the prostate after brachytherapy seed implants. For this, we have created a model called FANTPROST in the shape of a 48 mm side cube, with a standard prostate inserted in the center of this cube with different distributions of brachytherapy seeds in this volume. The prostate, according to this model, was obtained from the phantom voxels MASH2 developed by Numerical Dosimetry Group, Department of Nuclear Energy - Federal University of Pernambuco. The modeling of the seeds, added to FANTPROST, was done through the use of geometric information of Iodine-125 Amersham 6711 commercial seed. The simulations were performed by the code MCNP5 for spatial distributions containing different amounts of seeds within the FANTPROST. The obtained curves allowed an estimation of the behavior of the maximum dose that decreases with distance, showing that this tool can be used for a more accurate analysis of the effects produced by the presence of such seeds in the prostate and its vicinity. (author)

  5. Measure of the uncertainty associated with the reconstruction of applicators in adaptive guided brachytherapy by resonance; Medida de la incertidumbre asociada a la reconstruccion de aplicadores en braquiterapia adaptativa guiada por resonancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Pozas, S.; Federico, M.; Perez Molina, J. L.; Marti Asenjo, J.; Sanchez Carrascal, M.; Macias verde, D.; Ruiz Egea, E.; Lara Jimenez, P.; Martin Oliva, R.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the uncertainty introduced in the process to rebuild the catheters using three methods, manual reconstruction from a template elaborate service, auto-rebuild with the software included in the TPS and reconstruction from radiopaque mannequins in CT and subsequent merger. (Author)

  6. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, Clare; Maree, Gert; Munro, Roger; Lecuona, Karin; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant.

  7. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, Clare [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Maree, Gert; Munro, Roger [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lecuona, Karin [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Sauerwein, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Strahlenklinik, NCTeam

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. Results: The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Conclusion: Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K., E-mail: tarun.podder@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Caldwell, Barrett [Schools of Industrial Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Crass, Jostin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Imaging Research, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computer Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Meltsner, Michael A. [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3508 GA (Netherlands); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Salcudean, Tim [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Song, Danny Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce R. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  10. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J L; Rasmussen, B E; Davis, S D; Micka, J A; Culberson, W S; DeWerd, L A

    2014-12-01

    To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for (125)I and (103)Pd brachytherapy sources relative to (60)Co. LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a (60)Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 (125)I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 (125)I seed, and the Best 2335 (103)Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the (60)Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the (60)Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for (125)I and (103)Pd relative to (60)Co. The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to (60)Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%-15% for (125)I and (103)Pd sources relative to (60)Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around (125)I and (103)Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy.

  11. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  12. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, IPENCNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a {sup 192}Ir and a {sup 125}I radioactive sources. The {sup 192}Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The {sup 125}I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of {sup 125}I and one of {sup 192}Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the {sup 192}Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the {sup 125}I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  13. Brachytherapy in oesophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, J.T.; Kuan, R. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    Patients with recurrent or locally advanced oesophageal carcinoma have a poor prognosis. Relief of dysphagia is often the goal of any further treatment. Several methods, including laser re-canalization, prosthetic intubation, dilatation, external beam irradiation (EBI) and intraluminal brachytherapy (IBT) can be used to alleviate dysphagia. In this retrospective review of 11 patients, eight with recurrent tumour and three newly diagnosed patients were treated with low dose rate IBT. Relief of dysphagia was achieved in nine patients, all of whom were able to maintain swallowing of at least a semi-solid diet until death or last follow-up. Toxicity was minimal, but survival was poor, with a median survival of only 3 months. IBT presents several advantages over other palliative methods, especially in recurrent tumours where re-treatment with EBI is often difficult because of normal tissue tolerance. Low dose rate IBT takes only 1-2 days to deliver, is highly effective, has little morbidity and the palliation achieved is relatively durable. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  14. Toward adaptive stereotactic robotic brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Demonstration of an adaptive workflow incorporating inverse planning and an MR stealth robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUNHA, J. ADAM; HSU, I-CHOW; POULIOT, JEAN; ROACH, MACK; SHINOHARA, KATSUTO; KURHANEWICZ, JOHN; REED, GALEN; STOIANOVICI, DAN

    2011-01-01

    To translate any robot into a clinical environment, it is critical that the robot can seamlessly integrate with all the technology of a modern clinic. MRBot, an MR-stealth brachytherapy delivery device, was used in a closed-bore 3T MRI and a clinical brachytherapy cone beam CT suite. Targets included ceramic dummy seeds, MR-Spectroscopy-sensitive metabolite, and a prostate phantom. Acquired DICOM images were exported to planning software to register the robot coordinates in the imager’s frame, contour and verify target locations, create dose plans, and export needle and seed positions to the robot. The coordination of each system element (imaging device, brachytherapy planning system, robot control, robot) was validated with a seed delivery accuracy of within 2 mm in both a phantom and soft tissue. An adaptive workflow was demonstrated by acquiring images after needle insertion and prior to seed deposition. This allows for adjustment if the needle is in the wrong position. Inverse planning (IPSA) was used to generate a seed placement plan and coordinates for ten needles and 29 seeds were transferred to the robot. After every two needles placed, an image was acquired. The placed seeds were identified and validated prior to placing the seeds in the next two needles. The ability to robotically deliver seeds to locations determined by IPSA and the ability of the system to incorporate novel needle patterns were demonstrated. Shown here is the ability to overcome this critical step. An adaptive brachytherapy workflow is demonstrated which integrates a clinical anatomy-based seed location optimization engine and a robotic brachytherapy device. Demonstration of this workflow is a key element of a successful translation to the clinic of the MRI stealth robotic delivery system, MRBot. PMID:20642386

  15. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Jasmine H., E-mail: francij1@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Brodie, Scott E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

  16. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioengineering, Seoul National University College of Engineering, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Kwang-Jae [Hanaro Applications Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Young-bong [Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Choy, Young Bin, E-mail: ybchoy@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioengineering, Seoul National University College of Engineering, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon, E-mail: ybchoy@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  17. Skin dose in breast brachytherapy: Defining a robust metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilts, Michelle; Halperin, Heather; Morton, Dan; Batchelar, Deidre; Bachand, Francois; Chowdhury, Rezwan; Crook, Juanita

    2015-01-01

    To define a simple, robust, and relevant metric for measuring skin dose in breast brachytherapy. Postoperative treatment plans (Day 0) for 15 permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) and 10 multicatheter high-dose-rate (MC-HDR) brachytherapy patients were included. Retrospectively, three skin structures were contoured: 2 mm external from the body; and subsurface layers 2 mm and 4 mm thick. Maximum point dose (Dmax), doses to small volumes (e.g., D0.2cc), and the volumes receiving a percentage of the prescription dose (V%, e.g., V66) were calculated. D0.2cc was investigated as a surrogate to the dose given to 1 cm(2) of skin (D1cm(2)). Pearson product-moment correlation (R(2)) was computed between metrics. Observed trends were consistent across brachytherapy technique. V% did not correlate well with any other metrics: median (range) R(2), 0.63 (0.43, 0.77) and 0.69 (0.3, 0.89) for PBSI and MC-HDR, respectively. Dmax was inconsistently correlated across contours and not well correlated with doses to small volumes: median (range) R(2), 0.85 (0.76, 0.93) and 0.88 (0.83, 0.93) for PBSI and MC-HDR, respectively. In contrast, doses to small volumes were consistently well correlated, even across skin layers: D0.1cc vs. D0.2cc median (range) R(2), 0.98 (0.97, 0.99) and 0.97 (0.94, 0.99) for PBSI and MC-HDR, respectively. Doses to small volumes are robust measures of breast skin dose and given skin's strong area effect, D0.2cc for a 2 mm thick skin layer, a simple surrogate of D1cm(2), is recommended for recording skin dose in any breast brachytherapy. Dmax is not robust and should be avoided. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shimul A; Cima, Robert R; Benoit, Eric; Breen, Elizabeth L; Bleday, Ronald

    2004-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is gaining wide popularity as an alternative to resection for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. Rectal-urethral fistula after prostate brachytherapy is a rare but serious complication, and its incidence, presentation, risk factors, and clinical management have not been well described. From January 1997 to October 2002, seven patients with rectal-urethral fistulas were referred to two institutions (Brigham and Women's Hospital and West Roxbury Veteran's Administration Hospital) of a major teaching referral center. Clinical presentation, risk factors, prostate staging, and clinical management were examined in a retrospective fashion. Seven rectal-urethral fistulas developed from roughly 700 (1 percent) patients treated with prostate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. The average patient age was 67.7 years, preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 7.1, and Gleason score was 3+3. Symptoms occurred at a mean of 27.3 months after prostate brachytherapy was started and included anorectal pain (57 percent), clear mucous discharge (57 percent), diarrhea (43 percent), and rectal ulceration (43 percent). Coronary artery disease was a common comorbidity (71 percent). Previous transurethral resection of prostate (28 percent) and pelvic irradiation or external beam radiation therapy (14 percent) were not associated with increased risk of rectal-urethral fistula. All patients underwent a diverting colostomy (86 percent) or ileostomy (14 percent), and four patients went on to have definitive therapy. Definitive resection was performed between 5 and 43 months after diverting ostomy and was chosen on the basis of comorbid disease, quality of life, and degree of operation. Two patients required a second diversion after definitive resection because of anorectal pain and a colocutaneous fistula. Postoperative complications included myocardial infarction (14 percent), blood transfusion (14 percent), and bowel perforation (14 percent). Patients

  19. Bladder wall recurrence of prostate cancer after high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Hsu, I-Chow; Braunstein, Steve; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Roach, Mack

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer seeding after needle biopsy has been reported in the perineum, rectal wall, and periprostatic soft tissue. In this article, we report the results of a localized prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder following protrusion of a single high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter through the bladder wall at the ultimate site of failure. A 62-year-old man with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma was treated with long-term androgen deprivation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation, and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost. He developed biochemical recurrence 4 years after treatment, and a CT scan of the pelvis revealed a nodule in the posterior, inferior bladder wall. Surgical pathology following transurethral resection of tumor within the bladder was consistent with high-grade prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient's prostate-specific antigen level fell to the range of normal postoperatively, and whole body imaging, including a multi-parametric MRI of the prostate with diffusion and spectroscopy, failed to reveal any other sites of disease. Review of the CT scan obtained for dosimetry at the time of brachytherapy demonstrated a lone catheter protruding through the bladder wall at the site of eventual recurrence. The tumor recurred in the bladder 12 months later, once more without evidence of disease within the prostate itself or distantly, and the patient was started on salvage androgen deprivation therapy. This case is the first report of prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder wall after brachytherapy and raises questions about prostate cancer biology, brachytherapy technique, and the timing of brachytherapy boost relative to whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Intravascular brachytherapy for peripheral vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA through balloon dilatation with or without stenting, i.e. vessel expansion through balloons with or without of implantation of small tubes, called stents, are used in the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD. The intravascular vessel irradiation, called intravascular brachytherapy, promises a reduction in the rate of repeated stenosis (rate of restenosis after PTA. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of brachytherapy in PAOD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in August 2007 in the most important medical electronic databases for publications beginning from 2002. The medical evaluation included randomized controlled trials (RCT. The information synthesis was performed using meta-analysis. Health economic modeling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economical assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG-2007. Results: Medical evaluation: Twelve publications about seven RCT on brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy were included in the medical evaluation. Two RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six and/or twelve months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after successful balloon dilatation, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.84. At five years, time to recurrence of restenosis was significantly delayed after brachytherapy. One RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after PTA with optional stenting, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.95. One RCT observed a significantly higher rate of late thrombotic occlusions after brachytherapy in the subgroup of stented patients. A single RCT for brachytherapy

  1. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  2. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor

  3. Brachytherapy in breast cancer: an effective alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicheł, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) with following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast has become widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of EBRT after BCS is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 42.5 to 50 Gy. An additional dose is given to treated volume as a boost to a portion of the breast. In the early stage of breast cancer, research has shown that the area requiring radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from local recurrence is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an approach that treats only the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin rather than the whole breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose in four to five days. There has been a growing interest for APBI and various approaches have been developed under phase I-III clinical studies; these include multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy, balloon catheter brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-EBRT) and intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). Balloon-based brachytherapy approaches include MammoSite, Axxent electronic brachytherapy, Contura, hybrid brachytherapy devices. Another indication for breast brachytherapy is reirradiation of local recurrence after mastectomy. Published results of brachytherapy are very promising. We discuss the current status, indications, and technical aspects of breast cancer brachytherapy. PMID:26327829

  4. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  5. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  6. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  7. Using matrix summation method for three dimensional dose calculation in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibandeh-Gorji, Mahmoud; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Mohammadi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to calculate radiation dose around a brachytherapy source in a water phantom for different seed locations or rotation the sources by the matrix summation method. Monte Carlo based codes like MCNP are widely used for performing radiation transport calculations and dose evaluation in brachytherapy. But for complicated situations, like using more than one source, moving or rotating the source, the routine Monte Carlo method for dose calculation needs a long time running. The MCNPX code has been used to calculate radiation dose around a (192)Ir brachytherapy source and saved in a 3D matrix. Then, we used this matrix to evaluate the absorbed dose in any point due to some sources or a source which shifted or rotated in some places by the matrix summation method. Three dimensional (3D) dose results and isodose curves were presented for (192)Ir source in a water cube phantom shifted for 10 steps and rotated for 45 and 90° based on the matrix summation method. Also, we applied this method for some arrays of sources. The matrix summation method can be used for 3D dose calculations for any brachytherapy source which has moved or rotated. This simple method is very fast compared to routine Monte Carlo based methods. In addition, it can be applied for dose optimization study.

  8. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T., E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  9. A fully actuated robotic assistant for MRI-guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-03-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm.

  10. Development of a high-precision xyz-measuring table for the determination of the 3D dose rate distributions of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, M; Krause, T; Flühs, D; Spaan, B

    2012-11-21

    An xyz-measuring table with a modular design has been developed for the determination of the individual 3D dose rate distributions of different brachytherapy sources requiring a high spatial resolution and reproducibility. The instrumental setup consists of a plastic scintillator detector system and the xyz-measuring table for guiding the detector across the radioactive sources. For this purpose, a micro positioning system with piezo inertial drives is chosen, providing a step width of 450 nm. To ensure a high reproducibility and accuracy better than 1 μm, an exposed linear encoder controls the positioning. The successful operation of the xyz-measuring table is exemplarily shown by measurements of dose profiles of two brachytherapy sources, an ophthalmic plaque and a radioactive seed. The setup allows a fully automated quality assurance of ophthalmic plaques and radioactive seeds under clinical conditions and can be extended to other (brachytherapy) sources of similar dimensions.

  11. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-S?nchez, Rosa; Celada-?lvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Garc?a-Mart?nez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A.; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Mic?, Alejandro; Rodr?guez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applic...

  12. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Carmen Pujades

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT allowsto estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for eachclinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adaptedto High Dose Rate (HDR. This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied tothree different institutions that use different implant techniques. Material and methods: Patients treated throughout 2010 till April 2011 were considered for this study. This examplewas chosen to be the representative of the latest implant techniques and to ensure consistency in the planning. A sufficientnumber of cases for both BT modalities, prescription dose and different work methodology (depending on theinstitution were taken into account. The specific nomograms were built using the correlation between the prostatevo lume and some characteristic parameters of each BT modality, such as the source Air Kerma Strength, numberof implanted seeds in LDR or total radiation time in HDR. Results: For each institution and BT modality, nomograms normalized to the prescribed dose were obtained andfitted to a linear function. The parameters of the adjustment show a good agreement between data and the fitting.It should be noted that for each institution these linear function parameters are different, indicating that each centreshould construct its own nomograms. Conclusions: Nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate brachytherapy are simple quality assurance tools, specific foreach institution. Nevertheless, their use should be complementary to the necessary independent verification.

  13. A hybrid deformable model for simulating prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David; Fenster, Aaron; Ladak, Hanif M.

    2006-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) guided prostate brachytherapy is a minimally invasive form of cancer treatment during which a needle is used to insert radioactive seeds into the prostate at pre-planned positions. Interaction with the needle can cause the prostate to deform and this can lead to inaccuracy in seed placement. Virtual reality (VR) simulation could provide a way for surgical residents to practice compensating for these deformations. To facilitate such a tool, we have developed a hybrid deformable model that combines ChainMail distance constraints with mass-spring physics to provide realistic, yet customizable deformations. Displacements generated by the model were used to warp a baseline US image to simulate an acquired US sequence. The algorithm was evaluated using a gelatin phantom with a Young's modulus approximately equal to that of the prostate (60 kPa). A 2D US movie was acquired while the phantom underwent needle insertion and inter-frame displacements were calculated using normalized cross correlation. The hybrid model was used to simulate the same needle insertion and the two sets of displacements were compared on a frame-by-frame basis. The average perpixel displacement error was 0.210 mm. A simulation rate of 100 frames per second was achieved using a 1000 element triangular mesh while warping a 300x400 pixel US image on an AMD Athlon 1.1 Ghz computer with 1 GB of RAM and an ATI Radeon 9800 Pro graphics card. These results show that this new deformable model can provide an accurate solution to the problem of simulating real-time prostate brachytherapy.

  14. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  15. Plastic optical fibre sensor for in-vivo radiation monitoring during brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fibre sensor is presented for applications in real-time in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose a cancer patient receives during seed implantation in Brachytherapy. The sensor is based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material is embedded in the core of a 1mm plastic optical fibre. Three scintillation materials are investigated: thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl), terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb) and europium-doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu). Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide was identified as being the most suitable scintillator and further testing demonstrates its measureable response to different activities of Iodine-125, the radio-active source commonly used in Brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  16. Calculation of Changes in RadiationExposure due to Prostate Displacement inPermanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limited studies are available on the calculation of radiation exposure and its associated risks for people in contact with patients who have been treated with permanent prostate brachytherapy. In this study the changes in the radiation exposure were calculated in different stages of the bladder fullness in prostate seed brachytherapy.Methods:Magnetic resonance images of three patients with full and empty bladders and different prostate sizes (32-71 mL; mean 54.6 mL were used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. Dose rate to skin for each patient was calculated using MCNP4c, MCNPX.Results:There were no significant differences between dose distribution in the skin relative to the changes in the prostate position due to bladder filling (P=0.05.Conclusion:Our results showed a negligible change in radiation exposure around the patient due to prostate displacement after bladder filling.

  17. Efficacy and Feasibility of Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, J; Hashimoto, Yas; Hashimoto, Yai; Kondo, T; Takagi, T; Nozaki, T; Shimizu, T; Akimoto, T; Ishida, H; Karasawa, K; Tanabe, K

    2016-04-01

    In young patients with localized prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy is the treatment of choice in the general population. Radiotherapy, such as low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy, is a viable alternative as well. However, in transplant patients, irradiation is not proposed as often as it is in healthy adults because of the risk of post-radiation ureteral stenosis and gastrointestinal toxicity as the result of fragile tissue. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and feasibility of LDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Between May 2007 and December 2014, all patients who had undergone LDR brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer at our institution were retrospectively identified (n = 203). Of these patients, 2 had a history of renal transplantation. We reviewed all available clinical data retrospectively. One patient had a functioning graft and the other had re-started hemodialysis 7 years after the transplantation. The mean time from renal transplantation to prostate cancer diagnosis was 16 years. The mean follow-up after seed implantation was 45 months. There were no peri-operative complications after seed implantation. The 2 patients remained free of prostate-specific antigen progression during the follow-up period. The renal function of the patient with a functioning graft, as measured by serum creatinine, was stable during and after the operation. LDR brachytherapy is technically feasible and acceptable as a minimally invasive treatment in carefully selected RTRs with localized prostate cancer. This treatment should be considered a suitable option for RTRs with localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-Sánchez, Rosa; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; García-Martínez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applicator close to the skin surface, and therefore combines the benefits of brachytherapy with those of low energy X-ray radiotherapy. The Esteya electronic brachytherapy system is specifically designed for skin surface brachytherapy procedures. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical implementation of the new Esteya electronic brachytherapy system, which may provide guidance for users of this system. The information covered includes patient selection, treatment planning (depth evaluation and margin determination), patient marking, and setup. The justification for the hypofractionated regimen is described and compared with others protocols in the literature. Quality assurance (QA) aspects including daily testing are also included. We emphasize that these are guidelines, and clinical judgment and experience must always prevail in the care of patients, as with any medical treatment. We conclude that clinical implementation of the Esteya brachytherapy system is simple for patients and providers, and should allow for precise and safe treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  19. Brachytherapy catheter spacing and stabilization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanes, D Jeffrey; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Park, Sang-June; Steinberg, Michael L; Hayes, John K; Kamrava, Mitchell R

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate catheter spacing, implant stability, and patient comfort during multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy. Uniform and consistent spacing of multiple interstitial implant catheters can be difficult because individual catheters may become displaced during the course of treatment. The authors have developed a brachytherapy catheter fixation method using Jackson-Pratt (JP) drains that can be used within wounds to maintain catheter spacing or on the skin surface for applicator fixation. JP drains are threaded over the implant needles to space and stabilize the implant geometry. The needles are then replaced with the usual brachytherapy catheters. Surgically directed ("open") placement of implant catheters is less prone to displacement when a drain connects and spaces the catheters in the wound. Fixation on the skin surface can also be achieved with the JP drains, which make the friction buttons optional. The soft drain material helps avoid discomfort and pressure injury sometimes associated with hard plastic buttons. Small (10 French) round JP drains are suitable for breast, and head and neck sites and larger 7×10-mm flat JP drains for extremity sarcomas, abdominal, or thoracic tumors. The complex brachytherapy devices fashioned from widely available surgical drains effectively guide and maintain geometry for multicatheter interstitial implants. Stable implant geometry leads to more reliable implementation of brachytherapy dosimetry. Patient comfort is improved and soft tissue injury from hard-edged buttons is avoided. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of a...

  1. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of a...

  2. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must...

  3. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in accordance...

  4. Archaeobotanical reconstructions of vegetation and report of mummified apple seeds found in the cellar of a first-century Roman villa on Elba Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Claudio; Scali, Monica; Vignani, Rita; Cambi, Franco; Dugerdil, Lucas; Faleri, Claudia; Cresti, Mauro

    In the late Roman Republic period (2nd-1st century BC), in the area of San Giovanni on Elba Island, previously subject to intense extraction of iron ore, a rustic villa was established by Marco Valerio Messalla, a supreme Roman magistrate. The foundations of the walls were discovered and excavated by an archaeological mission. Palaeobotanical analysis of a set of stratigraphic layers was performed. Palynological slides showed remains of palynomorphic and non-pollen objects, while data combined with anthracological investigations confirmed the hypothesis that in the 1st century AD the villa was destroyed by a fire that created a compact crust under which were discovered four broken Roman amphorae containing about five hundred apple seeds. Comparisons of archaeological and fresh seeds from reference collections showed discontinuous morphology except for one group of archaeological samples. DNA was isolated from seeds that had well-preserved embryos in all groups. DNA extracts from archaeological, wild and modern domestic seeds (controls) were amplified by PCR and tested with SSR molecular markers, followed by genome analysis. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  6. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo [Center of Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Physics, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  7. Effect of postoperative radiation therapy on mandibular reconstruction using a modular endoprosthesis - A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lye, K.W.; Chin, F.K.; Tideman, H.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The endoprosthetic system has been shown to be a potential option for mandibular reconstruction. The objective of this pilot in vivo animal study was to determine the effects of postoperative radiation using brachytherapy on bone and soft tissue healing in mandibles reconstructed with the

  8. AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF PELVIS FOR BRACHYTHERAPY OF PROSTATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardell, M; Magnusson, M; Sandborg, M; Alm Carlsson, G; Jeuthe, J; Malusek, A

    2016-06-01

    Advanced model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in quantitative computed tomography (CT) perform automatic segmentation of tissues to estimate material properties of the imaged object. Compared with conventional methods, these algorithms may improve quality of reconstructed images and accuracy of radiation treatment planning. Automatic segmentation of tissues is, however, a difficult task. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm that automatically segments tissues in CT images of the male pelvis. The newly developed algorithm (MK2014) combines histogram matching, thresholding, region growing, deformable model and atlas-based registration techniques for the segmentation of bones, adipose tissue, prostate and muscles in CT images. Visual inspection of segmented images showed that the algorithm performed well for the five analysed images. The tissues were identified and outlined with accuracy sufficient for the dual-energy iterative reconstruction algorithm whose aim is to improve the accuracy of radiation treatment planning in brachytherapy of the prostate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen [Department of Medical Physics, Rikshospital-Radiumhospital Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Bergstrand, Eva Stabell [Department of Medical Physics, Rikshospital-Radiumhospital Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); Knutsen, Bjoern Helge [Department of Medical Physics, Rikshospital-Radiumhospital Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); Roeislien, Jo [Section of Biostatistics, Rikshospital-Radiumhospital Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); Olsen, Dag Rune [Institute for Cancer Research, Rikshospital-Radiumhospital Medical Center, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-08-21

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the method of applicator reconstruction and/or the applicator orientation influence the dose calculation to points around the applicator for brachytherapy of cervical cancer with CT-based treatment planning. A phantom, containing a fixed ring applicator set and six lead pellets representing dose points, was used. The phantom was CT scanned with the ring applicator at four different angles related to the image plane. In each scan the applicator was reconstructed by three methods: (1) direct reconstruction in each image (DR) (2) reconstruction in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for the DR and MPR methods for all but two points. All applicator orientations had similar dose calculation reproducibility. Using library plans for applicator reconstruction gives the most reproducible dose calculation. However, with restrictive guidelines for applicator reconstruction the uncertainties for all methods are low compared to other factors influencing the accuracy of brachytherapy.

