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Sample records for brachytherapy radiation source

  1. Brachytherapy with 125-Iodine sources: transport and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla D.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Moura, Joao A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Feher, Anselmo; Hilario, Katia F.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The estimates for the year 2009 show that 466,730 new cancer cases will occur in Brazil. Prostate cancer is the second most incident type. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy, with Iodine-125 sources are an important form of treatment for this kind of cancer. The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) created a project to develop a national prototype of these sources and is implementing a facility for local production. The seeds manufacture in Brazil will allow to diminish the treatment cost and make it possible for a larger number of patients. While the laboratory is not ready, the IPEN import and it distributes seeds. This work aim is to present and evaluate the transport procedures and the radiological protection applied to imported sources in order to assist the procedures for the new laboratory implementation. Before sending to hospitals, the seeds are packed by a radioprotector supervisor, in accordance with CNEN NE 5.01 standard 'Radioactive Material Transport'. Despite Iodine-125 presents low energy photons, around 29 keV, local and personal dosimeters are used during the transport process, as described in CNEN NN 3.01 standard 'Radiological Protection Basic Guideline'. All the results show no contamination and very low exposure, proving the method to be valid. The transport procedure used is correct, according to the regulations. As an result of this work, a new dosimeter should be installed and evaluate in future study. (author)

  2. Radiation protection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1996-02-01

    It covers technical procedures in medical applications for cancer treatment. Radiation protection principles in brachytherapy. Medical uses in therapy for Sr-90, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Ir-192, Au-198, Bi-214, Pb-214. (The author)

  3. Radiation safety and gynaecological brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1983, the Radiation Control Section of the South Australian Health Commission conducted an investigation into radiation safety practices in gynaecological brachytherapy. Part of the investigation included a study of the transportation of radioactive sources between hospitals. Several deficiences in radiation safety were found in the way these sources were being transported. New transport regulations came into force in South Australia in July 1984 and since then there have been many changes in the transportation procedure

  4. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.

  5. The needs for brachytherapy source calibrations in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coursey, B.M.; Goodman, L.J.; Hoppes, D.D.; Loevinger, R.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Soares, C.G.; Weaver, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Brachytherapy sources of beta and gamma radiation ('brachy' is from the Greek, meaning 'near') have a long history of use in interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and ocular radiation therapy. In the past the US national standards for these sources were often specified in activity or milligram radium equivalent. With the introduction of new radionuclide sources to replace radium, source strength calibrations are now expressed as air kerma rate at a meter. In this paper, we review the NIST standards for brachytherapy sources, list some of the common radionuclides and source encapsulations in use in the US radiology community, and describe the latest NIST work, in collaboration with several US medical institutions, on a method of two- and three-dimensional dose mapping of brachytherapy sources using radiochromic films. (orig.)

  6. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostelato, Maria Elisa Chuery Martins

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  7. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in accordance...

  8. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must...

  9. Procedures for calibration of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Alonso Samper, J.L.; Morales Lopez, J.L.; Saez Nunez, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Brachytherapy source strength verification is a responsibility of the user of these source, in fact of the Medical Physicists in charge of this issue in a Radiotherapy Service. The calibration procedures in the users conditions are shown. Specifics methods for source strength determination are recommended, both for High Dose Rate (HDR) sources with Remote Afterloading equipment and for Low Dose Rate sources. The The results of the calibration of HDR Remote After loaders are indicated

  10. Determining profile of dose distribution for PD-103 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkay, Camgoz; Mehmet, N. Kumru; Gultekin, Yegin

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Brachytherapy is a particular radiotherapy for cancer treatments. By destructing cancerous cells using radiation, the treatment proceeded. When alive tissues are subject it is hazardous to study experimental. For brachytherapy sources generally are studied as theoretical using computer simulation. General concept of the treatment is to locate the radioactive source into cancerous area of related tissue. In computer studies Monte Carlo mathematical method that is in principle based on random number generations, is used. Palladium radioisotope is LDR (Low radiation Dose Rate) source. Main radioactive material was coated with titanium cylinder with 3mm length, 0.25 mm radius. There are two parts of Pd-103 in the titanium cylinder. It is impossible to investigate differential effects come from two part as experimental. Because the source dimensions are small compared with measurement distances. So there is only simulation method. In dosimetric studies it is aimed to determine absorbed dose distribution in tissue as radial and angular. In nuclear physics it is obligation to use computer based methods for researchers. Radiation studies have hazards for scientist and people interacted with radiation. When hazard exceed over recommended limits or physical conditions are not suitable (long work time, non economical experiments, inadequate sensitivity of materials etc.) it is unavoidable to simulate works and experiments before practices of scientific methods in life. In medical area, usage of radiation is required computational work for cancer treatments. Some computational studies are routine in clinics and other studies have scientific development purposes. In brachytherapy studies there are significant differences between experimental measurements and theoretical (computer based) output data. Errors of data taken from experimental studies are larger than simulation values errors. In design of a new brachytherapy source it is important to consider detailed

  11. Calibration of brachytherapy sources. Guidelines on standardized procedures for the calibration of brachytherapy sources at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    Today, irradiation by brachytherapy is considered an essential part of the treatment for almost all the sites of cancer. With the improved localization techniques and treatment planning systems, it is now possible to have precise and reproducible dose delivery. However, the desired clinical results can only be achieved with a good clinical and dosimetric practice, i.e. with the implementation of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme which includes detailed quality control procedures. As summarized in the present report, accidents in brachytherapy treatments have been caused due to the lack of traceable calibration of the sources, due to the incorrect use of quantities and units, or errors made in the dose calculation procedure. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources has established a requirement on the calibration of sources used for medical exposure. For sources used in brachytherapy treatments, a calibration traceable to a standards dosimetry laboratory is required. The present report deals with the calibration of brachytherapy sources and related quality control (QC) measurements, QC of ionization chambers and safety aspects related to the calibration procedures. It does not include safety aspects related to the clinical use of brachytherapy sources, which have been addressed in a recent IAEA publication, IAEA-TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. The procedures recommended in this report yield traceability to internationally accepted standards. It must be realized, however, that a comprehensive QA programme for brachytherapy cannot rest on source calibration alone, but must ensure QC of all the equipment and techniques that are used for the dose delivery to the patient. The present publication incorporates the reports of several consultants meetings in the field of

  12. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula; Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Belinato, Walmir

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a 192 Ir and a 125 I radioactive sources. The 192 Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The 125 I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of 125 I and one of 192 Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the 192 Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the 125 I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  13. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, IPENCNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a {sup 192}Ir and a {sup 125}I radioactive sources. The {sup 192}Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The {sup 125}I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of {sup 125}I and one of {sup 192}Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the {sup 192}Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the {sup 125}I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  14. Monte Carlo simulations and radiation dosimetry measurements of 142Pr capillary tube-based radioactive implant (CTRI). A new structure for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakht, M.K.; Haddadi, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Ahmadi, S.J.; Sadjadi, S.S.; Tenreiro, C.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, a promising β - -emitting praseodymium-142 glass seed was proposed for brachytherapy of prostate cancer. In accordance with the previous study, a 142 Pr capillary tube-based radioactive implant (CTRI) was suggested as a source with a new structure to enhance application of β - -emitting radioisotopes such as 142 Pr in brachytherapy. Praseodymium oxide powder was encapsulated in a glass capillary tube. Then, a thin and flexible fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon layer sealed the capillary tube. The source was activated in the Tehran Research Reactor by the 141 Pr(n, γ) 142 Pr reaction. Measurements of the dosimetric parameters were performed using GafChromic radiochromic film. In addition, the dose rate distribution of 142 Pr CTRI was calculated by modeling 142 Pr source in a water phantom using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP5) Code. The active source was unreactive and did not leak in water. In comparison with the earlier proposed 142 Pr seed, the suggested source showed similar desirable dosimetric characteristics. Moreover, the 142 Pr CTRI production procedure may be technically and economically more feasible. The mass of praseodymium in CTRI structure could be greater than that of the 142 Pr glass seed; therefore, the required irradiation time and the neutron flux could be reduced. A 142 Pr CTRI was proposed for brachytherapy of prostate cancer. The dosimetric calculations by the experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation were performed to fulfill the requirements according to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine recommendations before the clinical use of new brachytherapy sources. The characteristics of the suggested source were compared with those of the previously proposed 142 Pr glass seed. (author)

  15. Monte Carlo Simulations Validation Study: Vascular Brachytherapy Beta Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orion, I.; Koren, K.

    2004-01-01

    During the last decade many versions of angioplasty irradiation treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this unique brachytherapy is to administer a sufficient radiation dose into the vein walls in order to prevent restonosis, a clinical sequel to balloon angioplasty. The most suitable sources for this vascular brachytherapy are the β - emitters such as Re-188, P-32, and Sr-90/Y-90, with a maximum energy range of up to 2.1 MeV [1,2,3]. The radioactive catheters configurations offered for these treatments can be a simple wire [4], a fluid filled balloon or a coated stent. Each source is differently positioned inside the blood vessel, and the emitted electrons ranges therefore vary. Many types of sources and configurations were studied either experimentally or with the use of the Monte Carlo calculation technique, while most of the Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using EGS4 [5] or MCNP [6]. In this study we compared the beta-source absorbed-dose versus radial-distance of two treatment configurations using MCNP and EGS4 simulations. This comparison was aimed to discover the differences between the MCNP and the EGS4 simulation code systems in intermediate energies electron transport

  16. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou J; Zamdborg L; Sebastian E

    2015-01-01

    Jun Zhou,1,2 Leonid Zamdborg,1 Evelyn Sebastian1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, 2Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI, USA Abstract: The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy ...

  17. What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What To Know About Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) “I asked questions. My doctor took the time ... most. Understanding Radiation Therapy: Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) Types of brachytherapy: Low-dose rate (LDR) implants ...

  18. Measurement of radiation exposures to the radiotherapists in the brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshisuke; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu

    1986-01-01

    Radiation exposures to the radiotherapists during brachytherapy with Iridium and Cesium were measured. For which TLD and pocket chamber were used. The materials were 30 patients, 14 of whom were treated by Iridium, and other 16 patients were treated by Cesium, from November 1983 to June 1984. The procedures of brachytherapy were divided into three parts: preparation, insertion, and withdrawal. In the Iridium therapy, 7 patients were treated for lesions in bile duct and in the Cesium therapy 13 patients were treated for lesions in head and neck. In the Iridium therapy the mean radiation exposures to the chest were 12.3 mrem, 177 mrem to the fingers, 9.6 mrem to the abdomen, 13.6 mrem to the head. In the Cesium therapy the mean radiation exposures to the chest were 49.4 mrem. 292 mrem to the fingers, 18.3 mrem to the abdomen, 49.4 mrem to the head. Thus, radiation exposures in the Iridium therapy were lower than those in the Cesium therapy in each sites of measurement. This could be because, in the Iridium therapy, afterloading procedure were used and the energy of Iridium gammar-ray is lower then that of Cesium gammar-ray and protection boards could be more effective in the Iridium therapy, than in the Cesium therapy. We analized radiation exposures according to the amount of sources, which are divided into two groups, 10 - 39 Cs. Eq. mCi (3.7 x 10 - 1.4 x 10 Cs. Eq. Bq) and 40 - 80 Cs. Eq. mCi (1.5 x 10 - 3.0 x 10 Cs. Eq. Bq). In the source runging 40 - 80 Cs. Eq. mCi, radiation exposures to the fingers in the Iridium therapy were almost the same as those in the Cesium therapy. When head and neck were treated radiation exposures to the fingers in the Iridium therapy were higher than those in the Cesium therapy. Therefore more effort should be pain to reduce radiation exposures to the fingers in the iridium therapy, especialy in assembling procedure. (author)

  19. Radiation exposure of nursing personnel to brachytherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, P.D.; Kase, K.R.; Bjaerngard, B.E.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation exposure of nursing personnel to brachytherapy patients has been analyzed from data collected during the years 1973-1976, at four different hospitals. The average annual dose per exposed nurse ranged between 25 and 150 mrem. The radiation exposure per nurse was found to be proportional to the total potential exposure and was uncorrelated with the size of the nursing staff. (author)

  20. Radiation therapy sources, equipment and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The safety code for Telegamma Therapy Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-1) and safety code for Brachytherapy Sources, Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-3) were issued by AERB in 1986 and 1988 respectively. These codes specified mandatory requirements for radiation therapy facilities, covering the entire spectrum of operations ranging from the setting up of a facility to its ultimate decommissioning, including procedures to be followed during emergency situations. The codes also stipulated requirements of personnel and their responsibilities. With the advent of new techniques and equipment such as 3D-conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, treatment planning system, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, portal imaging, integrated brachytherapy and endovascular brachytherapy during the last two decades, AERB desires that these codes be revised and merged into a single code titled Radiation Therapy Sources, Equipment, and Installations

  1. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  2. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  3. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  4. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  5. EVALUATION OF BRACHYTHERAPY FACILITY SHIELDING STATUS IN KOREA OBTAINED FROM RADIATION SAFETY REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI HYUN KEUM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-eight radiation safety reports for brachytherapy equipment were evaluated to determine the current status of brachytherapy units in Korea and to assess how radiation oncology departments in Korea complete radiation safety reports. The following data was collected: radiation safety report publication year, brachytherapy unit manufacturer, type and activity of the source that was used, affiliation of the drafter, exposure rate constant, the treatment time used to calculate workload and the HVL values used to calculate shielding design goal values. A significant number of the reports (47.4% included the personal information of the drafter. The treatment time estimates varied widely from 12 to 2,400 min/week. There was acceptable variation in the exposure rate constant values (ranging between 0.469 and 0.592 (R-m2/Ci·hr, as well as in the HVLs of concrete, steel and lead for Iridium-192 sources that were used to calculate shielding design goal values. There is a need for standard guidelines for completing radiation safety reports that realistically reflect the current clinical situation of radiation oncology departments in Korea. The present study may be useful for formulating these guidelines.

  6. Prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaya Garro, Olgger; Vela Mora, Mariano; Revilla Silva, Angel Revilla

    2005-01-01

    It has developed prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy. This one was made in two stages, at the first one, we designed and constructed the container (capsule), the filling system and the sealed system; at the second one, we made the irradiation of the capsules containing the 'target'. The prototypes was made of aluminum in cylindrical geometry. During the irradiation test was made using two different dimensions: one of 1 mm outer diameter and 1 cm length and another one of 0.8 mm outer diameter and 5 mm length. They were radiated in the core of the RP-10 research reactor, at 7.93 x10 13 n/cm 2 .s thermal neutron flux during 27 operation cycles. Activities of 144.53 MBq (3.91 mCi) and 107.67 MBq (2.91 mCi) was obtained for each case. This activities are adequate to restenosis and for some tumors treatment. We can observed that the capsules irradiated passed visual inspection in its physical integrity (leakage and geometry). It has been demonstrated, that the beta radiation for his minor power of penetration and its high interaction, causes major local damage to the malignant tissue, minimizing the damage of the healthy surrounding tissues. It has been advisable to use for the treatment of illnesses of the circulatory system and some tumors. At the present, the source of strontium-90 are the most beta ray source used, but of this one are obtained as fission product of uranium target, where valuable radioactive waste is generated, whereas if we were using phosphorus-32 that we propose, radioactive waste would not be generated since it would take place directly as sealed source, for reaction (n, β). (author)

  7. Primary calibration of coiled 103Pd brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, Adam B.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Micka, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Coiled 103 Pd brachytherapy sources have been developed by RadioMed Corporation for use as low-dose-rate (LDR) interstitial implants. The coiled sources are provided in integer lengths from 1 to 6 cm and address many common issues seen with traditional LDR brachytherapy sources. The current standard for determining the air-kerma strength (S K ) of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources is the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (NIST WAFAC). Due to geometric limitations, however, the NIST WAFAC is unable to determine the S K of sources longer than 1 cm. This project utilized the University of Wisconsin's Variable-Aperture Free-Air Chamber (UW VAFAC) to determine the S K of the longer coiled sources. The UW VAFAC has shown agreement in S K values of 1 cm length coils to within 1% of those determined with the NIST WAFAC, but the UW VAFAC does not share the same geometric limitations as the NIST WAFAC. A new source holder was constructed to hold the coiled sources in place during measurements with the UW VAFAC. Correction factors for the increased length of the sources have been determined and applied to the measurements. Using the new source holder and corrections, the S K of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources has been determined. Corrected UW VAFAC data and ionization current measurements from well chambers have been used to determine calibration coefficients for use in the measurement of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources in well chambers. Thus, the UW VAFAC has provided the first transferable, primary measurement of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources with lengths greater than 1 cm

  8. Guidelines for the calibration of low energy photon sources at beta-ray brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    With the development of improved methods of implanting brachytherapy sources in a precise manner for treating prostate cancer and other disease processes, there has been a tremendous growth in the use of low energy photon sources, such as 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy seeds. Low energy photon sources have the advantage of easier shielding and also lowering the dose to normal tissue. However, the dose distributions around these sources are affected by the details in construction of the source and its encapsulation more than other sources used for brachytherapy treatments, such as 192 Ir. With increasing number of new low energy photon sources on the market, care should be taken with regard to its traceability to primary standards. It cannot be assumed that a calibration factor for an ionization chamber that is valid for one type of low energy photon source, automatically is valid for another source even if both would use the same isotope. Moreover, the method used to calculate the dose must also take into account the structure of the source and the encapsulation. The dose calculation algorithm that is valid for one type of low energy source may not be valid for another source even if in both cases the same radionuclide is used. Simple ''point source'' approximations, i.e. where the source is modeled as a point, should be avoided, as such methods do not account for any details in the source construction. In this document, the dose calculation formalism adopted for low energy photon sources is that recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) as outlined by Task Group-43 (TG-43). This method accounts for the source and capsule geometry. The AAPM recommends brachytherapy photon sources to be specified in terms of 'Air Kerma Strength' that is also used in the formalism mentioned above. On the other hand, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends that the specification be done in terms of Reference Air

  9. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  10. Radiation protection of patients in epiescleral brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, J.M. de; Sanchez, G.; Sendon, J.R.; Castillo, A. del; Hernando, I.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. Choroidal melanoma and other ophthalmic tumors are treated with episcleral plaques. Optimisation and other criteria are necessary to avoid damage in eye and visual function preservation. Purpose. To study the dosimetric phases to apply radiation protection criteria. To determine procedures for quality assurance of applicators, sources and treatment prescription and planning. Method. We have revised treatment procedure. First, aspects shared for all the patients. Then treatment planning and applicator assembling. After that, we study insertion and treatment. Finally, we check the chart flow to modify, if necessary. It necessary consider normative and recommendations. Results and conclusions. Quality assurance of sources (calibration, autoradiography), applicator (effects, dose distribution) and treatment planning are revised. Appropriate patient data acquisition is essential due the special characteristics of tumor and eye. Treatment planning involves optimisation as a factor. Seed selection is very important to avoid misadministration. Next procedure is applicator assembling. We must care to choose the same as dosimetry and to carry out its verification. Sources insertion is a surgical procedure. It is essential in accurate placement. Desinsertion is also surgical, and must be adapted to dosimetry and prescription. Flow chart is modified adding two staff meetings to discuss about patient data and doses. (author)

  11. Reference air kerma rate calibration system for high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy sources in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei-Han; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Lin, Yi-Chun

    2017-11-01

    Ir-192 sources are widely used in brachytherapy and the number of treatments is around seven thousand for the use of the high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy source per year in Taiwan. Due to its physical half-life of 73.8 days, the source should be replaced four times per year to maintain the HDR treatment mode (DDEP, 2005; Coursey et al., 1992). When doing this work, it must perform the source dose trace to assure the dose accuracy. To establish the primary measurement standard of reference air kerma rate(RAKR) for the HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy sources in Taiwan, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) fabricated a dual spherical graphite-walled cavity ionization chambers system to directly measure the RAKR of the Ir-192 brachytherapy source. In this system, the ion-charge was accumulated by the two ionization chambers and after correction for the ion recombination, temperature, atmosphere pressure, room scattering, graphite-wall attenuation, air attenuation, source decay, stem effect, and so on. The RAKR of the Ir-192 source was obtained in the ambient conditions of 22 °C and one atmosphere. The measurement uncertainty of the system was around 0.92% in 96% confidence level (k=2.0). To verify the accuracy of the result, the source calibration comparison has been made at the National Radiation Standard Laboratory (NRSL) of INER and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) in 2015. The ratio of the measurement results between INER and PTB, INER/PTB, was 0.998±0.027 (k=2) which showed good consistency and the performance of the system was verified.

  12. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  13. Brachytherapy - not pulsed and low rate brachytherapy. Medical radiation protection - ED 4248

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    After an indication of authorizations required to perform brachytherapy, this sheet indicates the concerned personnel, indicates the different treatment steps, briefly describes the risk related to ionizing radiations, indicates the various aspects of risk assessment and of determination of exposure levels (definition of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, possible methods for dose monitoring), presents the strategy for risk management (rules regarding risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation, individual technical measures, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring) and how this risk management can be assessed

  14. Radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagna, G.; Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P.; Gauron, C.

    2011-01-01

    The French defense radiation protection service (SPRA) and the French national institute for research and safety (INRS) conducted a joint study to assess the radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds at the Val-de-Grace military hospital. The purpose of the study was the assessment of the effective doses, the equivalent doses to the extremities and lens received by a novice team, the different ambient dose equivalent rates measurements and the delineation of areas. After six brachy-therapies, all the recorded doses with whole-body InLight R OSL and nanoDot R dosimeters remained below the detection limit for the whole staff. The dose rate measured at the end of implantation by an AT1123 R survey meter is about 170 μSv/h at the perineum of the patient. The controlled area limit is estimated to be about 20 cm from the patient perineum. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for the categorization of workers, the delineation of areas and the dose monitoring procedures. This study demonstrates that real-time ultrasound-guided trans-perineal prostate brachytherapy delivers low dose to the operators because of the radioactive source characteristics and the instrumentation providing an effective radiation protection for the surgical team. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of (101)Rh as a brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakravan, Delaram; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2015-04-01

    Recently a number of hypothetical sources have been proposed and evaluated for use in brachytherapy. In the present study, a hypothetical (101)Rh source with mean photon energy of 121.5 keV and half-life of 3.3 years, has been evaluated as an alternative to the existing high-dose-rate (HDR) sources. Dosimetric characteristics of this source model have been determined following the recommendation of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) of the American Association of the Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), and the results are compared with the published data for (57)Co source and Flexisource (192)Ir sources with similar geometries. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of the (101)Rh hypothetical HDR source design. Geometric design of this hypothetical source was considered to be similar to that of Flexisource (192)Ir source. Task group No. 43 dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength per mCi, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated for the (101)Rh source through simulations. Air kerma strength per activity and dose rate constant for the hypothetical (101)Rh source were 1.09 ± 0.01 U/mCi and 1.18 ± 0.08 cGy/(h.U), respectively. At distances beyond 1.0 cm in phantom, radial dose function for the hypothetical (101)Rh source is higher than that of (192)Ir. It has also similar 2D anisotropy functions to the Flexisource (192)Ir source. (101)Rh is proposed as an alternative to the existing HDR sources for use in brachytherapy. This source provides medium energy photons, relatively long half-life, higher dose rate constant and radial dose function, and similar 2D anisotropy function to the Flexisource (192)Ir HDR source design. The longer half-life of the source reduces the frequency of the source exchange for the clinical environment.

  16. Evaluation of hypothetical (153)Gd source for use in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Behmadi, Marziyeh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric parameters of a hypothetical (153)Gd source for use in brachytherapy and comparison of the dosimetric parameters with those of (192)Ir and (125)I sources. Dose rate constant, the radial dose function and the two dimensional (2D) anisotropy function data for the hypothetical (153)Gd source were obtained by simulation of the source using MCNPX code and then were compared with the corresponding data reported by Enger et al. A comprehensive comparison between this hypothetical source and a (192)Ir source with similar geometry and a (125)I source was performed as well. Excellent agreement was shown between the results of the two studies. Dose rate constant values for the hypothetical (153)Gd, (192)Ir, (125)I sources are 1.173 cGyh(-1) U(-1), 1.044 cGyh(-1) U(-1), 0.925 cGyh(-1) U(-1), respectively. Radial dose function for the hypothetical (153)Gd source has an increasing trend, while (192)Ir has more uniform and (125)I has more rapidly falling off radial dose functions. 2D anisotropy functions for these three sources indicate that, except at 0.5 cm distance, (192)Ir and (125)I have more isotropic trends as compared to the (153)Gd source. A more uniform radial dose function, and 2D anisotropy functions with more isotropy, a much higher specific activity are advantages of (192)Ir source over (153)Gd. However, a longer half-life of (153)Gd source compared to the other two sources, and lower energy of the source with respect to (192)Ir are advantages of using (153)Gd in brachytherapy versus (192)Ir source.

  17. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...... determination of an optimal dwell-time sequence for a train of seeds that deliver ratiation while stepping through the vessel lesion. The results illustrate the advantage of this strategy over the common approach of delivering radiation by positioning a single train of seeds along the whole lesion....

