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Sample records for brachytherapy radiation source

  1. Brachytherapy with 125-Iodine sources: transport and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla D.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Moura, Joao A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Feher, Anselmo; Hilario, Katia F.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The estimates for the year 2009 show that 466,730 new cancer cases will occur in Brazil. Prostate cancer is the second most incident type. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy, with Iodine-125 sources are an important form of treatment for this kind of cancer. The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) created a project to develop a national prototype of these sources and is implementing a facility for local production. The seeds manufacture in Brazil will allow to diminish the treatment cost and make it possible for a larger number of patients. While the laboratory is not ready, the IPEN import and it distributes seeds. This work aim is to present and evaluate the transport procedures and the radiological protection applied to imported sources in order to assist the procedures for the new laboratory implementation. Before sending to hospitals, the seeds are packed by a radioprotector supervisor, in accordance with CNEN NE 5.01 standard 'Radioactive Material Transport'. Despite Iodine-125 presents low energy photons, around 29 keV, local and personal dosimeters are used during the transport process, as described in CNEN NN 3.01 standard 'Radiological Protection Basic Guideline'. All the results show no contamination and very low exposure, proving the method to be valid. The transport procedure used is correct, according to the regulations. As an result of this work, a new dosimeter should be installed and evaluate in future study. (author)

  2. Comparison of radiation shielding requirements for HDR brachytherapy using 169Yb and 192Ir sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Baltas, D.

    2006-01-01

    169 Yb has received a renewed focus lately as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following the results of a recent work by our group which proved 169 Yb to be a good candidate for HDR prostate brachytherapy, this work seeks to quantify the radiation shielding requirements for 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications in comparison to the corresponding requirements for the current 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy standard. Monte Carlo simulation (MC) is used to obtain 169 Yb and 192 Ir broad beam transmission data through lead and concrete. Results are fitted to an analytical equation which can be used to readily calculate the barrier thickness required to achieve a given dose rate reduction. Shielding requirements for a HDR brachytherapy treatment room facility are presented as a function of distance, occupancy, dose limit, and facility workload, using analytical calculations for both 169 Yb and 192 Ir HDR sources. The barrier thickness required for 169 Yb is lower than that for 192 Ir by a factor of 4-5 for lead and 1.5-2 for concrete. Regarding 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications, the lead shielding requirements do not exceed 15 mm, even in highly conservative case scenarios. This allows for the construction of a lead door in most cases, thus avoiding the construction of a space consuming, specially designed maze. The effects of source structure, attenuation by the patient, and scatter conditions within an actual treatment room on the above-noted findings are also discussed using corresponding MC simulation results

  3. Radiation protection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1996-02-01

    It covers technical procedures in medical applications for cancer treatment. Radiation protection principles in brachytherapy. Medical uses in therapy for Sr-90, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Ir-192, Au-198, Bi-214, Pb-214. (The author)

  4. Radiation safety and gynaecological brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1983, the Radiation Control Section of the South Australian Health Commission conducted an investigation into radiation safety practices in gynaecological brachytherapy. Part of the investigation included a study of the transportation of radioactive sources between hospitals. Several deficiences in radiation safety were found in the way these sources were being transported. New transport regulations came into force in South Australia in July 1984 and since then there have been many changes in the transportation procedure

  5. Radioactive sources in brachytherapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Janez

    2003-01-01

    Background. In modern brachytherapy, a greast step forward was made in the 1960s in France with the introduction of new radioactive isotopes and new techniques. These innovations spread rapidly across Europe, though no single dosimetry standard had been set by then. In the new millennium, the advances in brachytherapy are further stimulated by the introduction of 3-D imaging techniques and the latest after loading irradiation equipment that use point sources. The international organiyation IC...

  6. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.

  7. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External ... In all cases of brachytherapy, the source of radiation is encapsulated ... non-radioactive metallic capsule. This prevents the radioactive materials ...

  8. Radiation protection procedures and dose to the staff in brachytherapy with permanent implant of the sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, G.; Cattani, F.

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of intra capsular prostate cancers with the permanent implantation of low energy sealed radioactive sources (''103 Pd-''125I) offers the same probability of curing the tumours as surgery and external-beam radiotherapy with a minimum incidence of unwanted side-effects. The first attempts of using sealed sources for treating prostate cancers go back to 1917, when Barringer reported the results obtained with the implant of ''236Ra needles. Beginning from that period the interest for prostate brachytherapy has shown a fluctuating trend, due especially to the technological possibilities and to the status of the alternative treatment modalities (surgery, external radiotherapy). The main reason of the substantial failure of brachytherapy as compared to the two other treatment modalities had two main causes: the energy, too high ( E≅ 840 keV), of γ-radiation emitted by ''226 Ra in equilibrium with its decay products and the lack of imaging techniques able to visualize with sufficient accuracy both the prostate and the arrangement, inside it, of the radioactive sources. The employ of low energy γ-emitting radionuclides began in 1974, when Whitmore et al. working at the Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer Hospital of New York suggested the use of ''125 I sealed sources for the realisation of interstitial permanent implants. Also this attempt, though reducing the side effects typical of the surgical intervention (incontinence, impotence), did non give the expected results in terms of local control of the disease and, as a consequence, of the survival's length. This partial failure was attributed to the fact that, in most cases the dose distribution inside the target volume was not homogeneous, due to the inadequacy of the available imaging techniques used for checking the real position of the sources, during their manual insertion in the tissues. In the last ten years,however, great progresses have been made in the US i maging techniques, in the manufacture of

  9. Specification of brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    BCRU recommends that the following specification of gamma-ray brachytherapy sources be adopted. Unless otherwise stated, the output of a cylindrical source should be specified in air kerma rate at a point in free space at a distance of 1 m from the source on the radial plane of symmetry, i.e. the plane bisecting the active length and perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of the source. For a wire source the output should be specified for a 1 cm length. For any other construction of source, the point at which the output is specified should be stated. It is also recommended that the units in which the air kerma rate is expressed should be micrograys per hour (..mu..Gy/h).

  10. American College of Radiology-American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for electronically generated low-energy radiation sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Phillip M; Gaspar, Laurie E; Buzurovic, Ivan; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Kasper, Michael E; Nag, Subir; Ouhib, Zoubir; Petit, Joshua H; Rosenthal, Seth A; Small, William; Wallner, Paul E; Hartford, Alan C

    This collaborative practice parameter technical standard has been created between the American College of Radiology and American Brachytherapy Society to guide the usage of electronically generated low energy radiation sources (ELSs). It refers to the use of electronic X-ray sources with peak voltages up to 120 kVp to deliver therapeutic radiation therapy. The parameter provides a guideline for utilizing ELS, including patient selection and consent, treatment planning, and delivery processes. The parameter reviews the published clinical data with regard to ELS results in skin, breast, and other cancers. This technical standard recommends appropriate qualifications of the involved personnel. The parameter reviews the technical issues relating to equipment specifications as well as patient and personnel safety. Regarding suggestions for educational programs with regard to this parameter,it is suggested that the training level for clinicians be equivalent to that for other radiation therapies. It also suggests that ELS must be done using the same standards of quality and safety as those in place for other forms of radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 137Cs - Brachytherapy sources : a technology scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.N.

    2001-01-01

    Cancer has emerged as one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. India houses world's second largest population and registers 4-5 lakhs new cancer cases every year. Cancer of cervix is most common form of malignancy among Indian women. Radiation therapy, especially intracavity brachytherapy in conjunction with other modalities like surgery, chemotherapy has been found to be highly effective for the management and control of cervical carcinoma at all stages. A technology has been developed indigenously for the fabrication of 137 Cs sources for brachytherapy applications

  12. Definition of medical event is to be based on the total source strength for evaluation of permanent prostate brachytherapy: A report from the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Subir; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Hagan, Michael; Rivard, Mark J; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Welsh, James S; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission deems it to be a medical event (ME) if the total dose delivered differs from the prescribed dose by 20% or more. A dose-based definition of ME is not appropriate for permanent prostate brachytherapy as it generates too many spurious MEs and thereby creates unnecessary apprehension in patients, and ties up regulatory bodies and the licensees in unnecessary and burdensome investigations. A more suitable definition of ME is required for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) formed a working group of experienced clinicians to review the literature, assess the validity of current regulations, and make specific recommendations about the definition of an ME in permanent prostate brachytherapy. The working group found that the current definition of ME in §35.3045 as "the total dose delivered differs from the prescribed dose by 20 percent or more" was not suitable for permanent prostate brachytherapy since the prostate volume (and hence the resultant calculated prostate dose) is dependent on the timing of the imaging, the imaging modality used, the observer variability in prostate contouring, the planning margins used, inadequacies of brachytherapy treatment planning systems to calculate tissue doses, and seed migration within and outside the prostate. If a dose-based definition for permanent implants is applied strictly, many properly executed implants would be improperly classified as an ME leading to a detrimental effect on brachytherapy. The working group found that a source strength-based criterion, of >20% of source strength prescribed in the post-procedure written directive being implanted outside the planning target volume is more appropriate for defining ME in permanent prostate brachytherapy. ASTRO recommends that the definition of ME for permanent prostate brachytherapy should not be dose based but should be based upon the source strength (air-kerma strength) administered.

  13. The theoretical basis and clinical methodology for stereotactic interstitial brain tumor irradiation using iododeoxyuridine as a radiation sensitizer and samarium-145 as a brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Kanellitsas, C.; Clendenon, N.R.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    High grade astrocytomas have proven resistant to all conventional therapy. A technique to produce radiation enhancement during interstitial brain tumor irradiation by using a radiation sensitizer (IdUrd) and by stimulation of Auger electron cascades through absorption of low energy photons in iodine (Photon activation) is described. Clinical studies using IdUrd, 192 Ir as a brachytherapy source, and external radiation have produced promising results. Substituting samarium-145 for 192 Ir in this protocol is expected to produce enhanced results. 15 refs

  14. The needs for brachytherapy source calibrations in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coursey, B.M.; Goodman, L.J.; Hoppes, D.D.; Loevinger, R.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Soares, C.G.; Weaver, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Brachytherapy sources of beta and gamma radiation ('brachy' is from the Greek, meaning 'near') have a long history of use in interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and ocular radiation therapy. In the past the US national standards for these sources were often specified in activity or milligram radium equivalent. With the introduction of new radionuclide sources to replace radium, source strength calibrations are now expressed as air kerma rate at a meter. In this paper, we review the NIST standards for brachytherapy sources, list some of the common radionuclides and source encapsulations in use in the US radiology community, and describe the latest NIST work, in collaboration with several US medical institutions, on a method of two- and three-dimensional dose mapping of brachytherapy sources using radiochromic films. (orig.)

  15. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: an electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mark J; Davis, Stephen D; DeWerd, Larry A; Rusch, Thomas W; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-11-01

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, S700 Source exhibited depth dose behavior similar to low-energy photon-emitting low dose rate sources 125I and l03Pd, yet with capability for variable and much higher dose rates and subsequently adjustable penetration capabilities. This paper presents the calculated and measured in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for the model S700 Source at the aforementioned three operating voltages.

  16. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostelato, Maria Elisa Chuery Martins

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  17. Radiographic Control of 137-Cs Brachytherapy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistrovic, M.; Viculin, T.; Jurkovic, S.

    2003-01-01

    1 37C s brachytherapy sources are practical for the intracavitary application due to their relatively long lifetime (T 1/2 = 30 y). On the other hand, due to the relatively low energy (0.66 MeV) of the emitted photons, they are suitable for an efficient radiation protection. The dose distribution around the sources is usually calculated by a specific program. However this program requires the knowledge of the position of sources within the applicator as well as the distribution of activity along them. The only way to learn these data is to make an X-ray picture of applicators and sources superimposed to the autoradiography of every source. It is difficult to achieve satisfactory radiographs with high dose rate sources with standard X-ray film material because autoradiography covers the structure of the radiographic shadow. The problem can be overcome either by applying a high intensity X-ray or gamma beam (originating from a radiotherapeutic machine), or by using photographic material of very low sensitivity, for example photographic paper. Combining both possibilities one can obtain satisfactory images. (author)

  18. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must...

  19. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in accordance...

  20. Procedures for calibration of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Alonso Samper, J.L.; Morales Lopez, J.L.; Saez Nunez, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Brachytherapy source strength verification is a responsibility of the user of these source, in fact of the Medical Physicists in charge of this issue in a Radiotherapy Service. The calibration procedures in the users conditions are shown. Specifics methods for source strength determination are recommended, both for High Dose Rate (HDR) sources with Remote Afterloading equipment and for Low Dose Rate sources. The The results of the calibration of HDR Remote After loaders are indicated

  1. Current status of brachytherapy in Korea: a national survey of radiation oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Juree; Park, Won; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to acquire information on brachytherapy resources in Korea through a national survey of radiation oncologists. Between October 2014 and January 2015, a questionnaire on the current status of brachytherapy was distributed to all 86 radiation oncology departments in Korea. The questionnaire was divided into sections querying general information on human resources, brachytherapy equipment, and suggestions for future directions of brachytherapy policy in Korea. The response rate of the survey was 88.3%. The average number of radiation oncologists per center was 2.3. At the time of survey, 28 centers (36.8%) provided brachytherapy to patients. Among the 28 brachytherapy centers, 15 (53.5%) were located in in the capital Seoul and its surrounding metropolitan areas. All brachytherapy centers had a high-dose rate system using (192)Ir (26 centers) or (60)Co (two centers). Among the 26 centers using (192)Ir sources, 11 treated fewer than 40 patients per year. In the two centers using (60)Co sources, the number of patients per year was 16 and 120, respectively. The most frequently cited difficulties in performing brachytherapy were cost related. A total of 21 centers had a plan to sustain the current brachytherapy system, and four centers noted plans to upgrade their brachytherapy system. Two centers stated that they were considering discontinuation of brachytherapy due to cost burdens of radioisotope source replacement. The present study illustrated the current status of brachytherapy in Korea. Financial difficulties were the major barriers to the practice of brachytherapy.

  2. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: An electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Davis, Stephen D.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Rusch, Thomas W.; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-01-01

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent trade mark sign X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, P (5) were 0.20, 0.24, and 0.29 for the 40, 45, and 50 kV voltage settings, respectively. For 1 125 I and 103 Pd, yet with capability for variable and much higher dose rates and subsequently adjustable penetration capabilities. This paper presents the calculated and measured in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for the model S700 Source at the aforementioned three operating voltages

  3. Determining profile of dose distribution for PD-103 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkay, Camgoz; Mehmet, N. Kumru; Gultekin, Yegin

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Brachytherapy is a particular radiotherapy for cancer treatments. By destructing cancerous cells using radiation, the treatment proceeded. When alive tissues are subject it is hazardous to study experimental. For brachytherapy sources generally are studied as theoretical using computer simulation. General concept of the treatment is to locate the radioactive source into cancerous area of related tissue. In computer studies Monte Carlo mathematical method that is in principle based on random number generations, is used. Palladium radioisotope is LDR (Low radiation Dose Rate) source. Main radioactive material was coated with titanium cylinder with 3mm length, 0.25 mm radius. There are two parts of Pd-103 in the titanium cylinder. It is impossible to investigate differential effects come from two part as experimental. Because the source dimensions are small compared with measurement distances. So there is only simulation method. In dosimetric studies it is aimed to determine absorbed dose distribution in tissue as radial and angular. In nuclear physics it is obligation to use computer based methods for researchers. Radiation studies have hazards for scientist and people interacted with radiation. When hazard exceed over recommended limits or physical conditions are not suitable (long work time, non economical experiments, inadequate sensitivity of materials etc.) it is unavoidable to simulate works and experiments before practices of scientific methods in life. In medical area, usage of radiation is required computational work for cancer treatments. Some computational studies are routine in clinics and other studies have scientific development purposes. In brachytherapy studies there are significant differences between experimental measurements and theoretical (computer based) output data. Errors of data taken from experimental studies are larger than simulation values errors. In design of a new brachytherapy source it is important to consider detailed

  4. Radiation Protection Training in Intracoronary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, C.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Sabate, M.; Galvan, C.; Meiggs, L.; Corral, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    To report the educational objectives and contents on Radiation Protection (RP) for the practice of Intracoronary Brachytherapy (ICB) procedures. The wide international experience on training programs for ICB as well as our own experience organizing several courses aimed at Cardiologists, Radio therapists and Medical Physicists has been used to elaborate specific RP objectives and contents. The objectives, differentiated for Cardiologists, Radio therapists, Medical Physicists, Nurses and Technicians, pretend to guarantee the safety and RP of both patient and staff in the procedures of ICB. The objectives are necessarily different because their RP formation and their role in the procedure are different. The general topics included in RP training programmes for ICB could be: general topics on RP (Interaction of radiation and matter, RP principles, radiobiology, etc), principles of operation of ICB and interventional X-ray equipment, quantification of radiation dose and risks, optimisation of protection of staff and patients, accidents and emergencies, regulations, responsibilities, quality assurance program, handling of ICB sources, installation and commissioning. Training programs based on the objectives presented in this paper would encourage positive safety culture in ICB and can also be used as a starting point by the Regulatory Authority for the authorization of new Installations and credentialing of professionals involved in this technique as well as for the continuous education of the staff involved. (Author) 10 refs

  5. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula; Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Belinato, Walmir

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a 192 Ir and a 125 I radioactive sources. The 192 Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The 125 I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of 125 I and one of 192 Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the 192 Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the 125 I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  6. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, IPENCNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a {sup 192}Ir and a {sup 125}I radioactive sources. The {sup 192}Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The {sup 125}I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of {sup 125}I and one of {sup 192}Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the {sup 192}Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the {sup 125}I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  7. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  8. Monte Carlo simulations and radiation dosimetry measurements of 142Pr capillary tube-based radioactive implant (CTRI). A new structure for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakht, M.K.; Haddadi, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Ahmadi, S.J.; Sadjadi, S.S.; Tenreiro, C.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, a promising β - -emitting praseodymium-142 glass seed was proposed for brachytherapy of prostate cancer. In accordance with the previous study, a 142 Pr capillary tube-based radioactive implant (CTRI) was suggested as a source with a new structure to enhance application of β - -emitting radioisotopes such as 142 Pr in brachytherapy. Praseodymium oxide powder was encapsulated in a glass capillary tube. Then, a thin and flexible fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon layer sealed the capillary tube. The source was activated in the Tehran Research Reactor by the 141 Pr(n, γ) 142 Pr reaction. Measurements of the dosimetric parameters were performed using GafChromic radiochromic film. In addition, the dose rate distribution of 142 Pr CTRI was calculated by modeling 142 Pr source in a water phantom using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP5) Code. The active source was unreactive and did not leak in water. In comparison with the earlier proposed 142 Pr seed, the suggested source showed similar desirable dosimetric characteristics. Moreover, the 142 Pr CTRI production procedure may be technically and economically more feasible. The mass of praseodymium in CTRI structure could be greater than that of the 142 Pr glass seed; therefore, the required irradiation time and the neutron flux could be reduced. A 142 Pr CTRI was proposed for brachytherapy of prostate cancer. The dosimetric calculations by the experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation were performed to fulfill the requirements according to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine recommendations before the clinical use of new brachytherapy sources. The characteristics of the suggested source were compared with those of the previously proposed 142 Pr glass seed. (author)

  9. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  10. Radiation exposure after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, Federica; Vavassori, Andrea; Polo, Alfredo; Rondi, Elena; Cambria, Raffaella; Orecchia, Roberto; Tosi, Giampiero

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Limited information is available on the true radiation exposure and associated risks for the relatives of the patients submitted to prostate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive sources and for any other people coming into contact with them. In order to provide appropriate information, we analyzed the radiation exposure data from 216 prostate cancer patients who underwent 125 I or 103 Pd implants at the European Institute of Oncology of Milan, Italy. Patients and methods: Between October 1999 and October 2004, 216 patients with low risk prostate carcinoma were treated with 125 I (200 patients) or 103 Pd (16 patients) permanent seed implantation. One day after the procedure, radiation exposure measurements around the patients were performed using an ionization chamber survey meter (Victoreen RPO-50) calibrated in dose rate at an accredited calibration center (calibration Centre SIT 104). Results: The mean dose rate at the posterior skin surface (gluteal region) following 125 I implants was 41.3 μSv/h (range: 6.2-99.4 μSv/h) and following 103 Pd implants was 18.9 μSv/h (range 5.0-37.3 μSv/h). The dose rate at 50 cm from the skin decreased to the mean value of 6.4 μSv/h for the 125 I implants and to the mean value of 1.7 μSv/h for the 103 Pd implants. Total times required to reach the annual dose limit (1 mSv/year) recommended for the general population by the European Directive 96/29/Euratom and by the Italian law (Decreto Legislativo 241/2000) at a distance of 50 cm from the posterior skin surface of the implanted patient would be 7.7 and 21.6 days for 125 I and for 103 Pd. Good correlation between the measured dose rates and both the total implanted activity and the distance between the most posteriorly implanted seed and the skin surface of the patients was found. Conclusions: Our data show that the dose rates at 50 cm away from the prostate brachytherapy patients are very low and that the doses possibly absorbed by the

  11. Brachytherapy radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Biase, Steven J.; Wallner, Kent; Tralins, Kevin; Sutlief, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB) in brachytherapy-related impotence. Methods and Materials: Fourteen Pd-103 or I-125 implant patients were studied. For patients treated with implant alone, the prostate and margin (clinical target volume [CTV]) received a prescription dose of 144 Gy for I-125 or 115 Gy for Pd-103. Two patients received Pd-103 (90 Gy) with 46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Axial CT images were acquired 2 to 4 hours postoperatively for postimplant dosimetry. Because the NVBs cannot be visualized on CT, NVB calculation points were determined according to previously published anatomic descriptions. Bilateral NVB points were considered to lie posterior-laterally, approximately 2 mm from the prostatic capsule. NVB doses were recorded bilaterally, at 0.5-cm intervals from the prostatic base. Results: For Pd-103, the average NVB doses ranged from 150 Gy to 260 Gy, or 130% to 226% of the prescription dose. For I-125, the average NVB dose ranged from 200 Gy to 325 Gy, or 140% to 225% of the prescription dose. These was no consistent relationship between the NVB dose and the distance from the prostatic base. To examine the possible effect of minor deviations of our calculation points from the true NVB location, we performed NVB calculations at points 2 mm medial or lateral from the NVB calculation point in 8 patients. Doses at these alternate calculation points were comparable, although there was greater variability with small changes in the calculation point if sources were located outside the capsule, near the NVB calculation point. Three patients who developed early postimplant impotence had maximal NVB doses that far exceeded the average values. Conclusions: In the next few years, we hope to clarify the role of high NVB radiation doses on potency, by correlating NVB dose calculations with a large number of patients enrolled in an ongoing I-125 versus Pd-103 trial for early-stage patients

  12. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R.; Ha, Sung W.

    2003-01-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a 90 Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter

  13. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R. [College of Medicine, Florida Univ., Florida (United States); Ha, Sung W. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a {sub 90}Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter.

  14. Monte Carlo Simulations Validation Study: Vascular Brachytherapy Beta Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orion, I.; Koren, K.

    2004-01-01

    During the last decade many versions of angioplasty irradiation treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this unique brachytherapy is to administer a sufficient radiation dose into the vein walls in order to prevent restonosis, a clinical sequel to balloon angioplasty. The most suitable sources for this vascular brachytherapy are the β - emitters such as Re-188, P-32, and Sr-90/Y-90, with a maximum energy range of up to 2.1 MeV [1,2,3]. The radioactive catheters configurations offered for these treatments can be a simple wire [4], a fluid filled balloon or a coated stent. Each source is differently positioned inside the blood vessel, and the emitted electrons ranges therefore vary. Many types of sources and configurations were studied either experimentally or with the use of the Monte Carlo calculation technique, while most of the Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using EGS4 [5] or MCNP [6]. In this study we compared the beta-source absorbed-dose versus radial-distance of two treatment configurations using MCNP and EGS4 simulations. This comparison was aimed to discover the differences between the MCNP and the EGS4 simulation code systems in intermediate energies electron transport

  15. Radiation Exposure Reduction to Brachytherapy Staff By Using Remote Afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalla, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    The radiation exposures to the personnel staff from patients with brachytherapy implants in a brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposures to the brachytherapy personnel, as determined by Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) monitors, indicates a four-fold reduction in exposures after the implantation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for seven quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the brachytherapy staff of 2543 Μ Sv. After the implantation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per person of 153 Μ Sv. This is 76% reduction in exposure to brachytherapy personnel with the use of these devices

  16. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated for a 131Cs source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the IsoRay Medical model CS-1 Rev2 131 Cs brachytherapy source was performed. Dose distributions were simulated using Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) in liquid water, Solid TM , and Virtual Water TM spherical phantoms. From these results, the in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters have been determined, and were compared with those of Murphy et al. [Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)] using measurements and simulations. Our results suggest that calculations obtained using erroneous cross-section libraries should be discarded as recommended by the 2004 AAPM TG-43U1 report. Our MC Λ value of 1.046±0.019 cGy h -1 U -1 is within 1.3% of that measured by Chen et al. [Med. Phys. 32, 3279-3285 (2005)] using TLDs and the calculated results of Wittman and Fisher [Med. Phys. 34, 49-54 (2007)] using MCNP5. Using the discretized energy approach of Rivard [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 55, 775-782 (2001)] to ascertain the impact of individual 131 Cs photons on radial dose function and anisotropy functions, there was virtual equivalence of results for 29.461≤E γ ≤34.419 keV and for a mono-energetic 30.384 keV photon source. Comparisons of radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data are also included, and an analysis of material composition and cross-section libraries was performed

  17. Radiation safety parameters following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smathers, Sesalie; Wallner, Kent; Korssjoen, Tammy; Bergsagel, Carl; Hudson, Rick H.; Sutlief, Steven; Blasko, John

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the degree and variability of radiation exposure to the general public from patients after I-125 or Pd-103 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Radiation exposure measurements were made from 38 consecutive, unselected patients with stage T1 or T2 prostatic carcinoma who had trans perineal I-125 or Pd-103 implants at the University of Washington in 1998. Results: The exposure rate at the anterior skin surface following a I-125 implant ranged from 2.2 to 8.9 mrem/hour (average: 5.0). The exposure rate at the anterior skin surface from a Pd-103 implant ranged from 0.5 to 4.9 mrem/hour (average: 1.7). Based on the current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations the time required to reach the annual limit at the anterior skin surface would be 20 hours for I-125 and 59 hours for Pd-103. For exposure at the lateral skin surface, the times would exceed 500 hours for either isotope. Conclusions: This data suggest that patients need not be concerned about being a radiation risk to the general public following their procedure

  18. Development of the Dutch primary standard for beta-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marel, J. an der; Dijk, E. van

    2002-01-01

    The application of β-radiation emitting radioactive sources in medicine is rapidly expanding. An important new application is the use of β-radiation emitting radioactive sources in endovascular brachytherapy to avoid restenosis. Another well-known application is the use of the ophthalmic applicator (flat or concave surface source) for the treatment of tumors in the eye. Dose and dose distributions are very important characteristics of brachytherapy sources. The absorbed dose in the treated tissue should be known accurately to assure a good quality of the treatment and to develop new treatment methods and source configurations. At the Nederland s Meetinstituut (NMi) a project is going on for the development of a primary standard for betadosimetry. With this standard, dose and dose distributions of β-sources as used in brachytherapy can be measured in terms of absorbed dose to water. The primary standard is based on an extrapolation chamber. The extrapolation chamber will become part of a quality assurance system in Dutch hospitals for endovascular brachytherapy sources. The quality assurance system will further consist of transfer standards like well-type ionisation chambers, plastic scintillator systems and radiochromic film dosimetry. Apart from the endovascular sources the extrapolation chamber will be used to characterize ophthalmic applicators

  19. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou J; Zamdborg L; Sebastian E

    2015-01-01

    Jun Zhou,1,2 Leonid Zamdborg,1 Evelyn Sebastian1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, 2Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI, USA Abstract: The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy ...

  20. Radiation safety program in high dose rate brachytherapy facility at INHS Asvini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy concerns primarily the use of radioactive sealed sources which are inserted into catheters or applicators and placed directly into tissue either inside or very close to the target volume. The use of radiation in treatment of patients involves both benefits and risks. It has been reported that early radiation workers had developed radiation induced cancers. These incidents lead to continuous work for the improvement of radiation safety of patients and personnel The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy needs appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize the risks to both patients and medical staff. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control, quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program developedfor a high dose rate brachytherapy facility at our centre which may serve as a guideline for other centres intending to install a similar facility.

  1. Factors affecting radiation injury after interstitial brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibel, S.A.; Gutin, P.H.; Davis, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of brachytherapy on normal brain tissue are not easily delineated in the clinical setting because of the presence of concurrent radiation-induced changes in the coexistent brain tumor. Sequential morphologic studies performed after the implantation of radioactive sources into the brains of experimental animals have provided a better understanding of the character and magnitude of the structural changes produced by interstitial irradiation on normal brain tissue. Furthermore, the clinical experience accumulated thus far provides not only relevant information, but also some guidelines for future treatment policies. In this paper, the authors summarize the experimental findings and review the pathologic and clinical features of brain injury caused by interstitial brachytherapy. A number of studies in the older literature examined the effects of radioisotopes such as radium-226 (38--43), radon-22 (44--46), gold-198 (29,47--50), tantalum-182 (29,51,52) yttrium-9- (50,53,54), and cobalt-60 (29,50,55). This review is restricted to low- and high-activity encapsulated iodine-125 ( 125 I) and iridium-192 ( 192 Ir), the isotopes that are most commonly used in current clinical practice

  2. Radiation therapy sources, equipment and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The safety code for Telegamma Therapy Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-1) and safety code for Brachytherapy Sources, Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-3) were issued by AERB in 1986 and 1988 respectively. These codes specified mandatory requirements for radiation therapy facilities, covering the entire spectrum of operations ranging from the setting up of a facility to its ultimate decommissioning, including procedures to be followed during emergency situations. The codes also stipulated requirements of personnel and their responsibilities. With the advent of new techniques and equipment such as 3D-conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, treatment planning system, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, portal imaging, integrated brachytherapy and endovascular brachytherapy during the last two decades, AERB desires that these codes be revised and merged into a single code titled Radiation Therapy Sources, Equipment, and Installations

  3. Radiation exposure of nursing personnel to brachytherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, P.D.; Kase, K.R.; Bjaerngard, B.E.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation exposure of nursing personnel to brachytherapy patients has been analyzed from data collected during the years 1973-1976, at four different hospitals. The average annual dose per exposed nurse ranged between 25 and 150 mrem. The radiation exposure per nurse was found to be proportional to the total potential exposure and was uncorrelated with the size of the nursing staff. (author)

  4. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 04: Commissioning and Implementation of a Cobalt-60 High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dysart, Jonathan [Horizon Health Network (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    An Eckert & Ziegler Bebig Co0.A86 cobalt 60 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy source was commissioned for clinical use. Long-lived Co-60 HDR sources offer potential logistical and economic advantages over Ir-192 sources, and should be considered for low to medium workload brachytherapy departments where modest increases in treatment times are not a factor. In optimized plans, the Co-60 source provides a similar dose distribution to Ir-192 despite the difference in radiation energy. By switching to Co-60, source exchange frequency can be reduced by a factor of 20, resulting in overall financial savings of more than 50% compared to Ir-192 sources. In addition, a reduction in Physicist QA workload of roughly 200 hours over the 5 year life of the Co-60 source is also expected. These benefits should be considered against the modest increases in average treatment time compared to those of Ir-192 sources, as well as the centre-specific needs for operating room shielding modification.

  5. A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Ulrich; Kaulich, Theodor W; Álvarez-Romero, José T; Carlsson Tedgren, Sa; Enger, Shirin A; Medich, David C; Mourtada, Firas; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J; Zakaria, G Abu

    2016-06-01

    In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detector's response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E¯(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality indexQ(BT)(E¯), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, around BT sources. While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT)(E¯)=TPR10(20)(E¯) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT)(E¯)=Dprim(r=2cm,θ0=90°)/Dprim(r0=1cm,θ0=90°), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, Dprim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT)(E¯) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient μ¯(E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons Eprim(eff)(r0,θ0) at the TG-43 reference position Pref(r0=1cm,θ0=90°), being close to the mean total photon energy E¯tot(r0,θ0). If one has calibrated detectors, published E¯tot(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor [Formula: see text] for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q0, the detector's response can be determined and Dw(r,θ) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality indexQ(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon's penetration probability and scattering potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Radiation protection during brachytherapy, radiosynoviorthesis or radioimmunotherapy using liquid beta sources. Statement of the SSK; Strahlenschutz bei der Therapie mit Beta-Strahlern in fluessiger Form im Rahmen einer Brachytherapie, Radiosynoviorthese und einer Radioimmuntherapie. Empfehlung der Strahlenschutzkommission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-07-01

    Unsealed liquid beta sources (Sr-89, Y-90, I-131, Er-169, Re-186, Re-188) are used increasingly in nuclear medicine for therapeutic purposes. In contrast to radioiodine therapy of thyroid diseases, interdisciplinary cooperation may be necessary (cardiology, orthopedic, rheumatology, oncology etc.), e.g. during applicaiton outside nuclear medicine or in case of non-nuclear invasive application methods. During preparation and application of beta sources, enhanced radiation exposure of the medical staff, especially doctors, is possible both in consequence of external exposure and in case of contaminations. Routine applications of unsealed liquid beta sources therefore necessitate specified radiation protection measures as specified in the guideline ''Strahlenschutz in der Medizin''. (orig.)

  7. Algorithms for the process management of sealed source brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, M.J.; Ulin, K.; Sternick, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Incidents and misadministrations suggest that brachytherapy may benefit form clarification of the quality management program and other mandates of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To that end, flowcharts of step by step subprocesses were developed and formatted with dedicated software. The overall process was similarly organized in a complex flowchart termed a general process map. Procedural and structural indicators associated with each flowchart and map were critiqued and pre-existing documentation was revised. open-quotes Step-regulation tablesclose quotes were created to refer steps and subprocesses to Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules and recommendations in their sequences of applicability. Brachytherapy algorithms were specified as programmable, recursive processes, including therapeutic dose determination and monitoring doses to the public. These algorithms are embodied in flowcharts and step-regulation tables. A general algorithm is suggested as a template form which other facilities may derive tools to facilitate process management of sealed source brachytherapy. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  9. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  10. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  11. Primary calibration of coiled 103Pd brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, Adam B.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Micka, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Coiled 103 Pd brachytherapy sources have been developed by RadioMed Corporation for use as low-dose-rate (LDR) interstitial implants. The coiled sources are provided in integer lengths from 1 to 6 cm and address many common issues seen with traditional LDR brachytherapy sources. The current standard for determining the air-kerma strength (S K ) of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources is the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (NIST WAFAC). Due to geometric limitations, however, the NIST WAFAC is unable to determine the S K of sources longer than 1 cm. This project utilized the University of Wisconsin's Variable-Aperture Free-Air Chamber (UW VAFAC) to determine the S K of the longer coiled sources. The UW VAFAC has shown agreement in S K values of 1 cm length coils to within 1% of those determined with the NIST WAFAC, but the UW VAFAC does not share the same geometric limitations as the NIST WAFAC. A new source holder was constructed to hold the coiled sources in place during measurements with the UW VAFAC. Correction factors for the increased length of the sources have been determined and applied to the measurements. Using the new source holder and corrections, the S K of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources has been determined. Corrected UW VAFAC data and ionization current measurements from well chambers have been used to determine calibration coefficients for use in the measurement of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources in well chambers. Thus, the UW VAFAC has provided the first transferable, primary measurement of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources with lengths greater than 1 cm

  12. Third-party brachytherapy source calibrations and physicist responsibilities: Report of the AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Bice, William S. Jr.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Hevezi, James M.; Huq, M. Saiful; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Rivard, Mark J.; Seuntjens, Jan P.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    The AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group was formed to investigate and recommend quality control and quality assurance procedures for brachytherapy sources prior to clinical use. Compiling and clarifying recommendations established by previous AAPM Task Groups 40, 56, and 64 were among the working group's charges, which also included the role of third-party handlers to perform loading and assay of sources. This document presents the findings of the working group on the responsibilities of the institutional medical physicist and a clarification of the existing AAPM recommendations in the assay of brachytherapy sources. Responsibility for the performance and attestation of source assays rests with the institutional medical physicist, who must use calibration equipment appropriate for each source type used at the institution. Such equipment and calibration procedures shall ensure secondary traceability to a national standard. For each multi-source implant, 10% of the sources or ten sources, whichever is greater, are to be assayed. Procedures for presterilized source packaging are outlined. The mean source strength of the assayed sources must agree with the manufacturer's stated strength to within 3%, or action must be taken to resolve the difference. Third party assays do not absolve the institutional physicist from the responsibility to perform the institutional measurement and attest to the strength of the implanted sources. The AAPM leaves it to the discretion of the institutional medical physicist whether the manufacturer's or institutional physicist's measured value should be used in performing dosimetry calculations

  13. Prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaya Garro, Olgger; Vela Mora, Mariano; Revilla Silva, Angel Revilla

    2005-01-01

    It has developed prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy. This one was made in two stages, at the first one, we designed and constructed the container (capsule), the filling system and the sealed system; at the second one, we made the irradiation of the capsules containing the 'target'. The prototypes was made of aluminum in cylindrical geometry. During the irradiation test was made using two different dimensions: one of 1 mm outer diameter and 1 cm length and another one of 0.8 mm outer diameter and 5 mm length. They were radiated in the core of the RP-10 research reactor, at 7.93 x10 13 n/cm 2 .s thermal neutron flux during 27 operation cycles. Activities of 144.53 MBq (3.91 mCi) and 107.67 MBq (2.91 mCi) was obtained for each case. This activities are adequate to restenosis and for some tumors treatment. We can observed that the capsules irradiated passed visual inspection in its physical integrity (leakage and geometry). It has been demonstrated, that the beta radiation for his minor power of penetration and its high interaction, causes major local damage to the malignant tissue, minimizing the damage of the healthy surrounding tissues. It has been advisable to use for the treatment of illnesses of the circulatory system and some tumors. At the present, the source of strontium-90 are the most beta ray source used, but of this one are obtained as fission product of uranium target, where valuable radioactive waste is generated, whereas if we were using phosphorus-32 that we propose, radioactive waste would not be generated since it would take place directly as sealed source, for reaction (n, β). (author)

  14. EVALUATION OF BRACHYTHERAPY FACILITY SHIELDING STATUS IN KOREA OBTAINED FROM RADIATION SAFETY REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI HYUN KEUM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-eight radiation safety reports for brachytherapy equipment were evaluated to determine the current status of brachytherapy units in Korea and to assess how radiation oncology departments in Korea complete radiation safety reports. The following data was collected: radiation safety report publication year, brachytherapy unit manufacturer, type and activity of the source that was used, affiliation of the drafter, exposure rate constant, the treatment time used to calculate workload and the HVL values used to calculate shielding design goal values. A significant number of the reports (47.4% included the personal information of the drafter. The treatment time estimates varied widely from 12 to 2,400 min/week. There was acceptable variation in the exposure rate constant values (ranging between 0.469 and 0.592 (R-m2/Ci·hr, as well as in the HVLs of concrete, steel and lead for Iridium-192 sources that were used to calculate shielding design goal values. There is a need for standard guidelines for completing radiation safety reports that realistically reflect the current clinical situation of radiation oncology departments in Korea. The present study may be useful for formulating these guidelines.

  15. Guidelines for the calibration of low energy photon sources at beta-ray brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    With the development of improved methods of implanting brachytherapy sources in a precise manner for treating prostate cancer and other disease processes, there has been a tremendous growth in the use of low energy photon sources, such as 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy seeds. Low energy photon sources have the advantage of easier shielding and also lowering the dose to normal tissue. However, the dose distributions around these sources are affected by the details in construction of the source and its encapsulation more than other sources used for brachytherapy treatments, such as 192 Ir. With increasing number of new low energy photon sources on the market, care should be taken with regard to its traceability to primary standards. It cannot be assumed that a calibration factor for an ionization chamber that is valid for one type of low energy photon source, automatically is valid for another source even if both would use the same isotope. Moreover, the method used to calculate the dose must also take into account the structure of the source and the encapsulation. The dose calculation algorithm that is valid for one type of low energy source may not be valid for another source even if in both cases the same radionuclide is used. Simple ''point source'' approximations, i.e. where the source is modeled as a point, should be avoided, as such methods do not account for any details in the source construction. In this document, the dose calculation formalism adopted for low energy photon sources is that recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) as outlined by Task Group-43 (TG-43). This method accounts for the source and capsule geometry. The AAPM recommends brachytherapy photon sources to be specified in terms of 'Air Kerma Strength' that is also used in the formalism mentioned above. On the other hand, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends that the specification be done in terms of Reference Air

  16. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  17. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  18. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L.