  10. Seed quality in informal seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords:     informal seed systems, seed recycling, seed quality, germination, seed pathology, seed health, seed-borne diseases, mycotoxigenic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, mycotoxins, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Nigeria.   Seed is a crucial input for agricultural

  11. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  12. TU-AB-201-11: A Novel Theoretical Framework for MRI-Only Image Guided LDR Prostate and Breast Brachytherapy Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) of calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient

  13. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy ... a grain of rice) in or near the tumor and leaving them there permanently. ... the radioactivity level of the implants eventually diminishes to nothing. ...

  14. Adaptive cone-beam CT planning improves long-term biochemical disease-free survival for (125)I prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, M; Smit Duijzentkunst, D A; Westendorp, H; van de Pol, S M G; Kattevilder, R; Schellekens, A; van der Voort van Zyp, J R N; Moerland, M A; van Vulpen, M; Hoekstra, C J

    Determining the independent effect of additional intraoperative adaptive C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) planning vs. transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided interactive planning alone in (125)I brachytherapy for prostate cancer (PCa) on biochemical disease-free survival (BDFS). T1/T2-stage PCa patients receiving TRUS-guided brachytherapy from 2000 to 2014 were analyzed. From October 2006, patients received additional intraoperative adaptive CBCT planning for dosimetric evaluation and subsequent remedial seed placement in underdosed areas. Patients were stratified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate BDFS (primary outcome), overall survival, and PCa-specific survival (secondary outcomes). Cox regression was used to assess the relation between CBCT use and biochemical failure (BF) and overall mortality. In all, 1623 patients were included. Median followup was 99 months (interquartile range 70-115) for TRUS patients (n = 613) and 51 months (interquartile range 29-70) for CBCT patients (n = 1010). BF occurred 203 times and 206 patients died, 26 from PCa. For TRUS and CBCT patients, 7-year BDFS was 87.2% vs. 93.5% (log rank: p = 0.04) for low, 75.9% vs. 88.5% (p brachytherapy leads to a significant increase in BDFS in all NCCN risk groups. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Mayr, Nina A; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (alpha=0.15 Gy(-1) and alpha/beta=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD2) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125I and 103Pd implants. The EUD2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125I and 103Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125I and 1.3-1.6 for 103Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  16. Adjuvant iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma after complete hepatectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor recurrence is a major problem after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The current study evaluated the effects of adjuvant iodine-125 ((125I brachytherapy on postoperative recurrence of HCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From July 2000 to June 2004, 68 HCC patients undergoing curative hepatectomy were randomly assigned into a (125I adjuvant brachytherapy group (n = 34 and a group of best care (n = 34. Patients in the (125I adjuvant brachytherapy group received (125I seed implantation on the raw surface of resection. Patients in the best care control group received identical treatments except for the (125I seed implantation. Time to recurrence (TTR and 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS were compared between the two groups. The follow-up ended in January 2010, and lasted for 7.7-106.4 months with a median of 47.6 months. TTR was significantly longer in the (125I group (mean of 60.0 months vs. 36.7 months in the control. The 1-, 3- and 5-year recurrence-free rates of the (125I group were 94.12%, 76.42%, and 73.65% vs. 88.24%, 50.00%, and 29.41% compared with the control group, respectively. The 1-, 3- and 5-year OS rates of the (125I group were 94.12%, 73.53%, and 55.88% vs. 88.24%, 52.94%, and 29.41% compared with the control group, respectively. The (125I brachytherapy decreased the risk of recurrence (HR = 0.310 and the risk of death (HR = 0.364. Most frequent adverse events in the (125I group included nausea, vomiting, arrhythmia, decreased white blood cell and/or platelet counts, and were generally mild and manageable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Adjuvant (125I brachytherapy significantly prolonged TTR and increased the OS rate after curative resection of HCC. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000081011.

  17. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using μ-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D J; Cutajar, D L; George, S P; Guatelli, S; Bucci, J A; Enari, K E; Miller, S; Siegele, R; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-06-07

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences.Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30-60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2-5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors

  18. Iodine-125 seeds for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Joao A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Manzoli, Jose E.; Souza, Carla D., E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b, E-mail: czeituni@pobox.co, E-mail: afeher@ipen.b, E-mail: jmoura31@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: esmoura@ipen.b, E-mail: hrnagato@ipen.b, E-mail: jemanzoli@ipen.b, E-mail: cdsouza@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam, Dib, E-mail: dib.karan@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades

    2009-07-01

    In Brazil, cancer has become one of the major public health problems. An estimate by the Health Ministry showed that 466,430 people had the disease in the country in 2008. The prostate cancer is the second largest death cause among men. The National Institute of Cancer estimated the occurrence of 50,000 new cases for 2009. Some of these patients are treated with Brachytherapy, using Iodine-125 seeds. By this technique, small seeds with Iodine-125, a radioactive material, are implanted in the prostate. The advantages of radioactive seed implants are the preservation of healthy tissues and organs near the prostate, besides the low rate of impotence and urinary incontinence. The Energy and Nuclear Research Institute - IPEN, which belongs to the Nuclear Energy National Commission - CNEN, established a program for the development of the technique and production of Iodine-125 seeds in Brazil. The estimate for the 125-Iodine seeds demand is of 8,000 seeds/month and the laboratory to be implanted will need this production capacity. The purpose of this paper is to explain the project status and show some data about the seeds used in the country. The project will be divided in two phases: technological development of a prototype and a laboratory implementation for the seeds production. (author)

  19. Lung-conserving treatment of a pulmonary oligometastasis with a wedge resection and 131Cs brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, A Gabriella; Parikh, Apurva; Yondorf, Menachem; Trichter, Samuel; Gupta, Divya; Port, Jeffrey; Parashar, Bhupesh

    2013-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas most frequently metastasize to the lung. Surgical resection of pulmonary metastases is the primary treatment modality. Although lobectomy is widely acknowledged as the standard procedure to treat primary pulmonary tumors, the standard for pulmonary metastases is not well defined; furthermore, compromised lung function may tip the scales in favor of a less invasive approach. Here, we report the results of a patient treated with wedge resection and intraoperative cesium-131 ((131)Cs). A 58-year-old African American female was diagnosed with the American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage IIA mixed uterine leiomyosarcoma and underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by adjuvant external beam radiotherapy to a total dose of 45 Gy and vaginal brachytherapy to a total dose of 20 Gy. At 2 years, a routine CT scan of the chest revealed metastasis to right upper lobe of the lung. The patient's poor pulmonary function, related to a 45 pack-year smoking history and chronic emphysema, precluded a lobectomy. After the patient underwent a lung-sparing wedge resection of the pulmonary right upper lobe metastasis and intraoperative brachytherapy with (131)Cs seeds to a total dose of 80 Gy, she remained disease free in the implanted area. At a 2-year followup, imaging continued to reveal 100% local control of the area treated with wedge resection and intraoperative (131)Cs brachytherapy. The patient had no complications from this treatment. Such treatment approach may become an attractive option in patients with oligometastatic disease and compromised pulmonary function. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. 

  1. The surgical viability and radiological monitoring of brain implants of bioactive micro-seeds in an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Giane X. O.; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Siqueira, Sávio Lana; Maciel, Marcelo B.

    2005-01-01

    The interstitial implant is a therapeutic modality in brachytherapy of the head and neck. Presently, the seeds implanted in tumors in the central nervous system are metallic I-125. After the full emission of the radionuclide, the seed remains inert in the implanted area. Bioactive ceramic seeds have been prepared for this research group incorporating Sm-152 to be active in Sm-153. The main goal of the present study is the development of a the surgical technique for implanting the biodegradabl...

  2. The American Brachytherapy Society consensus guidelines for plaque brachytherapy of uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To present the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines for plaque brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma. An international multicenter Ophthalmic Oncology Task Force (OOTF) was assembled to include 47 radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and ophthalmic oncologists from 10 countries. The ABS-OOTF produced collaborative guidelines, based on their eye cancer-specific clinical experience and knowledge of the literature. This work was reviewed and approved by the ABS Board of Directors as well as within the journal's peer-reivew process. The ABS-OOTF reached consensus that ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy is best performed in subspecialty brachytherapy centers. Quality assurance, methods of plaque construction, and dosimetry should be consistent with the 2012 joint guidelines of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and ABS. Implantation of plaque sources should be performed by subspecialty-trained surgeons. Although there exist select restrictions related to tumor size and location, the ABS-OOTF agreed that most melanomas of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid could be treated with plaque brachytherapy. The ABS-OOTF reached consensus that tumors with gross orbital extension and blind painful eyes and those with no light perception vision are unsuitable for brachytherapy. In contrast, only select retinoblastomas are eligible for plaque brachytherapy. Prescription doses, dose rates, treatment durations, and clinical methods are described. Plaque brachytherapy is an effective eye and vision-sparing method to treat patients with intraocular tumors. Practitioners are encouraged to use ABS-OOTF guidelines to enhance their practice. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of preplan MRI and preplan CT-based prostate volume with intraoperative ultrasound-based prostate volume in real-time permanent brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Li; Kim, Ja Young; Lee, Bo Mi; Chang, Sei Kyung; Ko, Seung Young; Kim, Sung Jun; Park, Dong Soo; Shin, Hyun Soo [CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seougnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The present study compared the difference between intraoperative transrectal ultrasound (iTRUS)-based prostate volume and preplan computed tomography (CT), preplan magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based prostate volume to estimate the number of seeds needed for appropriate dose coverage in permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Between March 2007 and March 2011, among 112 patients who underwent permanent brachytherapy with 125I, 60 image scans of 56 patients who underwent preplan CT (pCT) or preplan MRI (pMRI) within 2 months before brachytherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-four cases among 30 cases with pCT and 26 cases among 30 cases with pMRI received neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT). In 34 cases, NHT started after acquisition of preplan image. The median duration of NHT after preplan image acquisition was 17 and 21 days for cases with pCT and pMRI, respectively. The prostate volume calculated by different modalities was compared. And retrospective planning with iTRUS image was performed to estimate the number of 125I seed required to obtain recommended dose distribution according to prostate volume. The mean difference in prostate volume was 9.05 mL between the pCT and iTRUS and 6.84 mL between the pMRI and iTRUS. The prostate volume was roughly overestimated by 1.36 times with pCT and by 1.33 times with pMRI. For 34 cases which received NHT after image acquisition, the prostate volume was roughly overestimated by 1.45 times with pCT and by 1.37 times with pMRI. A statistically significant difference was found between preplan image-based volume and iTRUS-based volume (p<0.001). The median number of wasted seeds is approximately 13, when the pCT or pMRI volume was accepted without modification to assess the required number of seeds for brachytherapy. pCT-based volume and pMRI-based volume tended to overestimate prostate volume in comparison to iTRUS-based volume. To reduce wasted seeds and cost of the brachytherapy, we should take the volume

  4. Assessment of the implant geometry in fractionated interstitial HDR breast brachytherapy using an electromagnetic tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermeier, Markus; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav; Bert, Christoph

    During the partial-breast treatment course by interstitial brachytherapy, electromagnetic tracking (EMT) was applied to measure the implant geometry. Implant-geometry variation, choice of reference data, and three registration methods were assessed. The implant geometry was measured in 28 patients after catheter implantation (EMTbed), during CT imaging (EMTCT), and in each of up to n = 9 treatment fractions (EMTF(k), k = 1, 2,… n). EMTF(k) were registered to the planned implant reconstruction (CTplan) by using all dwell positions (DPs), the button centers, or three fiducial sensors on the patient's skin. Variation in implant geometry obtained from EMTF(k) was assessed for EMTbed, EMTCT, and CTplan. EMT was used to measure 3932 catheters. A duration of 6.5 ± 1.7 min was needed for each implant measurement (mean, 17 catheters) plus setup of the EMT system. Data registration based on the DP deviated significantly lower than registration on button centers or fiducial sensors. Within a registration group, there was a geometry in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy breast treatments. EMTbed, EMTCT, and CTplan data can serve as reference for assessment of implant changes. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 1251 seed calibration using afterloading equipment Seed Selectron. Practical solution to meet the recommendations of the AAPM; Calibracion de semillas de {sup 1}25I usando el equipo de carga difereida SeedSelectron. Solucion practica para cumplir las recomendaciones de la AAPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Richart, J.; Perez-Garcia, J.; Guirado, D.; Ballester, F.; Rodriguez, S.; Santos, M.; Depiaggio, M.; Carmona, V.; Lliso, F.; Camacho, C.; Pujades, M. C.

    2011-07-01

    Seed Selectron is a system used in the after loader permanent implant brachytherapy seeds 1-125 interstitial prostate. Two aspects are critical when you can meet the recommendations of the AAPM: a practical difficulty to check the quantity of seed required, and the great uncertainty of all measured diodes. The purpose of this paper is to present a practical solution that has been adopted to implement the recommendations of the AAPM.

  6. Vertex Reconstruction in ATLAS Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Matt; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Vertex reconstruction is the process of taking reconstructed tracks and using them to determine the locations of proton collisions. In this poster we present the performance of our current vertex reconstruction algorithm, and look at investigations into potential improvements from a new seed finding method.

  7. In vivo dosimetry with a linear MOSFET array to evaluate the urethra dose during permanent implant brachytherapy using iodine-125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther J; Haanstra, Björk K C; Murrer, Lars H P; van Gils, Francis C J M; Dekker, Andre L A J; Mijnheer, Ben J; Lambin, Philippe

    2009-11-15

    To develop a technique to monitor the dose rate in the urethra during permanent implant brachytherapy using a linear MOSFET array, with sufficient accuracy and without significantly extending the implantation time. Phantom measurements were performed to determine the optimal conditions for clinical measurements. In vivo measurements were performed in 5 patients during the (125)I brachytherapy implant procedure. To evaluate if the urethra dose obtained in the operating room with the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and the patient in treatment position is a reference for the total accumulated dose; additional measurements were performed after the implantation procedure, in the recovery room. In vivo measurements during and after the implantation procedure agree very well, illustrating that the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and patient positioning do not influence the measured dose in the urethra. In vivo dose values obtained during the implantation are therefore representative for the total accumulated dose in the urethra. In 5 patients, the dose rates during and after the implantation were below the maximum dose rate of the urethra, using the planned seed distribution. In vivo dosimetry during the implantation, using a MOSFET array, is a feasible technique to evaluate the dose in the urethra during the implantation of (125)I seeds for prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  9. The American Brachytherapy Society Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix Part II: High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Beriwal, Sushil; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Gaffney, David; Hansen, Jorgen; Jones, Ellen; Kirisits, Christian; Thomadsen, Bruce; Erickson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This report presents the 2011 update to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy guidelines for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in cervical cancer brachytherapy formulated updated guidelines for HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring, ovoids, cylinder or interstitial applicators for locally advanced cervical cancer were revised based on medical evidence in the literature and input of clinical experts in gynecologic brachytherapy. Results The Cervical Cancer Committee for Guideline Development affirms the essential curative role of tandem-based brachytherapy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer. Proper applicator selection, insertion, and imaging are fundamental aspects of the procedure. Three-dimensional imaging with magnetic resonance or computed tomography or radiographic imaging may be used for treatment planning. Dosimetry must be performed after each insertion prior to treatment delivery. Applicator placement, dose specification and dose fractionation must be documented, quality assurance measures must be performed, and follow-up information must be obtained. A variety of dose/fractionation schedules and methods for integrating brachytherapy with external-beam radiation exist. The recommended tumor dose in 2 Gray (Gy) per fraction radiobiologic equivalence (EQD2) is 80–90 Gy, depending on tumor size at the time of brachytherapy. Dose limits for normal tissues are discussed. Conclusion These guidelines update those of 2000 and provide a comprehensive description of HDR cervical cancer brachytherapy in 2011. PMID:22265437

  10. Late coronary occlusion after intracoronary brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Costa (Marco); M. Sabaté (Manel); I.P. Kay (Ian Patrick); P. Cervinka; J.M.R. Ligthart (Jürgen); P. Serrano (Pedro); V.L.M.A. Coen (Veronique); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.C. Levendag (Peter); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Intracoronary brachytherapy appears to be a promising technology to prevent restenosis. Presently, limited data are available regarding the late safety of this therapeutic modality. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of late (>1 month)

  11. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study aims to report the incidence of treatment-induced acute toxicities, local control and survival of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy concomitant with weekly Cisplatin chemotherapy. Methods: Forty patients with FIGO Stages IB2 ...

  12. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  13. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria E.C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Calvo, Wilson A.P., E-mail: somessar@ipen.b, E-mail: afeher@ipen.b, E-mail: sprenger@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b, E-mail: olcosta@ipen.b, E-mail: wapcalvo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  14. Study of dose deposition for different configurations of OncoSeed 6711 seeds; Estudo da deposicao de dose para diferentes configuracoes de sementes OncoSeed 6711

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaz, Lucas Crusoe

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. Iodine-125 brachytherapy seeds are presented as a form of treatment. In prostate cancer therapy 80-120 iodine-125 seeds are implanted in the organ following a previous planning. During positioning and after it, the implanted seeds can undergo slight displacements relative to the original position. These deviations may cause changes in dose distribution in the tumor volume. This work has made a dosimetry study for iodine-125 seeds used in low dose rate brachytherapy. In the first stage, we performed a one seed dosimetric parameters study following the TG-43 protocol recommendations with the objective of validating our methodology. Then a quantitative study of the variation in dose distribution for three configurations of four seeds OncoSeed 6711 was conducted with two configurations using the seeds in symmetrical positions and the other presenting small displacements. A soft tissue phantom and TLD dosimeters were used. Then a qualitative study of isodose curves of the configurations was performed using radiochromic film, Gafchromic model. This method was used to complement the study of the crystals. The seed´s dosimetric parameters obtained in this work showed excellent agreement with the TG-43 consensual values, thus validating the methodology used in this work. The results obtained with radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeters have shown that there is a significant difference in dose distribution when there is a change in the positioning of the seeds. The use of these two methods simultaneously is efficient since the crystals bring a point view and the film has a global view of the dose distribution. (author)

  15. Study of dose deposition for different configurations of seeds OncoSeed 6711; Estudo da deposicao de dose para diferentes configuracoes de sementes OncoSeed 6711

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaz, Lucas Crusoe

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. lodine-125 brachytherapy seeds are presented as a form of treatment. In prostate cancer therapy 80-120 iodine-125 seeds are implanted in the organ following a previous planning. During positioning and after it, the implanted seeds can undergo slight displacements relative to the original position. These deviations may cause changes in dose distribution in the tumor volume. This work has made a dosimetry study for iodine-125 seeds used in low dose rate brachytherapy. In the first stage, we performed a one seed dosimetric parameters study following the TG-43 protocol recommendations with the objective of validating our methodology. Then a quantitative study of the variation in dose distribution for three configurations of four seeds OncoSeed 6711 was conducted with two configurations using the seeds in symmetrical positions and the other presenting small displacements. A soft tissue phantom and TLD dosimeters were used. Then a qualitative study of isodose curves of the configurations was performed using radiochromic film, Gafchromic model. This method was used to complement the study of the crystals. The seed's dosimetric parameters obtained in this work showed excellent agreement with the TG-43 consensual values, thus validating the methodology used in this work. The results obtained with radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeters have shown that there is a significant difference in dose distribution when there is a change in the positioning of the seeds. The use of these two methods simultaneously is efficient since the crystals bring a point view and the film has a global view of the dose distribution. (author)

  16. MO-D-BRD-00: Electronic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  17. Patterns of care study for brachytherapy: results of the questionnaire for the years 2002 and 2007 in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Londres

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of the ESTRO Patterns of Care study for Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE 2002 was to develop an aid to analyse brachytherapy practices. A 2nd version of the PCB questionnaire was created for 2007. Data over 2007 were collected at the radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and compared with those from 2002. The aim of this study is to describe national brachytherapy practices, to demonstrate trends, and to provide data for rational health care planning.Material and methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire. For each centre, a local coordinator, responsible for coordinating the questionnaires and support of the further analysis was assigned. Data from the national cancer incidence registry was used for comparison with the data from the 21 Dutch departments.Results: There was a decrease in low-dose rate equipment in parallel to an increase in both pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate equipment. The use of 3D CT and MR based imaging techniques showed a slow rise. The most common clinical procedures were for prostate, gynaecological, and oesophageal tumours. A large increase (146% in permanent implant prostate applications using 125I seeds was observed. The numbers of oesophageal and gynaecological treatmentsremained stable. There is concern on the low numbers of cases treated in some institutions for a few complex treatment sites. For head and neck, anal canal, paediatrics, bladder and eye interventions it ranged from 3-20 patients per year per institution.Conclusions: The increase in number of patient treated with brachytherapy is in accordance with the increases in cancer incidence. The percentage of all radiotherapy patients treated with brachytherapy (approximately 5% remained stable. The survey identified certain trends in resources and techniques, as well as areas of expected improvement and possible gain in clinical outcome. Data reported from this survey can be used for further planning of resources

  18. Analysis of an Optimized MLOS Tomographic Reconstruction Algorithm and Comparison to the MART Reconstruction Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Foy, Roderick; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2011-11-01

    An optimally designed MLOS tomographic reconstruction algorithm for use in 3D PIV and PTV applications is analyzed. Using a set of optimized reconstruction parameters, the reconstructions produced by the MLOS algorithm are shown to be comparable to reconstructions produced by the MART algorithm for a range of camera geometries, camera numbers, and particle seeding densities. The resultant velocity field error calculated using PIV and PTV algorithms is further minimized by applying both pre and post processing to the reconstructed data sets.