  18. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite porous matrixes for application as radiation sources in brachytherapy; Sintese e caracterizacao de matrizes porosas de hidroxiapatita para aplicacao como fontes radioativas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Kassio Andre; Lameiras, Fernando Soares; Silva, Viviane Viana [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: kassiolacerda@yahoo.com.br

    2006-04-15

    Porous ceramic materials based on calcium phosphate compounds (CPC) have been studied aiming at different biomedical applications such as implants, drug delivery systems and radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Two kinds of hydroxyapatite (HAp) powders and their ceramic bodies were characterized by a combination of different techniques (X-rays diffraction and fluorescence, infrared spectrophotometry, BET method, thermal analysis, and scanning electron microscopy) to evaluate their physico-chemical and microstructural characteristics in terms of chemical composition, segregated phases, microstructure, porosity, and chemical and thermal stability. The results revealed that these systems presented potential for use as porous biodegradable radioactive sources able to be loaded with a wide range of radionuclides for cancer treatment by the brachytherapy technique. (author)

  19. Cs-137 brachytherapy sources calibration with well chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetto, M.; Sansogne, R.; Arbiser, S.; Duran, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the procedures and actions developed for the identification and reference air kerma rate (S k ) verification of Cs-137 sources used in gynecological brachytherapy practices. Following the IAEA TECDOC 1151 recommendations, the first stage consisted in designing the documentation required for the inventory and shipping registry of sources, along with the digital spreadsheets for calculating the decay and S k of the sources at the moment of implantation. As a second stage, the S k of sources was measured, following the low dose rate sources protocol advise, with a Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber calibrated at the University of Wisconsin SSDL. The documentation generated through this procedure allows identify each source clearly and uni-vocally. No significant differences were found between the S k values obtained from the well chamber calibration procedure and those reported by the manufacturer in the corresponding certificates. The highest percent difference found was 2.3%. (author) [es

  20. Three-dimensional tomosynthetic image restoration for brachytherapy source localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persons, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    Tomosynthetic image reconstruction allows for the production of a virtually infinite number of slices from a finite number of projection views of a subject. If the reconstructed image volume is viewed in toto, and the three-dimensional (3D) impulse response is accurately known, then it is possible to solve the inverse problem (deconvolution) using canonical image restoration methods (such as Wiener filtering or solution by conjugate gradient least squares iteration) by extension to three dimensions in either the spatial or the frequency domains. This dissertation presents modified direct and iterative restoration methods for solving the inverse tomosynthetic imaging problem in 3D. The significant blur artifact that is common to tomosynthetic reconstructions is deconvolved by solving for the entire 3D image at once. The 3D impulse response is computed analytically using a fiducial reference schema as realized in a robust, self-calibrating solution to generalized tomosynthesis. 3D modulation transfer function analysis is used to characterize the tomosynthetic resolution of the 3D reconstructions. The relevant clinical application of these methods is 3D imaging for brachytherapy source localization. Conventional localization schemes for brachytherapy implants using orthogonal or stereoscopic projection radiographs suffer from scaling distortions and poor visibility of implanted seeds, resulting in compromised source tracking (reported errors: 2-4 mm) and dosimetric inaccuracy. 3D image reconstruction (using a well-chosen projection sampling scheme) and restoration of a prostate brachytherapy phantom is used for testing. The approaches presented in this work localize source centroids with submillimeter error in two Cartesian dimensions and just over one millimeter error in the third

  1. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, 137 Cs and 60 Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  2. Evaluation of 101Rh as a brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently a number of hypothetical sources have been proposed and evaluated for use in brachytherapy. In the present study, a hypothetical 101Rh source with mean photon energy of 121.5 keV and half-life of 3.3 years, has been evaluated as an alternative to the existing high-dose-rate (HDR) sources. Dosimetric characteristics of this source model have been determined following the recommendation of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) of the American Association of the Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), and the results are compared with the published data for 57Co source and Flexisource 192Ir sources with similar geometries. Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of the 101Rh hypothetical HDR source design. Geometric design of this hypothetical source was considered to be similar to that of Flexisource 192Ir source. Task group No. 43 dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength per mCi, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated for the 101Rh source through simulations. Results Air kerma strength per activity and dose rate constant for the hypothetical 101Rh source were 1.09 ± 0.01 U/mCi and 1.18 ± 0.08 cGy/(h.U), respectively. At distances beyond 1.0 cm in phantom, radial dose function for the hypothetical 101Rh source is higher than that of 192Ir. It has also similar 2D anisotropy functions to the Flexisource 192Ir source. Conclusions 101Rh is proposed as an alternative to the existing HDR sources for use in brachytherapy. This source provides medium energy photons, relatively long half-life, higher dose rate constant and radial dose function, and similar 2D anisotropy function to the Flexisource 192Ir HDR source design. The longer half-life of the source reduces the frequency of the source exchange for the clinical environment. PMID:26034499

  3. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T., E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  4. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T.

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  5. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  6. Modeling a Hypothetical 170Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical 170 Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of 170 Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical 170 Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount ( 170 Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being generated in the source core and experiencing little attenuation in the source encapsulation. Electrons are efficiently absorbed by the gold and platinum encapsulations. However, for the stainless-steel capsule (or other lower Z encapsulations) electrons will escape. The dose from these electrons is dominant over the photon dose in the first few millimeter but is not taken into account by current standard treatment planning systems. The total energy spectrum of photons emerging from the source depends on the encapsulation composition and results in mean photon energies well above 100 keV. This is higher than the main gamma-ray energy peak at 84 keV. Based on our

  7. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  8. WE-DE-201-08: Multi-Source Rotating Shield Brachytherapy Apparatus for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X; Kim, Y; Flynn, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel multi-source rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) apparatus for the precise simultaneous angular and linear positioning of all partially-shielded 153Gd radiation sources in interstitial needles for treating prostate cancer. The mechanism is designed to lower the detrimental dose to healthy tissues, the urethra in particular, relative to conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) techniques. Methods: Following needle implantation, the delivery system is docked to the patient template. Each needle is coupled to a multi-source afterloader catheter by a connector passing through a shaft. The shafts are rotated by translating a moving template between two stationary templates. Shaft walls as well as moving template holes are threaded such that the resistive friction produced between the two parts exerts enough force on the shafts to bring about the rotation. Rotation of the shaft is then transmitted to the shielded source via several keys. Thus, shaft angular position is fully correlated with the position of the moving template. The catheter angles are simultaneously incremented throughout treatment as needed, and only a single 360° rotation of all catheters is needed for a full treatment. For each rotation angle, source depth in each needle is controlled by a multi-source afterloader, which is proposed as an array of belt-driven linear actuators, each of which drives a source wire. Results: Optimized treatment plans based on Monte Carlo dose calculations demonstrated RSBT with the proposed apparatus reduced urethral D 1cc below that of conventional HDR-BT by 35% for urethral dose gradient volume within 3 mm of the urethra surface. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with multi-source RSBT apparatus using nineteen 62.4 GBq 153 Gd sources is 117 min. Conclusions: The proposed RSBT delivery apparatus in conjunction with multiple nitinol catheter-mounted platinum-shielded 153 Gd sources enables a mechanically feasible urethra

  9. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  10. RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR PATIENT RELEASE FROM CLINIC AFTER RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY OF BRACHYTHERAPY WITH SEALED SOURCE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. M.I. Balonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dose criteria for limitation of exposure incurred by persons helping the patients or living with patients discharged from hospitals following radionuclide therapy or brachytherapy with implanted sealed radionuclide sources have been proposed for national Russian regulation. By means of a conservative dosimetry model, the values of operational radiological criteria for patient discharge from hospital are substantiated, i.e. whole body activity for radionuclides 125I,131I,153Sm and 188Re as well as dose rate near patient body. Observance of suggested criteria included in the new Russian Standards for Radiation Safety (RSS-99/2009 will ensure radiation safety of people in near environment (family, close friends et ah.

  11. Radiation protection after interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirraco, R.; Pereira, A.; Cavaco, A. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil - Centro R egional de Oncologia do Porto, SA, Porto (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In this study we measure patients radiation exposure dose after interstitial {sup 125}I permanent prostate Brachytherapy implants, and correlate it with dose limits for public, total activity implanted, patient preoperative weight(1), distance between prostate walls and anterior skin surface. Methods and Material: We analyse 20 patients who were implanted with {sup 125}I seeds. The instrument used to measure radiation is a calibrated Berthold Umo LB 123 aco-plated to a LB 1236-H10 detector. Three measurements were taken: at the perineal and anterior pelvic zones on contact with the skin and at 1 m from the patient. The maximum value was taken for all measurements. The dose at a distance of one meter is obtained at anterior pelvic zone, perpendicular to the skin, according to the recommendations of A.A.P.M.(1). The distance between prostate walls was determined using post -operative CT images. Results: The doses at the perineal zone have determined an average of 186 {mu}Sv/h (range: 110 340 {mu}Sv/h) and at surface pelvic zone of 41 {mu}Sv/h (range: 15 103 {mu}Sv/h). The dose at a distance of 1 meter has an average value of 0.4 {mu}Sv/h (range: 0.2 1.0 {mu}Sv/h). The average total activity implanted was 25 mCi (range: 17 38 mCi). The distance between prostate walls and skin pelvic surface of the patients has an average value of 8.9 cm (range: 6.6 -11.5 cm). At a distance of 1 meter from the pelvic zone the dose measured is very low and below dose limits imposed by the European Directive EURATOM 2 and the Portuguese law. For general public to reach annual dose limit (EURATOM - 1 mSv/year) when contacting the pelvic zone, we extrapolate that 4 days (range: 1.6 11.1 days) would be needed, assuming a daily contact period of 6 hours. Conclusion: We established a correlation between the distance of prostate walls to the skin perineal surface and the total dose, but we find no correlation between measured doses, total activity implanted

  12. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment calculations. The radiation therapists are specially trained technologists who may assist in delivery of the treatments. ... a computer-controlled remote afterloading machine. X-rays , ultrasound , CT , or MRI scans may be used to ...

  13. Quality assurance of Vari-source high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy- remote after loader and cost effectiveness of Vari-source HDR- brachytherapy: NORI, Islamabad experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Mahmood, H.; Jafri, S.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A quality control of Vari-Source high dose rate (HDR) remote after loading brachytherapy machine was carried out and the cost effectiveness of HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated considering the cost of ten Iridium-192 wire sources at Nuclear Medicine, Oncology and Radiotherapy Institute (NORI), Islamabad, Pakistan. A total number of 253 intracavitary insertions were done in 98 patients from October 1996 to May 2001. The results of the quality control tests performed during 1996 to 2001 were within the acceptable limits. The cost effectiveness of Vari-Source HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated. The average cost per patient was calculated as US$ 491. Small number of patients was treated as the machine was used for gynecologic malignancies only. The objective was to assess the quality control status of HDR brachytherapy machine on patient treatment day, source exchange day and periodic day (monthly basis). It was found that the cost per patient can be minimized if other type of cancer patients are also treated on Vari-Source HDR machine. (author)

  14. Sources of pulsed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of various sources of pulsed radiation are examined from the viewpoint of their importance to the radiation chemist, and some examples of uses of such sources are mentioned. A summary is given of the application of methods of physical dosimetry to pulsed sources, and the calibration of convenient chemical dosimeters by physical dosimetry is outlined. 7 figures, 1 table

  15. Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO): Transition of a magnetic resonance simulator to a brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roberta; Armour, Elwood; Beeckler, Courtney; Briner, Valerie; Choflet, Amanda; Cox, Andrea; Fader, Amanda N; Hannah, Marie N; Hobbs, Robert; Huang, Ellen; Kiely, Marilyn; Lee, Junghoon; Morcos, Marc; McMillan, Paige E; Miller, Dave; Ng, Sook Kien; Prasad, Rashmi; Souranis, Annette; Thomsen, Robert; DeWeese, Theodore L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2018-03-13

    As a core component of a new gynecologic cancer radiation program, we envisioned, structured, and implemented a novel Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO) unit and magnetic resonance (MR)-brachytherapy environment in an existing MR simulator. We describe the external and internal processes required over a 6-8 month time frame to develop a clinical and research program for gynecologic brachytherapy and to successfully convert an MR simulator into an IRO unit. Support of the institution and department resulted in conversion of an MR simulator to a procedural suite. Development of the MR gynecologic brachytherapy program required novel equipment, staffing, infrastructural development, and cooperative team development with anesthetists, nurses, therapists, physicists, and physicians to ensure a safe and functional environment. Creation of a separate IRO unit permitted a novel billing structure. The creation of an MR-brachytherapy environment in an MR simulator is feasible. Developing infrastructure includes several collaborative elements. Unique to the field of radiation oncology, formalizing the space as an Interventional Radiation Oncology unit permits a sustainable financial structure. Copyright © 2018 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental derivation of the fluence non-uniformity correction for air kerma near brachytherapy linear sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E. A.; Almeida, C. E. de

    2008-01-01

    In brachytherapy, one of the elements to take into account for measurements free in air is the non-uniformity of the photon fluence due to the beam divergence that causes a steep dose gradient near the source. The correction factors for this phenomenon have been usually evaluated by two available theories by Kondo and Randolph [Radiat. Res. 13, 37-60 (1960)] and Bielajew [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 517-538 (1990)], both conceived for point sources. This work presents the experimental validation of the Monte Carlo calculations made by Rodriguez and deAlmeida [Phys. Med. Biol. 49, 1705-1709 (2004)] for the non-uniformity correction specifically for a Cs-137 linear source measured using a Farmer type ionization chamber. The experimental values agree very well with the Monte Carlo calculations and differ from the results predicted by both theoretical models widely used. This result confirms that for linear sources there are some important differences at short distances from the source and emphasizes that those theories should not be used for linear sources. The data provided in this study confirm the limitations of the mentioned theories when linear sources are used. Considering the difficulties and uncertainties associated with the experimental measurements, it is recommended to use the Monte Carlo data to assess the non-uniformity factors for linear sources in situations that require this knowledge

  17. Development of Reactor RIs and Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ul Jae; Han, H. S.; Lee, J. S.

    2010-04-01

    This project aimed to develop radioisotopes and radiation sources, which are employed radiotherapy in medical fields and process diagnoses and measurements in industry. Major accomplishments are as followed. · Development of Non-Carrier-Added Therapeutic RI's - Developed the core separation processes by using novel adsorbents - Succeeded commercial scale production of non-carrier-added 177 Lu and developed production processes for 147 Pm and 47 Sc · Demonstration of 188 W/ 188 Re generator technology and prototype product - Demonstrated 1 Ci generator (30 times better performance than commercial products) - Developed pilot-scale production system, and supplied generators for the development of radiopharmaceuticals · Development of 90 Sr/ 90 Y Generator System - Developed core adsorbents for the RI separation - Constructed Proto type generator and demonstrated for 500mCi production - Demonstrated the production of radiopharmaceutical grade 90 Y : 100 ∼ 10,000 purer than commercially available products - Constructed pilot scale generator system for regular production of 90 Y ·Development of β-ray sources for thickness measurements and brachytherapy - Developed 90 Sr thickness gauge source and received KOLAS certification - Developed and tested for the possibility of the application of a β-ray source to brachytherapy of eye diseases. - Completed safety accessment of the P-32brachytherapy source ·Development of Small Focal γ-ray Source for Radiography - Developed the source and tested in real conditions: 28.5% improvement in radiography quality compared to a regular source - Technology-transferred for earlier commercialization ·Extraction of RI Mixture from Irradiated Natural Uranium without Dissolution - Multi-step separation of fission products for useful RI's - Developed six adsorbents and tested for the separation of Lanthanides and Actinide

  18. Effectiveness Evaluation of Skin Covers against Intravascular Brachytherapy Sources Using VARSKIN3 Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghani HR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The most common intravascular brachytherapy sources include 32P, 188Re, 106Rh and 90Sr/90Y. In this research, skin absorbed dose for different covering materials in dealing with these sources were evaluated and the best covering material for skin protection and reduction of absorbed dose by radiation staff was recognized and recommended. Method: Four materials including polyethylene, cotton and two different kinds of plastic were proposed as skin covers and skin absorbed dose at different depths for each kind of the materials was calculated separately using the VARSKIN3 code. Results: The results suggested that for all sources, skin absorbed dose was minimized when using polyethylene. Considering this material as skin cover, maximum and minimum doses at skin surface were related to 90Sr/90Y and 106Rh, respectively. Conclusion: polyethylene was found the most effective cover in reducing skin dose and protecting the skin. Furthermore, proper agreement between the results of VARSKIN3 and other experimental measurements indicated that VRASKIN3 is a powerful tool for skin dose calculations when working with beta emitter sources. Therefore, it can be utilized in dealing with the issue of radiation protection.

  19. Production of 125I seed sources for brachytherapy uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites, M.; Miranda, J.; Condor, R.; Cavero, L.; Martinez, R.

    2006-01-01

    The production of radioactive sources of 125 I, used mainly for the brachytherapy of prostate and ocular cancer, is a work that is being carried out in the plant of production of radioisotopes (PPR) of the Nuclear Center Racso of the IPEN. The employed methodology is based on the 125 I physical-chemistry adsorption at silver wires coated with palladium. In the realization of the tests, it has been considered the procedure used by India and Iran participants of this CRP. In the execution of this work, the 131 I radioisotope is been used simulating the 125 I, because in the PPR-IPEN we produce the 131 I. In total 50 samples were used, they were divided in ten groups. In first place with nine working groups, the optimum conditions for work for the coating of the silver wires with palladium were obtained, these being the following: simple method, employing PdCl 2 0.1 m, pH of 5.5 to 6.5 and a temperature of 100 deg. C. Later on, a series of tests were carried out to determine the appropriate parameters for the adsorption of 131 I in the previously treated wires, these being the following: carrier concentration of Ki 0.03 m, time of adsorption of 6 hours, and temperature of 70 deg. C. Finally, the percentage of 131 I adsorption was obtained in the silver wires tried previously with palladium chloride solution of 98.24%. The control of leachability was made, having very good results. To confirm these previously mentioned parameters, a test was made with ten pieces of silver wires, corresponding to the group 10, giving the confirmation as a result of these. Also, samples of the titanium tube have been sent for test with microplasma welding to a French company: air welding liquidates export. With these results obtained, subsequently the production of these radioactive sources will be carried out employing 125 I as a radioisotope. (author)

  20. Comparison of the hypothetical (57)Co brachytherapy source with the (192)Ir source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rostami, Atefeh; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Khademi, Sara; Knaup, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    The (57)Co radioisotope has recently been proposed as a hypothetical brachytherapy source due to its high specific activity, appropriate half-life (272 days) and medium energy photons (114.17 keV on average). In this study, Task Group No. 43 dosimetric parameters were calculated and reported for a hypothetical (57)Co source. A hypothetical (57)Co source was simulated in MCNPX, consisting of an active cylinder with 3.5 mm length and 0.6 mm radius encapsulated in a stainless steel capsule. Three photon energies were utilized (136 keV [10.68%], 122 keV [85.60%], 14 keV [9.16%]) for the (57)Co source. Air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function, and isodose curves for the source were calculated and compared to the corresponding data for a (192)Ir source. The results are presented as tables and figures. Air kerma strength per 1 mCi activity for the (57)Co source was 0.46 cGyh(-1) cm 2 mCi(-1). The dose rate constant for the (57)Co source was determined to be 1.215 cGyh(-1)U(-1). The radial dose function for the (57)Co source has an increasing trend due to multiple scattering of low energy photons. The anisotropy function for the (57)Co source at various distances from the source is more isotropic than the (192)Ir source. The (57)Co source has advantages over (192)Ir due to its lower energy photons, longer half-life, higher dose rate constant and more isotropic anisotropic function. However, the (192)Ir source has a higher initial air kerma strength and more uniform radial dose function. These properties make (57)Co a suitable source for use in brachytherapy applications.

  1. Study of dose distributions in voxel phantoms for brachytherapy sources using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    This work studies the effects of corrections in the calculation of dose distribution for brachytherapy sources when they are inserted in a male human voxel phantom. The sources studied here are the Best Industries 125 I 2301 model for low dose rate and the Amersham Buchler G0814 model 192 Ir seed for high dose rate, in the simulation of prostate treatments. The presence of organs around the interest point scatters radiation in a different form than a water cube, the situation that is usually configured in these calculations. The insertion of the sources in an anthropomorphic phantom brings results closer to the real situation. The chosen phantom was the head and torso voxel phantom created by Zubal. The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used to simulate the radiation transportation along the source shielding and the human organs of the voxel phantom. After inserting the source in the phantom, the energy deposition in each voxel is computed, allowing the construction of isodose curves. The source insertion in the anthropomorphic phantom aims also at a further knowledge about the brachytherapy treatment planning and additional information such as the target volume dose and in neighbor organs, data that will be useful for medical staff working with this technique. (author)

  2. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A. [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  3. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq 192Ir source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A.

    1995-01-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate 192 Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq 192 Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors

  4. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... been recognized by the Commission or an Agreement State, and who meets the requirements in paragraph (b... competence in radiation safety, radionuclide handling, treatment planning, quality assurance, and clinical...

  5. Water equivalency evaluation of PRESAGE® dosimeters for dosimetry of Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2010-11-01

    A major challenge in brachytherapy dosimetry is the measurement of steep dose gradients. This can be achieved with a high spatial resolution three dimensional (3D) dosimeter. PRESAGE® is a polyurethane based dosimeter which is suitable for 3D dosimetry. Since an ideal dosimeter is radiologically water equivalent, we have investigated the relative dose response of three different PRESAGE® formulations, two with a lower chloride and bromide content than original one, for Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources. Doses were calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. Our results indicate that PRESAGE® dosimeters are suitable for relative dose measurement of Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources and the lower halogen content PRESAGE® dosimeters are more water equivalent than the original formulation.

  6. New sources of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1979-09-01

    An attempt is made to select examples of radiation sources whose application may make new or unconventional demands on radiation protection and dosimetry. A substantial body of knowledge about high energy facilities exists and, partly for this reason, the great high energy accelerators are mentioned only briefly.

  7. New sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1979-09-01

    An attempt is made to select examples of radiation sources whose application may make new or unconventional demands on radiation protection and dosimetry. A substantial body of knowledge about high energy facilities exists and, partly for this reason, the great high energy accelerators are mentioned only briefly

  8. Methodology study for fixation of radioactive iodine in polymeric substrate for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Daiane B. de; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Fernandes, Vagner; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de; Camargo, Anderson Rogerio de

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now the second leading cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Prostate cancer is the most common among men. Brachytherapy is a modality of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed inside or in contact with the organ to be treated. The most widely used radioisotope in prostate brachytherapy is Iodine-125 which is presented fixated on a silver substrate that is subsequently placed inside a titanium capsule. A large dose of radiation is released only in the targeted tumor protecting healthy surrounding tissues. The technique requires the application of 80 - 120 seeds per patient. The implants of seeds have low impact and non-surgical procedures. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. This work proposes an alternative to the seeds that have already been developed, in order to reduce the cost by obtaining a better efficiency on fixing the radioactive iodine onto the epoxy resin. Methods have been developed to perform the fixation of Iodine-125 onto polymeric substrates. The parameters analyzed were the immersion time, type of static or dynamic reaction, concentration of the adsorption solution, the specific activity of the radioactive source, the need for carrier and chemical form of the radioactive Iodine. These experiments defined the most effective method to fixate the Iodine onto the polymeric material (epoxy resin), the Iodine activity in the polymeric substrate, the activity of the distribution of variation in a plot of polymeric cores and the efficiency of the epoxy resin to seal the seed. (author)

  9. Methodology study for fixation of radioactive iodine in polymeric substrate for brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Daiane B. de; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Fernandes, Vagner; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de; Camargo, Anderson Rogerio de, E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is now the second leading cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Prostate cancer is the most common among men. Brachytherapy is a modality of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed inside or in contact with the organ to be treated. The most widely used radioisotope in prostate brachytherapy is Iodine-125 which is presented fixated on a silver substrate that is subsequently placed inside a titanium capsule. A large dose of radiation is released only in the targeted tumor protecting healthy surrounding tissues. The technique requires the application of 80 - 120 seeds per patient. The implants of seeds have low impact and non-surgical procedures. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. This work proposes an alternative to the seeds that have already been developed, in order to reduce the cost by obtaining a better efficiency on fixing the radioactive iodine onto the epoxy resin. Methods have been developed to perform the fixation of Iodine-125 onto polymeric substrates. The parameters analyzed were the immersion time, type of static or dynamic reaction, concentration of the adsorption solution, the specific activity of the radioactive source, the need for carrier and chemical form of the radioactive Iodine. These experiments defined the most effective method to fixate the Iodine onto the polymeric material (epoxy resin), the Iodine activity in the polymeric substrate, the activity of the distribution of variation in a plot of polymeric cores and the efficiency of the epoxy resin to seal the seed. (author)

  10. The role of interstitial brachytherapy in the management of primary radiation therapy for uterine cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Murakami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of this study was to report the clinical results of uterine cervical cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy including brachytherapy, and investigate the role of interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT. Material and methods: All consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients who were treated by primary radiation therapy were reviewed, and those who were treated by ISBT were further investigated for clinical outcomes and related toxicities. Results : From December 2008 to October 2014, 209 consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients were treated with primary radiation therapy. Among them, 142 and 42 patients were treated by intracavitary and hybrid brachytherapy, respectively. Twenty-five patients (12% were treated by high-dose-rate (HDR-ISBT. Five patients with distant metastasis other than para-aortic lymph node were excluded, and 20 patients consisted of the analysis. Three-year overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, and local control (LC rate were 44.4%, 38.9%, and 87.8%, respectively. Distant metastasis was the most frequent site of first relapse after HDR-ISBT. One and four patients experienced grade 3 and 2 rectal bleeding, one grade 2 cystitis, and two grade 2 vaginal ulcer. Conclusions : Feasibility and favorable local control of interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer was demonstrated through a single institutional experience with a small number of patients.

  11. Synchrotron radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the exponential growth of the utilization of synchrotron radiation for research in the domain of the material sciences, atomic and molecular physics, biology and technology, a major construction activity has been generated towards new dedicated electron storage rings, designed optimally for synchrotron radiation applications, also, expansion programs are underway at the existing facilities, such as DORIS, SPEAR, and VEPP. In this report the basic properties of synchrotron radiation will be discussed, a short overview will be given of the existing and new facilities, some aspects of the optimization of a structure for a synchrotron radiation source will be discussed and the addition of wigglers and undulators for spectrum enhancement will be described. Finally, some parameters of an optimized synchrotron radiation source will be given.

  12. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented

  13. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and occupational exposures during manual 192Ir intracoronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Shanta, A.; Tripathi, U.B.; Bhatt, B.C.

    2001-01-01

    Intracoronary brachytherapy is a new modality of radiation therapy and is being used to reduce the rate of restenosis after angioplasty. Clinical trials for evaluation of safety and efficacy of manually implanted 192 Ir seed ribbons are underway at various cardiology centres in India. 192 Ir emits high energy gamma rays (0.136 -1.06 MeV), which causes concern regarding safety of the personnel when these sources are manually used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab) for intracoronary irradiation. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and exposures to personnel have been measured at 6 different cardiology centres in the country during 8 different clinical trials using radiation survey meter, personnel monitoring badges and pocket dosimeters. Activities of 192 Ir seed ribbons used in these clinical trials were in the range of 5.55 - 14.8 GBq. Measured radiation levels behind the mobile lead shields, at the top of lead shields, near the patient head, near the patient toes and at the main door of the Cath Lab were in the range of 2.6-20, 50-256, 385-450, 22-225 and 2-16 μSv/hr/3.7GBq, respectively. Measured effective doses to occupational workers were in range of 14-100 μSv/procedure/3.7GBq. Based on these measurements, user institutions have been advised to use lead glass mounted L-shaped mobile lead shields with proper orientation during clinical trials, avoid unwanted occupancy in the Cath Lab and around the patient during irradiation and use conveniently long forceps or tongs for implantation and removal of sources. (author)

  14. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  15. Categorization of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, M.

    2000-01-01

    Through one-parameter (factor) analysis it is proved a hypothesis that the value of a radiation source (RS) activity of an application correlates with the category (the rank) given to it by the IAEA categorization although it is based on other parameters of the RS applications (practices like devices with radiation sources in industry, science, medicine and agriculture). The principles of the new IAEA categorization, taking into account the potential harm the sources may cause and the necessary regulatory control, are described. (author)

  16. Tunable terahertz radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

    2014-01-21

    Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

  17. High dose-rate brachytherapy source position quality assurance using radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.C.; Devic, S.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, radiographic film has been used to verify high-dose-rate brachytherapy source position accuracy by co-registering autoradiographic and diagnostic images of the associated applicator. Filmless PACS-based clinics that do not have access to radiographic film and wet developers may have trouble performing this quality assurance test in a simple and practical manner. We describe an alternative method for quality assurance using radiochromic-type film. In addition to being easy and practical to use, radiochromic film has some advantages in comparison with traditional radiographic film when used for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance

  18. Clinical Practice and Quality Assurance Challenges in Modern Brachytherapy Sources and Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2008-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either 'systematic' or 'stochastic' in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist

  19. GEC/ESTRO-EAU recommendations on temporary brachytherapy using stepping sources for localised prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovács, György; Pötter, Richard; Loch, Tillmann; Hammer, Josef; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Bertermann, Hagen

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this paper is to present the GEC/ESTRO-EAU recommendations for template and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided transperineal temporary interstitial prostate brachytherapy using a high dose rate iridium-192 stepping source and a remote afterloading technique.