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 192 Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for lung, 0.9x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for oesophagus and 0.48x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for colon, 7.8x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for stomach and 1.7x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 , whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 ; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  19. Radiation protection of patients in epiescleral brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, J.M. de; Sanchez, G.; Sendon, J.R.; Castillo, A. del; Hernando, I.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. Choroidal melanoma and other ophthalmic tumors are treated with episcleral plaques. Optimisation and other criteria are necessary to avoid damage in eye and visual function preservation. Purpose. To study the dosimetric phases to apply radiation protection criteria. To determine procedures for quality assurance of applicators, sources and treatment prescription and planning. Method. We have revised treatment procedure. First, aspects shared for all the patients. Then treatment planning and applicator assembling. After that, we study insertion and treatment. Finally, we check the chart flow to modify, if necessary. It necessary consider normative and recommendations. Results and conclusions. Quality assurance of sources (calibration, autoradiography), applicator (effects, dose distribution) and treatment planning are revised. Appropriate patient data acquisition is essential due the special characteristics of tumor and eye. Treatment planning involves optimisation as a factor. Seed selection is very important to avoid misadministration. Next procedure is applicator assembling. We must care to choose the same as dosimetry and to carry out its verification. Sources insertion is a surgical procedure. It is essential in accurate placement. Desinsertion is also surgical, and must be adapted to dosimetry and prescription. Flow chart is modified adding two staff meetings to discuss about patient data and doses. (author)

  20. Brachytherapy - not pulsed and low rate brachytherapy. Medical radiation protection - ED 4248

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    After an indication of authorizations required to perform brachytherapy, this sheet indicates the concerned personnel, indicates the different treatment steps, briefly describes the risk related to ionizing radiations, indicates the various aspects of risk assessment and of determination of exposure levels (definition of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, possible methods for dose monitoring), presents the strategy for risk management (rules regarding risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation, individual technical measures, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring) and how this risk management can be assessed

  1. Developing A Directional High-Dose Rate (d-HDR) Brachytherapy Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Athena Yvonne

    Conventional sources used in brachytherapy provide nearly isotropic or radially symmetric dose distributions. Optimizations of dose distributions have been limited to varied dwell times at specified locations within a given treatment volume, or manipulations in source position for seed implantation techniques. In years past, intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) has been used to reduce the amount of radiation to surrounding sensitive structures in select intracavitary cases by adding space or partial shields. Previous work done by Lin et al., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown potential improvements in conformality for brachytherapy treatments using a directionally shielded low dose rate (LDR) source for treatments in breast and prostate. Directional brachytherapy sources irradiate approximately half of the radial angles around the source, and adequately shield a quarter of the radial angles on the opposite side, with sharp gradient zones between the treated half and shielded quarter. With internally shielded sources, the radiation can be preferentially emitted in such a way as to reduce toxicities in surrounding critical organs. The objective of this work is to present findings obtained in the development of a new directional high dose rate (d-HDR) source. To this goal, 103Pd (Z = 46) is reintroduced as a potential radionuclide for use in HDR brachytherapy. 103Pd has a low average photon energy (21 keV) and relatively short half -life (17 days), which is why it has historically been used in low dose rate applications and implantation techniques. Pd-103 has a carrier-free specific activity of 75000 Ci/g. Using cyclotron produced 103Pd, near carrier-free specific activities can be achieved, providing suitability for high dose rate applications. The evolution of the d-HDR source using Monte Carlo simulations is presented, along with dosimetric parameters used to fully characterize the source. In addition, a discussion on how to obtain elemental

  2. Evaluation of (101)Rh as a brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakravan, Delaram; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2015-04-01

    Recently a number of hypothetical sources have been proposed and evaluated for use in brachytherapy. In the present study, a hypothetical (101)Rh source with mean photon energy of 121.5 keV and half-life of 3.3 years, has been evaluated as an alternative to the existing high-dose-rate (HDR) sources. Dosimetric characteristics of this source model have been determined following the recommendation of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) of the American Association of the Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), and the results are compared with the published data for (57)Co source and Flexisource (192)Ir sources with similar geometries. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of the (101)Rh hypothetical HDR source design. Geometric design of this hypothetical source was considered to be similar to that of Flexisource (192)Ir source. Task group No. 43 dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength per mCi, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated for the (101)Rh source through simulations. Air kerma strength per activity and dose rate constant for the hypothetical (101)Rh source were 1.09 ± 0.01 U/mCi and 1.18 ± 0.08 cGy/(h.U), respectively. At distances beyond 1.0 cm in phantom, radial dose function for the hypothetical (101)Rh source is higher than that of (192)Ir. It has also similar 2D anisotropy functions to the Flexisource (192)Ir source. (101)Rh is proposed as an alternative to the existing HDR sources for use in brachytherapy. This source provides medium energy photons, relatively long half-life, higher dose rate constant and radial dose function, and similar 2D anisotropy function to the Flexisource (192)Ir HDR source design. The longer half-life of the source reduces the frequency of the source exchange for the clinical environment.

  3. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuko, Noriko; Katsura, Kouji; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Sato, Katsurou; Kawana, Masahiro; Nonomura, Naobumi

    2000-01-01

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using 198 Au grains and 137 Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Stephen M.

    The low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds employed in permanent radioactive-source implant treatments usually use one of two radionuclides, 125I or 103Pd. The theoretically expected source spectroscopic output from these sources can be obtained via Monte Carlo calculation based upon seed dimensions and materials as well as the bare-source photon emissions for that specific radionuclide. However the discrepancies resulting from inconsistent manufacturing of sources in comparison to each other within model groups and simplified Monte Carlo calculational geometries ultimately result in undesirably large uncertainties in the Monte Carlo calculated values. This dissertation describes experimentally attained spectroscopic outputs of the clinically used brachytherapy sources in air and in liquid water. Such knowledge can then be applied to characterize these sources by a more fundamental and metro logically-pure classification, that of energy-based dosimetry. The spectroscopic results contained within this dissertation can be utilized in the verification and benchmarking of Monte Carlo calculational models of these brachytherapy sources. This body of work was undertaken to establish a usable spectroscopy system and analysis methods for the meaningful study of LDR brachytherapy seeds. The development of a correction algorithm and the analysis of the resultant spectroscopic measurements are presented. The characterization of the spectrometer and the subsequent deconvolution of the measured spectrum to obtain the true spectrum free of any perturbations caused by the spectrometer itself is an important contribution of this work. The approach of spectroscopic deconvolution that was applied in this work is derived in detail and it is applied to the physical measurements. In addition, the spectroscopically based analogs to the LDR dosimetry parameters that are currently employed are detailed, as well as the development of the theory and measurement methods to arrive at these

  5. Evaluation of hypothetical (153)Gd source for use in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Behmadi, Marziyeh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric parameters of a hypothetical (153)Gd source for use in brachytherapy and comparison of the dosimetric parameters with those of (192)Ir and (125)I sources. Dose rate constant, the radial dose function and the two dimensional (2D) anisotropy function data for the hypothetical (153)Gd source were obtained by simulation of the source using MCNPX code and then were compared with the corresponding data reported by Enger et al. A comprehensive comparison between this hypothetical source and a (192)Ir source with similar geometry and a (125)I source was performed as well. Excellent agreement was shown between the results of the two studies. Dose rate constant values for the hypothetical (153)Gd, (192)Ir, (125)I sources are 1.173 cGyh(-1) U(-1), 1.044 cGyh(-1) U(-1), 0.925 cGyh(-1) U(-1), respectively. Radial dose function for the hypothetical (153)Gd source has an increasing trend, while (192)Ir has more uniform and (125)I has more rapidly falling off radial dose functions. 2D anisotropy functions for these three sources indicate that, except at 0.5 cm distance, (192)Ir and (125)I have more isotropic trends as compared to the (153)Gd source. A more uniform radial dose function, and 2D anisotropy functions with more isotropy, a much higher specific activity are advantages of (192)Ir source over (153)Gd. However, a longer half-life of (153)Gd source compared to the other two sources, and lower energy of the source with respect to (192)Ir are advantages of using (153)Gd in brachytherapy versus (192)Ir source.

  6. Cs-137 brachytherapy sources calibration with well chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetto, M.; Sansogne, R.; Arbiser, S.; Duran, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the procedures and actions developed for the identification and reference air kerma rate (S k ) verification of Cs-137 sources used in gynecological brachytherapy practices. Following the IAEA TECDOC 1151 recommendations, the first stage consisted in designing the documentation required for the inventory and shipping registry of sources, along with the digital spreadsheets for calculating the decay and S k of the sources at the moment of implantation. As a second stage, the S k of sources was measured, following the low dose rate sources protocol advise, with a Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber calibrated at the University of Wisconsin SSDL. The documentation generated through this procedure allows identify each source clearly and uni-vocally. No significant differences were found between the S k values obtained from the well chamber calibration procedure and those reported by the manufacturer in the corresponding certificates. The highest percent difference found was 2.3%. (author) [es

  7. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125 I and 103 Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S K ) standard for 125 I seeds and has also established an S K standard for 103 Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (Λ) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of Λ and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of Λ. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that Λ may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S K and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for Λ was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of Λ as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated Λ for 125 I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192 Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within ±1%. For the 103 Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the ±7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for Λ proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known

  8. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Colleen A., E-mail: clawton@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Firat, Selim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Baikadi, Madhava [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northeast Radiation Oncology Center, Scranton, PA (United States); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Kuettel, Michael [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Morton, Gerald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sandler, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  9. Three-dimensional tomosynthetic image restoration for brachytherapy source localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persons, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    Tomosynthetic image reconstruction allows for the production of a virtually infinite number of slices from a finite number of projection views of a subject. If the reconstructed image volume is viewed in toto, and the three-dimensional (3D) impulse response is accurately known, then it is possible to solve the inverse problem (deconvolution) using canonical image restoration methods (such as Wiener filtering or solution by conjugate gradient least squares iteration) by extension to three dimensions in either the spatial or the frequency domains. This dissertation presents modified direct and iterative restoration methods for solving the inverse tomosynthetic imaging problem in 3D. The significant blur artifact that is common to tomosynthetic reconstructions is deconvolved by solving for the entire 3D image at once. The 3D impulse response is computed analytically using a fiducial reference schema as realized in a robust, self-calibrating solution to generalized tomosynthesis. 3D modulation transfer function analysis is used to characterize the tomosynthetic resolution of the 3D reconstructions. The relevant clinical application of these methods is 3D imaging for brachytherapy source localization. Conventional localization schemes for brachytherapy implants using orthogonal or stereoscopic projection radiographs suffer from scaling distortions and poor visibility of implanted seeds, resulting in compromised source tracking (reported errors: 2-4 mm) and dosimetric inaccuracy. 3D image reconstruction (using a well-chosen projection sampling scheme) and restoration of a prostate brachytherapy phantom is used for testing. The approaches presented in this work localize source centroids with submillimeter error in two Cartesian dimensions and just over one millimeter error in the third

  10. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR 192 Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single 192 Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the 192 Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for 192 Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET dosimeter for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchitra, G.; Bharanidharan, G.; Manigandan, D.; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.; Subbaiah, K.V.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo patient dose verification is considered to be an important part of quality assurance in radiotherapy, as there may be uncertainty between the prescribed dose and the dose actually delivered to the patients. A dose estimator method was used to calculate the dose in the extremely thin sensitive volume. This work shows the response of MOSFET detector for various brachytherapy sources at various experimental condition and the results were compared with the earlier published values. The details of computations and the results are discussed

  12. Evaluation of 101Rh as a brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently a number of hypothetical sources have been proposed and evaluated for use in brachytherapy. In the present study, a hypothetical 101Rh source with mean photon energy of 121.5 keV and half-life of 3.3 years, has been evaluated as an alternative to the existing high-dose-rate (HDR) sources. Dosimetric characteristics of this source model have been determined following the recommendation of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) of the American Association of the Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), and the results are compared with the published data for 57Co source and Flexisource 192Ir sources with similar geometries. Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of the 101Rh hypothetical HDR source design. Geometric design of this hypothetical source was considered to be similar to that of Flexisource 192Ir source. Task group No. 43 dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength per mCi, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated for the 101Rh source through simulations. Results Air kerma strength per activity and dose rate constant for the hypothetical 101Rh source were 1.09 ± 0.01 U/mCi and 1.18 ± 0.08 cGy/(h.U), respectively. At distances beyond 1.0 cm in phantom, radial dose function for the hypothetical 101Rh source is higher than that of 192Ir. It has also similar 2D anisotropy functions to the Flexisource 192Ir source. Conclusions 101Rh is proposed as an alternative to the existing HDR sources for use in brachytherapy. This source provides medium energy photons, relatively long half-life, higher dose rate constant and radial dose function, and similar 2D anisotropy function to the Flexisource 192Ir HDR source design. The longer half-life of the source reduces the frequency of the source exchange for the clinical environment. PMID:26034499

  13. Fitting and benchmarking of Monte Carlo output parameters for iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquah, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy, the use of radioactive sources for the treatment of tumours is an important tool in radiation oncology. Accurate calculations of dose delivered to malignant and normal tissues are the main responsibility of the Medical Physics staff. With the use of Treatment Planning System (TPS) computers now becoming a standard practice in the Radiation Oncology Departments, Independent calculations to certify the results of these commercial TPSs are important part of a good quality management system for brachytherapy implants. There are inherent errors in the dose distributions produced by these TPSs due to its failure to account for heterogeneity in the calculation algorithms and Monte Carlo (MC) method seems to be the panacea for these corrections. In this study, a fit functional form using MC output parameters was performed to reduce dose calculation uncertainty using the Matlab software curve fitting applications. This includes the modification of the AAPM TG-43 parameters to accommodate the new developments for a rapid brachytherapy dose rate calculation. Analytical computations were performed to hybridize the anisotropy function, F(r,θ) and radial dose function, g(r) into a single new function f(r,θ) for the Nucletron microSelectron High Dose Rate 'new or v2' (mHDRv2) 192 Ir brachytherapy source. In order to minimize computation time and to improve the accuracy of manual calculations, the dosimetry function f(r,θ) used fewer parameters and formulas for the fit. Using MC outputs as the standard, the percentage errors for the fits were calculated and used to evaluate the average and maximum uncertainties. Dose rate deviation between the MC data and fit were also quantified as errors(E), which showed minimal values. These results showed that the dosimetry parameters from this study as compared to those of MC outputs parameters were in good agreement and better than the results obtained from literature. The work confirms a lot of promise in building robust

  14. Estimation of whole-body radiation exposure from brachytherapy for oral cancer using a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Kaida, A.; Miura, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Toda, K.; Yoshimura, R.; Sumi, Y.; Kurabayashi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Early stage oral cancer can be cured with oral brachytherapy, but whole-body radiation exposure status has not been previously studied. Recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee (ICRP) recommended the use of ICRP phantoms to estimate radiation exposure from external and internal radiation sources. In this study, we used a Monte Carlo simulation with ICRP phantoms to estimate whole-body exposure from oral brachytherapy. We used a Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) to model oral brachytherapy with 192 Ir hairpins and 198 Au grains and to perform a Monte Carlo simulation on the ICRP adult reference computational phantoms. To confirm the simulations, we also computed local dose distributions from these small sources, and compared them with the results from Oncentra manual Low Dose Rate Treatment Planning (mLDR) software which is used in day-to-day clinical practice. We successfully obtained data on absorbed dose for each organ in males and females. Sex-averaged equivalent doses were 0.547 and 0.710 Sv with 192 Ir hairpins and 198 Au grains, respectively. Simulation with PHITS was reliable when compared with an alternative computational technique using mLDR software. We concluded that the absorbed dose for each organ and whole-body exposure from oral brachytherapy can be estimated with Monte Carlo simulation using PHITS on ICRP reference phantoms. Effective doses for patients with oral cancer were obtained.

  15. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T., E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  16. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T.

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  17. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, 137 Cs and 60 Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  18. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbergen, Erik F.M. van; Fowler, Jack F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  19. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of 192Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-15

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in 192Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an 192Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the +-3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The 192Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI

  20. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of 192Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-01

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in 192 Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an 192 Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the ±3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The 192 Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI

  1. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-15

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an {sup 192}Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the {+-}3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The {sup 192}Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI.

  2. Design and dosimetric characteristics of a new endocavitary contact radiotherapy system using an electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Susan; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Lu, Wei; Myerson, Robert J; Parikh, Parag

    2012-11-01

    To present design aspects and acceptance tests performed for clinical implementation of electronic brachytherapy treatment of early stage rectal adenocarcinoma. A dosimetric comparison is made between the historically used Philips RT-50 unit and the newly developed Axxent(®) Model S700 electronic brachytherapy source manufactured by Xoft (iCad, Inc.). Two proctoscope cones were manufactured by ElectroSurgical Instruments (ESI). Two custom surface applicators were manufactured by Xoft and were designed to fit and interlock with the proctoscope cones from ESI. Dose rates, half value layers (HVL), and percentage depth dose (PDD) measurements were made with the Xoft system and compared to historical RT-50 data. A description of the patient treatment approach and exposure rates during the procedure is also provided. The electronic brachytherapy system has a lower surface dose rate than the RT-50. The dose rate to water on the surface from the Xoft system is approximately 2.1 Gy∕min while the RT-50 is 10-12 Gy∕min. However, treatment times with Xoft are still reasonable. The HVLs and PDDs between the two systems were comparable resulting in similar doses to the target and to regions beyond the target. The exposure rate levels around a patient treatment were acceptable. The standard uncertainty in the dose rate to water on the surface is approximately ±5.2%. The Philips RT-50 unit is an out-of-date radiotherapy machine that is no longer manufactured with limited replacement parts. The use of a custom-designed proctoscope and Xoft surface applicators allows delivery of a well-established treatment with the ease of a modern radiotherapy device. While the dose rate is lower with the use of Xoft, the treatment times are still reasonable. Additionally, personnel may stand farther away from the Xoft radiation source, thus potentially reducing radiation exposure to the operator and other personnel.

  3. Design and dosimetric characteristics of a new endocavitary contact radiotherapy system using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Lu Wei; Myerson, Robert J.; Parikh, Parag

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present design aspects and acceptance tests performed for clinical implementation of electronic brachytherapy treatment of early stage rectal adenocarcinoma. A dosimetric comparison is made between the historically used Philips RT-50 unit and the newly developed Axxent ® Model S700 electronic brachytherapy source manufactured by Xoft (iCad, Inc.). Methods: Two proctoscope cones were manufactured by ElectroSurgical Instruments (ESI). Two custom surface applicators were manufactured by Xoft and were designed to fit and interlock with the proctoscope cones from ESI. Dose rates, half value layers (HVL), and percentage depth dose (PDD) measurements were made with the Xoft system and compared to historical RT-50 data. A description of the patient treatment approach and exposure rates during the procedure is also provided. Results: The electronic brachytherapy system has a lower surface dose rate than the RT-50. The dose rate to water on the surface from the Xoft system is approximately 2.1 Gy/min while the RT-50 is 10–12 Gy/min. However, treatment times with Xoft are still reasonable. The HVLs and PDDs between the two systems were comparable resulting in similar doses to the target and to regions beyond the target. The exposure rate levels around a patient treatment were acceptable. The standard uncertainty in the dose rate to water on the surface is approximately ±5.2%. Conclusions: The Philips RT-50 unit is an out-of-date radiotherapy machine that is no longer manufactured with limited replacement parts. The use of a custom-designed proctoscope and Xoft surface applicators allows delivery of a well-established treatment with the ease of a modern radiotherapy device. While the dose rate is lower with the use of Xoft, the treatment times are still reasonable. Additionally, personnel may stand farther away from the Xoft radiation source, thus potentially reducing radiation exposure to the operator and other personnel.

  4. Design and dosimetric characteristics of a new endocavitary contact radiotherapy system using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Susan; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Lu Wei; Myerson, Robert J.; Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To present design aspects and acceptance tests performed for clinical implementation of electronic brachytherapy treatment of early stage rectal adenocarcinoma. A dosimetric comparison is made between the historically used Philips RT-50 unit and the newly developed Axxent{sup Registered-Sign} Model S700 electronic brachytherapy source manufactured by Xoft (iCad, Inc.). Methods: Two proctoscope cones were manufactured by ElectroSurgical Instruments (ESI). Two custom surface applicators were manufactured by Xoft and were designed to fit and interlock with the proctoscope cones from ESI. Dose rates, half value layers (HVL), and percentage depth dose (PDD) measurements were made with the Xoft system and compared to historical RT-50 data. A description of the patient treatment approach and exposure rates during the procedure is also provided. Results: The electronic brachytherapy system has a lower surface dose rate than the RT-50. The dose rate to water on the surface from the Xoft system is approximately 2.1 Gy/min while the RT-50 is 10-12 Gy/min. However, treatment times with Xoft are still reasonable. The HVLs and PDDs between the two systems were comparable resulting in similar doses to the target and to regions beyond the target. The exposure rate levels around a patient treatment were acceptable. The standard uncertainty in the dose rate to water on the surface is approximately {+-}5.2%. Conclusions: The Philips RT-50 unit is an out-of-date radiotherapy machine that is no longer manufactured with limited replacement parts. The use of a custom-designed proctoscope and Xoft surface applicators allows delivery of a well-established treatment with the ease of a modern radiotherapy device. While the dose rate is lower with the use of Xoft, the treatment times are still reasonable. Additionally, personnel may stand farther away from the Xoft radiation source, thus potentially reducing radiation exposure to the operator and other personnel.

  5. Microdosimetric evaluation of relative biological effectiveness for 103PD, 125I, 241AM, and 192IR brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C.S.; Kliauga, P.; Zaider, M.; Amols, H.I.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the microdosimetric-derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 103 Pd, 125 I, 241 Am, and 192 Ir brachytherapy sources at low doses and/or low dose rates. Methods and Materials: The Theory of Dual Radiation Action can be used to predict expected RBE values based on the spatial distribution of energy deposition at microscopic levels from these sources. Single-event lineal energy spectra for these isotopes have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically. A grid-defined wall-less proportional counter was used to measure the lineal energy distributions. Unlike conventional Rossi proportional counters, the counter used in these measurements has a conducting nylon fiber as the central collecting anode and has no metal parts. Thus, the Z-dependence of the photoelectric effect is eliminated as a source of measurement error. Single-event spectra for these brachytherapy sources have been also calculated by: (a) the Monte Carlo code MCNP to generate the electron slowing down spectrum, (b) transport of monoenergetic electron tracks, event by event, with our Monte Carlo code DELTA, (c) using the concept of associated volume to obtain the lineal energy distribution f(y) for each monoenergetic electron, and (d) obtaining the composite lineal energy spectrum for a given brachytherapy source based on the electron spectrum calculated at step (a). Results: Relative to 60 Co, the RBE values obtained from this study are: 2.3 for 103 Pd, 2.1 for 125 I, 2.1 for 241 Am, and 1.3 for 192 Ir. Conclusions: These values are consistent with available data from in vitro cell survival experiments. We suggest that, at least for these brachytherapy sources, microdosimetry may be used as a credible alternative to time-consuming (and often uncertain) radiobiological experiments to obtain information on radition quality and make reliable predictions of RBE in low dose rate brachytherapy

  6. Modeling a Hypothetical 170Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical 170 Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of 170 Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical 170 Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount ( 170 Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being generated in the source core and experiencing little attenuation in the source encapsulation. Electrons are efficiently absorbed by the gold and platinum encapsulations. However, for the stainless-steel capsule (or other lower Z encapsulations) electrons will escape. The dose from these electrons is dominant over the photon dose in the first few millimeter but is not taken into account by current standard treatment planning systems. The total energy spectrum of photons emerging from the source depends on the encapsulation composition and results in mean photon energies well above 100 keV. This is higher than the main gamma-ray energy peak at 84 keV. Based on our

  7. Air core detectors for Cerenkov-free scintillation dosimetry of brachytherapy β-sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Marion; Thomann, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are used for dosimetry in small radiation fields with high dose gradients, e.g., provided by β-emitting sources like 106 Ru/ 106 Rh eye plaques. A drawback is a background signal caused by Cerenkov radiation generated by electrons passing the optical fibers (light guides) of this dosimetry system. Common approaches to correct for the Cerenkov signal are influenced by uncertainties resulting from detector positioning and calibration procedures. A different approach to avoid any correction procedure is to suppress the Cerenkov signal by replacing the solid core optical fiber with an air core light guide, previously shown for external beam therapy. In this study, the air core concept is modified and applied to the requirements of dosimetry in brachytherapy, proving its usability for measuring water energy doses in small radiation fields. Three air core detectors with different air core lengths are constructed and their performance in dosimetry for brachytherapy β-sources is compared with a standard two-fiber system, which uses a second fiber for Cerenkov correction. The detector systems are calibrated with a 90 Sr/ 90 Y secondary standard and tested for their angular dependence as well as their performance in depth dose measurements of 106 Ru/ 106 Rh sources. The signal loss relative to the standard detector increases with increasing air core length to a maximum value of 58.3%. At the same time, however, the percentage amount of Cerenkov light in the total signal is reduced from at least 12.1% to a value below 1.1%. There is a linear correlation between induced dose and measured signal current. The air core detectors determine the dose rates for 106 Ru/ 106 Rh sources without any form of correction for the Cerenkov signal. The air core detectors show advantages over the standard two-fiber system especially when measuring in radiation fields with high dose gradients. They can be used as simple one-fiber systems and allow for an almost

  8. Calibration of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M H [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dozimetria, Rio de Jainero (Brazil); Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas, UERL, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sibata, C H [Roswell Park Cancer Inst., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A method for calibration of high dose rate sources used in afterloading brachytherapy systems is described. The calibration for {sup 192}Ir is determined by interpolating {sup 60}Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. All measurements were done using the same build up caps as described by Goetsch et al and recommended by AAPM. The attenuation correction factors were determined to be 0.9903, 0.9928 and 0.9993 for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 60}Co and 250 kV x-ray, respectively. A wall + cap thickness of 0.421 g.cm{sup -2} is recommended for all measurements to ensure electronic equilibrium for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-ray beams. A mathematical formalism is described for determination of (N{sub x}){sub Ir}. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig.

  9. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  10. Monte Carlo dosimetry of a tandem positioned beta-emitting intravascular brachytherapy source train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Steven A.; Schumer, Wendy; Horrigan, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Prevention of restenosis following interventional coronary procedures with catheter based beta-emitting sources is currently under clinical trial investigations. Systems utilizing fixed length source trains limit the clinician's ability to increase the radiation source length as required. A technique known as 'pull back' is used when the segment of artery requiring radiation is longer than the available fixed length source train. In this instance, tandem positioning of the fixed length source is used to treat the longer length of artery. The aim of this study was to examine the dosimetry of the junction region associated with pull back treatments using a commercially available 90 Sr/Y catheter based intravascular brachytherapy source train. Dose profiles were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B, at radial distances of 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mm for pull back techniques using 2.5 mm overlapping, abutting, and 2.5 mm spaced source trains. Results at the protocol prescription radius of 2 mm showed a junction dose elevated 61% above prescription for 2.5 mm overlapping source trains. For 2.5 mm spaced trains, this figure falls to 64% below prescription dose. In contrast, abutted source trains exhibited only a 1% depression below prescription dose in the junction region. The reference point dose rate per unit activity of this source was found to be consistent with previous studies

  11. Studies on the preparation of 103Pd inner core of seed sources for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Sujata; Manolkar, R.B.; Vimalnath, K.V.; Dash, A.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2007-01-01

    103 Pd seed sources are used widely world over for brachytherapy applications. 103 Pd available in-house was used to study its deposition on silver wire using electro-deposition and electroless deposition techniques with an aim to developing the inner core preparation of sealed radiation sources for treatment of prostate and ocular melanoma. Various parameters such as radioactive concentration of the feed solution, current density, time, temperature and pH of the solution were optimized to achieve maximum 103 Pd deposition on Ag wire. In electroless technique, the deposited amount of Pd was found to be nearly triple compared to electro-deposition in two hours time period. Both the methods gave nonleachable and well adherent sources. (author)

  12. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bakhshabadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. 125 I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy 131 Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of 125 I, 103 Pd, and 131 Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. Material and methods: ProstaSeed 125 I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of 103 Pd and 131 Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed 125 I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Results : Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, 131 Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the 103 Pd source. Conclusions : The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U of 131 Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the 103 Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the 125 I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life.

  13. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshabadi, Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Knaup, Courtney; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-02-01

    Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. (125)I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy (131)Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of (125)I, (103)Pd, and (131)Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. ProstaSeed (125)I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of (103)Pd and (131)Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed (125)I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, (131)Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the (103)Pd source. The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U) of (131)Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the (103)Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the (125)I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life.

  14. Dosimetry of iridium-192 sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henn, Keli Cristina

    1999-09-01

    The use of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) has been increasing in recent years, due to several advantages relative to conventional low dose rate brachytherapy, such as: shorter treatment times, the ability to fractionate treatment (and thus perform many treatments on an outpatient basis) and reduced worker exposures. Most HDR equipment uses small, high activity 192 Ir sources, which are introduced into the patient using a remote system. The dose distribution around these sources is strongly dependent on the size and shape of the active volume and on the encapsulation of the source. The objective of this work is to compare two methods of calibrating sources of 192 Ir, mamely, measurements in air with an ionization thimble chamber or with a well-type ionization chamber. In addition, we measured the anisotropy of the sources and made comparisons with values supplied by the manufacturer, since this factor is taken into account in the planning system algorithm when dose distributions are calculated. The dose was also evaluated at points of clinical interest (i.e. in the rectum and bladder) and compared to values obtained with the Nucletron PLATO-BPS planning system. The use of lead for rectal protection was evaluated in a cylindrical applicator, aiming the further development of a gynecological applicator. The results of the calibration of seven sources showed that the uncertainty in the calibration in a 'jig' system is smaller than 1%, compared to the value supplied by the source manufacturer. The differences between the results obtained with the well-type ionization camera and the 'jig' system were around 2%. The anisotropy showed good agreement with the values supplied by the manufacturer. The results show that the anisotropy factors, in air and water, are approximately constant and equal to 1.0, for angles between 70 deg and 150 deg. For angles smaller than 70 deg the anisotropy factor in water is larger than in air. Results are also presented for 180 deg, which

  15. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Smith, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  16. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  17. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  18. About brachytherapy for the handling of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Silva, Nilton O.; Damaso, Renato S.; Costa, Helder R.; Borges, Paulo H.R.; Mendes, Bruno M.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of brachytherapy is argued in this article. The 'hardware' and 'necessary software' for the handling are summarily presented. Being the macro-dosimetry an important stage in the radiation therapy procedure, a simplified method of doses evaluation in conventional brachytherapy is presented. In an illustrative form, isodoses of a three-dimensional distribution of linear sources are drawn on a digitalized X-ray picture, exemplifying the handling of breast brachytherapy by sources of iridium

  19. [Optimal intravascular brachytherapy: safety and radiation protection, reliability and precision guaranteed by guidelines, recommendations and regulatory requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Ulrich; Kaulich, Theodor W; Lorenz, Joachim

    2002-02-01

    The success of intravascular brachytherapy relies entirely on the interdisciplinary approach. Interventional cardiologists, radiation oncologists and medical physicists must form a team from day 1. All members of the team need special knowledge and regular training in the field of vascular radiation therapy. Optimization of intravascular brachytherapy requires the use of standardized methods of dose specification, recording and reporting. This also implies using standardized methods of source calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water and having methods for simple internal control of the dosimetric quantities of new or replaced sources. Guidance is offered by international recommendations (AAPM TG 60, DGMP Report 16, NCS and EVA GEC-ESTRO). LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION--WHAT'S NEW?: In Europe, new legal requirements on radiation protection issues have to be fulfilled. For Germany, the revised "Strahlenschutzverordnung" has been released recently. Nearly all organizational and medical processes are affected. For intravascular brachytherapy, several changes of requirements have to be considered. However, to follow these requirements does not cause serious problems. DGMP REPORT 16: GUIDELINES FOR MEDICAL PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF INTRAVASCULAR BRACHYTHERAPY: Evaluation of clinical results by comparison of intravascular brachytherapy treatment parameters is possible only if the prescribed dose and the applied dose distribution are reported clearly, completely and uniformly. The DGMP guidelines thus recommend to prescribe the dose to water at the system related reference point PRef at 2 mm radial distance for intracoronary application (and at 5 mm for peripheral vessels). The mean dose at 1 mm tissue depth (respectively at 2 mm) should be reported in addition. To safely define the planning target volume from the injured length, safety margins of at least 5 mm (10 mm) have to be taken into account on both ends. Safety margins have also to be considered for

  20. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Daniel E; Soni, Payal D; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Merrick, Gregory S; Stock, Richard G; Blasko, John C; Zelefsky, Michael J

    To review outcomes for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy (CMRT) utilizing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with a brachytherapy boost. The available literature for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy was reviewed and summarized. At this time, the literature suggests that the majority of high-risk cancers are curable with multimodal treatment. Several large retrospective studies and three prospective randomized trials comparing CMRT to dose-escalated EBRT have demonstrated superior biochemical control with CMRT. Longer followup of the randomized trials will be required to determine if this will translate to a benefit in metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Although greater toxicity has been associated with CMRT compared to EBRT, recent studies suggest that technological advances that allow better definition and sparing of critical adjacent structures as well as increasing experience with brachytherapy have improved implant quality and the toxicity profile of brachytherapy. The role of androgen deprivation therapy is well established in the external beam literature for high-risk disease, but there is controversy regarding the applicability of these data in the setting of dose escalation. At this time, there is not sufficient evidence for the omission of androgen deprivation therapy with dose escalation in this population. Comparisons with surgery remain limited by differences in patient selection, but the evidence would suggest better disease control with CMRT compared to surgery alone. Due to a series of technological advances, modern combination series have demonstrated unparalleled rates of disease control in the high-risk population. Given the evidence from recent randomized trials, combination therapy may become the standard of care for high-risk cancers. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  1. Afterloading techniques in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, M.; Orban, R.; Lorenz, B.

    1981-01-01

    The advantages of applying modern afterloading methods in brachytherapie of malignant diseases are outlined. They include, among other things, a considerable reduction in radiation exposure to staff involved. Furthermore, the radiation protection requirements imposed by the licensing authority on the construction, equipment and operation of remote controlled afterloading installations with gamma sources of up to 4 TBq (108 Ci) have been compiled. (author)

  2. Radiation protection after interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirraco, R.; Pereira, A.; Cavaco, A. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil - Centro R egional de Oncologia do Porto, SA, Porto (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In this study we measure patients radiation exposure dose after interstitial {sup 125}I permanent prostate Brachytherapy implants, and correlate it with dose limits for public, total activity implanted, patient preoperative weight(1), distance between prostate walls and anterior skin surface. Methods and Material: We analyse 20 patients who were implanted with {sup 125}I seeds. The instrument used to measure radiation is a calibrated Berthold Umo LB 123 aco-plated to a LB 1236-H10 detector. Three measurements were taken: at the perineal and anterior pelvic zones on contact with the skin and at 1 m from the patient. The maximum value was taken for all measurements. The dose at a distance of one meter is obtained at anterior pelvic zone, perpendicular to the skin, according to the recommendations of A.A.P.M.(1). The distance between prostate walls was determined using post -operative CT images. Results: The doses at the perineal zone have determined an average of 186 {mu}Sv/h (range: 110 340 {mu}Sv/h) and at surface pelvic zone of 41 {mu}Sv/h (range: 15 103 {mu}Sv/h). The dose at a distance of 1 meter has an average value of 0.4 {mu}Sv/h (range: 0.2 1.0 {mu}Sv/h). The average total activity implanted was 25 mCi (range: 17 38 mCi). The distance between prostate walls and skin pelvic surface of the patients has an average value of 8.9 cm (range: 6.6 -11.5 cm). At a distance of 1 meter from the pelvic zone the dose measured is very low and below dose limits imposed by the European Directive EURATOM 2 and the Portuguese law. For general public to reach annual dose limit (EURATOM - 1 mSv/year) when contacting the pelvic zone, we extrapolate that 4 days (range: 1.6 11.1 days) would be needed, assuming a daily contact period of 6 hours. Conclusion: We established a correlation between the distance of prostate walls to the skin perineal surface and the total dose, but we find no correlation between measured doses, total activity implanted

  3. Quality assurance of Vari-source high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy- remote after loader and cost effectiveness of Vari-source HDR- brachytherapy: NORI, Islamabad experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Mahmood, H.; Jafri, S.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A quality control of Vari-Source high dose rate (HDR) remote after loading brachytherapy machine was carried out and the cost effectiveness of HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated considering the cost of ten Iridium-192 wire sources at Nuclear Medicine, Oncology and Radiotherapy Institute (NORI), Islamabad, Pakistan. A total number of 253 intracavitary insertions were done in 98 patients from October 1996 to May 2001. The results of the quality control tests performed during 1996 to 2001 were within the acceptable limits. The cost effectiveness of Vari-Source HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated. The average cost per patient was calculated as US$ 491. Small number of patients was treated as the machine was used for gynecologic malignancies only. The objective was to assess the quality control status of HDR brachytherapy machine on patient treatment day, source exchange day and periodic day (monthly basis). It was found that the cost per patient can be minimized if other type of cancer patients are also treated on Vari-Source HDR machine. (author)

  4. Development of a semiautomatic cutting machine for the fabrication of 137Cs-brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avhad, B.G.; Dutta, M.L.; Saxena, S.K.; Dash, A.

    2004-01-01

    Cesium-137 sources are used in brachytherapy for the treatment of gynaecological cancers.The process of source preparation entails the vitrification of radioactive glass, its conversion into glass spheres, subsequent filling of spheres into platinum moulds and cutting of sources into the tubular form of dimension 1.5 mm(OD) x 5 mm(l). The large scale production of these sources demands the remote cutting operations within 4 inch thick lead shielded processing plants. This paper describes the development of a semi-automatic cutting machine, which can be used in the large scale production of 137 Cs brachytherapy sources. (author)

  5. Sources of pulsed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of various sources of pulsed radiation are examined from the viewpoint of their importance to the radiation chemist, and some examples of uses of such sources are mentioned. A summary is given of the application of methods of physical dosimetry to pulsed sources, and the calibration of convenient chemical dosimeters by physical dosimetry is outlined. 7 figures, 1 table

  6. Comparison of the hypothetical (57)Co brachytherapy source with the (192)Ir source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rostami, Atefeh; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Khademi, Sara; Knaup, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    The (57)Co radioisotope has recently been proposed as a hypothetical brachytherapy source due to its high specific activity, appropriate half-life (272 days) and medium energy photons (114.17 keV on average). In this study, Task Group No. 43 dosimetric parameters were calculated and reported for a hypothetical (57)Co source. A hypothetical (57)Co source was simulated in MCNPX, consisting of an active cylinder with 3.5 mm length and 0.6 mm radius encapsulated in a stainless steel capsule. Three photon energies were utilized (136 keV [10.68%], 122 keV [85.60%], 14 keV [9.16%]) for the (57)Co source. Air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function, and isodose curves for the source were calculated and compared to the corresponding data for a (192)Ir source. The results are presented as tables and figures. Air kerma strength per 1 mCi activity for the (57)Co source was 0.46 cGyh(-1) cm 2 mCi(-1). The dose rate constant for the (57)Co source was determined to be 1.215 cGyh(-1)U(-1). The radial dose function for the (57)Co source has an increasing trend due to multiple scattering of low energy photons. The anisotropy function for the (57)Co source at various distances from the source is more isotropic than the (192)Ir source. The (57)Co source has advantages over (192)Ir due to its lower energy photons, longer half-life, higher dose rate constant and more isotropic anisotropic function. However, the (192)Ir source has a higher initial air kerma strength and more uniform radial dose function. These properties make (57)Co a suitable source for use in brachytherapy applications.

  7. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  8. Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO): Transition of a magnetic resonance simulator to a brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roberta; Armour, Elwood; Beeckler, Courtney; Briner, Valerie; Choflet, Amanda; Cox, Andrea; Fader, Amanda N; Hannah, Marie N; Hobbs, Robert; Huang, Ellen; Kiely, Marilyn; Lee, Junghoon; Morcos, Marc; McMillan, Paige E; Miller, Dave; Ng, Sook Kien; Prasad, Rashmi; Souranis, Annette; Thomsen, Robert; DeWeese, Theodore L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2018-03-13

    As a core component of a new gynecologic cancer radiation program, we envisioned, structured, and implemented a novel Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO) unit and magnetic resonance (MR)-brachytherapy environment in an existing MR simulator. We describe the external and internal processes required over a 6-8 month time frame to develop a clinical and research program for gynecologic brachytherapy and to successfully convert an MR simulator into an IRO unit. Support of the institution and department resulted in conversion of an MR simulator to a procedural suite. Development of the MR gynecologic brachytherapy program required novel equipment, staffing, infrastructural development, and cooperative team development with anesthetists, nurses, therapists, physicists, and physicians to ensure a safe and functional environment. Creation of a separate IRO unit permitted a novel billing structure. The creation of an MR-brachytherapy environment in an MR simulator is feasible. Developing infrastructure includes several collaborative elements. Unique to the field of radiation oncology, formalizing the space as an Interventional Radiation Oncology unit permits a sustainable financial structure. Copyright © 2018 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq 192Ir source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A.

    1995-01-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate 192 Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq 192 Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors

  10. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuepers, S; Piessens, M; Verbeke, L; Roelstraete, A [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  11. WE-DE-201-08: Multi-Source Rotating Shield Brachytherapy Apparatus for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kim, Y; Flynn, R [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a novel multi-source rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) apparatus for the precise simultaneous angular and linear positioning of all partially-shielded 153Gd radiation sources in interstitial needles for treating prostate cancer. The mechanism is designed to lower the detrimental dose to healthy tissues, the urethra in particular, relative to conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) techniques. Methods: Following needle implantation, the delivery system is docked to the patient template. Each needle is coupled to a multi-source afterloader catheter by a connector passing through a shaft. The shafts are rotated by translating a moving template between two stationary templates. Shaft walls as well as moving template holes are threaded such that the resistive friction produced between the two parts exerts enough force on the shafts to bring about the rotation. Rotation of the shaft is then transmitted to the shielded source via several keys. Thus, shaft angular position is fully correlated with the position of the moving template. The catheter angles are simultaneously incremented throughout treatment as needed, and only a single 360° rotation of all catheters is needed for a full treatment. For each rotation angle, source depth in each needle is controlled by a multi-source afterloader, which is proposed as an array of belt-driven linear actuators, each of which drives a source wire. Results: Optimized treatment plans based on Monte Carlo dose calculations demonstrated RSBT with the proposed apparatus reduced urethral D{sub 1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 35% for urethral dose gradient volume within 3 mm of the urethra surface. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with multi-source RSBT apparatus using nineteen 62.4 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources is 117 min. Conclusions: The proposed RSBT delivery apparatus in conjunction with multiple nitinol catheter-mounted platinum-shielded {sup 153}Gd sources enables a mechanically feasible

  12. Source of hope [El Salvador’s only brachytherapy centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon Castro, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Set up in 2008 with the IAEA’s support, the Cancer Institute 'Dr. Narciso Diaz Bazan' is El Salvador’s only brachytherapy treatment facility for women affected by uterine cancer. To date, over 1000 women affected by cervical cancer have received treatment in the centre

  13. Ionizing radiation, radiation sources, radiation exposure, radiation effects. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 deals with radiation exposure due to artificial radiation sources. The article describes X-ray diagnosis complete with an analysis of major methods, nuclear-medical diagnosis, percutaneous radiation therapy, isotope therapy, radiation from industrial generation of nucler energy and other sources of ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the authors attempt to asses total dose, genetically significant dose and various hazards of total radiation exposure by means of a summation of all radiation impacts. (orig./WU) [de

  14. Water equivalency evaluation of PRESAGE® dosimeters for dosimetry of Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2010-11-01

    A major challenge in brachytherapy dosimetry is the measurement of steep dose gradients. This can be achieved with a high spatial resolution three dimensional (3D) dosimeter. PRESAGE® is a polyurethane based dosimeter which is suitable for 3D dosimetry. Since an ideal dosimeter is radiologically water equivalent, we have investigated the relative dose response of three different PRESAGE® formulations, two with a lower chloride and bromide content than original one, for Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources. Doses were calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. Our results indicate that PRESAGE® dosimeters are suitable for relative dose measurement of Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources and the lower halogen content PRESAGE® dosimeters are more water equivalent than the original formulation.