  19. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  20. Evolutionary differences in Δ13C detected between spore and seed bearing plants following exposure to a range of atmospheric O2:CO2 ratios; implications for paleoatmosphere reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Amanda S.; Yiotis, Charilaos; Montañez, Isabel P.; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2017-09-01

    The stable carbon isotopes of fossil plants are a reflection of the atmosphere and environment in which they grew. Fossil plant remains have thus stored information about the isotopic composition and concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) and possibly pO2 through time. Studies to date, utilizing extant plants, have linked changes in plant stable carbon isotopes (δ13Cp) or carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) to changes in pCO2 and/or pO2. These studies have relied heavily on angiosperm representatives, a phylogenetic group only present in the fossil record post-Early Cretaceous (∼140 million years ago (mya)), whereas gymnosperms, monilophytes and lycophytes dominated terrestrial ecosystems prior to this time. The aim of this study was to expand our understanding of carbon isotope discrimination in all vascular plant groups of C3 plants including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms, under elevated CO2 and sub-ambient O2 to explore their utility as paleo-atmospheric proxies. To achieve this goal, plants were grown in controlled environment chambers under a range of O2:CO2 ratio treatments. Results reveal a strong phylogenetic dependency on Δ13C, where spore-bearing (lycophytes and monilophytes) have significantly higher 13C discrimination than seed plants (gymnosperms and angiosperms) by ∼5‰. We attribute this strong phylogenetic signal to differences in Ci/Ca likely mediated by fundamental differences in how spore and seed bearing plants control stomatal aperture. Decreasing O2:CO2 ratio in general resulted in increased carbon isotope discrimination in all plant groups. Notably, while all plant groups respond unidirectionally to elevated atmospheric CO2 (1900 ppm and ambient O2), they do not respond equally to sub-ambient O2 (16%). We conclude that (1) Δ13C has a strong phylogenetic or 'reproductive grade' bias, whereby Δ13C of spore reproducing plants is significantly different to seed reproducing taxa. (2) Δ13C increases

  1. SU-F-BRA-03: Integrating Novel Electromagnetic Tracking Hollow Needle Assistance in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racine, E; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D [Philips Group Innovation - Biomedical Systems, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Beaulieu, L [Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the results of a complete permanent implant brachytherapy procedure assisted by an electromagnetic (EM) hollow needle possessing both 3D tracking and seed drop detection abilities. Methods: End-to-end in-phantom EM-assisted LDR procedures were conducted. The novel system consisted of an EM tracking apparatus (NDI Aurora V2, Planar Field Generator), a 3D US scanner (Philips CX50), a hollow needle prototype allowing 3D tracking and seed drop detection and a specially designed treatment planning software (Philips Healthcare). A tungsten-doped 30 cc spherical agarose prostate immersed in gelatin was used for the treatment. A cylindrical shape of 0.8 cc was carved along its diameter to mimic the urethra. An initial plan of 26 needles and 47 seeds was established with the system. The plan was delivered with the EM-tracked hollow needle, and individual seed drop locations were recorded on the fly. The phantom was subsequently imaged with a CT scanner from which seed positions and contour definitions were obtained. The DVHs were then independently recomputed and compared with those produced by the planning system, both before and after the treatment. Results: Of the 47 seeds, 45 (96%) were detected by the EM technology embedded in the hollow needle design. The executed plan (from CT analysis) differed from the initial plan by 2%, 14% and 8% respectively in terms of V100, D90 and V150 for the prostate, and by 8%, 7% and 10% respectively in terms of D5, V100 and V120 for the urethra. Conclusion: The average DVH deviations between initial and executed plans were within a 5% tolerance imposed for this proof-of-concept assessment. This relatively good concordance demonstrates the feasibility and potential benefits of combining EM tracking and seed drop detection for real-time dosimetry validation and assistance in permanent implant brachytherapy procedures. This project has been entirely funded by Philips Healthcare.

  2. Verification of High Dose Rate 192Ir Source Position During Brachytherapy Treatment Using Silicon Pixel Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, Matej; Burger, Janez; Cindro, Vladimir; Kramberger, Gregor; Mandic, Igor; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2011-10-01

    A system for in-vivo tracking of 192Ir source during high dose rate or pulsed dose rate brachytherapy treatment was built using 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors as image sensors and knife-edge lead pinholes as collimators. With source self-images obtained from a dual-pinhole system, location of the source could be reconstructed in three dimensions in real time. The system was tested with 192Ir clinical source (kerma rate in air at 1 m 2.38 Gy/h) in air and plexi-glass phantom. The locations of the source were tracked from a distance of 40 cm in a field of view of 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. Reconstruction precision, defined as the average distance between true and reconstructed source positions, with data collected in less than 1 s with 22 GBq 192Ir source was about 5 mm. The reconstruction precision was in our case mainly limited by imperfect alignment of detectors and pinholes. With perfect alignment the statistical error would allow precision of about 1 mm which could further be improved with larger detector placed at larger distance from the pinhole. However already the modest precision of few millimeters is sufficient for in-vivo detection of larger deviations from planned treatment caused by various misadministrations or malfunctioning of the brachytherapy treatment apparatus. Usage of silicon detectors offers a possibility for building a compact device which could be used as an independent online quality assurance system. In this paper details about sensors, readout system and reconstruction algorithm are described. Results from measurements with clinical source are presented.

  3. Synthesis of phosphosilicate matrix for application to brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Aline B.F., E-mail: linebfs@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Santos, Ana M.M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: amms@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Center of Nuclear Technology Development (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Brachytherapy with beta sources can be useful for in situ radiotherapy of cancers where tiny radioactive seeds are injected directly into the tumor. Phosphorus {sup 31}P can be activated to b-emitter {sup 32}P by neutron activation with a half-life of 14.3 days. In this work, phosphosilicate matrices were synthesized through sol-gel process by hydrolysis and condensation of the tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) under two different conditions of synthesis. In both conditions the phosphoric acid and drying control chemical additives (DCCA's) were the same. Three drying control chemical additives were utilized: propylene carbonate, N,N-dimethylformamide and ethylene glycol. The casting solutions were prepared with phosphorus content of 3.2 wt.% and xerogels were thermally treated at 900 deg C. Different microstructures were observed under different conditions of synthesis. The microstructures of phosphosilicate matrices obtained with ethylene glycol and without DCCA's have shown the presence of a globular structure regions with large amount of phosphorous. (author)

  4. Gold marker displacement due to needle insertion during HDR-brachytherapy for treatment of prostate cancer: A prospective cone beam computed tomography and kilovoltage on-board imaging (kV-OBI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann Markus KA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate gold marker displacement due to needle insertion during HDR-brachytherapy for therapy of prostate cancer. Patients and methods 18 patients entered into this prospective evaluation. Three gold markers were implanted into the prostate during the first HDR-brachytherapy procedure after the irradiation was administered. Three days after marker implantation all patients had a CT-scan for planning purpose of the percutaneous irradiation. Marker localization was defined on the digitally-reconstructed-radiographs (DRR for daily (VMAT technique or weekly (IMRT set-up error correction. Percutaneous therapy started one week after first HDR-brachytherapy. After the second HDR-brachytherapy, two weeks after first HDR-brachtherapy, a cone-beam CT-scan was done to evaluate marker displacement due to needle insertion. In case of marker displacement, the actual positions of the gold markers were adjusted on the DRR. Results The value of the gold marker displacement due to the second HDR-brachytherapy was analyzed in all patients and for each gold marker by comparison of the marker positions in the prostate after soft tissue registration of the prostate of the CT-scans prior the first and second HDR-brachytherapy. The maximum deviation was 5 mm, 7 mm and 12 mm for the anterior-posterior, lateral and superior-inferior direction. At least one marker in each patient showed a significant displacement and therefore new marker positions were adjusted on the DRRs for the ongoing percutaneous therapy. Conclusions Needle insertion in the prostate due to HDR-brachytherapy can lead to gold marker displacements. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the actual position of markers after the second HDR-brachytherapy. In case of significant deviations, a new DRR with the adjusted marker positions should be generated for precise positioning during the ongoing percutaneous irradiation.

  5. Image fusion techniques in permanent seed implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Polo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty years major software and hardware developments in brachytherapy treatment planning, intraoperative navigation and dose delivery have been made. Image-guided brachytherapy has emerged as the ultimate conformal radiation therapy, allowing precise dose deposition on small volumes under direct image visualization. In thisprocess imaging plays a central role and novel imaging techniques are being developed (PET, MRI-MRS and power Doppler US imaging are among them, creating a new paradigm (dose-guided brachytherapy, where imaging is used to map the exact coordinates of the tumour cells, and to guide applicator insertion to the correct position. Each of these modalities has limitations providing all of the physical and geometric information required for the brachytherapy workflow.Therefore, image fusion can be used as a solution in order to take full advantage of the information from each modality in treatment planning, intraoperative navigation, dose delivery, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation.Image fusion, understood as the visualization of any morphological volume (i.e. US, CT, MRI together with an additional second morpholo gical volume (i.e. CT, MRI or functional dataset (functional MRI, SPECT, PET, is a well known method for treatment planning, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation. The term image fusion is used when multiple patient image datasets are registered and overlaid or merged to provide additional information. Fused images may be created from multiple images from the same imaging modality taken at different moments (multi-temporalapproach, or by combining information from multiple modalities. Quality means that the fused images should provide additional information to the brachythe rapy process (diagnosis and staging, treatment planning, intraoperative imaging, treatment delivery and follow-up that cannot be obtained in other ways. In this review I will focus on the role of

  6. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources for...

  7. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual physical...

  8. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  9. SU-F-BRA-02: Electromagnetic Tracking in Brachytherapy as An Advanced Modality for Treatment Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellermeier, M; Herbolzheimer, J; Kreppner, S; Lotter, M; Strnad, V [University Clinic Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Bert, C [University Clinic Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the use of Electromagnetic Tracking (EMT) for quality assurance in brachytherapy by means of phantom studies and to assess the clinical applicability of EMT during HDR breast brachytherapy. Methods: An EMT system was investigated to examine its suitability for clinical applications in brachytherapy. A field generator served as electromagnetic field emitter. Sensors (magnetic sensitive only), connected to a control unit, were used and their respective position and orientation inside a pre-defined measurement volume (500 mm cube length) determined. Up to three 6DoF sensors were placed on the phantom’s surface to obtain additional reference coordinates used to derive relative measured positions of a smaller 5DoF sensor inserted in the 6F catheters of the implant. The catheters were successively measured by manual displacement of the sensor at ∼40 mm/s. The measured catheter tracks, acquired multiple times at various locations (CT and treatment room), were smoothed, divided into intervals (2.5 mm dwell step size), registered (rigid Iterative Closest Point transformation) and compared against the known phantom geometry. Results: The reference coordinates were used to exclude the influence of external (e.g., respiratory-induced) motion. Precision tests in a clinical setting showed variances below 1 mm (translational) and 1° (rotational), respectively. Our method for catheter reconstruction preserved the length of the tracked catheter (within 1 mm). The measured tracking accuracy was 1±0.3 mm (maximum: 2 mm). The results are less accurate in environments potentially interfering with the magnetic field, e.g., in the vicinity of ferromagnetic table components. Conclusion: Our EMT system is able to perform reproducible and accurate catheter tracking and reconstruction. Currently, measurements of the implant geometry in HDR breast treatments are initiated. Online implant monitoring by means of EM tracking may be a first step towards advanced

  10. Seed quality in informal seed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords:     informal seed systems, seed recycling, seed quality, germination, seed pathology, seed health, seed-borne diseases, mycotoxigenic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, mycotoxins, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Nigeria.   Seed is a crucial input for agricultural production. Approximately 80% of the smallholder farmers in Africa depend for their seed on the informal seed system, consisting of farmers involved in selection, production and dissemination of seed. The la...

  11. Development of a brachytherapy audit checklist tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann; Hadley, Scott; Jolly, Shruti; Lee, Choonik; Roberson, Peter; Roberts, Donald; Ritter, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    To develop a brachytherapy audit checklist that could be used to prepare for Nuclear Regulatory Commission or agreement state inspections, to aid in readiness for a practice accreditation visit, or to be used as an annual internal audit tool. Six board-certified medical physicists and one radiation oncologist conducted a thorough review of brachytherapy-related literature and practice guidelines published by professional organizations and federal regulations. The team members worked at two facilities that are part of a large, academic health care center. Checklist items were given a score based on their judged importance. Four clinical sites performed an audit of their program using the checklist. The sites were asked to score each item based on a defined severity scale for their noncompliance, and final audit scores were tallied by summing the products of importance score and severity score for each item. The final audit checklist, which is available online, contains 83 items. The audit scores from the beta sites ranged from 17 to 71 (out of 690) and identified a total of 7-16 noncompliance items. The total time to conduct the audit ranged from 1.5 to 5 hours. A comprehensive audit checklist was developed which can be implemented by any facility that wishes to perform a program audit in support of their own brachytherapy program. The checklist is designed to allow users to identify areas of noncompliance and to prioritize how these items are addressed to minimize deviations from nationally-recognized standards. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  12. An Active Mammosite For Breast Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that uses radioactive sources inside or in close proximity to cancerous tumors, thus minimizing exposure to neighboring healthy cells. This radiation oncology treatment unlike many others is localized and precise. The latest involvement of the Brachytherapy research group of the medical physics program at Hampton University is in the development of a scintillator fiber based detector for the breast cancer specific Mammosite (balloon device) from Cytyc Inc. Radioactive sources are inserted into a small plastic catheter (shaft) and pushed at the end of the tube. At that location, a water filled balloon surrounds the source and allow uniform gamma emission into cancer tumors. There is presently no capability for this device to provide measurements of the location of the source, as well as the radiation emitted from the source. Recent data were acquired to evaluate the possibility of measuring the dose distribution during breast Brachytherapy cancer treatments with this device. A high activity ^192Ir radioactive source and a 0.5 and 1 mm^2 scintillating fibers were used. Results will be presented and discussed.

  13. Experimental dosimetry of Ho-166 bioglass seed polymer-protected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to develop experimental dosimetry of Ho-166 bio glass seed for brachytherapy studies using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 radio chromium films. The methodology consists of placement of radio chromium films in a compressed breast phantom, along with bio glass polymer-protected seeds of [Si: Ca: Ho] and [Si: Ca: Ho: Zr]. The bio glass seeds were encapsulated with polyvinyl alcohol, before being activated and used in the study. The bio glass seeds were introduced into the breast phantom, along with radio chromium films for a period of 2 hours. After the exposure time, radio chromium films were removed from phantom and digitized for analysis in ImageDIG 2.0 program, which quantifies the intensity of RGB (Red, Green, Blue). The dose calculation was evaluated by Monte Carlo technique. Experimental and theoretical data were used to calibrate the dose distribution. The results were plotted on graphs and dose iso curves were obtained. As conclusion it is possible to perform dosimetry in Ho-166 seed brachytherapy using radio chromium films, limited to a short exposure time and small activity. (author)

  14. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  15. Improving the efficiency of image guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Otter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy is an essential component of the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancers. It enables the dose to the tumor to be boosted whilst allowing relative sparing of the normal tissues. Traditionally, cervical brachytherapy was prescribed to point A but since the GEC-ESTRO guidelines were published in 2005, there has been a move towards prescribing the dose to a 3D volume. Image guided brachytherapy has been shown to reduce local recurrence, and improve survival and is optimally predicated on magnetic resonance imaging. Radiological studies, patient workflow, operative parameters, and intensive therapy planning can represent a challenge to clinical resources. This article explores the ways, in which 3D conformal brachytherapy can be implemented and draws findings from recent literature and a well-developed hospital practice in order to suggest ways to improve the efficiency and efficacy of a brachytherapy service. Finally, we discuss relatively underexploited translational research opportunities.

  16. Establishing High-Quality Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Phantom Simulator Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaker, Nikhil G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Albert, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Banner Health, Loveland/Greeley, Colorado (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Pugh, Thomas J.; Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bruno, Teresa L. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Prestidge, Bradley R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Crook, Juanita M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Cox, Brett W.; Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, Illinois (United States); Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Center, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To design and implement a unique training program that uses a phantom-based simulator to teach the process of prostate brachytherapy (PB) quality assurance and improve the quality of education. Methods and Materials: Trainees in our simulator program were practicing radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, and fellows of the American Brachytherapy Society. The program emphasized 6 core areas of quality assurance: patient selection, simulation, treatment planning, implant technique, treatment evaluation, and outcome assessment. Using the Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) preoperative treatment planning technique, trainees implanted their ultrasound phantoms with dummy seeds (ie, seeds with no activity). Pre- and postimplant dosimetric parameters were compared and correlated using regression analysis. Results: Thirty-one trainees successfully completed the simulator program during the period under study. The mean phantom prostate size, number of seeds used, and total activity were generally consistent between trainees. All trainees met the V100 >95% objective both before and after implantation. Regardless of the initial volume of the prostate phantom, trainees' ability to cover the target volume with at least 100% of the dose (V100) was not compromised (R=0.99 pre- and postimplant). However, the V150 had lower concordance (R=0.37) and may better reflect heterogeneity control of the implant process. Conclusions: Analysis of implants from this phantom-based simulator shows a high degree of consistency between trainees and uniformly high-quality implants with respect to parameters used in clinical practice. This training program provides a valuable educational opportunity that improves the quality of PB training and likely accelerates the learning curve inherent in PB. Prostate phantom implantation can be a valuable first step in the acquisition of the required skills to safely perform PB.

  17. In vivo dose verification method in catheter based high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaselskė, Evelina; Adlienė, Diana; Rudžianskas, Viktoras; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis; Inčiūra, Arturas

    2017-12-01

    In vivo dosimetry is a powerful tool for dose verification in radiotherapy. Its application in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is usually limited to the estimation of gross errors, due to inability of the dosimetry system/ method to record non-uniform dose distribution in steep dose gradient fields close to the radioactive source. In vivo dose verification in interstitial catheter based HDR brachytherapy is crucial since the treatment is performed inserting radioactive source at the certain positions within the catheters that are pre-implanted into the tumour. We propose in vivo dose verification method for this type of brachytherapy treatment which is based on the comparison between experimentally measured and theoretical dose values calculated at well-defined locations corresponding dosemeter positions in the catheter. Dose measurements were performed using TLD 100-H rods (6 mm long, 1 mm diameter) inserted in a certain sequences into additionally pre-implanted dosimetry catheter. The adjustment of dosemeter positioning in the catheter was performed using reconstructed CT scans of patient with pre-implanted catheters. Doses to three Head&Neck and one Breast cancer patient have been measured during several randomly selected treatment fractions. It was found that the average experimental dose error varied from 4.02% to 12.93% during independent in vivo dosimetry control measurements for selected Head&Neck cancer patients and from 7.17% to 8.63% - for Breast cancer patient. Average experimental dose error was below the AAPM recommended margin of 20% and did not exceed the measurement uncertainty of 17.87% estimated for this type of dosemeters. Tendency of slightly increasing average dose error was observed in every following treatment fraction of the same patient. It was linked to the changes of theoretically estimated dosemeter positions due to the possible patient's organ movement between different treatment fractions, since catheter reconstruction was

  18. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwang21@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion [Department of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Pan, Li [Siemens Healthcare USA, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seethamraju, Ravi T. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Dumoulin, Charles L. [Radiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  19. An ultrasound image navigation robotic prostate brachytherapy system based on US to MRI deformable image registration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihui; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Ranlu; Yang, Yunpeng; Liang, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an ultrasound image navigation robotic prostate brachytherapy system. It uses a 2D ultrasound (US) probe rigidly fixed to a robotic needle insertion mechanism. Combined with the US probe registration and image registration, this system will help to navigate the prostate brachytherapy to increase the inserting accuracy. The novelty of the system is that after the US probe registration using an improved iterative closest point (ICP) registration method, the initial registration for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US image can be completely automatically. Moreover, a deformable registration method based on statistical measurement was proposed to register US to MRI images intra-operatively. The 6-degree of freedom (6-DOF) of robot and ultrasound probe are calibrated together with an accuracy of 0.9mm, allowing the needles to be precisely inserted to the seed targets after the image registration. Experiments were conducted by using US/MRI images, capturing from patients. Results showed that the accuracies of probe registration and US-MRI registration were: 0.44±0.12mm and 2.30±0.41mm, respectively. With the help of this robotic system, the accuracy and the costing of time for prostate brachytherapy will greatly improve.

  20. SU-F-T-55: Reproducibility of Interstitial HDR Brachytherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Ellis, R; Traughber, B; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating gynecological cancers with interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires precise reconstruction of catheter positions to obtain accurate dosimetric plans. In this study, we investigated the degree of reproducibility of dosimetric plans for Syed HDR brachytherapy. Methods: We randomly selected five patients having cervix-vaginal cancer who were recently treated in our clinic with interstitial HDR brachytherapy with a prescription dose of 25–30 Gy in five fractions. Interstitial needles/catheters were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and intra-operative 3T MRI scan was performed to confirm the desired catheter placement for adequate target volume coverage. A CT scan was performed and fused with the MRI for delineating high-risk CTV (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR-CTV) and OARs. HDR treatment plans were generated using Oncentra planning software. A single plan was used for all five fractions of treatment for each patient. For this study, we took the original clinical plan and removed all the reconstructed catheters from the plan keeping the original contours unchanged. Then, we manually reconstructed all the catheters and entered the same dwell time from the first original clinical plan. The dosimetric parameters studied were: D90 for HR-CTV and IR-CV, and D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid and bowel. Results: The mean of absolute differences in dosimetric coverage (D90) were (range): 1.3% (1.0–2.0%) and 2.0% (0.9–3.6%) for HR-CTV and IR-CTV, respectively. In case of OARs, the mean of absolute variations in D2cc were (range): 4.7% (0.7–8.9%) for bladder, 1.60% (0.3–3.2%) for rectum, 1.6% (0–3.9%) for sigmoid, and 1.8% (0–5.1%) for bowel. Conclusion: Overall, the reproducibility of interstitial HDR plans was within clinically acceptable limit. Observed maximum variation in D2cc for bladder. If number of catchers and dwell points were relatively low or any one catheter was heavily loaded, then reproducibility of the plan

  1. American Brachytherapy Society consensus report for accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Arthur, Douglas; Shaitelman, Simona; Polgár, Csaba; Todor, Dorin; Zoberi, Imran; Kamrava, Mitchell; Major, Tibor; Yashar, Catheryn; Wazer, David E

    To develop a consensus report for the quality practice of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB). The American Brachytherapy Society Board appointed an expert panel with clinical and research experience with breast brachytherapy to provide guidance for the current practice of IMB. This report is based on a comprehensive literature review with emphasis on randomized data and expertise of the panel. Randomized trials have demonstrated equivalent efficacy of APBI using IMB compared with whole breast irradiation for select patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several techniques for placement of interstitial catheters are described, and importance of three-dimensional planning with appropriate optimization is reviewed. Optimal target definition is outlined. Commonly used dosing schemas include 50 Gy delivered in pulses of 0.6-0.8 Gy/h using pulsed-dose-rate technique and 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 32 Gy in eight fractions, or 30 Gy in seven fractions using high-dose-rate technique. Potential toxicities and strategies for toxicity avoidance are described in detail. Dosimetric constraints include limiting whole breast volume that receives ≥50% of prescription dose to skin dose to ≤100% of prescription dose (≤60-70% preferred), chest wall dose to ≤125% of prescription dose, Dose Homogeneity Index to >0.75 (>0.85 preferred), V150 Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. System for radiation delivery applied to brachytherapy using a polymeric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa Junior, Iorque L.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). PCA 1 - Anexo Engenharia]. E-mail: iorque@eng-nucl.mest.ufmg.br; campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    This work describes a system for radiation delivery applied to brachytherapy using radioactive macroaggregate produced by sol-gel route incorporating Samarium-153 loaded in a polymeric vehicle. The polymer Poly Vinyl Alcohol, PVA, was selected as vehicle. It presents high biocompatibility and is suitable for low temperature handling. The PVA is the water-soluble synthetic resin more produced in the world being used in several applications including controlled drugs delivery. The developed polymeric delivery system is presented as flexible flat surface with a load of macroaggregate in the form of micro seeds or dispersed dust. Such device fits in various brachytherapy applications, especially in interstitial or intracavitary implants and intraoperative radiation therapy. These systems provide mechanical sustainment for the radioactive macroaggregates in well defined spatial distribution improving the conformation of the absorbed dose in the organ or tumor and it can be set up during surgery quickly and safely, reducing the radiation exposition of the medical crew. The degradation time in physiological solution are presented. (author)

  3. SU-E-T-635: Process Mapping of Eye Plaque Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, J; Kim, Y [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To apply a risk-based assessment and analysis technique (AAPM TG 100) to eye plaque brachytherapy treatment of ocular melanoma. Methods: The role and responsibility of personnel involved in the eye plaque brachytherapy is defined for retinal specialist, radiation oncologist, nurse and medical physicist. The entire procedure was examined carefully. First, major processes were identified and then details for each major process were followed. Results: Seventy-one total potential modes were identified. Eight major processes (corresponding detailed number of modes) are patient consultation (2 modes), pretreatment tumor localization (11), treatment planning (13), seed ordering and calibration (10), eye plaque assembly (10), implantation (11), removal (11), and deconstruction (3), respectively. Half of the total modes (36 modes) are related to physicist while physicist is not involved in processes such as during the actual procedure of suturing and removing the plaque. Conclusion: Not only can failure modes arise from physicist-related procedures such as treatment planning and source activity calibration, but it can also exist in more clinical procedures by other medical staff. The improvement of the accurate communication for non-physicist-related clinical procedures could potentially be an approach to prevent human errors. More rigorous physics double check would reduce the error for physicist-related procedures. Eventually, based on this detailed process map, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) will identify top tiers of modes by ranking all possible modes with risk priority number (RPN). For those high risk modes, fault tree analysis (FTA) will provide possible preventive action plans.