  20. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  1. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, Shahid B.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-01-01

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for 103 Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r,θ), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r 103 Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r,θ) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r,θ) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the linear interpolation technique. The results of these investigations indicate that the TG-43U1 formalism can be extended for elongated brachytherapy sources, if the two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy function is tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 cm, L/2, and L/2±0.2 cm. Moreover, with the addition of recommended radial distances for 2D anisotropy functions, the linear interpolation technique more closely replicates

  2. Application of Gafchromic registered film in the dosimetry of an intravascular brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haijun; Roa, D. Eduardo; Yue Ning; D'Errico, Francesco; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-01-01

    The methodology of brachytherapy source dosimetry with Gafchromic registered MD 55-2 film (ISP Technologies, Inc.) is examined with an emphasis on the nonlinearity of the optical density-dose relation within the dynamic dose range, the radial distance-dependent measurement uncertainty, and the format of data presentation. The specific source chosen for this study was a Checkmate trade mark sign (Cordis Corporation) intravascular brachytherapy system. The two-dimensional dose distribution around the source was characterized by a comprehensive analysis of measurement uncertainties. A comparative analysis of the dosimetric data from the vendor and from the scientific literature showed a substantial consistency of the information available for the Checkmate trade mark sign source. Our two-dimensional dosimetric data for the Checkmate trade mark sign source trains is presented in the form of measured along and away dose tables

  3. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    cardiovascular interventions. The present report includes a description of suitable detector systems that can be used for the calibration. It must be emphasized that for safe use of brachytherapy a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme should be developed at the radiotherapy center using this modality. A QA programme cannot rest on a source calibration alone, but in addition it should address all the different steps included in the treatment process. Such a programme is described in IAEA- TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. As summarized in the present report, omission of a QA programme may have serious consequences for a patient undergoing brachytherapy treatment. The parts of this publication describing the calibration of low energy photon sources and beta ray sources have been written in close collaboration with members of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  4. Safe handling of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    This chapter discussed the subjects related to the safe handling of radiation sources: type of radiation sources, method of use: transport within premises, transport outside premises; Disposal of Gamma Sources

  5. Categorization of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a categorization scheme for radiation sources that could be relevant to decisions both in a retrospective application to bring sources under control and in a prospective sense to guide the application of the regulatory infrastructure. The Action Plan envisages that the preparation of guidance on national strategies and programmes for the detection and location of orphan sources and their subsequent management should commence after the categorization of sources has been carried out. In the prospective application of the system of notification, registration, and licensing, the categorization is relevant to prioritize a regulatory authority's resources and training activities; to guide the degree of detail necessary for a safety assessment; and to serve as a measure of the intensity of effort which a regulatory authority should apply to the safety and security of a particular type of source

  6. Dosimetry experience of 192IR sources used In HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Myrku, Rodina Cela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 192IR Sources are the most commonly used in radiotherapy treatments HDR worldwide. According to international recommendations on quality assurance in HDR brachytherapy, an acceptance test based on the determination of the source strength of any new source shall be carried out before first application to verify the manufacturer’s calibration data. The present paper gives the experimental determination of the source strength for our brachytherapy sources used until now in brachytherapy treatments. Materials/Methods: At Mother Teresa University Hospital we have a cost-effective gynecological brachytherapy unit from Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG named GyneSource® that is a five channel HDR after loader equipped with an 192IR source. The software used is HDR plus™ 2.5 that delivers an optimized treatment plan and makes the process especially fast and we use intracavitary BEBIG applicators. From April 2009 up to December 2012, we have imported nine HDR 192IR Sources. The exchange of the source and acceptance test is done by the physicist of the clinic once the source is imported. The measurements are done with a Well-type ionization chamber HDR1000 Plus and the electrometer used is MAX4000. Only seven sources are compared as we miss the dosimetry data of the first source, and the forth source was not measured and not used because the machine was not working in that time. Results/Conclusions: Eight sources were accepted for clinically use as the measurement were within the tolerance. The source number four with e deviation of -1.92% has been double checked compared with a free in-air measurement with farmer type chamber that gave a deviation to source certificate of 4% that is still inside the tolerance to accept a source for clinical use. The deviations of measured Air Kerma rate to the value of the sources certificates of all our used 192IR sources are less than 2%, which are within the tolerance. The checked value of updated source strength in

  7. Monte Carlo dosimetry of the IRAsource high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabiasl, Akbar; Ayoobian, Navid; Jabbari, Iraj; Poorbaygi, Hossein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a common method for cancer treatment in clinical brachytherapy. Because of the different source designs, there is a need for specific dosimetry data set for each HDR model. The purpose of this study is to obtain detailed dose rate distributions in water phantom for a first prototype HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source model, IRAsource, and compare with the other published works. In this study, Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP version 4C) code was used to simulate the dose rate distributions around the HDR source. A full set of dosimetry parameters reported by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43U1 was evaluated. Also, the absorbed dose rate distributions in water, were obtained in an along-away look-up table. The dose rate constant, Λ, of the IRAsource was evaluated to be equal to 1.112 ± 0.005 cGy h −1 U −1 . The results of dosimetry parameters are presented in tabulated and graphical formats and compared with those reported from other commercially available HDR 192 Ir sources, which are in good agreement. This justifies the use of specific data sets for this new source. The results obtained in this study can be used as input data in the conventional treatment planning systems.

  8. Optical Imaging of Ionizing Radiation from Clinical Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Travis M; Drain, Charles Michael; Grimm, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear medicine uses ionizing radiation for both in vivo diagnosis and therapy. Ionizing radiation comes from a variety of sources, including x-rays, beam therapy, brachytherapy, and various injected radionuclides. Although PET and SPECT remain clinical mainstays, optical readouts of ionizing radiation offer numerous benefits and complement these standard techniques. Furthermore, for ionizing radiation sources that cannot be imaged using these standard techniques, optical imaging offers a unique imaging alternative. This article reviews optical imaging of both radionuclide- and beam-based ionizing radiation from high-energy photons and charged particles through mechanisms including radioluminescence, Cerenkov luminescence, and scintillation. Therapeutically, these visible photons have been combined with photodynamic therapeutic agents preclinically for increasing therapeutic response at depths difficult to reach with external light sources. Last, new microscopy methods that allow single-cell optical imaging of radionuclides are reviewed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Neuro-oncology update: radiation safety and nursing care during interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, T.M.; Drake, D.K.; Sewchand, W.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation control and safety are major considerations for nursing personnel during the care of patients receiving brachytherapy. Since the theory and practice of radiation applications are not part of the routine curriculum of nursing programs, the education of nurses and other health care professionals in radiation safety procedures is important. Regulatory agencies recommend that an annual safety course be given to all persons frequenting, using, or associated with patients containing radioactive materials. This article presents pertinent aspects of the principles and procedures of radiation safety, the role of personnel dose-monitoring devices, and the value of additional radiation control features, such as a lead cubicle, during interstitial brain implants. One institution's protocol and procedures for the care of high-intensity iridium-192 brain implants are discussed. Preoperative teaching guidelines and nursing interventions included in the protocol focus on radiation control principles

  10. Reduction in radiation exposure to nursing personnel with the use of remote afterloading brachytherapy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.; Eichling, J.; Purdy, J.; Slessinger, E.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation exposure to nursing personnel from patients with brachytherapy implants on a large brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposure to nurses, as determined by TLD monitors, indicates a 7-fold reduction in exposure after the implementation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for six quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the nurses of 152 and 154 mrem (1.5 mSv). After the implementation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per nurse of 23 and 19 mrem (0.2 mSv). This is an 87% reduction in exposure to nurses with the use of these devices (p less than 0.01)

  11. Outcomes and toxicities in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlussel Markovic, Emily; Buckstein, Michael; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard G

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the cancer control outcomes and long-term treatment-related morbidity of brachytherapy as well as combination brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. A retrospective review was conducted in a prospectively collected database of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated either with brachytherapy or brachytherapy and EBRT, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in the period 1990-2014. Urinary and erectile dysfunction symptoms were measured using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the Mount Sinai erectile function scale and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Cancer control endpoints included biochemical failure and development of distant metastases. All statistical analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Survival curves were calculated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial methods and compared using log-rank tests. Cox regression multivariate analyses were used to test the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcomes. A total of 902 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 91 months. Of these, 390 received brachytherapy and 512 received combination therapy with EBRT. In patients with one intermediate-risk factor, the addition of EBRT did not significantly affect freedom from biochemical failure or distant metastases. Among patients with two or three intermediate-risk factors, added EBRT did not improve freedom from biochemical failure. Significant differences in late toxicity between patients treated with brachytherapy vs combination brachytherapy and EBRT were identified including urge incontinence (P actuarial methods showed that patients receiving combination therapy more frequently experienced loss of potency, as measured by the Mount Sinai erectile function scale (P = 0.040). Brachytherapy monotherapy results in equal biochemical and distant control in both patients with

  12. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an 192 Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an 192 Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The

  13. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria E.C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Calvo, Wilson A.P., E-mail: somessar@ipen.b, E-mail: afeher@ipen.b, E-mail: sprenger@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b, E-mail: olcosta@ipen.b, E-mail: wapcalvo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  14. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria E.C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Calvo, Wilson A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  15. An assessment of the radiological impact of brachytherapy application in Metro Manila hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palattao, M.V.B.; Venida, L.L.; Loterina, R.A.; Espiritu, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most important uses of radioactive sources in medicine is the application of brachytherapy technology. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation therapy where an encapsulated radioactive source delivers gamma or beta radiation into a tumor site. The paper describes different categories of brachytherapy applications involving manual insertion or afterloading and remote afterloading techniques. A list of five hospitals in Metro Manila practicing different techniques of brachytherapy are enumerated. Because of the widespread uses of radioactive sources in brachytherapy technology in medicine, inadequate control in its use had led to a number of incidents resulting to unnecessary exposure of radiation workers, patients and general public. This study was initiated to determine the radilogical hazards involved in brachytherapy applications. It presents contingency scenarios and their projected radiological consequences. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winick, Herman

    2003-01-01

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, micr...

  17. Effect of inhomogeneities and source position on dose distribution of nucletron high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy source by Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandola R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of least dense dry air and highly dense cortical bone in the path of radiation and the position of source, near or far from the surface of patient, affects the exact dose delivery like in breast brachytherapy. Aim: This study aims to find out the dose difference in the presence of inhomogenieties like cortical bone and dry air as well as to find out difference of dose due to position of source in water phantom of high dose rate (HDR 192 Ir nucletron microselectron v2 (mHDRv2 brachytherapy source using Monte Carlo (MC simulation EGSnrc code, so that the results could be used in Treatment Planning System (TPS for more precise brachytherapy treatment. Settings and Design: The settings and design are done using different software of the computer. Methods and Materials: For this study, the said source, water phantom of volume 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 , inhomogeneities each of volume 1 x 2 x 2 cm 3 with their position, water of water phantom and position of source are modeled using three-dimensional MC EGSnrc code. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and probability are used for results and discussion. Results : The % relative dose difference is calculated here as 5.5 to 6.5% higher and 4.5 to 5% lower in the presence of air and cortical bone respectively at transverse axis of the source, which may be due to difference of linear attenuation coefficients of the inhomogeneities. However, when the source was positioned at 1 cm distance from the surface of water phantom, the near points between 1 to 2 cm and 3 to 8 cm. from the source, at its transverse axis, were 2 to 3.5% and 4 to 16% underdose to the dose when the source was positioned at mid-point of water phantom. This may be due to lack of back scatter material when the source was positioned very near to the surface of said water phantom and overlap of the additional cause of missing scatter component with the primary dose for near points from the source. These results were found in

  18. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Tian, J.; Lin, Y.; Chen, S.; He, W.; Hu, Y.; Li, Q.

    1985-01-01

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  19. Non-uniform dwell times in line source high dose rate brachytherapy: physical and radiobiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Tan, L.T.; Freestone, G.; Bleasdale, C.; Myint, S.; Littler, J.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to vary source dwell times in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy allows for the use of non-uniform dwell times along a line source. This may have advantages in the radical treatment of tumours depending on individual tumour geometry. This study investigates the potential improvements in local tumour control relative to adjacent normal tissue isoeffects when intratumour source dwell times are increased along the central portion of a line source (technique A) in radiotherapy schedules which include a relatively small component of HDR brachytherapy. Such a technique is predicted to increase the local control for tumours of diameters ranging between 2 cm and 4 cm by up to 11% compared with a technique in which there are uniform dwell times along the line source (technique B). There is no difference in the local control rates for the two techniques when used to treat smaller tumours. Normal tissue doses are also modified by the technique used. Technique A produces higher normal tissue doses at points perpendicular to the centre of the line source and lower dose at points nearer the ends of the line source if the prescription point is not in the central plane of the line source. Alternatively, if the dose is prescribed at a point in the central plane of the line source, the dose at all the normal tissue points are lower when technique A is used. (author)

  20. Radiation absorbed doses in the event of balloon rupture (BR) during endovascular brachytherapy (EB) using 188Re-perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelides, S.; Hetherington, E.; Karolis, C.; Walker, B.; Jackson, T.; Knittel, T.; Friend, C.; Pitney, M.; Jepson, N.; Milross, C.; Lonergan, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: endovascular brachytherapy (EB) using liquid or solid radiation sources, is an effective emerging therapy for coronary artery disease. Liquid sources provide uniform radiation dose to the vessel wall. However the radiation burden in the unlikely event of BR is not insignificant. The aims of this study were to determine i) absorbed dose for various 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals in the event of BR, and ii) effects of thyroid uptake blocking agent, Lugol's iodine (Ll) and/or bladder catheterisation (BC). Dose calculations were based on MIRDOSE 3.1 with dynamic bladder model and MIRD Dose Estimate Report No.8 for 99 Tc m -pertechnetate, which has similar biokinetic properties to 188 Re-perrhenate. Normal renal function and a bladder voiding interval of 4.8h (1 minute with catheter) were assumed. BR was simulated ex-vivo by puncturing a Solaris angioplasty balloon filled with normal saline at 4 atm. LI, MAG3 and DTPA substantially reduces the radiation dose following BR, particularly to the thyroid, and BC reduces the bladder wall dose. Only the contents of the balloon leaked; 0.4 ml of the total volume of 1.8ml. As binding of 188 Re to ligands is cumbersome, we opted to use LI. Twenty five patients with in-stent re-stenosis have been treated using 188 Re-perrhenate (8 GBq/ml), with no BR. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Radiation-induced circumscribed superficial morphea after brachytherapy for endometrial adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Trivedi, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced morphea (RIM is a rare and underrecognized complication of radiation therapy that most commonly occurs in women after treatment for breast cancer. Although not fully understood, RIM is hypothesized to arise from an increase in cytokines that stimulate collagen production and extracellular matrix formation. Most documented cases of RIM occur 1 year after radiation therapy and are localized to areas that were treated for breast cancer. We report on a case of a female patient with stage IB endometrial adenocarcinoma who was treated with 24 Gray of adjuvant brachytherapy. The patient developed a diffuse morpheaform, pruritic eruption only at distant sites from the brachytherapy treatment field. Although treatment for RIM is generally unsatisfactory, our patient experienced improvement in the pruritus and a regression of the lesions while applying topical 0.1% tacrolimus ointment and 0.1% triamcinolone creme. An early diagnosis of RIM can prevent extensive workup, guide treatment, and improve quality of life for patients. Keywords: radiation-induced morphea, postirradiation morphea

  2. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  3. Natural sources of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Natural sources of ionizing radiations are described in detail. The sources are subdivided into sources of extraterrestrial origin (cosmic radiation) and sources of terrestrial origin. Data on the concentration of different nuclides in rocks, various soils, ground waters, atmospheric air, tissues of plants and animals, various food stuffs are presented. The content of natural radionuclides in environmental objects, related to human activities, is discussed

  4. Development of an open source software module for enhanced visualization during MR-guided interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Egger, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, gynecologic malignancies were the 4th leading cause of death in U.S. women and for patients with extensive primary or recurrent disease, treatment with interstitial brachytherapy may be an option. However, brachytherapy requires precise insertion of hollow catheters with introducers into the tumor in order to eradicate the cancer. In this study, a software solution to assist interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy has been investigated and the software has been realized as an own module under (3D) Slicer, which is a free open source software platform for (translational) biomedical research. The developed research module allows on-time processing of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) data over a direct DICOM connection to a MR scanner. Afterwards follows a multi-stage registration of CAD models of the medical brachytherapy devices (template, obturator) to the patient's MR images, enabling the virtual placement of interstitial needles to assist the physician during the intervention.

  5. Mechanical Design of the Radio-Isotope Source Driver Module for an Initial Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Tri Harjanto; Hendra Prasetia

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy equipment for therapy against cervical cancer is developed by empowering local products. An Iridium-192 with 5 Curies of energy is used. The source is wrapped in a capsule and combined with a wire diameter of 1 mm and length 1800 mm. The therapy is carried out by inserting the radiation source into the patient's body through an applicator. The system for loading-unloading the isotope source is divided into three modules: the source driver module, the source container modules, and channel distributor module. In this paper, the discussion is focused on engineering activities of the first module that serves to drive forward and backward position of the Iridium-192 isotope sources. The activity begins with the development of preliminary design sketches that produces drawings of mechanical components required. Furthermore, the calculations are carried out in order to establish the main component specifications. From this stage, a stepper motor type M66-A50K-G10 as a mechanical driver is chosen. The next stage is developing the detailed design and producing detailed drawings for all components. The fabrication of each component refers to the detailed design drawings. All components are assembled completely into the source driver module. Test also shows that the module works manually well. By rotating the manual handle in both directions, the tip of the wire moves alternately in forward and backward directions. (author)

  6. A method to combine three dimensional dose distributions for external beam and brachytherapy radiation treatments for gynecological neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, V.; Sahijdak, W.M.; Orton, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation treatment of gynecological neoplasms, such as cervical carcinoma, usually combines external radiation therapy with one or more intracavitary brachytherapy applications. Although the dose from external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy can be calculated and displayed in 3D individually, the dose distributions are not combined. At most, combined point doses are calculated for select points using various time-dose models. In this study, we present a methodology to combine external beam and brachytherapy treatments for gynecological neoplasms. Material and Methods: Three dimensional bio-effect treatment planning to obtain complication probability has been outlined. CT scans of the patient's pelvis with the gynecological applicator in place are used to outline normal tissue and tumor volumes. 3D external beam and brachytherapy treatment plans are developed separately and an external beam dose matrix and a brachytherapy dose matrix was calculated. The dose in each voxel was assumed to be homogeneous. The physical dose in each voxel of the dose matrix was then converted into extrapolated response dose (ERD) based on the linear quadratic model that accounts for the dose per fraction, number of fractions, dose rate, and complete or incomplete repair of sublethal damage (time between fractions). The net biological dose delivered was obtained by summing the ERD grids from external beam and brachytherapy since there was complete repair of sublethal damage between external beam and brachytherapy treatments. The normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability were obtained using the biological dose matrix based on the critical element model. Results: The outlined method of combining external beam and brachytherapy treatments was implemented on gynecological treatments using an applicator for brachytherapy treatments. Conclusion: Implementation of the biological dose calculation that combine different modalities is extremely useful

  7. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-01-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (Λ) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (<50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of Λ taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of Λ. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in Λ determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it ideal to determine

  8. Endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy as boost radiation for primary early T stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Bo Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT is usually applied as boost radiotherapy for superficial residual of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC after primary extern-beam radiptherapy (ERT. Here, we evaluated the outcome of endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy (IMBT boost radiation for deep-seated residual NPC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two hundred and thirteen patients with residual NPC who were salvaged with brachytherapy boost radiation during 2005-2009 were analyzed retrospectively. Among these patients, 171 patients had superficial residual NPC (≤1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium were treated with ICBT boost radiation, and interstitial IMBT boost radiation was delivered to 42 patients with deep-seated residual NPC (>1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium. We found that IMBT boost subgroup had a higher ratio of T2b (81.0% VS 34.5%, P<0.001 and stage II (90.5% VS 61.4%, P = 0.001 than that of ICBT boost subgroup. The dosage of external-beam radiotherapy in the nasopharyngeal (63.0±3.8 VS 62.6±4.3 Gray (Gy, P = 0.67 and regional lymph nodes (55.8±5.0 VS 57.5±5.7 Gy, P = 0.11 was comparable in both groups. For brachytherapy, IMBT subgroup had a lower boost radiation dosage than ICBT subgroup (11.0±2.9 VS 14.8±3.2 Gy, P<0.01. Though the IMBT group had deeper residual tumors and received lower boost radiation dosages, both subgroups had the similar 5-year actuarial overall survival rate (IMBT VS ICBT group: 96.8% VS 93.6%, P = 0.87, progression-free survival rate (92.4% VS 86.5%, P = 0.41 and distant metastasis-free survival rate (94.9% VS 92.7%, P = 0.64. Moreover, IMBT boost radiation subgroup had a similar local (97.4% VS 94.4%, P = 0.57 and regional (95.0% VS 97.2%, P = 0.34 control to ICBT subgroup. The acute and late toxicities rates were comparable between the both subgroups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IMBT boost radiation may be a promising therapeutic

  9. Evaluation of the response of polymeric gel modified MAGIC-f using a clinical brachytherapy source and Monte Carlo simulation with package PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevedo, Ana Luiza; Nicolucci, Patricia; Borges, Leandro F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work a comparison of experimental and simulated relative doses of a clinical brachytherapy source was performed. A 5 x 5 x 7 cm 3 phantom with a modified MAGIC-f gel was irradiated using a clinical 192 Ir source and read using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE was used to simulate the dose distributions of the same radiation source. The dose distributions were obtained in two planes perpendicular to the source: one passing through the source's center and the other at 0.5 cm away from the source's center. The higher differences found between experimental and computational distributions were 12.5% at a point 0.62 cm from the source for the central plane and 8.6% at 1.3 cm from the source to the plane 0.5 cm away from the source's center. Considering the high dose gradient of these dose distributions, the results obtained show that the modified MAGIC-f gel is promising for brachytherapy dosimetry. (author)

  10. Study of dosimetric parameters for iodine-125 brachytherapy sources development from IPEN-CNEN/SP using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Tiago Batista de

    2016-01-01

    Expectations of the World Health Organization for the year 2030 are that the number of cancer deaths is approximately 13.2 million, reflecting the high proportion of this disease in global health issue. With respect to prostate cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute, the number of cases diagnosed worldwide in 2012 was approximately 1.1 million, while in Brazil the data demonstrated the incidence of 68,000 new cases. The treatment of cancer can be performed with surgery (prostatectomy) or radiation therapy. Among radiotherapy, we can highlight the brachytherapy technique, which consists in the introduction of small radioactive sources (seeds) within the prostate, which is delivered a high dose value in the treatment volume and low dose in the surrounding tissues. In Brazil, the medical profession estimates a demand of approximately 8000 seeds / month, and the unit cost of each seed at least US $ 26.00. The AAPM protocol TG-43 recommend the dose-rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function for dosimetric analysis LDR brachytherapy seeds. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to assess the dosimetric parameters of the OncoSeed-6711, manufactured by Oncura-GEHealthcare, and a seed developed by Radiation Technology Center, using the MCNP5 code. A 6711 seed, an IPEN seed and the 30 x 30 x 30cm 3 phantom filled with water were modeled to simulate the dose distribution. The 6711 seed parameters were compared with literature, and the results presented relative error less than 0.1% for Λ. In comparison with the 6711 seed, the IPEN model seed dosimetric parameters were similar, account the statistical uncertainty. (author)

  11. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ 2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In

  12. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.

    1999-01-01

    determination of an optimal dwell-time sequence for a train of seeds that deliver ratiation while stepping through the vessel lesion. The results illustrate the advantage of this strategy over the common approach of delivering radiation by positioning a single train of seeds along the whole lesion....

  13. Experience with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation sources is discussed, emphasizing characteristics important for x-ray microscopy. Bending magnets, wigglers and undulators are considered as sources of radiation. Operating experience at the national Synchrotron Light Source on the VUV and XRAY storage rings is reviewed, with particular consideration given to achieved current and lifetime, transverse bunch dimensions, and orbit stability. 6 refs., 3 figs

  14. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  15. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the performance of high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hayes, John K; Hsu, I-Chow J; Morris, David E; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Tward, Jonathan D; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Independent assessment of source position for gynecological applicator in high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Satoshi; Nishioka, Shie; Iijima, Kotaro; Wakita, Akihisa; Abe, Yukinao; Tohyama, Naoki; Kawamura, Shinji; Minemura, Toshiyuki; Itami, Jun

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a phantom designed for independent examination of a source position in brachytherapy that is suitable for inclusion in an external auditing program. We developed a phantom that has a special design and a simple mechanism, capable of firmly fixing a radiochromic film and tandem-ovoid applicators to assess discrepancies in source positions between the measurements and treatment planning system (TPS). Three tests were conducted: 1) reproducibility of the source positions ( n = 5); 2) source movements inside the applicator tube; 3) changing source position by changing curvature of the transfer tubes. In addition, as a trial study, the phantom was mailed to 12 institutions, and 23 trial data sets were examined. The source displacement ΔX and ΔY (reference = TPS) were expressed according to the coordinates, in which the positive direction on the X-axis corresponds to the external side of the applicator perpendicular to source transfer direction Y-axis. Test 1: The 1σ fell within 1 mm irrespective of the dwell positions. Test 2: ΔX were greater around the tip of the applicator owing to the source cable. Test 3: All of the source position changes fell within 1 mm. For postal audit, the mean and 1.96σ in ΔX were 0.8 and 0.8 mm, respectively. Almost all data were located within a positive region along the X-axis due to the source cable. The mean and 1.96σ in ΔY were 0.3 and 1.6 mm, respectively. The variance in ΔY was greater than that in ΔX, and large uncertainties exist in the determination of the first dwell position. The 95% confidence limit was 2.1 mm. In HDR brachytherapy, an effectiveness of independent source position assessment could be demonstrated. The 95% confidence limit was 2.1 mm for a tandem-ovoids applicator.