  15. Methodology study for fixation of radioactive iodine in polymeric substrate for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Daiane B. de; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Fernandes, Vagner; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de; Camargo, Anderson Rogerio de

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now the second leading cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Prostate cancer is the most common among men. Brachytherapy is a modality of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed inside or in contact with the organ to be treated. The most widely used radioisotope in prostate brachytherapy is Iodine-125 which is presented fixated on a silver substrate that is subsequently placed inside a titanium capsule. A large dose of radiation is released only in the targeted tumor protecting healthy surrounding tissues. The technique requires the application of 80 - 120 seeds per patient. The implants of seeds have low impact and non-surgical procedures. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. This work proposes an alternative to the seeds that have already been developed, in order to reduce the cost by obtaining a better efficiency on fixing the radioactive iodine onto the epoxy resin. Methods have been developed to perform the fixation of Iodine-125 onto polymeric substrates. The parameters analyzed were the immersion time, type of static or dynamic reaction, concentration of the adsorption solution, the specific activity of the radioactive source, the need for carrier and chemical form of the radioactive Iodine. These experiments defined the most effective method to fixate the Iodine onto the polymeric material (epoxy resin), the Iodine activity in the polymeric substrate, the activity of the distribution of variation in a plot of polymeric cores and the efficiency of the epoxy resin to seal the seed. (author)

  16. SU-E-T-284: Revisiting Reference Dosimetry for the Model S700 Axxent 50 KVp Electronic Brachytherapy Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiatt, JR; Rivard, MJ

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft was characterized in 2006 by Rivard et al. The source design was modified in 2006 to include a plastic centering insert at the source tip to more accurately position the anode. The objectives of the current study were to establish an accurate Monte Carlo source model for simulation purposes, to dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and to determine dose differences between the source with and without the centering insert. Methods: Design information from dissected sources and vendor-supplied CAD drawings were used to devise the source model for radiation transport simulations of dose distributions in a water phantom. Collision kerma was estimated as a function of radial distance, r, and polar angle, θ, for determination of reference TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Simulations were run for 10 10 histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.03% at r=1 cm and 0.08% at r=10 cm. Results: The dose rate distribution the transverse plane did not change beyond 2% between the 2006 model and the current study. While differences exceeding 15% were observed near the source distal tip, these diminished to within 2% for r>1.5 cm. Differences exceeding a factor of two were observed near θ=150° and in contact with the source, but diminished to within 20% at r=10 cm. Conclusions: Changes in source design influenced the overall dose rate and distribution by more than 2% over a third of the available solid angle external from the source. For clinical applications using balloons or applicators with tissue located within 5 cm from the source, dose differences exceeding 2% were observed only for θ>110°. This study carefully examined the current source geometry and presents a modern reference TG-43 dosimetry dataset for the model S700 source

  17. Effect of photon energy spectrum on dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Davenport, David; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the photon energy spectrum of brachytherapy sources on task group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetric parameters. Different photon spectra are used for a specific radionuclide in Monte Carlo simulations of brachytherapy sources. MCNPX code was used to simulate 125I, 103Pd, 169Yb, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Air kerma strength per activity, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated and isodose curves were plotted for three different photon energy spectra. The references for photon energy spectra were: published papers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The data calculated by these photon energy spectra were compared. Dose rate constant values showed a maximum difference of 24.07% for 103Pd source with different photon energy spectra. Radial dose function values based on different spectra were relatively the same. 2D anisotropy function values showed minor differences in most of distances and angles. There was not any detectable difference between the isodose contours. Dosimetric parameters obtained with different photon spectra were relatively the same, however it is suggested that more accurate and updated photon energy spectra be used in Monte Carlo simulations. This would allow for calculation of reliable dosimetric data for source modeling and calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems.

  18. New sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1979-09-01

    An attempt is made to select examples of radiation sources whose application may make new or unconventional demands on radiation protection and dosimetry. A substantial body of knowledge about high energy facilities exists and, partly for this reason, the great high energy accelerators are mentioned only briefly

  19. High dose-rate brachytherapy source position quality assurance using radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.C.; Devic, S.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, radiographic film has been used to verify high-dose-rate brachytherapy source position accuracy by co-registering autoradiographic and diagnostic images of the associated applicator. Filmless PACS-based clinics that do not have access to radiographic film and wet developers may have trouble performing this quality assurance test in a simple and practical manner. We describe an alternative method for quality assurance using radiochromic-type film. In addition to being easy and practical to use, radiochromic film has some advantages in comparison with traditional radiographic film when used for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance

  20. Clinical Practice and Quality Assurance Challenges in Modern Brachytherapy Sources and Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2008-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either 'systematic' or 'stochastic' in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist

  1. Synchrotron radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the exponential growth of the utilization of synchrotron radiation for research in the domain of the material sciences, atomic and molecular physics, biology and technology, a major construction activity has been generated towards new dedicated electron storage rings, designed optimally for synchrotron radiation applications, also, expansion programs are underway at the existing facilities, such as DORIS, SPEAR, and VEPP. In this report the basic properties of synchrotron radiation will be discussed, a short overview will be given of the existing and new facilities, some aspects of the optimization of a structure for a synchrotron radiation source will be discussed and the addition of wigglers and undulators for spectrum enhancement will be described. Finally, some parameters of an optimized synchrotron radiation source will be given.

  2. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  3. Categorization of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, M.

    2000-01-01

    Through one-parameter (factor) analysis it is proved a hypothesis that the value of a radiation source (RS) activity of an application correlates with the category (the rank) given to it by the IAEA categorization although it is based on other parameters of the RS applications (practices like devices with radiation sources in industry, science, medicine and agriculture). The principles of the new IAEA categorization, taking into account the potential harm the sources may cause and the necessary regulatory control, are described. (author)

  4. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, Shahid B.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-01-01

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for 103 Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r,θ), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r 103 Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r,θ) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r,θ) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the linear interpolation technique. The results of these investigations indicate that the TG-43U1 formalism can be extended for elongated brachytherapy sources, if the two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy function is tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 cm, L/2, and L/2±0.2 cm. Moreover, with the addition of recommended radial distances for 2D anisotropy functions, the linear interpolation technique more closely replicates

  5. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and occupational exposures during manual 192Ir intracoronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Shanta, A.; Tripathi, U.B.; Bhatt, B.C.

    2001-01-01

    Intracoronary brachytherapy is a new modality of radiation therapy and is being used to reduce the rate of restenosis after angioplasty. Clinical trials for evaluation of safety and efficacy of manually implanted 192 Ir seed ribbons are underway at various cardiology centres in India. 192 Ir emits high energy gamma rays (0.136 -1.06 MeV), which causes concern regarding safety of the personnel when these sources are manually used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab) for intracoronary irradiation. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and exposures to personnel have been measured at 6 different cardiology centres in the country during 8 different clinical trials using radiation survey meter, personnel monitoring badges and pocket dosimeters. Activities of 192 Ir seed ribbons used in these clinical trials were in the range of 5.55 - 14.8 GBq. Measured radiation levels behind the mobile lead shields, at the top of lead shields, near the patient head, near the patient toes and at the main door of the Cath Lab were in the range of 2.6-20, 50-256, 385-450, 22-225 and 2-16 μSv/hr/3.7GBq, respectively. Measured effective doses to occupational workers were in range of 14-100 μSv/procedure/3.7GBq. Based on these measurements, user institutions have been advised to use lead glass mounted L-shaped mobile lead shields with proper orientation during clinical trials, avoid unwanted occupancy in the Cath Lab and around the patient during irradiation and use conveniently long forceps or tongs for implantation and removal of sources. (author)

  6. A robotic device for MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerburg, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the treatment options for prostate cancer is brachytherapy with iodine-125 sources. In prostate brachytherapy a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate with a steep dose fall off to critical surrounding organs. The implantation of the iodine sources is currently performed under

  7. Application of Gafchromic registered film in the dosimetry of an intravascular brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haijun; Roa, D. Eduardo; Yue Ning; D'Errico, Francesco; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-01-01

    The methodology of brachytherapy source dosimetry with Gafchromic registered MD 55-2 film (ISP Technologies, Inc.) is examined with an emphasis on the nonlinearity of the optical density-dose relation within the dynamic dose range, the radial distance-dependent measurement uncertainty, and the format of data presentation. The specific source chosen for this study was a Checkmate trade mark sign (Cordis Corporation) intravascular brachytherapy system. The two-dimensional dose distribution around the source was characterized by a comprehensive analysis of measurement uncertainties. A comparative analysis of the dosimetric data from the vendor and from the scientific literature showed a substantial consistency of the information available for the Checkmate trade mark sign source. Our two-dimensional dosimetric data for the Checkmate trade mark sign source trains is presented in the form of measured along and away dose tables

  8. Synchroton Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light

  9. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-21

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  10. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E C; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-07

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  11. Management of Spent Radiation Source from Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisyah

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays the use of radioactive source for both radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy in Indonesia hospital increases rapidly. Sealed source used in radiotherapy among others for brachytherapy, teletherapy, bone densitometry, whole blood irradiation and gamma knife (radiosurgery). In line with this, the waste of spent radiation sources will be generated in hospitals. Of course these spent radiation sources must be treated correctly in order to maintain the safety of both the public and the environment. According to the Act No. 10/1997, BATAN, in care of the Radioactive Waste Management Center is the national appointed agency for the management of radioactive waste. The option for waste management by hospitals needs to be expound, either by re-exporting to the supplier of origin, re-exporting to other supplier, re-use by other licensee or sending to the Radioactive Waste Management Center. Usually the waste sent by the hospitals to the center comprises of sealed radiation source of 60 Co, 137 Cs or 226 Ra. The management of spent radiation source in the center is carried out in several steps i.e. conditioning, temporary storage, and long-term storage (final disposal). The conditioning of non 226 Ra is carried out by placing the waste in a 200 litter drum shell, 950 or 350 litter concrete shells, depends on the activity and dimension of the spent radiation source. The conditioning of 226 Ra is carried out by encapsulating the waste in a stainless steel container for long-term storage shield which then placed in a 200 litter drum shell. The temporary storage of the conditioned spent radiation source is carried out by storing it in the center’s temporary storages, either low or medium activity waste. Finally, the conditioned spent radiation source is buried in a disposal facility. For medium half-life spent radiation source, the final disposal is burial it in a shallow-land disposal; mean while, for long half-life spent radiation source, the final disposal is burial it in

  12. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  13. Dosimetry experience of 192IR sources used In HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Myrku, Rodina Cela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 192IR Sources are the most commonly used in radiotherapy treatments HDR worldwide. According to international recommendations on quality assurance in HDR brachytherapy, an acceptance test based on the determination of the source strength of any new source shall be carried out before first application to verify the manufacturer’s calibration data. The present paper gives the experimental determination of the source strength for our brachytherapy sources used until now in brachytherapy treatments. Materials/Methods: At Mother Teresa University Hospital we have a cost-effective gynecological brachytherapy unit from Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG named GyneSource® that is a five channel HDR after loader equipped with an 192IR source. The software used is HDR plus™ 2.5 that delivers an optimized treatment plan and makes the process especially fast and we use intracavitary BEBIG applicators. From April 2009 up to December 2012, we have imported nine HDR 192IR Sources. The exchange of the source and acceptance test is done by the physicist of the clinic once the source is imported. The measurements are done with a Well-type ionization chamber HDR1000 Plus and the electrometer used is MAX4000. Only seven sources are compared as we miss the dosimetry data of the first source, and the forth source was not measured and not used because the machine was not working in that time. Results/Conclusions: Eight sources were accepted for clinically use as the measurement were within the tolerance. The source number four with e deviation of -1.92% has been double checked compared with a free in-air measurement with farmer type chamber that gave a deviation to source certificate of 4% that is still inside the tolerance to accept a source for clinical use. The deviations of measured Air Kerma rate to the value of the sources certificates of all our used 192IR sources are less than 2%, which are within the tolerance. The checked value of updated source strength in

  14. Monte Carlo dosimetry of the IRAsource high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabiasl, Akbar; Ayoobian, Navid; Jabbari, Iraj; Poorbaygi, Hossein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a common method for cancer treatment in clinical brachytherapy. Because of the different source designs, there is a need for specific dosimetry data set for each HDR model. The purpose of this study is to obtain detailed dose rate distributions in water phantom for a first prototype HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source model, IRAsource, and compare with the other published works. In this study, Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP version 4C) code was used to simulate the dose rate distributions around the HDR source. A full set of dosimetry parameters reported by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43U1 was evaluated. Also, the absorbed dose rate distributions in water, were obtained in an along-away look-up table. The dose rate constant, Λ, of the IRAsource was evaluated to be equal to 1.112 ± 0.005 cGy h −1 U −1 . The results of dosimetry parameters are presented in tabulated and graphical formats and compared with those reported from other commercially available HDR 192 Ir sources, which are in good agreement. This justifies the use of specific data sets for this new source. The results obtained in this study can be used as input data in the conventional treatment planning systems.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation of stepping source in afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy for GZP6 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toossi, M.T.B.; Abdollahi, M.; Ghorbani, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Stepping source in brachytherapy systems is used to treat a target lesion longer than the effective treatment length of the source. Dose calculation accuracy plays a vital role in the outcome of brachytherapy treatment. In this study, the stepping source (channel 6) of GZP6 brachytherapy unit was simulated by Monte Carlo simulation and matrix shift method. The stepping source of GZP6 was simulated by Monte Carlo MCNPX code. The Mesh tally (type I) was employed for absorbed dose calculation in a cylindrical water phantom. 5 x 108 photon histories were scored and a 0.2% statistical uncertainty was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations. Dose distributions were obtained by our matrix shift method for esophageal cancer tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm. Isodose curves produced by simulation and TPS were superimposed to estimate the differences. Results Comparison of Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions show that in longitudinal direction (source movement direction) Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions are comparable. [n transverse direction, the dose differences of 7 and 5% were observed for esophageal tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm respectively. Conclusions Although, the results show that the maximum difference between Monte Carlo and TPS calculations is about 7%, but considering that the certified activity is given with ± I 0%, uncertainty, then an error of the order of 20% for Monte Carlo calculation would be reasonable. It can be suggested that accuracy of the dose distribution produced by TPS is acceptable for clinical applications. (author)

  16. Safe handling of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    This chapter discussed the subjects related to the safe handling of radiation sources: type of radiation sources, method of use: transport within premises, transport outside premises; Disposal of Gamma Sources

  17. Categorization of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a categorization scheme for radiation sources that could be relevant to decisions both in a retrospective application to bring sources under control and in a prospective sense to guide the application of the regulatory infrastructure. The Action Plan envisages that the preparation of guidance on national strategies and programmes for the detection and location of orphan sources and their subsequent management should commence after the categorization of sources has been carried out. In the prospective application of the system of notification, registration, and licensing, the categorization is relevant to prioritize a regulatory authority's resources and training activities; to guide the degree of detail necessary for a safety assessment; and to serve as a measure of the intensity of effort which a regulatory authority should apply to the safety and security of a particular type of source

  18. Novel high resolution 125I brachytherapy source dosimetry using Ge-doped optical fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, Fatma; Hugtenburg, Richard P.; Nisbet, Andrew; Bradley, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The steep dose gradients close to brachytherapy sources limit the ability to obtain accurate measurements of dose. Here we use a novel high spatial resolution dosimeter to measure dose around a 125 I source and compare against simulations. Ge-doped optical fibres, used as thermoluminescent dosimeters, offer sub-mm spatial resolution, linear response from 10 cGy to >1 kGy and dose-rate independence. For a 125 I brachytherapy seed in a PMMA phantom, doses were obtained for source-dosimeter separations from 0.1 cm up to several cm, supported by EGSnrc/DOSRZznrc Monte Carlo simulations and treatment planning system data. The measurements agree with simulations to within 2.3%±0.3% along the transverse and perpendicular axes and within 3.0%±0.5% for measurements investigating anisotropy in angular dose distribution. Measured and Veriseed™ brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) values agreed to within 2.7%±0.5%. Ge-doped optical fibre dosimeters allow detailed dose mapping around brachytherapy sources, not least in situations of high dose gradient. - Highlights: • We evaluate fall-off in dose for distances from an 125 I source of 1 mm to 60 mm. • The TL of optical fibres accommodate high dose gradients and doses that reduce by a factor of 10 3 across the range of separations. • We verify measured values using DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code simulations and the Variseed™ Treatment Planning System. • Measured radial and angular dose are obtained with ≤3% uncertainty

  19. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L

    2002-07-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with {sup 192}Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for lung, 0.9x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for oesophagus and 0.48x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for colon, 7.8x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for stomach and 1.7x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}, whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  20. Comparison of 60Cobalt and 192Iridium sources in high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.; Baier, K.; Flentje, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: 60 Co sources with dimensions identical to those of 192 Ir have recently been made available in clinical brachytherapy. A longer half time reduces demands on logistics and quality assurance and perhaps costs. Material and Methods: Comparison of the physical properties of 60 Co and 192 Ir with regard to brachytherapy. Results: Required activities for the same air kerma rate are lower by a factor of 2.8 for 60 Co. Differential absorption in tissues of different densities can be neglected. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that integral dose due to radial dose fall off is higher for 192 Ir in comparison to 60 Co within the first 22 cm from the source (normalization at 1 cm). At larger distances this relationship is reversed. Conclusion: Clinical examples for intracavitary and interstitial applications however, show practically identical dose distributions in the treatment volume. (orig.)

  1. Dosimetric effects of saline- versus water-filled balloon applicators for IORT using the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage; Templeton, Alistair; Zhen, Heming; Turian, Julius; Bernard, Damian; Chu, James C H; Griem, Katherine L; Liao, Yixiang

    The Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System (Xoft, Inc., San Jose, CA) is a viable option for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) treatment of early-stage breast cancer. The low-energy (50-kVp) X-ray source simplifies shielding and increases relative biological effectiveness but increases dose distribution sensitivity to medium composition. Treatment planning systems typically assume homogenous water for brachytherapy dose calculations, including precalculated atlas plans for Xoft IORT. However, Xoft recommends saline for balloon applicator filling. This study investigates dosimetric differences due to increased effective atomic number (Z eff ) for saline (Z eff  = 7.56) versus water (Z eff  = 7.42). Balloon applicator diameters range from 3 to 6 cm. Monte Carlo N-Particle software is used to calculate dose at the surface (D s ) of and 1 cm away (D 1cm ) from the water-/saline-filled balloon applicator using a single dwell at the applicator center as a simple estimation of the dosimetry and multiple dwells simulating the clinical dose distributions for the atlas plans. Single-dwell plans show a 4.4-6.1% decrease in D s for the 3- to 6-cm diameter applicators due to the saline. Multidwell plans show similar results: 4.9% and 6.4% D s decrease, for 4-cm and 6-cm diameter applicators, respectively. For the single-dwell plans, D 1cm decreases 3.6-5.2% for the 3- to 6-cm diameter applicators. For the multidwell plans, D 1cm decreases 3.3% and 5.3% for the 4-cm and 6-cm applicators, respectively. The dosimetric effect introduced by saline versus water filling for Xoft balloon applicator-based IORT treatments is ∼5%. Users should be aware of this in the context of both treatment planning and patient outcome studies. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an 192 Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an 192 Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The

  3. Optical Imaging of Ionizing Radiation from Clinical Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Travis M; Drain, Charles Michael; Grimm, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear medicine uses ionizing radiation for both in vivo diagnosis and therapy. Ionizing radiation comes from a variety of sources, including x-rays, beam therapy, brachytherapy, and various injected radionuclides. Although PET and SPECT remain clinical mainstays, optical readouts of ionizing radiation offer numerous benefits and complement these standard techniques. Furthermore, for ionizing radiation sources that cannot be imaged using these standard techniques, optical imaging offers a unique imaging alternative. This article reviews optical imaging of both radionuclide- and beam-based ionizing radiation from high-energy photons and charged particles through mechanisms including radioluminescence, Cerenkov luminescence, and scintillation. Therapeutically, these visible photons have been combined with photodynamic therapeutic agents preclinically for increasing therapeutic response at depths difficult to reach with external light sources. Last, new microscopy methods that allow single-cell optical imaging of radionuclides are reviewed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria E.C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Calvo, Wilson A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  5. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria E.C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Calvo, Wilson A.P., E-mail: somessar@ipen.b, E-mail: afeher@ipen.b, E-mail: sprenger@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b, E-mail: olcosta@ipen.b, E-mail: wapcalvo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  6. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Radiation Sources Michael G. Stabin, PhD, CHP Introduction Radiation exposures from diagnostic medical examinations are generally ... of exposure annually to natural background radiation. Plain Film X Rays Single Radiographs Effective Dose, mSv Skull ( ...

  7. Outcomes and toxicities in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlussel Markovic, Emily; Buckstein, Michael; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard G

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the cancer control outcomes and long-term treatment-related morbidity of brachytherapy as well as combination brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. A retrospective review was conducted in a prospectively collected database of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated either with brachytherapy or brachytherapy and EBRT, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in the period 1990-2014. Urinary and erectile dysfunction symptoms were measured using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the Mount Sinai erectile function scale and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Cancer control endpoints included biochemical failure and development of distant metastases. All statistical analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Survival curves were calculated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial methods and compared using log-rank tests. Cox regression multivariate analyses were used to test the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcomes. A total of 902 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 91 months. Of these, 390 received brachytherapy and 512 received combination therapy with EBRT. In patients with one intermediate-risk factor, the addition of EBRT did not significantly affect freedom from biochemical failure or distant metastases. Among patients with two or three intermediate-risk factors, added EBRT did not improve freedom from biochemical failure. Significant differences in late toxicity between patients treated with brachytherapy vs combination brachytherapy and EBRT were identified including urge incontinence (P actuarial methods showed that patients receiving combination therapy more frequently experienced loss of potency, as measured by the Mount Sinai erectile function scale (P = 0.040). Brachytherapy monotherapy results in equal biochemical and distant control in both patients with

  8. Non-uniform dwell times in line source high dose rate brachytherapy: physical and radiobiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Tan, L.T.; Freestone, G.; Bleasdale, C.; Myint, S.; Littler, J.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to vary source dwell times in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy allows for the use of non-uniform dwell times along a line source. This may have advantages in the radical treatment of tumours depending on individual tumour geometry. This study investigates the potential improvements in local tumour control relative to adjacent normal tissue isoeffects when intratumour source dwell times are increased along the central portion of a line source (technique A) in radiotherapy schedules which include a relatively small component of HDR brachytherapy. Such a technique is predicted to increase the local control for tumours of diameters ranging between 2 cm and 4 cm by up to 11% compared with a technique in which there are uniform dwell times along the line source (technique B). There is no difference in the local control rates for the two techniques when used to treat smaller tumours. Normal tissue doses are also modified by the technique used. Technique A produces higher normal tissue doses at points perpendicular to the centre of the line source and lower dose at points nearer the ends of the line source if the prescription point is not in the central plane of the line source. Alternatively, if the dose is prescribed at a point in the central plane of the line source, the dose at all the normal tissue points are lower when technique A is used. (author)

  9. Neuro-oncology update: radiation safety and nursing care during interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, T.M.; Drake, D.K.; Sewchand, W.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation control and safety are major considerations for nursing personnel during the care of patients receiving brachytherapy. Since the theory and practice of radiation applications are not part of the routine curriculum of nursing programs, the education of nurses and other health care professionals in radiation safety procedures is important. Regulatory agencies recommend that an annual safety course be given to all persons frequenting, using, or associated with patients containing radioactive materials. This article presents pertinent aspects of the principles and procedures of radiation safety, the role of personnel dose-monitoring devices, and the value of additional radiation control features, such as a lead cubicle, during interstitial brain implants. One institution's protocol and procedures for the care of high-intensity iridium-192 brain implants are discussed. Preoperative teaching guidelines and nursing interventions included in the protocol focus on radiation control principles

  10. Tuned sources of submillimetre radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhnyj, V.L.

    1981-01-01

    The main present directions of development of sources of frequency coherent tuned radiation of electromagnetic waves in the submillimeter range: nonlinear mixing of different frequencies; semiconductor lasers; molecular lasers with optical pumping; relativistic electron beams in a magnetic field as submillimeter radiation sources; submillimeter radiation sources on the basis of SHF classical electrovacuum devices - are considered. The designs of generator systems and their specifications are presented. The main parameters of electromagnetic radiation of different sources, such as: power, stability, frequency, tuning range - are presented. The methods of improving sources and electromagnetic radiation parameters are proposed. The examples of possible applications of submillimeter radiation in different spheres of science and technology are given [ru

  11. Reduction in radiation exposure to nursing personnel with the use of remote afterloading brachytherapy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.; Eichling, J.; Purdy, J.; Slessinger, E.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation exposure to nursing personnel from patients with brachytherapy implants on a large brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposure to nurses, as determined by TLD monitors, indicates a 7-fold reduction in exposure after the implementation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for six quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the nurses of 152 and 154 mrem (1.5 mSv). After the implementation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per nurse of 23 and 19 mrem (0.2 mSv). This is an 87% reduction in exposure to nurses with the use of these devices (p less than 0.01)

  12. Re-evaluation of a radiation protection cost benefit analysis study in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broek, J.G. van den; Weatherburn, H.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigates changes in the NRPB advice concerning cost benefit analysis over the last 10 years by correcting all figures for inflation and applying them to a particular radiation protection example, a previously published case of the introduction of afterloading brachytherapy equipment at the Christie Hospital, Manchester. It has been shown that for this example NRPB advice at one time led to a large cost benefit, at another time led to a large cost deficit and later still it again gives a large cost benefit. Application of cost benefit analysis to decision making in radiation protection is therefore shown to be in need of further investigation and clarification. (author)

  13. Spectroscopic output of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher-Moga, Jacqueline; Beach, Stephen M.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Global Physics Solutions, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    The spectroscopic output of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources is dependent on the physical design and construction of the source. Characterization of the emitted photons from 12 {sup 125}I and 3 {sup 103}Pd LDR brachytherapy source models is presented. Photon spectra, both along the transverse bisector and at several polar angles, were measured in air with a high-purity reverse electrode germanium (REGe) detector. Measured spectra were corrected to in vacuo conditions via Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The tabulated and plotted spectroscopic data provide a more complete understanding of each source model's output characteristics than can be obtained with other measurement techniques. The variation in fluorescence yield of the {sup 125}I sources containing silver caused greater differences in the emitted spectra and average energies among these seed models than was observed for the {sup 103}Pd sources or the {sup 125}I sources that do not contain silver. Angular spectroscopic data further highlighted the effects of source construction unique to each model, as well as the asymmetric output of many seeds. These data demonstrate the need for the incorporation of such physically measured output characteristics in the Monte Carlo modeling process.

  14. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winick, Herman

    2003-01-01

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, micr...

  15. Radiation sources and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honious, H.B.; Janzow, E.F.; Malson, H.A.; Moyer, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to radiation sources comprising a substrate having an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface, a layer of a metal radioactive isotope of the scandium group, which in addition to scandium, yttrium, lanthanum and actinium, includes all the lanthanide and actinide series of elements, with the actinide series usually being preferred because of the nature of the radioactive isotopes therein, particularly americium-241, curium-244, plutonium-238, californium-252 and promethium-147, and a non-radioactive bonding metal codeposited on the surface by electroplating the isotope and bonding metal from an electrolytic solution, the isotope being present in the layer in minor amount as compared to the bonding metal, and with or without a non-radioactive protective metal coating covering the isotoype and bonding metal on the surface, the coating being sufficiently thin to permit radiation to pass through the coating. The invention also relates to a process for providing radiation sources comprising codepositing a layer of the metal radioactive isotope with a non-radioactive bonding metal from an electrolytic solution in which the isotope is present in minor molar amount as compared to the bonding metal such that the codeposited layer contains a minor molar amount of the isotope compared to the bonding metal by electroplating on an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface of a cathode substrate, and with or without depositing a nonradioactive protective metal coating over the isotope and bonding metal on the surface, the coating being sufficiently thin to permit radiation to pass through the coating

  16. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Tian, J.; Lin, Y.; Chen, S.; He, W.; Hu, Y.; Li, Q.

    1985-01-01

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  17. Mechanical Design of the Radio-Isotope Source Driver Module for an Initial Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Tri Harjanto; Hendra Prasetia

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy equipment for therapy against cervical cancer is developed by empowering local products. An Iridium-192 with 5 Curies of energy is used. The source is wrapped in a capsule and combined with a wire diameter of 1 mm and length 1800 mm. The therapy is carried out by inserting the radiation source into the patient's body through an applicator. The system for loading-unloading the isotope source is divided into three modules: the source driver module, the source container modules, and channel distributor module. In this paper, the discussion is focused on engineering activities of the first module that serves to drive forward and backward position of the Iridium-192 isotope sources. The activity begins with the development of preliminary design sketches that produces drawings of mechanical components required. Furthermore, the calculations are carried out in order to establish the main component specifications. From this stage, a stepper motor type M66-A50K-G10 as a mechanical driver is chosen. The next stage is developing the detailed design and producing detailed drawings for all components. The fabrication of each component refers to the detailed design drawings. All components are assembled completely into the source driver module. Test also shows that the module works manually well. By rotating the manual handle in both directions, the tip of the wire moves alternately in forward and backward directions. (author)

  18. Determination of the chemical yield on the Fricke dosimetry for 192Ir sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, M.G.; Albuquerque, M.A.G.; Almeida, C.E. de; Rosado, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of developing a primary standard for the absorbed dose to water, for the 192 Ir sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy, this work focuses on the determination of the chemical yield, G(Fe +3 ), using Fricke dosimetry, for the energy of those sources . The G(Fe +3 ) were determined the for three qualities of x-ray beams (150, 250 and 300 kV ) and for 60 Co energy. The G(Fe +3 ) value for the average energy of 192 Ir was obtained by linear fit, the found value was 1,555 ± 0,015 μmol/J. (author)

  19. Procedures for brachytherapy sources lost in a radiotherapy department; Protocolo para fontes de braquiterapia extraviadas no ambiente hospitalar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Adelaide de [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    1997-12-31

    Brachytherapy sources are easily lost in a Radiotherapy Department owing to unexpected behaviour of the patient and/or inattention of the people in charge of the sources. This work reports a protocol to be used when brachytherapy sources are lost and it was based on the search of three sealed sources of Cesium 137 with activity of 37 x 10{sup 7} Bq, removed by a patient from a conventional afterloading intra-uterine system (Henscke). (author) 5 refs., 3 figs.; e-mail: dalmeida at biomag.ffclrp.usp.br

  20. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-01-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (Λ) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (<50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of Λ taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of Λ. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in Λ determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it ideal to determine

  1. Natural sources of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Natural sources of ionizing radiations are described in detail. The sources are subdivided into sources of extraterrestrial origin (cosmic radiation) and sources of terrestrial origin. Data on the concentration of different nuclides in rocks, various soils, ground waters, atmospheric air, tissues of plants and animals, various food stuffs are presented. The content of natural radionuclides in environmental objects, related to human activities, is discussed

  2. Radiation absorbed doses in the event of balloon rupture (BR) during endovascular brachytherapy (EB) using 188Re-perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelides, S.; Hetherington, E.; Karolis, C.; Walker, B.; Jackson, T.; Knittel, T.; Friend, C.; Pitney, M.; Jepson, N.; Milross, C.; Lonergan, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: endovascular brachytherapy (EB) using liquid or solid radiation sources, is an effective emerging therapy for coronary artery disease. Liquid sources provide uniform radiation dose to the vessel wall. However the radiation burden in the unlikely event of BR is not insignificant. The aims of this study were to determine i) absorbed dose for various 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals in the event of BR, and ii) effects of thyroid uptake blocking agent, Lugol's iodine (Ll) and/or bladder catheterisation (BC). Dose calculations were based on MIRDOSE 3.1 with dynamic bladder model and MIRD Dose Estimate Report No.8 for 99 Tc m -pertechnetate, which has similar biokinetic properties to 188 Re-perrhenate. Normal renal function and a bladder voiding interval of 4.8h (1 minute with catheter) were assumed. BR was simulated ex-vivo by puncturing a Solaris angioplasty balloon filled with normal saline at 4 atm. LI, MAG3 and DTPA substantially reduces the radiation dose following BR, particularly to the thyroid, and BC reduces the bladder wall dose. Only the contents of the balloon leaked; 0.4 ml of the total volume of 1.8ml. As binding of 188 Re to ligands is cumbersome, we opted to use LI. Twenty five patients with in-stent re-stenosis have been treated using 188 Re-perrhenate (8 GBq/ml), with no BR. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  3. Radiation-induced circumscribed superficial morphea after brachytherapy for endometrial adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Trivedi, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced morphea (RIM is a rare and underrecognized complication of radiation therapy that most commonly occurs in women after treatment for breast cancer. Although not fully understood, RIM is hypothesized to arise from an increase in cytokines that stimulate collagen production and extracellular matrix formation. Most documented cases of RIM occur 1 year after radiation therapy and are localized to areas that were treated for breast cancer. We report on a case of a female patient with stage IB endometrial adenocarcinoma who was treated with 24 Gray of adjuvant brachytherapy. The patient developed a diffuse morpheaform, pruritic eruption only at distant sites from the brachytherapy treatment field. Although treatment for RIM is generally unsatisfactory, our patient experienced improvement in the pruritus and a regression of the lesions while applying topical 0.1% tacrolimus ointment and 0.1% triamcinolone creme. An early diagnosis of RIM can prevent extensive workup, guide treatment, and improve quality of life for patients. Keywords: radiation-induced morphea, postirradiation morphea

  4. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  5. Evaluation of the response of polymeric gel modified MAGIC-f using a clinical brachytherapy source and Monte Carlo simulation with package PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevedo, Ana Luiza; Nicolucci, Patricia; Borges, Leandro F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work a comparison of experimental and simulated relative doses of a clinical brachytherapy source was performed. A 5 x 5 x 7 cm"3 phantom with a modified MAGIC-f gel was irradiated using a clinical "1"9"2Ir source and read using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE was used to simulate the dose distributions of the same radiation source. The dose distributions were obtained in two planes perpendicular to the source: one passing through the source's center and the other at 0.5 cm away from the source's center. The higher differences found between experimental and computational distributions were 12.5% at a point 0.62 cm from the source for the central plane and 8.6% at 1.3 cm from the source to the plane 0.5 cm away from the source's center. Considering the high dose gradient of these dose distributions, the results obtained show that the modified MAGIC-f gel is promising for brachytherapy dosimetry. (author)

  6. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  7. Study of dosimetric parameters for iodine-125 brachytherapy sources development from IPEN-CNEN/SP using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Tiago Batista de

    2016-01-01

    Expectations of the World Health Organization for the year 2030 are that the number of cancer deaths is approximately 13.2 million, reflecting the high proportion of this disease in global health issue. With respect to prostate cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute, the number of cases diagnosed worldwide in 2012 was approximately 1.1 million, while in Brazil the data demonstrated the incidence of 68,000 new cases. The treatment of cancer can be performed with surgery (prostatectomy) or radiation therapy. Among radiotherapy, we can highlight the brachytherapy technique, which consists in the introduction of small radioactive sources (seeds) within the prostate, which is delivered a high dose value in the treatment volume and low dose in the surrounding tissues. In Brazil, the medical profession estimates a demand of approximately 8000 seeds / month, and the unit cost of each seed at least US $ 26.00. The AAPM protocol TG-43 recommend the dose-rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function for dosimetric analysis LDR brachytherapy seeds. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to assess the dosimetric parameters of the OncoSeed-6711, manufactured by Oncura-GEHealthcare, and a seed developed by Radiation Technology Center, using the MCNP5 code. A 6711 seed, an IPEN seed and the 30 x 30 x 30cm 3 phantom filled with water were modeled to simulate the dose distribution. The 6711 seed parameters were compared with literature, and the results presented relative error less than 0.1% for Λ. In comparison with the 6711 seed, the IPEN model seed dosimetric parameters were similar, account the statistical uncertainty. (author)

  8. A method to combine three dimensional dose distributions for external beam and brachytherapy radiation treatments for gynecological neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, V.; Sahijdak, W.M.; Orton, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation treatment of gynecological neoplasms, such as cervical carcinoma, usually combines external radiation therapy with one or more intracavitary brachytherapy applications. Although the dose from external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy can be calculated and displayed in 3D individually, the dose distributions are not combined. At most, combined point doses are calculated for select points using various time-dose models. In this study, we present a methodology to combine external beam and brachytherapy treatments for gynecological neoplasms. Material and Methods: Three dimensional bio-effect treatment planning to obtain complication probability has been outlined. CT scans of the patient's pelvis with the gynecological applicator in place are used to outline normal tissue and tumor volumes. 3D external beam and brachytherapy treatment plans are developed separately and an external beam dose matrix and a brachytherapy dose matrix was calculated. The dose in each voxel was assumed to be homogeneous. The physical dose in each voxel of the dose matrix was then converted into extrapolated response dose (ERD) based on the linear quadratic model that accounts for the dose per fraction, number of fractions, dose rate, and complete or incomplete repair of sublethal damage (time between fractions). The net biological dose delivered was obtained by summing the ERD grids from external beam and brachytherapy since there was complete repair of sublethal damage between external beam and brachytherapy treatments. The normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability were obtained using the biological dose matrix based on the critical element model. Results: The outlined method of combining external beam and brachytherapy treatments was implemented on gynecological treatments using an applicator for brachytherapy treatments. Conclusion: Implementation of the biological dose calculation that combine different modalities is extremely useful

  9. Experimental and theoretical determination of dosimetric characteristics of IsoAid ADVANTAGETM125I brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Hayes, Joshua L.; Zhang Hualin; Sowards, Keith

    2002-01-01

    125 I brachytherapy sources are being used for interstitial implants in tumor sites such as the prostate. Recently, the ADVANTAGE TM 125 I, Model IAI-125, source became commercially available for interstitial brachytherapy treatment. Dosimetric characteristics (dose rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined, following the AAPM Task Group 43 recommendations. Derivation of the dose rate constant was based on recent NIST WAFAC calibration performed in accordance with their 1999 standard. Measurements were performed in Solid Water TM phantom using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters. The theoretical calculations were performed in both Solid Water TM and water using the PTRAN Monte Carlo code. The results indicated that a dose rate constant of the new source in water was 0.98±0.03 cGy h -1 U -1 . The radial dose function of the new source was measured in Solid Water TM and calculated both in water and Solid Water TM at distances up to 10.0 cm. The anisotropy function, F(r,θ), of the new source was measured and calculated in Solid Water TM at distances of 2 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm, and 7 cm and also was calculated in water at distances ranging from 1 cm to 7 cm from the source. From the anisotropy function, the anisotropy factors and anisotropy constant were derived. The anisotropy constant of the ADVANTAGE TM 125 I source in water was found to be 0.97±0.03. The dosimetric characteristics of this new source compared favorably with those from the Amersham Health Model 6711 source. Complete dosimetric parameters of the new source are presented in this paper

  10. High dose-rate brachytherapy source localization: positional resolution using a diamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, T; Suchowerska, N; Bilek, M M; McKenzie, D R; Ng, N; Kron, T

    2003-01-01

    A potential real-time source position verification process for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment is described. This process is intended to provide immediate confirmation that a treatment is proceeding according to plan, so that corrective action can be taken if necessary. We show that three dosimeters are in principle sufficient and demonstrate the feasibility of the process using a diamond detector and an Ir-192 source. An error analysis including all identified sources of error shows that this detector is capable of locating the distance to the source to within 2 mm for distances up to 12 cm. This positional accuracy is less than the diameter of typical HDR catheters indicating that a diamond detector can be used to accurately determine the distance to the source. The uncertainty in the distance is found to increase with distance

  11. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Daiane C.B.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.; Vicente, Roberto; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S.; Batista, Talita Q.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R., E-mail: dcsouza@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam Junior, Dib, E-mail: dib.karam@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)

  12. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Daiane C.B.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.; Vicente, Roberto; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S.; Batista, Talita Q.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R.; Karam Junior, Dib

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)

  13. Endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy as boost radiation for primary early T stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Bo Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT is usually applied as boost radiotherapy for superficial residual of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC after primary extern-beam radiptherapy (ERT. Here, we evaluated the outcome of endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy (IMBT boost radiation for deep-seated residual NPC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two hundred and thirteen patients with residual NPC who were salvaged with brachytherapy boost radiation during 2005-2009 were analyzed retrospectively. Among these patients, 171 patients had superficial residual NPC (≤1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium were treated with ICBT boost radiation, and interstitial IMBT boost radiation was delivered to 42 patients with deep-seated residual NPC (>1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium. We found that IMBT boost subgroup had a higher ratio of T2b (81.0% VS 34.5%, P<0.001 and stage II (90.5% VS 61.4%, P = 0.001 than that of ICBT boost subgroup. The dosage of external-beam radiotherapy in the nasopharyngeal (63.0±3.8 VS 62.6±4.3 Gray (Gy, P = 0.67 and regional lymph nodes (55.8±5.0 VS 57.5±5.7 Gy, P = 0.11 was comparable in both groups. For brachytherapy, IMBT subgroup had a lower boost radiation dosage than ICBT subgroup (11.0±2.9 VS 14.8±3.2 Gy, P<0.01. Though the IMBT group had deeper residual tumors and received lower boost radiation dosages, both subgroups had the similar 5-year actuarial overall survival rate (IMBT VS ICBT group: 96.8% VS 93.6%, P = 0.87, progression-free survival rate (92.4% VS 86.5%, P = 0.41 and distant metastasis-free survival rate (94.9% VS 92.7%, P = 0.64. Moreover, IMBT boost radiation subgroup had a similar local (97.4% VS 94.4%, P = 0.57 and regional (95.0% VS 97.2%, P = 0.34 control to ICBT subgroup. The acute and late toxicities rates were comparable between the both subgroups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IMBT boost radiation may be a promising therapeutic

  14. A Dosimetric Characterization of the 137Cs Brachytherapy source to be used in Libyan Medical Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, T.; Eshaibani, R.; Assatel, O.

    2007-01-01

    A dosimetric characterization of the 137C s brachytherapy source to be used in Libyan medical centers was carried out using analytical and Monte Carlo investigations. The dose rates in air across the transverse axis were calculated using a Monte Carlo Code and the Sievert integral method. A good agreement between the results was achieved. The Monte Carlo Code was then used to calculate the two dimensional dose rates in water and isodose curves were generated. The latter results were used to calculate the dose rate at the reference point, radial dose function and the anisotropy function according to the American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) TG.43 formalism .

  15. Determination of factors through Monte Carlo method for Fricke dosimetry from 192Ir sources for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Mariano Gazineu; Salata, Camila; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas develops a methodology for the determination of the absorbed dose to water by Fricke chemical dosimetry method for brachytherapy sources of 192 Ir high dose rate and have compared their results with the laboratory of the National Research Council Canada. This paper describes the determination of the correction factors by Monte Carlo method, with the Penelope code. Values for all factors are presented, with a maximum difference of 0.22% for their determination by an alternative way. (author)

  16. Quality control of Ir-192, Cs-137 and Ra-226 sources for use in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyrzun Cortes, C.H.; Palma D, A.M.; Penaloza C, H.; Tomicic, M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to establish a certain degree of reliability in the use and managing of radioactive material in brachytherapy, a minimal quality control to each source was implemented. The purpose was to estimate the degree of radioactive leak, resistance to the mechanic traction and stress of use. Through a physical control of the radioactive material (a simple dip test and using a photon scanner or auto-radiography) the minimal conditions that guarantee safe use are established. This information is transmitted to a calibration laboratory for certification in exposure rate and/or activity. Systematic use of these tests, enables discovery of radioactive material leakage due to faults in the seal. (author)

  17. Quality control of Ir-192, Cs-137 and Ra-226 sources for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyrzun Cortes, C H; Palma D, A M; Penaloza C, H; Tomicic, M [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    1996-08-01

    In order to establish a certain degree of reliability in the use and managing of radioactive material in brachytherapy, a minimal quality control to each source was implemented. The purpose was to estimate the degree of radioactive leak, resistance to the mechanic traction and stress of use. Through a physical control of the radioactive material (a simple dip test and using a photon scanner or auto-radiography) the minimal conditions that guarantee safe use are established. This information is transmitted to a calibration laboratory for certification in exposure rate and/or activity. Systematic use of these tests, enables discovery of radioactive material leakage due to faults in the seal. (author).