  4. Dose volume uniformity index: a simple tool for treatment plan evaluation in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Prabhakar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In radiotherapy treatment planning, dose homogeneity inside the target volume plays a significant role in the final treatment outcome. Especially in brachytherapy where there is a steep dose gradient in the dose distribution inside the target volume, comparing the plans based on the dose homogeneity helps in assessing the high dose volume inside the final treatment plan. In brachytherapy, the dose inhomogeneity inside the target volume depends on many factors such as the type of sources, placement of these radioactive sources, distance between the applicators/implanttubes, dwell time of the source, etc. In this study, a simple index, the dose volume uniformity index (DVUI, has been proposed to study the dose homogeneity inside the target volume. This index gives the total dose volume inhomogeneity inside a given prescription isoline.Material and methods: To demonstrate the proposed DVUI in this study, a single plane implant (breast: 6 catheters, a double plane implant (breast: 9 catheters and a tongue implant (5 catheters were selected. The catheters were reconstructed from the CT image datasets in the Plato treatment planning system. The doses for the single, double and tongue implants were prescribed to the reference dose rate as per the Paris technique. DVUI was computed from the cumulative dose volume histogram.Results: For a volume receiving a uniform dose inside the prescription isoline, the DVUI is 1. Any value of DVUI > 1 shows the presence of a relatively high dose volume inside the prescription isoline. In addition to the concept of DVUI, a simple conformality index, the dose volume conformality index (DVCI, has also been proposed in this study based on the DVUI.Conclusion: The DVUI and the proposed DVCI in this study provide an easy way of comparing the rival plans in brachytherapy.

  5. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  6. seed oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wara

    ABSTRACT. Neem seed oil from the neem tree (Azadiracta indica) finds wide usage one of which is its utilization for cosmetics particularly soap products. The chemical analysis of seed oil was carried out using the methods reported by AOAC (1998), Akpan et al., (2006) and Bassir, (1978) which revealed that it had.

  7. [Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P; Martinet, L; Perrot, P; Baraer, F; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J-Y; Malard, O; Ferron, C; Dreno, B

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medicosurgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6h). The median dose was 20Gy (range, 15-40Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early - within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6cm (p=0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Early perioperative LDR brachytherapy delivering 20Gy at 5mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. 2009 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. TU-AB-201-10: Novel Conformal Skin Brachytherapy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C; Johnson, D; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Rasmussen, K; Jung, J [East Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel conformal skin brachytherapy (CSBT) device was developed to provide patient specific treatment for small inoperable lesions and irregular surfaces that are not good candidates for electron external beam, e.g. eyelids, nose, lips, ears, etc. Methods: A prototype was built and tested using radioactive seeds spaced by 1.5 mm attached to a 3D printed template. Seeds were allowed to move independently at treatment surface to conform to target geometry. Beta-emitter Praseodymium-142 (half-life: 19.12 h, average beta energy: 809 keV) and Iodine-125 Model 6711 (half-life: 59.4 days, average gamma energy: 28 keV) seeds were used to test the feasibility of the device in solid water phantom for different prescription depths and surface areas. Percent depth doses and dose profiles were analyzed. MCNPX2.6 Monte Carlo Simulation and Gafchromic EBT3 film measurements were performed for a single Pr-142 seed. Treatment with nineteen I-125 seeds was planned in BrachyVision and measured experimentally for a total dose of 500 cGy at 5.0 mm depth. Results: For a single Pr-142 seed, dose was 500.0 cGy at surface and 17.4 cGy at 5.00 mm. BrachyVision planned and film doses for I-125 seed matrix were 500 cGy and 473.5 cGy at 5 mm depth and 171.0 cGy and 201.0 cGy at 10 mm depth. Total covered surface area for Pr-142 and I-125 were 2.35 mm{sup 2} and 88.24 mm{sup 2} respectively. Profile dose fall-off showed to be very conformal to contact area with 50% of the total surface dose from a single Pr-142 and array of I-125 seeds being deposited at 0.72 mm and 0.65 mm respectively from the central axis. Conclusion: CSBT device provides a high conformal dose to small surfaces. BrachyVision can be used to predict clinical dose distributions for multiple seeds matrix. Different radioactive seeds can be used to suit prescription depth and treatment area.

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy as an alternative to plaque brachytherapy in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldebawy, Eman; Patrocinio, Horacio; Evans, Michael; Hashem, Rania; Nelson, Sylvie; Sidi, Rubina; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-12-01

    Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role for selected patients with retinoblastoma. Newer non-invasive radiotherapy techniques such as stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCR) that uses highly accurate positioning to deliver treatment with small beams may be an interesting alternative to brachytherapy. We report a case treated with SCR and compare the dosimetry with that achievable with brachytherapy. With advantages and disadvantages to both, SCR should more often be considered in the management of RB because of the more homogeneous dose within the target volume and similar or lower doses to surrounding normal tissues.

  10. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  11. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Majdoub, Faycal; Neudorfer, Clemens; Maarouf, Mohammad [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias; Deckert, Martina [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Hellmich, Martin [University Hospital of Cologne, Institute of Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, Cologne (Germany); Buehrle, Christian [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the treatment of oligodendroglial brain tumors with interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) using {sup 125}iodine seeds ({sup 125}I) and analyzed prognostic factors. Between January 1991 and December 2010, 63 patients (median age 43.3 years, range 20.8-63.4 years) suffering from oligodendroglial brain tumors were treated with {sup 125}I IBT either as primary, adjuvantly after incomplete resection, or as salvage therapy after tumor recurrence. Possible prognostic factors influencing disease progression and survival were retrospectively investigated. The actuarial 2-, 5-, and 10-year overall and progression-free survival rates after IBT for WHO II tumors were 96.9, 96.9, 89.8 % and 96.9, 93.8, 47.3 %; for WHO III tumors 90.3, 77, 54.9 % and 80.6, 58.4, 45.9 %, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete remission in 2 patients, partial remission in 13 patients, stable disease in 17 patients and tumor progression in 31 patients. Median time to progression for WHO II tumors was 87.6 months and for WHO III tumors 27.8 months. Neurological status improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 20 patients, while 9 patients deteriorated. There was no treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related morbidity was transient in 11 patients. WHO II, KPS ≥ 90 %, frontal location, and tumor surface dose > 50 Gy were associated with increased overall survival (p ≤ 0.05). Oligodendroglioma and frontal location were associated with a prolonged progression-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that IBT achieves local control rates comparable to surgery and radio-/chemotherapy treatment, is minimally invasive, and safe. Due to the low rate of side effects, IBT may represent an attractive option as part of a multimodal treatment schedule, being supplementary to microsurgery or as a salvage therapy after chemotherapy and conventional irradiation. (orig.) [German] Die Behandlung oligodendroglialer Hirntumoren durch die interstitielle Brachytherapie

  12. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Nathan H J; Orio, Peter F; Merrick, Gregory S; Prestidge, Bradley R; Hartford, Alan Charles; Rosenthal, Seth A

    Transperineal permanent brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) has produced practice parameters for LDR prostate brachytherapy. These practice parameters define the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric guidelines, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these parameters can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Long-term control and toxicity with brachytherapy for localized breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitelman, Simona F; Amendola, Beatriz; Khan, Atif; Beriwal, Sushil; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Kim, Leonard H; Cuttino, Laurie

    There has been significant controversy regarding the equivalency of accelerated partial breast irradiation to whole-breast irradiation. With the recent publication of a large, randomized trial comparing these two treatment modalities, an update on the current state of knowledge of brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation, with respect to local control and toxicities, would be useful to practitioners and patients. A systematic literature review was conducted examining articles published between January 2000 and April 2016 on the topics "brachytherapy" and "breast." A total of 67 articles met inclusion criteria, providing outcomes on local tumor control and/or toxicity for breast brachytherapy. Reported 5-year local failure rates were 1.4-6.1% for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) and 0-5.7% for single-entry brachytherapy catheters when delivered to patients with standard selection criteria. Toxicity profiles are acceptable, with cosmetic outcomes comparable to whole-breast irradiation. The reported rates of infection were 0-12%. Symptomatic fat necrosis was found in 0-12% and 0-3.2% of patients treated with MIB and single-entry brachytherapy catheters, respectively. Late Grade ≥3 telangiectasias and fibrosis were reported in 0-8% and 0-9.1% of patients treated with MIB, respectively. These side effects were less common with single-entry brachytherapy catheters (0-2.0% and 0%, respectively). Breast brachytherapy is a treatment technique that provides acceptable rates of local control in select patients, as demonstrated by Level I evidence. The side effect profile of this treatment is well documented and should be shared with patients when considering this treatment modality. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Monte Carol-Based Dosimetry of Beta-Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.K.

    2002-06-25

    Monte Carlo simulations for radiation dosimetry and the experimental verifications of the simulations have been developed for the treatment geometry of intravascular brachytherapy, a form of radionuclide therapy for occluded coronary disease (restenosis). Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, has been used to calculate the radiation dose from the encapsulated array of B-emitting seeds (Sr/Y-source train). Solid water phantoms have been fabricated to measure the dose on the radiochromic films that were exposed to the beta source train for both linear and curved coronary vessel geometries. While the dose difference for the 5-degree curved vessel at the prescription point of f+2.0 mm is within the 10% guideline set by the AAPM, however, the difference increased dramatically to 16.85% for the 10-degree case which requires additional adjustment for the acceptable dosimetry planning. The experimental dose measurements agree well with the simulation results

  15. Seed regulations and local seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.

    2000-01-01

    Seed regulations have been introduced in most countries based on the development of formal seed production. Concerns about seed quality and about the varietal identity of the seeds have commonly led to seed laws. However, formal regulations are often inappropriate for informal seed systems, which

  16. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B., E-mail: anatoly@uow.edu.au [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522 (Australia); Franklin, D. R. [Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney 2007 (Australia); Bucci, J. [St George Hospital Cancer Care Centre, Kogarah 2217 (Australia); Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan 20133 (Italy); Zaider, M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  17. Long-term outcome of magnetic resonance spectroscopic image–directed dose escalation for prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Martin T.; Nasser, Nicola J.; Mathur, Nitin; Cohen, Gil’ad N.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yuen, Jasper; Vargas, Hebert A.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zakian, Kristen L.; Zaider, Marco; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To report the long-term control and toxicity outcomes of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, who underwent low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy with magnetic resonance spectroscopic image (MRSI)–directed dose escalation to intraprostatic regions. METHODS AND MATERIALS Forty-seven consecutive patients between May 2000 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. Each patient underwent a preprocedural MRSI, and MRS-positive voxels suspicious for malignancy were identified. Intraoperative planning was used to determine the optimal seed distribution to deliver a standard prescription dose to the entire prostate, while escalating the dose to MRS-positive voxels to 150% of prescription. Each patient underwent transperineal implantation of radioactive seeds followed by same-day CT for postimplant dosimetry. RESULTS The median prostate D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the prostate) was 125.7% (interquartile range [IQR], 110.3–136.5%) of prescription. The median value for the MRS-positive mean dose was 229.9% (IQR, 200.0–251.9%). Median urethra D30 and rectal D30 values were 142.2% (137.5–168.2%) and 56.1% (40.1–63.4%), respectively. Median followup was 86.4 months (IQR, 49.8–117.6). The 10-year actuarial prostate-specific antigen relapse–free survival was 98% (95% confidence interval, 93–100%). Five patients (11%) experienced late Grade 3 urinary toxicity (e.g., urethral stricture), which improved after operative intervention. Four of these patients had dose-escalated voxels less than 1.0 cm from the urethra. CONCLUSIONS Low-dose-rate brachytherapy with MRSI-directed dose escalation to suspicious intraprostatic regions exhibits excellent long-term biochemical control. Patients with dose-escalated voxels close to the urethra were at higher risk of late urinary stricture. PMID:27009848

  18. SU-E-T-259: Development of a Primary Standard for LDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H; McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Research Council initiated a program in 2012 to develop a primary standard to calibrate I-125 and Pd-103 sources used for LDR brachytherapy and disseminate this through calibration services to Canadian users. This will simplify procedures as Canadian cancer centres currently have to ship instruments to the US. Methods: The standard is based on a commercial version of the wide-angle free air chamber (WAFAC) pioneered by NIST. Significant enhancements were implemented to improve signal-to-noise and measurement reproducibility and eliminate electric field effects. Validation of this ionization chamber was then carried out in a low-energy X -ray beam (∼ 31 keV) where the dose rate had been previously established using the existing NRC primary standard free-air chamber. As a final component of this initial testing, measurements were made with a set of I-125 seeds (with air kerma strength traceable to NIST). Results: Excellent agreement of the two NRC free-air chambers was obtained within the combined standard uncertainty of 0.5 %. However, it was found that the WAFAC response is very sensitive to the beam geometry (distance from the source, diameter of the beam-defining aperture, etc) and Monte Carlo calculations, carried out to evaluate these geometry corrections, have confirmed the experimental results. The results for the seed measurements indicated a precision of better than 1 % is achievable for a reasonable acquisition time and the air kerma strength agreed with the manufacturer (NIST-traceable) value within 2 %. Conclusion: The prototype primary standard for LDR brachytherapy has met accuracy target of 3 % for the determination of air kerma strength. Work is ongoing to refine operation of the device and develop the calibration protocol for clinical users, with an anticipated launch of a calibration service in late 2015.

  19. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R., E-mail: ccg.andreza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  20. A flattening filter for brachytherapy skin irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Haque, Mamoon; Foulkes, Kristie; Jeraj, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Radioactive sources in close contact offer an alternative to superficial radiation in the treatment of skin lesions. A flattening filter was designed for a lead surface applicator to improve the skin dose distribution of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit (Nucletron). At three heights from the opening (10, 15 and 25 mm) of the cylindrical applicator, the 192Ir source can be driven into the centre of the applicator. Thin sheets of lead foil (0.2 mm) were cut into circular shapes and placed in the opening to build a cylindrical cone that acts as a flattening filter. The shape of the cone was optimized in an iterative process using a spreadsheet and the resulting dose distribution under the applicator was determined using radiosensitive film. The use of the filter improved the dose distribution in a plane perpendicular to the beam axis to be within +/-5% of the central axis dose. The present applicator and flattening filter together with an HDR brachytherapy unit offer an alternative for skin irradiation where a superficial unit is not available or will be replaced with a more flexible device. As the depth dose characteristics can be modified using different source-to-surface distances, the dose throughout the patient's skin can be shaped as desired by the radiation oncologist using a compensator design type approach.

  1. TU-AB-BRC-08: Egs-brachy, a Fast and Versatile Monte Carlo Code for Brachytherapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberland, M; Taylor, R; Rogers, D; Thomson, R [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce egs-brachy, a new, fast, and versatile Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy applications. Methods: egs-brachy is an EGSnrc user-code based on the EGSnrc C++ class library (egs++). Complex phantom, applicator, and source model geometries are built using the egs++ geometry module. egs-brachy uses a tracklength estimator to score collision kerma in voxels. Interaction, spectrum, energy fluence, and phase space scoring are also implemented. Phase space sources and particle recycling may be used to improve simulation efficiency. HDR treatments (e.g. stepping source through dwell positions) can be simulated. Standard brachytherapy seeds, as well as electron and miniature x-ray tube sources are fully modelled. Variance reduction techniques for electron source simulations are implemented (Bremsstrahlung cross section enhancement, uniform Bremsstrahlung splitting, and Russian Roulette). TG-43 parameters of seeds are computed and compared to published values. Example simulations of various treatments are carried out on a single 2.5 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2680 v3 processor core. Results: TG-43 parameters calculated with egs-brachy show excellent agreement with published values. Using a phase space source, 2% average statistical uncertainty in the PTV ((2mm){sup 3} voxels) can be achieved in 10 s for 100 {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd seeds in a 36.2 cm{sup 3} prostate PTV, 31 s for 64 {sup 103}Pd seeds in a 64 cm{sup 3} breast PTV, and 56 s for a miniature x-ray tube in a 27 cm{sup 3} breast PTV. Comparable uncertainty is reached in 12 s in a (1 mm){sup 3} water voxel 5 mm away from a COMS 16mm eye plaque with 13 {sup 103}Pd seeds. Conclusion: The accuracy of egs-brachy has been demonstrated through benchmarking calculations. Calculation times are sufficiently fast to allow full MC simulations for routine treatment planning for diverse brachytherapy treatments (LDR, HDR, miniature x-ray tube). egs-brachy will be available as free and open-source software to the

  2. Metallic artifact mitigation and organ-constrained tissue assignment for Monte Carlo calculations of permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Miksys, N.; Thomson, R. M., E-mail: rthomson@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Furutani, K. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate methods of generating accurate patient-specific computational phantoms for the Monte Carlo calculation of lung brachytherapy patient dose distributions. Methods: Four metallic artifact mitigation methods are applied to six lung brachytherapy patient computed tomography (CT) images: simple threshold replacement (STR) identifies high CT values in the vicinity of the seeds and replaces them with estimated true values; fan beam virtual sinogram replaces artifact-affected values in a virtual sinogram and performs a filtered back-projection to generate a corrected image; 3D median filter replaces voxel values that differ from the median value in a region of interest surrounding the voxel and then applies a second filter to reduce noise; and a combination of fan beam virtual sinogram and STR. Computational phantoms are generated from artifact-corrected and uncorrected images using several tissue assignment schemes: both lung-contour constrained and unconstrained global schemes are considered. Voxel mass densities are assigned based on voxel CT number or using the nominal tissue mass densities. Dose distributions are calculated using the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose for{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds and are compared directly as well as through dose volume histograms and dose metrics for target volumes surrounding surgical sutures. Results: Metallic artifact mitigation techniques vary in ability to reduce artifacts while preserving tissue detail. Notably, images corrected with the fan beam virtual sinogram have reduced artifacts but residual artifacts near sources remain requiring additional use of STR; the 3D median filter removes artifacts but simultaneously removes detail in lung and bone. Doses vary considerably between computational phantoms with the largest differences arising from artifact-affected voxels assigned to bone in the vicinity of the seeds. Consequently, when metallic artifact reduction and constrained tissue

  3. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  4. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  5. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  6. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  7. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Doggett; James Brazil; Marketa Limova; Leah Press; Sidney Smith; Jeremy Peck

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX), an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California). All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up...

  8. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya(®) Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy.

  9. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  10. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Doggett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX, an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California. All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up of 23.7 months, the local recurrence rate is 12.5%. The single lesion that failed was not debulked surgically prior to electronic brachytherapy. Conclusions : To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the use of radiation therapy as curative primary treatment for AFX. No contraindication to the use of radiations is found in the literature, with surgery being the sole treatment for AFX noted. Our recurrence rate is 0% for debulked lesions. Risk of recurrence is mitigated with surgical debulking prior to brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy appears to be a safe and effective treatment for debulked AFX. Multiple excisions, skin grafting, and wound care can be avoided in elderly patients by the use of electronic brachytherapy.

  11. MO-B-BRC-01: Introduction [Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, J. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  12. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  13. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose. PMID:26290399

  14. Neither high-dose nor low-dose brachytherapy increases flap morbidity in salvage treatment of recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Henderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While brachytherapy is often used concurrently with flap reconstruction following surgical ablation for head and neck cancer, it remains unclear whether it increases morbidity in the particularly high risk subset of patients undergoing salvage treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer (RH&NC. Material and methods : A retrospective chart review was undertaken that evaluated patients with RH&NC who underwent flap coverage after surgical re-resection and concomitant brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was flap viability, and the secondary endpoints were flap and recipient site complications. Results : In the 23 subjects included in series, flap viability and skin graft take was 100%. Overall recipient site complication rate was 34.8%, high-dose radiation (HDR group 50%, and low-dose radiation (LDR group 29.4%. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups. Conclusions : In patients who undergo flap reconstruction and immediate postoperative radiotherapy following salvage procedures for RH&NC, flap coverage of defects in combination with brachytherapy remains a safe and effective means of providing stable soft tissue coverage.

  15. SU-F-T-48: Clinical Implementation of Brachytherapy Planning System for COMS Eye Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C; Islam, M; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To commission the Brachytherapy Planning (BP) system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) for the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaques by evaluating dose differences against original plans from Nucletron Planning System (NPS). Methods: NPS system is the primary planning software for COMS-plaques at our facility; however, Brachytherapy Planning 11.0.47 (Varian Medical Systems) is used for secondary check and for seed placement configurations not originally commissioned. Dose comparisons of BP and NPS plans were performed for prescription of 8500 cGy at 5 mm depth and doses to normal structures: opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk and lens. Plans were calculated for Iodine-125 seeds (OncoSeeds, Model 6711) using COMS-plaques of 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 mm diameters. An in-house program based on inverse-square was utilized to calculate point doses for comparison as well. Results: The highest dose difference between BP and NPS was 3.7% for the prescription point for all plaques. Doses for BP were higher than doses reported by NPS for all points. The largest percent differences for apex, opposite retina, inner sclera, macula, optic disk, and lens were 3.2%, 0.9%, 13.5%, 20.5%, 15.7% and 2.2%, respectively. The dose calculated by the in-house program was 1.3% higher at the prescription point, and were as high as 42.1%, for points away from the plaque (i.e. opposite retina) when compared to NPS. Conclusion: Doses to the tumor, lens, retina, and optic nerve are paramount for a successful treatment and vision preservation. Both systems are based on TG-43 calculations and assume water medium tissue homogeneity (ρe=1, water medium). Variations seen may result from the different task group versions and/or mathematical algorithms of the software. BP was commissioned to serve as a backup system and it also enables dose calculation in cases where seeds don’t follow conventional placement configuration.