  17. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Daiane C.B.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.; Vicente, Roberto; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S.; Batista, Talita Q.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R.; Karam Junior, Dib

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)

  18. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  19. Determination of factors through Monte Carlo method for Fricke dosimetry from 192Ir sources for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Mariano Gazineu; Salata, Camila; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas develops a methodology for the determination of the absorbed dose to water by Fricke chemical dosimetry method for brachytherapy sources of 192 Ir high dose rate and have compared their results with the laboratory of the National Research Council Canada. This paper describes the determination of the correction factors by Monte Carlo method, with the Penelope code. Values for all factors are presented, with a maximum difference of 0.22% for their determination by an alternative way. (author)

  20. MR-based source localization for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E; Moerland, M A; Zijlstra, F; Viergever, M A; Lagendijk, J J W; Seevinck, P R

    2018-04-05

    For the purpose of MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method for real-time localization of an HDR brachytherapy source was developed, which requires high spatial and temporal resolutions. MR-based localization of an HDR source serves two main aims. First, it enables real-time treatment verification by determination of the HDR source positions during treatment. Second, when using a dummy source, MR-based source localization provides an automatic detection of the source dwell positions after catheter insertion, allowing elimination of the catheter reconstruction procedure. Localization of the HDR source was conducted by simulation of the MR artifacts, followed by a phase correlation localization algorithm applied to the MR images and the simulated images, to determine the position of the HDR source in the MR images. To increase the temporal resolution of the MR acquisition, the spatial resolution was decreased, and a subpixel localization operation was introduced. Furthermore, parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding) was applied to further decrease the MR scan time. The localization method was validated by a comparison with CT, and the accuracy and precision were investigated. The results demonstrated that the described method could be used to determine the HDR source position with a high accuracy (0.4-0.6 mm) and a high precision (⩽0.1 mm), at high temporal resolutions (0.15-1.2 s per slice). This would enable real-time treatment verification as well as an automatic detection of the source dwell positions.

  1. MR-based source localization for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E.; Moerland, M. A.; Zijlstra, F.; Viergever, M. A.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Seevinck, P. R.

    2018-04-01

    For the purpose of MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method for real-time localization of an HDR brachytherapy source was developed, which requires high spatial and temporal resolutions. MR-based localization of an HDR source serves two main aims. First, it enables real-time treatment verification by determination of the HDR source positions during treatment. Second, when using a dummy source, MR-based source localization provides an automatic detection of the source dwell positions after catheter insertion, allowing elimination of the catheter reconstruction procedure. Localization of the HDR source was conducted by simulation of the MR artifacts, followed by a phase correlation localization algorithm applied to the MR images and the simulated images, to determine the position of the HDR source in the MR images. To increase the temporal resolution of the MR acquisition, the spatial resolution was decreased, and a subpixel localization operation was introduced. Furthermore, parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding) was applied to further decrease the MR scan time. The localization method was validated by a comparison with CT, and the accuracy and precision were investigated. The results demonstrated that the described method could be used to determine the HDR source position with a high accuracy (0.4–0.6 mm) and a high precision (⩽0.1 mm), at high temporal resolutions (0.15–1.2 s per slice). This would enable real-time treatment verification as well as an automatic detection of the source dwell positions.

  2. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krema, Hatem, E-mail: htmkrm19@yahoo.com [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weisbrod, Daniel [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J.; Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  3. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of radionuclide-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Chadha, Manjeet; Mourtada, Firas; Demanes, D Jeffrey

    Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy method in which radionuclide sources are used to deliver a radiation dose at a distance of up to a few centimeters by surface, intracavitary, intraluminal, or interstitial application. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclides for brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses radionuclides such as iridium-192 at dose rates of 20 cGy per minute (12 Gy per hour) or more to a designated target point or volume. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is indicated for treating malignant or benign tumors where the treatment volume or targeted points are defined and accessible. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Californium-252 versus conventional gamma radiation in the brachytherapy of advanced cervical carcinoma: comparative treatment results of a 10-year, randomized study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tačev, Tačo; Strnad, Vratislav; Ptáčková, Blanka

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have shown that the application of 252Cf, as a source of gamma/neutron radiation in brachytherapy, provides properties and new treatment modalities that help to overcome this factor. There were 117 patients with stages IIb and IIIb treated intracavitarily with 252Cf during the first week of therapy by 6 Gy (40 Gy-eq) of the neutron component. Supplementation by a 16 Gy dose of intracavitary gamma radiation was done in the fifth week. There were 110 patients with stages IIb and IIIb intracavitarily treated solely by gamma radiation. An intracavitary dose of 56 Gy was applied in two fractions at the third and fifth weeks, respectively. In all patients the same dose of 56 Gy-eq was applied intracavitarily, supported by an external radiation of 40 Gy. The total applied doses at points A (paracevical space) and B (pelvis wall) were 85 and 59 Gy, respectively. The importance of 252Cf application in the brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma by overcoming the tumor resistance to conventional photon irradiation has been confirmed.

  5. Calculated neutron air kerma strength conversion factors for a generically encapsulated Cf-252 brachytherapy source

    CERN Document Server

    Rivard, M J; D'Errico, F; Tsai, J S; Ulin, K; Engler, M J

    2002-01-01

    The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron air kerma strength conversion factor (S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f) is a parameter needed to convert the radionuclide mass (mu g) provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory into neutron air kerma strength required by modern clinical brachytherapy dosimetry formalisms indicated by Task Group No. 43 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The impact of currently used or proposed encapsulating materials for sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf brachytherapy sources (Pt/Ir-10%, 316L stainless steel, nitinol, and Zircaloy-2) on S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f was calculated and results were fit to linear equations. Only for substantial encapsulation thicknesses, did S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f decrease, while the impact of source encapsulation composition is increasingly negligible as Z increases. These findings are explained on the basis of the non-relativistic kinematics governing the majority of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron interactions. Neutron kerma and energy spectra resul...

  6. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Stephen R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: UMahmood@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  7. SU-E-T-284: Revisiting Reference Dosimetry for the Model S700 Axxent 50 KV{sub p} Electronic Brachytherapy Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, JR [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft was characterized in 2006 by Rivard et al. The source design was modified in 2006 to include a plastic centering insert at the source tip to more accurately position the anode. The objectives of the current study were to establish an accurate Monte Carlo source model for simulation purposes, to dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and to determine dose differences between the source with and without the centering insert. Methods: Design information from dissected sources and vendor-supplied CAD drawings were used to devise the source model for radiation transport simulations of dose distributions in a water phantom. Collision kerma was estimated as a function of radial distance, r, and polar angle, θ, for determination of reference TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.03% at r=1 cm and 0.08% at r=10 cm. Results: The dose rate distribution the transverse plane did not change beyond 2% between the 2006 model and the current study. While differences exceeding 15% were observed near the source distal tip, these diminished to within 2% for r>1.5 cm. Differences exceeding a factor of two were observed near θ=150° and in contact with the source, but diminished to within 20% at r=10 cm. Conclusions: Changes in source design influenced the overall dose rate and distribution by more than 2% over a third of the available solid angle external from the source. For clinical applications using balloons or applicators with tissue located within 5 cm from the source, dose differences exceeding 2% were observed only for θ>110°. This study carefully examined the current source geometry and presents a modern reference TG-43 dosimetry dataset for the model S700 source.

  8. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.

    2003-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D 50 ) and 25% (D 25 ) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D 50 should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation

  9. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales L, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  10. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  11. Study and methodology development for quality control in the production process of iodine-125 radioactive sealed sources applied to brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Joao Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Today cancer is the second cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Excluding skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most incident in the population. Prostate tumor can be treated by several ways, including brachytherapy, which consists in introducing sealed radioactive sources (Iodine - 125 seeds) inside the tumor. The target region of treatment receives a high radiation dose, but healthy neighbor tissues receive a significantly reduced radiation dose. The seed is made of a welding sealed titanium capsule, 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm length, enclosing a 0.5 mm diameter silver wire with Iodine-125 adsorbed. After welded, the seeds have to be submitted to a leak test to prevent any radioactive material release. The aims of this work were: (a) the study of the different leakage test methods applied to radioactive seeds and recommended by the ISO 997820, (b) the choice of the appropriate method and (c) the flowchart determination of the process to be used during the seeds production. The essays exceeded the standards with the use of ultra-sound during immersion and the corresponding benefits to leakage detection. Best results were obtained with the immersion in distilled water at 20 degree C for 24 hours and distilled water at 70 degree C for 30 minutes. These methods will be used during seed production. The process flowchart has all the phases of the leakage tests according to the sequence determined in the experiments. (author)

  12. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides (60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source beta-, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the 192Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for 60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for 60Co and 192Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., > 0.5%) within 3.3 mm of 60Co and 1.7 mm of 192Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for 137Cs and 169Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  13. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  14. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla Daruich

    2012-01-01

    Among the different ways to treat prostate cancer, brachytherapy with iodine- 125 seeds is an option that provides good results and fewer side effects. In the present study several deposition methods of radioactive iodine in a silver substrate were compared in order to choose the most suitable alternative for the routine production to be implemented at IPEN's laboratory. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers present. Therefore, the 131 I was used for testing (same chemical behavior as 131 I). Four methods were selected: Method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method developed by D.Kubiatowicz) presented 65.16% efficiency; Method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by D. Kubiatowicz - HCl) with the result of 70.80% efficiency; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) with 55.80% efficiency; Method 4 (IQ-IPEN) resulted in 99% efficiency. Since this method has more radioactive material fixation (which represents virtually the entire cost of the seed), the final price is the cheapest. This method is the suggested one to be implemented in the IPEN's laboratory for brachytherapy sources production. Besides, the method is the fasted one. (author)

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy to replace brachytherapy for brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer patients – a preliminary result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,4 Ming-Chow Wei,4 Wen-Yih Wu,4 Hsu-Dong Sun,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Yen-Ping Hsieh,6 Yu-Jen Chen,3,7–9 Pei-Wei Shueng1,101Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Department of Radiation Oncology, 8Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, TaiwanAim: To review the experience and to evaluate the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT via helical tomotherapy (HT, for the treatment of brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer.Methods: Between September 1, 2008 to January 31, 2012, nine cervical cancer patients unsuitable for brachytherapy were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive whole pelvic radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, followed by SBRT via HT.Results: The actuarial locoregional control rate at 3 years was 78%. The mean biological equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions of the tumor, rectum, bladder, and intestines was 76.0 ± 7.3, 73.8 ± 13.2, 70.5 ± 10.0, and 43.1 ± 7.1, respectively. Only two had residual tumors after treatment, and the others were tumor-free. Two patients experienced grade 3 acute toxicity: one had diarrhea; and another experienced thrombocytopenia. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities. Three patients suffered from manageable rectal bleeding in

  16. The sources of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation protection of workers and of members of the public requires an assessment of the various sources of exposure, their variations in time or under specific conditions or circumstances, and the possibilities for control or limitation. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has evaluated the various components of natural and man-made sources in some detail. Natural exposures form the largest component of radiation exposure of man. Variability in exposures depends on elevation, the concentrations of radionuclides in soil, food and water, the composition of building materials and the susceptibility of indoor spaces to radon build-up. Man-made sources have included exposures to fallout from atmospheric nuclear testing and discharged from nuclear fuel cycle installations in routine operations or in accidents. The other main source of radiation exposures of individuals is in medical diagnostic examinations and therapeutic treatments. (author)

  17. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  18. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author) [pt

  19. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, D L; Yoo, S

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the gre...

  20. Searching for Orphan radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystrov, Evgenij; Antonau, Uladzimir; Gurinovich, Uladzimir; Kazhamiakin, Valery; Petrov, Vitaly; Shulhovich, Heorhi; Tischenko, Siarhei

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The problem of orphan sources cannot be left unaddressed due high probability of accidental exposure and use of sources for terrorism. Search of objects of this kind is complex particularly when search territory is large. This requires devices capable of detecting sources, identifying their radionuclide composition, and correlating scan results to geographical coordinates and displaying results on a map. Spectral radiation scanner AT6101C can fulfill the objective of search for gamma and neutron radiation sources, radionuclide composition identification, correlation results to geographical coordinates and displaying results on a map. The scanner consists of gamma radiation scintillation detection unit based on NaI(Tl) crystal, neutron detection unit based on two He 3 counters, GPS receiver and portable ruggedized computer. Built-in and application software automates entire scan process, saving all results to memory for further analysis with visual representation of results as spectral information diagrams, count rate profile and gamma radiation dose rates on a geographical map. The scanner informs operator with voice messages on detection of radiation sources, identification result and other events. Scanner detection units and accessories are packed in a backpack. Weighing 7 kg, the scanner is human portable and can be used for scan inside cars. The scanner can also be used for radiation mapping and inspections. (author)

  1. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...

  2. Performance assessment of the BEBIG MultiSource® high dose rate brachytherapy treatment unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony; Mzenda, Bongile

    2009-12-01

    A comprehensive system characterisation was performed of the Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG GmbH MultiSource® High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment unit with an 192Ir source. The unit is relatively new to the UK market, with the first installation in the country having been made in the summer of 2009. A detailed commissioning programme was devised and is reported including checks of the fundamental parameters of source positioning, dwell timing, transit doses and absolute dosimetry of the source. Well chamber measurements, autoradiography and video camera analysis techniques were all employed. The absolute dosimetry was verified by the National Physical Laboratory, UK, and compared to a measurement based on a calibration from PTB, Germany, and the supplied source certificate, as well as an independent assessment by a visiting UK centre. The use of the 'Krieger' dosimetry phantom has also been evaluated. Users of the BEBIG HDR system should take care to avoid any significant bend in the transfer tube, as this will lead to positioning errors of the source, of up to 1.0 mm for slight bends, 2.0 mm for moderate bends and 5.0 mm for extreme curvature (depending on applicators and transfer tube used) for the situations reported in this study. The reason for these errors and the potential clinical impact are discussed. Users should also note the methodology employed by the system for correction of transit doses, and that no correction is made for the initial and final transit doses. The results of this investigation found that the uncorrected transit doses lead to small errors in the delivered dose at the first dwell position, of up to 2.5 cGy at 2 cm (5.6 cGy at 1 cm) from a 10 Ci source, but the transit dose correction for other dwells was accurate within 0.2 cGy. The unit has been mechanically reliable, and source positioning accuracy and dwell timing have been reproducible, with overall performance similar to other existing HDR equipment. The unit is capable of high

  3. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  4. Radioactive waste evacuation of the sources of a low dose rate brachytherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrada, A.; Huerga, C.; Santa Olalla, I.; Vicedo, A.; Corredoira, E.; Plaza, R.; Vidal, J.; Tellez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The second class Radioactive Installation start -up authorization makes responsible for its security to the installation exploiter and supervisor. The specifications established in the authorization, which are mandatory, point out several actions, some of these actions are the hermeticity tests of radioactive sources an radiologic controls of environment dosimetry. It is necessary to optimize the time spent in each activity, managing them as reasonably as possible. An important matter to take into account is to keep and control only those radioactive or radiological equipment which, even if are in work, have an appropriate performance for the patient treatment Material And Method a Paz hospital has an intracavity brachytherapy (L.D.R.), Curietron model. The Radioprotection Department proposed to remove from service the unit due to its age, this was carried out by the Commission of Guarantee and Quality Control. There were different solutions taken into account to decommission the unit, finally the option chosen as the most convenient for the installation was to manage directly the withdrawal of the radioactive material which consisted of seven Cs-137 probes model CsM1 and total nominal certificated activity of 7770 MBq ( 210 mCi ) dated in May 2005. It also has to be considered as a radioactive waste the inner storage elements of the Curietron and the transport and storage curie stock, built with depleted uranium. To accomplish this aim an evacuation container was designed consisting of an alloy of low-melting point (M.C.P.96), which fulfills the transport conditions imposed by E.N.R.E.S.A. ( Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A). A theoretical calculation was performed to estimate the thickness of the shield which adequate to the rate of dose in contact demanded. Accuracy of these calculations has been verified using T.L. dosimetry. Results The radiation levels during the extraction intervention of the radioactive probes and its transfer to

  5. Radioactive waste evacuation of the sources of a low dose rate brachytherapy unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrada, A.; Huerga, C.; Santa Olalla, I.; Vicedo, A.; Corredoira, E.; Plaza, R.; Vidal, J.; Tellez, M. [La Paz Hospital, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction The second class Radioactive Installation start -up authorization makes responsible for its security to the installation exploiter and supervisor. The specifications established in the authorization, which are mandatory, point out several actions, some of these actions are the hermeticity tests of radioactive sources an radiologic controls of environment dosimetry. It is necessary to optimize the time spent in each activity, managing them as reasonably as possible. An important matter to take into account is to keep and control only those radioactive or radiological equipment which, even if are in work, have an appropriate performance for the patient treatment Material And Method a Paz hospital has an intracavity brachytherapy (L.D.R.), Curietron model. The Radioprotection Department proposed to remove from service the unit due to its age, this was carried out by the Commission of Guarantee and Quality Control. There were different solutions taken into account to decommission the unit, finally the option chosen as the most convenient for the installation was to manage directly the withdrawal of the radioactive material which consisted of seven Cs-137 probes model CsM1 and total nominal certificated activity of 7770 MBq ( 210 mCi ) dated in May 2005. It also has to be considered as a radioactive waste the inner storage elements of the Curietron and the transport and storage curie stock, built with depleted uranium. To accomplish this aim an evacuation container was designed consisting of an alloy of low-melting point (M.C.P.96), which fulfills the transport conditions imposed by E.N.R.E.S.A. ( Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A). A theoretical calculation was performed to estimate the thickness of the shield which adequate to the rate of dose in contact demanded. Accuracy of these calculations has been verified using T.L. dosimetry. Results The radiation levels during the extraction intervention of the radioactive probes and its transfer to

  6. Evaluating adjacent organ radiation doses from postoperative intracavitary vaginal vault brachytherapy for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caon, Julianna; Holloway, Caroline; Dubash, Rustom; Yuen, Conrad; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2014-01-01

    To document doses received by critical organs during adjuvant high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal vault brachytherapy. Patients treated with HDR vaginal vault radiation between January 1, 2009, and January 31, 2012, who had a CT simulation with the treatment cylinder in situ were included. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed and the rectum, sigmoid, small bowel, and bladder were contoured. Standardized plans treating the upper 4 cm of the vaginal vault were used to deliver a total of 21 Gy (Gy) at 0.5 cm from the apex of the vaginal vault in three fractions. There were 41 patients. Median age was 62 years. The median vaginal cylinder diameter was 3 cm. The mean 2cc dose to the rectum, sigmoid, small bowel, and bladder were 5.7, 4.7, 4.0, and 5.6 Gy, respectively. Bladder volume ranged from 67-797cc. Assuming minimal interfraction organ variation, the equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction was extrapolated from data and may be near or beyond organ tolerance for rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel in some cases. Spearman correlation found that increased bladder volume was not associated with adjacent organs at risk dose but may be associated with a trend (p=0.06) toward increased bladder dose (R=0.30). This study describes the dose received by adjacent critical structures during vaginal vault HDR brachytherapy. This is important information for documentation in the rare setting of treatment-related toxicity or recurrence. Bladder volume was not associated with dose to adjacent organs. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of 60 Co HDR brachytherapy source in water and in different solid water phantom materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference medium for brachytherapy dose measurements is water. Accuracy of dose measurements of brachytherapy sources is critically dependent on precise measurement of the source-detector distance. A solid phantom can be precisely machined and hence source-detector distances can be accurately determined. In the present study, four different solid phantom materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1 are modeled using the Monte Carlo methods to investigate the influence of phantom material on dose rate distributions of the new model of BEBIG 60 Co brachytherapy source. The calculated dose rate constant is 1.086 ± 0.06% cGy h−1 U−1 for water, PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1. The investigation suggests that the phantom materials RW1 and Solid Water represent water-equivalent up to 20 cm from the source. PMMA and polystyrene are water-equivalent up to 10 cm and 15 cm from the source, respectively, as the differences in the dose data obtained in these phantom materials are not significantly different from the corresponding data obtained in liquid water phantom. At a radial distance of 20 cm from the source, polystyrene overestimates the dose by 3% and PMMA underestimates it by about 8% when compared to the corresponding data obtained in water phantom.

  8. A Comparison of the Dosimetric Parameters of Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source in Different Tissues with Water Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction After the publication of Task Group number 43 dose calculation formalism by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM, this method has been known as the most common dose calculation method in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this formalism, the water phantom is introduced as the reference dosimetry phantom, while the attenuation coefficient of the sources in the water phantom is different from that of different tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the phantom materials on the TG-43 dosimetery parameters of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods In this research, the Cs-137 (Model Selectron brachytherapy source was simulated in different phantoms (bone, soft tissue, muscle, fat, and the inhomogeneous phantoms of water/bone of volume 27000 cm3 using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. *F8 tally was used to obtain the dose in a fine cubical lattice. Then the TG-43 dosimetry parameters of the brachytherapy source were obtained in water phantom and compared with those of different phantoms. Results The percentage difference between the radial dose function g(r of bone and the g(r of water phantom, at a distance of 10 cm from the source center is 20%, while such differences are 1.7%, 1.6% and 1.1% for soft tissue, muscle, and fat, respectively. The largest difference of the dose rate constant of phantoms with those of water is 4.52% for the bone phantom, while the differences for soft tissue, muscle, and fat are 1.18%, 1.27%, and 0.18%, respectively. The 2D anisotropy function of the Cs-137 source for different tissues is identical to that of water. Conclusion The results of the simulations have shown that dose calculation in water phantom would introduce errors in the dose calculation around brachytherapy sources. Therefore, it is suggested that the correction factors of different tissues be applied after dose calculation in water phantoms, in order to

  9. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  10. Assessing patient characteristics and radiation-induced non-targeted effects in vivo for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Christine; Timotin, Emilia; Wong, Raimond; Sur, Ranjan K; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    To test whether blood, urine, and tissue based colony-forming assays are a useful clinical detection tool for assessing fractionated treatment responses and non-targeted radiation effects in bystander cells. To assess patients' responses to radiation treatments, blood serum, urine, and an esophagus explant-based in vivo colony-forming assay were used from oesophageal carcinoma patients. These patients underwent three fractions of high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT). Human keratinocyte reporters exposed to blood sera taken after the third fraction of brachytherapy had a significant increase in cloning efficiency compared to baseline samples (p fractions for the blood sera data only. Patient characteristics such as gender had no statistically significant effect (p > 0.05). Large variability was observed among the patients' tissue samples, these colony-forming assays showed no significant changes throughout fractionated brachytherapy (p > 0.05). Large inter-patient variability was found in the urine and tissue based assays, so these techniques were discontinued. However, the simple blood-based assay had much less variability. This technique may have future applications as a biological dosimeter to predict treatment outcome and assess non-targeted radiation effects.

  11. Influence of radioactive sources discretization in the Monte Carlo computational simulations of brachytherapy procedures: a case study on the procedures for treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Costa, Kleber Souza Silva; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy computational simulation procedures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods have shown to be increasingly important to the improvement of cancer fighting strategies. One of the biases in this practice is the discretization of the radioactive source in brachytherapy simulations, which often do not match with a real situation. This study had the aim to identify and to measure the influence of radioactive sources discretization in brachytherapy MC simulations when compared to those that do not present discretization, using prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 radionuclide as model. Simulations were carried out with 108 events with both types of sources to compare them using EGSnrc code associated to MASH phantom in orthostatic and supine positions with some anatomic adaptations. Significant alterations were found, especially regarding bladder, rectum and the prostate itself. It can be concluded that there is a need to discretized sources in brachytherapy simulations to ensure its representativeness. (author)

  12. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J.

    2000-01-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 ± 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 ± 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  13. Prostate-specific antigen bounce after high-dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Kakinoki, Hiroaki; Tsutsui, Akio; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Matsunobu, Toru; Uehara, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer patients was evaluated. Sixty-one patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 24 months) in our institute. A PSA bounce was defined as a rise of at least 0.1 ng/ml greater than a previous PSA level, with a subsequent decline equal to, or less than, the initial nadir. A PSA bounce was noted in 16 (26.2%) of 61 patients (one patient had a PSA bounce twice). Median time to develop a PSA bounce was 18 months, but 23.5% developed a PSA bounce after 24 months. Median duration of PSA bounce was 6 months and 11.8% had increased PSA within a period of 12 months. Median bounce height was 0.2 ng/ml (range, 0.1 to 3.39 ng/ml). A bounce height of gerater than 2 ng/ml was seen in 11.8%. Clinical characteristics (age, prostate volume, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, risk classification, stage, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score) do not predict whether or not there will be a PSA bounce. In patients treated with HDR-brachytherapy followed by EBRT, the incidence and characteristics of PSA bounce were similar to those in patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of PSA bounce following HDR-brachytherapy with EBRT. (author)

  14. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V.

    1998-01-01

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  15. Importance of the neutrons kerma coefficient in the planning of Brachytherapy treatments with Cf-252 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M.; Azorin N, J.; Francois L, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Cf-252 is a fast neutrons emitting radioisotope by spontaneous fission that can be used as sealed source in medicine applications, industry and research. Commercially its offer sources of different sizes, compact and with a fast neutrons emission of the order of 10 6 n/s-μg and an energy spectra that presents respectively maxim and average energy in 2.1 MeV and 0.7 MeV. In medicine new applications are being developed for the treatment of patient with hypoxic and voluminous tumors, where the therapy with photons has not given positive results, as well as for the protocols of therapy treatment by boron neutron capture, where very small sources of Cf-252 will be used with the interstitial brachytherapy technique of high and low dose rate. In this work an analysis of how the small differences that exist in the elementary composition of 4 wicked tumors, 4 ICRU healthy tissues and 3 substitute materials of ICRU tissue used in dosimetry are presented, its generate changes in the neutrons kerma coefficient in function of the energy and consequently in the absorbed dose in the interval of 11 eV to 29 MeV. These differences can produce maximum variations of the neutron kerma coefficients ratio for E n > 1 keV of the one: 15% tumor/ICRU guest healthy tissue, 12% ICRU tumor/muscle, 12% ICRU healthy tissues ICRU/ICRU muscle, 22% substitutes tissue/tumor and 22% ICRU substitutes tissue/muscle. Also, it was found that the average value of the neutrons kerma coefficient for the 4 wicked tumors is from 6% to 7% smaller that the average value for the soft tissue in the interval energy of interest for therapy with fast neutrons with E n > 1 MeV. These results have a special importance during the planning process of brachytherapy treatments with sources of 252 Cf, to optimize and to individualize the patients treatments. (Author)

  16. Radiation sources working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  17. SU-E-T-232: Custom High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Surface Mold Applicators: The Importance Source to Skin Distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Surface mold applicators can be customized to fit irregular skin surfaces that are difficult to treat with other radiation therapy techniques. Optimal design of customized HDR skin brachytherapy is not well-established. We evaluated the impact of applicator thickness (source to skin distance) on target dosimetry. Methods: 27 patients had 34 treated sites: scalp 4, face 13, extremity 13, and torso 4. Custom applicators were constructed from 5–15 mm thick thermoplastic bolus molded over the skin lesion. A planar array of plastic brachytherapy catheters spaced 5–10 mm apart was affixed to the bolus. CT simulation was used to contour the target volume and to determine the prescription depth. Inverse planning simulated annealing followed by graphical optimization was used to plan and deliver 40–56 Gy in 8–16 fractions. Target coverage parameters (D90, Dmean, and V100) and dose uniformity (V110–200, D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) were studied according to target depth (<5mm vs. ≥5mm) and applicator thickness (5–10mm vs. ≥10mm). Results: The average prescription depth was 4.2±1.5mm. The average bolus thickness was 9.2±2.4mm. The median CTV volume was 10.0 cc (0.2–212.4 cc). Similar target coverage was achieved with prescription depths of <5mm and ≥5mm (Dmean = 113.8% vs. 112.4% and D90 = 100.2% vs. 98.3%). The <5mm prescription depth plans were more uniform (D0.1cc = 131.8% vs. 151.8%). Bolus thickness <10mm vs. ≥10mm plans also had similar target coverage (Dmean = 118.2% vs. 110.7% and D90 = 100.1% vs. 99.0%). Applicators ≥10mm thick, however, provide more uniform target dosimetry (D0.1cc = 146.9% vs. 139.5%). Conclusion: Prescription depth is based upon the thickness of the lesion and upon the clinical needs of the patient. Applicators ≥10mm thick provide more dose uniformity than 5–10mm thick applicators. Applicator thickness is an important variable that should be considered during treatment planning to achieve optimal dose uniformity

  18. Dosimetric comparison of vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dosimetric study to compare high dose rate (HDR vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy plan versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT boost plan for doses delivered to target volume and organs at risk (OAR in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT. Materials and Methods: Fifteen postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma suitable for vaginal ovoid brachytherapy following WPRT of 46 Gy/23 fractions/4.5 weeks were included. All were treated with brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy each. The equivalent dose for IMRT was calculated by computing biologically effective dose of brachytherapy by linear quadratic model. Dose of brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy was equivalent to IMRT dose of 26 Gy/13 fractions. Doses to target volume and OAR were compared between HDR and IMRT plans. Results: Target volume was well covered with both HDR and IMRT plans, but dose with brachytherapy was much higher (P < 0.05. Mean doses, doses to 0.1, 1, 2, and 5cc, 1/3 rd , 1/2, and 2/3 rd volume of bladder and rectum were significantly lower with HDR plans. Conclusion: In postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma, HDR brachytherapy following WPRT appears to be better than IMRT for tumor coverage and reducing dose to critical organs.