  18. MR-based source localization for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E.; Moerland, M. A.; Zijlstra, F.; Viergever, M. A.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Seevinck, P. R.

    2018-04-01

    For the purpose of MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method for real-time localization of an HDR brachytherapy source was developed, which requires high spatial and temporal resolutions. MR-based localization of an HDR source serves two main aims. First, it enables real-time treatment verification by determination of the HDR source positions during treatment. Second, when using a dummy source, MR-based source localization provides an automatic detection of the source dwell positions after catheter insertion, allowing elimination of the catheter reconstruction procedure. Localization of the HDR source was conducted by simulation of the MR artifacts, followed by a phase correlation localization algorithm applied to the MR images and the simulated images, to determine the position of the HDR source in the MR images. To increase the temporal resolution of the MR acquisition, the spatial resolution was decreased, and a subpixel localization operation was introduced. Furthermore, parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding) was applied to further decrease the MR scan time. The localization method was validated by a comparison with CT, and the accuracy and precision were investigated. The results demonstrated that the described method could be used to determine the HDR source position with a high accuracy (0.4–0.6 mm) and a high precision (⩽0.1 mm), at high temporal resolutions (0.15–1.2 s per slice). This would enable real-time treatment verification as well as an automatic detection of the source dwell positions.

  19. Applications of the Italian protocol for the calibration of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piermattei, A.; Azario, L.

    1997-01-01

    The Associazione Italiana di Fisica Biomedica (AIFB; Italian Association of Biomedical Physics) has adopted the Italian protocol for the calibration of brachytherapy sources. The AIFB protocol allows measurements of the reference air kerma rate, dK/dt r , within 1.7% (1σ). To measure dK/dt r the AIFB protocol has identified a direct and an indirect procedure. The direct procedure is based on the use of spherical or cylindrical ionization chambers as local reference dosimeters positioned along the transverse bisector axis of the source. Once the source is specified by a dK/dt r value, this can be used to calibrate a field instrument, such as a well-type ionization chamber, for further source calibrations by means of an indirect procedure. This paper reports the results obtained by the Physics Laboratory of the Universita Cattolica del S Cuore (PL-UCSC), in terms of dK/dt r calibration of five types of source, 169 Yb, 192 Ir and 137 Cs. The role of the dK/dt r determination for a brachytherapy source has been underlined when a new source such as the 169 Yb seed model X1267 has been proposed for clinical use. The dK/dt r values for 137 Cs spherical sources differed by 5% from the vendor's mean value. The five types of source calibrated in terms of dK/dt r were used to obtain the calibration factor, N K r source , of an HDR-1000 well-type ionization chamber. (author)

  20. Experience with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation sources is discussed, emphasizing characteristics important for x-ray microscopy. Bending magnets, wigglers and undulators are considered as sources of radiation. Operating experience at the national Synchrotron Light Source on the VUV and XRAY storage rings is reviewed, with particular consideration given to achieved current and lifetime, transverse bunch dimensions, and orbit stability. 6 refs., 3 figs

  1. Radiation exposure management over a decade in sealed sources fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Nitin V.; Swaminathan, N.; Singh, P.; Sreenivas, V.; Bairwa, S.M.; Rath, D.P.; Patil, B.N.; Sastry, K.V.S.

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive sealed sources find innumerable applications in medical and industrial applications. 60 Co teletherapy sources are used for the treatment of cancer. In brachytherapy; 137 Cs and 192 Ir are used. Industrial sources using 60 Co, 137 Cs find applications in nucleonic gauges, tracer studies etc. 60 Co and 192 Ir sources are used in radiography also. In addition, 60 Co is widely used in irradiator facilities. Board of Isotopes and Radiation Technology (BRIT) has committed in supply of these sealed sources to various hospitals and industrial institutions in India. Annually, PetaBq (PBq) level of above mentioned isotopes are handled remotely in hot cells, RLG, BARC. This paper brings out a detailed account on the radiological surveillance provided during the fabrication of these sources implementing ALARA. The decrease in collective dose per activity handled is the outcome of improved operation practices which were carried out at various stages of source fabrication. (author)

  2. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ 2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In

  3. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.

    1999-01-01

    determination of an optimal dwell-time sequence for a train of seeds that deliver ratiation while stepping through the vessel lesion. The results illustrate the advantage of this strategy over the common approach of delivering radiation by positioning a single train of seeds along the whole lesion....

  4. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Beth A.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hayes, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Morris, David E.; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  5. Dose Distributions of an 192Ir Brachytherapy Source in Different Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used MCNPX code to investigate the brachytherapy 192Ir dose distributions in water, bone, and lung tissue and performed radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter measurements to verify the obtained MCNPX results. The results showed that the dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function in water were highly consistent with data in the literature. However, the lung dose near the source would be overestimated by up to 12%, if the lung tissue is assumed to be water, and, hence, if a tumor is located in the lung, the tumor dose will be overestimated, if the material density is not taken into consideration. In contrast, the lung dose far from the source would be underestimated by up to 30%. Radial dose functions were found to depend not only on the phantom size but also on the material density. The phantom size affects the radial dose function in bone more than those in the other tissues. On the other hand, the anisotropy function in lung tissue was not dependent on the radial distance. Our simulation results could represent valid clinical reference data and be used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with lung cancer.

  6. Calculated neutron air kerma strength conversion factors for a generically encapsulated Cf-252 brachytherapy source

    CERN Document Server

    Rivard, M J; D'Errico, F; Tsai, J S; Ulin, K; Engler, M J

    2002-01-01

    The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron air kerma strength conversion factor (S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f) is a parameter needed to convert the radionuclide mass (mu g) provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory into neutron air kerma strength required by modern clinical brachytherapy dosimetry formalisms indicated by Task Group No. 43 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The impact of currently used or proposed encapsulating materials for sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf brachytherapy sources (Pt/Ir-10%, 316L stainless steel, nitinol, and Zircaloy-2) on S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f was calculated and results were fit to linear equations. Only for substantial encapsulation thicknesses, did S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f decrease, while the impact of source encapsulation composition is increasingly negligible as Z increases. These findings are explained on the basis of the non-relativistic kinematics governing the majority of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron interactions. Neutron kerma and energy spectra resul...

  7. Investigation of source position uncertainties & balloon deformation in MammoSite brachytherapy on treatment effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaleh, S.

    2010-01-01

    The MammoSite ® breast high dose rate brachytherapy is used in treatment of early-stage breast cancer. The tumour bed volume is irradiated with high dose per fraction in a relatively small number of fractions. Uncertainties in the source positioning and MammoSite balloon deformation will alter the prescribed dose within the treated volume. They may also expose the normal tissues in balloon proximity to excessive dose. The purpose of this work is to explore the impact of these two uncertainties on the MammoSite dose distribution in the breast using dose volume histograms and Monte Carlo simulations. The Lyman–Kutcher and relative seriality models were employed to estimate the normal tissues complications associated with the MammoSite dose distributions. The tumour control probability was calculated using the Poisson model. This study gives low probabilities for developing heart and lung complications. The probability of complications of the skin and normal breast tissues depends on the location of the source inside the balloon and the volume receiving high dose. Incorrect source position and balloon deformation had significant effect on the prescribed dose within the treated volume. A 4 mm balloon deformation resulted in reduction of the tumour control probability by 24%. Monte Carlo calculations using EGSnrc showed that a deviation of the source by 1 mm caused approximately 7% dose reduction in the treated target volume at 1 cm from the balloon surface. In conclusion, accurate positioning of the 192 Ir source at the balloon centre and minimal balloon deformation are critical for proper dose delivery with the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. On the basis of this study, we suggest that the MammoSite treatment protocols should allow for a balloon deformation of ≤2 mm and a maximum source deviation of ≤1 mm.

  8. Standardization of the calibration of brachytherapy sources at the IAEA dosimetry laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanta, A.; Andreo, P.

    1996-01-01

    A new service to SSDLs has been initiated at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory for providing calibrations of well-type ionisation chambers, used in brachytherapy applications, which are traceable to the International Measurement System. Considering that the most common radionuclide used in the developing countries is 137 Cs, two such sources of the type used for gynaecological intracavitary applications have been purchased by the Agency and calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA. These 137 Cs reference sources together with a well-type ionization chamber constitute the IAEA brachytherapy dosimetry standard. Based on the recommendations by a group of experts, a method has been developed for transferring calibrations to SSDLs which is described in this paper. The method is based on the acquisition by the SSDLs of sources and equipment similar to those at the IAEA. The well-type chamber is to be calibrated at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory, and this will be used at the SSDL to calibrate its own reference sources. These sources can in turn by used to calibrate well-type chambers from hospital users and to calibrate other type of sources by performing measurements in air. In order to standardize the procedures for the two methods and to provide guidance to the SSDLs, measurements have been carried out at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The reproducibility of the two type of measurements has been found to be better than 0.5%, and the uncertainty of calibrations estimated to be less than 1.5% (one standard deviation). (author). 8 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  9. SU-E-T-284: Revisiting Reference Dosimetry for the Model S700 Axxent 50 KV{sub p} Electronic Brachytherapy Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, JR [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft was characterized in 2006 by Rivard et al. The source design was modified in 2006 to include a plastic centering insert at the source tip to more accurately position the anode. The objectives of the current study were to establish an accurate Monte Carlo source model for simulation purposes, to dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and to determine dose differences between the source with and without the centering insert. Methods: Design information from dissected sources and vendor-supplied CAD drawings were used to devise the source model for radiation transport simulations of dose distributions in a water phantom. Collision kerma was estimated as a function of radial distance, r, and polar angle, θ, for determination of reference TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.03% at r=1 cm and 0.08% at r=10 cm. Results: The dose rate distribution the transverse plane did not change beyond 2% between the 2006 model and the current study. While differences exceeding 15% were observed near the source distal tip, these diminished to within 2% for r>1.5 cm. Differences exceeding a factor of two were observed near θ=150° and in contact with the source, but diminished to within 20% at r=10 cm. Conclusions: Changes in source design influenced the overall dose rate and distribution by more than 2% over a third of the available solid angle external from the source. For clinical applications using balloons or applicators with tissue located within 5 cm from the source, dose differences exceeding 2% were observed only for θ>110°. This study carefully examined the current source geometry and presents a modern reference TG-43 dosimetry dataset for the model S700 source.

  10. SU-E-T-155: Calibration of Variable Longitudinal Strength 103Pd Brachytherapy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J; Radtke, J; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) allow for a customized intensity along the length of the source. These have applications in focal brachytherapy treatments of prostate cancer where dose boosting can be achieved through modulation of intra-source strengths. This work focused on development of a calibration methodology for VLS sources based on measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of five 1 cm 10 3 Pd sources each containing four regions of variable 103 Pd strength. Methods: The air-kerma strengths of the sources were measured with a variable-aperture free-air chamber (VAFAC). Source strengths were also measured using a well chamber. The in-air azimuthal and polar anisotropy of the sources were measured by rotating them in front of a NaI scintillation detector and were calculated with MC simulations. Azimuthal anisotropy results were normalized to their mean intensity values. Polar anisotropy results were normalized to their average transverse axis intensity values. The relative longitudinal strengths of the sources were measured via on-contact irradiations with radiochromic film, and were calculated with MC simulations. Results: The variable 103 Pd loading of the sources was validated by VAFAC and well chamber measurements. Ratios of VAFAC air-kerma strengths and well chamber responses were within ±1.3% for all sources. Azimuthal anisotropy results indicated that ≥95% of the normalized values for all sources were within ±1.7% of the mean values. Polar anisotropy results indicated variations within ±0.3% for a ±7.6° angular region with respect to the source transverse axis. Locations and intensities of the 103 Pd regions were validated by radiochromic film measurements and MC simulations. Conclusion: The calibration methodology developed in this work confirms that the VLS sources investigated have a high level of polar uniformity, and that the strength and longitudinal intensity can be verified experimentally and

  11. Incidents with hazardous radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhacker, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Incidents with hazardous radiation sources can occur in any country, even those without nuclear facilities. Preparedness for such incidents is supposed to fulfill globally agreed minimum standards. Incidents are categorized in incidents with licensed handling of radiation sources as for material testing, transport accidents of hazardous radiation sources, incidents with radionuclide batteries, incidents with satellites containing radioactive inventory, incidents wit not licensed handling of illegally acquired hazardous radiation sources. The emergency planning in Austria includes a differentiation according to the consequences: incidents with release of radioactive materials resulting in restricted contamination, incidents with release of radioactive materials resulting in local contamination, and incidents with the hazard of e@nhanced exposure due to the radiation source.

  12. SU-F-T-54: Determination of the AAPM TG-43 Brachytherapy Dosimetry Parameters for A New Titanium-Encapsulated Yb-169 Source by Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynoso, F [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Munro, J [Source Production & Equipment Co., Inc., St. Rose, LA (United States); Cho, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of a new titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source designed to maximize the dose enhancement during gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy (GNRT). Methods: An existing Monte Carlo (MC) model of the titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source, which was described in the current investigators’ published MC optimization study, was modified based on the source manufacturer’s detailed specifications, resulting in an accurate model of the titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source that was actually manufactured. MC calculations were then performed using the MCNP5 code system and the modified source model, in order to obtain a complete set of the AAPM TG-43 parameters for the new Yb-169 source. Results: The MC-calculated dose rate constant for the new titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source was 1.05 ± 0.03 cGy per hr U, indicating about 10% decrease from the values reported for the conventional stainless steel-encapsulated Yb-169 sources. The source anisotropy and radial dose function for the new source were found similar to those reported for the conventional Yb-169 sources. Conclusion: In this study, the AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of a new titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source were determined by MC calculations. The current results suggested that the use of titanium, instead of stainless steel, to encapsulate the Yb-169 core would not lead to any major change in the dosimetric characteristics of the Yb-169 source, while it would allow more low energy photons being transmitted through the source filter thereby leading to an increased dose enhancement during GNRT. Supported by DOD/PCRP grant W81XWH-12-1-0198 This investigation was supported by DOD/PCRP grant W81XWH-12-1- 0198.

  13. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides (60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source beta-, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the 192Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for 60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for 60Co and 192Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., > 0.5%) within 3.3 mm of 60Co and 1.7 mm of 192Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for 137Cs and 169Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  14. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales L, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  15. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krema, Hatem, E-mail: htmkrm19@yahoo.com [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weisbrod, Daniel [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J.; Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  16. Time dependence of energy spectra of brachytherapy sources and its impact on the half and the tenth value layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Chen Zhe; Hearn, Robert A.; Rodgers, Joseph J.; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Several factors including radionuclide purity influence the photon energy spectra from sealed brachytherapy sources. The existence of impurities and trace elements in radioactive materials as well as the substrate and encapsulation may not only alter the spectrum at a given time but also cause change in the spectra as a function of time. The purpose of this study is to utilize a semiempirical formalism, which quantitatively incorporates this time dependence, to calculate and evaluate the shielding requirement impacts introduced by this time dependence for a 103 Pd source. Methods: The formalism was used to calculate the NthVL thicknesses in lead for a 103 Pd model 200 seed. Prior to 2005, the 103 Pd in this source was purified to a level better than 0.006% of the total 103 Pd activity, the key trace impurity consisting of 65 Zn. Because 65 Zn emits higher energy photons and has a much longer half-life of 244 days compared to 103 Pd, its presence in 103 Pd seeds led to a time dependence of the photon spectrum and other related physical quantities. This study focuses on the time dependence of the NthVL and the analysis of the corresponding shielding requirements. Results: The results indicate that the first HVL and the first TVL in lead steadily increased with time for about 200 days and then reached a plateau. The increases at plateau were more than 1000 times compared to the corresponding values on the zeroth day. The second and third TVLs in lead reached their plateaus in about 100 and 60 days, respectively, and the increases were about 19 and 2.33 times the corresponding values on the zeroth day, respectively. All the TVLs demonstrated a similar time dependence pattern, with substantial increases and eventual approach to a plateau. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the time dependence of the emitted photon spectra from brachytherapy sources can introduce substantial variations in the values of the NthVL with time if certain impurities are present

  17. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Chao, Clifford; Erickson, Beth; Fowler, Jeffery; Gupta, Nilendu; Martinez, Alvaro; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  18. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla Daruich

    2012-01-01

    Among the different ways to treat prostate cancer, brachytherapy with iodine- 125 seeds is an option that provides good results and fewer side effects. In the present study several deposition methods of radioactive iodine in a silver substrate were compared in order to choose the most suitable alternative for the routine production to be implemented at IPEN's laboratory. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers present. Therefore, the 131 I was used for testing (same chemical behavior as 131 I). Four methods were selected: Method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method developed by D.Kubiatowicz) presented 65.16% efficiency; Method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by D. Kubiatowicz - HCl) with the result of 70.80% efficiency; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) with 55.80% efficiency; Method 4 (IQ-IPEN) resulted in 99% efficiency. Since this method has more radioactive material fixation (which represents virtually the entire cost of the seed), the final price is the cheapest. This method is the suggested one to be implemented in the IPEN's laboratory for brachytherapy sources production. Besides, the method is the fasted one. (author)

  19. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  20. Study and methodology development for quality control in the production process of iodine-125 radioactive sealed sources applied to brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Joao Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Today cancer is the second cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Excluding skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most incident in the population. Prostate tumor can be treated by several ways, including brachytherapy, which consists in introducing sealed radioactive sources (Iodine - 125 seeds) inside the tumor. The target region of treatment receives a high radiation dose, but healthy neighbor tissues receive a significantly reduced radiation dose. The seed is made of a welding sealed titanium capsule, 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm length, enclosing a 0.5 mm diameter silver wire with Iodine-125 adsorbed. After welded, the seeds have to be submitted to a leak test to prevent any radioactive material release. The aims of this work were: (a) the study of the different leakage test methods applied to radioactive seeds and recommended by the ISO 997820, (b) the choice of the appropriate method and (c) the flowchart determination of the process to be used during the seeds production. The essays exceeded the standards with the use of ultra-sound during immersion and the corresponding benefits to leakage detection. Best results were obtained with the immersion in distilled water at 20 degree C for 24 hours and distilled water at 70 degree C for 30 minutes. These methods will be used during seed production. The process flowchart has all the phases of the leakage tests according to the sequence determined in the experiments. (author)

  1. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Stephen R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: UMahmood@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  2. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Stephen R.; Walker, Gary V.; Koshy, Matthew; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mahmood, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  3. Radiation transmission data for radionuclides and materials relevant to brachytherapy facility shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannis, P; Baltas, D; Granero, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Gimeno, J; Ballester, F; Venselaar, J L M

    2008-11-01

    To address the limited availability of radiation shielding data for brachytherapy as well as some disparity in existing data, Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate radiation transmission data for 60Co, 137CS, 198Au, 192Ir 169Yb, 170Tm, 131Cs, 125I, and 103pd photons through concrete, stainless steel, lead, as well as lead glass and baryte concrete. Results accounting for the oblique incidence of radiation to the barrier, spectral variation with barrier thickness, and broad beam conditions in a realistic geometry are compared to corresponding data in the literature in terms of the half value layer (HVL) and tenth value layer (TVL) indices. It is also shown that radiation shielding calculations using HVL or TVL values could overestimate or underestimate the barrier thickness required to achieve a certain reduction in radiation transmission. This questions the use of HVL or TVL indices instead of the actual transmission data. Therefore, a three-parameter model is fitted to results of this work to facilitate accurate and simple radiation shielding calculations.

  4. Determination of dosimetric characteristics of OptiSeedTM a plastic brachytherapy 103Pd source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhonglu; Hertel, Nolan E.

    2005-01-01

    A new 103 Pd plastic brachytherapy source, OptiSeed TM Model 1032P, is being introduced by International Brachytherapy sa (IBt). Measurements of the dose distributions about the source were performed using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) in Virtual Water TM . MCNP5 calculations were performed to determine the dose distributions in Virtual Water TM and liquid water. The source dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function and anisotropy factor have been determined following the updated AAPM TG-43 recommendations. The measured dose rate constant in the Virtual Water TM phantom was determined to be 0.727±6.9% cGy h -1 U -1 , and the computed value is 0.716±2.1% cGy h -1 U -1 . The Monte-Carlo simulation yielded a dose rate constant of 0.665±2.1% cGy h -1 U -1 in water. The measured dose rate constant in water is 0.675±7.5% cGy h -1 U -1 . It is determined by multiplying the dose rate constant measured in the Virtual Water TM phantom with the ratio of the value calculated in water to that in Virtual Water TM . The average of the measured and calculated dose rate constant is 0.670±5.5% cGy h -1 U -1 . The radial dose functions of the new source were measured for distances ranging from 1 to 7 cm in a Virtual Water TM phantom. The anisotropy functions in Virtual Water TM phantom were measured for distances of 2, 3, 5, and 7 cm. The Monte-Carlo computed radial dose functions, anisotropy functions, and anisotropy factors in both Virtual Water TM phantom and water are reported

  5. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  6. Absolute measurement of LDR brachytherapy source emitted power: Instrument design and initial measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Martha J; Palmer, Benjamin R; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-02-01

    Energy-based source strength metrics may find use with model-based dose calculation algorithms, but no instruments exist that can measure the energy emitted from low-dose rate (LDR) sources. This work developed a calorimetric technique for measuring the power emitted from encapsulated low-dose rate, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. This quantity is called emitted power (EP). The measurement methodology, instrument design and performance, and EP measurements made with the calorimeter are presented in this work. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was developed to measure EP from LDR brachytherapy sources. The calorimeter employed an electrical substitution technique to determine the power emitted from the source. The calorimeter's performance and thermal system were characterized. EP measurements were made using four (125)I sources with air-kerma strengths ranging from 2.3 to 5.6 U and corresponding EPs of 0.39-0.79 μW, respectively. Three Best Medical 2301 sources and one Oncura 6711 source were measured. EP was also computed by converting measured air-kerma strengths to EPs through Monte Carlo-derived conversion factors. The measured EP and derived EPs were compared to determine the accuracy of the calorimeter measurement technique. The calorimeter had a noise floor of 1-3 nW and a repeatability of 30-60 nW. The calorimeter was stable to within 5 nW over a 12 h measurement window. All measured values agreed with derived EPs to within 10%, with three of the four sources agreeing to within 4%. Calorimeter measurements had uncertainties ranging from 2.6% to 4.5% at the k = 1 level. The values of the derived EPs had uncertainties ranging from 2.9% to 3.6% at the k = 1 level. A calorimeter capable of measuring the EP from LDR sources has been developed and validated for (125)I sources with EPs between 0.43 and 0.79 μW.

  7. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  8. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, D L; Yoo, S

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the gre...

  9. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, Seth A.; Bittner, Nathan H.J.; Beyer, David C.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Goldsmith, Brian J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, W. Robert; Nag, Subir; Suh, W. Warren; Potters, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  10. The sources of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation protection of workers and of members of the public requires an assessment of the various sources of exposure, their variations in time or under specific conditions or circumstances, and the possibilities for control or limitation. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has evaluated the various components of natural and man-made sources in some detail. Natural exposures form the largest component of radiation exposure of man. Variability in exposures depends on elevation, the concentrations of radionuclides in soil, food and water, the composition of building materials and the susceptibility of indoor spaces to radon build-up. Man-made sources have included exposures to fallout from atmospheric nuclear testing and discharged from nuclear fuel cycle installations in routine operations or in accidents. The other main source of radiation exposures of individuals is in medical diagnostic examinations and therapeutic treatments. (author)

  11. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-103Pd brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S. Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a brachytherapy source having 103 Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model 103 Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA- 103 Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h -1 U -1 with an approximate uncertainty of ±0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r,θ), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA- 103 Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms

  12. Ionizing radiations: effects and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, S.; Nenot, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Having first mentioned the effects of ionizing radiations in cancerogenisis, pre-natal, and genetic fields, the authors present the different sources of radiations and estimate their respective contributions to the total irradiation dose. Their paper makes reference to the main elements of a report issued by the United Nations Scientific Committee in 1977 [fr

  13. Evaluation of radiation dose on people adjacent to implant patients during brachytherapy for prostate cancer using {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Catholic University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The incidence of prostate cancer is rapidly increasing due to aging of the population and westernization of dietary habits, etc. As a result, the frequency of prostate cancer has become the fifth highest among all male cancers and the first among urological cancers. Brachytherapy is commonly used for locally progressing prostate cancers. Since the mid 1980s, therapies using radio-isotopes, such as low-invasive {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd and {sup 192}Ir, have been widely performed in the U.S. and Europe. However, brachytherapy involves implanting radio-isotopes into the human body which is of concern because it may expose the health care professionals administering the therapy to unnecessary radiation. Accordingly, this study intends to predict the radiation dose that people adjacent to patients implanted with a radio-isotope are exposed to during prostate cancer radiation therapy by using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and {sup 192}Ir.

  14. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M., E-mail: fernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br; and others

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  15. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy to replace brachytherapy for brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer patients – a preliminary result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,4 Ming-Chow Wei,4 Wen-Yih Wu,4 Hsu-Dong Sun,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Yen-Ping Hsieh,6 Yu-Jen Chen,3,7–9 Pei-Wei Shueng1,101Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Department of Radiation Oncology, 8Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, TaiwanAim: To review the experience and to evaluate the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT via helical tomotherapy (HT, for the treatment of brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer.Methods: Between September 1, 2008 to January 31, 2012, nine cervical cancer patients unsuitable for brachytherapy were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive whole pelvic radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, followed by SBRT via HT.Results: The actuarial locoregional control rate at 3 years was 78%. The mean biological equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions of the tumor, rectum, bladder, and intestines was 76.0 ± 7.3, 73.8 ± 13.2, 70.5 ± 10.0, and 43.1 ± 7.1, respectively. Only two had residual tumors after treatment, and the others were tumor-free. Two patients experienced grade 3 acute toxicity: one had diarrhea; and another experienced thrombocytopenia. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities. Three patients suffered from manageable rectal bleeding in

  17. Radioactive waste evacuation of the sources of a low dose rate brachytherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrada, A.; Huerga, C.; Santa Olalla, I.; Vicedo, A.; Corredoira, E.; Plaza, R.; Vidal, J.; Tellez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The second class Radioactive Installation start -up authorization makes responsible for its security to the installation exploiter and supervisor. The specifications established in the authorization, which are mandatory, point out several actions, some of these actions are the hermeticity tests of radioactive sources an radiologic controls of environment dosimetry. It is necessary to optimize the time spent in each activity, managing them as reasonably as possible. An important matter to take into account is to keep and control only those radioactive or radiological equipment which, even if are in work, have an appropriate performance for the patient treatment Material And Method a Paz hospital has an intracavity brachytherapy (L.D.R.), Curietron model. The Radioprotection Department proposed to remove from service the unit due to its age, this was carried out by the Commission of Guarantee and Quality Control. There were different solutions taken into account to decommission the unit, finally the option chosen as the most convenient for the installation was to manage directly the withdrawal of the radioactive material which consisted of seven Cs-137 probes model CsM1 and total nominal certificated activity of 7770 MBq ( 210 mCi ) dated in May 2005. It also has to be considered as a radioactive waste the inner storage elements of the Curietron and the transport and storage curie stock, built with depleted uranium. To accomplish this aim an evacuation container was designed consisting of an alloy of low-melting point (M.C.P.96), which fulfills the transport conditions imposed by E.N.R.E.S.A. ( Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A). A theoretical calculation was performed to estimate the thickness of the shield which adequate to the rate of dose in contact demanded. Accuracy of these calculations has been verified using T.L. dosimetry. Results The radiation levels during the extraction intervention of the radioactive probes and its transfer to

  18. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author) [pt

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of 60 Co HDR brachytherapy source in water and in different solid water phantom materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference medium for brachytherapy dose measurements is water. Accuracy of dose measurements of brachytherapy sources is critically dependent on precise measurement of the source-detector distance. A solid phantom can be precisely machined and hence source-detector distances can be accurately determined. In the present study, four different solid phantom materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1 are modeled using the Monte Carlo methods to investigate the influence of phantom material on dose rate distributions of the new model of BEBIG 60 Co brachytherapy source. The calculated dose rate constant is 1.086 ± 0.06% cGy h−1 U−1 for water, PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1. The investigation suggests that the phantom materials RW1 and Solid Water represent water-equivalent up to 20 cm from the source. PMMA and polystyrene are water-equivalent up to 10 cm and 15 cm from the source, respectively, as the differences in the dose data obtained in these phantom materials are not significantly different from the corresponding data obtained in liquid water phantom. At a radial distance of 20 cm from the source, polystyrene overestimates the dose by 3% and PMMA underestimates it by about 8% when compared to the corresponding data obtained in water phantom.

  20. A Comparison of the Dosimetric Parameters of Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source in Different Tissues with Water Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction After the publication of Task Group number 43 dose calculation formalism by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM, this method has been known as the most common dose calculation method in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this formalism, the water phantom is introduced as the reference dosimetry phantom, while the attenuation coefficient of the sources in the water phantom is different from that of different tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the phantom materials on the TG-43 dosimetery parameters of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods In this research, the Cs-137 (Model Selectron brachytherapy source was simulated in different phantoms (bone, soft tissue, muscle, fat, and the inhomogeneous phantoms of water/bone of volume 27000 cm3 using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. *F8 tally was used to obtain the dose in a fine cubical lattice. Then the TG-43 dosimetry parameters of the brachytherapy source were obtained in water phantom and compared with those of different phantoms. Results The percentage difference between the radial dose function g(r of bone and the g(r of water phantom, at a distance of 10 cm from the source center is 20%, while such differences are 1.7%, 1.6% and 1.1% for soft tissue, muscle, and fat, respectively. The largest difference of the dose rate constant of phantoms with those of water is 4.52% for the bone phantom, while the differences for soft tissue, muscle, and fat are 1.18%, 1.27%, and 0.18%, respectively. The 2D anisotropy function of the Cs-137 source for different tissues is identical to that of water. Conclusion The results of the simulations have shown that dose calculation in water phantom would introduce errors in the dose calculation around brachytherapy sources. Therefore, it is suggested that the correction factors of different tissues be applied after dose calculation in water phantoms, in order to

  1. Searching for Orphan radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystrov, Evgenij; Antonau, Uladzimir; Gurinovich, Uladzimir; Kazhamiakin, Valery; Petrov, Vitaly; Shulhovich, Heorhi; Tischenko, Siarhei

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The problem of orphan sources cannot be left unaddressed due high probability of accidental exposure and use of sources for terrorism. Search of objects of this kind is complex particularly when search territory is large. This requires devices capable of detecting sources, identifying their radionuclide composition, and correlating scan results to geographical coordinates and displaying results on a map. Spectral radiation scanner AT6101C can fulfill the objective of search for gamma and neutron radiation sources, radionuclide composition identification, correlation results to geographical coordinates and displaying results on a map. The scanner consists of gamma radiation scintillation detection unit based on NaI(Tl) crystal, neutron detection unit based on two He 3 counters, GPS receiver and portable ruggedized computer. Built-in and application software automates entire scan process, saving all results to memory for further analysis with visual representation of results as spectral information diagrams, count rate profile and gamma radiation dose rates on a geographical map. The scanner informs operator with voice messages on detection of radiation sources, identification result and other events. Scanner detection units and accessories are packed in a backpack. Weighing 7 kg, the scanner is human portable and can be used for scan inside cars. The scanner can also be used for radiation mapping and inspections. (author)

  2. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...

  3. Material-specific Conversion Factors for Different Solid Phantoms Used in the Dosimetry of Different Brachytherapy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Based on Task Group No. 43 (TG-43U1 recommendations, water phantom is proposed as a reference phantom for the dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. The experimental determination of TG-43 parameters is usually performed in water-equivalent solid phantoms. The purpose of this study was to determine the conversion factors for equalizing solid phantoms to water. Materials and Methods TG-43 parameters of low- and high-energy brachytherapy sources (i.e., Pd-103, I-125 and Cs-137 were obtained in different phantoms, using Monte Carlo simulations. The brachytherapy sources were simulated at the center of different phantoms including water, solid water, poly(methyl methacrylate, polystyrene and polyethylene. Dosimetric parameters such as dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function of each source were compared in different phantoms. Then, conversion factors were obtained to make phantom parameters equivalent to those of water. Results Polynomial coefficients of conversion factors were obtained for all sources to quantitatively compare g(r values in different phantom materials and the radial dose function in water. Conclusion Polynomial coefficients of conversion factors were obtained for all sources to quantitatively compare g(r values in different phantom materials and the radial dose function in water.

  4. Study of Different Tissue Density Effects on the Dose Distribution of a 103Pd Brachytherapy Source Model MED3633

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical application of encapsulated radioactive brachytherapy sources has a major role in cancer treatment. In the present research, the effects of different tissue densities on the dose distribution of a 103Pd brachytherapy source in a spherical phantom of 50 cm radius have been studied. Material and Methods: As is well known, absorbed dose in tissue depends to its density, but this difference is not clear in measurements. Therefore, we applied the MCNP code to evaluate the effect of density on the dose distribution. 103Pd brachytherapy sources are used to treat prostate, breast and other cancers. Results: Absorbed dose has been calculated and presented around a source placed in the center of the phantom for different tissue densities. Also, we derived anisotropy and radial dose functions and compared our Monte Carlo results with experimental results of Rivard and Li et al. for F(1, θ and g(r in 1.040 g/cm3 tissue. Conclusion: The results of this study show that relative dose variations around the source center are very considerable at different densities, because of the presence of a photoabsorber (Au-Cu alloy in the source core. Dose variation exceeds 80% at the point (Z = 2.4 mm, Y = 0 mm. Computed values of anisotropy and radial dose functions are in good agreement with the experimental results of Rivard and Li et al.

  5. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J.

    2000-01-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 ± 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 ± 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  6. Influence of radioactive sources discretization in the Monte Carlo computational simulations of brachytherapy procedures: a case study on the procedures for treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Costa, Kleber Souza Silva; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy computational simulation procedures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods have shown to be increasingly important to the improvement of cancer fighting strategies. One of the biases in this practice is the discretization of the radioactive source in brachytherapy simulations, which often do not match with a real situation. This study had the aim to identify and to measure the influence of radioactive sources discretization in brachytherapy MC simulations when compared to those that do not present discretization, using prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 radionuclide as model. Simulations were carried out with 108 events with both types of sources to compare them using EGSnrc code associated to MASH phantom in orthostatic and supine positions with some anatomic adaptations. Significant alterations were found, especially regarding bladder, rectum and the prostate itself. It can be concluded that there is a need to discretized sources in brachytherapy simulations to ensure its representativeness. (author)

  7. Efficacy of phosphorus-32 brachytherapy without external-beam radiation for long-term tumor control in patients with craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shaheryar F; Moore, Reilin J; Boaz, Joel C; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Radioactive phosphorus-32 (P32) has been used as brachytherapy for craniopharyngiomas with the hope of providing local control of enlarging tumor cysts. Brachytherapy has commonly been used as an adjunct to the standard treatment of surgery and external-beam radiation (EBR). Historically, multimodal treatment, including EBR, has shown tumor control rates as high as 70% at 10 years after treatment. However, EBR is associated with significant long-term risks, including visual deficits, endocrine dysfunction, and cognitive decline. Theoretically, brachytherapy may provide focused local radiation that controls or shrinks a symptomatic cyst without exposing the patient to the risks of EBR. For this study, the authors reviewed their experiences with craniopharyngioma patients treated with P32 brachytherapy as the primary treatment without EBR. The authors reviewed these patients' records to evaluate whether this strategy effectively controls tumor growth, thus avoiding the need for further surgery or EBR. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of pediatric patients treated for craniopharyngioma between 1997 and 2004. This was the time period during which the authors' institution had a relatively high use of P32 for treatment of cystic craniopharyngioma. All patients who had surgery and injection of P32 without EBR were identified. The patient records were analyzed for complications, cyst control, need for further surgery, and need for future EBR. RESULTS Thirty-eight patients were treated for craniopharyngioma during the study period. Nine patients (23.7%) were identified who had surgery (resection or biopsy) with P32 brachytherapy but without initial EBR. These 9 patients represented the study group. For 1 patient (11.1%), there was a complication with the brachytherapy procedure. Five patients (55.5%) required subsequent surgery. Seven patients (77.7%) required subsequent EBR for tumor growth. The mean time between the injection of P32 and

  8. Phantom study of radiation doses outside the target volume brachytherapy versus external radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt; Persson, Essie; Westman, Gunnar; Persliden, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is sometimes suggested as an adjuvant treatment after surgery of some tumours. When introducing this, it would be useful to have an estimate of the dose distribution to different body sites, both near and distant to target, comparing conventional external irradiation to brachytherapy. The aim of the present study was to determine radiation doses with both methods at different body sites, near and distant to target, in an experimental situation on an operated left sided breast cancer on a female Alderson phantom. Methods: Five external beam treatments with isocentric tangential fields were given by a linear accelerator. A specified dose of 1.0 Gy was given to the whole left sided breast volume. Five interstitial brachytherapy treatments were given to the upper, lateral quadrant of the left breast by a two plane, 10 needles implant. A dose of 1.0 Gy specified according to the Paris system was administered by a pulsed dose rate afterloading machine. Absorbed dose in different fixed dose points were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results: Both methods yielded an absorbed dose of the same size to the bone marrow and internal organs distant to target, 1.0-1.4% of the prescribed dose. There was a trend of lower doses to the lower half of the trunk and higher doses to the upper half of the trunk, respectively, by brachytherapy. A 90% reduction of absorbed dose with brachytherapy compared to external irradiation was found in the near-target region within 5 cm from target boundary where parts of the left lung and the heart are situated. If an adjuvant dose of 50 Gy is given with the external radiotherapy and brachytherapy, the absorbed dose in a part of the myocardium could be reduced from 31.8 to 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: Near target, brachytherapy yielded a considerably lower absorbed dose which is of special importance when considering radiation effects on the myocard and lungs. We could not demonstrate any difference of

  9. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma of the Prostate after Brachytherapy for Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Horiguchi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RTx has been employed as a curative therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. RTx-induced sarcomas (RISs are rare, late adverse events, representing less than 0.2% of all irradiated patients. RISs are more aggressive tumors than prostatic adenocarcinomas. Herein, we present a case with RTx-induced prostatic leiomyosarcoma after permanent brachytherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. A 69-year-old male presented with dysuria and gross hematuria. Six years previously, he had been diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and was treated by permanent brachytherapy. Urethroscopy showed stenosis by a tumor at the prostate. Transurethral prostatectomy was performed for a diagnosis. Based on pathological findings, the diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma of the prostate. He was treated with three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CTx that consisted of doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI, followed by a prostatocystectomy with intrapelvic lymphadenectomy. The tumor extended from the prostate and infiltrated the bladder wall and serosa with lymphatic and venous invasion. The surgical margin was negative, and no residual prostatic adenocarcinoma was observed. The proportion of necrotic tumor cells by neoadjuvant CTx was around 50%. Subsequently, adjuvant CTx was offered, but the patient chose a follow-up without CTx. Local recurrence and lung metastasis were detected by computed tomography 3 months after the surgery. He was treated again with AI. However, CTx was not effective and he died 6 months after the operation. In conclusion, an effective treatment strategy for prostatic sarcoma should be developed in the near future, although the clinical feature of prostatic sarcoma remains unclear due to its rare incidence.

  10. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V.

    1998-01-01

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  11. Importance of the neutrons kerma coefficient in the planning of Brachytherapy treatments with Cf-252 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M.; Azorin N, J.; Francois L, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Cf-252 is a fast neutrons emitting radioisotope by spontaneous fission that can be used as sealed source in medicine applications, industry and research. Commercially its offer sources of different sizes, compact and with a fast neutrons emission of the order of 10 6 n/s-μg and an energy spectra that presents respectively maxim and average energy in 2.1 MeV and 0.7 MeV. In medicine new applications are being developed for the treatment of patient with hypoxic and voluminous tumors, where the therapy with photons has not given positive results, as well as for the protocols of therapy treatment by boron neutron capture, where very small sources of Cf-252 will be used with the interstitial brachytherapy technique of high and low dose rate. In this work an analysis of how the small differences that exist in the elementary composition of 4 wicked tumors, 4 ICRU healthy tissues and 3 substitute materials of ICRU tissue used in dosimetry are presented, its generate changes in the neutrons kerma coefficient in function of the energy and consequently in the absorbed dose in the interval of 11 eV to 29 MeV. These differences can produce maximum variations of the neutron kerma coefficients ratio for E n > 1 keV of the one: 15% tumor/ICRU guest healthy tissue, 12% ICRU tumor/muscle, 12% ICRU healthy tissues ICRU/ICRU muscle, 22% substitutes tissue/tumor and 22% ICRU substitutes tissue/muscle. Also, it was found that the average value of the neutrons kerma coefficient for the 4 wicked tumors is from 6% to 7% smaller that the average value for the soft tissue in the interval energy of interest for therapy with fast neutrons with E n > 1 MeV. These results have a special importance during the planning process of brachytherapy treatments with sources of 252 Cf, to optimize and to individualize the patients treatments. (Author)

  12. Low dose rate 137Cs Brachytherapy source calibration with farmer type ionisation chamber and specialised fabricated jig in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opare-Asare, K.