  16. Development and evaluation of an automatic interstitial catheter digitization tool for adaptive high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dise, Joseph; Liang, Xing; Scheuermann, Joshua; Anamalayil, Shibu; Mesina, Carmen; Lin, Lilie L; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To develop and evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm for use in adaptive high-dose-rate brachytherapy for gynecologic cancers using the Syed-Neblett template. We developed an automatic catheter digitization tool, which uses a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. Seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The region growing was constrained by a spline model of the catheters, which prevents intercatheter crossover or incorrect digitization due to air pockets. Plan reoptimization was performed on successive day computed tomography scans using dwell positions for the Day 1 computed tomography. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in five fractions, twice daily, and more than 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatically and manually digitized plans. The region growing algorithm was able to successfully digitize all catheters. The mean difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. No significant difference was found in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. The mean D90% of the clinical target volume over all 3 days of treatment of the manual vs. reoptimized automatic plans was 94.3 ± 6.58% and 92.32 ± 8.34%, respectively (p = 0.50). The algorithm discussed in this article is the first developed for adaptive interstitial brachytherapy for a large number of catheters (14 on average). The algorithm has future potential in digitization quality assurance. A region growing algorithm was developed to automatically digitize interstitial catheters in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This automatic digitization tool was shown to be accurate compared with manual digitization. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society

  17. Gracilis muscle interposition with primary rectal without urethral repair for moderate sized rectourethral fistula caused by brachytherapy for prostate cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalavicius, Narimantas Evaldas; Lunevicius, Raimundas; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Poskus, Tomas; Ulys, Albertas

    2012-09-25

    There is a 0.16% chance of a rectourethral fistula after prostate brachytherapy monotherapy using Palladium-103 or Iodine-125 implants. We present an unusual case report of a rectourethral fistula following brachyradiotherapy monotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma. It was also associated with unusual management of the fistula. A 58-year-old Caucasian man underwent brachyradiotherapy monotherapy as definitive treatment for verified intracapsular prostate adenocarcinoma receiving 56 Iodine-125 implants using a transrectal ultrasound-guided technique. The patient started to complain of severe perineal pain and mild rectal bleeding 15Â months after brachyradiotherapy. A biopsy of mucosa of his anterior rectal wall was performed. A moderate sized rectourethral fistula was confirmed 23Â months after implantation of Iodine-125 seeds. Laparoscopic sigmoidostomy and suprapubic cystostomy were then performed. Long-term cortisone applications in combination with 30 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and antibacterial therapies were initiated due to necrotic infection. A gracilis muscle interposition to create a partition between the patient's rectum and urethra in conjunction with primary rectal repair but without urethral repair were performed 6 months later. The 3cm rectal defect was repaired via a 3cm-long horizontal perineal incision. The 1.5cm urethral defect just below the prostate was not repaired. The patient underwent an optic internal urethrotomy 3Â months later for a 1.5cm-long urethral stricture. Several planned preventive urethral buginages were performed to avoid urethral stricture recurrence. At 12Â months postoperatively, there were no signs of a fistula and cancer recurrence. He now has a normal voiding and anal continence. Severe rectal pain, bleeding, and local anterior necrotic proctitis are predictors of a rectourethral fistula. Urinary and fecal diversion is the first-step operation. Gracilis muscle interposition in conjunction with primary

  18. Gracilis muscle interposition with primary rectal without urethral repair for moderate sized rectourethral fistula caused by brachytherapy for prostate cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samalavicius Narimantas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is a 0.16% chance of a rectourethral fistula after prostate brachytherapy monotherapy using Palladium-103 or Iodine-125 implants. We present an unusual case report of a rectourethral fistula following brachyradiotherapy monotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma. It was also associated with unusual management of the fistula. Case presentation A 58-year-old Caucasian man underwent brachyradiotherapy monotherapy as definitive treatment for verified intracapsular prostate adenocarcinoma receiving 56 Iodine-125 implants using a transrectal ultrasound-guided technique. The patient started to complain of severe perineal pain and mild rectal bleeding 15Â months after brachyradiotherapy. A biopsy of mucosa of his anterior rectal wall was performed. A moderate sized rectourethral fistula was confirmed 23Â months after implantation of Iodine-125 seeds. Laparoscopic sigmoidostomy and suprapubic cystostomy were then performed. Long-term cortisone applications in combination with 30 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and antibacterial therapies were initiated due to necrotic infection. A gracilis muscle interposition to create a partition between the patient's rectum and urethra in conjunction with primary rectal repair but without urethral repair were performed 6 months later. The 3cm rectal defect was repaired via a 3cm-long horizontal perineal incision. The 1.5cm urethral defect just below the prostate was not repaired. The patient underwent an optic internal urethrotomy 3Â months later for a 1.5cm-long urethral stricture. Several planned preventive urethral buginages were performed to avoid urethral stricture recurrence. At 12Â months postoperatively, there were no signs of a fistula and cancer recurrence. He now has a normal voiding and anal continence. Conclusion Severe rectal pain, bleeding, and local anterior necrotic proctitis are predictors of a rectourethral fistula. Urinary and fecal diversion is the first

  19. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  20. 78 FR 41125 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting AGENCY...'s permanent implant brachytherapy program. This interim policy affects NRC licensees that are authorized to perform permanent implant brachytherapy. DATES: This policy revision is effective July 9, 2013...

  1. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after the...

  2. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  3. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  4. Fast dose optimization for rotating shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung; Wu, Xiaodong; Dadkhah, Hossein; Yi, Jirong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Xu, Weiyu

    2017-10-01

    To provide a fast computational method, based on the proximal graph solver (POGS) - A convex optimization solver using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), for calculating an optimal treatment plan in rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). RSBT treatment planning has more degrees of freedom than conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy due to the addition of emission direction, and this necessitates a fast optimization technique to enable clinical usage. The multi-helix RSBT (H-RSBT) delivery technique was investigated for five representative cervical cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for all patients using the POGS method and the commercially available solver IBM ILOG CPLEX. The rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), and HR-CTV boundary were the structures included in our optimization, which applied an asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control. Dose calculation resolution was 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 for all cases. The H-RSBT applicator had 6 helices, with 33.3 mm of translation along the applicator per helical rotation and 1.7 mm spacing between dwell positions, yielding 17.5° emission angle spacing per 5 mm along the applicator. For each patient, HR-CTV D90 , HR-CTV D100 , rectum D2cc , sigmoid D2cc , and bladder D2cc matched within 1% for CPLEX and POGS methods. Also, similar EQD2 values between CPLEX and POGS methods were obtained. POGS was around 18 times faster than CPLEX. For all patients, total optimization times were 32.1-65.4 s for CPLEX and 2.1-3.9 s for POGS. POGS reduced treatment plan optimization time approximately 18 times for RSBT with similar HR-CTV D90 , organ at risk (OAR) D2cc values, and EQD2 values compared to CPLEX, which is significant progress toward clinical translation of RSBT. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Complementary method of analyzing the quality of the implant I-125 seeds for prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound imaging post-implant; Metodo complementario de analisis de la calidad del implante de semillas de I-125 para braquiterapia de prostata mediante la adquisicion de imagenes ecograficas post-implante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Dominguez, M.; Carrasco Herrera, M.; Baeza Trujillo, M.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose a complementary method based on Longitudinal mode ultrasound images acquired the same day of surgery, at the end of the implant. This option will allow us to evaluate the dosimetry end of treatment with the patient in the same position he was planning and to the rectum and bladder just as full. This will permit the identification of bodies and the seeds of interest more easily and will have a reference with which to compare one month later, when the CT images can also detect whether there has been some migration.

  6. A modified dose calculation formalism for electronic brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWerd, Larry A; Culberson, Wesley S; Micka, John A; Simiele, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    To propose a modification of the current dose calculation formalism introduced in the Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. Electronic brachytherapy sources are miniature x-ray tubes emitting low energies with high-dose-rates. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has introduced a new primary air-kerma rate standard for one of these sources, in contrast to air-kerma strength. A modification of the TG-43 protocol for calculation of dose-rate distributions around electronic brachytherapy sources including sources in an applicator is presented. It cannot be assumed that the perturbations from sources in an applicator are negligible, and thus, the applicator is incorporated in the formalism. The modified protocol mimics the fundamental methodology of the original TG-43 formalism, but now incorporates the new NIST-traceable source strength metric of air-kerma rate at 50 cm and introduces a new subscript, i, to denote the presence of an applicator used in treatment delivery. Applications of electronic brachytherapy sources for surface brachytherapy are not addressed in this Technical Note since they are well documented in other publications. A modification of the AAPM TG-43 protocol has been developed to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. The modified TG-43 formalism allows dose calculations to be performed using a new NIST-traceable source strength metric and introduces the concept of applicator-specific formalism parameters denoted with subscript, i. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Skin surface brachytherapy: A survey of contemporary practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhacheva, Anna O; Devlin, Phillip M; Shirvani, Shervin M; Barker, Christopher A; Beron, Phillip; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Doggett, Stephen W; Hochman, Lawrence; Hsu, Charles; Kasper, Michael; Keisch, Martin; Mutyala, Subhakar; Prestidge, Bradley; Rodriguez Villalba, Silvia; Shukla, Vershalee; Sundararaman, Srinath; Kamrava, Mitchell

    The aim of this study was to define current patterns of care among radiation oncologists who use skin surface brachytherapy for the treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in academic and community settings. A 30-question electronic survey was administered to clinician members of the American Brachytherapy Society. The respondents were asked to provide details regarding their clinical practice and their approach to skin surface brachytherapy. A total of 16 surveys were returned. Among the respondents, aggregate experience varied from 8 to 1800 cases. Most preferred brachytherapy over external beam radiation because of shorter treatment course, conformality of treatment for irregular or curved targets, and shallow dose deposition. Of the total, 60% of respondents routinely estimated lesion depth via ultrasound before initiating treatment. Treatment margin on gross disease varied widely (range, 3-15 mm; median, 5 mm). Hypofractionation was the preferred dose schedule. Prescribed doses ranged from 30 Gy in five fractions to 64 Gy in 32 fractions (EQD2, 40 Gy-65 Gy). There was a tendency to increase the number of fractions for larger targets, although some used the same fractionation regardless of anatomic location or lesion size. There was no consensus on dosimetric constraints, and some respondents reported cases of severe toxicity, particularly when treating the pretibial skin. This pattern of care study suggests that skin brachytherapy can be a convenient and safe tool for treatment of BCC and cSCC. Prospective trials and the development of expert consensus guidelines would be beneficial for optimizing skin surface brachytherapy and reducing practice variation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, CHUQ Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D

  9. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus E.; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction...... of the dosimeter position. Instead, the treatment is judged based on dose rate comparisons between measurements and calculations of the most viable dosimeter position provided by the AEDA in a data driven approach. As a result, the AEDA compensates for false error cases related to systematic effects...... of the dosimeter position reconstruction. Given its nearly exclusive dependence on stable dosimeter positioning, the AEDA allows for a substantially simplified and time efficient real-time in vivo BT dosimetry implementation. Methods:In the event of a measured potential treatment error, the AEDA proposes the most...

  10. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  11. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  12. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  13. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Melhus, Christopher S; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J

    2011-03-01

    AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Agreement using the gamma-index test was > or = 99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  14. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of radionuclide-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Chadha, Manjeet; Mourtada, Firas; Demanes, D Jeffrey

    Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy method in which radionuclide sources are used to deliver a radiation dose at a distance of up to a few centimeters by surface, intracavitary, intraluminal, or interstitial application. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclides for brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses radionuclides such as iridium-192 at dose rates of 20 cGy per minute (12 Gy per hour) or more to a designated target point or volume. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is indicated for treating malignant or benign tumors where the treatment volume or targeted points are defined and accessible. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A study of optimization techniques in HDR brachytherapy for the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ghana Shyam

    Several studies carried out thus far are in favor of dose escalation to the prostate gland to have better local control of the disease. But optimal way of delivery of higher doses of radiation therapy to the prostate without hurting neighboring critical structures is still debatable. In this study, we proposed that real time high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with highly efficient and effective optimization could be an alternative means of precise delivery of such higher doses. This approach of delivery eliminates the critical issues such as treatment setup uncertainties and target localization as in external beam radiation therapy. Likewise, dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy is not influenced by organ edema and potential source migration as in permanent interstitial implants. Moreover, the recent report of radiobiological parameters further strengthen the argument of using hypofractionated HDR brachytherapy for the management of prostate cancer. Firstly, we studied the essential features and requirements of real time HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. Automating catheter reconstruction with fast editing tools, fast yet accurate dose engine, robust and fast optimization and evaluation engine are some of the essential requirements for such procedures. Moreover, in most of the cases we performed, treatment plan optimization took significant amount of time of overall procedure. So, making treatment plan optimization automatic or semi-automatic with sufficient speed and accuracy was the goal of the remaining part of the project. Secondly, we studied the role of optimization function and constraints in overall quality of optimized plan. We have studied the gradient based deterministic algorithm with dose volume histogram (DVH) and more conventional variance based objective functions for optimization. In this optimization strategy, the relative weight of particular objective in aggregate objective function signifies its importance with respect to other objectives

  16. Optimization in Radiation Therapy: Applications in Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, Philip David

    Over 50% of cancer patients require radiation therapy (RT). RT is an optimization problem requiring maximization of the radiation damage to the tumor while minimizing the harm to the healthy tissues. This dissertation focuses on two main RT optimization problems: 1) brachytherapy and 2) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The brachytherapy research involved solving a non-convex optimization problem by creating an open-source genetic algorithm optimizer to determine the optimal radioactive seed distribution for a given set of patient volumes and constraints, both dosimetric- and implant-based. The optimizer was tested for a set of 45 prostate brachytherapy patients. While all solutions met the clinical standards, they also benchmarked favorably with those generated by a standard commercial solver. Compared to its compatriot, the salient features of the generated solutions were: slightly reduced prostate coverage, lower dose to the urethra and rectum, and a smaller number of needles required for an implant. Historically, IMRT requires modulation of fluence while keeping the photon beam energy fixed. The IMRT-related investigation in this thesis aimed at broadening the solution space by varying photon energy. The problem therefore involved simultaneous optimization of photon beamlet energy and fluence, denoted by XMRT. Formulating the problem as convex, linear programming was applied to obtain solutions for optimal energy-dependent fluences, while achieving all clinical objectives and constraints imposed. Dosimetric advantages of XMRT over single-energy IMRT in the improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs) was demonstrated in simplified phantom studies. The XMRT algorithm was improved to include clinical dose-volume constraints and clinical studies for prostate and head and neck cancer patients were investigated. Compared to IMRT, XMRT provided improved dosimetric benefit in the prostate case, particularly within intermediate- to low-dose regions (≤ 40 Gy

  17. The impact of body mass index on dosimetric quality in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I. Echevarria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy has been established as an effective and safe treatment option for men with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer. In this retrospective analysis, we sought to study the effect of body mass index (BMI on post-implant dosimetric quality. Material and methods : After institutional approval, records of patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer treated in Puerto Rico with LDR brachytherapy during 2008-2013 were reviewed. All patients were implanted with 125I seeds to a prescription dose of 145 Gy. Computed tomography (CT based dosimetry was performed 1 month after implant. Patients with at least 1 year of prostate-specific antigen (PSA follow-up were included. Factors predictive of adequate D90 coverage (≥ 140 Gy were compared via the Pearson χ2 or Wilcoxon rank-sum test as appropriate. Results : One-hundred and four patients were included in this study, with 53 (51% patients having a D90 ≥ 140 Gy. The only factor associated with a dosimetric coverage detriment (D90 < 140 Gy was BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (p = 0.03. Prostate volume (p = 0.26, initial PSA (p = 0.236, age (p = 0.49, hormone use (p = 0.93, percent of cores positive (p = 0.95, risk group (p = 0.24, tumor stage (p = 0.66, and Gleason score (p = 0.61 did not predict D90. Conclusions : In this study we show that BMI is a significant pre-implant predictor of D90 (< 140 Gy vs. ≥ 140 Gy. Although other studies have reported that prostate volume also affects D90, our study did not find this correlation to be statistically significant, likely because all of our patients had a prostate volume 140 Gy.

  18. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis.

  19. Developing a Verification and Training Phantom for Gynecological Brachytherapy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbobeh Nazarnejad

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dosimetric accuracy is a major issue in the quality assurance (QA program for treatment planning systems (TPS. An important contribution to this process has been a proper dosimetry method to guarantee the accuracy of delivered dose to the tumor. In brachytherapy (BT of gynecological (Gyn cancer it is usual to insert a combination of tandem and ovoid applicators with a complicated geometry which makes their dosimetry verification difficult and important. Therefore, evaluation and verification of dose distribution is necessary for accurate dose delivery to the patients. Materials and Methods The solid phantom was made from Perspex slabs as a tool for intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetric QA. Film dosimetry (EDR2 was done for a combination of ovoid and tandem applicators introduced by Flexitron brachytherapy system. Treatment planning was also done with Flexiplan 3D-TPS to irradiate films sandwiched between phantom slabs. Isodose curves obtained from treatment planning system and the films were compared with each other in 2D and 3D manners. Results The brachytherapy solid phantom was constructed with slabs. It was possible to insert tandems and ovoids loaded with radioactive source of Ir-192 subsequently. Relative error was 3-8.6% and average relative error was 5.08% in comparison with the films and TPS isodose curves. Conclusion Our results showed that the difference between TPS and the measurements is well within the acceptable boundaries and below the action level according to AAPM TG.45. Our findings showed that this phantom after minor corrections can be used as a method of choice for inter-comparison analysis of TPS and to fill the existing gap for accurate QA program in intracavitary brachytherapy. The constructed phantom also showed that it can be a valuable tool for verification of accurate dose delivery to the patients as well as training for brachytherapy residents and physics students.

  20. Aspects of dosimetry and clinical practice of skin brachytherapy: The American Brachytherapy Society working group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhib, Zoubir; Kasper, Michael; Perez Calatayud, Jose; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Pai, Sujatha; Strasswimmer, John

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common type of human malignancy. Although surgical techniques are the standard treatment, radiation therapy using photons, electrons, and brachytherapy (BT) (radionuclide-based and electronic) has been an important mode of treatment in specific clinical situations. The purpose of this work is to provide a clinical and dosimetric summary of the use of BT for the treatment of NMSC and to describe the different BT approaches used in treating cutaneous malignancies. A group of experts from the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, and dermatology, who specialize in managing cutaneous malignancies reviewed the literature and compiled their clinical experience regarding the clinical and dosimetric aspects of skin BT. A dosimetric and clinical review of both high dose rate ((192)Ir) and electronic BT treatment including surface, interstitial, and custom mold applicators is given. Patient evaluation tools such as staging, imaging, and patient selection criteria are discussed. Guidelines for clinical and dosimetric planning, appropriate margin delineation, and applicator selection are suggested. Dose prescription and dose fractionation schedules, as well as prescription depth are discussed. Commissioning and quality assurance requirements are also outlined. Given the limited published data for skin BT, this article is a summary of the limited literature and best practices currently in use for the treatment of NMSC. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  2. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  3. Collision-kerma conversion between dose-to-tissue and dose-to-water by photon energy-fluence corrections in low-energy brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Antunes, Paula C. G.; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Andreo, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, introduced in 1995, has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations, except in the vicinity of the source capsule. Subsequent dosimetry developments, based on Monte Carlo calculations or analytical solutions of transport equations, do not rely on the CPE assumption and determine directly the dose to different tissues. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seeds is proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences. State-of-the art Monte Carlo calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone), which in all cases include a realistic modelling of low-energy brachytherapy sources in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases (e.g. bone tissue).

  4. Endoluminal brachytherapy for recurrent laryngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, M.M. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, (Australia). Dept of Radiotherapy; Smart, G.P.; Hedland-Thomas, B. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA, (Australia). Dept of Medical Physics; Harper, C.S. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA (Australia). Radiation Oncology Centre

    1997-11-01

    Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx is usually treated with local field radiotherapy. Surgery is used for salvage following recurrence. Further recurrences present a more difficult therapeutic problem which requires individualized management. The aims of local control, survival, maintenance of function and minimizing side effects all need to be balanced according to the site and extent of disease. The present case study looks at the management of a 54-year-old man with multiple recurrences from a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. It describes a technique of endoluminal brachytherapy using an iridium-192 wire spiraled around the outer part of a tracheotomy tube that achieves good local control while enabling self-insertion and self-cleaning during the procedure. The dose given was 2500 cGy at 5 mm over 25.2 h and was achieved with minimal early or delayed side effects. The patient had no further symptoms relating to the stomal recurrence until his death from metastatic disease 6 months later. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound system for high-dose-rate interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy needle guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jessica R.; Surry, Kathleen; D'Souza, David; Leung, Eric; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for gynaecological cancers often includes brachytherapy; in particular, in high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted into the tumour and surrounding area through a template in order to deliver the radiation dose. Currently, there is no standard modality for visualizing needles intra-operatively, despite the need for precise needle placement in order to deliver the optimal dose and avoid nearby organs, including the bladder and rectum. While three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging has been proposed for 3D intra-operative needle guidance, anterior needles tend to be obscured by shadowing created by the template's vaginal cylinder. We have developed a 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) system that uses a conventional two-dimensional side-fire TRUS probe rotated inside a hollow vaginal cylinder made from a sonolucent plastic (TPX). The system was validated using grid and sphere phantoms in order to test the geometric accuracy of the distance and volumetric measurements in the reconstructed image. To test the potential for visualizing needles, an agar phantom mimicking the geometry of the female pelvis was used. Needles were inserted into the phantom and then imaged using the 3D TVUS system. The needle trajectories and tip positions in the 3D TVUS scan were compared to their expected values and the needle tracks visualized in magnetic resonance images. Based on this initial study, 360-degree 3D TVUS imaging through a sonolucent vaginal cylinder is a feasible technique for intra-operatively visualizing needles during HDR interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  6. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  7. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2015-01-21

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  8. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  9. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  10. [Forest soil seed bank and natural regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Sun, X; Wang, P

    2001-04-01

    The characteristics of temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of forest soil seed bank and their effects on natural regeneration were reviewed in this paper. The density of the seed bank of forest soil, which is affected by the types and ages of forest, is lower than that of cultivated land and grassplot, and can vary widely. The extent to which the composition of forest soil seed bank is influenced by its counterpart plantation depends on the stages of succession. The dynamics of forest soil seed bank is the combined effect of periodical and random factors. It is suggested that forest soil seed bank is the material base of forest regeneration, and the configuration and function of forest soil seed bank would influence the ability and the direction of natural forest regeneration. According to the characteristics of forest soil seed bank and obstructive factors influencing regeneration, some artificial measures can be adopted to accelerate natural regeneration. Studies on the forest soil seed bank should focus on the application of basic theories of disturbed ecology, and regard the reconstruction of degenerative ecosystem and the succession of populations in the ecotone as the main contents to study. As for the research method, it is advisable to employ long-term and located observations.

  11. A novel conformal superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy device for the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and keloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Clara; Johnson, Daniel; Rasmussen, Karl; Leinweber, Clinton; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Jung, Jae Won

    To develop a novel conformal superficial brachytherapy (CSBT) device as a treatment option for the patient-specific radiation therapy of conditions including superficial lesions, postsurgical positive margins, Dupuytren's contractures, keloid scars, and complex anatomic sites (eyelids, nose, ears, etc.). A preliminary CSBT device prototype was designed, built, and tested using readily available radioactive seeds. Iodine-125 ((125)I) seeds were independently guided to the treatment surface to conform to the target. Treatment planning was performed via BrachyVision Planning System (BPS) and dose distributions measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Percent depth dose curves and profiles for Praseodymium-142 ((142)Pr), and Strontium-90/Yttrium-90 ((90)Sr-(90)Y) were also investigated as potential sources. Results achieved with (90)Sr-(90)Y and electron external beam radiation therapy were compared and Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended 2.6 simulations of (142)Pr seeds were validated. BPS was able to predict clinical dose distributions for a multiple seeds matrix. Calculated and measured doses for the (125)I seed matrix were 500 cGy and 473.5 cGy at 5 mm depth, and 171.0 cGy and 201.0 cGy at 10 mm depth, respectively. Results of (90)Sr-(90)Y tests demonstrate a more conformal dose than electron EBRT (1.6 mm compared to 4.3 mm penumbra). Measured (142)Pr doses were 500 cGy at surface and 17.4 cGy at 5 mm depth. The CSBT device provides a highly conformal dose to small surface areas. Commercially available BPS can be used for treatment planning, and Monte Carlo simulation can be used for plans using beta-emitting sources and complex anatomies. Various radionuclides may be used in this device to suit prescription depths and treatment areas. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamer Refaat

    2011-06-12

    Jun 12, 2011 ... The mean age was 48.49 years. EBR to the whole pelvis TO 45 Gy in 25 fractions .... with radio-opaque seeds or a radio-opaque vaginal tampon. Barium or another radio-opaque device was used to ..... A common language has been developed that allows differ- ent BT traditions to communicate. Important ...

  13. on oil palm seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    flies' activities caused damage to seeds including rotten kennels and seeds, empty shells and dead developing embryos in transparent polyethylene storage bags. The highest infestation was on 2052 seeds out of a total production of 582,503 germinated seeds in batch number 5 and the lowest was 223 seeds out of ...