  19. On non-radiating sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musafir, Ricardo E.

    2013-08-01

    Following the analysis by P.E. Doak on the radiating (active) and non-radiating (reactive) parts of a source distribution and their effect on the identification of sources, this paper discusses the possible structure of non-radiating sources, i.e., of sources which produce a null field outside the source region. It is shown that these sources can be of three types, two of them only with arbitrary time dependence. In this case, the non-radiating sources are forcibly formed by the difference of two source distributions which generate, outside the region limited by the sources in question, the same field. In the type discussed by Doak, one source distribution encircles the other and cancelation is attained as a global effect. In the other, emphasized by Ffowcs Williams, the two source distributions are superimposed and cancelation is produced locally. The latter type of non-radiating source is discussed in detail, it being shown that, while they do not represent physical sources, they provide valuable information on non-radiating effects. The third type refers to single frequency sources and involves a particular match of wavelength, geometry and source strength distribution so that the acoustic energy gets trapped inside the source region. Of these three types of non-radiating sources, only the first one—that focused by Doak—can influence the identification of the active part of a source distribution from measurements made outside the source region. Evanescent waves, associated with a purely reactive field, are also discussed. It is pointed out that evanescent waves obtained in the decomposition of the field of a vibrating body of finite extent, although useful for representing certain aspects of the field, do not exist physically. Aspects affecting the identification of sources are also briefly tackled. Can the sources be taken as essentially omnidirectional or directional features of the individual sources are important? (should the sources be represented by e

  20. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Seth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Beyer, David C; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Goldsmith, Brian J; Horwitz, Eric M; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Lee, W Robert; Nag, Subir; Suh, W Warren; Potters, Louis

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Radiation Oncology and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Theoretical and experimental determination of dosimetric characteristics for ADVANTAGETM Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Dini, Sharifeh A.; Awan, Shahid B.; Dou, Kai; Koona, Rafiq A.

    2006-01-01

    ADVANTAGE TM Pd-103 brachytherapy source has been recently introduced by IsoAid TM for prostate permanent implants. Dosimetric characteristics (Dose rate constant, radial dose function, 2D-, and 1D-anisotropy functions) of this source model have been determined using both theoretical and experimental methods, following the updated TG-43U1 protocol. Derivation of the dose rate constant was based on recent NIST WAFAC calibration performed in accordance with the 1999 Standards. Measurements were performed in Solid Water TM using LiF TLD chips and the theoretical calculations were performed in Solid Water TM and liquid water phantom materials using PTRAN Monte Carlo code. The results of the Monte Carlo simulation have shown a dose rate constant of 0.69 cGy h -1 U -1 in liquid water and 0.67 cGy h -1 U -1 in Solid Water TM medium. The measured dose rate constant in Solid Water TM was found to be 0.68±8% cGy h -1 U -1 , which is in a good agreement (within ±5%) to the Monte Carlo simulated data. The 2D- and 1D-anisotropy functions of the ADVANTAGE TM Pd-103 source were calculated for radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 cm. Radial dose function was determined for radial distances ranging from 0.2 to 8.0 cm using line source approximation. All these calculations are based on L eff equal to 3.61 cm, calculated following TG-43U1 recommendations. The tabulated data for 2D-anisotropy function, 1D-anisotropy function, dose rate constant and radial dose function have been produced for clinical application of this source model

  2. Radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds; Exposition radiologique de l'equipe operatoire au cours de curietherapies de prostate par implants permanents d'iode-125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagna, G.; Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Service de protection radiologique des armees (SPRA), 1 bis rue du Lieutenant Raoul Batany, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Gauron, C. [Institut national de recherche et de securite (INRS), Departement Etudes et Assistance Medicales, 30 rue Olivier Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14 (France)

    2011-04-15

    The French defense radiation protection service (SPRA) and the French national institute for research and safety (INRS) conducted a joint study to assess the radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds at the Val-de-Grace military hospital. The purpose of the study was the assessment of the effective doses, the equivalent doses to the extremities and lens received by a novice team, the different ambient dose equivalent rates measurements and the delineation of areas. After six brachy-therapies, all the recorded doses with whole-body InLight{sup R} OSL and nanoDot{sup R} dosimeters remained below the detection limit for the whole staff. The dose rate measured at the end of implantation by an AT1123{sup R} survey meter is about 170 {mu}Sv/h at the perineum of the patient. The controlled area limit is estimated to be about 20 cm from the patient perineum. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for the categorization of workers, the delineation of areas and the dose monitoring procedures. This study demonstrates that real-time ultrasound-guided trans-perineal prostate brachytherapy delivers low dose to the operators because of the radioactive source characteristics and the instrumentation providing an effective radiation protection for the surgical team. (authors)

  3. Californium-252 (252Cf) versus conventional gamma radiation in the brachytherapy of advanced cervical carcinoma long-term treatment results of a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacev, Taco; Ptácková, Blanka; Strnad, Vratislav

    2003-06-01

    When photon radiotherapy is applied to cervical carcinoma, it has been observed that, despite important progress in radiotherapy technique and quality assurance, no significant increase in curative rates has resulted. Among the reasons for this is the varying radiosensitivity of different tumor subpopulations. Treatment with californium-252 ((252)Cf), as a source of gamma/neutron radiation in brachytherapy, provides properties and new treatment modalities that help to overcome this factor. From January 1985 to June 1993, 227 women with stage IIB and IIIB cervical carcinoma were treated in a randomized brachytherapy study as follows: (1) 117 patients (55 with stage IIB, 62 with stage IIIB) were treated with (252)Cf during the 1st week of therapy by 6 Gy (40 Gy-eq) of the neutron component in point A. Supplementation by a 16-Gy dose with (226)Ra or (137)Cs was done in the 5th week. (2) 110 patients (50 with stage IIB, 60 with stage IIIB) were treated solely by gamma radiation ((226)Ra or (137)Cs). A dose of 56 Gy in point A was applied in two fractions at the 3rd and 5th week, respectively. The dose of 56 Gy-equivalents was completed by external radiation with 40 Gy. The total radiation doses at points A and B amounted to 85 Gy and 59 Gy, respectively. The treatment results were compared. The overall 5-year survival rate for all stages IIB and IIIB was better by 18.9% for (252)Cf patients than for patients receiving conventional treatment (75.2% vs. 56.3%, respectively; p 252)Cf group, it was significantly better by 22.8% than for the conventional group (66.1% vs. 43.3%, respectively; p 252)Cf patients was the result of significantly less local relapses compared with patients treated conventionally (12,8% vs. 31.8%; p 252)Cf in the brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma by overcoming the tumor resistance to conventional photon irradiation has been confirmed.

  4. Source strength verification and quality assurance of preloaded brachytherapy needles using a CMOS flat panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Maryam; Spadinger, Ingrid; Chng, Nick

    2016-06-01

    Current methods of low dose rate brachytherapy source strength verification for sources preloaded into needles consist of either assaying a small number of seeds from a separate sample belonging to the same lot used to load the needles or performing batch assays of a subset of the preloaded seed trains. Both of these methods are cumbersome and have the limitations inherent to sampling. The purpose of this work was to investigate an alternative approach that uses an image-based, autoradiographic system capable of the rapid and complete assay of all sources without compromising sterility. The system consists of a flat panel image detector, an autoclavable needle holder, and software to analyze the detected signals. The needle holder was designed to maintain a fixed vertical spacing between the needles and the image detector, and to collimate the emissions from each seed. It also provides a sterile barrier between the needles and the imager. The image detector has a sufficiently large image capture area to allow several needles to be analyzed simultaneously.Several tests were performed to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of source strengths obtained using this system. Three different seed models (Oncura 6711 and 9011 (125)I seeds, and IsoAid Advantage (103)Pd seeds) were used in the evaluations. Seeds were loaded into trains with at least 1 cm spacing. Using our system, it was possible to obtain linear calibration curves with coverage factor k = 1 prediction intervals of less than ±2% near the centre of their range for the three source models. The uncertainty budget calculated from a combination of type A and type B estimates of potential sources of error was somewhat larger, yielding (k = 1) combined uncertainties for individual seed readings of 6.2% for (125)I 6711 seeds, 4.7% for (125)I 9011 seeds, and 11.0% for Advantage (103)Pd seeds. This study showed that a flat panel detector dosimetry system is a viable option for source strength verification in

  5. Determination of task group 43 dosimetric parameters for CSM40 137Cs source for use in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jimabadi, Elaheh; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Behmadi, Marziyeh

    2018-03-01

    The CSM40 137 Cs source model is currently being used in clinical brachytherapy. According to the recommendations of task group No. 43 (TG-43) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, dosimetry parameters of brachytherapy sources should be determined by two independent investigators before their clinical use. The aim of this study was to determine the TG-43 dosimetry parameters for a medium-dose-rate CSM40 137 Cs source. The determined dosimetric parameters included the air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function. To determine the source's dosimetric parameters, the CSM40 source was stimulated by the Monte Carlo N-Particle MCNP code. The TG-43 parameters were compared with the data of Vijande et al. on this source. The results showed that the dosimetry parameters for this source had good agreement with the results of Vijande et al. The dosimetric parameters of the CSM40 source can be used in treatment-planning systems incorporating this source model. The data can also be used for the quality assurance of treatment-planning systems.

  6. Comparison of treatment using teletherapy (external beam radiation) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samea, Renato; Lourenco, Laercio Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Background - Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is still a difficult tumor to treat with very poor prognosis. Aim - To compare the response to teletherapy treatment (external beam radiotherapy) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods - Were studied 49 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus on clinical stage III (TNM-1999). They were separated into two groups. The first, underwent radiation therapy alone with linear accelerator of particles, average dose of 6000 cGy and the second to external beam radiation therapy at a dose of 5040 cGy combined with brachytherapy with Iridium 192 at a dose of 1500 cGy. Brachytherapy started one to two weeks after the end of teletherapy, and it was divided into three weekly applications of 500 cGy. Age, gender, race, habits (smoking and drinking), body mass index (BMI), complications with treatment benefits (pain relief and food satisfaction) and survival were analyzed. Results - The quality of life (food satisfaction, and pain palliation of dysphagia) were better in the group treated with external beam radiation therapy combined with brachytherapy. Survival was higher in the brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy alone. Conclusion - Although the cure rate of squamous cell cancer of the esophagus is almost nil when treated with irradiation alone, this therapy is a form of palliative treatment for most patients in whom surgical contraindication exists. (author)

  7. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D. L.; Yoo, S.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the greedy algorithm can solve the optimization problem efficiently and arrives at a clinically acceptable solution in less than 10 seconds. Our study was inclusive, that is there was no combination of sources that clearly stood out from the others and could therefore be considered the preferred set of sources for treatment planning. Source strengths of 0.2 mCi (low), 0.4 mCi (medium), and 0.6 mCi (high) of 125 I in four different combinations were used for the multi-strength source study. The combination of high- and medium-strength sources achieved a more uniform target dose distribution due to few source implants whereas the combination of low-and medium-strength sources achieved better sparing of sensitive tissues including that of the single-strength 0.4 mCi base case. 125 I at 0.4 mCi and 192 Ir at 0.12 mCi and 0.25 mCi source strengths were used for the multi-specie source study. This study also proved inconclusive , Treatment plans using a combination of two 0

  8. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Henderson; S. Yoo; B.R. Thomadsen

    2002-09-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the greedy algorithm can solve the optimization problem efficiently and arrives at a clinically acceptable solution in less than 10 seconds. Our study was inclusive, that is there was no combination of sources that clearly stood out from the others and could therefore be considered the preferred set of sources for treatment planning. Source strengths of 0.2 mCi (low), 0.4 mCi (medium), and 0.6 mCi (high) of {sup 125}I in four different combinations were used for the multi-strength source study. The combination of high- and medium-strength sources achieved a more uniform target dose distribution due to few source implants whereas the combination of low-and medium-strength sources achieved better sparing of sensitive tissues including that of the single-strength 0.4 mCi base case. {sup 125}I at 0.4 mCi and {sup 192}Ir at 0.12 mCi and 0.25 mCi source strengths were used for the multi-specie source study. This study also proved inconclusive , Treatment

  9. Dosimetric characteristics of the Best registered double-wall 103Pd brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, A.S.; Bharucha, Z.; Yoe-Sein, M.; Sowards, Keith

    2001-01-01

    103 Pd and 125 I brachytherapy sources are being used for interstitial implants in tumor sites such as the prostate. Recently, a double-wall 103 Pd source has been introduced, which has a design different from that of sources presently on the market. Dosimetric characteristics (dose rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined following the AAPM Task Group 43 recommendations and were related to the October 10, 2000 revision of the NIST 1999 S K Standard for 103 Pd. Measurements were performed in a Solid Water trade mark sign phantom using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters. For these measurements, slabs of Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material were machined to accommodate the source and LiF TLD chips of dimensions (3.1x3.1x0.8 mm 3 ) and (1.0x1.0x1.0 mm 3 ). The TLD chips were surrounded by at least 10 cm of Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material to provide full scattering conditions. The Monte Carlo simulations were performed in Solid Water trade mark sign and liquid water using the PTRAN code. The results of this investigation show an excellent agreement (within 5%) between the measured (0.67±8% cGy h -1 U -1 ) and calculated (to be 0.65±3% cGy h -1 U -1 ) dose rate constant in Solid Water trade mark sign . The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the Best registered 103 Pd in water was found to be 0.67±0.02 cGy h -1 U -1 . The radial dose function, g(r), of the new 103 Pd source was measured at distances ranging from 0.5 and 7 cm using LiF TLD in Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material. Moreover, the radial dose function of the new source was calculated in liquid water and Solid Water trade mark sign at distances ranging from 0.1 to 7 cm using the PTRAN Monte Carlo Code. The anisotropy function, F(r,θ), of the new 103 Pd source was also measured in Solid Water trade mark sign and calculated in both Solid Water trade mark sign and water phantom material

  10. An open-source genetic algorithm for determining optimal seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Madamesila, J; Beauchamp, A; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    An open source optimizer that generates seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy was designed, tested, and validated. The optimizer was a simple genetic algorithm (SGA) that, given a set of prostate and urethra contours, determines the optimal seed distribution in terms of coverage of the prostate with the prescribed dose while avoiding hotspots within the urethra. The algorithm was validated in a retrospective study on 45 previously contoured low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Dosimetric indices were evaluated to ensure solutions adhered to clinical standards. The SGA performance was further benchmarked by comparing solutions obtained from a commercial optimizer (inverse planning simulated annealing [IPSA]) with the same cohort of 45 patients. Clinically acceptable target coverage by the prescribed dose (V100) was obtained for both SGA and IPSA, with a mean ± standard deviation of 98 ± 2% and 99.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. For the prostate D90, SGA and IPSA yielded 177 ± 8 Gy and 186 ± 7 Gy, respectively, which were both clinically acceptable. Both algorithms yielded reasonable dose to the rectum, with V100 < 0.3 cc. A reduction in dose to the urethra was seen using SGA. SGA solutions showed a slight prostate volume dependence, with smaller prostates (<25 cc) yielding less desirable, although still clinically viable, dosimetric outcomes. SGA plans used, on average, fewer needles than IPSA (21 vs. 24, respectively), which may lead to a reduction in urinary toxicity and edema that alters post-implant dosimetry. An open source SGA was validated that provides a research tool for the brachytherapy community. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A phantom for verification of dwell position and time of a high dose rate brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madebo, M.; Kron, T.; Pillainayagam, J.; Franich, R.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy of dwell position and reproducibility of dwell time are critical in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A phantom was designed to verify dwell position and dwell time reproducibility for an Ir-192 HDR stepping source using Computed Radiography (CR). The central part of the phantom, incorporating thin alternating strips of lead and acrylic, was used to measure dwell positions. The outer part of the phantom features recesses containing different absorber materials (lead, aluminium, acrylic and polystyrene foam), and was used for determining reproducibility of dwell times. Dwell position errors of <1 mm were easily detectable using the phantom. The effect of bending a transfer tube was studied with this phantom and no change of clinical significance was observed when varying the curvature of the transfer tube in typical clinical scenarios. Changes of dwell time as low as 0.1 s, the minimum dwell time of the treatment unit, could be detected by choosing dwell times over the four materials that produce identical exposure at the CR detector.

  12. The wall correction factor for a spherical ionization chamber used in brachytherapy source calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, A.; Azario, L.; Fidanzio, A.; Viola, P.; Dell'Omo, C.; Iadanza, L.; Fusco, V.; Lagares, J. I.; Capote, R.

    2003-12-01

    The effect of wall chamber attenuation and scattering is one of the most important corrections that must be determined when the linear interpolation method between two calibration factors of an ionization chamber is used. For spherical ionization chambers the corresponding correction factors Aw have to be determined by a non-linear trend of the response as a function of the wall thickness. The Monte Carlo and experimental data here reported show that the Aw factors obtained for an Exradin A4 chamber, used in the brachytherapy source calibration, in terms of reference air kerma rate, are up to 1.2% greater than the values obtained by the linear extrapolation method for the studied beam qualities. Using the Aw factors derived from Monte Carlo calculations, the accuracy of the calibration factor NK,Ir for the Exradin A4, obtained by the interpolation between two calibration factors, improves about 0.6%. The discrepancy between the new calculated factor and that obtained using the complete calibration curve of the ion-chamber and the 192Ir spectrum is only 0.1%.

  13. Balloon brachytherapy for brain tumor-radiation safety experiences at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanka, Venkata K

    2006-11-01

    Balloon brachytherapy is a technique for the removal of a brain tumor in which an inflatable balloon is placed in a resection cavity and then filled with liquid I, delivering low energy dose to the cancerous cells surrounding the cavity. After preparing a patient room to mitigate any spills or contamination, liquid 125I (Iotrex) was assayed with a dose calibrator and injected into the balloon placed in the patient's brain. Approximately 98.6% of the isotope was recovered at the end of the procedure. Approximately 1.4% remained unrecovered and is assumed to have diffused through the balloon membrane. Each day, the patient's urine was collected and the total urine activity measured was less than 7% of the unrecovered activity. The remainder of the unrecovered activity was not evaluated. It was assumed to be distributed in the patient's body, and a tiny quantity of liquid spilled from an IV line while injecting. Training was conducted for radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, and participating residents regarding balloon brachytherapy radiation safety precautions. Precautions during treatment included safe handling of body fluids. General radiation safety precautions and nursing care instructions were posted on the patient door. Air monitoring was conducted to detect any airborne iodine. At the time of balloon removal, the radiation safety department monitored the operating room and staff for contamination. Waste, including the balloon, was held for decay on site prior to disposal.

  14. Technical Note: Monte Carlo calculations of the AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for a new titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso, Francisco J; Munro Iii, John J; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2017-07-01

    Due to a number of distinct advantages resulting from the relatively low energy gamma ray spectrum of Yb-169, various designs of Yb-169 sources have been developed over the years for brachytherapy applications. Lately, Yb-169 has also been suggested as an effective and practical radioisotope option for a novel radiation treatment approach often known as gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy (GNRT). In a recently published study, the current investigators used the Monte Carlo N-Particle Version 5 (MCNP5) code to design a novel titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source optimized for GNRT applications. In this study, the original MC source model was modified to accurately match the specifications of the manufactured Yb-169 source. The modified MC model was then used to obtain a complete set of the AAPM TG-43 parameters for the new titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source. The MC-calculated dose rate constant for this titanium-encapsulated Yb-169 source was 1.19 ± 0.03 cGy·h-1·U-1, indicating no significant change from the values reported for stainless steel-encapsulated Yb-169 sources. The source anisotropy and radial dose function for the new source were also found similar to those reported for the stainless steel-encapsulated Yb-169 sources. The current results suggest that the use of titanium, instead of stainless steel, to encapsulate the Yb-169 core would not lead to any major change in the dosimetric characteristics of the Yb-169 source. The results also show that the titanium encapsulation of the Yb-169 source could be accomplished while meeting the design goals as described in the current investigators' published MC optimization study for GNRT applications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Monte Carlo dosimetric characterization of the Flexisource Co-60 high-dose-rate brachytherapy source using PENELOPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, Julio F; Guerrero, Rafael; Torres, Javier; Lallena, Antonio M

    60 Co sources have been commercialized as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. One of them is the Flexisource Co-60 HDR source manufactured by Elekta. The only available dosimetric characterization of this source is that of Vijande et al. [J Contemp Brachytherapy 2012; 4:34-44], whose results were not included in the AAPM/ESTRO consensus document. In that work, the dosimetric quantities were calculated as averages of the results obtained with the Geant4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) codes, though for other sources, significant differences have been quoted between the values obtained with these two codes. The aim of this work is to perform the dosimetric characterization of the Flexisource Co-60 HDR source using PENELOPE. The MC simulation code PENELOPE (v. 2014) has been used. Following the recommendations of the AAPM/ESTRO report, the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, the air-kerma strength, the dose rate constant, and the absorbed dose rate in water have been calculated. The results we have obtained exceed those of Vijande et al. In particular, the absorbed dose rate constant is ∼0.85% larger. A similar difference is also found in the other dosimetric quantities. The effect of the electrons emitted in the decay of 60 Co, usually neglected in this kind of simulations, is significant up to the distances of 0.25 cm from the source. The systematic and significant differences we have found between PENELOPE results and the average values found by Vijande et al. point out that the dosimetric characterizations carried out with the various MC codes should be provided independently. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutron sources for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'omyina, E.A.; Yivankova, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors discuss the peculiarities of biologic effect of fast neutrons from the perspective of overcoming radioresistance of the tumor cells. Retrospective radiobiological and clinical data obtained during treatment of cancer with fast neutrons at Oncology Institute of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine (now National Cancer Institute of Ministry of Health of Ukraine) are reported. It was proven that neutron therapy allows to achieve a positive effect in patients with primary tumors and relapses. 252 Cf neutrons indicated to treatment of the tumors poorly sensitive to gamma-radiation were used. 252 Cf sources were used in combination radiotherapy for cancer of endometrium and uterine cervix. The sources were introduced to the cavity and fornix of the vagina. The treatment was performed by means of alternation of distance and intracavitary radiation therapy. Complete tumor regression was achieved in almost all patients. Radiation reactions were easily controlled during the treatment. Investigation of longterm results of treatment with 252 Cf sources demonstrated that their application allowed to achieve a high and prolonged relapse-free effect.

  17. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  18. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This publication is part of practical radiation safety manual series for different fields of application aimed primarily at persons handling radiation sources on a daily routine basis, which could at same time be used by the competent authorities, supporting their efforts in the radiation protection training of workers or medical assistance personnel or helping on-site management to set up local radiation protection rules. It is dedicated to brachytherapy: its application and procedures guides

  19. External beam radiation and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for elderly patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively observe and analyze the long-term treatment outcomes of 96 elderly patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GEJAC who were treated with californium-252 (252Cf neutron brachytherapy (NBT in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT with or without chemotherapy. Material and methods: From January 2002 to November 2012, 96 patients with GEJAC underwent treatment. The total radiation dose to the reference point via NBT was 8-25 Gy-eq in 2 to 5 fractions, with 1 fraction per week. The total dose via EBRT was 40-54 Gy, which was delivered over a period of 4 to 5.5 weeks with normal fraction. Results: The median survival time for the 96 patients was 15.3 months, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year rates of overall survival (OS were 62.5%, 33.7%, 20.1%, and 7.9%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year rates for local-regional control (LRC were 78.7%, 57.9%, 41.8%, and 26.4%, respectively. The patients’ age was an independent factor that was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.006 and LRC (p = 0.0005, according to univariate analysis. The 3-year OS (LRC was 31.9% (62.9% for patients aged 70-74 years and 16.1% (19.5% for patients aged ≥ 75 years. From the time of treatment completion to the development of local-regional recurrence or death, 5 (5.2% patients experienced fistula and 7 (7.3% experienced massive bleeding. Conclusions: The clinical data indicated that NBT in combination with EBRT produced favorable local control and long-term survival rates for elderly patients with GEJAC, and that the side effects were tolerable. The patient’s age could be used to select the appropriate treatment in an elderly patient.