    2013-06-01

    An important part of a general quality assurance (QA) program for brachytherapy dosimetry is the source calibration because wide ranges of uncertainties are quoted by manufactures. This research is aimed at calibrating LDR 137 Cs brachytherapy source in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital by multiple-distance air kerma measurement technique using a specialized designed jig and a calibrated therapy ionization chamber. Specialized jig was fabricated with source holder positions and ionization chamber positions on the jig. Farmer type ionization chamber of volume 0.6cm 3 was used with and without build up cap. The results were validated using well type ionization chamber on channels on 1 and 5 taking into account decay correction. Air Kerma rates were determined at multiple distances between 8cm to 12cm from measured charges recorded by Max 4000 electrometer. The scatter dose relationship described by Ezzell [1992] was used to determine scattered radiation. The analytical method of determining air kerma calibration factor of 137 Cs described by Sharma et.al [2011] was used to determine beam quality correction factor for the 137 Cs. Beam attenuation was determined. Experimental data were compared with manufacturer's quoted source strength for verification. Well type ionization chamber results and experimental results on channel V1 and V5 deviated by 2.39% and 1.58% respectively. Experimental data deviated by 4.73% and 1.24% from theoretical data on channels V1 and V5 respectively. The mean of the experimental data deviated from the theoretical data by ±3.1% and from the well type measurements data by ±1.98%. The well type chamber results compared well with the experimental data. This is an indication that the method used for source calibration is a reliable alternative method of source calibration. The method used in this work has proven to be an efficient way of determining the actual source strength of the LDR brachytherapy 137 Cs source in Korle-Bu Radiotherapy Centre

  13. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Av. Insurgentes 2354, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Monzon, E., E-mail: eric_1985@fisica.ugto.mx [IMSS, Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad No. 1, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1813, 37340 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  14. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A.; Monzon, E.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  15. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  16. SU-E-T-232: Custom High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Surface Mold Applicators: The Importance Source to Skin Distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Surface mold applicators can be customized to fit irregular skin surfaces that are difficult to treat with other radiation therapy techniques. Optimal design of customized HDR skin brachytherapy is not well-established. We evaluated the impact of applicator thickness (source to skin distance) on target dosimetry. Methods: 27 patients had 34 treated sites: scalp 4, face 13, extremity 13, and torso 4. Custom applicators were constructed from 5–15 mm thick thermoplastic bolus molded over the skin lesion. A planar array of plastic brachytherapy catheters spaced 5–10 mm apart was affixed to the bolus. CT simulation was used to contour the target volume and to determine the prescription depth. Inverse planning simulated annealing followed by graphical optimization was used to plan and deliver 40–56 Gy in 8–16 fractions. Target coverage parameters (D90, Dmean, and V100) and dose uniformity (V110–200, D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) were studied according to target depth (<5mm vs. ≥5mm) and applicator thickness (5–10mm vs. ≥10mm). Results: The average prescription depth was 4.2±1.5mm. The average bolus thickness was 9.2±2.4mm. The median CTV volume was 10.0 cc (0.2–212.4 cc). Similar target coverage was achieved with prescription depths of <5mm and ≥5mm (Dmean = 113.8% vs. 112.4% and D90 = 100.2% vs. 98.3%). The <5mm prescription depth plans were more uniform (D0.1cc = 131.8% vs. 151.8%). Bolus thickness <10mm vs. ≥10mm plans also had similar target coverage (Dmean = 118.2% vs. 110.7% and D90 = 100.1% vs. 99.0%). Applicators ≥10mm thick, however, provide more uniform target dosimetry (D0.1cc = 146.9% vs. 139.5%). Conclusion: Prescription depth is based upon the thickness of the lesion and upon the clinical needs of the patient. Applicators ≥10mm thick provide more dose uniformity than 5–10mm thick applicators. Applicator thickness is an important variable that should be considered during treatment planning to achieve optimal dose uniformity

  17. Assessing patient characteristics and radiation-induced non-targeted effects in vivo for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Christine; Timotin, Emilia; Wong, Raimond; Sur, Ranjan K; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    To test whether blood, urine, and tissue based colony-forming assays are a useful clinical detection tool for assessing fractionated treatment responses and non-targeted radiation effects in bystander cells. To assess patients' responses to radiation treatments, blood serum, urine, and an esophagus explant-based in vivo colony-forming assay were used from oesophageal carcinoma patients. These patients underwent three fractions of high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT). Human keratinocyte reporters exposed to blood sera taken after the third fraction of brachytherapy had a significant increase in cloning efficiency compared to baseline samples (p fractions for the blood sera data only. Patient characteristics such as gender had no statistically significant effect (p > 0.05). Large variability was observed among the patients' tissue samples, these colony-forming assays showed no significant changes throughout fractionated brachytherapy (p > 0.05). Large inter-patient variability was found in the urine and tissue based assays, so these techniques were discontinued. However, the simple blood-based assay had much less variability. This technique may have future applications as a biological dosimeter to predict treatment outcome and assess non-targeted radiation effects.

  18. Radiation sources working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  19. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  20. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currier, Blake [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Munro, John J. III [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States); Medich, David C. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,θ), Λ, g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), φ{sub an}(r), and φ{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup −1} U{sup −1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,θ), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, φ{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup −2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose

  1. Radiation complications and tumor control after 125I plaque brachytherapy for ocular melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Kline, Robert W.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Robertson, Dennis M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome of 125 I plaque brachytherapy at our institution and identify the risk factors associated with the development of radiation complications, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 2000, 156 patients underwent 125 I episcleral plaque (COMS design) application for the treatment of ocular melanoma. Chart analysis of follow-up ophthalmologic appointments assessed the incidence of ocular side effects after therapy. Statistical analysis assessed outcomes and significant influencing factors. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, the 5-year overall survival was 83%. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 91%. Initial local control at 5 years was 92%, with 100% ultimate local control after secondary therapy that included 9 enucleations. The risk of metastasis was 10% at 5 years and 27% at 10 years. Vision stayed the same or improved in 25% of patients, and 44% of patients maintained visual acuity better than 20/200. Thirteen percent of patients experienced chronic pain or discomfort in the treated eye. Dose rates to the tumor apex greater than 90 to 100 cGy/h were associated with increased systemic control but worse radiation toxicity. Conclusion: Patients in our series experienced excellent local tumor control. Higher dose rates to the tumor apex were associated with reduced rates of distant metastases but worse ocular function

  2. In-water calibration of PDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with an NE2571 ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaert, N.; Verhaegen, F.; Thierens, H.

    1998-01-01

    An ionometric calibration procedure for 192 Ir PDR brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water is presented. The calibration of the source is performed directly in a water phantom at short distances (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 cm) using an NE2571 Farmer type ion chamber. To convert the measured air-kerma rate in water to dose rate to water a conversion factor (CF) was calculated by adapting the medium-energy x-ray dosimetry protocol for a point source geometry (diverging beam). The obtained CF was verified using two different methods. Firstly, the CF was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, where the source-ionization chamber geometry was modelled accurately. In a second method, a combination of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of the air-kerma rate in water (at 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 cm distance) and in air (1 m distance) was used to determine the CF. The obtained CFs were also compared with conversion factors calculated with the adapted dosimetry protocol for high-energy photons introduced by Toelli. All calculations were done for a Gammamed PDR 192 Ir source-NE2571 chamber geometry. The conversion factors obtained with the four different methods agree to within 1% at the three distances of interest. We obtained the following values (medium-energy x-ray protocol): CF(1 cm) = 1.458; CF(2.5 cm) = 1.162; CF(5.0 cm) = 1.112 (1σ=0.7% for the three distances of interest). The obtained results were checked with TLD measurements. The values of the specific dose rate constant and the radial dose function calculated in this work are in accordance with the literature data. (author)

  3. Theoretical and experimental determination of dosimetric characteristics for ADVANTAGETM Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Dini, Sharifeh A.; Awan, Shahid B.; Dou, Kai; Koona, Rafiq A.

    2006-01-01

    ADVANTAGE TM Pd-103 brachytherapy source has been recently introduced by IsoAid TM for prostate permanent implants. Dosimetric characteristics (Dose rate constant, radial dose function, 2D-, and 1D-anisotropy functions) of this source model have been determined using both theoretical and experimental methods, following the updated TG-43U1 protocol. Derivation of the dose rate constant was based on recent NIST WAFAC calibration performed in accordance with the 1999 Standards. Measurements were performed in Solid Water TM using LiF TLD chips and the theoretical calculations were performed in Solid Water TM and liquid water phantom materials using PTRAN Monte Carlo code. The results of the Monte Carlo simulation have shown a dose rate constant of 0.69 cGy h -1 U -1 in liquid water and 0.67 cGy h -1 U -1 in Solid Water TM medium. The measured dose rate constant in Solid Water TM was found to be 0.68±8% cGy h -1 U -1 , which is in a good agreement (within ±5%) to the Monte Carlo simulated data. The 2D- and 1D-anisotropy functions of the ADVANTAGE TM Pd-103 source were calculated for radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 cm. Radial dose function was determined for radial distances ranging from 0.2 to 8.0 cm using line source approximation. All these calculations are based on L eff equal to 3.61 cm, calculated following TG-43U1 recommendations. The tabulated data for 2D-anisotropy function, 1D-anisotropy function, dose rate constant and radial dose function have been produced for clinical application of this source model

  4. Theoretical and experimental determination of dosimetric characteristics for ADVANTAGE{sup TM} Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meigooni, Ali S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)]. E-mail: alimeig@uky.edu; Dini, Sharifeh A. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Awan, Shahid B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Dou, Kai [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Koona, Rafiq A. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    ADVANTAGE{sup TM} Pd-103 brachytherapy source has been recently introduced by IsoAid{sup TM} for prostate permanent implants. Dosimetric characteristics (Dose rate constant, radial dose function, 2D-, and 1D-anisotropy functions) of this source model have been determined using both theoretical and experimental methods, following the updated TG-43U1 protocol. Derivation of the dose rate constant was based on recent NIST WAFAC calibration performed in accordance with the 1999 Standards. Measurements were performed in Solid Water{sup TM} using LiF TLD chips and the theoretical calculations were performed in Solid Water{sup TM} and liquid water phantom materials using PTRAN Monte Carlo code. The results of the Monte Carlo simulation have shown a dose rate constant of 0.69 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} in liquid water and 0.67 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} in Solid Water{sup TM} medium. The measured dose rate constant in Solid Water{sup TM} was found to be 0.68{+-}8% cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}, which is in a good agreement (within {+-}5%) to the Monte Carlo simulated data. The 2D- and 1D-anisotropy functions of the ADVANTAGE{sup TM} Pd-103 source were calculated for radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 cm. Radial dose function was determined for radial distances ranging from 0.2 to 8.0 cm using line source approximation. All these calculations are based on L {sub eff} equal to 3.61 cm, calculated following TG-43U1 recommendations. The tabulated data for 2D-anisotropy function, 1D-anisotropy function, dose rate constant and radial dose function have been produced for clinical application of this source model.

  5. Dosimetric comparison of vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dosimetric study to compare high dose rate (HDR vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy plan versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT boost plan for doses delivered to target volume and organs at risk (OAR in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT. Materials and Methods: Fifteen postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma suitable for vaginal ovoid brachytherapy following WPRT of 46 Gy/23 fractions/4.5 weeks were included. All were treated with brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy each. The equivalent dose for IMRT was calculated by computing biologically effective dose of brachytherapy by linear quadratic model. Dose of brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy was equivalent to IMRT dose of 26 Gy/13 fractions. Doses to target volume and OAR were compared between HDR and IMRT plans. Results: Target volume was well covered with both HDR and IMRT plans, but dose with brachytherapy was much higher (P < 0.05. Mean doses, doses to 0.1, 1, 2, and 5cc, 1/3 rd , 1/2, and 2/3 rd volume of bladder and rectum were significantly lower with HDR plans. Conclusion: In postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma, HDR brachytherapy following WPRT appears to be better than IMRT for tumor coverage and reducing dose to critical organs.

  6. SU-F-T-49: Dosimetry Parameters and TPS Commissioning for the CivaSheet Directional Pd-103 Brachytherapy Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The CivaSheet is a new LDR Pd-103 brachytherapy device offering directional-radiation for preferentially irradiating malignancies with healthy-tissue sparing. Observations are presented on dosimetric characterization, TPS commissioning, and evaluation of the dosesuperposition- principle for summing individual elements comprising a planar CivaSheet Methods: The CivaSheet comprises individual sources (CivaDots, 0.05cm thick and 0.25cm diam.) inside a flexible bioabsorbable substrate with a 0.8cm center-to-center rectangular array. All non-radioactive components were measured to ensure accuracy of manufacturer-provided dimensional information. The Pd spatial distribution was gleaned from radioactive and inert samples, then modeled with the MCNP6 radiation-transport-code. A 6×6 array CivaSheet was modeled to evaluate the dose superposition principle for treatment planning. Air-kerma-strength was estimated using the NIST WAFAC geometry. Absorbed dose was estimated in water with polar sampling covering 0.05≤r≤15cm in 0.05cm increments and 0°≤θ≤180° in 1° increments. These data were entered into VariSeed9.0 and tested for the dose-superposition-principle. Results: The dose-rate-constant was 0.579 cGy/h/U with g(r) determined along the rotational-axis of symmetry (0°) instead of 90°. gP(r) values at 0.1, 0.5, 2, 5, and 10cm were 1.884, 1.344, 0.558, 0.088, and 0.0046. F(r,θ) decreased between 0° and 180° by factors of 270, 23, and 5.1 at 0.1, 1, and 10cm. The highest dose-gradient was at 92°, changing by a factor of 3 within 1° due to Au-foil shielding. TPS commissioning from 0.1≤r≤11cm and 0°≤θ≤180° demonstrated 2% reproducibility of input data except at the high-dose-gradient where interpolations caused 3% differences. Dose superposition of CivaDots replicated a multi-source CivaSheet array within 2% except where another CivaDot was present. Following implantation, the device is not perfectly planar. TPS accuracy utilizing the dose

  7. Source strength verification and quality assurance of preloaded brachytherapy needles using a CMOS flat panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golshan, Maryam, E-mail: maryam.golshan@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T1Z1, Canada and Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Center, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Spadinger, Ingrid [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Center, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Chng, Nick [Department of Medical Physics, Center for the North, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Prince George, British Columbia V2M 7E9 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Current methods of low dose rate brachytherapy source strength verification for sources preloaded into needles consist of either assaying a small number of seeds from a separate sample belonging to the same lot used to load the needles or performing batch assays of a subset of the preloaded seed trains. Both of these methods are cumbersome and have the limitations inherent to sampling. The purpose of this work was to investigate an alternative approach that uses an image-based, autoradiographic system capable of the rapid and complete assay of all sources without compromising sterility. Methods: The system consists of a flat panel image detector, an autoclavable needle holder, and software to analyze the detected signals. The needle holder was designed to maintain a fixed vertical spacing between the needles and the image detector, and to collimate the emissions from each seed. It also provides a sterile barrier between the needles and the imager. The image detector has a sufficiently large image capture area to allow several needles to be analyzed simultaneously.Several tests were performed to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of source strengths obtained using this system. Three different seed models (Oncura 6711 and 9011 {sup 125}I seeds, and IsoAid Advantage {sup 103}Pd seeds) were used in the evaluations. Seeds were loaded into trains with at least 1 cm spacing. Results: Using our system, it was possible to obtain linear calibration curves with coverage factor k = 1 prediction intervals of less than ±2% near the centre of their range for the three source models. The uncertainty budget calculated from a combination of type A and type B estimates of potential sources of error was somewhat larger, yielding (k = 1) combined uncertainties for individual seed readings of 6.2% for {sup 125}I 6711 seeds, 4.7% for {sup 125}I 9011 seeds, and 11.0% for Advantage {sup 103}Pd seeds. Conclusions: This study showed that a flat panel detector dosimetry system

  8. WE-FG-BRA-02: Docetaxel Eluting Brachytherapy Spacers for Local Chemo-Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Kumar, R; Sridhar, S [Northeastern University & Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Nguyen, P [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D’Amico, A [Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Cormack, R [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose an innovative combinatorial treatment strategy of Local ChemoRadiation Therapy (LCRT) using a sustained drug delivery platform in the form of a spacer to locally radio-sensitize the prostate with Docetaxel (DTX) enabling a synergistic cure with the use of lower radiation doses. These biodegradable spacers are physically similar to the inert spacers routinely used in prostate brachytherapy but are now loaded with formulations of DTX. Methods: Spacers were loaded with ∼500µg Docetaxel (DTX) for prostate cancer studies. The implants were characterized in vitro using SEM and HPLC. The release kinetic studies were carried out in buffer (pH 6.0) at 37°C. Subcutaneous PC3 tumors were xenografted in nude mice. Prostate cancer studies were done with and without radiation using SARRP at 5Gy, 10Gy, and 15Gy. Drug-loaded implants were injected once intratumorally using an 18G brachytherapy needle. Results: The release study in vitro showed a highly sustained release for multiple weeks at therapeutically relevant doses. The monotherapy with local DTX spacer showed sustained tumor inhibition compared to empty implants and an equivalent DTX dose given systemically. At 40 days, 89% survival was observed for mice treated with DTX implants compared with 0% in all other treatment groups. The combined treatment with local DTX spacer and radiation (10Gy) showed the highest degree of tumor suppression (significant tumor growth inhibition by day 90). The control mice showed continuous tumor growth and were scarified by day 56. Groups of mice treated with DTX-spacer or radiation alone showed initial tumor suppression but growth continued after day 60. A larger experiment is ongoing. Conclusion: This approach provides localized delivery of the chemotherapeutic sensitizer directly to the tumor and avoids the toxicities associated with both brachytherapy and current systemic delivery of docetaxel. Sustained release of DTX is an effective chemotherapy option alone or

  9. A comparison of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles in men with and without prostate brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Dorsey, Anthony T.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Donzella, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The etiology of erectile dysfunction after definitive local therapy for carcinoma of the prostate gland represents a multifactorial phenomenon including neurogenic compromise, venous insufficiency, local trauma, and psychogenic causes. It has been suggested that impotence after prostate brachytherapy is a consequence of excessive radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB). Herein we evaluate the potential relationship between radiation dose to the NVB and the development of erectile dysfunction following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The radiation dose to the NVB was evaluated for 33 patients who developed erectile dysfunction (ED) following brachytherapy plus 21 additional patients who were potent before and subsequent to brachytherapy. Of the 54 patient study group, the median follow up was 37 months, and 25 patients were managed with 125 I as a monotherapeutic approach and 29 received 103 Pd as a boost following 45 Gy of external beam radiation therapy. Radiographic localization of the NVB was performed via a two-dimensional geometric model that placed 3-NVB calculation points on the left and right posterolateral side of each 5-mm CT slice. Parameters evaluated included dose-surface histograms, dose parameters via point doses on each slice, the magnitude of the dose in relationship to the distance from the base, and the relationship between NVB radiation dose in patients with and without ED, patient response to sildenafil and case sequence number. Results: In terms of percent prescribed minimum peripheral dose (% mPD), there was no significant difference in mean neurovascular bundle dose between potent and impotent patients, between the isotopes ( 125 I or 103 Pd), mono- or boost therapy, or side of the prostate for which the overall average was 217% ± 55% of mPD. There was also no significant dosimetric difference in terms of response to sildenafil based on a multivariate analysis which included % mPD and various dose

  10. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D. L.; Yoo, S.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the greedy algorithm can solve the optimization problem efficiently and arrives at a clinically acceptable solution in less than 10 seconds. Our study was inclusive, that is there was no combination of sources that clearly stood out from the others and could therefore be considered the preferred set of sources for treatment planning. Source strengths of 0.2 mCi (low), 0.4 mCi (medium), and 0.6 mCi (high) of 125 I in four different combinations were used for the multi-strength source study. The combination of high- and medium-strength sources achieved a more uniform target dose distribution due to few source implants whereas the combination of low-and medium-strength sources achieved better sparing of sensitive tissues including that of the single-strength 0.4 mCi base case. 125 I at 0.4 mCi and 192 Ir at 0.12 mCi and 0.25 mCi source strengths were used for the multi-specie source study. This study also proved inconclusive , Treatment plans using a combination of two 0

  11. Influence of source geometry and materials on the transverse axis dosimetry of 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruqing; Sloboda, Ron S.

    1998-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose rates on the transverse axis in water and air kerma strengths normalized to unit source activity were calculated for a low dose rate steel-clad 192 Ir source, MicroSelectron high dose rate and pulsed dose rate 192 Ir sources, and a VariSource high dose rate 192 Ir source, as well as five other hypothetical cylindrical 192 Ir source designs. Based on these results, the dependence of dose rate and air kerma strength on source geometry and materials was analysed. Source geometry and attenuation in the core material are the important factors determining basic dosimetric characteristics. Core length, h, only affects the dose rate on the transverse axis at radial distances r 192 Ir sources is suggested, and similarities and differences in the dose rate constant and radial dose function between these sources are explained. (author)

  12. Dosimetric characteristics of the Best registered double-wall 103Pd brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, A.S.; Bharucha, Z.; Yoe-Sein, M.; Sowards, Keith

    2001-01-01

    103 Pd and 125 I brachytherapy sources are being used for interstitial implants in tumor sites such as the prostate. Recently, a double-wall 103 Pd source has been introduced, which has a design different from that of sources presently on the market. Dosimetric characteristics (dose rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined following the AAPM Task Group 43 recommendations and were related to the October 10, 2000 revision of the NIST 1999 S K Standard for 103 Pd. Measurements were performed in a Solid Water trade mark sign phantom using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters. For these measurements, slabs of Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material were machined to accommodate the source and LiF TLD chips of dimensions (3.1x3.1x0.8 mm 3 ) and (1.0x1.0x1.0 mm 3 ). The TLD chips were surrounded by at least 10 cm of Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material to provide full scattering conditions. The Monte Carlo simulations were performed in Solid Water trade mark sign and liquid water using the PTRAN code. The results of this investigation show an excellent agreement (within 5%) between the measured (0.67±8% cGy h -1 U -1 ) and calculated (to be 0.65±3% cGy h -1 U -1 ) dose rate constant in Solid Water trade mark sign . The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the Best registered 103 Pd in water was found to be 0.67±0.02 cGy h -1 U -1 . The radial dose function, g(r), of the new 103 Pd source was measured at distances ranging from 0.5 and 7 cm using LiF TLD in Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material. Moreover, the radial dose function of the new source was calculated in liquid water and Solid Water trade mark sign at distances ranging from 0.1 to 7 cm using the PTRAN Monte Carlo Code. The anisotropy function, F(r,θ), of the new 103 Pd source was also measured in Solid Water trade mark sign and calculated in both Solid Water trade mark sign and water phantom material

  13. A phantom for verification of dwell position and time of a high dose rate brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madebo, M.; Kron, T.; Pillainayagam, J.; Franich, R.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy of dwell position and reproducibility of dwell time are critical in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A phantom was designed to verify dwell position and dwell time reproducibility for an Ir-192 HDR stepping source using Computed Radiography (CR). The central part of the phantom, incorporating thin alternating strips of lead and acrylic, was used to measure dwell positions. The outer part of the phantom features recesses containing different absorber materials (lead, aluminium, acrylic and polystyrene foam), and was used for determining reproducibility of dwell times. Dwell position errors of <1 mm were easily detectable using the phantom. The effect of bending a transfer tube was studied with this phantom and no change of clinical significance was observed when varying the curvature of the transfer tube in typical clinical scenarios. Changes of dwell time as low as 0.1 s, the minimum dwell time of the treatment unit, could be detected by choosing dwell times over the four materials that produce identical exposure at the CR detector.

  14. Fabrication of Miniature Titanium Capsule for Brachytherapy Sources Using Tungsten Inert Gas Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghdi, R.; Sheibani, Sh.; Tamizifar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The capsules containing radioactive materials as brachytherapy sources are used for implanting into some target organs for malignant disorders treatments, such as prostate, eyes, and brain cancers. The conventional method for sealing the tubes is to weld them using a laser beam which is now a part of tube melting methods (self welding). The purpose of this study was to seal miniature titanium tubes containing radioactive materials in the form of capsules. This study introduced a new method based on melting process. A piece of commercially pure titanium grade 2 in the form of disk was used for the experiment. The sample was melted at the top of the tube by a Tungsten Inert Gas welding device for a short time duration. After completion of the melting, the disk in the form of a drop was mixed with a small part of it and both were solidified and hence closed the tube. We evaluated the tubes for the metallurgical properties and seal process which took place by Tungsten Inert Gas in different zones, including the heat affected zone, fusion zone, and interface of the joint of the drop to the tube. Finally, the produced samples were tested according to the ISO2919 and ISO9978 and the results confirmed the Disk and Tungsten Inert Gas procedure.

  15. Monte Carlo dosimetric characterization of the Flexisource Co-60 high-dose-rate brachytherapy source using PENELOPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, Julio F; Guerrero, Rafael; Torres, Javier; Lallena, Antonio M

    60 Co sources have been commercialized as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. One of them is the Flexisource Co-60 HDR source manufactured by Elekta. The only available dosimetric characterization of this source is that of Vijande et al. [J Contemp Brachytherapy 2012; 4:34-44], whose results were not included in the AAPM/ESTRO consensus document. In that work, the dosimetric quantities were calculated as averages of the results obtained with the Geant4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) codes, though for other sources, significant differences have been quoted between the values obtained with these two codes. The aim of this work is to perform the dosimetric characterization of the Flexisource Co-60 HDR source using PENELOPE. The MC simulation code PENELOPE (v. 2014) has been used. Following the recommendations of the AAPM/ESTRO report, the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, the air-kerma strength, the dose rate constant, and the absorbed dose rate in water have been calculated. The results we have obtained exceed those of Vijande et al. In particular, the absorbed dose rate constant is ∼0.85% larger. A similar difference is also found in the other dosimetric quantities. The effect of the electrons emitted in the decay of 60 Co, usually neglected in this kind of simulations, is significant up to the distances of 0.25 cm from the source. The systematic and significant differences we have found between PENELOPE results and the average values found by Vijande et al. point out that the dosimetric characterizations carried out with the various MC codes should be provided independently. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of an adjoint sensitivity field-based treatment-planning technique for the use of newly designed directional LDR sources in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, V; Thomadsen, B R; Henderson, D L

    2012-02-21

    The development and application of an automated 3D greedy heuristic (GH) optimization algorithm utilizing the adjoint sensitivity fields for treatment planning to assess the advantage of directional interstitial prostate brachytherapy is presented. Directional and isotropic dose kernels generated using Monte Carlo simulations based on Best Industries model 2301 I-125 source are utilized for treatment planning. The newly developed GH algorithm is employed for optimization of the treatment plans for seven interstitial prostate brachytherapy cases using mixed sources (directional brachytherapy) and using only isotropic sources (conventional brachytherapy). All treatment plans resulted in V100 > 98% and D90 > 45 Gy for the target prostate region. For the urethra region, the D10(Ur), D90(Ur) and V150(Ur) and for the rectum region the V100cc, D2cc, D90(Re) and V90(Re) all are reduced significantly when mixed sources brachytherapy is used employing directional sources. The simulations demonstrated that the use of directional sources in the low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of the prostate clearly benefits in sparing the urethra and the rectum sensitive structures from overdose. The time taken for a conventional treatment plan is less than three seconds, while the time taken for a mixed source treatment plan is less than nine seconds, as tested on an Intel Core2 Duo 2.2 GHz processor with 1GB RAM. The new 3D GH algorithm is successful in generating a feasible LDR brachytherapy treatment planning solution with an extra degree of freedom, i.e. directionality in very little time.

  17. Development of an adjoint sensitivity field-based treatment-planning technique for the use of newly designed directional LDR sources in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, V.; Thomadsen, B. R.; Henderson, D. L.

    2012-02-01

    The development and application of an automated 3D greedy heuristic (GH) optimization algorithm utilizing the adjoint sensitivity fields for treatment planning to assess the advantage of directional interstitial prostate brachytherapy is presented. Directional and isotropic dose kernels generated using Monte Carlo simulations based on Best Industries model 2301 I-125 source are utilized for treatment planning. The newly developed GH algorithm is employed for optimization of the treatment plans for seven interstitial prostate brachytherapy cases using mixed sources (directional brachytherapy) and using only isotropic sources (conventional brachytherapy). All treatment plans resulted in V100 > 98% and D90 > 45 Gy for the target prostate region. For the urethra region, the D10Ur, D90Ur and V150Ur and for the rectum region the V100cc, D2cc, D90Re and V90Re all are reduced significantly when mixed sources brachytherapy is used employing directional sources. The simulations demonstrated that the use of directional sources in the low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of the prostate clearly benefits in sparing the urethra and the rectum sensitive structures from overdose. The time taken for a conventional treatment plan is less than three seconds, while the time taken for a mixed source treatment plan is less than nine seconds, as tested on an Intel Core2 Duo 2.2 GHz processor with 1GB RAM. The new 3D GH algorithm is successful in generating a feasible LDR brachytherapy treatment planning solution with an extra degree of freedom, i.e. directionality in very little time.

  18. Radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds; Exposition radiologique de l'equipe operatoire au cours de curietherapies de prostate par implants permanents d'iode-125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagna, G.; Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Service de protection radiologique des armees (SPRA), 1 bis rue du Lieutenant Raoul Batany, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Gauron, C. [Institut national de recherche et de securite (INRS), Departement Etudes et Assistance Medicales, 30 rue Olivier Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14 (France)

    2011-04-15

    The French defense radiation protection service (SPRA) and the French national institute for research and safety (INRS) conducted a joint study to assess the radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds at the Val-de-Grace military hospital. The purpose of the study was the assessment of the effective doses, the equivalent doses to the extremities and lens received by a novice team, the different ambient dose equivalent rates measurements and the delineation of areas. After six brachy-therapies, all the recorded doses with whole-body InLight{sup R} OSL and nanoDot{sup R} dosimeters remained below the detection limit for the whole staff. The dose rate measured at the end of implantation by an AT1123{sup R} survey meter is about 170 {mu}Sv/h at the perineum of the patient. The controlled area limit is estimated to be about 20 cm from the patient perineum. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for the categorization of workers, the delineation of areas and the dose monitoring procedures. This study demonstrates that real-time ultrasound-guided trans-perineal prostate brachytherapy delivers low dose to the operators because of the radioactive source characteristics and the instrumentation providing an effective radiation protection for the surgical team. (authors)

  19. Overview of terahertz radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallerano, G.P.; Biedron, S.G.

    2004-01-01

    Although terahertz (THz) radiation was first observed about hundred years ago, the corresponding portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been for long time considered a rather poorly explored region at the boundary between the microwaves and the infrared. This situation has changed during the past ten years with the rapid development of coherent THz sources, such as solid state oscillators, quantum cascade lasers, optically pumped solid state devices and novel free electron devices, which have in turn stimulated a wide variety of applications from material science to telecommunications, from biology to biomedicine. For a comprehensive review of THz technology the reader is addressed to a recent paper by P. Siegel. In this paper we focus on the development and perspectives of THz radiation sources.

  20. Fabrication of sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mars, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given for fabricating a sealed radiation source, consisting in depositing on a metal substrate a thin active coat of a radioelement, termed first coat, submitting this coated substrate to an oxidation treatment in order to obtain on the first coat an inactive coat of an oxide of the metal, termed second coat, and depositing a coat of varnish on this second inactive coat [fr

  1. Comparison of treatment using teletherapy (external beam radiation) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samea, Renato; Lourenco, Laercio Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Background - Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is still a difficult tumor to treat with very poor prognosis. Aim - To compare the response to teletherapy treatment (external beam radiotherapy) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods - Were studied 49 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus on clinical stage III (TNM-1999). They were separated into two groups. The first, underwent radiation therapy alone with linear accelerator of particles, average dose of 6000 cGy and the second to external beam radiation therapy at a dose of 5040 cGy combined with brachytherapy with Iridium 192 at a dose of 1500 cGy. Brachytherapy started one to two weeks after the end of teletherapy, and it was divided into three weekly applications of 500 cGy. Age, gender, race, habits (smoking and drinking), body mass index (BMI), complications with treatment benefits (pain relief and food satisfaction) and survival were analyzed. Results - The quality of life (food satisfaction, and pain palliation of dysphagia) were better in the group treated with external beam radiation therapy combined with brachytherapy. Survival was higher in the brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy alone. Conclusion - Although the cure rate of squamous cell cancer of the esophagus is almost nil when treated with irradiation alone, this therapy is a form of palliative treatment for most patients in whom surgical contraindication exists. (author)

  2. Comparison of treatment using teletherapy (external beam radiation) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samea, Renato; Lourenco, Laercio Gomes, E-mail: renatosamea@globo.com [Department of Surgical Oncology of Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Hospital, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Background - Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is still a difficult tumor to treat with very poor prognosis. Aim - To compare the response to teletherapy treatment (external beam radiotherapy) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods - Were studied 49 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus on clinical stage III (TNM-1999). They were separated into two groups. The first, underwent radiation therapy alone with linear accelerator of particles, average dose of 6000 cGy and the second to external beam radiation therapy at a dose of 5040 cGy combined with brachytherapy with Iridium 192 at a dose of 1500 cGy. Brachytherapy started one to two weeks after the end of teletherapy, and it was divided into three weekly applications of 500 cGy. Age, gender, race, habits (smoking and drinking), body mass index (BMI), complications with treatment benefits (pain relief and food satisfaction) and survival were analyzed. Results - The quality of life (food satisfaction, and pain palliation of dysphagia) were better in the group treated with external beam radiation therapy combined with brachytherapy. Survival was higher in the brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy alone. Conclusion - Although the cure rate of squamous cell cancer of the esophagus is almost nil when treated with irradiation alone, this therapy is a form of palliative treatment for most patients in whom surgical contraindication exists. (author)

  3. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  4. Results of the intestitial brachytherapy and of the combination external radiation-brachytherapy in 150 patients with carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannazzari, G.L.; Negri, G.L.; Ozzello, F.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report their experience on the treatment of carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth with interstitial brachytherapy, alone or in conbination with external irradiation. One hundred and fifty patients were treated; among these, 116 with brachytherapy alone, 34 with combined treatment. The five years local control in those patients treated with brachytherapy alone was 72.5% in T1, 61.2% in T2 and 35% in T3; in those patients treated with external irradiation and brachytherapy the global five years control was 42.5%. The global five years survival was 64% in the patients treated with brachytherapy alone 48% in the patients treated with combined therapy

  5. Results of the intestitial brachytherapy and of the combination external radiation-brachytherapy in 150 patients with carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannazzari, G L; Negri, G L; Ozzello, F

    1986-01-01

    The authors report their experience on the treatment of carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth with interstitial brachytherapy, alone or in conbination with external irradiation. One hundred and fifty patients were treated; among these, 116 with brachytherapy alone, 34 with combined treatment. The five years local control in those patients treated with brachytherapy alone was 72.5% in T1, 61.2% in T2 and 35% in T3; in those patients treated with external irradiation and brachytherapy the global five years control was 42.5%. The global five years survival was 64% in the patients treated with brachytherapy alone 48% in the patients treated with combined therapy. 42 refs.

  6. Balloon brachytherapy for brain tumor-radiation safety experiences at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanka, Venkata K

    2006-11-01

    Balloon brachytherapy is a technique for the removal of a brain tumor in which an inflatable balloon is placed in a resection cavity and then filled with liquid I, delivering low energy dose to the cancerous cells surrounding the cavity. After preparing a patient room to mitigate any spills or contamination, liquid 125I (Iotrex) was assayed with a dose calibrator and injected into the balloon placed in the patient's brain. Approximately 98.6% of the isotope was recovered at the end of the procedure. Approximately 1.4% remained unrecovered and is assumed to have diffused through the balloon membrane. Each day, the patient's urine was collected and the total urine activity measured was less than 7% of the unrecovered activity. The remainder of the unrecovered activity was not evaluated. It was assumed to be distributed in the patient's body, and a tiny quantity of liquid spilled from an IV line while injecting. Training was conducted for radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, and participating residents regarding balloon brachytherapy radiation safety precautions. Precautions during treatment included safe handling of body fluids. General radiation safety precautions and nursing care instructions were posted on the patient door. Air monitoring was conducted to detect any airborne iodine. At the time of balloon removal, the radiation safety department monitored the operating room and staff for contamination. Waste, including the balloon, was held for decay on site prior to disposal.

  7. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  8. Production of iridium-192 radiation sources: Indian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, K.V.S.; Kolhe, O.T.; Nagarja, P.S.; Paramr, Y.D.

    2002-01-01

    Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), a unit under the Department of Atomic Energy is fabricating and supplying Ir-192 industrial radiography sources for various models of radiography cameras for use in the industry for non-destructive testing. Basically these sources are fabricated by encapsulating the required quantity of the activity in stainless steel 316 L capsules using Tungsten Inert gas welding process and crimping/attaching to the respective pigtail assemblies of the radiography cameras. The inactive iridium pellets are irradiated in the DHRUVA reactor at a flux on 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. The performance classification of these source encapsulation for various conditions of normal and accidental nature are tested by subjecting the prototype sources as per the standard laid down by the regulatory authority, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, in India. The sources are fabricated as per the national and international standards. Activity of the sources varies from 37O GBq (10 Ci ) to 2.96 TBq (80 Ci ) source strength depending on the requirement of the user. The specific activity of the Ir-192 sources supplied is around 7.4 TBq/gm (200 Ci/gm ). Quality control /Assurance for the manufacture of the source begins from the procurement of the raw material and ends with the finished source. Ir- 192 in the form of -0.3 mm diameter (0.1 mm dia wire of Ir-25 % and Pt-75% sheathed in pure platinum of 0.1 mm thick) is being supplied for use in the treatment of cancer of cervix, tongue etc. by brachytherapy. This is supplied in lengths of 50 cm / 100 cm with 37 - 185 GBq/cm ( 1-5 mCi/cm) activity. Annually 925 TBq (25 kCi) of Ir-192 for industrial radiography and about 60 meters of wire for brachytherapy are being fabricated and supplied. Because of the quality of these sources BRIT not only caters to the Indian industry but also is able to export sources to the third world countries. (Author)

  9. Intra coronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghofourian, H.; Ghahremani, A.; Oliaie, A.; Taghizadeh Asl, M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the initial promise of vasculopathy intervention restenosis- a consequence of the (normal) would healing process-has emerged as a major problem. Angiographic restenosis has been reported in 40-60% of patients after successful P TCA. The basic mechanism of restenosis, (acute recoil, negative remodeling and neo intimal hyperplasia), are only partially counteracted by endovascular prosthetic devices (s tents). The rate of in-s tent restenosis, which is primarily caused by neo intimal hyperplasia due to the (micro) trauma of the arterial wall by the s tent struts, has been reduced to 18-32%. Ionizing (beta or gamma) radiations has been established as a potent treatment for malignant disorders. In recent years, there has also been increasing interest among clinicians in the management of benign lesions with radiation. Over the past several years, there has been a growing body of evidence that endovascular brachytherapy has a major impact on the biology of the restenosis. It must be underlined that understanding the biology and pathophysiology of restenosis and assessing various treatment options should preferably be a team effort, with the three g races b eing interventional cardiologist, nuclear oncologist, and industrial partners. The vast amount of data in over 20000 patients from a wide range of randomized controlled trials, has shown that brachytherapy is the only effective treatment for in-s tent restenosis. We are learning more and more about how to improve brachytherapy. While the new coated s tents that we heard about today is fascinating and extremely promising, brachytherapy still has a very important place in difficult patients, such as those with total occlusions, osti al lesions, left main lesions, multivessel disease and diabetes. Regarding to above mentioned tips, we (a research team work, in the Nuclear Research Center Of the Atomic Energy Organization Of Iran), focused on synthesis and preparation of radioactive materials for use in I c-B T. We

  10. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients

  12. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  13. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J. L.; Micka, J. A.; Culberson, W. S.; DeWerd, L. A.; Rasmussen, B. E.; Davis, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60 Co. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a 60 Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 125 I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 125 I seed, and the Best 2335 103 Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the 60 Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the 60 Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125 I and 103 Pd relative to 60 Co. Results: The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to 60 Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. Conclusions: The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%–15% for 125 I and 103 Pd sources relative to 60 Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy

  14. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J L; Rasmussen, B E; Davis, S D; Micka, J A; Culberson, W S; DeWerd, L A

    2014-12-01

    To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for (125)I and (103)Pd brachytherapy sources relative to (60)Co. LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a (60)Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 (125)I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 (125)I seed, and the Best 2335 (103)Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the (60)Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the (60)Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for (125)I and (103)Pd relative to (60)Co. The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to (60)Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%-15% for (125)I and (103)Pd sources relative to (60)Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around (125)I and (103)Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy.

  15. SU-F-T-32: Evaluation of the Performance of a Multiple-Array-Diode Detector for Quality Assurance Tests in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with Ir-192 Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpool, K; De La Fuente Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode- detector for geometric and dosimetric quality assurance (QA) tests of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an Ir-192-source. Methods: A phantom setup was designed that encapsulated a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode-detector (MapCheck2) and a catheter for the HDR brachytherapy Ir-192 source. This setup was used to perform both geometric and dosimetric quality assurance for the HDR-Ir192 source. The geometric tests included: (a) measurement of the position of the source and (b) spacing between different dwell positions. The dosimteric tests include: (a) linearity of output with time, (b) end effect and (c) relative dose verification. The 2D-dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 was used to perform the previous tests. The results of MapCheck2 were compared with the corresponding quality assurance testes performed with Gafchromic-film and well-ionization-chamber. Results: The position of the source and the spacing between different dwell-positions were reproducible within 1 mm accuracy by measuring the position of maximal dose using MapCheck2 in contrast to the film which showed a blurred image of the dwell positions due to limited film sensitivity to irradiation. The linearity of the dose with dwell times measured from MapCheck2 was superior to the linearity measured with ionization chamber due to higher signal-to-noise ratio of the diode readings. MapCheck2 provided more accurate measurement of the end effect with uncertainty < 1.5% in comparison with the ionization chamber uncertainty of 3%. Although MapCheck2 did not provide absolute calibration dosimeter for the activity of the source, it provided accurate tool for relative dose verification in HDR-brachytherapy. Conclusion: The 2D-array-diode-detector provides a practical, compact and accurate tool to perform quality assurance for HDR-brachytherapy with an Ir-192 source. The diodes in MapCheck2 have high radiation sensitivity and

  16. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This publication is part of practical radiation safety manual series for different fields of application aimed primarily at persons handling radiation sources on a daily routine basis, which could at same time be used by the competent authorities, supporting their efforts in the radiation protection training of workers or medical assistance personnel or helping on-site management to set up local radiation protection rules. It is dedicated to brachytherapy: its application and procedures guides

  17. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy ( w,m ) and dose to medium (D m,m ), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D 90 to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%–15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. Conclusions: TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study highlights the importance of backscatter to peak skin dose. Tissue heterogeneities, applicator, and patient geometries demonstrate the need for a more robust dose calculation method for low energy brachytherapy sources

  18. Experimental determination of dosimetric characterization of a newly designed encapsulated interstitial brachytherapy source of 103Pd-model Pd-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Ravinder; Yue Ning; Roa, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    A newly designed encapsulated 103 Pd source has been introduced (BrachySeed trade mark sign -Pd-103, also named Model Pd-1, manufactured by DRAXIMAGE Inc. and distributed by Cytogen Corp.) for interstitial brachytherapy to provide more isotropic dose distributions. In this work, the dosimetric characteristics of the 103 Pd source were measured with micro LiF TLD chips and dosimetry parameters were characterized based upon the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 formalism. The dose rate constant of the sources was determined to be 0.66±0.05 cGy h-1 U-1. The radial dose function was measured and was found to be similar to that of the Theragenics Model 200 103 Pd source. The anisotropy constant for the Model Pd-1 source was determined to be 1.03

  19. A new treatment planning formalism for catheter-based beta sources used in intravascular brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N S; Chiu-Tsao, S T; Tsao, H S; Harrison, L B

    2001-01-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) is an emerging modality for the treatment of atherosclerotic lesions in the artery. As part of the refinement in this rapidly evolving modality of treatment, the current simplistic dosimetry approach based on a fixed-point prescription must be challenged by future rigorous dosimetry method employing image-based three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. The goals of 3D IVBT treatment planning calculations include (1) achieving high accuracy in a slim cylindrical region of interest, (2) accounting for the edge effect around the source ends, and (3) supporting multiple dwell positions. The formalism recommended by Task Group 60 (TG-60) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is applicable for gamma sources, as well as short beta sources with lengths less than twice the beta particle range. However, for the elongated beta sources and/or seed trains with lengths greater than twice the beta range, a new formalism is required to handle their distinctly different dose characteristics. Specifically, these characteristics consist of (a) flat isodose curves in the central region, (b) steep dose gradient at the source ends, and (c) exponential dose fall-off in the radial direction. In this paper, we present a novel formalism that evolved from TG-60 in maintaining the dose rate as a product of four key quantities. We propose to employ cylindrical coordinates (R, Z, phi), which are more natural and suitable to the slim cylindrical shape of the volume of interest, as opposed to the spherical coordinate system (r, theta, phi) used in the TG-60 formalism. The four quantities used in this formalism include (1) the distribution factor, H(R, Z), (2) the modulation function, M(R, Z), (3) the transverse dose function, h(R), and (4) the reference dose rate at 2 mm along the perpendicular bisector, D(R0=2 mm, Z0=0). The first three are counterparts of the geometry factor, the anisotropy function and the radial dose function in the

  20. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.reniers@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN, The Netherlands and Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo CP 11049, 05422-970 (Brazil); Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas [Xoft, A Subsidiary of iCAD, Sunnyvale, California 94085-4115 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Université Laval, Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de l’Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 Canada (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN, The Netherlands and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (<50 kV) brachytherapy system used in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Breast tissue is a heterogeneous tissue in terms of density and composition. Dosimetric calculations of seven APBI patients treated with Axxent were made using a model-based Monte Carlo platform for a number of tissue models and dose reporting methods and compared to TG-43 based plans. Methods: A model of the Axxent source, the S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (D{sub w,m}) and dose to medium (D{sub m,m}), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D{sub 90} to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the

  1. Investigation of Anisotropy Caused by Cylinder Applicator on Dose Distribution around Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source using MCNP4C Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brachytherapy is a type of radiotherapy in which radioactive sources are used in proximity of tumors normally for treatment of malignancies in the head, prostate and cervix. Materials and Methods: The Cs-137 Selectron source is a low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy source used in a remote afterloading system for treatment of different cancers. This system uses active and inactive spherical sources of 2.5 mm diameter, which can be used in different configurations inside the applicator to obtain different dose distributions. In this study, first the dose distribution at different distances from the source was obtained around a single pellet inside the applicator in a water phantom using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The simulations were then repeated for six active pellets in the applicator and for six point sources.  Results: The anisotropy of dose distribution due to the presence of the applicator was obtained by division of dose at each distance and angle to the dose at the same distance and angle of 90 degrees. According to the results, the doses decreased towards the applicator tips. For example, for points at the distances of 5 and 7 cm from the source and angle of 165 degrees, such discrepancies reached 5.8% and 5.1%, respectively.  By increasing the number of pellets to six, these values reached 30% for the angle of 5 degrees. Discussion and Conclusion: The results indicate that the presence of the applicator causes a significant dose decrease at the tip of the applicator compared with the dose in the transverse plane. However, the treatment planning systems consider an isotropic dose distribution around the source and this causes significant errors in treatment planning, which are not negligible, especially for a large number of sources inside the applicator.