  14. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Eric; Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-12-01

    In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0.05) and they were

  15. Individualized 3D scanning and printing for non-melanoma skin cancer brachytherapy: a financial study for its integration into clinical workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Sintas, Andreu; Arguís, Monica; Hernández, Víctor; Árquez, Miguel; López, Iolanda; Rovirosa, Àngeles; Puig, Doménec

    2017-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common tumor in the population. There are different therapeutic modalities. Brachytherapy is one of the techniques used, in which it is necessary to build customized moulds for some patients. Currently, these moulds are made by hand using rudimentary techniques. We present a new procedure based on 3D printing and the analysis of the clinical workflow. Moulds can be made either by hand or by automated 3D printing. For making moulds by hand, a patient's alginate negative is created and, from that, the gypsum cast and customized moulds are made by hand from the patient's negative template. The new process is based on 3D printing. The first step is to take a 3D scan of the surface of the patient and then, 3D modelling software is used to obtain an accurate anatomical reconstruction of the treatment area. We present the clinical workflow using 3D scanning and printing technology, comparing its costs with the usual custom handmade mould protocol. The time spent for the new process is 6.25 hours, in contrast to the time spent for the conventional process, which is 9.5 hours. We found a 34% reduction in time required to create a mould for brachytherapy treatment. The labor cost of the conventional process is 211.5 vs. 152.5 hours, so the reduction is 59 hours. There is also a 49.5% reduction in the financial costs, mostly due to lack of need of a computed tomography (CT) scan of the gypsum and the mould. 3D scanning and printing offers financial benefits and reduces the clinical workload. As the present project demonstrates, through the application of 3D printing technologies, the costs and time spent during the process in the clinical workload in brachytherapy treatment are reduced. Overall, 3D printing is a promising technique for brachytherapy that might be well received in the community.

  16. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  17. seed oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wara

    The foam height of the soap was found to be 2.0 cm which is lower than that of Jatropha oil soap(5.4cm), Sesame oil soap(4.8cm), Cotton seed oil soap(4.5cm) and shea nut soap(4.2cm),t higher than that of Castor oil soap(1.6cm) and Castor glycerine soap(1.4cm). The soap was milk in colour and slightly soluble in distilled ...

  18. Spinal anaesthesia for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting and subjects: Forty female patients, presenting to Groote Schuur Hospital for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix, were randomised to receive either 5 mg or 9 mg (1 ml or 1.8 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, plus 15 μg fentanyl via the L3/L4 interspace. Results: Patients receiving the lower dose could be ...

  19. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate

  20. Calculation of the Transit Dose in HDR Brachytherapy Based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Monte Carlo method, which is the gold standard for accurate dose calculations in radiotherapy, was used to obtain the transit doses around a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant with thirteen dwell points. The midpoints of each of the inter-dwell separations, of step size 0.25 cm, were representative of the ...

  1. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD...

  2. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  3. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A; Smith, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast brachytherapy after lumpectomy is controversial in younger patients, as effectiveness is unclear and selection criteria are debated. Methods Using MarketScan® healthcare claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (ages 18–64), treated from 2003–2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3,134) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups, based on age (Agebrachytherapy vs. WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: In patients Agebrachytherapy patients were Agebrachytherapy patients were Endocrine- vs. 44% of WBI patients (P=0.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Agebrachytherapy vs. 9.0% after WBI (Hazard ratio[HR]=2.18, 1.37–3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs. 4.9%; HR=1.76, 1.26–2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Agebrachytherapy vs. WBI and therefore may be useful for selecting appropriate younger brachytherapy candidates. PMID:26279027

  4. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer - from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2017-02-01

    In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical) are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  5. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  6. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  7. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Erickson, Beth A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Small, William; Eifel, Patricia J

    Brachytherapy is the use of radionuclides to treat malignancies or benign conditions by means of a radiation source placed close to or into the tumor or treatment site. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclide brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has traditionally been used for treating prostate, head and neck, breast, cervical, and endometrial cancers as well as obstructive bile duct, esophageal, or bronchial lesions. It has been practiced for over a century with a variety of sources including radium-226, cesium-137, and, more recently, iridium- 192, iodine-125, and palladium-103. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy can be given as interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and/or plesiotherapy to a wide variety of treatment sites. This practice parameter addresses sealed sources as they are used for LDR brachytherapy. It is recognized that unsealed sources (e.g., yttrium-90) are also a form of LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  9. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  10. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Olsen, Dag Rune; Grau, Cai; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-10-01

    Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the potential benefit in patients. In 14 patients, treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index (OI), homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12 theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. Geometrical and graphical optimisation improved the dose plans significantly with graphical optimisation being superior. Graphically optimised dose plans showed a significant decrease of 18%+/-9% in high dose volume (p<0.001). HI, COIN, and OI were significantly improved from 0.50+/-0.05 to 0.60+/-0.05, from 0.65+/-0.04 to 0.71+/-0.04, and from 0.19+/-0.03 to 0.15+/-0.03, respectively (p<0.001 for all). Moreover, minimum target dose increased significantly from 71%+/-5% to 80%+/-5% (p<0.001). The improvement in OI and HI obtained by optimisation depended on the regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose plans between patients. Dwell time optimisation significantly improved the dose distribution regarding homogeneity, conformity, minimum target dose, and size of high dose volumes. Graphical optimisation is fast, reproducible and superior to geometric optimisation.

  11. Phylogenetic diversification of Early Cretaceous seed plants: The compound seed cone of Doylea tetrahedrasperma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Gar W; Stockey, Ruth A

    2016-05-01

    Discovery of cupulate ovules of Doylea tetrahedrasperma within a compact, compound seed cone highlights the rich diversity of fructification morphologies, pollination biologies, postpollination enclosure of seeds, and systematic diversity of Early Cretaceous gymnosperms. Specimens were studied using the cellulose acetate peel technique, three-dimensional reconstructions (in AVIZO), and morphological phylogenetic analyses (in TNT). Doylea tetrahedrasperma has bract/fertile short shoot complexes helically arranged within a compact, compound seed cone. Complexes diverge from the axis as a single unit and separate distally into a free bract tip and two sporophylls. Each sporophyll bears a single, abaxial seed, recurved toward the cone axis, that is enveloped after pollinaton by sporophyll tissue, forming a closed cupule. Ovules are pollinated by bisaccate grains captured by micropylar pollination horns. The unique combination of characters shown by D. tetrahedrasperma includes the presence of cupulate seeds borne in conifer-like compound seed cones, an ovuliferous scale analogue structurally equivalent to the ovulate stalk of Ginkgo biloba, gymnospermous pollination, and nearly complete enclosure of mature seeds. These features characterize the Doyleales ord. nov., clearly distinguish it from the seed fern order Corystospermales, and allow for recognition of another recently described Early Cretaceous seed plant as a second species in genus Doylea. A morphological phylogenetic analysis highlights systematic relationships of the Doyleales ord. nov. and emphasizes the explosive phylogenetic diversification of gymnosperms that was underway at the time when flowering plants may have originated and/or first began to radiate. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  12. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Tejinder; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Shikha; Bisht, Shyam Singh; Basu, Trinanjan; Abhishek, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D) USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT). The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites. PMID:28533803

  13. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susovan Banerjee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT. The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites.

  14. Surgical resection and permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kim; Sneed, Penny K; Kunwar, Sandeep; Kragten, Annemarie; Larson, David A; Berger, Mitchel S; Chan, Albert; Pouliot, Jean; McDermott, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of surgical resection and permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy without adjuvant whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. Forty patients were treated with permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy at the time of resection of brain metastases from 1997 to 2003. Actuarial freedom from progression (FFP) and survival were measured from the date of surgery and estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with censoring at last imaging for FFP endpoints. The median survival was 11.3 months overall, 12.0 months in 19 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases and 7.3 months in 21 patients with recurrent brain metastases. Twenty-two patients (55%) remained free of progression of brain metastases, three failed at the resection cavity (including one with leptomeningeal dissemination), two failed with leptomeningeal spread only, and 13 failed elsewhere in the brain including two who also had leptomeningeal disease. The 1-year resection cavity FFP probabilities were 92%, 86% and 88%; and brain FFP probabilities were 29%, 43% and 37% for the newly diagnosed, recurrent and all patients, respectively. Symptomatic necrosis developed 7.4-40.0 months (median, 19.5 months) after brachytherapy in 9 patients (23%), confirmed by resection in 6 patients. Excellent local control was achieved using permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain metastasis resection cavities, although there is a high risk of radiation necrosis over time. These data support consideration of permanent brachytherapy without adjuvant WBRT as a treatment option in patients with symptomatic or large newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases.

  15. [Eyebrow reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraër, F; Darsonval, V; Lejeune, F; Bochot-Hermouet, B; Rousseau, P

    2013-10-01

    The eyebrow is an essential anatomical area, from a social point of view, so its reconstruction, in case of skin defect, must be as meticulous as possible, with the less residual sequela. Capillary density extremely varies from one person to another and the different methods of restoration of this area should absolutely take this into consideration. We are going to review the various techniques of reconstruction, according to the sex and the surface to cover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    OpenAIRE

    Susovan Banerjee; Tejinder Kataria; Deepak Gupta; Shikha Goyal; Shyam Singh Bisht; Trinanjan Basu; Ashu Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of br...

  17. Seed manual: Rural household seed security

    OpenAIRE

    Neuendorf, O. (ed.)

    2004-01-01

    This training manual on Small Scale Seed Production is meant to be used by the individual farmer or farmer group, the intermediary or extension worker, as well as the trainer(s) to train, elaborate, and execute a small scale seed production project. Nine instructional chapters focus on the following topics: introduction to the basic theoretical principles of food production, planning and implementation of seed production, project preparatory phase: training of trainers; small scale seed produ...

  18. Surface reconstruction through poisson disk sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguang Hou

    Full Text Available This paper intends to generate the approximate Voronoi diagram in the geodesic metric for some unbiased samples selected from original points. The mesh model of seeds is then constructed on basis of the Voronoi diagram. Rather than constructing the Voronoi diagram for all original points, the proposed strategy is to run around the obstacle that the geodesic distances among neighboring points are sensitive to nearest neighbor definition. It is obvious that the reconstructed model is the level of detail of original points. Hence, our main motivation is to deal with the redundant scattered points. In implementation, Poisson disk sampling is taken to select seeds and helps to produce the Voronoi diagram. Adaptive reconstructions can be achieved by slightly changing the uniform strategy in selecting seeds. Behaviors of this method are investigated and accuracy evaluations are done. Experimental results show the proposed method is reliable and effective.

  19. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  1. Performance of the ATLAS primary vertex reconstruction algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Matt

    2017-01-01

    The reconstruction of primary vertices in the busy, high pile up environment of the LHC is a challenging task. The challenges and novel methods developed by the ATLAS experiment to reconstruct vertices in such environments will be presented. Such advances in vertex seeding include methods taken from medical imagining, which allow for reconstruction of very nearby vertices will be highlighted. The performance of the current vertexing algorithms using early Run-2 data will be presented and compared to results from simulation.

  2. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzmann, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  3. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067159

    2016-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  4. Present status and future of high-precision image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Dimopoulos, Johannes C. A.; Berger, Daniel; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. (Dept. of Radiotherapy Medical Univ. of Vienna, General Hospital Vienna, Wien (Austria))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for cervical cancer, using mainly MRI, is an evolving method, increasingly replacing the 2D approach based on conventional radiography. During the complex 4D chain of this procedure image-assistance is provided for disease assessment, provisional treatment planning ('pre-planning'), applicator placement and reconstruction, as well as for contouring, definitive treatment planning and quality control of dose delivery. With IGABT changes of topography adjacent to the applicator, caused by tumour regression, oedema, organ changes and dilation are identified. Thus, the CTV for IGABT is primarily based on the tumour volume at the time of BT and takes into account both time and spatial domains. IGABT requires systematic concepts for target, OAR, biological modelling, DVH analysis, and dose-volume-adaptation. Methods and Results. This report focuses on the advantages and uncertainties, dose-effect relations and clinical results of the IGABT procedure addressing the current status and future perspectives. Uncertainties during the 4D chain of IGABT are mainly related to target contouring, applicator reconstruction, as well as to inter-fraction, intra-fraction and inter-application variability, as caused by tumour response and organ changes. Different from EBRT where set-up uncertainties are compensated by adding a margin to the CTV, no margins to the lateral and anterior-posterior directions can be used for IGABT. Discussion. By 3D treatment planning for IGABT significant improvement of the DVH parameters is achieved compared to 2D library plans. In small tumours the benefit is primarily obtained by a decrease of dose to nearby OAR while in large tumours the use of supplementary interstitial techniques and optimization may double the target volume that can be treated at a therapeutic dose level. The clinical impact of IGABT could recently be demonstrated by the establishment of some correlations between

  5. Vaginal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  6. Experimental iodine-125 seed irradiation of intracerebral brain tumors in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haveman Jaap

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-dose radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with brain cancer. However, in preclinical research external beam radiotherapy is limited to heterotopic murine models– high-dose radiotherapy to the murine head is fatal due to radiation toxicity. Therefore, we developed a stereotactic brachytherapy mouse model for high-dose focal irradiation of experimental intracerebral (orthotopic brain tumors. Methods Twenty-one nude mice received a hollow guide-screw implanted in the skull. After three weeks, 5 × 105 U251-NG2 human glioblastoma cells were injected. Five days later, a 2 mCi iodine-125 brachytherapy seed was inserted through the guide-screw in 11 randomly selected mice; 10 mice received a sham seed. Mice were euthanized when severe neurological or physical symptoms occurred. The cumulative irradiation dose 5 mm below the active iodine-125 seeds was 23.0 Gy after 13 weeks (BEDtumor = 30.6 Gy. Results In the sham group, 9/10 animals (90% showed signs of lethal tumor progression within 6 weeks. In the experimental group, 2/11 mice (18% died of tumor progression within 13 weeks. Acute side effects in terms of weight loss or neurological symptoms were not observed in the irradiated animals. Conclusion The intracerebral implantation of an iodine-125 brachytherapy seed through a stereotactic guide-screw in the skull of mice with implanted brain tumors resulted in a significantly prolonged survival, caused by high-dose irradiation of the brain tumor that is biologically comparable to high-dose fractionated radiotherapy– without fatal irradiation toxicity. This is an excellent mouse model for testing orthotopic brain tumor therapies in combination with radiation therapy.

  7. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy; Otimizacao de dose em implantes intersticiais permanentes simulados de braquiterapia de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Fernando Pereira de

    2006-07-01

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  8. Time dependence of energy spectra of brachytherapy sources and its impact on the half and the tenth value layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ning J; Chen, Zhe; Hearn, Robert A; Rodgers, Joseph J; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-11-01

    Several factors including radionuclide purity influence the photon energy spectra from sealed brachytherapy sources. The existence of impurities and trace elements in radioactive materials as well as the substrate and encapsulation may not only alter the spectrum at a given time but also cause change in the spectra as a function of time. The purpose of this study is to utilize a semiempirical formalism, which quantitatively incorporates this time dependence, to calculate and evaluate the shielding requirement impacts introduced by this time dependence for a 103Pd source. The formalism was used to calculate the NthVL thicknesses in lead for a 103Pd model 200 seed. Prior to 2005, the 103Pd in this source was purified to a level better than 0.006% of the total 103Pd activity, the key trace impurity consisting of 65Zn. Because 65Zn emits higher energy photons and has a much longer half-life of 244 days compared to 103Pd, its presence in 103Pd seeds led to a time dependence of the photon spectrum and other related physical quantities. This study focuses on the time dependence of the NthVL and the analysis of the corresponding shielding requirements. The results indicate that the first HVL and the first TVL in lead steadily increased with time for about 200 days and then reached a plateau. The increases at plateau were more than 1000 times compared to the corresponding values on the zeroth day. The second and third TVLs in lead reached their plateaus in about 100 and 60 days, respectively, and the increases were about 19 and 2.33 times the corresponding values on the zeroth day, respectively. All the TVLs demonstrated a similar time dependence pattern, with substantial increases and eventual approach to a plateau. The authors conclude that the time dependence of the emitted photon spectra from brachytherapy sources can introduce substantial variations in the values of the NthVL with time if certain impurities are present. The contribution of 65Zn to the dose rate

  9. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Tward, J; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Huang, L; Szegedi, M; Kokeny, K; Salter, B [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  10. Leakage test evaluation used for qualification of iodine-125 seeds sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, Anselmo; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Calvo, Wilson A.P.; Somessari, Samir L.; Moura, Joao A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Souza, Carla D.; Rela, Paulo R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: afeher@ipen.br, e-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, e-mail: czeituni@pobox.com, e-mail: wapcalco@ipen.br, e-mail: somessar@ipen.br, e-mail: jmoura31@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: esmoura@ipen.br, e-mail: cdsouza@ipen.br, e-mail: prela@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The prostate cancer is a problem of public health in Brazil, and the second cause of cancer deaths in men, exceeded only by lung cancer. Among the possible treatments available for prostate cancer is brachytherapy, in which small seeds containing Iodine-125 radioisotope are implanted in the prostate. The seed consists of a sealed titanium tube measuring 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing a central silver wire with adsorbed Iodine-125. The tube sealing is made with titanium at the ends, using electric arc welding or laser process. This sealing must be leakage-resistant and free of cracks, therefore avoiding the Iodine-125 to deposit in the silver wire to escape and spread into the human body. To ensure this problem does not occur, rigorous leakage tests, in accordance with the standard Radiation protection - Sealed Radioactive Sources - leakage Test Methods - ISO 9978, should be applied. The aim of this study is to determine, implement and evaluate the leakage test to be used in the Iodine-125 seeds production, in order to qualify the sealing procedure. The standard ISO 9978 presents a list of tests to be carried out according to the type of source. The preferential methods for brachytherapy sources are soaking and helium. To assess the seeds leakage, the method of immersion test at room temperature was applied. The seeds are considered leakage-free if the detected activity does not exceed the 185 Bq (5 nCi). An Iodine standard was prepared and its value determined in a sodium iodide detector. A liquid scintillation counter was calibrated with the standard for seeds leakage tests. Forty-eight seeds were welded for these tests. (author)

  11. Protocol-based image-guided salvage brachytherapy. Early results in patients with local failure of prostate cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmer, G.; Lotter, M.; Kreppner, S.; Fietkau, R.; Strnad, V. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the overall clinical outcome of protocol-based image-guided salvage pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure particularly regarding feasibility and side effects. Patients and methods: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer (median age, 69 years) were treated during 2005-2011 with interstitial PDR brachytherapy (PDR-BT) as salvage brachytherapy after radiotherapy failure. The treatment schedule was PDR-BT two times with 30 Gy (pulse dose 0.6 Gy/h, 24 h per day) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of optimal coverage of the whole prostate (V{sub 100} > 95 %) simultaneously respecting the protocol-based dose volume constraints for the urethra (D{sub 0.1} {sub cc} < 130 %) and the rectum (D{sub 2} {sub cc} < 50-60 %) taking into account the previous radiation therapy. Local relapse after radiotherapy (external beam irradiation, brachytherapy with J-125 seeds or combination) was confirmed mostly via choline-PET and increased PSA levels. The primary endpoint was treatment-related late toxicities - particularly proctitis, anal incontinence, cystitis, urinary incontinence, urinary frequency/urgency, and urinary retention according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. The secondary endpoint was PSA-recurrence-free survival. Results: We registered urinary toxicities only. Grade 2 and grade 3 toxicities were observed in up to 11.1 % (2/18) and 16.7 % (3/18) of patients, respectively. The most frequent late-event grade 3 toxicity was urinary retention in 17 % (3/18) of patients. No late gastrointestinal side effects occurred. The biochemical PSA-recurrence-free survival probability at 3 years was 57.1 %. The overall survival at 3 years was 88.9 %; 22 % (4/18) of patients developed metastases. The median follow-up time for all patients after salvage BT was 21 months (range, 8-77 months). Conclusion: Salvage PDR-brachytherapy

  12. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  13. Organic Leek Seed Production - Securing Seed Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, L C; Boelt, B

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... organic vegetable growers can get derogations to use non-organic seeds in their productions. Potentially, this could lead to the organic consumers’ loss of faith and interest in organic products. The pre-requisite for an organic vegetable production is the presence of organically produced high quality...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  14. Organic leek seed production - securing seed quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Lise Christina; Boelt, Birte

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... organic vegetable growers can get derogations to use non-organic seeds in their productions. Potentially, this could lead to the organic consumers’ loss of faith and interest in organic products. The pre-requisite for an organic vegetable production is the presence of organically produced high quality...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.2067 Section 35.2067 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources... of the semi-annual physical inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources required by § 35.67...

  16. Parallelized patient-specific quality assurance for high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy in an integrated computed tomography-on-rails brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Showalter, Timothy N; Watkins, W Tyler; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    To describe a parallelized patient-specific quality assurance (QA) program designed to ensure safety and quality in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in an integrated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails brachytherapy suite. A patient-specific QA program has been modified for the image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) program in an integrated CT-on-rails brachytherapy suite. In the modification of the QA procedures of Task Group-59, the additional patient-specific QA procedures are included to improve rapid IGBT workflow with applicator placement, imaging, planning, treatment, and applicator removal taking place in one room. The IGBT workflow is partitioned into two groups of tasks that can be performed in parallel by two or more staff members. One of the unique components of our implemented workflow is that groups work together to perform QA steps in parallel and in series during treatment planning and contouring. Coordinating efforts in this systematic way enable rapid and safe brachytherapy treatment while incorporating 3-dimensional anatomic variations between treatment days. Implementation of these patient-specific QA procedures in an integrated CT-on-rails brachytherapy suite ensures confidence that a rapid workflow IGBT program can be implemented without sacrificing patient safety or quality and deliver highly-conformal dose to target volumes. These patient-specific QA components may be adapted to other IGBT environments that seek to provide rapid workflow while ensuring quality. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  18. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  19. Long-term tumor control after brachytherapy for base-of-prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungtaek Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients presenting with cancer at the base of the prostate after brachytherapyas monotherapy. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who had undergone transpe -ri neal ultrasound-guided implantation with 125I or 103Pd seeds as monotherapy between March 1998 and December2006, at our institution. A minimum follow-up interval of 2 years was required for inclusion in our analysis. Dosimetrywas assessed using computed tomography 30 days after the implant. Treatment failure was defined as the appearanceof biopsy-proved tumor after seed implantation, radiographic evidence of metastases, receipt of salvage therapy,or elevation of the prostate-specific antigen level beyond the nadir value plus 2 ng/mL. Results: With a median follow-up interval of 89 months (range 25-128 months, all 52 of the identified patients hadno evidence of disease progression or biochemical failure. The mean number of cores sampled at the prostate base was2.84 (median 2; Gleason scores assigned at central review were 6-8 in all patients. Of the 30 patients (58% for whomdosimetric data were available at day 30, the median V100 values of the right and left base were 92.0% and 93.5%, respectively,and the median D90 values of the right and left base were 148 Gy and 151 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Permanent prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy results in a high probability of disease-free survivalfor men with cancer at the base of the prostate.

  20. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdnaderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  1. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kathy, E-mail: Kathy.Han@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  2. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sungjae; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tanaka, Eiichi; Sumida, Iori; Tamari, Keisuke; Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    We have retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. From 1997 to 2012, salvage HDR brachytherapy was performed in 43 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 41-88 years). HDR brachytherapy was performed by interstitial brachytherapy in 34 patients (79%) and by intracavity brachytherapy in nine patients (21%). Seventeen (40%) of the 43 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy. The median followup period was 58 months (range, 6-179 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates (LC) were 84%, 52%, and 78%, respectively. Patients who received brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy experienced no nodal recurrence (0 of 17 patients), whereas 23% of the patients (6 of 26 patients) who received brachytherapy alone experienced nodal recurrence (p = 0.047). The pathologic grade at the time of initial surgery (G1-2 vs. G3) was found to be a significant prognostic factor for both OS and PFS. The respective 5-year OS was 96% vs. 40% (p brachytherapy vs. intracavity brachytherapy) were significant prognostic factors for LC. The respective 5-year LC was 74% vs. 100% (p = 0.020) and 85% vs. 56% (p = 0.035). HDR brachytherapy is effective and feasible in patients with isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Pathologic grade, age, and modality were significant prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy - Mammographic and CT response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares], e-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The present research investigates the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom (in vitro) for future applications in brachytherapy treatments. The main research goal is to investigate the viability of monitoring ceramic and polymeric devices, in vitro based on simple methods of radiological diagnostic, maintaining the easiest access to the population, represented by the conventional X-ray and mammography. The methodology involves the processing of ceramic devices constituted by bioglasses of Sm, SmBa, Ho, HoBa and the production of polymeric devices, such as polymeric membranes incorporating Ho e HoBa. Contrast agent of Barium was introduced in the syntheses of those devices to improve the radiological visibility in breast equivalent-tissue (TE) phantom. The breast phantom is constituted of glandular, adipose and skin TE, reproducing a 5 cm compressed real breast. In the compressed breast phantom, all types of ceramic and polymeric devices were implanted side by side. Radiological images were generated through X-ray equipment, mammography and computerized tomography (TC), for the samples implanted in the compressed breast phantom. The results show that SmBa and HoBa seeds on breast phantom presented suitable radiological visibility, on all the radiological diagnostic methods. However, the X-rays radiological visibility of Sm seeds without contrast was discreet. On mammography and TC images, it was not possible to identify those seeds, because the same ones were degraded after two months immersed in the glandular TE, after placed on the phantom. The Ho seeds were identified on all radiological diagnostic images, although non contrast agent in its constitution was added. However, the holmium polymeric membranes in direct contact with TE did not show Xray radiological visibility. However, the polymeric membranes of HoBa in the same conditions presented efficient X-rays radiological response. For mammography and TC methods

  4. Nonlinear reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Yu, Hao-Ran

    2017-12-01

    We present a direct approach to nonparametrically reconstruct the linear density field from an observed nonlinear map. We solve for the unique displacement potential consistent with the nonlinear density and positive definite coordinate transformation using a multigrid algorithm. We show that we recover the linear initial conditions up to the nonlinear scale (rδrδL>0.5 for k ≲1 h /Mpc ) with minimal computational cost. This reconstruction approach generalizes the linear displacement theory to fully nonlinear fields, potentially substantially expanding the baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions information content of dense large scale structure surveys, including for example SDSS main sample and 21 cm intensity mapping initiatives.