  20. Experimental determination of the TG-43 dosimetric characteristics of EchoSeedTM model 6733 125I brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, A.S.; Dini, Sharifeh A.; Sowards, Keith; Hayes, Joshua L.; Al-Otoom, Awni

    2002-01-01

    Recently an improved design of a 125 I brachytherapy source has been introduced for interstitial seed implants, particularly for prostate seed implants. This design improves the in situ ultrasound visualization of the source compared to the conventional seed. In this project, the TG-43 recommended dosimetric characteristics of the new brachytherapy source have been experimentally determined in Solid Water trade mark sign phantom material. The measured dosimetric characteristics of the new source have been compared with data reported in the literature for other source designs. The measured dose rate constant, Λ, in Solid Water was multiplied by 1.05 to extract the dose rate constant in water. The dose rate constant of the new source in water was found to be 0.99±8% cGy h -1 U -1 . The radial dose function was measured at distances between 0.5 and 10 cm using LiF TLDs in Solid Water trade mark sign phantom. The anisotropy function, F(r,θ), was measured at distances of 2, 3, 5, and 7 cm

  1. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  2. Robustness to source displacement in dual air kerma strength planning for focal low-dose-rate brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, S Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid T; Chng, Nicholas T; Morris, W James

    2016-01-01

    To describe the use of dual source strength implants for focal low-dose-rate brachytherapy. An interneedle dual source strength planning strategy is described for focal low-dose-rate brachytherapy of the prostate. The implanted treatment plans were designed using peripheral (except near the rectum) needles loaded with high strength (0.9 U) sources and central needles loaded with low strength (0.4 U) sources ("interneedle" dual strength planning). This approach has been applied for focally treating 3 patients. In this article, we compare the characteristics and robustness to source motion of interneedle dual strength planning with four alternative planning strategies (single strength high, low, and intermediate, and intraneedle dual strength) on 50 simulated cases. Interneedle dual source strength planning results in greater robustness to source motion and overall lower seed and needle density compared to the standard low source strength planning currently used in our centre. This planning approach is also significantly superior to single strength high, single strength intermediate and intraneedle dual strength planning strategies in terms of high dose to the urethral avoidance structure. The use of interneedle dual source strength treatment plans for focal low-dose-rate brachytherapy is possibly the practical solution for limiting the density of sources required to deliver the prescribed dose while limiting proximity of high strength sources to organs at risk. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Beta Radiation exposure of medical personnel during vascular brachytherapy with Re-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moka, D.; Baer, F.; Barth, I.; Rimpler, A.

    2002-01-01

    Intracoronary radiation is currently considered a promising breakthrough approach for preventing restenosis after angioplasty and stenting in patients with severe coronary artery disease. For the therapy of in-stent-restenosis vascular irradiation using balloon catheters filled with liquid radioisotopes provide excellent homogeneity due to the artery stenosis morphology. The radionuclide normally used is a Re-188 solutions (E β ,max=2,12 MeV). To achieve a sufficient dose in the stenosed artery wall (30 Gy in 0.5 mm wall depth) in a tolerable time-scale very high specific activities (>5-10 GBq/ml) of the isotope are necessary. During the preparation of the radioactive solution and the application at the patient very short distances between the source of the radiation and the skin of the doctors for cardiology / nuclear medicine are possible, especially when manipulations at the balloon catheter during the radiation are necessary. In addition, a severe risk of contamination exists. A further problem is that in hospitals often no or insufficient dosimeters for beta radiation are available. Occupational radiation exposure of the personnel was determined at the preparation of the Re-188 solution, the therapy itself and the waste management. The partial body exposure, i. e. the dose of the skin at the hands due to beta radiation, was determined with very sensitive thin-layer thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). During a preparation, intracoronary radiation and waste management of the Re-188-perrhenate solution using normal radiation shielding first measurements resulted din more than 500 mSv per working day at the fingertips. This extreme high radiation exposure of the personnel were mainly due to direct radiation by touching the evacuated balloon catheter (only residual radionuclides left). to reduced radiation we performed several additional radiation protection measures. The consequent use of plastic shielding of the source, the use of a semiautomatic preparation

  4. SU-F-T-32: Evaluation of the Performance of a Multiple-Array-Diode Detector for Quality Assurance Tests in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with Ir-192 Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpool, K; De La Fuente Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode- detector for geometric and dosimetric quality assurance (QA) tests of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an Ir-192-source. Methods: A phantom setup was designed that encapsulated a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode-detector (MapCheck2) and a catheter for the HDR brachytherapy Ir-192 source. This setup was used to perform both geometric and dosimetric quality assurance for the HDR-Ir192 source. The geometric tests included: (a) measurement of the position of the source and (b) spacing between different dwell positions. The dosimteric tests include: (a) linearity of output with time, (b) end effect and (c) relative dose verification. The 2D-dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 was used to perform the previous tests. The results of MapCheck2 were compared with the corresponding quality assurance testes performed with Gafchromic-film and well-ionization-chamber. Results: The position of the source and the spacing between different dwell-positions were reproducible within 1 mm accuracy by measuring the position of maximal dose using MapCheck2 in contrast to the film which showed a blurred image of the dwell positions due to limited film sensitivity to irradiation. The linearity of the dose with dwell times measured from MapCheck2 was superior to the linearity measured with ionization chamber due to higher signal-to-noise ratio of the diode readings. MapCheck2 provided more accurate measurement of the end effect with uncertainty < 1.5% in comparison with the ionization chamber uncertainty of 3%. Although MapCheck2 did not provide absolute calibration dosimeter for the activity of the source, it provided accurate tool for relative dose verification in HDR-brachytherapy. Conclusion: The 2D-array-diode-detector provides a practical, compact and accurate tool to perform quality assurance for HDR-brachytherapy with an Ir-192 source. The diodes in MapCheck2 have high radiation sensitivity and

  5. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J. L.; Micka, J. A.; Culberson, W. S.; DeWerd, L. A.; Rasmussen, B. E.; Davis, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60 Co. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a 60 Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 125 I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 125 I seed, and the Best 2335 103 Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the 60 Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the 60 Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125 I and 103 Pd relative to 60 Co. Results: The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to 60 Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. Conclusions: The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%–15% for 125 I and 103 Pd sources relative to 60 Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy

  6. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  7. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Sandra; Costa, Filipa; Pereira, Alexandre; Lencart, Joana; Dias, Anabela; Cunha, Luís; Sousa, Olga; Silva, José Pedro; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-01-09

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy.

  8. Evaluation of Delivery Costs for External Beam Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Nilsen, Kristine; Hill, Colin; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Lash, Donna H; Lain, Melody; Christodoulou, Deborah; Hodge, Constance; Showalter, Timothy N

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the delivery costs, using time-driven activity-based costing, and reimbursement for definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Process maps were created to represent each step of the radiation treatment process and included personnel, equipment, and consumable supplies used to deliver care. Personnel were interviewed to estimate time involved to deliver care. Salary data, equipment purchasing information, and facilities costs were also obtained. We defined the capacity cost rate (CCR) for each resource and then calculated the total cost of patient care according to CCR and time for each resource. Costs were compared with 2016 Medicare reimbursement and relative value units (RVUs). The total cost of radiation therapy for cervical cancer was $12,861.68, with personnel costs constituting 49.8%. Brachytherapy cost $8610.68 (66.9% of total) and consumed 423 minutes of attending radiation oncologist time (80.0% of total). External beam radiation therapy cost $4055.01 (31.5% of total). Personnel costs were higher for brachytherapy than for the sum of simulation and external beam radiation therapy delivery ($4798.73 vs $1404.72). A full radiation therapy course provides radiation oncologists 149.77 RVUs with intensity modulated radiation therapy or 135.90 RVUs with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, with total reimbursement of $23,321.71 and $16,071.90, respectively. Attending time per RVU is approximately 4-fold higher for brachytherapy (5.68 minutes) than 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (1.63 minutes) or intensity modulated radiation therapy (1.32 minutes). Time-driven activity-based costing was used to calculate the total cost of definitive radiation therapy for cervical cancer, revealing that brachytherapy delivery and personnel resources constituted the majority of costs. However, current reimbursement policy does not reflect the increased attending physician effort and delivery costs of brachytherapy. We

  9. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  10. Doses of radiation in the environment of patients undergoing treatment of ophthalmic brachytherapy; Dosis de radiaciones en el entorno de pacientes sometidos a tratamientos de braquiterapia oftalmica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terron Leon, J. A.; Moreno Reyes, J. C.; Perales Molina, A.; Miras, H.; Ortiz, M.; Macias, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents results for measures of dose made to different patient undergoing treatment with ophthalmic brachytherapy. The aim of these measures has been, on the one hand, verify assessments relating to radiation protection in the memory of the installation and, on the other hand, experimental measures that can serve to reduce the perception of the radiological risk professionals have. (Author)

  11. Device for measuring semiconductor radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, W.; Wendt, H.; Doss, R.

    1975-01-01

    In a measuring device, the determination of the local dependence of the intensity and/or the delay time of the recombination radiation on the radiation band of a semiconductor radiation source is reduced to phase measuring so as to enable short delays at 10 -11 seconds to be determined. The measuring device comprises an excitation source for a semiconductor radiation source, a magnifying optical system which images the semiconductor radiation source on a diaphragm having a radiation receiver in its rear. A phasemeter connected to the excitation receiver on the one hand and to the radiation receiver on the other, compares the phase of the excitation signal to the phase of the received signal. The image of the semiconductor radiation source is displaceable relatively to the diaphragm and can be viewed through an observation system. (auth)

  12. Monte Carlo aided design of an improved well-type ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Tim D; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2007-04-01

    The determination of the air kerma strength of a brachytherapy seed is necessary for effective treatment planning. Well-type ionization chambers are used on site at therapy clinics to determine the air kerma strength of seeds. In this work, an improved well-type ionization chamber for low energy, low dose rate brachytherapy sources is designed using Monte Carlo transport calculations to aid in the design process. The design improvements are the elimination of the air density induced over-response effect seen in other air-communicating chambers for low energy photon sources, and a larger signal strength (response or current) for 103Pd and 125I based seeds. A prototype well chamber based on the Monte Carlo aided design but using graphite coated acrylic walls rather than the design basis air equivalent plastic (C-552) walls was constructed and experimentally evaluated. The prototype chamber produced an 85% stronger signal when measuring a commonly used 103Pd seed and a 26% stronger signal when measuring a commonly used 125I seed when compared to another commonly used well chamber. The normalized PTP corrected chamber response is, at most, 1.3% and 2.4% over unity for air densities/pressures corresponding to an elevation of 3048 m (10000 feet) above sea level for the commonly used 103Pd and 125I based seeds respectively. Comparing calculated and measured chamber responses for common 103Pd and 125I based brachytherapy seeds show agreement within 0.6% and 0.2%, respectively. We conclude that Monte Carlo transport calculations accurately model the response of this new well chamber and in general can be used to predict the response of well chambers. The prototype chamber built in this work responds as predicted by the Monte Carlo calculations.

  13. Dosimetry of brachytherapy by the Oncoseed 6711 using glass rod dosimeters and EGS5 in a geometry lacking radiation equilibrium scatter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Tateoka, K.; Kamo, K.; Hareyama, M.; Takada, J.; Asanuma, O.; Bengua, G.; Sato, K.; Takeda, H.; Bengua, G.; Ueda, T.; Takagi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to develop a dose calculation method which is applicable to the inter-seed attenuation and the geometry lacking the equilibrium radiation scatter conditions in brachytherapy. The dose obtained from measurement with a radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) was compared to the dose calculated with the Monte Carlo (MC) code 'EGS5,' using an 1251 source structure. The GRDs were irradiated with 1251 on coseed 6711 in a human head phantom. The phantom was a cylinder made of 2 mm thick PMMA with a diameter of 18 cm and length of 16 cm. Some of the GRD positions were so close to the phantom surface that the backscatter margin was less than 5 cm, insufficient for photons. The EGS5 simulations were found to reproduce the relative dose distributions as measured with the GRDs to within 25% uncertainty in the geometry lacking the equilibrium radiation scatter conditions. The absolute value of the GRD measurement agreed with the American Association of Physicist in Medicine Task Group No 43 Updated Protocol (AAPM-TG43U1) formalism to within 3% of the reference point. The results of this investigation support the validity of both the MC calculation method and GRD measurement in this study as well as the TG-43U1 formalism. Also, this calculation is applicable to inter-seed attenuation and the geometry lacking the equilibrium radiation scatter.

  14. Development of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir radiation sources for intravascular irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kogure, H; Iwamoto, S; Iwata, K; Kawauchi, Y; Nagata, Y; Sorita, T; Suzuki, K

    2003-01-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy is a novel therapy for preventing the restenosis of coronary artery by use of low-dose irradiation. JAERI and Kyoto University have been developing sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir radiation sources by the cooperative research project entitled as 'The research on safety and effectiveness of the intravascular brachytherapy for preventing restenosis of the coronary artery disease' since 1998. The radiation source was introduced into the stenosis through a catheter (a guide-tube to insert directly into vascular) to irradiate the diseased part. Ten sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir seed sources (phi 0.4 mm x 2.5 mm) were positioned between nylon spacers (phi 0.3 mm x 1.0 mm) in a flexible covering tube and the tube was plugged with a core-wire; the tube was shrunk to fix the inside materials and the size is 0.46 mm in diameter and 3 m in length. The physically optimal design was determined to insert the radiation source easily into vascular and to get the dose uniformity in the diseased part. The production me...

  15. Energy spectrum based calculation of the half and the tenth value layers for brachytherapy sources using a semiempirical parametrized mass attenuation coefficient formulism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.

    2008-01-01

    As different types of radionuclides (e.g., 131 Cs source) are introduced for clinical use in brachytherapy, the question is raised regarding whether a relatively simple method exists for the derivation of values of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). For the radionuclide that has been clinically used for years, such as 125 I and 103 Pd, the sources have been manufactured and marketed by several vendors with different designs and structures. Because of the nature of emission of low energy photons for these radionuclides, energy spectra of the sources are very dependent on their individual designs. Though values of the HVL or the TVL in certain commonly used shielding materials are relatively small for these low energy photon emitting sources, the question remains how the variations in energy spectra affect the HVL (or TVL) values and whether these values can be calculated with a relatively simple method. A more fundamental question is whether a method can be established to derive the HVL (TVL) values for any brachytherapy sources and for different materials in a relatively straightforward fashion. This study was undertaken to answer these questions. Based on energy spectra, a well established semiempirical mass attenuation coefficient computing scheme was utilized to derive the HVL (TVL) values of different materials for different types of brachytherapy sources. The method presented in this study may be useful to estimate HVL (TVL) values of different materials for brachytherapy sources of different designs and containing different radionuclides

  16. Preparation and evaluation of various 32P sources for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelenz, B.U.; Bilski, P.; Ochab, E.; Rajchel, B.; Styczen, J.; Walichiewicz, P.; Wodniecki, J.; Wilczek, K.

    2001-01-01

    A relatively high per cent of restenoses, being a long-term complication of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), can be significantly reduced by short-range ionizing radiation applied locally, immediately after PTCA. In search for dosimetrically favourable and easy to handle radiation sources for this purpose, we tried a pure β - emitter 32 P (t 1/2 =14.3 days). Ways of preparation of 32 P sources were the following: (1) Neutron activation of 31 P layers implanted into metallic surfaces by ionic methods; (2) Conversion coating of metallic surfaces in aqueous solutions containing 32 PO 4 3- ions; (3) Direct application of Na 2 H 32 PO 4 solutions in the angioplasty balloon. It was shown that: (1) 32 P sources obtained by 31 P ion implantation followed by neutron activation can be useful, but only if activation of the support material by thermal neutrons is negligible; (2) Phosphate layers on stainless steel surface exhibit rather poor adhesion. Similar layers on titanium require further studies; (3) Liquid 32 P sources ensure very good radial dose distribution but only utmost care in filling the balloon can give a reliable activity-dose dependence. Dosimetry of liquid sources, performed in a PMMA phantom by thermoluminescence method showed that 32 P sources of radioactive concentration of 200 MBq/cm 3 can deposit therapeutic dose during about 12 min of exposition. TL detectors manufactured for this purpose in our laboratory show very good spatial resolution and can be recommended for similar studies. (author)

  17. Study and development of methodology for radioactive iodine fixation in polymeric substrate for manufacturing sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Carla D.; Benega, Marcos A.G. and others

    2014-01-01

    According global estimates of Globocan 2012 project of the International Agency for Research of Cancer, of the World Health Organization, there were 14,1 million new cases of cancer and a total of 8,2 million deaths from cancer. Also show that in 2030, the overall load will be 21,4 million new cases and 13,2 million cancer deaths. One of the prostate cancer therapy is brachytherapy, used in early and middle stages of the disease. It is made with the introduction of seeds with radioactive material within the tumor or in nearby regions, affecting the minimum surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is the study and developing the deposition of radioactive iodine on the polymeric substrate method, and an analysis relating the efficiency of the method to implementation in the laboratory of brachytherapy from IPEN. Iodine-125 is adsorbed on an epoxy resin solution. The objective of this study is to offer a new proposal for seeds. The results will give the data for the radiation protection and the procedures for radioactive waste management

  18. Carcinoma of the cervix: analysis of complications after primary external beam radiation and Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, Karin S.; Stuecklschweiger, Georg F.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Poschauko, Johann; Pickel, Hellmuth; Hackl, Arnulf

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is still a concern that the use of HDR brachytherapy might result in an increase of late tissue damage. This retrospective study evaluates the incidence and severity of late complications in patients with carcinoma of the cervix who underwent combined external beam radiation (EBR) and Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy and attempts to identify pretreatment and treatment parameters correlating with late complications. Material and methods: Between 1985 and 1992, 161 patients with carcinoma of the cervix (FIGO stages IB-IVB) received EBR to the pelvis (ave. max. dose 48.8 Gy) followed by 1-6 Ir-192 HDR placements (median 2). Doses to point A ranged from 8.5 to 38.7 Gy (median 17 Gy). Parameters examined included age, diabetes, obesity, history of inflammatory bowel disease or diverticulitis, prior surgery, hemoglobin level, FIGO stage, EBR dose, technique and daily dose fraction, number of HDR treatments and total dose to point A, maximum doses to bladder and rectum delivered by brachytherapy and cumulative dose to point A. Median follow-up for all patients was 37 months. Complications were rated using an in-house scoring system and according to the French-Italian Glossary (FIG). Results: Actuarial 5-year survival was 93%, 57%, 46%, and 0% for stages IB, II, IIIB, and IV, respectively. Of 161 patients, 11% developed moderate and 3.7% severe sequelae (FIG: 2.5%, 3.7%). Since some patients experienced more than one complication, the overall incidence was 13.6% and 4.9% (FIG: 3.1%, 4.9%) with respective 5-year actuarial rates of 14% and 5% for moderate, and 2% and 8% for severe bowel and genitourinary tract complications (FIG: 3.5%, 0, and 2%, 8%). All severe bowel complications occurred within 1.5 years whereas urinary tract sequelae continued to develop throughout the follow-up period. FIGO stage was associated with a significant increase in late sequelae (P=0.015). Analysis of the remaining pretreatment and treatment parameters failed to reveal

  19. Separation of fission produced 106Ru from simulated high level nuclear wastes for production of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blicharska, Magdalena; Bartoś, Barbara; Krajewski, Seweryn; Bilewicz, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy is the common method for treating various tumors, and currently 106 Ru and 125 I applicators are the most frequently used. Considering that 106 Ru is a β emitter with maximum energy of 3.54 MeV, it is best indicated in the treatment of small melanomas, with up to 20 mm tissue range. 106 Ru is commercially obtained from neutron irradiated high enrichment 235 U target in process of production 99 Mo. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing the 99 Mo, therefore alternative strategies for production of this key medical isotope are explored. In our work, we propose to use liquid high-level radioactive waste as a source of high activity of 106 Ru. Simple calculations indicate that 1 dm 3 of HLLW solution after 4 years of cooling contains about 500 GBq of 106 Ru. This amount of activity is enough for production of about few thousands of brachytherapy sources. Present communication reports results of our process development studies on the recovery of ruthenium radioisotopes from simulated solution of high level radioactive waste using oxidation-extraction method

  20. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J. [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of {approx}1.4 smaller than for HDR {sup 192}Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were {approx}28 and {approx}11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also

  1. Regulatory control of radiation sources in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxtova, L.

    2001-01-01

    In Slovakia, there are two regulatory authorities. Regulatory control of the utilization of nuclear energy, based on the Slovak National Council's law No. 130/1998 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, is exercised by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. The second regulatory authority - the Ministry of Health - is empowered by law No. 72/1994 on the protection of human health to license radiation sources and is responsible for radiation protection supervision (there are nearly 3000 establishments with sealed sources, radiation generators and unsealed sources in Slovakia). Pursuant to a new radiation protection regulation based on international standards, radiation sources are to be categorized in six classes according to the associated exposure and contamination hazards. A national strategy for improving the safety of radiation sources over their life-cycle and for the management of disused and orphan sources is being prepared for governmental approval. (author)

  2. Safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to enhance the efficacy, quality and efficiency of the whole regulatory process. It provides advice on good practice administrative procedures for the regulatory process for preparation of applications, granting of authorizations, inspection, and enforcement. It also provides information on the development and use of standard safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection. The plans are intended to be used in conjunction with more detailed advice related to specific practices. In this sense, this TECDOC provides advice on a systematic approach to evaluations of protection and safety while other IAEA Safety Guides assist the user to distinguish between the acceptable and the unacceptable. This TECDOC covers administrative advice to facilitate the regulatory process governing authorization and inspection. It also covers the use of standard assessment and inspection plans and provides simplified plans for the more common, well established uses of radiation sources in medicine and industry, i.e. sources for irradiation facilities, industrial radiography, well logging, industrial gauging, unsealed sources in industry, X ray diagnosis, nuclear medicine, teletherapy and brachytherapy

  3. Definitive Brachytherapy for Kaposi's Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Ezzell, G.; Zalupski, M.; Fontanesi, J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and possible complications in patients diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma and treated with definitive brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January, 1995 and December, 1995, four patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) were treated with brachytherapy. Three patients, all with positive HIV status were treated using Iridium 192 (Ir-192) sources via a high-dose rate remote afterloader. One patient with endemic KS was treated using the application of catheters loaded with Californium 252. Eight sites were treated and included scalp, feet, nose, penis, hand, neck, and back. Dose rate for Ir-192 was 330cGy/fx to a total dose of 990cGy. The Californium was delivered as 100nGy/b.i.d. to a total dose of 900nGy. Follow-up as ranged from 2-6 months. Results: All four patients remain alive. Seven of eight sites have had complete clinical response and each patient has reported durable pain relief that has not subsided through last follow-up of 1/96. Two of eight sites, both treated with surface mold technique with Californium 252 developed moist desquamation. The remaining six sites did not demonstrate significant toxicity. Conclusion: Brachytherapy can offer Kaposi's sarcoma patients results that are equivalent to external beam radiation therapy, with minimal complications, a shorter treatment time and potential cost effectiveness

  4. Radiation proctitis after the high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Masashi; Katsumata, Tomoe; Satoh, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 12 patients treated for rectal bleeding after high-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. All patients developed grade 2 proctitis according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAC) and no patients needed blood transfusion. The patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and/or steroid suppositories. The bleeding stopped or improved in 11 patients. Although re-bleeding was noticed in 7 patients the same treatment was effective in 5 patients. (author)

  5. A fibre optic scintillator dosemeter for absorbed dose measurements of low-energy X-ray-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliski, A.; Soares, C.; Mitch, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed dosemeter using a 0.5 mm diameter x 0.5 mm thick cylindrical plastic scintillator coupled to the end of a fibre optic cable is capable of measuring the absorbed dose rate in water around low-activity, low-energy X-ray emitters typically used in prostate brachytherapy. Recent tests of this dosemeter showed that it is possible to measure the dose rate as a function of distance in water from 2 to 30 mm of a 103 Pd source of air-kerma strength 3.4 U (1 U = 1 μGy m 2 h -1 ), or 97 MBq (2.6 mCi) apparent activity, with good signal-to-noise ratio. The signal-to-noise ratio is only dependent on the integration time and background subtraction. The detector volume is enclosed in optically opaque, nearly water-equivalent materials so that there is no polar response other than that due to the shape of the scintillator volume chosen, in this case cylindrical. The absorbed dose rate very close to commercial brachytherapy sources can be mapped in an automated water phantom, providing a 3-D dose distribution with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The sensitive volume of the detector is 0.5 mm from the end of the optically opaque waterproof housing, enabling measurements at very close distances to sources. The sensitive detector electronics allow the measurement of very low dose rates, as exist at centimeter distances from these sources. The detector is also applicable to mapping dose distributions from more complex source geometries such as eye applicators for treating macular degeneration. (authors)

  6. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  7. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  8. Regulation for radiation protection in applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, Avinash U.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ionising radiation in multifarious field are increasing in the country for the societal benefits. The national regulatory body ensures safety and security of radiation sources by enforcing provisions in the national law and other relevant rules issued under the principle law. In addition, the enforcement of detailed requirements contained in practice specific safety codes and standard and issuance of safety directives brings effectiveness in ensuring safe handling and secure management of radiation sources. The regulatory requirements for control over radiation sources throughout their life-cycle have evolved over the years from experience gained. Nevertheless, some of the regulatory activities which require special attention have been identified such as the development of regulation to deal with advance emerging radiation technology in applications of radiation in medicine and industry; sustaining continuity in ensuring human resource development programme; inspections of category 3 and 4 disused sources and their safe disposal; measures for controlling transboundary movement of radiation sources. The regulatory measures have been contemplated and are being enforced to deal with the above issues in an effective manner. The complete involvement of the management of radiation facilities, radiation workers and their commitment in establishing and maintaining safety and security culture is essential to handle the radiation sources safely and efficiently at all times

  9. Comparison of192Ir,169Yb, and60Co high-dose rate brachytherapy sources for skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safigholi, Habib; Meigooni, Ali S; Song, William Y

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing the high-dose rate (HDR) 169 Yb and 60 Co sources, in addition to 192 Ir, for the treatment of skin malignancies with conical applicators. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to benchmark the dosimetric parameters of single 169 Yb (4140), 60 Co (Co0.A86), and 192 Ir (mHDR-V2) brachytherapy sources in a water phantom and compared their results against published data. A standard conical tungsten alloy Leipzig-style applicator (Stand.Appl) was used for determination of the dose distributions at various depths with a single dwell position of the HDR sources. The HDR sources were modeled with its long axis parallel to the treatment plane within the opening section of the applicator. The source-to-surface distance (SSD) was 1.6 cm, which included a 0.1 cm thick removable plastic end-cap used for clinical applications. The prescription depth was considered to be 0.3 cm in a water phantom following the definitions in the literature for this treatment technique. Dose distributions generated with the Stand.Appl and the 169 Yb and 60 Co sources have been compared with those of the 192 Ir source, for the same geometry. Then, applicator wall thickness for the 60 Co source was increased (doubled) in MC simulations in order to minimize the leakage dose and penumbra to levels that were comparable to that from the 192 Ir source. For each source-applicator combination, the optimized plastic end-cap dimensions were determined in order to avoid over-dosage to the skin surface. The normalized dose profiles at the prescription depth for the 169 Yb-Stand.Appl and the 60 Co-double-wall applicator were found to be similar to that of the 192 Ir-Stand.Appl, with differences Ir-, 169 Yb- and 60 Co-Stand.Appl were found to be comparable to the values with the 60 Co-double-walled applicator, with differences Ir-, 169 Yb-Stand.Appl, and 60 Co-double-wall applicators respectively. The leakage dose around the Stand.Appl for distance > 2 cm from the

  10. Control of radiation sources in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, S.

    2001-01-01

    The report refers to the regulations for radioactive material in force in Japan, and to the organizations with responsibilities for regulating radiation sources. An outline of the law regulating the use of radiation sources and radioactive materials is provided, including its scope, types of radiation sources under control, exemptions and the system of notification, authorization and inspection. The experience of Japan with orphan sources is presented in three different cases, and the measures carried out to store the orphan sources in safe conditions. (author)

  11. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majumdar Bishnu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory.