  2. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Sandra; Costa, Filipa; Pereira, Alexandre; Lencart, Joana; Dias, Anabela; Cunha, Luís; Sousa, Olga; Silva, José Pedro; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-01-09

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy.

  3. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, Sandra; Costa, Filipa; Pereira, Alexandre; Lencart, Joana; Dias, Anabela; Cunha, Luís; Sousa, Olga; Silva, José Pedro; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy

  4. Beta Radiation exposure of medical personnel during vascular brachytherapy with Re-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moka, D.; Baer, F.; Barth, I.; Rimpler, A.

    2002-01-01

    Intracoronary radiation is currently considered a promising breakthrough approach for preventing restenosis after angioplasty and stenting in patients with severe coronary artery disease. For the therapy of in-stent-restenosis vascular irradiation using balloon catheters filled with liquid radioisotopes provide excellent homogeneity due to the artery stenosis morphology. The radionuclide normally used is a Re-188 solutions (E β ,max=2,12 MeV). To achieve a sufficient dose in the stenosed artery wall (30 Gy in 0.5 mm wall depth) in a tolerable time-scale very high specific activities (>5-10 GBq/ml) of the isotope are necessary. During the preparation of the radioactive solution and the application at the patient very short distances between the source of the radiation and the skin of the doctors for cardiology / nuclear medicine are possible, especially when manipulations at the balloon catheter during the radiation are necessary. In addition, a severe risk of contamination exists. A further problem is that in hospitals often no or insufficient dosimeters for beta radiation are available. Occupational radiation exposure of the personnel was determined at the preparation of the Re-188 solution, the therapy itself and the waste management. The partial body exposure, i. e. the dose of the skin at the hands due to beta radiation, was determined with very sensitive thin-layer thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). During a preparation, intracoronary radiation and waste management of the Re-188-perrhenate solution using normal radiation shielding first measurements resulted din more than 500 mSv per working day at the fingertips. This extreme high radiation exposure of the personnel were mainly due to direct radiation by touching the evacuated balloon catheter (only residual radionuclides left). to reduced radiation we performed several additional radiation protection measures. The consequent use of plastic shielding of the source, the use of a semiautomatic preparation

  5. Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-09-07

    The stochastic nature of ionizing radiation interactions causes a microdosimetric spread in energy depositions for cell or cell nucleus-sized volumes. The magnitude of the spread may be a confounding factor in dose response analysis. The aim of this work is to give values for the microdosimetric spread for a range of doses imparted by (125)I and (192)Ir brachytherapy radionuclides, and for a (60)Co source. An upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to obtain frequency distributions of specific energy for each of these radiation qualities and for four different cell nucleus-sized volumes. The results demonstrate that the magnitude of the microdosimetric spread increases when the target size decreases or when the energy of the radiation quality is reduced. Frequency distributions calculated according to the formalism of Kellerer and Chmelevsky using full convolution of the Monte Carlo calculated single track frequency distributions confirm that at doses exceeding 0.08 Gy for (125)I, 0.1 Gy for (192)Ir, and 0.2 Gy for (60)Co, the resulting distribution can be accurately approximated with a normal distribution. A parameterization of the width of the distribution as a function of dose and target volume of interest is presented as a convenient form for the use in response modelling or similar contexts.

  6. The mean photon energy anti E{sub F} at the point of measurement determines the detector-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M} in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern [University of Oldenburg and Pius-Hospital Oldenburg (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics Group

    2016-11-01

    The application of various radiation detectors for brachytherapy dosimetry has motivated this study of the energy dependence of radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M}, the quotient of the detector responses under calibration conditions at a {sup 60}Co unit and under the given non-reference conditions at the point of measurement, M, occurring in photon brachytherapy. The investigated detectors comprise TLD, radiochromic film, ESR, Si diode, plastic scintillator and diamond crystal detectors as well as ionization chambers of various sizes, whose measured response-energy relationships, taken from the literature, served as input data. Brachytherapy photon fields were Monte-Carlo simulated for an ideal isotropic {sup 192}Ir point source, a model spherical {sup 192}Ir source with steel encapsulation and a commercial HDR GammaMed Plus source. The radial source distance was varied within cylindrical water phantoms with outer radii ranging from 10 to 30 cm and heights from 20 to 60 cm. By application of this semiempirical method - originally developed for teletherapy dosimetry - it has been shown that factor k{sub Q,M} is closely correlated with a single variable, the fluence-weighted mean photon energy anti E{sub F} at the point of measurement. The radial profiles of anti E{sub F} obtained with either the commercial {sup 192}Ir source or the two simplified source variants show little variation. The observed correlations between parameters k{sub Q,M} and anti E{sub F} are represented by fitting formulae for all investigated detectors, and further variation of the detector type is foreseen. The herewith established close correlation of radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M} with local mean photon energy anti E{sub F} can be regarded as a simple regularity, facilitating the practical application of correction factor k{sub Q,M} for in-phantom dosimetry around {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. anti E{sub F} values can be assessed by Monte Carlo simulation or

  7. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  8. Energy spectrum based calculation of the half and the tenth value layers for brachytherapy sources using a semiempirical parametrized mass attenuation coefficient formulism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.

    2008-01-01

    As different types of radionuclides (e.g., 131 Cs source) are introduced for clinical use in brachytherapy, the question is raised regarding whether a relatively simple method exists for the derivation of values of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). For the radionuclide that has been clinically used for years, such as 125 I and 103 Pd, the sources have been manufactured and marketed by several vendors with different designs and structures. Because of the nature of emission of low energy photons for these radionuclides, energy spectra of the sources are very dependent on their individual designs. Though values of the HVL or the TVL in certain commonly used shielding materials are relatively small for these low energy photon emitting sources, the question remains how the variations in energy spectra affect the HVL (or TVL) values and whether these values can be calculated with a relatively simple method. A more fundamental question is whether a method can be established to derive the HVL (TVL) values for any brachytherapy sources and for different materials in a relatively straightforward fashion. This study was undertaken to answer these questions. Based on energy spectra, a well established semiempirical mass attenuation coefficient computing scheme was utilized to derive the HVL (TVL) values of different materials for different types of brachytherapy sources. The method presented in this study may be useful to estimate HVL (TVL) values of different materials for brachytherapy sources of different designs and containing different radionuclides

  9. Evaluation of Delivery Costs for External Beam Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Nilsen, Kristine; Hill, Colin; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Lash, Donna H; Lain, Melody; Christodoulou, Deborah; Hodge, Constance; Showalter, Timothy N

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the delivery costs, using time-driven activity-based costing, and reimbursement for definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Process maps were created to represent each step of the radiation treatment process and included personnel, equipment, and consumable supplies used to deliver care. Personnel were interviewed to estimate time involved to deliver care. Salary data, equipment purchasing information, and facilities costs were also obtained. We defined the capacity cost rate (CCR) for each resource and then calculated the total cost of patient care according to CCR and time for each resource. Costs were compared with 2016 Medicare reimbursement and relative value units (RVUs). The total cost of radiation therapy for cervical cancer was $12,861.68, with personnel costs constituting 49.8%. Brachytherapy cost $8610.68 (66.9% of total) and consumed 423 minutes of attending radiation oncologist time (80.0% of total). External beam radiation therapy cost $4055.01 (31.5% of total). Personnel costs were higher for brachytherapy than for the sum of simulation and external beam radiation therapy delivery ($4798.73 vs $1404.72). A full radiation therapy course provides radiation oncologists 149.77 RVUs with intensity modulated radiation therapy or 135.90 RVUs with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, with total reimbursement of $23,321.71 and $16,071.90, respectively. Attending time per RVU is approximately 4-fold higher for brachytherapy (5.68 minutes) than 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (1.63 minutes) or intensity modulated radiation therapy (1.32 minutes). Time-driven activity-based costing was used to calculate the total cost of definitive radiation therapy for cervical cancer, revealing that brachytherapy delivery and personnel resources constituted the majority of costs. However, current reimbursement policy does not reflect the increased attending physician effort and delivery costs of brachytherapy. We

  10. Preparation and evaluation of various 32P sources for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelenz, B.U.; Bilski, P.; Ochab, E.; Rajchel, B.; Styczen, J.; Walichiewicz, P.; Wodniecki, J.; Wilczek, K.

    2001-01-01

    A relatively high per cent of restenoses, being a long-term complication of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), can be significantly reduced by short-range ionizing radiation applied locally, immediately after PTCA. In search for dosimetrically favourable and easy to handle radiation sources for this purpose, we tried a pure β - emitter 32 P (t 1/2 =14.3 days). Ways of preparation of 32 P sources were the following: (1) Neutron activation of 31 P layers implanted into metallic surfaces by ionic methods; (2) Conversion coating of metallic surfaces in aqueous solutions containing 32 PO 4 3- ions; (3) Direct application of Na 2 H 32 PO 4 solutions in the angioplasty balloon. It was shown that: (1) 32 P sources obtained by 31 P ion implantation followed by neutron activation can be useful, but only if activation of the support material by thermal neutrons is negligible; (2) Phosphate layers on stainless steel surface exhibit rather poor adhesion. Similar layers on titanium require further studies; (3) Liquid 32 P sources ensure very good radial dose distribution but only utmost care in filling the balloon can give a reliable activity-dose dependence. Dosimetry of liquid sources, performed in a PMMA phantom by thermoluminescence method showed that 32 P sources of radioactive concentration of 200 MBq/cm 3 can deposit therapeutic dose during about 12 min of exposition. TL detectors manufactured for this purpose in our laboratory show very good spatial resolution and can be recommended for similar studies. (author)

  11. Comparison of TG‐43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaker, Neda; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni1, Ali S.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross‐sectional library for the purpose of simulating different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross‐sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in  125I and  103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code — MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low‐energy sources such as  125I and  103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for  103Pd and 10 cm for  125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for  192Ir and less than 1.2% for  137Cs between the three codes. PACS number(s): 87.56.bg PMID:27074460

  12. Comparison of TG-43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaker, Neda; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-03-08

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross-sectional library for the purpose of simulating different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross-sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in 125I and 103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code - MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low-energy sources such as 125I and 103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for 103Pd and 10 cm for 125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for 192Ir and less than 1.2% for 137Cs between the three codes.

  13. A Monte Carlo Study on the Effect of Various Neutron Capturers on Dose Distribution in Brachytherapy with 252Cf Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozabadi M. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In neutron interaction with matter and reduction of neutron energy due to multiple scatterings to the thermal energy range, increasing the probability of thermal neutron capture by neutron captures makes dose enhancement in the tumors loaded with these materials. Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose distribution in the presence of 10B, 157Gd and 33S neutron capturers and to determine the effect of these materials on dose enhancement rate for 252Cf brachytherapy source. Methods: Neutron-ray flux and energy spectra, neutron and gamma dose rates and dose enhancement factor (DEF are determined in the absence and presence of 10B, 157Gd and 33S using Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The difference in the thermal neutron flux rate in the presence of 10B and 157Gd is significant, while the flux changes in the fast and epithermal energy ranges are insensible. The dose enhancement factor has increased with increasing distance from the source and reached its maximum amount equal to 258.3 and 476.1 cGy/h/µg for 157Gd and 10B, respectively at about 8 cm distance from the source center. DEF for 33S is equal to one. Conclusion: Results show that the magnitude of dose augmentation in tumors containing 10B and 157Gd in brachytherapy with 252Cf source will depend not only on the capture product dose level, but also on the tumor distance from the source. 33S makes dose enhancement under specific conditions that these conditions depend on the neutron energy spectra of source, the 33S concentration in tumor and tumor distance from the source.

  14. Separation of fission produced 106Ru from simulated high level nuclear wastes for production of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blicharska, Magdalena; Bartoś, Barbara; Krajewski, Seweryn; Bilewicz, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy is the common method for treating various tumors, and currently 106 Ru and 125 I applicators are the most frequently used. Considering that 106 Ru is a β emitter with maximum energy of 3.54 MeV, it is best indicated in the treatment of small melanomas, with up to 20 mm tissue range. 106 Ru is commercially obtained from neutron irradiated high enrichment 235 U target in process of production 99 Mo. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing the 99 Mo, therefore alternative strategies for production of this key medical isotope are explored. In our work, we propose to use liquid high-level radioactive waste as a source of high activity of 106 Ru. Simple calculations indicate that 1 dm 3 of HLLW solution after 4 years of cooling contains about 500 GBq of 106 Ru. This amount of activity is enough for production of about few thousands of brachytherapy sources. Present communication reports results of our process development studies on the recovery of ruthenium radioisotopes from simulated solution of high level radioactive waste using oxidation-extraction method

  15. Study and development of methodology for radioactive iodine fixation in polymeric substrate for manufacturing sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Carla D.; Benega, Marcos A.G. and others

    2014-01-01

    According global estimates of Globocan 2012 project of the International Agency for Research of Cancer, of the World Health Organization, there were 14,1 million new cases of cancer and a total of 8,2 million deaths from cancer. Also show that in 2030, the overall load will be 21,4 million new cases and 13,2 million cancer deaths. One of the prostate cancer therapy is brachytherapy, used in early and middle stages of the disease. It is made with the introduction of seeds with radioactive material within the tumor or in nearby regions, affecting the minimum surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is the study and developing the deposition of radioactive iodine on the polymeric substrate method, and an analysis relating the efficiency of the method to implementation in the laboratory of brachytherapy from IPEN. Iodine-125 is adsorbed on an epoxy resin solution. The objective of this study is to offer a new proposal for seeds. The results will give the data for the radiation protection and the procedures for radioactive waste management

  16. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  17. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  18. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Cheng, Chih-Yao

    2010-01-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V 100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  19. Development of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir radiation sources for intravascular irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kogure, H; Iwamoto, S; Iwata, K; Kawauchi, Y; Nagata, Y; Sorita, T; Suzuki, K

    2003-01-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy is a novel therapy for preventing the restenosis of coronary artery by use of low-dose irradiation. JAERI and Kyoto University have been developing sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir radiation sources by the cooperative research project entitled as 'The research on safety and effectiveness of the intravascular brachytherapy for preventing restenosis of the coronary artery disease' since 1998. The radiation source was introduced into the stenosis through a catheter (a guide-tube to insert directly into vascular) to irradiate the diseased part. Ten sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir seed sources (phi 0.4 mm x 2.5 mm) were positioned between nylon spacers (phi 0.3 mm x 1.0 mm) in a flexible covering tube and the tube was plugged with a core-wire; the tube was shrunk to fix the inside materials and the size is 0.46 mm in diameter and 3 m in length. The physically optimal design was determined to insert the radiation source easily into vascular and to get the dose uniformity in the diseased part. The production me...

  20. {sup 103}Pd strings: Monte Carlo assessment of a new approach to brachytherapy source design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J., E-mail: mark.j.rivard@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Reed, Joshua L.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A new type of{sup 103}Pd source (CivaString and CivaThin by CivaTech Oncology, Inc.) is examined. The source contains {sup 103}Pd and Au radio-opaque marker(s), all contained within low-Z{sub eff} organic polymers that permit source flexibility. The CivaString source is available in lengths L of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mm, and referred to in the current study as CS10–CS60, respectively. A thinner design, CivaThin, has sources designated as CT10–CT60, respectively. The CivaString and CivaThin sources are 0.85 and 0.60 mm in diameter, respectively. The source design is novel and offers an opportunity to examine its interesting dosimetric properties in comparison to conventional {sup 103}Pd seeds. Methods: The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used to estimate air-kerma rate and dose rate distributions with polar and cylindrical coordinate systems. Doses in water and prostate tissue phantoms were compared to determine differences between the TG-43 formalism and realistic clinical circumstances. The influence of Ti encapsulation and 2.7 keV photons was examined. The accuracy of superposition of dose distributions from shorter sources to create longer source dose distributions was also assessed. Results: The normalized air-kerma rate was not highly dependent onL or the polar angle θ, with results being nearly identical between the CivaString and CivaThin sources for common L. The air-kerma strength was also weakly dependent on L. The uncertainty analysis established a standard uncertainty of 1.3% for the dose-rate constant Λ, where the largest contributors were μ{sub en}/ρ and μ/ρ. The Λ values decreased with increasing L, which was largely explained by differences in solid angle. The radial dose function did not substantially vary among the CivaString and CivaThin sources for r ≥ 1 cm. However, behavior for r < 1 cm indicated that the Au marker(s) shielded radiation for the sources having L = 10, 30, and 50 mm. The 2D anisotropy function

  1. Oncentra brachytherapy planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jack

    2018-03-27

    In modern cancer management, treatment planning has progressed as a contemporary tool with all the advances in computing power in recent years. One of the advanced planning tools uses 3-dimensional (3D) data sets for accurate dose distributions in patient prescription. Among these planning processes, brachytherapy has been a very important part of a successful cancer management program, offering clinical benefits with specific or combined treatments with external beam therapy. In this chapter, we mainly discussed the Elekta Oncentra planning system, which is the main treatment planning tool for high-dose rate (HDR) modality in our facility and in many other facilities in the United States. HDR is a technically advanced form of brachytherapy; a high-intensity radiation source (3.6 mm in length) is delivered with step motor in submillimeter precision under computer guidance directly into the tumor areas while minimizing injury to surrounding normal healthy tissue. Oncentra planning is the key component to generate a deliverable brachytherapy procedure, which is executed on the microSelectron V3 remote afterloader treatment system. Creating a highly conformal plan can be a time-consuming task. The development of Oncentra software (version 4.5.3) offers a variety of useful tools that facilitate many of the clinical challenging tasks for planning, such as contouring and image reconstruction, as well as rapid planning calculations with dose and dose volume histogram analysis. Oncentra Brachy module creates workflow and optimizes the planning accuracy for wide varieties of clinical HDR treatments, such as skin, gynecologic (GYN), breast, prostate, and many other applications. The treatment file can also be transferred to the afterloader control station for speedy delivery. The design concept, calculation algorithms, and optimization modules presented some key characteristics to plan and treat the patients effectively and accurately. The dose distribution and accuracy of

  2. Regulatory control of radiation sources in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxtova, L.

    2001-01-01

    In Slovakia, there are two regulatory authorities. Regulatory control of the utilization of nuclear energy, based on the Slovak National Council's law No. 130/1998 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, is exercised by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. The second regulatory authority - the Ministry of Health - is empowered by law No. 72/1994 on the protection of human health to license radiation sources and is responsible for radiation protection supervision (there are nearly 3000 establishments with sealed sources, radiation generators and unsealed sources in Slovakia). Pursuant to a new radiation protection regulation based on international standards, radiation sources are to be categorized in six classes according to the associated exposure and contamination hazards. A national strategy for improving the safety of radiation sources over their life-cycle and for the management of disused and orphan sources is being prepared for governmental approval. (author)

  3. Safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to enhance the efficacy, quality and efficiency of the whole regulatory process. It provides advice on good practice administrative procedures for the regulatory process for preparation of applications, granting of authorizations, inspection, and enforcement. It also provides information on the development and use of standard safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection. The plans are intended to be used in conjunction with more detailed advice related to specific practices. In this sense, this TECDOC provides advice on a systematic approach to evaluations of protection and safety while other IAEA Safety Guides assist the user to distinguish between the acceptable and the unacceptable. This TECDOC covers administrative advice to facilitate the regulatory process governing authorization and inspection. It also covers the use of standard assessment and inspection plans and provides simplified plans for the more common, well established uses of radiation sources in medicine and industry, i.e. sources for irradiation facilities, industrial radiography, well logging, industrial gauging, unsealed sources in industry, X ray diagnosis, nuclear medicine, teletherapy and brachytherapy

  4. Safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to enhance the efficacy, quality and efficiency of the whole regulatory process. It provides advice on good practice administrative procedures for the regulatory process for preparation of applications, granting of authorizations, inspection, and enforcement. It also provides information on the development and use of standard safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection. The plans are intended to be used in conjunction with more detailed advice related to specific practices. In this sense, this TECDOC provides advice on a systematic approach to evaluations of protection and safety while other IAEA Safety Guides assist the user to distinguish between the acceptable and the unacceptable. This TECDOC covers administrative advice to facilitate the regulatory process governing authorization and inspection. It also covers the use of standard assessment and inspection plans and provides simplified plans for the more common, well established uses of radiation sources in medicine and industry, i.e. sources for irradiation facilities, industrial radiography, well logging, industrial gauging, unsealed sources in industry, X ray diagnosis, nuclear medicine, teletherapy and brachytherapy

  5. High energy particle accelerators as radiation Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, M E [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Vontrol, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Small accelerators in the energy range of few million electron volts are usually used as radiation sources for various applications, like radiotherapy, food irradiation, radiation sterilization and in other industrial applications. High energy accelerators with energies reaching billions of electron volts also find wide field of applications as radiation sources. Synchrotrons with high energy range have unique features as radiation sources. This review presents a synopsis of cyclic accelerators with description of phase stability principle of high energy accelerators with emphasis on synchrotrons. Properties of synchrotron radiation are given together with their applications in basic and applied research. 13 figs.,1 tab.

  6. Radiation attenuation gauge with magnetically coupled source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a radiation attenuation gauge for measuring thickness and density of a material which includes, in combination, a source of gamma radiation contained within a housing of magnetic or ferromagnetic material, and a means for measuring the intensity of gamma radiation. The measuring means has an aperture and magnetic means disposed adjacent to the aperture for attracting and holding the housed source in position before the aperture. The material to be measured is placed between the source and the measuring means

  7. Definitive Brachytherapy for Kaposi's Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Ezzell, G.; Zalupski, M.; Fontanesi, J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and possible complications in patients diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma and treated with definitive brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January, 1995 and December, 1995, four patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) were treated with brachytherapy. Three patients, all with positive HIV status were treated using Iridium 192 (Ir-192) sources via a high-dose rate remote afterloader. One patient with endemic KS was treated using the application of catheters loaded with Californium 252. Eight sites were treated and included scalp, feet, nose, penis, hand, neck, and back. Dose rate for Ir-192 was 330cGy/fx to a total dose of 990cGy. The Californium was delivered as 100nGy/b.i.d. to a total dose of 900nGy. Follow-up as ranged from 2-6 months. Results: All four patients remain alive. Seven of eight sites have had complete clinical response and each patient has reported durable pain relief that has not subsided through last follow-up of 1/96. Two of eight sites, both treated with surface mold technique with Californium 252 developed moist desquamation. The remaining six sites did not demonstrate significant toxicity. Conclusion: Brachytherapy can offer Kaposi's sarcoma patients results that are equivalent to external beam radiation therapy, with minimal complications, a shorter treatment time and potential cost effectiveness

  8. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Bishnu; Patel, Narayan Prasad; Vijayan, V.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory. (author)

  9. A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiatt, Jessica R.; Davis, Stephen D.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft, Inc., was characterized by Rivard et al. in 2006. Since then, the source design was modified to include a new insert at the source tip. Current study objectives were to establish an accurate source model for simulation purposes, dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and determine dose differences between the original simulation model and the current model S700 source design. Methods: Design information from measurements of dissected model S700 sources and from vendor-supplied CAD drawings was used to aid establishment of an updated Monte Carlo source model, which included the complex-shaped plastic source-centering insert intended to promote water flow for cooling the source anode. These data were used to create a model for subsequent radiation transport simulations in a water phantom. Compared to the 2006 simulation geometry, the influence of volume averaging close to the source was substantially reduced. A track-length estimator was used to evaluate collision kerma as a function of radial distance and polar angle for determination of TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Results for the 50 kV source were determined every 0.1 cm from 0.3 to 15 cm and every 1° from 0° to 180°. Photon spectra in water with 0.1 keV resolution were also obtained from 0.5 to 15 cm and polar angles from 0° to 165°. Simulations were run for 10 10 histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.04% at r = 1 cm and 0.06% at r = 5 cm. Results: The dose-rate distribution ratio for the model S700 source as compared to the 2006 model exceeded unity by more than 5% for roughly one quarter of the solid angle surrounding the source, i.e., θ ≥ 120°. The radial dose function diminished in a similar manner as for an 125 I seed, with values of 1.434, 0.636, 0.283, and 0.0975 at 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 cm, respectively. The radial dose function

  10. A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, Jessica R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02903 (United States); Davis, Stephen D. [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Rivard, Mark J., E-mail: mark.j.rivard@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft, Inc., was characterized by Rivard et al. in 2006. Since then, the source design was modified to include a new insert at the source tip. Current study objectives were to establish an accurate source model for simulation purposes, dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and determine dose differences between the original simulation model and the current model S700 source design. Methods: Design information from measurements of dissected model S700 sources and from vendor-supplied CAD drawings was used to aid establishment of an updated Monte Carlo source model, which included the complex-shaped plastic source-centering insert intended to promote water flow for cooling the source anode. These data were used to create a model for subsequent radiation transport simulations in a water phantom. Compared to the 2006 simulation geometry, the influence of volume averaging close to the source was substantially reduced. A track-length estimator was used to evaluate collision kerma as a function of radial distance and polar angle for determination of TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Results for the 50 kV source were determined every 0.1 cm from 0.3 to 15 cm and every 1° from 0° to 180°. Photon spectra in water with 0.1 keV resolution were also obtained from 0.5 to 15 cm and polar angles from 0° to 165°. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.04% at r = 1 cm and 0.06% at r = 5 cm. Results: The dose-rate distribution ratio for the model S700 source as compared to the 2006 model exceeded unity by more than 5% for roughly one quarter of the solid angle surrounding the source, i.e., θ ≥ 120°. The radial dose function diminished in a similar manner as for an {sup 125}I seed, with values of 1.434, 0.636, 0.283, and 0.0975 at 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 cm, respectively. The radial dose

  11. A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Jessica R; Davis, Stephen D; Rivard, Mark J

    2015-06-01

    The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft, Inc., was characterized by Rivard et al. in 2006. Since then, the source design was modified to include a new insert at the source tip. Current study objectives were to establish an accurate source model for simulation purposes, dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and determine dose differences between the original simulation model and the current model S700 source design. Design information from measurements of dissected model S700 sources and from vendor-supplied CAD drawings was used to aid establishment of an updated Monte Carlo source model, which included the complex-shaped plastic source-centering insert intended to promote water flow for cooling the source anode. These data were used to create a model for subsequent radiation transport simulations in a water phantom. Compared to the 2006 simulation geometry, the influence of volume averaging close to the source was substantially reduced. A track-length estimator was used to evaluate collision kerma as a function of radial distance and polar angle for determination of TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Results for the 50 kV source were determined every 0.1 cm from 0.3 to 15 cm and every 1° from 0° to 180°. Photon spectra in water with 0.1 keV resolution were also obtained from 0.5 to 15 cm and polar angles from 0° to 165°. Simulations were run for 10(10) histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.04% at r = 1 cm and 0.06% at r = 5 cm. The dose-rate distribution ratio for the model S700 source as compared to the 2006 model exceeded unity by more than 5% for roughly one quarter of the solid angle surrounding the source, i.e., θ ≥ 120°. The radial dose function diminished in a similar manner as for an (125)I seed, with values of 1.434, 0.636, 0.283, and 0.0975 at 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 cm, respectively. The radial dose function ratio between the current

  12. Brachytherapy source calibration, reviews, and consistency of 192Ir high-dose rate afterloading sources supplied over the period of 10 years: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagappan, Balasubramanian; Kumar, Yogesh; Patel, Narayan P.; Dhull, Anil Kumar; Kaushal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Measurement and verification of strength of monomodal high-dose rate (mHDR) 192 Ir source supplied by the vendor is a major part of quality assurance program. Reference air kerma rate (RAKR) or air kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma emitting brachytherapy sources. Physicist in our institution performed the source calibration as soon as each 192 Ir new source was loaded on the mHDR afterloading machine. The AKS accurately measured using a physikalisch technische werkstatten (PTW) re-entrant chamber-electrometer system in a scatter-free geometry was used to compute the air kerma rate (AKR) at one-meter distance in the air. To ensure accurate dose delivery to brachytherapy patients, measured AKS or RAKR should be entered correctly in both HDR treatment console station (TCS) as well as treatment planning system (TPS) associated with it. The clinical outcome mainly depends not only on the accuracy of the source strength measurement in the hospital but also on the correct source strength entered into both TCS and TPS software. A retrospective study on 22 mHDR V2 sources supplied by the vendor for the period of 10 years was taken up to access the accuracy of source strength supplied to the Radiotherapy department. The results are analyzed and reported. The accuracy in measured RAKR of all 22 sources supplied by vendor was well within the tolerance limits set by the national regulatory body and international recommendations. The deviations observed between measured RAKR versus manufacturer's quoted RAKR were in the range from -1.71% to +1.15%. In conclusion, the measured RAKR have good agreement with vendor quoted RAKR values. (author)

  13. Radiation proctitis after the high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Masashi; Katsumata, Tomoe; Satoh, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 12 patients treated for rectal bleeding after high-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. All patients developed grade 2 proctitis according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAC) and no patients needed blood transfusion. The patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and/or steroid suppositories. The bleeding stopped or improved in 11 patients. Although re-bleeding was noticed in 7 patients the same treatment was effective in 5 patients. (author)

  14. Verification and analysis of the positioning of a source of brachytherapy high dose within an applicator gynecological interstitial fletcher Utrecht TC/RM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panedo Cobos, J. M.; Garcia castejon, M. A.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Gomez-Tejedor Alonso, S.; Rincon Perez, M.; Luna Tirado, J.; Perez Casas, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Applicators are guides that circulate and are located within the patient brachytherapy sources. Applicators can suffer mechanical deformations due to processes of sterilization or shock, which may result in that the source do not place within these very precise and coincides with the planned. In these cases the planned treatment deviate actually managed. The object of this study is to verify that the position of the source into the dispenser coincides with the planned position, with a procedure that is described. (Author)

  15. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A; Landry, Guillaume; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2014-06-01

    The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (Dw,m) and dose to medium (Dm,m), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D90 to PTV was reduced by between ~4% and ~40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%-15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study

  16. SU-F-T-06: Development of a Formalism for Practical Dose Measurements in Brachytherapy in the German Standard DIN 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, F [Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Chofor, N [Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Schoenfeld, A [University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Harder, D [Georg-August University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the steep dose gradients in the vicinity of a radiation source and due to the properties of the changing photon spectra, dose measurements in Brachytherapy usually have large uncertainties. Working group DIN 6803-3 is presently discussing recommendations for practical brachytherapy dosimetry incorporating recent theoretical developments in the description of brachytherapy radiation fields as well as new detectors and phantom materials. The goal is to prepare methods and instruments to verify dose calculation algorithms and for clinical dose verification with reduced uncertainties. Methods: After analysis of the distance dependent spectral changes of the radiation field surrounding brachytherapy sources, the energy dependent response of typical brachytherapy detectors was examined with Monte Carlo simulations. A dosimetric formalism was developed allowing the correction of their energy dependence as function of source distance for a Co-60 calibrated detector. Water equivalent phantom materials were examined with Monte Carlo calculations for their influence on brachytherapy photon spectra and for their water equivalence in terms of generating equivalent distributions of photon spectra and absorbed dose to water. Results: The energy dependence of a detector in the vicinity of a brachytherapy source can be described by defining an energy correction factor kQ for brachytherapy in the same manner as in existing dosimetry protocols which incorporates volume averaging and radiation field distortion by the detector. Solid phantom materials were identified which allow precise positioning of a detector together with small correctable deviations from absorbed dose to water. Recommendations for the selection of detectors and phantom materials are being developed for different measurements in brachytherapy. Conclusion: The introduction of kQ for brachytherapy sources may allow more systematic and comparable dose measurements. In principle, the corrections can be

  17. Control of radiation sources in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, S.

    2001-01-01

    The report refers to the regulations for radioactive material in force in Japan, and to the organizations with responsibilities for regulating radiation sources. An outline of the law regulating the use of radiation sources and radioactive materials is provided, including its scope, types of radiation sources under control, exemptions and the system of notification, authorization and inspection. The experience of Japan with orphan sources is presented in three different cases, and the measures carried out to store the orphan sources in safe conditions. (author)

  18. Corrections to air kerma rate measurements of 125I brachytherapy sources to free space conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, D.R.; Duane, S.

    1994-05-01

    Air kerma rate measurements have been made between 40 cm and 100 cm from one of a set of 125 I reference sources within the facilities of Amersham International plc. Monte Carlo techniques have been used to calculate the air kerma rate components over the same range of distances from this source. After comparing the calculated data with measurements, the compliance of the data with the inverse square law was investigated, and corrections were derived to obtain the air kerma rate at 1 m in free space from each source. Simulations of the experimental setup with an isotropic monoenergetic point source close to the effective energy of 125 I were found to reproduce the air kerma rate measurements reasonably accurately, and indicated that the contribution due to scattered photons was significant. The overall correction (which is defined as the product of individual corrections for chamber size effect, air attenuation and radiation scatter) required to the inverse square law to obtain the air kerma rate at 1 m in free space was found to be 0.981, 0.984 and 0.980, respectively, for air kerma rate measurements at 40 cm, 60 cm and 100 cm from the 125 I reference source. The total uncertainty in these corrections was estimated to be 0.88% at the 1σ level. (author)

  19. Quantification of iodine in porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Kassio Andre; Lameiras, Fernando Soares [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Viviane Viana [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Universidade Vale do Rio Verde de Tres Coracoes, MG (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    In this study, non-radioactive iodine was incorporated in two types of biodegradable hydroxyapatite-based porous matrices (HA and HACL) through impregnation process from sodium iodine aqueous solutions with varying concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol/L) . The results revealed that both systems presented a high capacity of incorporating iodine into their matrices. The quantity of incorporated iodine was measured through Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The porous ceramic matrices based on hydroxyapatite demonstrated a great potential for uses in low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. (author)

  20. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  1. Regulation for radiation protection in applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, Avinash U.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ionising radiation in multifarious field are increasing in the country for the societal benefits. The national regulatory body ensures safety and security of radiation sources by enforcing provisions in the national law and other relevant rules issued under the principle law. In addition, the enforcement of detailed requirements contained in practice specific safety codes and standard and issuance of safety directives brings effectiveness in ensuring safe handling and secure management of radiation sources. The regulatory requirements for control over radiation sources throughout their life-cycle have evolved over the years from experience gained. Nevertheless, some of the regulatory activities which require special attention have been identified such as the development of regulation to deal with advance emerging radiation technology in applications of radiation in medicine and industry; sustaining continuity in ensuring human resource development programme; inspections of category 3 and 4 disused sources and their safe disposal; measures for controlling transboundary movement of radiation sources. The regulatory measures have been contemplated and are being enforced to deal with the above issues in an effective manner. The complete involvement of the management of radiation facilities, radiation workers and their commitment in establishing and maintaining safety and security culture is essential to handle the radiation sources safely and efficiently at all times

  2. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  3. Radiation protection problems with sealed Pu radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, M.; Wels, C.

    1982-01-01

    A brief outline of the production methods and most important properties of Pu-238 and Pu-239 is given, followed by an overview of possibilities for utilizing the different types of radiation emitted, a description of problems involved in the safe handling of Pu radiation sources, and an assessment of the design principles for Pu-containing alpha, photon, neutron and energy sources from the radiation protection point of view. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo dose calculations of beta-emitting sources for intravascular brachytherapy: a comparison between EGS4, EGSnrc, and MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Li, X A

    2001-02-01

    The dose parameters for the beta-particle emitting 90Sr/90Y source for intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) have been calculated by different investigators. At a distant distance from the source, noticeable differences are seen in these parameters calculated using different Monte Carlo codes. The purpose of this work is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of calculations using an EGS4, an EGSnrc, and the MCNP Monte Carlo codes. Data calculated and compared include the depth dose curve for a broad parallel beam of electrons, and radial dose distributions for point electron sources (monoenergetic or polyenergetic) and for a real 90Sr/90Y source. For the 90Sr/90Y source, the doses at the reference position (2 mm radial distance) calculated by the three code agree within 2%. However, the differences between the dose calculated by the three codes can be over 20% in the radial distance range interested in IVBT. The difference increases with radial distance from source, and reaches 30% at the tail of dose curve. These differences may be partially attributed to the different multiple scattering theories and Monte Carlo models for electron transport adopted in these three codes. Doses calculated by the EGSnrc code are more accurate than those by the EGS4. The two calculations agree within 5% for radial distance <6 mm.

  5. Radiation effects on light sources and detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of optoelectronics includes a wide variety of both military and non-military applications in which the systems must meet radiation exposure requirements. Herein, we review the work on radiation effects on sources and detectors for such optoelectronic systems. For sources the principal problem is permanent damage-induced light output degradation, while for detectors it is ionizing radiation-induced photocurrents

  6. Regulated control of practices and radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Excepting the radiation caused by the natural background radiation, the Executive Secretariat for Nuclear Affairs (SEAN) does not authorize any source no practice within the national territory that may imply exposure of a person to ionizing radiation unless this use is ruled. This document establishes the basic criteria to set up such system as well as to exclude or exempt practices and sources from this regulated control

  7. Radiation sources, radiation environment and risk level at Dubna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    The overall information about ionizing radiation sources, which form radiation environment and risk at Dubna, is introduced. Systematization of the measurement results is performed on the basis of the effective dose and losses of life expectancy. The contribution of different sources to total harm of Dubna inhabitants has been revealed. JINR sources carry in ∼ 4% from the total effective dose of natural and medicine radiation sources; the harm from them is much less than the harm from cigarette smoking. 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  8. Radiation exposure by using unsealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preitfellner, J.