  5. MO-E-BRD-03: Intra-Operative Breast Brachytherapy: Is One Stop Shopping Best? [Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, B. [University of Virginia (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  6. Causal Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    suitable source of core events supporting causal reconstruction in a range of domains might be a combination of bodily - kinesthetic and simple...suggested in the previ- ous section, a good place to start might be with causal situations involving bodily - kinesthetic events or simple mechanical events...ANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(LS) tý PJIfORMIN’, CRGANIZATION !.LPDRT NUMBEK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 545 Technology Square AIM 1403 Cambridge

  7. Organic forage seed production

    OpenAIRE

    BOELT, B.; Deleuran, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    From January 2004 only organically produced seed can be used in organic farming systems within the EU. Danish seed producers and seed companies are establishing an organic forage seed production in order to supply organic growers within the EU with high quality seed of recognised varieties. This brief paper outlines a project investigating improved cultivation and management techniques to ensure such a supply is met.

  8. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Tozer-Loft, S M

    2000-01-01

    compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising, but significant association with outcome. A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy i...

  9. 3T MR-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Malignancies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N; 10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes a combination of external beam radiation, followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is benefitial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose, and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachtherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This has been used in 18 cases to date in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. It is comprised of state of the art methods for MR imaging, image analysis, and treatment plann...

  10. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules.

  11. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraam S. Soliman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions.

  12. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Mireille, E-mail: mireilleguib@voila.fr [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); David, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Vergez, Sebastien [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); Rives, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Department of Epidemiology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  13. Scintillating fiber optic dosimeters for breast and prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F.; Freitas, H.; Melo, J.; Silva, P.; Gonçalves, A.; Peralta, L.; Rachinhas, P. J.; Simões, P. C. P. S.; Pinto, S.; Pereira, A.; Santos, J. A. M.; Costa, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2017-02-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality where the radioactive material is placed close to the tumor, being a common treatment for skin, breast, gynecological and prostate cancers. These treatments can be of low-dose-rate, using isotopes with mean energy of 30 keV, or high-dose-rate, using isotopes such as 192Ir with a mean energy of 380 keV. Currently these treatments are performed in most cases without in-vivo dosimetry for quality control and quality assurance. We developed a dosimeter using small diameter probes that can be inserted into the patient's body using standard brachytherapy needles. By performing real-time dosimetry in breast and prostate brachytherapy it will be possible to perform real-time dose correction when deviations from the treatment plan are observed. The dosimeter presented in this work was evaluated in-vitro. The studies consisted in the characterization of the dosimeter with 500 μm diameter sensitive probes (with a BCF-12 scintillating optical fiber) using an inhouse made gelatin breast phantom with a volume of 566 cm3. A breast brachytherapy treatment was simulated considering a tumor volume of 27 cm3 and a prescribed absolute dose of 5 Gy. The dose distribution was determined by the Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing (IPSA) optimization algorithm (ELEKTA). The dwell times estimated from the experimental measurements are in agreement with the prescribed dwell times, with relative error below 3%. The measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) including the stem-effect contribution is below 3%.

  14. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the photoluminescence. Furthermore, we recommend avoiding ruby crystals that exhibit significant time-dependent luminescence.

  15. HDR brachytherapy for superficial non-melanoma skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauden, Ruth; Pracy, Martin; Avery, Anne-Marie; Hodgetts, Ian; Gauden, Stan

    2013-04-01

    Our initial experience using recommended high dose per fraction skin brachytherapy (BT) treatment schedules, resulted in poor cosmesis. This study aimed to assess in a prospective group of patients the use of Leipzig surface applicators for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, for the treatment of small non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) using a protracted treatment schedule. Treatment was delivered by HDR brachytherapy with Leipzig applicators. 36 Gy, prescribed to between 3 to 4 mm, was given in daily 3 Gy fractions. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated weekly during irradiation using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Local response, late skin effects and cosmetic results were monitored at periodic intervals after treatment completion. From March 2002, 200 patients with 236 lesions were treated. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 25-121 months). A total of 162 lesions were macroscopic, while in 74 cases, BT was given after resection because of positive microscopic margins. There were 121 lesions that were basal cell carcinomas, and 115 were squamous cell carcinomas. Lesions were located on the head and neck (198), the extremities (26) and trunk (12). Local control was 232/236 (98%). Four patients required further surgery to treat recurrence. Grade 1 acute skin toxicity was detected in 168 treated lesions (71%) and grade 2 in 81 (34%). Cosmesis was good or excellent in 208 cases (88%). Late skin hypopigmentation changes were observed in 13 cases (5.5%). Delivering 36 Gy over 2 weeks to superficial NMSC using HDR brachytherapy is well tolerated and provides a high local control rate without significant toxicity. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View, CA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  17. A novel curvilinear approach for prostate seed implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hutapea, Parsaoran; Darvish, Kurosh; Yu Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leo Jenkins Cancer Center, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: A new technique called ''curvilinear approach'' for prostate seed implantation has been proposed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of curvilinear distribution of seeds for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Twenty LDR prostate brachytherapy cases planned intraoperatively with VariSeed planning system and I-125 seeds were randomly selected as reference rectilinear cases. All the cases were replanned by using curved-needle approach keeping the same individual source strength and the volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose 145 Gy (V{sub 100}). Parameters such as number of needles, seeds, and the dose coverage of the prostate (D{sub 90}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}), urethra (D{sub 30}, D{sub 10}) and rectum (D{sub 5}, V{sub 100}) were compared for the rectilinear and the curvilinear methods. Statistical significance was assessed using two-tailed student's t-test. Results: Reduction of the required number of needles and seeds in curvilinear method were 30.5% (p < 0.001) and 11.8% (p < 0.49), respectively. Dose to the urethra was reduced significantly; D{sub 30} reduced by 10.1% (p < 0.01) and D{sub 10} reduced by 9.9% (p < 0.02). Reduction in rectum dose D{sub 5} was 18.5% (p < 0.03) and V{sub 100} was also reduced from 0.93 cc in rectilinear to 0.21 cc in curvilinear (p < 0.001). Also the V{sub 150} and V{sub 200} coverage of prostate reduced by 18.8% (p < 0.01) and 33.9% (p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Significant improvement in the relevant dosimetric parameters was observed in curvilinear needle approach. Prostate dose homogeneity (V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}) improved while urethral dose was reduced, which might potentially result in better treatment outcome. Reduction in rectal dose could potentially reduce rectal toxicity and complications. Reduction in number of needles would minimize edema and thereby could improve postimplant urinary incontinence. This study indicates that the

  18. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Ronald E.; Kal, Henk B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy.

  19. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  20. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for esophageal cancer in previously irradiated patients: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Hee Kam, Stéphanie; Rivera, Sofia; Hennequin, Christophe; Lourenço, Nelson; Chirica, Mircea; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Quéro, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes after exclusive salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) intraluminal esophageal brachytherapy given to previously irradiated patients with recurrent esophageal cancer. We reviewed medical records of 30 patients who were treated by salvage HDR brachytherapy for local esophageal cancer. Brachytherapy delivered four to six fractions of 5-7 Gy at 5 mm from the applicator surface and 20 mm above and below the macroscopic tumor volume. Eighty percentage of patients received treatment as initially planned. Complete response rate, evaluated 1 month after brachytherapy by endoscopy and biopsy, was 53%. Squamous histology and complete endoscopic tumor response at 1 month were significantly associated with better local tumor control. Median local progression-free survival was 9.8 months. Overall survival was 31.5% and 17.5% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, preserved performance status and limited weight loss (brachytherapy were associated with better overall survival. Severe toxicity (Grade ≥3) occurred in 7 patients (23%). Although esophageal cancer in previously irradiated patients is associated with poor outcomes, HDR brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment for inoperable patients with locally limited esophageal cancer, particularly in the subset of patients with preserved performance status and limited weight loss (≤10%) before salvage brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Differences in outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with or without brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johannes; Dreifaldt, Ann-Charlotte; Mordhorst, Louise Bohr; Sorbe, Bengt

    To compare the clinical outcome of cervical cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy with and without the addition of brachytherapy. In all, 220 patients with cervical cancer stage I-IV treated between 1993 and 2009 were included. Three or five 6.0 Gy fractions of brachytherapy were given in addition to the external beam radiotherapy to 134 patients, whereas 86 patients received external beam radiotherapy alone (EBRTA). In the EBRTA group, the patients received external boost instead of brachytherapy with a total dose to the tumor of 64-72 Gy. The 5-year overall survival and cancer-specific survival rates of the complete series were 42.5% and 55.5%, respectively. The rates of primary complete remission, 5-year cancer-specific survival, and recurrence were 92.5%, 68.5%, and 31.3% for the brachytherapy group vs. 73.3%, 35.4%, and 37.2% for the EBRTA group. The survival (all types) of the patients receiving brachytherapy was significantly (p brachytherapy group. Brachytherapy is important to achieve sufficient doses to the periphery and central part of the tumor and should always be considered in treatment of cervical carcinomas. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Brachytherapy in France: current situation and economic outlook due to the unavailability of iridium wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vu, B; Boucher, S

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, about 6000 patients were treated with brachytherapy, the number diminishing by 2.6% per year since 2008. Prostate, breast and gynecological cancers are the most common types of cancers. Since 2008, the number of brachytherapy facilities has decreased by 18%. In medicoeconomic terms, brachytherapy faces many problems: the coding system is outdated; brachytherapy treatments cost as much as internal radiation; fees do not cover costs; since iridium wire has disappeared from the market, the technique will be transferred to more expensive high-speed or pulse dose rates. The French financing grid based on the national study of costs lags behind changes in such treatments and in the best of cases, hospitals resorting to alternatives such as in-hospital brachytherapy are funded at 46% of their additional costs. Brachytherapy is a reference technique. With intense pressure on hospital pricing, financing brachytherapy facilities will become even more problematic as a consequence of the disappearance of iridium 192 wires. The case of brachytherapy illustrates the limits of the French financing system and raises serious doubts as to its responsiveness. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. SU-F-T-03: Radiobiological Evaluation of a Directional Brachytherapy Device Surgically Implanted Following EBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Emrich, JG; Poli, J [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Preceding surgical implantation following external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) delivery, a radiobiological evaluation was performed for a new LDR Pd-103 directional brachytherapy device (CivaSheet). As this was the first case with the device used in combination with EBRT, there was concern to determine the appropriate prescription dose. Methods: The radiobiological model of Dale (1985, 1989) was used for a permanent LDR implant including radioactive decay. The biological effective dose (BED) was converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) for comparison with EBRT prescription expectations. Given IMRT delivery of 50.4 Gy, an LDR brachytherapy dose of approximately 15–20 Gy EQD2 was desired. To be specific to the treatment site (leiomyosarcoma T2bN0M0, grade 2 with R1 surgical margin), the radiobiological model required several radiobiological parameters with values taken from the literature. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine their relative importance on the calculated BED and subsequent EQD2. The Pd-103 decay constant (λ=0.0017 h{sup −1}) was also used. DVHs were prepared for pre- and post-surgical geometries to glean the possible and realized implant geometric configuration. DVHs prepared in VariSeed9 were converted to BEDVHs and subsequently EQD2 values for each volume-element. Results: For a physical dose of 28 Gy to a 0.5 cm depth, BED=21.7 Gy and EQD2=17.6 Gy, which was near the center of the desired EQD2 range. Tumor bed (CTV=4 cm{sup 3}) coverage was 99.2% with 48 sources implanted. In order of decreasing importance from the sensitivity analysis, the radiobiological parameters were α=0.25 Gy{sup −1}, T{sub POT}=23 days, α/β=8.6 Gy, and T=1.5 h. Percentage variations in these values produced EQD2 variations of 40%, 20%, 18%, and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: This radiobiological evaluation indicated that prescription dose may be determined for comparison with the desired EQD2, and that radiobiologicalparameter

  4. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  5. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method.

  6. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  7. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and (226)Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  8. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Daniel E; Soni, Payal D; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Merrick, Gregory S; Stock, Richard G; Blasko, John C; Zelefsky, Michael J

    To review outcomes for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy (CMRT) utilizing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with a brachytherapy boost. The available literature for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy was reviewed and summarized. At this time, the literature suggests that the majority of high-risk cancers are curable with multimodal treatment. Several large retrospective studies and three prospective randomized trials comparing CMRT to dose-escalated EBRT have demonstrated superior biochemical control with CMRT. Longer followup of the randomized trials will be required to determine if this will translate to a benefit in metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Although greater toxicity has been associated with CMRT compared to EBRT, recent studies suggest that technological advances that allow better definition and sparing of critical adjacent structures as well as increasing experience with brachytherapy have improved implant quality and the toxicity profile of brachytherapy. The role of androgen deprivation therapy is well established in the external beam literature for high-risk disease, but there is controversy regarding the applicability of these data in the setting of dose escalation. At this time, there is not sufficient evidence for the omission of androgen deprivation therapy with dose escalation in this population. Comparisons with surgery remain limited by differences in patient selection, but the evidence would suggest better disease control with CMRT compared to surgery alone. Due to a series of technological advances, modern combination series have demonstrated unparalleled rates of disease control in the high-risk population. Given the evidence from recent randomized trials, combination therapy may become the standard of care for high-risk cancers. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Subramanian, Manny; Ishmael Parsai, E

    2014-02-01

    A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301(125)I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni-Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni-Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Annealing the Ni-Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT images, and a preliminary experiment

  10. The surgical viability and radiological monitoring of brain implants of bioactive micro-seeds in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Giane X.O.; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Siqueira, Savio Lana; Maciel, Marcelo B. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2005-10-15

    The interstitial implant is a therapeutic modality in brachytherapy of the head and neck. Presently, the seeds implanted in tumors in the central nervous system are metallic I-125. After the full emission of the radionuclide, the seed remains inert in the implanted area. Bioactive ceramic seeds have been prepared for this research group incorporating Sm-152 to be active in Sm-153. The main goal of the present study is the development of a the surgical technique for implanting the biodegradable radioactive micro-seeds in the brains of rabbits, as well as the observation of the clinical reactions of the animal after implantation of two sets of three seeds. The surgical procedure consisted of performing two separate perforations 10 mm from each other in the skull, permitting the implantation of two groups of three seeds, totaling six seeds. The results of the pilot study showed the effectiveness of the surgical procedure and of the biocompatibility of the seeds and the lack of presence of adverse reactions, functional sequels, or inflammation in a follow up 50 days post-surgery. Such seeds of reduced volume, 0.2 x 1.6 mm, could be monitored by computerized tomography 30 days after implanting. (author)

  11. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  12. [Ultrastructural study on the facial nerve of rabbit after (125)I seed implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jian; Song, Tie-li; Ju, Xiang-qun; Zheng, Lei; Cai, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Jian-guo

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the ultrastructural variation of the facial nerve of rabbit with different dosage of (125)I seed brachytherapy. Fifty-four big ear rabbits were divided into 3 groups randomly and given 40 Gy, 80 Gy, 120 Gy respectively. Radioactive seeds were implanted in one side of parotid gland, the other side was implanted with vacant shell as a control group. The facial nerves were obtained 2, 4, 6 months respectively after operation and the histological ultrastructural changes observed by electromicroscope. In the control group, epineurium was continuous, there was slight pitting edema under the epineurium, and axonal myelin was loose. In the test groups, there was slight pitting edema under the epineurium, and axonal myelin sheath was loose at 4th month. Macrophage and regenerated fibers were found in the 80 Gy group and myelin sheath lamellar separation, regeneration of nerve in the 120 Gy dosage. The myelin sheath lamellar was separated and axonal myelin loose in the test group at 6th month. Myelin sheath amellar separation and edema under the epineurium were found in the group of 80 Gy and 120 Gy. The ultrastructure of the facial nerve is damaged by the dosage of 40 Gy, 80 Gy brachytherapy with (125)I seeds. The higher dosage the nerve receives, the more serious the damage will be. Both of the epineurium and axonal myelin sheath are integral and continuous 6 months after operation with dosage of 120 Gy.

  13. Long term outcome and side effects in patients receiving low-dose I125 brachytherapy: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Logghe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate the disease free survival (DFS, disease specific survival (DSS,overall survival (OS and side effects in patients who received low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy with I125 stranded seeds. Materials and methods: Between july 2003 and august 2012, 274 patients with organ confined prostate cancer were treated with permanent I125 brachytherapy. The median follow-up, age and pretreatment prostate specific antigen (iPSA was 84 months (12-120, 67 years (50-83 and 7.8 ng/mL (1.14-38, respectively. Median Gleason score was 6 (3-9. 219 patients (80% had stage cT1c, 42 patients (15.3% had stage cT2a, 3 (1.1% had stage cT2b and 3 (1.1% had stage cT2c. The median D90 was 154.3 Gy (102.7-190.2. Results: DSS was 98.5%.OS was 93.5%. 13 patients (4.7% developed systemic disease, 7 patients (2.55% had local progression. In 139 low risk patients, the 5 year biochemical freedom from failure rate (BFFF was 85% and 9 patients (6.4% developed clinical progression. In the intermediate risk group, the 5 year BFFF rate was 70% and 5 patients (7.1% developed clinical progression. Median nPSA in patients with biochemical relapse was 1.58 ng/mL (0.21 – 10.46, median nPSA in patients in remission was 0.51 ng/mL (0.01 – 8.5. Patients attaining a low PSA nadir had a significant higher BFFF (p<0.05. Median D90 in patients with biochemical relapse was 87.2 Gy (51 – 143,1. Patients receiving a high D90 had a significant higher BFFF (p<0.05. Conclusion: In a well selected patient population, LDR brachytherapy offers excellent outcomes. Reaching a low PSA nadir and attaining high D90 values are significant predictors for a higher DFS.

  14. The evolution of seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkies, Ada; Graeber, Kai; Knight, Charles; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    The evolution of the seed represents a remarkable life-history transition for photosynthetic organisms. Here, we review the recent literature and historical understanding of how and why seeds evolved. Answering the 'how' question involves a detailed understanding of the developmental morphology and anatomy of seeds, as well as the genetic programs that determine seed size. We complement this with a special emphasis on the evolution of dormancy, the characteristic of seeds that allows for long 'distance' time travel. Answering the 'why' question involves proposed hypotheses of how natural selection has operated to favor the seed life-history phenomenon. The recent flurry of research describing the comparative biology of seeds is discussed. The review will be divided into sections dealing with: (1) the development and anatomy of seeds; (2) the endosperm; (3) dormancy; (4) early seed-like structures and the transition to seeds; and (5) the evolution of seed size (mass). In many cases, a special distinction is made between angiosperm and gymnosperm seeds. Finally, we make some recommendations for future research in seed biology.

  15. Enhanced Ultrasound Visualization of Brachytherapy Seeds by a Novel Magnetically Induced Motion Imaging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    34/’ %+."$4)’ ’ =2& 7+-ś$7’ ,"&/.’ 9+/$&’ +1’ 12&’ 6*"/’ 6&01&%’ @+4’ UR5 (??’ HQ7’ +1 P?YC)’ ’=2&𔄁&+4$%&.’%&4൱+06&’+0.’Ŕ.$61+06&’@&%&’L*274 +0.’J

  16. In vitro experiments on PDR brachytherapy; In-Vitro-Untersuchungen zur PDR-Brachytherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, P.; Frank, C. [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, St. Marien-Krankenhaus, Siegen (Germany); Weber, K.J. [Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Radiologische Klinik, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Simulating the clinical situation in PDR brachytherapy, fractionation experiments were carried out in the dose rate gradient of afterloading sources. Different dose levels were produced with the same number of fractions in the same overall incubation time. The fractionation schedules which were to be compared with a CLDR reference curve were: 40x0.47 Gy, 20x0.94 Gy, 10x1.88 Gy, 5x3.76 Gy, 2x9.4 Gy given in a period of 20 h and 1x18.8 Gy as a `single dose` exposition. As measured by flow cytometry, the influence of the dose rate in the pulse on cell survival and on cell cycle distribution under superfractionation was examined on V79 cells. V79 spheroids as a model for a slowly growing tumor, reacted according to the radiobiological calculations, as a CLDR equivalancy was achieved with increasing fractionation. Rapidly growing V79 monolayer cells showed an inverse fractionation effect. A superfractionated irradiation with pulses of 0.94 Gy/h respectively 0.47 Gy/0.5 h was significantly more effective than the CLDR irradiation. This inverse fractionation effect in log-phase V79 cells could be attributed to the accumulation of cycling cells in the radiosensitive G2/M phase (G2 block) during protected exposure which was drastically more pronounced for the pulsed scheme. HeLa cells were rather insensitive to changes of fractionation. Superfractionation as well as hypofractionation yielded CLDR equivalent survival curves. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] In Anlehnung an die klinischen Verhaeltnisse der PDR-Brachytherapie wurden Fraktionierungsexperimente im Dosis-Leistungs-Gradienten von Afterloading-Quellen durchgefuehrt. Unterschiedliche Strahlendosen wurden mit der jeweils gleichen Anzahl von Fraktionen und in der jeweils gleichen `Gesamtinkubationszeit` erzeugt. Folgende Fraktionierungen wurden mit einer CLDR-Referenzkurve verglichen: 40x0,47 Gy, 20x0,94 Gy, 10x1,88 Gy, 5x3,76 Gy, 2x9,4 Gy in jeweils 20 Stunden und einmal 18,8 Gy als `Single-dose-`Exposition. Zusaetzlich wurden

  17. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds (crop...

  18. Efficiency of seed production in southern pine seed orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Bramlett

    1977-01-01

    Seed production in southern pine seed orchards can be evaluated by estimating the efficiency of four separate stages of cone, seed, and seedling development. Calculated values are: cone efficiency (CE), the ratio of mature cones to the initial flower crop; seed efficiency (SE), the ratio of filled seeds per cone to the seed potential; extraction efficiency (EE), the...

  19. Effect of postoperative radiation therapy on mandibular reconstruction using a modular endoprosthesis - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, Kok Weng; Chin, Francis Kuok Choon; Tideman, Henk; Merkx, Matthias A W; Jansen, John A

    2013-09-01

    The endoprosthetic system has been shown to be a potential option for mandibular reconstruction. The objective of this pilot in vivo animal study was to determine the effects of postoperative radiation using brachytherapy on bone and soft tissue healing in mandibles reconstructed with the endoprosthesis. Six adult Macaca fascicularis mandibles were reconstructed with a cemented endoprosthesis after segmental body resection. The animals were divided into two groups. The test group was subjected to radiation therapy 1 month postoperation while the control group did not receive any radiation. Results showed no major radiation side effects. Mucosal ulcerations and wound dehiscence at the radiated sites healed within 4 weeks. One animal from each group had prosthesis failure and was unable to complete the study. Micro-CT findings indicated no significant differences between the total bone volume percentage (TBV%) of the study and control groups. Histomorphometrical analysis using grading scales also showed no significant differences between the two groups. Under the study conditions, postoperative brachytherapy did not affect the tissue response around the endoprosthesis within the early 6 months postradiation period. The endoprosthesis, therefore, remains a viable reconstructive option when postoperative radiation is prescribed. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Healthy food trends -- chia seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chia seeds; Wellness - Chia seeds References Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. What are chia seeds? Updated February 5, 2014. www.eatright.org/resource/food/vitamins-and-supplements/nutrient-rich-foods/what-are-chia-seeds . Accessed ...