  12. 103Pd strings: Monte Carlo assessment of a new approach to brachytherapy source design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Reed, Joshua L.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A new type of 103 Pd source (CivaString and CivaThin by CivaTech Oncology, Inc.) is examined. The source contains 103 Pd and Au radio-opaque marker(s), all contained within low-Z eff organic polymers that permit source flexibility. The CivaString source is available in lengths L of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mm, and referred to in the current study as CS10–CS60, respectively. A thinner design, CivaThin, has sources designated as CT10–CT60, respectively. The CivaString and CivaThin sources are 0.85 and 0.60 mm in diameter, respectively. The source design is novel and offers an opportunity to examine its interesting dosimetric properties in comparison to conventional 103 Pd seeds. Methods: The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used to estimate air-kerma rate and dose rate distributions with polar and cylindrical coordinate systems. Doses in water and prostate tissue phantoms were compared to determine differences between the TG-43 formalism and realistic clinical circumstances. The influence of Ti encapsulation and 2.7 keV photons was examined. The accuracy of superposition of dose distributions from shorter sources to create longer source dose distributions was also assessed. Results: The normalized air-kerma rate was not highly dependent onL or the polar angle θ, with results being nearly identical between the CivaString and CivaThin sources for common L. The air-kerma strength was also weakly dependent on L. The uncertainty analysis established a standard uncertainty of 1.3% for the dose-rate constant Λ, where the largest contributors were μ en /ρ and μ/ρ. The Λ values decreased with increasing L, which was largely explained by differences in solid angle. The radial dose function did not substantially vary among the CivaString and CivaThin sources for r ≥ 1 cm. However, behavior for r 103 Pd wells and Au markers, respectively. Dose distributions of both source types had minimal anisotropy in comparison to conventional 103 Pd seeds

  13. Prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy; Prototipo de fuente radiactiva de fosforo para uso medico en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anaya Garro, Olgger; Vela Mora, Mariano; Revilla Silva, Angel Revilla [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru)]. E-mail: oanaya@ipen.gob.pe; mvela@ipen.gob.pe; arevilla@ipen.gob.pe

    2005-07-01

    It has developed prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy. This one was made in two stages, at the first one, we designed and constructed the container (capsule), the filling system and the sealed system; at the second one, we made the irradiation of the capsules containing the 'target'. The prototypes was made of aluminum in cylindrical geometry. During the irradiation test was made using two different dimensions: one of 1 mm outer diameter and 1 cm length and another one of 0.8 mm outer diameter and 5 mm length. They were radiated in the core of the RP-10 research reactor, at 7.93 x10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}.s thermal neutron flux during 27 operation cycles. Activities of 144.53 MBq (3.91 mCi) and 107.67 MBq (2.91 mCi) was obtained for each case. This activities are adequate to restenosis and for some tumors treatment. We can observed that the capsules irradiated passed visual inspection in its physical integrity (leakage and geometry). It has been demonstrated, that the beta radiation for his minor power of penetration and its high interaction, causes major local damage to the malignant tissue, minimizing the damage of the healthy surrounding tissues. It has been advisable to use for the treatment of illnesses of the circulatory system and some tumors. At the present, the source of strontium-90 are the most beta ray source used, but of this one are obtained as fission product of uranium target, where valuable radioactive waste is generated, whereas if we were using phosphorus-32 that we propose, radioactive waste would not be generated since it would take place directly as sealed source, for reaction (n, {beta}). (author)

  14. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  15. The monetary value of the man.rem and optimization in radiation therapy (brachytherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennow, K.R.; Jessen, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The personnel exposed by sources used for intracavitary radiation therapy in Denmark receive more than 40% of the collective dose recorded by personal dosemeters in Denmark. As the application of after-loading technique has become generally accepted by the medical profession in Denmark as a replacement to a considerable degree for manual radium therapy, the most promising suggestion for reduction of radiation doses is the introduction of after-loading facilities in all radiation therapy centres. Such facilities are now being planned in Denmark but their realization will entail great expense and therefore the financial aspects of these plans will be very important. At present the advantage of after-loading cannot be simply demonstrated to the politicians holding the purse strings, i.e. in terms of improved therapeutical gain, e.g. increased survival, although the incidence of complications has been shown to be lower, but the reduction in personnel radiation doses by the change to after-loading will be evident and be an important part of the cost-benefit analysis. By detailed investigation of all expenditures and savings, cost-benefit analysis has been carried out in order to isolate the relationship between expense and the collective dose reduction. If after-loading facilities are established in Denmark today with the intention of reducing the risk for employees and without any expectation of improvements in treatment, the monetary value of the man.rem implied is 10,000 kr. or 2000 US dollars. (author)

  16. Regulated control of practices and radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Excepting the radiation caused by the natural background radiation, the Executive Secretariat for Nuclear Affairs (SEAN) does not authorize any source no practice within the national territory that may imply exposure of a person to ionizing radiation unless this use is ruled. This document establishes the basic criteria to set up such system as well as to exclude or exempt practices and sources from this regulated control

  17. HDR and PDR192Ir source activity control procedures, as the part of the quality assurance system at Brachytherapy Department of Greater Poland Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowski, Grzegorz; Błasiak, Barbara; Stefaniak, Patrycja; Bielęda, Grzegorz

    2009-10-01

    One of the main causes of treatment failures in brachytherapy is incorrect source strength specification in planning system or treatment delivery console. Source strength control is the only scheme to avoid such mistakes. The main aim of this work was to present results of three years of HDR and PDR sources activity control. Study was based on data from 14 192 Ir HDR and PDR sources exchanges. Sources were checked three times: at the exchange day and after one and two months. Measurements were performed twice with thimble chamber (PMMA phantom), and well chamber. The source strength were measured as air - kerma and recalculated to activity. Source activities measured using well chamber and thimble chamber, as well as activities provided by planning system, were presented for PDR and HDR, respectively. Differences between results obtained using each chamber and activities from planning system were presented graphically. The calculated and measured activities differed less than 5%. Wilcoxon test was performed as well, no statistically significant differences were observed among HDR or PDR activities. Checking of source parameters is one of the most important parts of quality control system in brachytherapy facilities. Well chamber and thimble chamber based dosimetry systems are fast and reliable tools for 192 Ir source parameters checking in working brachytherapy department conditions.

  18. Warning signs for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    This Guide provides general instructions for marking radiation equipment and radioactive materials, and the places in which they are used. In this Guide a marking means a signboard or corresponding marking made, for example, using a sticker or by painting. The Guide governs both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Further instructions on markings in various applications are provided in other ST Guides

  19. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 {approx} 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 {approx} 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 {approx} 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 {approx} 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy{sub 10} (range:77 {approx} 94 Gy{sub 10}). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy{sub 3} (range: 122 {approx} 140 Gy{sub 3}) at point A, 109 Gy{sub 3} (range:88{approx} 125 Gy{sub 3}) at the rectum and 111 Gy{sub 3} (range: 91 {approx} 123 Gy{sub 3}) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 {approx} 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8{approx} 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure

  20. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  1. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  2. Radiation safety and inventory of sealed radiation sources in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Mannan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sealed radiation sources (SRS) of various types and activities are widely used in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and teaching in Pakistan. The proper maintenance of records of SRS is mandatory for users/licensees. Since 1956, more than 2000 radiation sources of different isotopes having activities of Bq to TBq have been imported. Of these, several hundred sources have been disposed of and some have been exported/returned to the suppliers. To ensure the safety and security of the sources and to control and regulate the safe use of radiation sources in various disciplines, the Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (DNSRP), the implementing arm of the regulatory authority in the country, has introduced a system for notifying, registering and licensing the use of all types of SRS. In order to update the inventory of SRS used throughout the country, the DNSRP has developed a database. (author)

  3. A generalized linear-quadratic model for radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and high-dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Huang, Zhibin; Lo, Simon S; Yuh, William T C; Mayr, Nina A

    2010-07-07

    Conventional radiation therapy for cancer usually consists of multiple treatments (called fractions) with low doses of radiation. These dose schemes are planned with the guidance of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, which has been the most prevalent model for designing dose schemes in radiation therapy. The high-dose fractions used in newer advanced radiosurgery, stereotactic radiation therapy, and high-dose rate brachytherapy techniques, however, cannot be accurately calculated with the traditional LQ model. To address this problem, we developed a generalized LQ (gLQ) model that encompasses the entire range of possible dose delivery patterns and derived formulas for special radiotherapy schemes. We show that the gLQ model can naturally derive the traditional LQ model for low-dose and low-dose rate irradiation and the target model for high-dose irradiation as two special cases of gLQ. LQ and gLQ models were compared with published data obtained in vitro from Chinese hamster ovary cells across a wide dose range [0 to approximately 11.5 gray (Gy)] and from animals with dose fractions up to 13.5 Gy. The gLQ model provided consistent interpretation across the full dose range, whereas the LQ model generated parameters that depended on dose range, fitted only data with doses of 3.25 Gy or less, and failed to predict high-dose responses. Therefore, the gLQ model is useful for analyzing experimental radiation response data across wide dose ranges and translating common low-dose clinical experience into high-dose radiotherapy schemes for advanced radiation treatments.

  4. Acute vasculitis after endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo L-G, Luis F.; Prionas, Stavros D.; Kaluza, Grzegorz L.; Raizner, Albert E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Angioplasty effectively relieves coronary artery stenosis but is often followed by restenosis. Endovascular radiation (β or γ) at the time of angioplasty prevents restenosis in a large proportion of vessels in swine (short term) and humans (short and long term). Little information is available about the effects of this radiation exposure beyond the wall of the coronary arteries. Methods and Materials: Samples were obtained from 76 minipigs in the course of several experiments designed to evaluate endovascular brachytherapy: 76 of 114 coronary arteries and 6 of 12 iliac arteries were exposed to endovascular radiation from 32 P sources (35 Gy at 0.5 mm from the intima). Two-thirds of the vessels had angioplasty or stenting. The vessels were systematically examined either at 28 days or at 6 months after radiation. Results: We found an unexpected lesion: acute necrotizing vasculitis in arterioles located ≤2.05 mm from the target artery. It was characterized by fibrinoid necrosis of the wall, often associated with lymphocytic exudates or thrombosis. Based on the review of perpendicular sections of tissue samples, the arterioles had received between 6 and 40 Gy. This arteriolar vasculitis occurred at 28 days in samples from 51% of irradiated coronary arteries and 100% of irradiated iliac arteries. By 6 months, the incidence of acute vasculitis decreased to 24% around the coronary arteries. However, at that time, healing vasculitis was evident, often with luminal narrowing, in 46% of samples. Vasculitis was not seen in any of 44 samples from unirradiated vessels (0%) and had no relation to angioplasty, stenting, or their sequelae. This radiation-associated vasculitis in the swine resembles the localized lymphocytic vasculitis that we have reported in tissues of humans exposed to external radiation. On the other hand, it is quite different from the various types of systemic vasculitis that occur in nonirradiated humans. Conclusion: Endoarterial brachytherapy

  5. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan. The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  6. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around brachytherapy sources, the capability of treatment planning systems, the performance of treatment units and methods to verify dose delivery. This work highlights the determinants of accuracy in HDR dosimetry and treatment delivery and presents a selection of papers, focusing on articles from the last five years, to reflect active areas of research and development. Apart from Monte Carlo modelling of source dosimetry, there is no clear consensus on the optimum techniques to be used to assure dosimetric accuracy through all the processes involved in HDR brachytherapy treatment. With the exception of the ESTRO mailed dosimetry service, there is little dosimetric audit activity reported in the literature, when compared with external beam radiotherapy verification.

  7. Radiation exposure to general public after permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Y.; Miyamoto, Y.; Oohashi, S.; Fukushi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Permanent prostate brachytherapy patients are generally told to limit their time around children and pregnant women. However, there is little data available to validate the instruction. For the skin effective dose rate, ion chamber survey meter model 451B-DE-SI was used. The meter was scanned at the point of 4.5, 20, 50 and 100 cm from the skin surface in each plane. Life time exposure was calculated from the average anterior data. At the point of 4.5 cm from the anterior skin surface, the lifetime equivalent dose was 46.5 mSv, at 20 cm it was 13.2 mSv, at 50 cm it was 3.5 mSv and at 100 cm it was 0.9 mSv. The risk from the prostate brachytherapy patients to general public is quite low. Only the case of close and long-time contact with the pregnant and the infant should be paid attention to. (authors)

  8. Radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    These Safety Fundamentals cover the protection of human beings against ionizing radiation (gamma and X rays and alpha, beta and other particles that can induce ionization as they interact with biological materials), referred to herein subsequently as radiation, and the safety of sources that produce ionizing radiation. The Fundamentals do not apply to non-ionizing radiation such as microwave, ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiation. They do not apply either to the control of non-radiological aspects of health and safety. They are, however, part of the overall framework of health and safety

  9. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules.

  10. Radiation sources and methods for producing them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malson, H.A.; Moyer, S.E.; Honious, H.B.; Janzow, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation sources contain a substrate with an electrically conducting, non-radioactive metal surface, a layer of a metal isotope of the scandium group as well as a percentage of non-radioactive binding metal being coated on the surface by means of an electroplating method. Besides examples for β sources ( 147 Pm), γ sources ( 241 Am), and neutron sources ( 252 Cf) there is described an α-radiation source ( 241 Am, 244 Cu, 238 Pu) for smoke detectors. There are given extensive tables and a bibliography. (DG) [de

  11. High-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer: the results of different fractionation regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yang, Dae Sik; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Yong [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    Although high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens have been practiced with a variety of modalities and various degrees of success, few studies on the subject have been conducted. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of local control and late complication rate according to different HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens in uterine cervical cancer patients. From November 1992 to March 1998, 224 patients with uterine cervical cancer were treated with external beam irradiation and HDR brachytherapy. In external pelvic radiation therapy, the radiation dose was 45 {approx} 54 Gy (median dose 54 Gy) with daily fraction size 1.8 Gy, five times per week. In HDR brachytherapy, 122 patients (Group A) were treated with three times weekly with 3 Gy to line-A (isodose line of 2 cm radius from source) and 102 patients (Group B) underwent the HDR brachytherapy twice weekly with 4 or 4.5 Gy to line-A after external beam irradiation. Iridium-192 was used as the source of HDR brachytherapy. Late complication was assessed from grade 1 to 5 using the RTOG morbidity grading system. The local control rate (LCR) at 5 years was 80% in group A and 84% in group B ({rho} = 0.4523). In the patients treated with radiation therapy alone, LCR at 5 years was 60.9% in group A and 76.9% in group B ({rho} = 0.2557). In post-operative radiation therapy patients, LCR at 5 years was 92.6% in group A and 91.6% in group B ({rho} 0.8867). The incidence of late complication was 18% (22 patients) and 29.4% (30 patients), of bladder complication was 9.8% (12 patients) and 14.7% (15 patients), and of rectal complication was 9.8% (12 patients) and 21.6% (22 patients), in group A and B, respectively. Lower fraction sized HDR brachytherapy was associated with decrease in late complication ({rho} =0.0405) (rectal complication, {rho} = 0.0147; bladder complication, {rho} =0.115). The same result was observed in postoperative radiation therapy patients ({rho} = 0.0860) and radiation only

  12. Sources of radiation exposure - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sources of radiation exposure are reviewed from the perspective of mining and milling of radioactive ores in Australia. The major sources of occupational and public exposure are identified and described, and exposures from mining and milling operations are discussed in the context of natural radiation sources and other sources arising from human activities. Most radiation exposure of humans comes from natural sources. About 80% of the world average of the effective dose equivalents received by individual people arises from natural radiation, with a further 15-20% coming from medical exposures*. Exposures results from human activities, such as mining and milling of radioactive ores, nuclear power generation, fallout from nuclear weapons testing and non-medical use of radioisotopes and X-rays, add less than 1% to the total. 9 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  13. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  14. All-fiber femtosecond Cherenkov radiation source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Møller, Uffe

    2012-01-01

    An all-fiber femtosecond source of spectrally isolated Cherenkov radiation is reported, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Using a monolithic, self-starting femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump source and the combination of photonic crystal fibers as the wave......-conversion medium, we demonstrate milliwatt-level, stable, and tunable Cherenkov radiation at visible wavelengths 580–630 nm, with pulse duration of sub-160-fs, and the 3 dB spectral bandwidth not exceeding 36 nm. Such an all-fiber Cherenkov radiation source is promising for practical applications in biophotonics...

  15. There are radiation sources out there!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahran, M.Y.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years we have been working in the area of the safety of radiation sources and radioactive materials. In this paper we summarize our findings and describe the recovery of an abandoned source. We call for further international co-operation in this area. In particular, we suggest an international system for the tagging and tracking of radioactive sources. (author)

  16. A comparison of radiation dose to the bulb of the penis in men with and without prostate brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Wallner, Kent; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Benson, Mark L.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the relationship between the radiation dose to the bulb of the penis and the development of erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy without external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three men who developed ED after transperineal ultrasound-guided permanent prostate brachytherapy for clinical T1/T2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland were paired with 23 similar men who maintained potency after implantation. Potency was defined as an erection sufficient for vaginal penetration. The mean and median follow-up for the entire group was 34.6 ± 13.7 months and 32.8 months, respectively. Patients were implanted with either 125 I (145 Gy TG-43) or 103 Pd (115 Gy, pre-NIST-99). No patient received external beam radiation therapy either before or after brachytherapy. The bulb of the penis was outlined at 0.5-cm intervals on the Day 0 postimplant CT scan. The radiation dose distribution to the bulb of the penis was defined in terms of the minimal dose delivered to 25%, 50%, 70%, 75%, 90%, and 95% of the bulb (D 25 , D 50 , D 70 , D 75 , D 90 , and D 95 ). Results: The radiation dose delivered to the bulb of the penis in men with postbrachytherapy-induced ED was statistically greater for all evaluated dosimetric parameters (D 25 , D 50 , D 70 , D 75 , D 90 , and D 95 ). Multivariate analysis indicated that dose to the bulb of the penis and patient age at the time of implant were predictive of postimplant ED, whereas choice of isotope had no effect. Among potent patients, 19/23 had D 50 ≤ 40% of prescribed minimal peripheral dose, whereas for the impotent patients, 19/23 had D 50 >40% of the minimal peripheral dose. Of the impotent patients, 17 utilized sildenafil, with 15 experiencing a favorable response (88%). Conclusion: Our data suggest that prostate brachytherapy-induced impotence is highly correlated with the radiation dose delivered to the bulb of the penis. With Day 0

  17. Ionizing radiation sources. Ionizing radiation interaction with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popits, R.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals of nuclear physics are reviewed under the headings: obtaining of X-rays and their properties; modes of radioactive decay of natural or man-made radionuclides; radioactive neutron sources; nuclear fission as basis for devising nuclear reactors and weapons; thermonuclear reactions; cosmic radiation. Basic aspects of ionizing radiation interactions with matter are considered with regard to charged particles, photon radiation, and neutrons. (A.B.)

  18. Radiation sources and technical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stonek, K.; Satorie, Z.; Vyskocil, I.

    1981-01-01

    Work is briefly described of the department for sealed sources production of the Institute, including leak testing and surface contamination of sealed sources. The department also provides technical services including the inspections of sealed sources used in medicine and geology and repair of damaged sources. It carries out research of the mechanical and thermal strength of sealed sources and of the possibility of reprocessing used 226 Ra sources. The despatch department is responsible for supplying the entire country with home and imported radionuclides. The department of technical services is responsible for testing imported radionuclides, assembling materials testing, industrial and medical irradiation devices, and for the collection and storage of low-level wastes on a national scale. (M.D.)

  19. Proposal for radioactive liquid waste management in a brachytherapy sealed sources development laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, C.D.; Peleias Jr, F.S.; Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Zeituni, C.A.; Benega, M.A.G.; Tiezzi, R.; Mattos, F.R.; Rodrigues, B.T.; Oliveira, T.B.; Feher, A.; Moura, J.A.; Costa, O.L.

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive waste management is addressed in several regulations. Literature survey indicates limited guidance on liquid waste management in Brachytherapy I-125 seeds production. Laboratories for those seeds are under implementation not only in Brazil but in several countries such as Poland, South Korea, Iran, China, and others. This paper may be used as reference to these other groups. For the correct implementation, a plan for radiological protection that has the management of radioactive waste fully specified is necessary. The proposal is that the waste will be deposited in a 20 L and 60 L containers which will take 2 years to fill. For glove box 1, the final activity of this container is 1.91 x 10 10 Bq (3.19 years to safe release in the environment). For glove box 3, the final activity of this container is 1.28 x 10 10 Bq (2.85 years to safe release in the environment). (authors)

  20. Radiation Safety and Orphan Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2006-01-01

    The wide spread use of radioactive and particularly of nuclear materials which started in the last century very quickly also demonstrated negative sides. The external exposure and radiotoxicity of these materials could be easily used in a malevolent act. Due to the fact that these materials could not be detected without special equipment designed for that purpose, severe control over their use in all phases of a life cycle is required. An orphan source is a radioactive source which is not under regulatory control, either because it has never been under regulatory or because it has been abandoned, lost, misplaced, stolen or transferred without proper authorization. In the last ten years a few international conferences were dedicated to the improvement of the safety and security of radioactive sources. Three main tasks are focused, the maintenance of data bases related to events with orphan sources and the publications of such events, the preparation of recommendations and guidelines to national regulatory bodies in order to prevent and detect the events related to orphan sources as well as to develop the response strategies to radiological or nuclear emergency, appraisals of the national strategies of radioactive sources control. Concerning Slovenia, strengthening control over orphan sources in Slovenia started after the adoption of new legislation in 2002. It was carried out through several tasks with the aim to prevent orphan sources, as well as to identify the sources which could be potentially orphan sources. The comprehensive methodology was developed by the Slovenian nuclear safety administration (S.N.S.A.) based on international guidelines as well as on the study of national lesson learned cases. The methodology was developed and used in close cooperation with all parties involved, namely other regulatory authorities, police, customs, agency for radioactive waste management (A.R.A.O.), technical support organisations (T.S.O.), users of source, authorised

  1. Characterization and storage of liquid wastes containing 125Iodine in the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Vitória S.; Souza, Daiane C.B. de; Barbosa, Nayane K.O.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Costa, Osvaldo L. da; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Vicente, Roberto; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources of Iodine-125 for medical applications have been developed at the Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) to meet the growing demand for medical applications such as brachytherapy. A dedicated laboratory is already being implemented at IPEN. Part of the processes involved in the production of sealed sources generate radioactive wastes that despite the short half-life (<100 days) have radioactive activity above the levels of exemption established by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission. Therefore, these wastes should receive appropriate treatment and storage until they reach the levels of release into the environment. This work aims to determine the volumes of the liquid wastes generated during the production stages of the sources, as well as to propose a temporary storage system for such wastes. The applied methodology consisted in determining the volumes of wastes generated in each production cell according to the manufacturing steps. After that, activities and activity concentrations were calculated for each container used for temporary storage inside the production laboratory. The total volume stored for one year in the temporary storage, as well as the rate of entry and exit of the liquid wastes were calculated according to the source production demand and the decay time of the radionuclide, respectively. The main results showed that the time required to reach sanitary sewage disposal values is within the period of operation of the facility. The total volume generated is also within the facility's temporary storage capacity

  2. Dosimetric feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy as an alternative to brachytherapy for definitive treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Ryan; Chen, Quan; Best, Ryan; Libby, Bruce; Crandley, Edwin F; Showalter, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the dosimetric feasibility of definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer. CT simulation scans from 10 medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer patients previously treated with high dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy were used to generate Helical Tomotherapy (HT) plans using the IMRT mode with clinical target volumes (CTVs) that included the uterus plus cervix. A prescription dose of 34 Gy in 4 fractions was used. The SBRT dosimetry was compared to the 10 prior intracavitary brachytherapy plans normalized to a standard dose. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were the bladder, rectum, sigmoid, femoral heads, and other bowel, including both large and small bowel. The simulation CT and daily image guidance for 4 patients treated with this technique were evaluated to assess for interfraction variation in the uterine position and effects on dosimetry. Compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, HT SBRT produced significantly greater overall target coverage to the uterus, boost CTV, and PTV, with exception of the V150% of the uterus. HT SBRT significantly increased dose to the rectum, bowel, and femoral heads compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, though not outside of dose tolerance limits. Review of daily image guidance for patients treated with this technique demonstrated good reproducibility with a mean overlap index of 0.87 (range, 0.74 – 0.99). Definitive SBRT for medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer appears to be a feasible treatment option. Future studies are warranted to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes with this technique, compared to HDR intracavitary brachytherapy

  3. Lack of Apparent Survival Benefit With Use of Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Patients With High-risk Prostate Cancer Receiving Combined External Beam Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, David D; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Mahal, Brandon A; Nguyen, Paul L; Devlin, Phillip M; King, Martin T; Orio, Peter F

    2018-01-01

    Although level 1 evidence has demonstrated a survival benefit from the addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the benefits of ADT with combined EBRT and brachytherapy for high-risk patients are unclear. We examined the association between ADT and overall survival in a national cohort of high-risk patients treated with EBRT with or without brachytherapy. We identified 46,325 men in the National Cancer Database with a diagnosis of high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score 8-10, clinical stage T3-T4, or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL) who were treated with EBRT with or without brachytherapy and ADT from 2004 through 2011. Multivariable Cox regression analysis adjusting for sociodemographic and clinicopathologic factors was used to identify the association between ADT and overall survival. The median follow-up period was 48.6 and 59.2 months for patients treated with EBRT only and combined modality RT, respectively. ADT was associated with an improvement in overall survival for the 85.0% (39,361) of the study cohort who underwent EBRT alone (adjusted hazard ratio 0.91, P=.001) but not for patients treated with combined modality RT (adjusted hazard ratio 1.05, P=.496), with a significant interaction (P interaction =.036). In contrast to the known survival benefit when ADT is given with EBRT, our results suggest that ADT might not improve survival for high-risk patients who undergo combined EBRT and brachytherapy. Given the significant adverse effects of ADT, in particular, with long-term therapy, a randomized controlled trial of combined EBRT and brachytherapy with or without ADT for select high-risk patients using a noninferiority design should be undertaken. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The feasibility of a second lumpectomy and breast brachytherapy for localized cancer in a breast previously treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Manjeet; Feldman, Sheldon; Boolbol, Susan; Wang, Lin; Harrison, Louis B

    2008-01-01

    With accumulating evidence supporting partial-breast irradiation, we conducted a Phase I/II study to evaluate the role of a second conservative surgery and brachytherapy for patients presenting with a local recurrence/new primary in a breast who has previously undergone a lumpectomy and external radiation therapy for breast cancer. Fifteen patients with a localized lesion in the breast have undergone a second lumpectomy and received low-dose-rate brachytherapy on protocol. The first 6 patients received a dose of 30Gy. With no unacceptable acute toxicity observed, the brachytherapy dose was increased to 45Gy. Three patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 8 patients are on antiestrogen therapy. The median time interval between the primary breast cancer diagnosis and the second cancer event in the ipsilateral breast is 94 months (range, 28-211). With a median followup of 36 months after brachytherapy, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier overall survival, local disease-free survival and mastectomy-free survival are 100% and 89%, respectively. There was no Grade 3/4 fibrosis or necrosis observed. All patients had baseline asymmetry due to the breast volume deficit from the second lumpectomy. With breast asymmetry as a given, the cosmetic result observed in all patients has been good to excellent. Early results suggest low-complication rates, high rate of local control and freedom from mastectomy. Additional studies are needed to establish whether a second lumpectomy and breast brachytherapy are an acceptable alternative to mastectomy for patients presenting with a localized cancer in a previously irradiated breast.