    1999-05-01

    Investigations on patients using radioactive substances are performed on a routinely basis in nuclear medicine facilities at many hospitals in our days. These investigations are performed by administering a radiopharmacon to the patient which, depending on several parameters, remains in the body of the patient for various periods of time. All these investigations have in common a g-ray exposure of the environment by the radioactive substance in the body of the patient. Among others, doctors, technical personnel, cleaning personnel, and accompanying persons of patients are exposed to g-rays. Based on these facts, the degree of danger for persons who get into contact with these patients is repeatedly questioned. An additional problem is the health risk of persons employed at a nuclear medicine facility. To answer the first question, the local dose rate in the environment of 102 patients was evaluated immediately after application of the radioactive substance, in intervals from 30 minutes up to several hours, over a period of up to 2 weeks. Depending on the nature of the investigation, the patients were subdivided into 6 groups of 16-20 persons. From the data measured, the effective and the biological half life as well as the local dose were computed. With the aid of concrete case examples, the possible radiation exposure for contact persons was estimated. Postulating unfavorable local and temporal factors in our estimations, the actual radiation exposure is to be estimated about 10-30 % lower. As a reference value for the danger of persons, the maximum permissible boundary values from the Austrian Regulations for Protection against Radiation were used. Referring to these boundary values, for none of the six nuclear medicine investigation methods a danger for contact persons could be derived, indicating that available security measures offer a sufficient protection for affected contact persons. To answer the question about the risk for persons employed at a nuclear

  9. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan. The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  10. The monetary value of the man.rem and optimization in radiation therapy (brachytherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennow, K.R.; Jessen, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The personnel exposed by sources used for intracavitary radiation therapy in Denmark receive more than 40% of the collective dose recorded by personal dosemeters in Denmark. As the application of after-loading technique has become generally accepted by the medical profession in Denmark as a replacement to a considerable degree for manual radium therapy, the most promising suggestion for reduction of radiation doses is the introduction of after-loading facilities in all radiation therapy centres. Such facilities are now being planned in Denmark but their realization will entail great expense and therefore the financial aspects of these plans will be very important. At present the advantage of after-loading cannot be simply demonstrated to the politicians holding the purse strings, i.e. in terms of improved therapeutical gain, e.g. increased survival, although the incidence of complications has been shown to be lower, but the reduction in personnel radiation doses by the change to after-loading will be evident and be an important part of the cost-benefit analysis. By detailed investigation of all expenditures and savings, cost-benefit analysis has been carried out in order to isolate the relationship between expense and the collective dose reduction. If after-loading facilities are established in Denmark today with the intention of reducing the risk for employees and without any expectation of improvements in treatment, the monetary value of the man.rem implied is 10,000 kr. or 2000 US dollars. (author)

  11. Physical aspects of endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2001-11-01

    Restenosis is severely limiting the outcome of vascular interventions. In several clinical trials endovascular brachytherapy has shown to reduce the restenosis rate. Local radiotherapy to the injured vessel wall is a promising new type of treatment in order to inhibit a complex wound healing process resulting in cell proliferation and re-obstruction of the treated vessel. Treatment planning has to be based on the dose distribution in the vicinity of the sources used. Source strength was determined in terms of air kerma rate for gamma nuclides (Iridium-192) and absorbed dose to water at reference distance of 2 mm for beta nuclides (Strontium-90/Yttrium-90, Phosphor-32), respectively. Radial dose profiles and the Reference Isodose Length (RIL) were determined using the EGSnrc code and GafChromic film. Good agreement was found between both methods. In order to treat the entire clinical target length, the (RIL) is an essential value during treatment planning. Examples are described for different levels of treatment planing including recommendations for optimal choice and positioning of the radioactive devices inside the artery. IVUS based treatment planning is illustrated with superposition of isodoses on cross-sectional images. A calculation model for radioactive stents is presented in order to determine dose volume histograms in a retrospective analysis. Radiation protection issues for endovascular brachytherapy are discussed in detail. Personal dose for the involved personnel is estimated based on calculations and measurements. Beta ray dosimetry is performed with suitable detectors. In order to estimate the exposure to the patient the dose to organs at risk is calculated and compared to the dose from angiography. There is an additional radiation exposure to patients and personnel caused by endovascular brachytherapy, but the values are much smaller than those caused by diagnostic angiography. (author)

  12. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  13. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories; Calibracion de fuentes de fotones y rayos beta usadas en braquiterapia. Guia de procedimiento estandarizados en Laboratorios Secundarios de Calibracion Dosimetrica (LSCD) y en hospitales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    after cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  14. Salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia for local recurrence after radiation therapy failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukielka, A.M.; Hetnal, M.; Dabrowski, T.; Walasek, T.; Brandys, P.; Reinfuss, M. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland); Nahajowski, D.; Kudzia, R.; Dybek, D. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate toxicity and early clinical outcomes of interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) combined with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in patients with biopsy-confirmed local recurrence of prostate cancer after previous external beam radiotherapy. Between September 2008 and March 2013, 25 patients with local recurrence of previously irradiated prostate cancer were treated. The main eligibility criteria for salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia were biopsy confirmed local recurrence and absence of nodal and distant metastases. All patients were treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 3 fractions at 21-day intervals. We performed 62 hyperthermia procedures out of 75 planned (83 %). The aim of the hyperthermia treatment was to heat the prostate to 41-43 C for 60 min. Toxicity for the organs of the genitourinary system and rectum was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v. 4.03). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure was based on the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The median age was 71 years (range 62-83 years), the median initial PSA level was 16.3 ng/ml (range 6.37-64 ng/ml), and the median salvage PSA level was 2.8 ng/ml (1.044-25.346 ng/ml). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 4-48 months). The combination of HDR brachytherapy and IHT was well tolerated. The most frequent complications were nocturia, weak urine stream, urinary frequency, hematuria, and urgency. Grade 2 rectal hemorrhage was observed in 1 patient. No grade 3 or higher complications were observed. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after salvage treatment was 74 %. The PSA in 20 patients decreased below the presalvage level, while 11 patients achieved a PSA nadir < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients are still alive. Of the 7 patients who experienced biochemical failure, bone metastases were found in 2 patients. IHT in combination

  15. Investigation of the Effects of Tissue Inhomogeneities on the Dosimetric Parameters of a Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source using the MCNP4C Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Zehtabian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brachytherapy is the use of small encapsulated radioactive sources in close vicinity of tumors. Various methods are used to obtain the dose distribution around brachytherapy sources. TG-43 is a dosimetry protocol proposed by the AAPM for determining dose distributions around brachytherapy sources. The goal of this study is to update this protocol for presence of bone and air inhomogenities.  Material and Methods: To update the dose rate constant parameter of the TG-43 formalism, the MCNP4C simulations were performed in phantoms composed of water-bone and water-air combinations. The values of dose at different distances from the source in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were estimated in spherical tally cells of 0.5 mm radius using the F6 tally. Results: The percentages of dose reductions in presence of air and bone inhomogenities for the Cs-137 source were found to be 4% and 10%, respectively. Therefore, the updated dose rate constant (Λ will also decrease by the same percentages.   Discussion and Conclusion: It can be easily concluded that such dose variations are more noticeable when using lower energy sources such as Pd-103 or I-125.

  16. Acute vasculitis after endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo L-G, Luis F.; Prionas, Stavros D.; Kaluza, Grzegorz L.; Raizner, Albert E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Angioplasty effectively relieves coronary artery stenosis but is often followed by restenosis. Endovascular radiation (β or γ) at the time of angioplasty prevents restenosis in a large proportion of vessels in swine (short term) and humans (short and long term). Little information is available about the effects of this radiation exposure beyond the wall of the coronary arteries. Methods and Materials: Samples were obtained from 76 minipigs in the course of several experiments designed to evaluate endovascular brachytherapy: 76 of 114 coronary arteries and 6 of 12 iliac arteries were exposed to endovascular radiation from 32 P sources (35 Gy at 0.5 mm from the intima). Two-thirds of the vessels had angioplasty or stenting. The vessels were systematically examined either at 28 days or at 6 months after radiation. Results: We found an unexpected lesion: acute necrotizing vasculitis in arterioles located ≤2.05 mm from the target artery. It was characterized by fibrinoid necrosis of the wall, often associated with lymphocytic exudates or thrombosis. Based on the review of perpendicular sections of tissue samples, the arterioles had received between 6 and 40 Gy. This arteriolar vasculitis occurred at 28 days in samples from 51% of irradiated coronary arteries and 100% of irradiated iliac arteries. By 6 months, the incidence of acute vasculitis decreased to 24% around the coronary arteries. However, at that time, healing vasculitis was evident, often with luminal narrowing, in 46% of samples. Vasculitis was not seen in any of 44 samples from unirradiated vessels (0%) and had no relation to angioplasty, stenting, or their sequelae. This radiation-associated vasculitis in the swine resembles the localized lymphocytic vasculitis that we have reported in tissues of humans exposed to external radiation. On the other hand, it is quite different from the various types of systemic vasculitis that occur in nonirradiated humans. Conclusion: Endoarterial brachytherapy

  17. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 {approx} 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 {approx} 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 {approx} 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 {approx} 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy{sub 10} (range:77 {approx} 94 Gy{sub 10}). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy{sub 3} (range: 122 {approx} 140 Gy{sub 3}) at point A, 109 Gy{sub 3} (range:88{approx} 125 Gy{sub 3}) at the rectum and 111 Gy{sub 3} (range: 91 {approx} 123 Gy{sub 3}) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 {approx} 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8{approx} 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure

  18. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 ∼ 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 ∼ 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 ∼ 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 ∼ 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy 10 (range:77 ∼ 94 Gy 10 ). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy 3 (range: 122 ∼ 140 Gy 3 ) at point A, 109 Gy 3 (range:88∼ 125 Gy 3 ) at the rectum and 111 Gy 3 (range: 91 ∼ 123 Gy 3 ) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 ) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m 2 ) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 ∼ 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8∼ 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure rate was 13% and distant metastatic rate was 3.3%. The crude rate of minor hematologic

  19. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  20. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  1. Proposal for radioactive liquid waste management in a brachytherapy sealed sources development laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, C.D.; Peleias Jr, F.S.; Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Zeituni, C.A.; Benega, M.A.G.; Tiezzi, R.; Mattos, F.R.; Rodrigues, B.T.; Oliveira, T.B.; Feher, A.; Moura, J.A.; Costa, O.L.

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive waste management is addressed in several regulations. Literature survey indicates limited guidance on liquid waste management in Brachytherapy I-125 seeds production. Laboratories for those seeds are under implementation not only in Brazil but in several countries such as Poland, South Korea, Iran, China, and others. This paper may be used as reference to these other groups. For the correct implementation, a plan for radiological protection that has the management of radioactive waste fully specified is necessary. The proposal is that the waste will be deposited in a 20 L and 60 L containers which will take 2 years to fill. For glove box 1, the final activity of this container is 1.91 x 10 10 Bq (3.19 years to safe release in the environment). For glove box 3, the final activity of this container is 1.28 x 10 10 Bq (2.85 years to safe release in the environment). (authors)

  2. Radiation safety and inventory of sealed radiation sources in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Mannan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sealed radiation sources (SRS) of various types and activities are widely used in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and teaching in Pakistan. The proper maintenance of records of SRS is mandatory for users/licensees. Since 1956, more than 2000 radiation sources of different isotopes having activities of Bq to TBq have been imported. Of these, several hundred sources have been disposed of and some have been exported/returned to the suppliers. To ensure the safety and security of the sources and to control and regulate the safe use of radiation sources in various disciplines, the Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (DNSRP), the implementing arm of the regulatory authority in the country, has introduced a system for notifying, registering and licensing the use of all types of SRS. In order to update the inventory of SRS used throughout the country, the DNSRP has developed a database. (author)

  3. Radiation sources and methods for producing them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malson, H.A.; Moyer, S.E.; Honious, H.B.; Janzow, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation sources contain a substrate with an electrically conducting, non-radioactive metal surface, a layer of a metal isotope of the scandium group as well as a percentage of non-radioactive binding metal being coated on the surface by means of an electroplating method. Besides examples for β sources ( 147 Pm), γ sources ( 241 Am), and neutron sources ( 252 Cf) there is described an α-radiation source ( 241 Am, 244 Cu, 238 Pu) for smoke detectors. There are given extensive tables and a bibliography. (DG) [de

  4. Sources of radiation exposure - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sources of radiation exposure are reviewed from the perspective of mining and milling of radioactive ores in Australia. The major sources of occupational and public exposure are identified and described, and exposures from mining and milling operations are discussed in the context of natural radiation sources and other sources arising from human activities. Most radiation exposure of humans comes from natural sources. About 80% of the world average of the effective dose equivalents received by individual people arises from natural radiation, with a further 15-20% coming from medical exposures*. Exposures results from human activities, such as mining and milling of radioactive ores, nuclear power generation, fallout from nuclear weapons testing and non-medical use of radioisotopes and X-rays, add less than 1% to the total. 9 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  5. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  6. Characterization and storage of liquid wastes containing 125Iodine in the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Vitória S.; Souza, Daiane C.B. de; Barbosa, Nayane K.O.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Costa, Osvaldo L. da; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Vicente, Roberto; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources of Iodine-125 for medical applications have been developed at the Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) to meet the growing demand for medical applications such as brachytherapy. A dedicated laboratory is already being implemented at IPEN. Part of the processes involved in the production of sealed sources generate radioactive wastes that despite the short half-life (<100 days) have radioactive activity above the levels of exemption established by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission. Therefore, these wastes should receive appropriate treatment and storage until they reach the levels of release into the environment. This work aims to determine the volumes of the liquid wastes generated during the production stages of the sources, as well as to propose a temporary storage system for such wastes. The applied methodology consisted in determining the volumes of wastes generated in each production cell according to the manufacturing steps. After that, activities and activity concentrations were calculated for each container used for temporary storage inside the production laboratory. The total volume stored for one year in the temporary storage, as well as the rate of entry and exit of the liquid wastes were calculated according to the source production demand and the decay time of the radionuclide, respectively. The main results showed that the time required to reach sanitary sewage disposal values is within the period of operation of the facility. The total volume generated is also within the facility's temporary storage capacity

  7. There are radiation sources out there!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahran, M.Y.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years we have been working in the area of the safety of radiation sources and radioactive materials. In this paper we summarize our findings and describe the recovery of an abandoned source. We call for further international co-operation in this area. In particular, we suggest an international system for the tagging and tracking of radioactive sources. (author)

  8. Radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    These Safety Fundamentals cover the protection of human beings against ionizing radiation (gamma and X rays and alpha, beta and other particles that can induce ionization as they interact with biological materials), referred to herein subsequently as radiation, and the safety of sources that produce ionizing radiation. The Fundamentals do not apply to non-ionizing radiation such as microwave, ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiation. They do not apply either to the control of non-radiological aspects of health and safety. They are, however, part of the overall framework of health and safety

  9. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the

  10. Radiation sources and technical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stonek, K.; Satorie, Z.; Vyskocil, I.

    1981-01-01

    Work is briefly described of the department for sealed sources production of the Institute, including leak testing and surface contamination of sealed sources. The department also provides technical services including the inspections of sealed sources used in medicine and geology and repair of damaged sources. It carries out research of the mechanical and thermal strength of sealed sources and of the possibility of reprocessing used 226 Ra sources. The despatch department is responsible for supplying the entire country with home and imported radionuclides. The department of technical services is responsible for testing imported radionuclides, assembling materials testing, industrial and medical irradiation devices, and for the collection and storage of low-level wastes on a national scale. (M.D.)

  11. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  12. The IPEM code of practice for determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on the NPL air kerma standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidmead, A M; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F; Locks, S M; Lee, C D; Aird, E G A; Flynn, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains the recommendations of the high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy working party of the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The recommendations consist of a Code of Practice (COP) for the UK for measuring the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. In 2004, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) commissioned a primary standard for the realization of RAKR of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. This has meant that it is now possible to calibrate ionization chambers directly traceable to an air kerma standard using an 192 Ir source (Sander and Nutbrown 2006 NPL Report DQL-RD 004 (Teddington: NPL) http://publications.npl.co.uk). In order to use the source specification in terms of either RAKR, .K R (ICRU 1985 ICRU Report No 38 (Washington, DC: ICRU); ICRU 1997 ICRU Report No 58 (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)), or air kerma strength, S K (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34), it has been necessary to develop algorithms that can calculate the dose at any point around brachytherapy sources within the patient tissues. The AAPM TG-43 protocol (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34) and the 2004 update TG-43U1 (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633-74) have been developed more fully than any other protocol and are widely used in commercial treatment planning systems. Since the TG-43 formalism uses the quantity air kerma strength, whereas this COP uses RAKR, a unit conversion from RAKR to air kerma strength was included in the appendix to this COP. It is recommended that the measured RAKR determined with a calibrated well chamber traceable to the NPL 192 Ir primary standard is used in the treatment planning system. The measurement uncertainty in the source calibration based on the system described in this COP has been reduced considerably compared to other methods based on interpolation techniques.

  13. Radiation Safety and Orphan Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2006-01-01

    The wide spread use of radioactive and particularly of nuclear materials which started in the last century very quickly also demonstrated negative sides. The external exposure and radiotoxicity of these materials could be easily used in a malevolent act. Due to the fact that these materials could not be detected without special equipment designed for that purpose, severe control over their use in all phases of a life cycle is required. An orphan source is a radioactive source which is not under regulatory control, either because it has never been under regulatory or because it has been abandoned, lost, misplaced, stolen or transferred without proper authorization. In the last ten years a few international conferences were dedicated to the improvement of the safety and security of radioactive sources. Three main tasks are focused, the maintenance of data bases related to events with orphan sources and the publications of such events, the preparation of recommendations and guidelines to national regulatory bodies in order to prevent and detect the events related to orphan sources as well as to develop the response strategies to radiological or nuclear emergency, appraisals of the national strategies of radioactive sources control. Concerning Slovenia, strengthening control over orphan sources in Slovenia started after the adoption of new legislation in 2002. It was carried out through several tasks with the aim to prevent orphan sources, as well as to identify the sources which could be potentially orphan sources. The comprehensive methodology was developed by the Slovenian nuclear safety administration (S.N.S.A.) based on international guidelines as well as on the study of national lesson learned cases. The methodology was developed and used in close cooperation with all parties involved, namely other regulatory authorities, police, customs, agency for radioactive waste management (A.R.A.O.), technical support organisations (T.S.O.), users of source, authorised

  14. Radiation Safety and Orphan Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M. [Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-07-01

    The wide spread use of radioactive and particularly of nuclear materials which started in the last century very quickly also demonstrated negative sides. The external exposure and radiotoxicity of these materials could be easily used in a malevolent act. Due to the fact that these materials could not be detected without special equipment designed for that purpose, severe control over their use in all phases of a life cycle is required. An orphan source is a radioactive source which is not under regulatory control, either because it has never been under regulatory or because it has been abandoned, lost, misplaced, stolen or transferred without proper authorization. In the last ten years a few international conferences were dedicated to the improvement of the safety and security of radioactive sources. Three main tasks are focused, the maintenance of data bases related to events with orphan sources and the publications of such events, the preparation of recommendations and guidelines to national regulatory bodies in order to prevent and detect the events related to orphan sources as well as to develop the response strategies to radiological or nuclear emergency, appraisals of the national strategies of radioactive sources control. Concerning Slovenia, strengthening control over orphan sources in Slovenia started after the adoption of new legislation in 2002. It was carried out through several tasks with the aim to prevent orphan sources, as well as to identify the sources which could be potentially orphan sources. The comprehensive methodology was developed by the Slovenian nuclear safety administration (S.N.S.A.) based on international guidelines as well as on the study of national lesson learned cases. The methodology was developed and used in close cooperation with all parties involved, namely other regulatory authorities, police, customs, agency for radioactive waste management (A.R.A.O.), technical support organisations (T.S.O.), users of source, authorised

  15. ROSY - Rossendorf synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einfeld, D.; Matz, W.

    1993-11-01

    The electron energy of the storage ring will be 3 GeV and the emitted synchrotron radiation is in the hard X-ray region with a critical energy of the spectrum of E c =8,4 keV (λ c =0,14 nm). With a natural emittance of 28 π nm rad ROSY emits high brilliance radiation. Besides the radiation from bending magnets there will be the possibility for using radiation from wigglers and undulators. For the insertion devices 8 places are foreseen four of which are located in non-dispersion-free regions. The storage ring is of fourfold symmetry, has a circumference of 148 m and is designed in a modified FODO structure. An upgrade of ROSY with superconducting bending magnets in order to shift the spectrum to higher energy can easily be done. Part I contains the scientific case and a description of the planned use of the beam lines. Part II describes the design of the storage ring and its components in more detail. (orig.) [de

  16. Ionizing radiation sources. Ionizing radiation interaction with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popits, R.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals of nuclear physics are reviewed under the headings: obtaining of X-rays and their properties; modes of radioactive decay of natural or man-made radionuclides; radioactive neutron sources; nuclear fission as basis for devising nuclear reactors and weapons; thermonuclear reactions; cosmic radiation. Basic aspects of ionizing radiation interactions with matter are considered with regard to charged particles, photon radiation, and neutrons. (A.B.)

  17. The utilization of radiation sources in Angola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, P.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the situation that Angola, which joined the IAEA in September 1999, is facing with the lack of an appropriate infrastructure for the control of radiation sources. It emphasizes the country's needs in technical assistance from the IAEA and other Member States for improving its regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety. (author)

  18. All-fiber femtosecond Cherenkov radiation source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Møller, Uffe

    2012-01-01

    -conversion medium, we demonstrate milliwatt-level, stable, and tunable Cherenkov radiation at visible wavelengths 580–630 nm, with pulse duration of sub-160-fs, and the 3 dB spectral bandwidth not exceeding 36 nm. Such an all-fiber Cherenkov radiation source is promising for practical applications in biophotonics...

  19. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of 192 Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaiza C, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D w for the energy of: 60 Co, 137C s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the 192 Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of 192 Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the 60 Co for D w , using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D w by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D w in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the 137 Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D w start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R TLD vs D w : For the energy of 60 Co, 137 Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F s ) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F s for the two 192 Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of capsules were sent to two hospitals that have the HDR Brachytherapy with sources of 192

  20. Irradiation device using radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraudin, Claude; Amarge, Edmond; Guiho, J.-P.; Horiot, J.-C.; Taniel, Gerard; Viel, Georges; Brethon, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    The invention refers to an irradiation appliance making use of radioactive sources such as cobalt 60. This invention concerns an irradiation appliance delivering an easily adjustable irradiation beam in accurate dimensions and enabling the radioactive sources to be changed without making use of intricate manipulations at the very place where the appliance has to be used. This kind of appliance is employed in radiotherapy [fr

  1. A national survey of HDR source knowledge among practicing radiation oncologists and residents: Establishing a willingness-to-pay threshold for cobalt-60 usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhot Vega, Raymond; Talcott, Wesley; Ishaq, Omar; Cohen, Patrice; Small, Christina J; Duckworth, Tamara; Sarria Bardales, Gustavo; Perez, Carmen A; Schiff, Peter B; Small, William; Harkenrider, Matthew M

    Ir-192 is the predominant source for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in United States markets. Co-60, with longer half-life and fewer source exchanges, has piloted abroad with comparable clinical dosimetry but increased shielding requirements. We sought to identify practitioner knowledge of Co-60 and establish acceptable willingness-to-pay (WTP) thresholds for additional shielding requirements for use in future cost-benefit analysis. A nationwide survey of U.S. radiation oncologists was conducted from June to July 2015, assessing knowledge of HDR sources, brachytherapy unit shielding, and factors that may influence source-selection decision-making. Self-identified decision makers in radiotherapy equipment purchase and acquisition were asked their WTP on shielding should a more cost-effective source become available. Four hundred forty surveys were completed and included. Forty-four percent were ABS members. Twenty percent of respondents identified Co-60 as an HDR source. Respondents who identified Co-60 were significantly more likely to be ABS members, have attended a national brachytherapy conference, and be involved in brachytherapy selection. Sixty-six percent of self-identified decision makers stated that their facility would switch to a more cost-effective source than Ir-192, if available. Cost and experience were the most common reasons provided for not switching. The most common WTP value selected by respondents was decision makers to establish WTP for shielding costs that source change to Co-60 may require. These results will be used to establish WTP threshold for future cost-benefit analysis. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  3. Development of brachytherapy medium doserate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atang Susila; Ari Satmoko; Ahmad Rifai; Kristiyanti

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment for different types of cancers and it become a common treatment modality in most radiotherapy clinics. PRPN has had experience in development of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy for cervix cancer treatment. However the treatment process using LDR device needs 5 hours in time that the patient feel uncomfort. Therefore PRPN develops Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy with radiation activity not more than 5 Currie. The project is divided into two stages. Purchasing of TPS software and TDS design are held in 2010, and the construction will be in 2011. (author)

  4. Cervical cancer. Application of MR imaging in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of application of MRI in arrangement of brachytherapy of cervical cancer, a method was proposed to see the radiation doses in surrounding tissues by superimposing the dose distribution pattern of the radiation source on the MR image. The applicator for the source was filled with water to get its T2-weighted image and was inserted in the patients. The MRI apparatus was Siemens Magnetom Vision (1.5T) with phased array coil. T2-weighted sagittal and coronary images were taken by turbospin echo and HASTE methods. The section thickness was 5 mm. The dose distribution pattern was superimposed on the frontal and lateral images by Siemens Mevaplan to see the doses in surrounding tissues. In 4 patients, it was possible to estimate the radiation dose in the posterior wall of bladder, anterior wall of rectum and urinary duct. The method is promising for arranging brachytherapy of cervical cancer. (K.H.)

  5. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Comparative characteristics of procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kanaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of interstitial radiation sources is the «youngest» of the radical method of treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC. The high level of efficiency comparable to prostatectomy at a significantly lower rate of complications causes rapid growth of clinical use of brachytherapy (BT. Depending on the radiation source and the mode of administration into the prostate gland are two types BT – high-dose rate (temporary (HDR-BT and low-dose rate (permanent (LDR-BT brachytherapy. At the heart of these two methods are based on a single principle of direct effect of the quantum gamma radiation on the area of interest. However, the differences between the characteristics of isotopes used and technical aspects of the techniques cause the difference in performance and complication rates for expression HDR-BT and LDR-BT.

  6. Loss and recovery of radiation sources in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, U.C.; Pradhan, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of radioisotope sources occurs as a result of the violation of safe work practices and non-compliance with rules and guidelines. The main causes are human error, negligence in source handling and storage as well as mismanagement and lack of supervision. The failure to adequately supervise and manage leads to a breakdown in communication and differences among workers, supervisors and managers. Recovery of lost sources is generally a tedious task. In India, apart from the efforts of the user institution, a team of scientists from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) undertakes searches and supervises recovery operations. Sources have been lost in brachytherapy and nuclear medicine departments of hospitals and in industrial institutions. For brachytherapy source losses, hospital garbage, dustbins, passages and lifts were the main targets for searches. While gamma ray and neutron sources could be traced for the most part, pure beta ray sources, such as Sr-90 used in ophthalmic applicators or as check sources, could not be recovered. In industrial radiography, the search for sources was more problematic, especially when the sources were stolen or lost in transport. Lost materials could not be traced in only two out of eleven instances of loss of Ir-192 sources since 1986. In a separate incident, sources which had been stolen were found in a deep river: this necessitated an elaborate fishing operation at a cost of some US$100,000. Each occurrence provided lessons calling for the introduction of new control measures. (author)

  7. Devices for obtaining information about radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosswill, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a sensitive, fast high-resolution device for obtaining information about the distribution of gamma and X-radiation sources and provides a radiation detector useful in such a device. It comprises a slit collimator with a multiplicity of slits each with slit-defining walls of material and thickness to absorb beam components impinging on them. The slits extend further in one direction than the other. The detector for separately detecting beam components passing through the slits also provides data output signals. It comprises a plurality of radiation transducing portions which are not photoconductor elements each at the end of a slit. A positioner operates to change the transverse position of the slits and radiation transducing portions relative to the source, wherein each radiation transducing element is positioned within its respective slit between the slit defining walls. Full details and preferred embodiments are given. (U.K.)

  8. Security of radioactive sources in radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Safety codes and safety standards are formulated on the basis of internationally accepted safety criteria for design, construction and operation of specific equipment, systems, structures and components of nuclear and radiation facilities. Safety codes establish the objectives and set requirements that shall be fulfilled to provide adequate assurance for safety. Safety guides and guidelines elaborate various requirements and furnish approaches for their implementation. Safety manuals deal with specific topics and contain detailed scientific and technical information on the subject. These documents are prepared by experts in the relevant fields and are extensively reviewed by advisory committees of the Board before they are published. The documents are revised when necessary, in the light of experience and feedback from users as well as new developments in the field. In India, radiation sources are being widely used for societal benefits in industry, medical practices, research, training and agriculture. It has been reported from all over the world that unsecured radioactive sources caused serious radiological accidents involving radiation injuries and fatalities. Particular concern was expressed regarding radioactive sources that have become orphaned (not under regulatory control) or vulnerable (under weak regulatory control and about to be orphaned). There is a concern about safety and security of radioactive sources and hence the need of stringent regulatory control over the handling of the sources and their security. In view of this, this guide is prepared which gives provisions necessary to safeguard radiation installations against theft of radioactive sources and other malevolent acts that may result in radiological consequences. It is, therefore, required that the radiation sources are used safely and managed securely by only authorised personnel. This guide is intended to be used by users of radiation sources in developing the necessary security plan for

  9. Regulatory control of radiation sources. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The basic requirements for the protection of persons against exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources were established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards), jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/ NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (the Sponsoring Organizations). The application of the Basic Safety Standards is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities for radiation protection and safety. Requirements relating to the legal and governmental infrastructure for the safety of nuclear facilities and sources of ionizing radiation, radiation protection, the safe management of radioactive waste and the safe transport of radioactive material are established in the Safety Requirements on Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1. This Safety Guide, which is jointly sponsored by the FAO, the IAEA, the International Labour Office, the PAHO and the WHO, gives detailed guidance on the key elements for the organization and operation of a national regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety, with particular reference to the functions of the national regulatory body that are necessary to ensure the implementation of the Basic Safety Standards. The Safety Guide is based technically on material first published in IAEA-TECDOC-10671, which was jointly sponsored by the FAO, the IAEA, the OECD/NEA, the PAHO and the WHO. The requirements established in GS-R-1 have been taken into account. The Safety Guide is oriented towards national

  10. Ionization detector with improved radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    The detector comprises a chamber having at least one radiation source disposed therein. The chamber includes spaced collector plates which form a part of a detection circuit for sensing changes in the ionization current in the chamber. The radiation source in one embodiment is in the form of a wound wire or ribbon suitably supported in the chamber and preferably a source of beta particles. The chamber may also include an adjustable electrode and the source may function as an adjustable current source by forming the wire or ribbon in an eliptical shape and rotating the structure. In another embodiment the source has a random shape and is homogeneously disposed in the chamber. 13 claims, 5 drawing figures

  11. Randomized comparison between intracoronary β-radiation brachytherapy and implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse in-stent restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukro, Christoph; Syeda, Bonni; Kirisits, Christian; Schmid, Rainer; Pichler, Philipp; Pokrajac, Boris; Lang, Irene; Poetter, Richard; Glogar, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intracoronary brachytherapy was the primary therapeutic option for the treatment of in-stent restenosis (ISR) during the last years. Especially for the treatment of diffuse ISR (lesions >10 mm), β-source brachytherapy was significantly superior to singular balloon angioplasty. Despite lacking clinical database, the implantation of drug eluting stents recently became a common procedure for the treatment of ISR. This randomized trial aimed to compare the efficacy of β-brachytherapy with β-radioisotopes 90 Sr/ 90 Y and paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of diffuse ISR. Material and methods: Thirty-seven patients with diffuse ISR were randomly assigned to β-brachytherapy after balloon angioplasty (Beta-Cath TM in 17 patients) or paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation (Taxus-Express2 TM in 20 patients). Six-month clinical follow-up was obtained for all patients, while angiographic follow-up was available for 30 patients. Results: Binary ISR (restenosis >50%) within target segment was observed in three patients treated with Beta-Cath TM , of which one needed target segment revascularisation for recurrent ISR, whereas no significant restenosis occurred in the patients treated with Taxus-Express2 TM (P = 0.037). No further major adverse cardiac (target segment revascularisation, myocardial infarction, death) was found in either group (P = NS). Stent implantation was the more time-saving (31 ± 11 min versus 60 ± 23 min, P TM arm, we found no difference in clinical outcome after implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse ISR when compared to β-brachytherapy

  12. WE-A-17A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Development of a Calorimeter for the Measurement of the Power Emitted From LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, M; Palmer, B; DeWerd, L [University of WI-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Model-based dose calculation algorithms for brachytherapy sources are designed to compute dose per particle or dose per unit energy leaving the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. As such, the power leaving the encapsulation of a source, called emitted power (EP), would be a natural source strength metric for these new algorithms. However, no instrument is currently capable of an absolute measurement of EP. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was designed and constructed to measure the EP of low-dose rate (LDR) I-125 and Pd-103 brachytherapy sources. Methods: Calorimeter design was optimized through thermal and Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Thermal modeling showed that specific thermal conditions would be necessary for accurate calorimeter measurements. These conditions were experimentally verified. The EP of two LDR I-125 source models was measured. An air-kermastrength (AKS)-to-EP conversion coefficient was determined through MC simulations and applied to well-type ionization chamber measurements of AKS to enable comparison with EP measurements. Results: MCdetermined EP per unit AKS conversion coefficients were source model dependent and are on the order of 0.1 μW/U. The signal-to-noise ratio was a function of source strength, and was 294 for a 0.5 μW source. Measurements were repeatable to within 3.6% for a 0.5 μW source. Initial EP measurements were made with two I-125 source models, a 5.7 U Oncura 6711 and a 2.9 U Best Medical 2301. Model 2301 results agreed with the MC-converted AKS value to within the measurement uncertainty of 4.3% at k=1. The Model 6711 results were systematically high and are under investigation. Conclusion: A calorimeter was designed to provide an absolute measurement of the EP for LDR brachytherapy sources and preliminary EP measurements have been made. This new calorimeter design shows promise of providing a more fundamentally useful source strength standard.

  13. Exposures to natural radiation sources. Annex B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The assessment of the radiation doses from natural sources in humans is presented. Both external sources of extraterrestrial origin (cosmic rays) and of terrestrial origin, and internal sources, comprising the naturally-occurring radionuclides which are taken into the human body, are discussed. This Annex is to a large extent a summary of Annex B of the 1977 report of the Committee. The doses due to the radon isotopes and to their short-lived decay products are briefly reviewed.

  14. Safe management of spent radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Valdezco, E.M.; Choi, Kwang-Sub

    2003-01-01

    Presented are 8 investigation reports concerning the safe management of spent radiation source (SRS) during the current 2 years. Four reports from Japan are: Scheme for SRS management (approach and present status of the SRS management and consideration toward solving problems); Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) activities related to safety of radiation sources (Chronology of action plan development, Outline of revised action plan, and Asian regional activities); Current status of SRS management in Japan (Regulation system, Obligations of licensed users, Regulatory system on sealed sources, Status in the incidents on sources occurred, Incident of source loss, and Incidents of orphan sources); and SRS management system in Japan (Current status of using of sealed sources, collection system of SRS-Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) services, and Disposal of SRS). Four reports from the Asian countries also concern the current statuses of SRS management in the Philippine (Radioactive waste sources, Waste management strategies, Conditioning of Ra sources, Ra project action plan, as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program, Dose assessment, Regulations on radioactive waste, Action plan on the safety and security of sources, IAEA Regional Demonstration Centers, and sitting studies for a near surface disposal facility); Thailand (Current status of using sealed sources, Inventory of SRS, and Current topics of SRS management); Indonesia (Principles of management of radiation sources, Legislative framework of SRS management practices, Regulatory on SRS, management of sealed SRS, management hurdles, and reported incidents); and Korea (Regulatory frame work, Collection systems of SRS, Radioisotope waste generation, Radiation exposure incident, and Scrap monitoring system). (N.I.)

  15. Regulatory control for safe usage of ionizing radiation sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In Bangladesh, there is a widespread and continuos growth in the use of the ionizing radiation sources both radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment in the field of industry, medicine, agriculture, research, teaching etc. In industry, they are employed in production as well as quality control such as non-destructive testing (radiography), nucleonic gauging, radiotracer techniques and in radiation processing. Medical applications of ionizing radiation include X-ray radiography, X-ray fluoroscopy, CT scan, mammography, nuclear medicine, beam therapy and brachytherapy. Besides radioisotopes are also used for research applications, viz., scattering experiments, tracer studies, etc. In agriculture, the uptake of nutrients by soil, and parts of plants are studied using suitable radionuclides. In all the above applications radioisotopes in two forms namely sealed sources and open sources in different chemical forms are employed with source strengths varying from micro curies to mega curies. The benefits to man from the use of ionizing radiation and sources of radiation are accompanied by risks which may result from exposure of man to ionizing radiation. In order to have an effective control on the use of radiation sources and to ensure radiological safety of the user as well as the public, Government of Bangladesh has promulgated Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NSRC) rules 1997 under the NSRC Act 1993. The Bangladesh Atomic Energy commission (BAEC) is the competent authority for formulating rules and regulations for ensuring radiological safety. BAEC is legally responsible for developing and strengthening the necessary radiation protection infrastructure in the country through the effective enforcement and implementation of regulatory requirements, criteria, obligations, guiding, codes etc. in order to save man and the related environment from the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. In Bangladesh, only those persons who have been

  16. The safe use of radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    As a means of promoting safety in the use of radiation sources, as well as encouraging consistency in regulatory control, the IAEA has from time to time organized training courses with the co-operation of Member State governments and organizations, to inform individuals from developing countries with appropriate responsibilities on the provisions for the safe use and regulation of radiation sources. Three such courses on the safe use of radiation sources have been held in both the USA, with the co-operation of the United States Government, and in Dublin, Ireland, with the co-operation of the Irish Government. The Training Course on the Safe Use and Regulation of Radiation Sources has been successfully given to over 77 participants from over 30 countries during the last years. The course is aimed at providing a basis of radiation protection knowledge in all aspects of the uses of radiation and of radiation sources that are used today. It is the intention of this course to provide a systematic enhancement of radioisotope safety in countries with developing radiological programmes through a core group of national authorities. The IAEA's training programmes provide an excellent opportunity for direct contact with lecturers that have extensive experience in resolving issues faced by developing countries and in providing guidance documents useful in addressing their problems. This document uses this collective experience and provides valuable technical information regarding the safety aspects of the uses not only of sealed and unsealed sources of radiation, but also for those machines that produce ionizing radiation. The first of these training courses, 'Safety and Regulation of Unsealed Sources' was held in Dublin, Ireland, June through July 1989 with the co-operation of the Nuclear Energy Board and Trinity College. This was an interregional training course, the participants came from all over the world. The second and third interregional courses, 'Safety and Regulation

  17. The safe use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    As a means of promoting safety in the use of radiation sources, as well as encouraging consistency in regulatory control, the IAEA has from time to time organized training courses with the co-operation of Member State governments and organizations, to inform individuals from developing countries with appropriate responsibilities on the provisions for the safe use and regulation of radiation sources. Three such courses on the safe use of radiation sources have been held in both the USA, with the co-operation of the United States Government, and in Dublin, Ireland, with the co-operation of the Irish Government. The Training Course on the Safe Use and Regulation of Radiation Sources has been successfully given to over 77 participants from over 30 countries during the last years. The course is aimed at providing a basis of radiation protection knowledge in all aspects of the uses of radiation and of radiation sources that are used today. It is the intention of this course to provide a systematic enhancement of radioisotope safety in countries with developing radiological programmes through a core group of national authorities. The IAEA's training programmes provide an excellent opportunity for direct contact with lecturers that have extensive experience in resolving issues faced by developing countries and in providing guidance documents useful in addressing their problems. This document uses this collective experience and provides valuable technical information regarding the safety aspects of the uses not only of sealed and unsealed sources of radiation, but also for those machines that produce ionizing radiation. The first of these training courses, 'Safety and Regulation of Unsealed Sources' was held in Dublin, Ireland, June through July 1989 with the co-operation of the Nuclear Energy Board and Trinity College. This was an interregional training course, the participants came from all over the world. The second and third interregional courses, 'Safety and Regulation

  18. Quantification of iodine in porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio André Lacerda

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, non-radioactive iodine was incorporated in two types of biodegradable hydroxyapatite-based porous matrices (HA and HACL through impregnation process from sodium iodine aqueous solutions with varying concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol/L . The results revealed that both systems presented a high capacity of incorporating iodine into their matrices. The quantity of incorporated iodine was measured through Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA. The porous ceramic matrices based on hydroxyapatite demonstrated a great potential for uses in low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy.Materiais cerâmicos porosos à base de compostos de fosfatos de cálcio (CFC vêm sendo estudados e desenvolvidos para várias aplicações biomédicas tais como implantes, sistemas para liberação de drogas e fontes radioativas para braquiterapia. Dois tipos de matrizes porosas biodegradáveis de hidroxiapatita (HA e HACL foram avaliadas em termos da capacidade de incorporação de iodo em suas estruturas. Resultados revelaram que as matrizes porosas a base de hidroxiapatita apresentaram alta capacidade de incorporar iodo em sua estrutura. A quantidade de iodo foi mensurada através da técnica de Análise por Ativação Nêutronica (AAN. As matrizes cerâmicas porosas à base de hidroxiapatita demostraram ter grande potencial para aplicação em braquiterapia de baixa taxa de dose (LDR - Low Dose Rate.

  19. Study and parameters survey for iodine-125 source dosimetry to be applied in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Eduardo Santana de

    2011-01-01

    The use of brachytherapy technique with iodine-125 seeds to prostate cancer treatment has been used for decades with good clinical outcomes. To aim the Brazilian population necessities, IPEN-CNEN/SP developed the iodine-125 seed prototype with national technology. The objectives of this work are the development and the study of dosimetric procedures associates with the experimental acquisition of the useful parameters for the iodine-125 dosimetric characterization and to evaluate if the developed procedures, in this work, have the basic conditions to determinate the dosimetric analysis, that are fundamental for clinical procedures. The dosimeters selected for the analysis are the TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti), initially these dosimeters were submitted for two selection steps to choose the dosimeters more reproducible for the dosimetric analysis. The two steps were the selection by the mass of the dosimeters and the reproducibility after four irradiation series in a Cobalt-60 irradiator (CTR-IPEN). Afterwards these steps, the dosimeters were irradiated in linear accelerator with 6 MV energy (Service of Radiotherapy - Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein) to yield the individual calibration factors to each dosimeter. After, the dosimeters were used to the irradiations with iodine-125 seed, 6711 model, (GE-Healthcare). The irradiations and others analysis with iodine-125 seeds yield the useful values for the determination of the parameters suggested by the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine): constant of dose rate, geometry function, dose radial function and anisotropy function. The results showed good agreement with the values published by the literature, for the same iodine- 125 model, this fact confirms that the realized parameters will be able to be used for the IPEN-CNEN iodine-125 seeds dosimetry and quality control. (author)

  20. X radiation sources based on accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couprie, M.E.; Filhol, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Light sources based on accelerators aim at producing very high brilliance coherent radiation, tunable from the infrared to X-ray range, with picosecond or femtosecond light pulses. The first synchrotron light sources were built around storage rings in which a large number of relativistic electrons produce 'synchrotron radiation' when their trajectory is subjected to a magnetic field, either in bending magnets or in specific insertion devices (undulators), made of an alternating series of magnets, allowing the number of curvatures to be increased and the radiation to be reinforced. These 'synchrotron radiation' storage rings are now used worldwide (there are more than thirty), and they simultaneously distribute their radiation to several tens of users around the storage ring. The most effective installations in term of brilliance are the so-called third generation synchrotron radiation light sources. The radiation produced presents pulse durations of the order of a few tens of ps, at a high rate (of the order of MHz); it is tunable over a large range, depending on the magnetic field and the electron beam energy and its polarisation is adjustable (in the V-UV-soft-X range). Generally, a very precise spectral selection is made by the users with a monochromator. The single pass linear accelerators can produce very short electron bunches (around 100 fs). The beam of very high electronic density is sent into successive undulator modules, reinforcing the radiation's longitudinal coherence, produced according to a Free Electron Laser (FEL) scheme by the interaction between the electron bunch and a light wave. The very high peak brilliance justifies their designation as fourth generation sources. The number of users is smaller because an electron pulse produces a radiation burst towards only one beamline. Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) let the beam pass several times in the accelerator structures either to recover the energy or to accelerate the electrons during several turns

  1. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: report of the AAPM and ESTRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K; Dewerd, Larry A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Meigooni, Ali S; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J; Sloboda, Ron S; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2012-05-01

    Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific (192)Ir, (137)Cs, and (60)Co source models. This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  2. Cosmical sources of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchowicz, B [Warsaw Univ. (Poland)

    1974-01-01

    A brief historical outline of the X-ray and ..gamma..-ray astronomies is given first, then a summary of the recent status of X-ray astronomy follows. Further chapters include information on ..gamma..-ray sources in the solar system, in our Galaxy, and beyond it. In discussing linear gamma spectra attention is paid to the possibility of studying explosive nucleo-synthesis by observation of gamma lines from supernova remnants, etc. Questions of the isotropic gamma background are discussed at the end of the survey.