  1. Grape Seed Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seeds, which are by-products of the wine industry. Grape seed extract is available in capsules and ... take anticoagulants (blood thinners), such as warfarin or aspirin. Keep in Mind Tell all your health care ...

  2. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  3. Primary Vertex Reconstruction at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and precise reconstruction of the primary vertex in an LHC collision is essential in both the reconstruction of the full kinematic properties of a hard-scatter event and of soft interactions as a measure of the amount of pile-up. The reconstruction of primary vertices in the busy, high pile-up environment of Run-2 of the LHC is a challenging task. New methods have been developed by the ATLAS experiment to reconstruct vertices in such environments. Advances in vertex seeding include methods taken from medical imaging, which allow for reconstruction of multiple vertices with small spatial separation. The adoption of this new seeding algorithm within the ATLAS adaptive vertex finding and fitting procedure will be discussed, and the first results of the new techniques from Run-2 data will be presented. Additionally, data-driven methods to evaluate vertex resolution will be presented with special focus on correct methods to evaluate the effect of the beam spot constraint; results from these methods in Ru...

  4. Iterative reconstruction of volumetric particle distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieneke, Bernhard

    2013-02-01

    For tracking the motion of illuminated particles in space and time several volumetric flow measurement techniques are available like 3D-particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) recording images from typically three to four viewing directions. For higher seeding densities and the same experimental setup, tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) reconstructs voxel intensities using an iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithm (e.g. multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique, MART) followed by cross-correlation of sub-volumes computing instantaneous 3D flow fields on a regular grid. A novel hybrid algorithm is proposed here that similar to MART iteratively reconstructs 3D-particle locations by comparing the recorded images with the projections calculated from the particle distribution in the volume. But like 3D-PTV, particles are represented by 3D-positions instead of voxel-based intensity blobs as in MART. Detailed knowledge of the optical transfer function and the particle image shape is mandatory, which may differ for different positions in the volume and for each camera. Using synthetic data it is shown that this method is capable of reconstructing densely seeded flows up to about 0.05 ppp with similar accuracy as Tomo-PIV. Finally the method is validated with experimental data.

  5. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal...... interviews, and seven semistructured interviews. The findings show that staff interaction is typified by the use of trust and relationship-enabling care, which is characterized by the establishment and maintenance of an informal, trusting relationship through a repeated reconstruction of normality...

  6. Pathological impairments induced by interstitial implantation of 125I Seeds in spinal canal of banna mini-pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zuozhang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use a banna mini-pig to set up 125I implantation model, and investigate the consequence of radiation-related impairments. Methods In present study, 125I seeds were implanted into spinal canal of T13 level of spine in banna mini-pigs. After operation, the pigs were raised up to 8 months, behavior changes were recorded within this period. After 8 months, spinal cords were collected for pathological analysis. Results In this study, a 125I brachytherapy animal model had been successfully established, in the model group, the banna pigs' Tarlov scale decreased from 5 to 2.57 ± 0.36, significant cellular impairments were noted by pathological analysis. Conclusions Without any protection and operation improvement, 125I implantation can cause serious histological impairments and moving difficulty for banna mini-pigs; this present research provides an alternative tool to study spinal 125I brachytherapy.

  7. Clinical efficacy of CT-guided iodine-125 seed implantation therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongmin, Wang [Soochow University, School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Suzhou (China); Shanghai Ruijin Hospital Luwan Branch, Shanghai (China); Yu, Liu; Kemin, Chen [Shanghai Ruijin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Fenju, Liu [Soochow University, School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Suzhou (China); Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou (China); Gang, Huang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2010-07-15

    To examine the clinical efficacy of CT-guided radioactive iodine-125 (125I) seeds implantation treatment in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. Thirty-one patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this study. The 125I seeds were implanted into pancreatic tumor under CT guidance. In addition, 10 patients received routine gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy 1 week after brachytherapy. Median diameter of the tumor was 5.8 cm. Follow-up period was 2 to 25 months. Symptoms of refractory pain were significantly resolved post-interventionally (P < 0.05), and Karnofsky physical score increased dramatically (P < 0.05). Tumor response which was demonstrated on repeated CT film 2 months post-treatment revealed complete response (CR) in 3 cases, partial response (PR) in 16 cases, stable disease (SD) in 9 cases, and progressive disease (PD) in 3 cases. Overall responding rate (CR+PR) was 61.3%. Median survival time for all patients was 10.31 months. Two seeds of radioactive 125I migrated to the liver in 2 patients. There were no serious complications detected during the follow-up period. This study suggests that CT-guided brachytherapy using 125I seeds implantation appears to be safe, effective, uncomplicated, and could produce adequate pain relief for treating unresectable pancreatic cancer. (orig.)

  8. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  9. (Cuminum cyminum L.) seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lenovo

    2013-08-19

    Aug 19, 2013 ... Key words: Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), Apiaceae, seed, fatty acids composition, petroselinic acid, maturation. ... Harvest dates, days after flowering, fruit colour and state of maturity, relative moisture and oil contents of cumin seeds ..... composition of cactus pear seed compared with cotton and grape.

  10. Needs of Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The "Needs of Seeds" formative assessment probe can be used to find out whether students recognize that seeds have needs both similar to and different from plants and other living organisms (Keeley, Eberle, and Tugel 2007). The probe reveals whether students overgeneralize the needs of seeds by assuming they have the same needs as the adult plants…

  11. Seed Proteomics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomic analysis of seeds encounters some specific problems that do not impinge on analyses of other plant cells, tissues, or organs. There are anatomic considerations. Seeds comprise the seed coat, the storage organ(s), and the embryonic axis. Are these to be studied individually or as a compo...

  12. Seed development and carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittich, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    Seeds assure the plant the onset of a next generation and a way of dispersal. They consist of endosperm and an embryo (originating from gametophytic tissue), enveloped by a seed coat (sporophytic tissue). Plants generate different types of seeds. For instance, the endosperm may either be

  13. Seeds to survive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Seeds are important for man, either as propagation material of crops or directly for the production of foods, fodder and drinks. The natural function of seeds is dispersal of its genes to successive generations. Survival mechanisms seed have evolved sometimes interfere with those preferred by

  14. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  15. (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma: factors associated with local tumor recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Christopher A; Francis, Jasmine H; Cohen, Gil'ad N; Marr, Brian P; Wolden, Suzanne L; McCormick, Beryl; Abramson, David H

    2014-01-01

    Plaque brachytherapy is a common form of treatment for uveal melanoma, and the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) used (125)I. Recently, (106)Ru has been reintroduced for plaque brachytherapy in the United States. We reviewed our experience treating uveal melanoma with (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy using COMS planning techniques, hypothesizing that we would observe similar outcomes to those in the COMS. Medical records of patients undergoing (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy were reviewed retrospectively. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded. Outcomes including visual acuity, local tumor recurrence, salvage treatment, metastasis, and survival were recorded. Cox regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with local tumor recurrence and enucleation. Twenty-eight patients were studied. Median age was 60 years, and 50% were men. Median tumor base diameter and height were 9.4 and 2.6 mm, respectively. Ophthalmic complications were rare. Local tumor recurrence and enucleation occurred in 13 and 4 patients, respectively. Local tumor recurrence was associated with low visual acuity in the tumor-bearing eye, posterior tumors, small plaque size, and difference in plaque-tumor diameter of brachytherapy using COMS planning techniques, we found a greater than expected rate of local tumor recurrence. Planning (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy should be done carefully at centers that have previously used COMS protocols and (125)I. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-G-201-04: Can the Dynamic Library of Flap Applicators Replace Treatment Planning in Surface Brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Harris, T; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Contemporary brachytherapy treatment planning systems-(TPS) include the applicator model libraries to improve digitization; however, the library of surface-flap-applicators-(SFA) is not incorporated into the commercial TPS. We propose the dynamic library-(DL) for SFA and investigate if such library can eliminate applicator reconstruction, source activation and dose normalization. Methods: DL was generated for the SFA using the C++class libraries of the Visualization Toolkit-(VTK) and Qt-application framework for complete abstraction of the graphical interface. DL was designed such that the user can initially choose the size of the applicator that corresponds to the one clinically placed to the patient. The virtual applicator-(VA) has an elastic property so that it can be registered to the clinical CT images with a real applicator-(RA) on it. The VA and RA matching is performed by adjusting the position and curvature of the VA. The VA does not elongate or change its size so each catheter could always be at a distance of 5mm from the skin and 10mm apart from the closest catheter maintaining the physical accuracy of the clinical setup. Upon the applicator placement, the dwell positions were automatically activated, and the dose is normalized to the prescription depth. The accuracy of source positioning was evaluated using various applicator sizes. Results: The accuracy of the applicator placement was in the sub-millimeter range. The time-study reveals that up to 50% of the planning time can be saved depending on the complexity of the clinical setup. Unlike in the classic approach, the planning time was not highly dependent on the applicator size. Conclusion: The practical benefits of the DL of the SFA were demonstrated. The time demanding planning processes can be partially automated. Consequently, the planner can dedicate effort to fine tuning, which can result in the improvement of the quality of treatment plans in surface brachytherapy.

  17. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, M.; Deantonio, L. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); University of ' ' Piemonte Orientale' ' , Department of Translational Medicine, Novara (Italy); Masini, L.; Filomeno, A.; Gambaro, G. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); Comoli, A.M. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Ophthalmology, Novara (Italy); Negri, E. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics, Novara (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium ({sup 192}Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.) [German] Das Karzinom des Augenlids stellt aufgrund der funktionellen und kosmetischen Beeintraechtigungen dieser anatomischen Region eine therapeutische Herausforderung dar. Ziele der Therapie sind sowohl die Tumorkontrolle als auch ein gutes funktionelles und kosmetisches Ergebnis. Lokale Kontrolle, Toxizitaet sowie funktionelle und kosmetische Ergebnisse bei Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids, die mit interstitieller Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, sollten analysiert werden. Sechzig Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids wurden mit interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Iridium-192-Draehten

  18. Major causes of impractical brachytherapy in elderly patients with uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanazume, Yumi; Yanazume, Shintaro; Iio, Kazuto; Yonekura, Ryuji; Kojima, Nobuko; Uchida, Natsuko; Koriyama, Chihaya; Douchi, Tsutomu

    2014-06-01

    Incomplete brachytherapy is a major risk factor for recurrence. However, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy has not been assessed adequately in elderly patients with invasive cervical cancer. The present study investigated the clinical importance of intracavitary brachytherapy and risk factors of incomplete intracavitary brachytherapy in elderly patients with cervical cancer. Subjects were 76 patients aged 70-89 years old with invasive cervical cancer. All subjects were recruited between January 1997 and September 2010, and were planning to receive external beam radiation therapy followed by high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Survival rates and the incidence of complications were compared between the 70s and 80s age groups. Risk factors for recurrence in elderly patients were evaluated using multivariate analysis, and risk factors for impractical intracavitary brachytherapy were also estimated. No significant differences were observed in 3-year progression-free survival rates or the incidence of complications in the two age groups. Cox multivariate analysis showed that histology (non-squamous cell carcinoma), incomplete intracavitary brachytherapy, and lymph node swelling were significant prognostic factors for recurrence. Impractical application was the major reason for incomplete treatment. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that a previous history without vaginal births (P = 0.016) was an independent risk factor for the impractical application, independent of tumor diameter ≥ 4 cm (P = 0.007). Incomplete intracavitary brachytherapy decreased the survival rates of elderly patients. Larger tumors and patients without a history of vaginal births were the two major causes of impractical intracavitary brachytherapy, which may be fatal, especially in elderly patients with bulky tumors. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. MO-E-BRD-00: Breast Brachytherapy: The Phoenix of Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  20. High brachytherapy doses can counteract hypoxia in cervical cancer—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru; Beskow, Catharina; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2017-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia is a well-known adverse factor for the outcome of radiotherapy. For cervical tumours in particular, several studies indicate large variability in tumour oxygenation. However, clinical evidence shows that the management of cervical cancer including brachytherapy leads to high rate of success. It was the purpose of this study to investigate whether the success of brachytherapy for cervical cancer, seemingly regardless of oxygenation status, could be explained by the characteristics of the brachytherapy dose distributions. To this end, a previously used in silico model of tumour oxygenation and radiation response was further developed to simulate the treatment of cervical cancer employing a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. Using a clinically-derived brachytherapy dose distribution and assuming a homogeneous dose delivered by external radiotherapy, cell survival was assessed on voxel level by taking into account the variation of sensitivity with oxygenation as well as the effects of repair, repopulation and reoxygenation during treatment. Various scenarios were considered for the conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the hypoxic region in the target. By using the clinically-prescribed brachytherapy dose distribution and varying the total dose delivered with external beam radiotherapy in 25 fractions, the resulting values of the dose for 50% tumour control, D 50, were in agreement with clinically-observed values for high cure rates if fast reoxygenation was assumed. The D 50 was furthermore similar for the different degrees of conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the tumour, regardless of whether the hypoxic fraction was 10%, 25%, or 40%. To achieve 50% control with external RT only, a total dose of more than 70 Gy in 25 fractions would be required for all cases considered. It can thus be concluded that the high doses delivered in brachytherapy can counteract the increased

  1. Optimal perioperative anesthesia management for gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A. Nielsen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To propose an optimal perioperative pain management clinical care pathway for interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer based on our interdepartmental experience. Material and methods : We conducted a retrospective review of 23 women who underwent 32 interstitial brachytherapy procedures for gynecological cancers, analyzing patient demographics, type of anesthetic, medications, postoperative pain scores, adverse events, and delays in discharge. We measured the association of postoperative nausea and/or vomiting (PONV with hydromorphone use, and postoperative pain scores and total narcotic administration with type of anesthesia. Results : In 91% of patients postoperative pain was managed with an epidural infusion plus, as needed (PRN, IV or patient controlled analgesia (PCA narcotics. The most common postoperative adverse event was PONV (53%, followed by delirium (22%. Hospital discharge was delayed, at least by one night, in 26% of patients. Use of a basal rate on the PCA was associated with all cases of delayed discharge from over-sedation and PONV. The use of 5 mg or more of intravenous (IV hydromorphone during the first 24-hours postoperatively was associated with PONV (p = 0.01. Use of a basal PCA was associated with delirium (p = 0.03. Postoperative pain scores were not significantly associated with the type of anesthesia. Conclusions : Interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy requires a multidisciplinary effort for optimal perioperative management. Our study outlines the appropriate preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anesthesia clinical care pathway. Decreased narcotic use during hospitalization and utilization of a patient-directed infusion may decrease side effects and allow for a more efficient hospital discharge.

  2. Reconstructive Urology

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    Fikret Fatih Önol

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of urethral stricture, Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG and reconstruction is applied with different patch techniques. Recently often prefered, this approach is, in bulber urethra strictures of BMG’s; by “ventral onley”, in pendulous urethra because of thinner spingiosis body, which provides support and nutrition of graft; by means of “dorsal inley” being anastomosis. In the research that Cordon et al. did, they compared conventional BMJ “onley” urethroplast and “pseudo-spongioplasty” which base on periurethral vascular tissues to be nourished by closing onto graft. In repairment of front urethras that spongiosis supportive tissue is insufficient, this method is defined as peripheral dartos [çevre dartos?] and buck’s fascia being mobilized and being combined on BMG patch. Between the years 2007 and 2012, assessment of 56 patients with conventional “ventral onley” BMG urethroplast and 46 patients with “pseudo-spongioplasty” were reported to have similar success rates (80% to 84% in 3.5 year follow-up on average. While 74% of the patients that were applied pseudo-spongioplasty had disease present at distal urethra (pendulous, bulbopendulous, 82% of the patients which were applied conventional onley urethroplast had stricture at proximal (bulber urethra yet. Also lenght of the stricture at the pseudo-spongioplasty group was longer in a statistically significant way (5.8 cm to 4.7 cm on average, p=0.028. This study which Cordon et al. did, shows that conditions in which conventional sponjiyoplasti is not possible, periurethral vascular tissues are adequate to nourish BMG. Even it is an important technique in terms of bringing a new point of view to today’s practice, data especially about complications that may show up after pseudo-spongioplasty usage on long distal strictures (e.g. appearance of urethral diverticulum is not reported. Along with this we think that, providing an oppurtinity to patch directly

  3. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  4. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  5. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  6. LOW-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: DIFFERENT INDICATIONS – DIFFERENT RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Biryukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Russia, there is presently a growing interest in low-dose intratissue radiotherapy (brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. Since its inception, current brachytherapy has undergone a number of significant changes in terms of improved visualization and better treatment planning and monitoring, which is sure to have affected the higher quality of their performance and better long-term results. The main purpose of the given paper is to generalize the data of foreign investigators who have the greatest experience with brachytherapy for its further use in the treatment of patients with locally advanced PC under the conditions of Russian clinics.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of 3D image-guided brachytherapy compared with 2D brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hayeon; Rajagopalan, Malolan S; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M Saiful; Smith, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) is a significant advance in locally advanced cervical cancer treatment. However, its cost-effectiveness (C/E) is unknown. We performed a C/E analysis of IGBT compared with conventional (two-dimensional [2D]) brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. A Markov model was constructed to model locally advanced cervical cancer treated with five fractions of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The model captured clinical parameters, quality of life utility, and treatment costs through the literature review. Costs were 2013 Medicare reimbursement. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, one-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated from a payer's perspective with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY gained. Treatment costs for five fractions of IGBT and 2D brachytherapy were $21,374 and $17,931, respectively. In the base-case analysis, the IGBT strategy costs $3003 more than 2D brachytherapy while gaining 0.16 QALYs, resulting in an ICER of $18,634 per QALY gained. In one-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of treatment costs, but the ICER remained brachytherapy. These findings were robust to variation of parameter values supporting the routine use of IGBT in locally advanced cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  9. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  10. American Brachytherapy Task Group Report: Adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy for early-stage endometrial cancer: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Block, Alec M; Alektiar, Kaled M; Gaffney, David K; Jones, Ellen; Klopp, Ann; Viswanathan, Akila N; Small, William

    This article aims to review the risk stratification of endometrial cancer, treatment rationale, outcomes, treatment planning, and treatment recommendations of vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in the postoperative management of endometrial cancer patients. The authors performed a thorough review of the literature and reference pertinent articles pertaining to the aims of this review. Adjuvant VBT for early-stage endometrial cancer patients results in very low rates of vaginal recurrence (0-3.1%) with low rates of late toxicity which are primarily vaginal in nature. Post-Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer 2 (PORTEC-2) supports that VBT results in noninferior rates of vaginal recurrence compared to external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of high-intermediate risk patients. VBT as a boost after external beam radiotherapy, in combination with chemotherapy, and for high-risk histologies have shown excellent results as well though randomized data do not exist supporting VBT boost. There are many different applicators, dose-fractionation schedules, and treatment planning techniques which all result in favorable clinical outcomes and low rates of toxicity. Recommendations have been published by the American Brachytherapy Society and the American Society of Radiation Oncology to help guide practitioners in the use of VBT. Data support that patients and physicians prefer joint decision making regarding the use of VBT, and patients often desire additional treatment for a marginal benefit in risk of recurrence. Discussions regarding adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer are best performed in a multidisciplinary setting, and patients should be counseled properly regarding the risks and benefits of adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. American Brachytherapy Task Group Report: A pooled analysis of clinical outcomes for high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Viswanathan, Akila; Liu, Yu; Li, Chin-Shang; Albuquerque, Kevin; Damato, Antonio L; Beriwal, Sushil; Erickson, Beth

    Advanced imaging used in combination with brachytherapy (BT) has revolutionized the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. We present a comprehensive review of the literature for definitive radiation with high-dose-rate (HDR) BT. In addition, we investigate potential outcome improvement with image-based brachytherapy (IBBT) compared to studies using traditional Point A dosing. This review extensively investigates acute and late toxicities. This study reviews the literature from 2000 to 2015 with an emphasis on modern approaches including concurrent chemotherapy (chemoRT), radiation, and HDR BT and IBBT. Descriptive statistics and pelvic control (PC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes were calculated using weighted means to report pooled analysis of outcomes. Literature search yielded 16 prospective, 51 retrospective studies that reported survival outcomes, and 13 retrospective studies that focused on acute and late toxicity outcomes regardless of applicator type. There are 57 studies that report Point A dose specification with 33 having chemoRT, and 10 studies that use IBBT, 8 with chemoRT. Patients receiving radiation and chemoRT with HDR BT in the prospective studies, with >24 months followup, rates of PC were: for RT: 73%, SD: 11; CRT: 82%, SD: 8; DFS-RT: 55%, SD: 10; CRT: 65%, SD: 7; OS-RT: 66%, SD: 7; CRT: 70%, SD: 11. In the retrospective studies, the PC rates (weighted means) for the radiation and chemoradiation outcomes are 75% vs. 80%, and for DFS, the values were 55% vs. 63%, respectively. Comparing patients receiving chemoRT and IBBT to traditional Point A dose specification, there is a significant improvement in PC (p Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-López, Ana M; Guirado, Damián; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Simancas, Fernando; Gazdic-Santic, Maja; Lallena, Antonio M

    2013-12-01

    Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of (125)I seeds. Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for (125)I selectSeed(TM) brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level. Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber. Variations of the altitude and changes in the weather conditions may produce

  13. Robust and accurate multi-view reconstruction by prioritized matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylimaki, Markus; Kannala, Juho; Holappa, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a prioritized matching approach for finding corresponding points in multiple calibrated images for multi-view stereo reconstruction. The approach takes a sparse set of seed matches between pairs of views as input and then propagates the seeds to neighboring regions by using...... a prioritized matching method which expands the most promising seeds first. The output of the method is a three-dimensional point cloud. Unlike previous correspondence growing approaches our method allows to use the best-first matching principle in the generic multi-view stereo setting with arbitrary number...

  14. Oil palm seed distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand-Gasselin Tristan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available For a tropical plant, the oil palm commodity chain has the peculiarity of possessing a major seed production sector for reasons that are primarily genetic. This seed sector has numerous original aspects. Breeders are also propagators and usually also distribute their seeds. Oil palm seeds are semi-recalcitrant: they display pseudo-dormancy. Achieving seed germination is difficult and requires lengthy treatments and special installations. This restriction greatly influences seed distribution and the role of the different stakeholders in the commodity chain. It was only once it had been discovered how the “sh” gene functioned, which controls shell thickness, and when it became necessary to produce “tenera” seeds derived from exclusively “dura x pisifera” crosses, that a true seed market developed. In addition it is difficult to organize seed distribution to smallholders. This is partly due to difficulties that the profession, or a State-run organization, has in controlling middlemen networks, and partly to the absence of any protective systems (UPOV, plant breeder certificate, etc. that generally oblige breeders to preserve and propagate parents in their own installations. In fact there are major inequalities in the access to seeds between agroindustry and smallholders. Another peculiarity of the oil palm seed market is the virtually total absence of guarantees for buyers: the quality of the research conducted by breeders, the seed production strategies necessary for transferring genetic progress, and the technical quality of production. The only guarantee today comes from the relations of confidence established year after year between breeders/distributors and growers. In this fields, research can lead to some proposals: molecular biology offers some interesting prospects for certifying seed quality and social science develop effective communication methods.

  15. A Brachytherapy Plan Evaluation Tool for Interstitial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surega Anbumani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiobiological metrics such as tumor control probability (TCP and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP help in assessing the quality of brachytherapy plans. Application of such metrics in clinics as well as research is still inadequate. This study presents the implementation of two indigenously designed plan evaluation modules: Brachy_TCP and Brachy_NTCP. Evaluation tools were constructed to compute TCP a