  3. Conventional external beam radiation therapy and high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy as a boost for patients older than 70 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson

    2005-01-01

    The treatment options for patients with non metastatic prostate cancer range from observation, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy to various combination of some to all of them. Objective: we evaluated the impact on biochemical control of disease (bNED), acute and late intestinal (GI) and urological (GU) morbidity for a group of patients older than 70 years presenting initial or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost to conventional external beam radiation therapy (RT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology from Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: a total of 56 patients older than 70 were treated from March, 1997 to June, 2002. All patients had prior to HDRB a course of RT to a median dose of 45 Gy. HDRB doses ranged from 16 Gy to 20 Gy, given in 4 fractions. Results: the median age of the patients was 74.4 years (range 70-83) and the median follow-up 33 months (range 24 to 60). The 5-year actuarial bNED rate was 77%. Acute GU and GI morbidity G1-2 were seen in 17.8% and 7.1% of patients, respectively. Late G1 or G2 GU morbidity was seen in 10.7% of the patients, while late G3 morbidity was observed in 7.1% of the patients, represented by urethral strictures. Conclusion: this group of patients had similar bNED rates when compared to literature, with acceptable morbidity rates. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo dose characterization of a new 90Sr/90Y source with balloon for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ruqing; Li, X. Allen; Lobdell, John

    2003-01-01

    Beta emitting source wires or seeds have been adopted in clinical practice of intravascular brachytherapy for coronary vessels. Due to the limitation of penetration depth, this type of source is normally not applicable to treat vessels with large diameter, e.g., peripheral vessel. In the effort to extend application of its beta source for peripheral vessels, Novoste has recently developed a new catheter-based system, the Corona trade mark sign 90 Sr/ 90 Y system. It is a source train of 6 cm length and is jacketed by a balloon. The existence of the balloon increases the penetration of the beta particles and maintains the source within a location away from the vessel wall. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system, we have calculated the two-dimensional (2-D) dose rate distribution of the Corona trade mark sign system in water for a balloon diameter of 5 mm. The dose rates on the transverse axis obtained in this study are in good agreement with calibration results of the National Institute of Standards and Technology for the same system for balloon diameters of 5 and 8 mm. Features of the 2-D dose field were studied in detail. The dose parameters based on AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. For a balloon diameter of 5 mm, the dose rate at the reference point (defined as r 0 =4.5 mm, 2 mm from the balloon surface) is found to be 0.010 28 Gy min -1 mCi -1 . A new formalism for a better characterization of this long source is presented. Calculations were also performed for other balloon diameters. The dosimetry for this source is compared with a 192 Ir source, commonly used for peripheral arteries. In conclusion, we have performed a detailed dosimetric characterization for a new beta source for peripheral vessels. Our study shows that, from dosimetric point of view, the Corona trade mark sign system can be used for the treatment of an artery with a large diameter, e.g., peripheral vessel

  5. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... competence in radiation safety, radionuclide handling, treatment planning, quality assurance, and clinical... hours of classroom and laboratory training in the following areas— (A) Radiation physics and... on hand; (E) Using administrative controls to prevent a medical event involving the use of byproduct...

  6. Determination of non-uniformity correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers close to 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelli, H.; Bielajew, A. F.; Mattsson, O.; Sernbo, G.

    1995-01-01

    When ionization chambers are used in brachytherapy dosimetry, the measurements must be corrected for the non-uniformity of the incident photon fluence. The theory for determination of non-uniformity correction factors, developed by Kondo and Randolph (Rad. Res. 1960) assumes that the electron fluence within the air cavity is isotropic and does not take into account material differences in the chamber wall. The theory was extended by Bielajew (PMB 1990) using an anisotropic electron angular fluence in the cavity. In contrast to the theory by Kondo and Randolph, the anisotropic theory predicts a wall material dependence in the non-uniformity correction factors. This work presents experimental determination of non-uniformity correction factors at distances between 10 and 140 mm from an Ir-192 source. The experimental work makes use of a PTW23331-chamber and Farmer-type chambers (NE2571 and NE2581) with different materials in the walls. The results of the experiments agree well with the anisotropic theory. Due to the geometrical shape of the NE-type chambers, it is shown that the full length of the these chambers, 24.1mm, is not an appropriate input parameter when theoretical non-uniformity correction factors are evaluated

  7. Devices for obtaining information about radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosswill, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a sensitive, fast, high-resolution device for obtaining information about the distribution of gamma and X-radiation sources and provides a radiation detector useful in such a device. It comprises a slit collimator with a multiplicity of slits each with slit-defining walls of material and thickness to absorb beam components impinging on them. The slits extend further in one transverse direction than the other. The detector for separately detecting beam components passing through the slits also provides data output signals. It comprises a plurality of radiation transducing portions, each at the end of a slit. A positioner changes the transverse position of the slits and radiation transducer (a photoconductor) relative to the source. Applications are in nuclear medicine and industry. Full details and preferred embodiments are given. (U.K.)

  8. Assessment of risk from radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaratnam, T.; Madhvanath, U.; Somasundaram, S.

    1976-01-01

    Assessment of risk from exposure to ionizing radiations from man-made radiation sources and nuclear installations has to be viewed from three aspects, namely, dose-effect relationship (genetic and somatic) for humans, calculation of doses or dose-commitments to population groups, assessment of risk to radiation workers and the population at large from the current levels of exposure from nuclear industry and comparison of risk estimates with other industries in a modern society. These aspects are discussed in brief. On the basis of available data, it is shown that estimated incidence of genetic diseases and cancers due to exposure of population to radiation from nuclear industry is negligible in comparison with their natural incidence, and radiation risks to the workers in nuclear industry are much lower than the risks in other occupations. (M.G.B.)

  9. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehoff, Peter; Polgar, Csaba; Ostertag, Horst; Major, Tibor; Sulyok, Zoltan; Kimmig, Bernhard; Kovacs, Gyoergy

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  10. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches.

  11. Occupational exposure to natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, T.; Sciocchetti, G.; Rannou, A.

    1993-01-01

    The most important natural sources of radiation are analyzed. The situation in France, Italy, and Spain concerning protection against natural radiation is described, including the identification of sources, and defined practices, organizations charged of national surveys and the responsibility of regulatory bodies and the role of operating management. The activities of the international organizations (ICRP, CEC and IAEA) are presented and discussed, and existing actions toward harmonization in the CEC, IAEA and other international programs is also discussed. (R.P.) 23 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Photon acceleration-based radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J. R.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    1999-01-01

    The acceleration and deceleration of photons in a plasma provides the means for a series of new radiation sources. Previous work on a DC to AC Radiation Converter (DARC source) has shown variable acceleration of photons having zero frequency (i.e., an electrostatic field) to between 6 and 100 GHz (1-3). These sources all had poor guiding characteristics resulting in poor power coupling from the source to the load. Continuing research has identified a novel way to integrate the DARC source into a waveguide. The so called ''pin structure'' uses stainless steel pins inserted through the narrow side of an X band waveguide to form the electrostatic field pattern (k≠0, ω=0). The pins are spaced such that the absorption band resulting from this additional periodic structure is outside of the X band range (8-12 GHz), in which the normal waveguide characteristics are left unchanged. The power of this X band source is predicted theoretically to scale quadratically with the pin bias voltage as -800 W/(kV) 2 and have a pulse width of -1 ns. Cold tests and experimental results are presented. Applications for a high power, short pulse radiation source extends to the areas of landmine detection, improved radar resolution, and experimental investigations of molecular systems

  13. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Michael V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  14. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. Radiation measurement practice for understanding statistical fluctuation of radiation count using natural radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2014-01-01

    It is known that radiation is detected at random and the radiation counts fluctuate statistically. In the present study, a radiation measurement experiment was performed to understand the randomness and statistical fluctuation of radiation counts. In the measurement, three natural radiation sources were used. The sources were fabricated from potassium chloride chemicals, chemical fertilizers and kelps. These materials contain naturally occurring potassium-40 that is a radionuclide. From high schools, junior high schools and elementary schools, nine teachers participated to the radiation measurement experiment. Each participant measured the 1-min integration counts of radiation five times using GM survey meters, and 45 sets of data were obtained for the respective natural radiation sources. It was found that the frequency of occurrence of radiation counts was distributed according to a Gaussian distribution curve, although the obtained 45 data sets of radiation counts superficially looked to be fluctuating meaninglessly. (author)

  16. The need for international standardization in clinical beta dosimetry for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Boehm, J.; Kaulich, T.W.

    2002-01-01

    Beta radiation has found increasing interest in radiotherapy. Besides the curative treatment of small and medium-sized intraocular tumors by means of ophthalmic beta radiation plaques, intravascular brachytherapy has proven to successfully overcome the severe problem of restenosis after interventional treatment of arterial stenosis in coronaries and peripheral vessels in many clinical trials with a large number of patients. Prior to initiating procedures applying beta radiation in radiotherapy, however, there is a common need to specify methods for the determination and specification of the absorbed dose to water or tissue and their spatial distributions. The IAEA-TECDOC-1274 Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy (2002) is a help for photon brachytherapy calibration. But, for beta seed and line sources, IAEA recommends well type ionization chambers as working standards which are far from measuring absorbed dose to water of the radiation clinically used. Although the application of such working standards seems to be more precise, large errors can occur when the medical physicist has to convert the calibration data to absorbed dose to water of the beta radiation emitted. The user must believe that the source is equally activated and that the manufacturer did not change the design and construction of the source encapsulation. With the DGMP Report 16 (2001) Guidelines for medical physical aspects of intravascular brachytherapy a very detailed code of practice is given, especially for the calibration and clinical dosimetry of intravascular beta radiation sources. As there is a global need for standardization in clinical dosimetry for intravascular brachytherapy utilizing beta radiation, the DIN-NAR, the German committee on standardization in radiology, task group dosimetry, has initiated an international adhoc working group for a new ISO work item proposal on the standardization of procedures in clinical dosimetry to guarantee reliable

  17. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  18. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... possession of ionizing radiation sources by non-Army entities (including their civilian contractors) on an... Radiation Permit (ARP) from the garrison commander to use, store, or possess ionizing radiation sources on an Army installation. For the purpose of this rule, ``ionizing radiation source'' means any source...

  19. Topical application of β-radiation to reduce intimal hyperplasia after carotid artery balloon injury in rabbit A possible application for brachytherapy in vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, David; Stevens, Scott L.; Skillern, C.S.; Wellons, Eric D.; Robinson, Keith; Matsuura, John H.; Gannon, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular brachytherapy for the prevention of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and restenosis after balloon/stent angioplasty has proven effective both in animal preparations and clinical trials. A variety of β-emitting isotopes and catheter-based devices have been developed for the delivery of low-dose radiation in clinical coronary and peripheral trials. No platform, however, has yet been developed for brachytherapy in concert with vascular surgical operations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vascular histopathologic response following balloon injury to rabbit carotid arteries with and without topically applied low-dose β-radiation. Methods: The β-emitting isotope strontium-90 (Sr-90) was conjugated onto the matrix of polypropylene (PLYP) mesh. Rabbit carotid arteries were balloon-injured with a no. 2 embolectomy catheter. Six carotid arteries were wrapped with nonradioactive PLYP mesh (controls) and Sr-90 (∼90 μCi) PLYP mesh in order to deliver low-dose radiation to the vessel wall from the external (adventitial) surface. Tissue was harvested at 6 weeks and processed for histologic examination. Results: There was consistent blockade of fibrocellular neointima formation with virtually no neointima present in all treated segments, compared to moderate neointima formation in controls. Medial thinning and smooth muscle cell (SMC) necrosis were also associated with topical brachytherapy. Conclusion: β-Radiation applied by an externally wrapped PLYP mesh labeled with Sr-90 markedly suppressed neointima formation in an animal vascular surgical injury model. Further studies, however, are necessary to determine a suitable isotope and dosage for clinical application

  20. Radiation oncology and medical physicists quality assurance in British Columbia Cancer Agency Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Morris, William James; Spadinger, Ingrid; Araujo, Cynthia; Cheung, Arthur; Chng, Nick; Crook, Juanita; Halperin, Ross; Lapointe, Vince; Miller, Stacy; Pai, Howard; Pickles, Tom

    2013-01-01

    To describe in detail British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency (BCCA) Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy (PB) Quality Assurance (QA) Program. The BCCA PB Program was established in 1997. It operates as one system, unified and supported by electronic and information systems, making it a single PB treatment provider for province of BC and Yukon. To date, >4000 patients have received PB (450 implants in 2011), making it the largest program in Canada. The Program maintains a large provincial prospective electronic database with records on all patients, including disease characteristics, risk stratification, pathology, preplan and postimplant dosimetric data, follow-up of prostate-specific antigen, and toxicity outcomes. QA was an integral part of the program since its inception. A formal QA Program was established in 2002, with key components that include: unified eligibility criteria and planning system, comprehensive database, physics and oncologist training and mentorship programs, peer review process, individual performance outcomes and feedback process, structured continuing education and routine assessment of the program's dosimetry, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen outcomes, administration and program leadership that promotes a strong culture of patient safety. The emphasis on creating a robust, broad-based network of skilled providers has been achieved by the program's requirements for training, education, and the QA process. The formal QA process is considered a key factor for the success of cancer control outcomes achieved at BCCA. Although this QA model may not be wholly transferable to all PB programs, some of its key components may be applicable to other programs to ensure quality in PB and patient safety. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Synchrotron radiation sources in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitza, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is now recognized to be an important instrument for experimental work in many fields of science. Recently the application of SR in medicine and industry, especially as a light source for microelectronics production have been demonstrated. Thus the development of SR sources has now grown to become a significant and independent dimension for accelerator research and technology. This article describes SR work in the Soviet Union

  2. Radiation effects concerns at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials used at spallation neutron sources are exposed to energetic particle and photon radiation. Mechanical and physical properties of these materials are altered; radiation damage on the atomic scale leads to radiation effects on the macroscopic scale. Most notable among mechanical-property radiation effects in metals and metal alloys are changes in tensile strength and ductility, changes in rupture strength, dimensional stability and volumetric swelling, and dimensional changes due to stress-induced creep. Physical properties such as electrical resistivity also are altered. The fission-reactor community has accumulated a good deal of data on material radiation effects. However, when the incident particle energy exceeds 50 MeV or so, a new form of radiation damage ensues; spallation reactions lead to more energetic atom recoils and the subsequent temporal and spatial distribution of point defects is much different from that due to a fission-reactor environment. In addition, spallation reactions cause atomic transmutations with these new atoms representing an impurity in the metal. The higher-energy case is of interest at spallation sources; limited detailed data exist for material performance in this environment. 35 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  3. Trade and transport of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide specifies the obligations pertaining to the trade in and transport of radiation sources and other matters to be taken into account in safety supervision. It also specifies obligations and procedures relating to transfrontier movements of radioactive waste contained in the EU Council Directive 92/3/Euratom. (7 refs.)

  4. Optimization of industrial processes using radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, Claudio G.; Silva Filho, Edmundo D. da; Toribio, Norberto M.; Gandara, Leonardo A.

    1996-01-01

    Aiming the enhancement of the staff protection against radiation in operational areas, the SAMARCO Mineracao S.A. proceeded a reevaluation and analysis of the real necessity of the densimeters/radioactive sources in the operational area, and also the development of an alternative control process for measurement the ore pulp, and introduced of the advanced equipment for sample chemical analysis

  5. Radiation as a source of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kazuaki

    1999-01-01

    Essence and nature of ionizing radiation as a source of risk are reviewed. Following to the appeal of necessity and importance of campaign for enlightening risk management, of individual and of society, background knowledge and information helpful to the promotion and discussion are summarized, also. (author)

  6. Underdense radiation sources: Moving towards longer wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C.A.; Kilkenny, J.D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States); Seely, J.F.; Weaver, J.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States); Tommasini, R.; Glendinning, S.G.; Chung, H.K.; Rosen, M.; Lee, R.W.; Scott, H.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California (United States); Tillack, M. [U. C. San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Underdense radiation sources have been developed to provide efficient laboratory multi-keV radiation sources for radiography and radiation hardening studies. In these plasmas laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung leads to high x-ray conversion efficiency because of efficient ionization of the low density aerogel or gas targets. Now we performing experiments in the soft x-ray energy regime where the atomic physics models are much more complicated. In recent experiments at the NIKE laser, we have irradiated a Ti-doped SiO{sub 2} aerogel with up to 1650 J of 248 nm wavelength light. The absolute Ti L-shell emission in the 200-800 eV range is measured with a diagnostic that uses a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. We will give an overview of the temporally-resolved absolutely calibrated spectra obtained over a range of conditions. (authors)

  7. Underdense radiation sources: Moving towards longer wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, C.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Seely, J.F.; Weaver, J.L.; Feldman, U.; Tommasini, R.; Glendinning, S.G.; Chung, H.K.; Rosen, M.; Lee, R.W.; Scott, H.A.; Tillack, M.

    2006-01-01

    Underdense radiation sources have been developed to provide efficient laboratory multi-keV radiation sources for radiography and radiation hardening studies. In these plasmas laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung leads to high x-ray conversion efficiency because of efficient ionization of the low density aerogel or gas targets. Now we performing experiments in the soft x-ray energy regime where the atomic physics models are much more complicated. In recent experiments at the NIKE laser, we have irradiated a Ti-doped SiO 2 aerogel with up to 1650 J of 248 nm wavelength light. The absolute Ti L-shell emission in the 200-800 eV range is measured with a diagnostic that uses a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. We will give an overview of the temporally-resolved absolutely calibrated spectra obtained over a range of conditions. (authors)

  8. Guidelines for testing sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    These guidelines are based on article 16(1) of the Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection dated 11 October 1984 (VOAS), in connection with article 36 of the Executory Provision to the VOAS, of 11 October 1984. They apply to the testing of sealed sources to verify their intactness, tightness and non-contamination as well as observance of their fixed service time. The type, scope and intervals of testing as well as the evaluation of test results are determined. These guidelines also apply to the testing of radiation sources forming part of radiation equipment, unless otherwise provided for in the type license or permit. These guidelines enter into force on 1 January 1990

  9. Protocol-based image-guided salvage brachytherapy. Early results in patients with local failure of prostate cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmer, G.; Lotter, M.; Kreppner, S.; Fietkau, R.; Strnad, V. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the overall clinical outcome of protocol-based image-guided salvage pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure particularly regarding feasibility and side effects. Patients and methods: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer (median age, 69 years) were treated during 2005-2011 with interstitial PDR brachytherapy (PDR-BT) as salvage brachytherapy after radiotherapy failure. The treatment schedule was PDR-BT two times with 30 Gy (pulse dose 0.6 Gy/h, 24 h per day) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of optimal coverage of the whole prostate (V{sub 100} > 95 %) simultaneously respecting the protocol-based dose volume constraints for the urethra (D{sub 0.1} {sub cc} < 130 %) and the rectum (D{sub 2} {sub cc} < 50-60 %) taking into account the previous radiation therapy. Local relapse after radiotherapy (external beam irradiation, brachytherapy with J-125 seeds or combination) was confirmed mostly via choline-PET and increased PSA levels. The primary endpoint was treatment-related late toxicities - particularly proctitis, anal incontinence, cystitis, urinary incontinence, urinary frequency/urgency, and urinary retention according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. The secondary endpoint was PSA-recurrence-free survival. Results: We registered urinary toxicities only. Grade 2 and grade 3 toxicities were observed in up to 11.1 % (2/18) and 16.7 % (3/18) of patients, respectively. The most frequent late-event grade 3 toxicity was urinary retention in 17 % (3/18) of patients. No late gastrointestinal side effects occurred. The biochemical PSA-recurrence-free survival probability at 3 years was 57.1 %. The overall survival at 3 years was 88.9 %; 22 % (4/18) of patients developed metastases. The median follow-up time for all patients after salvage BT was 21 months (range, 8-77 months). Conclusion: Salvage PDR-brachytherapy

  10. Aircrew radiation exposure: sources-risks-measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.

    1994-05-01

    A short review is given on the actual aircrew exposure and its sources. The resulting risks for harmful effects to the health and discuss methods for in-flight measurements of exposure is evaluated. An idea for a fairly simple and economic approach to a practical, airborne active dosimeter for the assessment of individual crew exposure is presented. The exposure of civil aircrew to cosmic radiation, should not be considered a tremendous risk to the health, there is no reason for panic. However, being significantly higher than the average exposure to radiation workers, it can certainly not be neglected. As recommended by ICRP, aircrew exposure has to be considered occupational radiation exposure and aircrews are certainly entitled to the same degree of protection, as other ground-based radiation workers have obtained by law, since long time. (author)

  11. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 μSv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, μSv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, μSv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of the response of polymeric gel modified MAGIC-f using a clinical brachytherapy source and Monte Carlo simulation with package PENELOPE; Avaliacao da resposta do gel polimerico MAGIC-f modificado utilizando uma fonte clinica de braquiterapia e simulacao Monte Carlo com o pacote PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, Ana Luiza; Nicolucci, Patricia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica; Borges, Leandro F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Setor de Radioterapia

    2016-07-01

    In this work a comparison of experimental and simulated relative doses of a clinical brachytherapy source was performed. A 5 x 5 x 7 cm{sup 3} phantom with a modified MAGIC-f gel was irradiated using a clinical {sup 192}Ir source and read using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE was used to simulate the dose distributions of the same radiation source. The dose distributions were obtained in two planes perpendicular to the source: one passing through the source's center and the other at 0.5 cm away from the source's center. The higher differences found between experimental and computational distributions were 12.5% at a point 0.62 cm from the source for the central plane and 8.6% at 1.3 cm from the source to the plane 0.5 cm away from the source's center. Considering the high dose gradient of these dose distributions, the results obtained show that the modified MAGIC-f gel is promising for brachytherapy dosimetry. (author)

  13. Audits in high dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.; Rosa, L.A.; Velasco, A.; Paiva, E. de; Goncalves, M.; Castelo, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    The lack of well established dosimetry protocols for HDR sources is a point of great concern regarding the uniformity of procedures within a particular country. The main objective of this paper is to report the results of an implementation of the audit program in dosimetry of high dose rate brachytherapy sources used by the radiation therapy centers in Brazil. In Brazil, among 169 radiotherapy centers, 35 have HDR brachytherapy systems. This program started in August 2001 and until now eight radiotherapy services were audited. The audit program consists of the visit in loco to each center and the evaluation of the intensity of the source with a well type chamber specially design for HDR 192 Ir sources. The measurements was carried out with a HDR1000PLUS Brachytherapy Well Type Chamber and a MAX 4000 Electrometer, both manufactured by Standard Imaging Inc. The chamber was calibrated in air kerma strength by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin in the USA. The same chamber was calibrated in Brazil using a 192 lr high dose rate source whose intensity was determined by 60 Co gamma rays and 250 kV x rays interpolation methodology. The Nk of 60 Co and 250 kV x rays were provided by the Brazilian National Standard Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI)

  14. Calibration of brachytherapy sources using ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhvanath, U.; Kini, U.R.; Gupta, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    A solution containing 0.20 mM of ferrous ammonium sulphate, 5.0 mM benzoic acid and 0.20 mM xylenol orange in 0.05 N sulphuric acid was used for the calibration of 252 Cf, 137 Cs, 226 Ra and 60 Co needle sources. A known volume of this solution contained in a pyrex glass tube was irradiated with the source kept in a glass capillary at the centre of the solution. A few hours of irradiation were required for each needle and the absorbance of the solution was measured at 540 nm against the unirradiated solution. The accuracy of this method was found to be within a few percent and is particularly useful for 252 Cf sources as the neutron component of the source contributes significantly to the absorbance produced. (author)

  15. A photon spectrometric dose-rate constant determination for the Advantage™ Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although several dosimetric characterizations using Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) have been reported for the new Advantage™ Pd-103 source (IsoAid, LLC, Port Richey, FL), no AAPM consensus value has been established for the dosimetric parameters of the source. The aim of this work was to perform an additional dose-rate constant (Λ) determination using a recently established photon spectrometry technique (PST) that is independent of the published TLD and ...

  16. Compact high-power terahertz radiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Krafft

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new type of THz radiation source, based on recirculating an electron beam through a high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavity, and using this beam to drive a standard electromagnetic undulator on the return leg, is discussed. Because the beam is recirculated and not stored, short bunches may be produced that radiate coherently in the undulator, yielding exceptionally high average THz power for relatively low average beam power. Deceleration from the coherent emission, and the detuning it causes, limits the charge-per-bunch possible in such a device.

  17. Source of broadband Jovian Kilometric radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.; Leblanc, Y.

    1987-02-01

    Broadband Jovian Kilometric radiation was observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 to be beamed away from the zenomagnetic equatorial plane. Two theories were proposed for the equatorial shadow zone. One suggested that Io plasma torus forms an obstacle to radiation produced on auroral field lines. The other theory proposed that the source is located on the outer flanks of the torus, the beaming being inherent to the emission mechanism. Results are presented which indicate that the latter is consistent with the observations and it would appear that the emission is produced by linear mode conversion of electrostatic upper hybrid to electromagnetic waves in plasma density gradients.

  18. Source of broadband Jovian Kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.; Leblanc, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Broadband Jovian Kilometric radiation was observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 to be beamed away from the zenomagnetic equatorial plane. Two theories were proposed for the equatorial shadow zone. One suggested that Io plasma torus forms an obstacle to radiation produced on auroral field lines. The other theory proposed that the source is located on the outer flanks of the torus, the beaming being inherent to the emission mechanism. Results are presented which indicate that the latter is consistent with the observations and it would appear that the emission is produced by linear mode conversion of electrostatic upper hybrid to electromagnetic waves in plasma density gradients

  19. A photon spectrometric dose-rate constant determination for the Advantage Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Although several dosimetric characterizations using Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) have been reported for the new Advantage Pd-103 source (IsoAid, LLC, Port Richey, FL), no AAPM consensus value has been established for the dosimetric parameters of the source. The aim of this work was to perform an additional dose-rate constant ({Lambda}) determination using a recently established photon spectrometry technique (PST) that is independent of the published TLD and Monte Carlo techniques. Methods: Three Model IAPD-103A Advantage Pd-103 sources were used in this study. The relative photon energy spectrum emitted by each source along the transverse axis was measured using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer designed for low-energy photons. For each source, the dose-rate constant was determined from its emitted energy spectrum. The PST-determined dose-rate constant ({sub PST}{Lambda}) was then compared to those determined by TLD ({sub TLD}{Lambda}) and Monte Carlo ({sub MC}{Lambda}) techniques. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated as the arithmetic mean of the average {Lambda} values determined by each of three different techniques. Results: The average {sub PST}{Lambda} value for the three Advantage sources was found to be (0.676{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}. Intersource variation in {sub PST}{Lambda} was less than 0.01%. The {sub PST}{Lambda} was within 2% of the reported {sub MC}{Lambda} values determined by PTRAN, EGSnrc, and MCNP5 codes. It was 3.4% lower than the reported {sub TLD}{Lambda}. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated to be (0.688{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, similar to the AAPM consensus values recommended currently for the Theragenics (Buford, GA) Model 200 (0.686{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, the NASI (Chatsworth, CA) Model MED3633 (0.688{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, and the Best Medical (Springfield, VA) Model 2335 (0.685{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} {sup 103}Pd

  20. A photon spectrometric dose-rate constant determination for the Advantage Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although several dosimetric characterizations using Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) have been reported for the new Advantage Pd-103 source (IsoAid, LLC, Port Richey, FL), no AAPM consensus value has been established for the dosimetric parameters of the source. The aim of this work was to perform an additional dose-rate constant (Λ) determination using a recently established photon spectrometry technique (PST) that is independent of the published TLD and Monte Carlo techniques. Methods: Three Model IAPD-103A Advantage Pd-103 sources were used in this study. The relative photon energy spectrum emitted by each source along the transverse axis was measured using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer designed for low-energy photons. For each source, the dose-rate constant was determined from its emitted energy spectrum. The PST-determined dose-rate constant ( PST Λ) was then compared to those determined by TLD ( TLD Λ) and Monte Carlo ( MC Λ) techniques. A likely consensus Λ value was estimated as the arithmetic mean of the average Λ values determined by each of three different techniques. Results: The average PST Λ value for the three Advantage sources was found to be (0.676±0.026) cGyh -1 U -1 . Intersource variation in PST Λ was less than 0.01%. The PST Λ was within 2% of the reported MC Λ values determined by PTRAN, EGSnrc, and MCNP5 codes. It was 3.4% lower than the reported TLD Λ. A likely consensus Λ value was estimated to be (0.688±0.026) cGyh -1 U -1 , similar to the AAPM consensus values recommended currently for the Theragenics (Buford, GA) Model 200 (0.686±0.033) cGyh -1 U -1 , the NASI (Chatsworth, CA) Model MED3633 (0.688±0.033) cGyh -1 U -1 , and the Best Medical (Springfield, VA) Model 2335 (0.685±0.033) cGyh -1 U -1 103 Pd sources. Conclusions: An independent Λ determination has been performed for the Advantage Pd-103 source. The PST Λ obtained in this work provides additional information

  1. SU-F-T-05: Dosimetric Evaluation and Validation of Newlydeveloped Well Chamber for Use in the Calibration of Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saminathan, S; Godson, H; Ponmalar, R; Manickam, R [Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Mazarello, J [Rosalina India private limited, Mumbai, Maharastra (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of newly developed well type ionization chamber and to validate the results with the commercially available calibrated well chambers that are being used for the calibration of brachytherapy sources. Methods: The newly developed well type ionization chamber (BDS 1000) has been designed for the convenient use in brachytherapy which is open to atmospheric condition. The chamber has a volume of 240 cm3 and weight of 2.5 Kg. The calibration of the radioactive source with activities from 0.01 mCi to 20 Ci can be carried out using this chamber. The dosimetric parameters such as leakage current, stability, scattering effect, ion collection efficiency, reference air kerma rate and nominal response with energy were carried out with the BDS 1000 well type ion chamber. The evaluated dosimetric characteristics of BDS1000 well chamber were validated with two other commercially available well chambers (HDR 1000 plus and BTC/3007). Results: The measured leakage current observed was negligible for the newly developed BDS 1000 well type ion chamber. The ion collection efficiency was close to 1 and the response of the chamber was found to be very stable. The determined sweet spot was at 42 mm from bottom of the chamber insert. The reference air kerma rate was found to be 4.634 × 105 Gym2hr-1A-1 for the BDS 1000 well chamber. The overall dosimetric characteristics of BDS 1000 well chamber was in good agreement with the dosimetric properties of other two well chambers. Conclusion: The dosimetric study shows that the newly developed BDS 1000 well type ionization chamber is high sensitive and reliable chamber for reference air kerma strength calibration. The results obtained confirm that this chamber can be used for the calibration of HDR and LDR brachytherapy sources.

  2. Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: Analyzing Effect of Source Configurations on Dose Metrics Relevant to Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the use of partial breast irradiation (PBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer with low-risk factors has increased. The volume of the high-dose regions has been correlated with toxicity in interstitial treatment. Although no such associations have been made in applicator-based experience, new applicators are being developed that use complex noncentered source configurations. This work studied the effect of noncentered source placements on the volume of the high-dose regions around a spherical applicator. Methods and Materials: Many applicator configurations were numerically simulated for a range of inflation radii. For each configuration, a dose homogeneity index was used as a dose metric to measure the volume of the high-dose region. Results: All multisource configurations examined resulted in an increase of the high-dose region compared with a single-center source. The resulting decrease in the prescription dose homogeneity index was more pronounced for sources further from the center of the applicator, and the effect was reduced as the number of dwell locations was increased. Conclusion: The geometries of particular applicators were not considered to achieve a more general result. On the basis of the calculations of this work, it would appear that treatment using noncentered dwell locations will lead to an increase in the volume of the high-dose regions

  3. Determination of air kerma standard of high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, E.J.; Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the air kerma standard of 192 Ir high dose rate sources to calibrate well-type chambers. Uncertainty analysis involving the measurements procedure are presented. (author)

  4. Applications and opportunities for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    An important spin-off benefit from the nuclear industry has been the ability to produce a wide variety of ionizing radiation sources for industrial, medical and scientific applications. These sources include radionuclides produced by irradiation of target material in reactors and cyclotrons or recovered from spent fuels, and accelerators. The uses of radiation in both medicine and industry can be expected to evolve. Traditional uses such as cancer therapy will mature and in some cases be displaced by new technology. Major new applications, including food processing and waste treatment, are expected to maintain the demand for isotopes such as cobalt 60 and to stimulate the development of economical and reliable accelerator systems. (L.L.) (Tab., 2 figs.)

  5. Facility - Radiation Source Features and User Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Abramovich, A.; Eichenbaum, A.L.; Kanter, M.; Sokolowski, J.; Yahalom, A.; Shiloh, J.; Schnitzer, I.; Pinhasi, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Recent measurements of the radiation characteristics of the tandem FEL prove .that the device operates as a high quality, tunable radiation source in the mm wave regime. Tuning range of 60% around a central frequency of 100 GHz was demonstrated by varying the tandem accelerator energy from 1 to 1.5 MeV with 1-1.5 Amp. Beam current. Fourier transform limited linewidth of Δ f/f -5 was measured in single-mode lasing operation. The FEL power in pulse operation (10μsec) was 10 kWatt. Operating the FEL at high repetition rate with 0.1 to 1 mSec pulses will make it possible to obtain high average power (1 kWatt) and narrow linewidth (10 -7 ). Based ,on these exceptional properties of the FEL as a high quality spectroscopic tool and as a source of high average power radiation, the FEL consortium, supported by a body of 10 radiation user groups from various universities and research institutes, embark on a new project for development of an Israeli FEL radiation user laboratory. The laboratory is presently in a design and building stage in the academic campus in Ariel. The FEL will be moved to this laboratory after completion of X-ray protection structure in the allocated building. In the first phase of development, the radiation user laboratory will consist of three user stations: a. Spectroscopic station (low average power). Material studies are planned in the fields of H.T.S.C., submicron semiconductor devices, gases. b. Material processing station (high average power). Experiments are planned in the fields of thin film ceramic sintering (including H.T.S.C.), functionally graded materials, surface treatment of metals, interaction with biological tissues. c. Atmospheric study station. Experiments are planned in the fields of aerosol, dust and clouds mapping, remote sensing of gases, wide-band mm wave communication The FEL experimental results and the user laboratory features will be described

  6. Early observed transient prostate-specific antigen elevations on a pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and fractionated MRI guided High Dose Rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K; Godette, Denise J; Stall, Bronwyn R; Coleman, C Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Ménard, Cynthia; Guion, Peter; Susil, Robert C; Citrin, Deborah E; Ning, Holly; Miller, Robert W; Ullman, Karen; Smith, Sharon; Crouse, Nancy Sears

    2006-01-01

    To report early observation of transient PSA elevations on this pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Eleven patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer received MRI guided HDR brachytherapy (10.5 Gy each fraction) before and after a course of external beam radiotherapy (46 Gy). Two patients continued on hormones during follow-up and were censored for this analysis. Four patients discontinued hormone therapy after RT. Five patients did not receive hormones. PSA bounce is defined as a rise in PSA values with a subsequent fall below the nadir value or to below 20% of the maximum PSA level. Six previously published definitions of biochemical failure to distinguish true failure from were tested: definition 1, rise >0.2 ng/mL; definition 2, rise >0.4 ng/mL; definition 3, rise >35% of previous value; definition 4, ASTRO defined guidelines, definition 5 nadir + 2 ng/ml, and definition 6, nadir + 3 ng/ml. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 18–36 mo). During follow-up, the incidence of transient PSA elevation was: 55% for definition 1, 44% for definition 2, 55% for definition 3, 33% for definition 4, 11% for definition 5, and 11% for definition 6. We observed a substantial incidence of transient elevations in PSA following combined external beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Such elevations seem to be self-limited and should not trigger initiation of salvage therapies. No definition of failure was completely predictive

  7. Applicability of a prototype for determination of absorbed dose using brachytherapy equipment with Ir-192 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Almeida, Mayara Gabriella Oliveira de; Vieira, Rafaela Etelvina de Amorim; Silva, Waldecy Ananias da; Nascimento, Rizia Keila

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at the development and improvement of a device to perform the absolute dosimetry sources of Ir-192 using the Fricke solution contained in a flask. The Fricke solution used was prepared using amounts of ferrous ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sulfuric acid, diluted with water tri distilled pre-established in the literature. The spectrophotometer used was a UV-VIS spectrophotometer (Beckman DU-640 Counter) for measuring the optical density at wavelength 304 nm. The calculation for determining the radial dose takes into account the radial distance and the angle formed with the transverse axis of the source. As the results obtained can be seen that the states of Pernambuco, Ceara, Paraiba e Piaui are in accordance with the recommendations of international standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which considers not acceptable a difference greater than 5% of prescribed dose and measured dose

  8. Regulation of radiation sources in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.R.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes in general the Canadian program for the regulation of radiation sources, with particular emphasis on radioisotope licences. The Atomic Energy Control Board is described, as are the most significant parts of the Regulations. Licensing, which is the method chosen for control, is explained by describing the assessment of an application through the enforcement of the requirements, and the overall effectiveness of the program is measured by analyzing the incidents and overexposures that have occurred in recent years

  9. Apparatus for radiation source depth determination in a material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for determining the depth of a radiation source within a body of material utilizing a radiation source holder moving the radiation source within the body. A plurality of switches have contacts that are fixed in relation to the movement of the radiation source within the material. Trigger means activates a particular switch at a preselected depth of the radiation source. Means for indicating the activation of a switch would thus produce a signal as a representative of the depth of the radiation source

  10. A systematic evaluation of the dose-rate constant determined by photon spectrometry for 21 different models of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-10-21

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic comparison of the dose-rate constant (Λ) determined by the photon spectrometry technique (PST) with the consensus value ((CON)Λ) recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for 21 low-energy photon-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. A total of 63 interstitial brachytherapy sources (21 different models with 3 sources per model) containing either (125)I (14 models), (103)Pd (6 models) or (131)Cs (1 model) were included in this study. A PST described by Chen and Nath (2007 Med. Phys. 34 1412-30) was used to determine the dose-rate constant ((PST)Λ) for each source model. Source-dependent variations in (PST)Λ were analyzed systematically against the spectral characteristics of the emitted photons and the consensus values recommended by the AAPM brachytherapy subcommittee. The values of (PST)Λ for the encapsulated sources of (103)Pd, (125)I and (131)Cs varied from 0.661 to 0.678 cGyh(-1) U(-1), 0.959 to 1.024 cGyh(-1)U(-1) and 1.066 to 1.073 cGyh(-1)U(-1), respectively. The relative variation in (PST)Λ among the six (103)Pd source models, caused by variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distributions of radioactivity among the source models, was less than 3%. Greater variations in (PST)Λ were observed among the 14 (125)I source models; the maximum relative difference was over 6%. These variations were caused primarily by the presence of silver in some (125)I source models and, to a lesser degree, by the variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distribution of radioactivity among the source models. The presence of silver generates additional fluorescent x-rays with lower photon energies which caused the (PST)Λ value to vary from 0.959 to 1.019 cGyh(-1)U(-1) depending on the amount of silver used by a given source model. For those (125)I sources that contain no silver, their (PST)Λ was less variable and had values within 1% of 1.024 cGyh(-1)U(-1). For the 16

  11. Safety of radiation sources in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belicic-Kolsek, A.; Sutej, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Republic of Slovenia, a central European country which has been independent since 1991, has about 2 million inhabitants and an area of 20,256 km 2 . The Constitutional Law on Enforcement of the Basic Constitutional Charter on the Autonomy and Independence of the Republic of Slovenia, adopted on 23 June 1991 (Off. Gaz. of the R of Slovenia No. 1/91), provided that all the laws adopted by the Socialist Federal Republic (SFR) of Yugoslavia should remain in force in the Republic of Slovenia pending the adoption of appropriate legislation by the Slovene Parliament. Under the Slovene Constitution, all international treaties ratified by Slovenia constitute an integral part of Slovenia's legislation and can be applied directly. In Slovenia, all regular types of ionizing radiation source are being used for peaceful purposes and are covered by a system for their safe use and control. All radiation sources and radioactive materials are registered and under regulatory control. Inspections are carried out periodically by the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia (HIRS) and, in the case of nuclear installations, the Slovene Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA). Technical checks on radiation sources are carried out periodically by technical support organizations: the Jozef Stefan Institute and the Institute for Occupational Safety (IOS). (author)

  12. High dose rate brachytherapy for prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: preliminary dosimetric tests of a new source presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popowski, Youri; Verin, Vitali; Papirov, Igor; Nouet, Philippe; Rouzaud, Michel; Grob, Eugene; Schwager, Michael; Urban, Philippe; Rutishauser, Wilhelm; Kurtz, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Balloon dilatation of coronary artery stenosis has become a standard treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease. Restenosis due to excessive intimal cell proliferation, which subsequently occurs in 20-50% of patients, represents one of the major clinical problems in contemporary cardiology, and no satisfactory method for its prevention has thus far been found. Because modest doses of radiation have proved effective in preventing certain types of abnormal cellular proliferation resulting from surgical trauma, and brachytherapy has already been used successfully after dilatation of peripheral arteries, development of a radioactive source suitable for coronary artery applications would be of great interest. Methods and Materials: Nonradioactive flexible yttrum-89 wires (diameter of 0.15 and 0.26 mm) were activated within the thermal neutron flux of an experimental reactor. Standard angioplasty balloons (2 cm long, 2.5 mm in diameter when inflated) were inserted for dosimetry into a specially manufactured tissue equivalent phantom. Four wells, drilled perpendicular to the axis of the balloon, allowed for the insertion of thermal luminescent dosimeters (TLDs; 2 mm of diameter) and spacers. The angioplasty balloon was inflated with air or with contrast media. Radioactive yttrium-90 wires were left in the central lumen of the balloon for 2 min. Doses at the surface of the balloon, and at 1, 2, and 3 mm were determined from TLD readings. Results: Doses obtained at the surface of the balloon, for a 2-min exposure for the 0.26 mm wire (balloon inflated with air) and the 0.15 mm wire (air or contrast), were 56.5 Gy, 17.8 Gy, 5.4 Gy, respectively. As expected for a beta emitter, the fall-off in dose as a function of depth was rapid. External irradiation from the beta source was negligible. Conclusions: Our experiments indicate that the dose rates attainable at the surface of the angioplasty balloon using this technique allow the doses necessary for the inhibition of

  13. Randomized trial on external radiation therapy alone versus external radiation therapy followed by brachytherapy in early stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a long term result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Li; Yuan Zhiyong; Xu Guozhen; Li Suyan; Xiao Guangli; Cai Weiming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare local control and toxicity in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy (BT) versus external beam radiotherapy alone (RT) for locally early stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From 1990 to 1997, 126 NPC patients staged T1 and T2 by 1992 Fuzhou Staging System (oropharynx, carotid sheath and soft tissue around cervical vertebral involvement excluded) were randomized into RT alone and RT followed BT groups. The two groups were comparable in age, gender, stage and pathology. The median follow-up was 112 months. T1 patients were randomized before the treatment into RT alone group of 66-70 Gy and RT plus BT with the dose of 56 Gy plus 10-16 Gy BT boost to the nasopharynx. For T2 patients, if MRI or CT showed no residual lesion in parapharyngeal space after 50 Gy, they were randomized into RT alone (median dose: 72 Gy) or RT of 66 Gy followed by 8-24 Gy BT boost (1-3 fractions over 1-3 weeks). Results: In RT group, 8 patients (13.1%) failed in primary site during the follow-up period, 7 (11%) in BT group. The 5-year local control rates was 86% for RT group and 88% for BT group (P=0.47). The 5-year overall survival rates were 83% and 84% (P=0.84), respectively. Ten patients (18%) in RT group (4 of grade I, 6 of grade II) and 7 patients (11%) in BT group (4 of grade I, 3 of grade II, P=0.31) developed radiation induced encephalopathy. The incide