  5. The utilization of radiation sources in Angola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, P.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the situation that Angola, which joined the IAEA in September 1999, is facing with the lack of an appropriate infrastructure for the control of radiation sources. It emphasizes the country's needs in technical assistance from the IAEA and other Member States for improving its regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety. (author)

  6. Potential brachytherapy nuclides of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanta, A.; Iyer, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    In the past there were relatively few radionuclides available for brachytherapy. But the situation is rapidly changing with the development of many new sources with properties that may be advantageous in certain clinical situations. In the choice of an acceptable, rather than an ideal radionuclide, it is important to consider the physical dose distribution, radiobiological effectiveness, ease of radiation protection, logistics and cost. Taking into account these factors, a number of radionuclides have been tried and more are being considered for specific type of applications. Presently, 137 Cs is the most commonly used radionuclide for intracavitary therapy and 192 Ir for interstitial therapy. 125 I has more or less replaced 198 Au for permanent implants. Clinical studies are being carried out to assess the feasibility of replacing 137 Cs with 241 Am for intracavitary applications and 125 I with 103 Pd and/or 169 Yb for interstitial permanent implants. Other radionuclides being considered are 75 Fe and 145 Sm. Neutron induced brachytherapy is a new technique being tried to ensure complete radiation safety. (author). 1 tab

  7. Development of brachytherapy medium doserate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atang Susila; Ari Satmoko; Ahmad Rifai; Kristiyanti

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment for different types of cancers and it become a common treatment modality in most radiotherapy clinics. PRPN has had experience in development of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy for cervix cancer treatment. However the treatment process using LDR device needs 5 hours in time that the patient feel uncomfort. Therefore PRPN develops Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy with radiation activity not more than 5 Currie. The project is divided into two stages. Purchasing of TPS software and TDS design are held in 2010, and the construction will be in 2011. (author)

  8. Cervical cancer. Application of MR imaging in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of application of MRI in arrangement of brachytherapy of cervical cancer, a method was proposed to see the radiation doses in surrounding tissues by superimposing the dose distribution pattern of the radiation source on the MR image. The applicator for the source was filled with water to get its T2-weighted image and was inserted in the patients. The MRI apparatus was Siemens Magnetom Vision (1.5T) with phased array coil. T2-weighted sagittal and coronary images were taken by turbospin echo and HASTE methods. The section thickness was 5 mm. The dose distribution pattern was superimposed on the frontal and lateral images by Siemens Mevaplan to see the doses in surrounding tissues. In 4 patients, it was possible to estimate the radiation dose in the posterior wall of bladder, anterior wall of rectum and urinary duct. The method is promising for arranging brachytherapy of cervical cancer. (K.H.)

  9. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of 192 Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaiza C, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D w for the energy of: 60 Co, 137C s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the 192 Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of 192 Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the 60 Co for D w , using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D w by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D w in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the 137 Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D w start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R TLD vs D w : For the energy of 60 Co, 137 Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F s ) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F s for the two 192 Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of capsules were sent to two hospitals that have the HDR Brachytherapy with sources of 192

  10. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  11. Regulatory control of radiation sources. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The basic requirements for the protection of persons against exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources were established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards), jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/ NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) (the Sponsoring Organizations). The application of the Basic Safety Standards is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities for radiation protection and safety. Requirements relating to the legal and governmental infrastructure for the safety of nuclear facilities and sources of ionizing radiation, radiation protection, the safe management of radioactive waste and the safe transport of radioactive material are established in the Safety Requirements on Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1. This Safety Guide, which is jointly sponsored by the FAO, the IAEA, the International Labour Office, the PAHO and the WHO, gives detailed guidance on the key elements for the organization and operation of a national regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety, with particular reference to the functions of the national regulatory body that are necessary to ensure the implementation of the Basic Safety Standards. The Safety Guide is based technically on material first published in IAEA-TECDOC-10671, which was jointly sponsored by the FAO, the IAEA, the OECD/NEA, the PAHO and the WHO. The requirements established in GS-R-1 have been taken into account. The Safety Guide is oriented towards national

  12. Randomized comparison between intracoronary β-radiation brachytherapy and implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse in-stent restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukro, Christoph; Syeda, Bonni; Kirisits, Christian; Schmid, Rainer; Pichler, Philipp; Pokrajac, Boris; Lang, Irene; Poetter, Richard; Glogar, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intracoronary brachytherapy was the primary therapeutic option for the treatment of in-stent restenosis (ISR) during the last years. Especially for the treatment of diffuse ISR (lesions >10 mm), β-source brachytherapy was significantly superior to singular balloon angioplasty. Despite lacking clinical database, the implantation of drug eluting stents recently became a common procedure for the treatment of ISR. This randomized trial aimed to compare the efficacy of β-brachytherapy with β-radioisotopes 90 Sr/ 90 Y and paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of diffuse ISR. Material and methods: Thirty-seven patients with diffuse ISR were randomly assigned to β-brachytherapy after balloon angioplasty (Beta-Cath TM in 17 patients) or paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation (Taxus-Express2 TM in 20 patients). Six-month clinical follow-up was obtained for all patients, while angiographic follow-up was available for 30 patients. Results: Binary ISR (restenosis >50%) within target segment was observed in three patients treated with Beta-Cath TM , of which one needed target segment revascularisation for recurrent ISR, whereas no significant restenosis occurred in the patients treated with Taxus-Express2 TM (P = 0.037). No further major adverse cardiac (target segment revascularisation, myocardial infarction, death) was found in either group (P = NS). Stent implantation was the more time-saving (31 ± 11 min versus 60 ± 23 min, P TM arm, we found no difference in clinical outcome after implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse ISR when compared to β-brachytherapy

  13. Loss and recovery of radiation sources in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, U.C.; Pradhan, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of radioisotope sources occurs as a result of the violation of safe work practices and non-compliance with rules and guidelines. The main causes are human error, negligence in source handling and storage as well as mismanagement and lack of supervision. The failure to adequately supervise and manage leads to a breakdown in communication and differences among workers, supervisors and managers. Recovery of lost sources is generally a tedious task. In India, apart from the efforts of the user institution, a team of scientists from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) undertakes searches and supervises recovery operations. Sources have been lost in brachytherapy and nuclear medicine departments of hospitals and in industrial institutions. For brachytherapy source losses, hospital garbage, dustbins, passages and lifts were the main targets for searches. While gamma ray and neutron sources could be traced for the most part, pure beta ray sources, such as Sr-90 used in ophthalmic applicators or as check sources, could not be recovered. In industrial radiography, the search for sources was more problematic, especially when the sources were stolen or lost in transport. Lost materials could not be traced in only two out of eleven instances of loss of Ir-192 sources since 1986. In a separate incident, sources which had been stolen were found in a deep river: this necessitated an elaborate fishing operation at a cost of some US$100,000. Each occurrence provided lessons calling for the introduction of new control measures. (author)

  14. Conventional external beam radiation therapy and high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy as a boost for patients older than 70 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson

    2005-01-01

    The treatment options for patients with non metastatic prostate cancer range from observation, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy to various combination of some to all of them. Objective: we evaluated the impact on biochemical control of disease (bNED), acute and late intestinal (GI) and urological (GU) morbidity for a group of patients older than 70 years presenting initial or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost to conventional external beam radiation therapy (RT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology from Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: a total of 56 patients older than 70 were treated from March, 1997 to June, 2002. All patients had prior to HDRB a course of RT to a median dose of 45 Gy. HDRB doses ranged from 16 Gy to 20 Gy, given in 4 fractions. Results: the median age of the patients was 74.4 years (range 70-83) and the median follow-up 33 months (range 24 to 60). The 5-year actuarial bNED rate was 77%. Acute GU and GI morbidity G1-2 were seen in 17.8% and 7.1% of patients, respectively. Late G1 or G2 GU morbidity was seen in 10.7% of the patients, while late G3 morbidity was observed in 7.1% of the patients, represented by urethral strictures. Conclusion: this group of patients had similar bNED rates when compared to literature, with acceptable morbidity rates. (author)

  15. Ionization detector with improved radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    The detector comprises a chamber having at least one radiation source disposed therein. The chamber includes spaced collector plates which form a part of a detection circuit for sensing changes in the ionization current in the chamber. The radiation source in one embodiment is in the form of a wound wire or ribbon suitably supported in the chamber and preferably a source of beta particles. The chamber may also include an adjustable electrode and the source may function as an adjustable current source by forming the wire or ribbon in an eliptical shape and rotating the structure. In another embodiment the source has a random shape and is homogeneously disposed in the chamber. 13 claims, 5 drawing figures

  16. A study on the dose distributions in various materials from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ming Hsu

    Full Text Available Dose distributions of (192Ir HDR brachytherapy in phantoms simulating water, bone, lung tissue, water-lung and bone-lung interfaces using the Monte Carlo codes EGS4, FLUKA and MCNP4C are reported. Experiments were designed to gather point dose measurements to verify the Monte Carlo results using Gafchromic film, radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, solid water, bone, and lung phantom. The results for radial dose functions and anisotropy functions in solid water phantom were consistent with previously reported data (Williamson and Li. The radial dose functions in bone were affected more by depth than those in water. Dose differences between homogeneous solid water phantoms and solid water-lung interfaces ranged from 0.6% to 14.4%. The range between homogeneous bone phantoms and bone-lung interfaces was 4.1% to 15.7%. These results support the understanding in dose distribution differences in water, bone, lung, and their interfaces. Our conclusion is that clinical parameters did not provide dose calculation accuracy for different materials, thus suggesting that dose calculation of HDR treatment planning systems should take into account material density to improve overall treatment quality.

  17. Safe management of spent radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Valdezco, E.M.; Choi, Kwang-Sub

    2003-01-01

    Presented are 8 investigation reports concerning the safe management of spent radiation source (SRS) during the current 2 years. Four reports from Japan are: Scheme for SRS management (approach and present status of the SRS management and consideration toward solving problems); Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) activities related to safety of radiation sources (Chronology of action plan development, Outline of revised action plan, and Asian regional activities); Current status of SRS management in Japan (Regulation system, Obligations of licensed users, Regulatory system on sealed sources, Status in the incidents on sources occurred, Incident of source loss, and Incidents of orphan sources); and SRS management system in Japan (Current status of using of sealed sources, collection system of SRS-Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) services, and Disposal of SRS). Four reports from the Asian countries also concern the current statuses of SRS management in the Philippine (Radioactive waste sources, Waste management strategies, Conditioning of Ra sources, Ra project action plan, as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program, Dose assessment, Regulations on radioactive waste, Action plan on the safety and security of sources, IAEA Regional Demonstration Centers, and sitting studies for a near surface disposal facility); Thailand (Current status of using sealed sources, Inventory of SRS, and Current topics of SRS management); Indonesia (Principles of management of radiation sources, Legislative framework of SRS management practices, Regulatory on SRS, management of sealed SRS, management hurdles, and reported incidents); and Korea (Regulatory frame work, Collection systems of SRS, Radioisotope waste generation, Radiation exposure incident, and Scrap monitoring system). (N.I.)

  18. The safe use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    As a means of promoting safety in the use of radiation sources, as well as encouraging consistency in regulatory control, the IAEA has from time to time organized training courses with the co-operation of Member State governments and organizations, to inform individuals from developing countries with appropriate responsibilities on the provisions for the safe use and regulation of radiation sources. Three such courses on the safe use of radiation sources have been held in both the USA, with the co-operation of the United States Government, and in Dublin, Ireland, with the co-operation of the Irish Government. The Training Course on the Safe Use and Regulation of Radiation Sources has been successfully given to over 77 participants from over 30 countries during the last years. The course is aimed at providing a basis of radiation protection knowledge in all aspects of the uses of radiation and of radiation sources that are used today. It is the intention of this course to provide a systematic enhancement of radioisotope safety in countries with developing radiological programmes through a core group of national authorities. The IAEA's training programmes provide an excellent opportunity for direct contact with lecturers that have extensive experience in resolving issues faced by developing countries and in providing guidance documents useful in addressing their problems. This document uses this collective experience and provides valuable technical information regarding the safety aspects of the uses not only of sealed and unsealed sources of radiation, but also for those machines that produce ionizing radiation. The first of these training courses, 'Safety and Regulation of Unsealed Sources' was held in Dublin, Ireland, June through July 1989 with the co-operation of the Nuclear Energy Board and Trinity College. This was an interregional training course, the participants came from all over the world. The second and third interregional courses, 'Safety and Regulation

  19. New high power coherent radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangle, P.; Coffey, T.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable renewed interest in the development of novel devices for the production of high power coherent electromagnetic radiation. This interest has been motivated largely by the realization that, with existing technology, certain processes utilizing relativistic electron beams can produce coherent electromagnetic radiation at power levels far in excess of those achieved by conventional electron devices. This paper will review the current status of this rapidly developing field, with emphasis on two generic devices. The major thrust in the recent development of electron beam driven radiation sources has been directed towards achieving shorter wavelengths, greater power and higher efficiencies. Shortly after the development of such successful sources as the magnetron, kylstron and various traveling wave devices, it became clear that, in their original form, they were limited in their ability to produce high levels of radiation efficiently at short wavelengths. To circumvent the inherent limitations of these conventional coherent radiation sources, many new concepts and mechanisms, as well as variations on conventional concepts, were proposed. This paper is concerned primarily with two devices which are, relatively speaking, newcomers to the list of coherent classical radiation sources. They are the free electron laser and the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM); one well known type of CRM is the gyrotron.

  20. Stem effect of a Ce3+ doped SiO2 optical dosimeter irradiated with a 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrara, Mauro; Tenconi, Chiara; Guilizzoni, Roberta; Borroni, Marta; Cavatorta, Claudia; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Fallai, Carlo; Gambarini, Grazia; Vedda, Anna; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic-coupled scintillation dosimeters are characterized by their small active volume if compared to other existing systems. However, they potentially show a greater stem effect, especially in external beam radiotherapy where the Cerenkov effect is not negligible. In brachytherapy, due to the lower energies and the shorter high dose range of the employed sources, the impact of the stem effect to the detector accuracy might be low. In this work, the stem effect of a Ce 3+ doped SiO 2 scintillation detector coupled to a SiO 2 optical fiber was studied for high dose rate brachytherapy applications. Measurements were performed in a water phantom at changing source-detector mutual positions. The same irradiations were performed with a passive optical fiber, which doesn't have the dosimeter at its end. The relative contribution of the passive fiber with respect to the uncorrected readings of the detector in each one of the investigated source dwell positions was evaluated. Furthermore, the dosimeter was calibrated both neglecting and correcting its response for the passive fiber readings. The obtained absolute dose measurements were then compared to the dose calculations resulting from the treatment planning system. Dosimeter uncertainties with and without taking into account the passive fiber readings were generally below 2.8% and 4.3%, respectively. However, a particular exception results when the source is positioned near to the optical fiber, where the detector underestimates the dose (−8%) or at source-detector longitudinal distances higher than 3 cm. The obtained results show that the proposed dosimeter might be adopted in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy with satisfactory accuracy, without the need for any stem effect correction. However, accuracy further improves by subtraction of the noise signal produced by the passive optical fiber. - Highlights: • A scintillation detector with 0.9 mm diameter was developed for in vivo dosimetry in

  1. Assessment of risk from radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaratnam, T.; Madhvanath, U.; Somasundaram, S.

    1976-01-01

    Assessment of risk from exposure to ionizing radiations from man-made radiation sources and nuclear installations has to be viewed from three aspects, namely, dose-effect relationship (genetic and somatic) for humans, calculation of doses or dose-commitments to population groups, assessment of risk to radiation workers and the population at large from the current levels of exposure from nuclear industry and comparison of risk estimates with other industries in a modern society. These aspects are discussed in brief. On the basis of available data, it is shown that estimated incidence of genetic diseases and cancers due to exposure of population to radiation from nuclear industry is negligible in comparison with their natural incidence, and radiation risks to the workers in nuclear industry are much lower than the risks in other occupations. (M.G.B.)

  2. Quantification of iodine in porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio André Lacerda

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, non-radioactive iodine was incorporated in two types of biodegradable hydroxyapatite-based porous matrices (HA and HACL through impregnation process from sodium iodine aqueous solutions with varying concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol/L . The results revealed that both systems presented a high capacity of incorporating iodine into their matrices. The quantity of incorporated iodine was measured through Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA. The porous ceramic matrices based on hydroxyapatite demonstrated a great potential for uses in low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy.Materiais cerâmicos porosos à base de compostos de fosfatos de cálcio (CFC vêm sendo estudados e desenvolvidos para várias aplicações biomédicas tais como implantes, sistemas para liberação de drogas e fontes radioativas para braquiterapia. Dois tipos de matrizes porosas biodegradáveis de hidroxiapatita (HA e HACL foram avaliadas em termos da capacidade de incorporação de iodo em suas estruturas. Resultados revelaram que as matrizes porosas a base de hidroxiapatita apresentaram alta capacidade de incorporar iodo em sua estrutura. A quantidade de iodo foi mensurada através da técnica de Análise por Ativação Nêutronica (AAN. As matrizes cerâmicas porosas à base de hidroxiapatita demostraram ter grande potencial para aplicação em braquiterapia de baixa taxa de dose (LDR - Low Dose Rate.

  3. Is oncoplastic surgery a contraindication for accelerated partial breast radiation using the interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Anna-Maria; Kauer-Dorner, Daniela; Resch, Alexandra; Schmid, Andreas; Thill, Marc; Niehoff, Peter; Melchert, Corinna; Berger, Daniel; Kovács, György

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients after oncoplastic surgery for early breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of 136 breasts of 134 patients, who received breast-conserving oncoplastic surgery for low-risk breast cancer between 2002 and 2010 in the Universities of Vienna and Luebeck followed by adjuvant APBI applying total doses of pulse dose rate of 50.4 Gy or high-dose rate (HDR) of 32 Gy over 4 days. Target volume definition was performed by the use of surgical-free margin data, related to intraoperatively fixed clip positions, pre- and postoperative imaging, and palpation. At the time of data acquisition, 131 of 134 patients were alive. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 4-106 months). After high-dose rate treatment, 3 of 89 patients showed systemic progress after a mean follow-up of 47 months (range, 19-75 months) and 2 patients had a different quadrant in-breast tumor after 27 and 35 months. One patient died 7 months after treatment of unknown causes. After pulse dose rate treatment, 1 of 45 patients had a local recurrence after 42 months and 1 patient died because of another cause after 13 months. We observed mild fibrosis in 27 breasts, telangiectasia in 6, hyperpigmentation in 14 cases, and keloid formation in 1. These preliminary results suggest the feasibility of multicatheter APBI after oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery in selected low-risk breast cancer patients; however, special attention to target volume definition is needed. Further prospective investigations with long follow-up are needed to define the real value of the procedure. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Occupational exposure to natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, T.; Sciocchetti, G.; Rannou, A.

    1993-01-01

    The most important natural sources of radiation are analyzed. The situation in France, Italy, and Spain concerning protection against natural radiation is described, including the identification of sources, and defined practices, organizations charged of national surveys and the responsibility of regulatory bodies and the role of operating management. The activities of the international organizations (ICRP, CEC and IAEA) are presented and discussed, and existing actions toward harmonization in the CEC, IAEA and other international programs is also discussed. (R.P.) 23 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Monte Carlo dose characterization of a new 90Sr/90Y source with balloon for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ruqing; Li, X. Allen; Lobdell, John

    2003-01-01

    Beta emitting source wires or seeds have been adopted in clinical practice of intravascular brachytherapy for coronary vessels. Due to the limitation of penetration depth, this type of source is normally not applicable to treat vessels with large diameter, e.g., peripheral vessel. In the effort to extend application of its beta source for peripheral vessels, Novoste has recently developed a new catheter-based system, the Corona trade mark sign 90 Sr/ 90 Y system. It is a source train of 6 cm length and is jacketed by a balloon. The existence of the balloon increases the penetration of the beta particles and maintains the source within a location away from the vessel wall. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system, we have calculated the two-dimensional (2-D) dose rate distribution of the Corona trade mark sign system in water for a balloon diameter of 5 mm. The dose rates on the transverse axis obtained in this study are in good agreement with calibration results of the National Institute of Standards and Technology for the same system for balloon diameters of 5 and 8 mm. Features of the 2-D dose field were studied in detail. The dose parameters based on AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. For a balloon diameter of 5 mm, the dose rate at the reference point (defined as r 0 =4.5 mm, 2 mm from the balloon surface) is found to be 0.010 28 Gy min -1 mCi -1 . A new formalism for a better characterization of this long source is presented. Calculations were also performed for other balloon diameters. The dosimetry for this source is compared with a 192 Ir source, commonly used for peripheral arteries. In conclusion, we have performed a detailed dosimetric characterization for a new beta source for peripheral vessels. Our study shows that, from dosimetric point of view, the Corona trade mark sign system can be used for the treatment of an artery with a large diameter, e.g., peripheral vessel

  6. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  7. The need for international standardization in clinical beta dosimetry for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Boehm, J.; Kaulich, T.W.

    2002-01-01

    Beta radiation has found increasing interest in radiotherapy. Besides the curative treatment of small and medium-sized intraocular tumors by means of ophthalmic beta radiation plaques, intravascular brachytherapy has proven to successfully overcome the severe problem of restenosis after interventional treatment of arterial stenosis in coronaries and peripheral vessels in many clinical trials with a large number of patients. Prior to initiating procedures applying beta radiation in radiotherapy, however, there is a common need to specify methods for the determination and specification of the absorbed dose to water or tissue and their spatial distributions. The IAEA-TECDOC-1274 Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy (2002) is a help for photon brachytherapy calibration. But, for beta seed and line sources, IAEA recommends well type ionization chambers as working standards which are far from measuring absorbed dose to water of the radiation clinically used. Although the application of such working standards seems to be more precise, large errors can occur when the medical physicist has to convert the calibration data to absorbed dose to water of the beta radiation emitted. The user must believe that the source is equally activated and that the manufacturer did not change the design and construction of the source encapsulation. With the DGMP Report 16 (2001) Guidelines for medical physical aspects of intravascular brachytherapy a very detailed code of practice is given, especially for the calibration and clinical dosimetry of intravascular beta radiation sources. As there is a global need for standardization in clinical dosimetry for intravascular brachytherapy utilizing beta radiation, the DIN-NAR, the German committee on standardization in radiology, task group dosimetry, has initiated an international adhoc working group for a new ISO work item proposal on the standardization of procedures in clinical dosimetry to guarantee reliable

  8. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  9. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 μSv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, μSv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, μSv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  10. Synchrotron radiation sources in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitza, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is now recognized to be an important instrument for experimental work in many fields of science. Recently the application of SR in medicine and industry, especially as a light source for microelectronics production have been demonstrated. Thus the development of SR sources has now grown to become a significant and independent dimension for accelerator research and technology. This article describes SR work in the Soviet Union

  11. Radiation as a source of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kazuaki

    1999-01-01

    Essence and nature of ionizing radiation as a source of risk are reviewed. Following to the appeal of necessity and importance of campaign for enlightening risk management, of individual and of society, background knowledge and information helpful to the promotion and discussion are summarized, also. (author)

  12. Trade and transport of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide specifies the obligations pertaining to the trade in and transport of radiation sources and other matters to be taken into account in safety supervision. It also specifies obligations and procedures relating to transfrontier movements of radioactive waste contained in the EU Council Directive 92/3/Euratom. (7 refs.)

  13. Laser ranging using safety radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrov, A. A.; Pozdniakov, M. G.

    2004-02-01

    Impulse laser rangefinders (ILR) on the basis of coherent radiation sources with various spectral structure characteristics complex analysis results are stated. Hardware and tehnological ILR realization opportunities with both located objects and information light streams extending environment (atmosphere) typical characteristics so as levels of probing optical signals biological influence are taken into account.

  14. Optimization of industrial processes using radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, Claudio G.; Silva Filho, Edmundo D. da; Toribio, Norberto M.; Gandara, Leonardo A.

    1996-01-01

    Aiming the enhancement of the staff protection against radiation in operational areas, the SAMARCO Mineracao S.A. proceeded a reevaluation and analysis of the real necessity of the densimeters/radioactive sources in the operational area, and also the development of an alternative control process for measurement the ore pulp, and introduced of the advanced equipment for sample chemical analysis

  15. Aircrew radiation exposure: sources-risks-measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.

    1994-05-01

    A short review is given on the actual aircrew exposure and its sources. The resulting risks for harmful effects to the health and discuss methods for in-flight measurements of exposure is evaluated. An idea for a fairly simple and economic approach to a practical, airborne active dosimeter for the assessment of individual crew exposure is presented. The exposure of civil aircrew to cosmic radiation, should not be considered a tremendous risk to the health, there is no reason for panic. However, being significantly higher than the average exposure to radiation workers, it can certainly not be neglected. As recommended by ICRP, aircrew exposure has to be considered occupational radiation exposure and aircrews are certainly entitled to the same degree of protection, as other ground-based radiation workers have obtained by law, since long time. (author)

  16. Compact high-power terahertz radiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Krafft

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new type of THz radiation source, based on recirculating an electron beam through a high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavity, and using this beam to drive a standard electromagnetic undulator on the return leg, is discussed. Because the beam is recirculated and not stored, short bunches may be produced that radiate coherently in the undulator, yielding exceptionally high average THz power for relatively low average beam power. Deceleration from the coherent emission, and the detuning it causes, limits the charge-per-bunch possible in such a device.

  17. Radiation source shielding and collimating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A radiation source, such as 241 Am, sealed in a capsule at atmospheric pressure especially for use in agricultural machines such as lettuce harvesters having a maturity tester is described. The capsule is disposed in a plunger movable in an evacuated chamber between a first position in alignment with a passage having a window permeable by radiation to the outside and a second position in which the capsule is out of alignment with the passage. A pressure responsive switch monitors the pressure in the chamber and affords an alarm if the chamber pressure rises

  18. Evaluation of the response of polymeric gel modified MAGIC-f using a clinical brachytherapy source and Monte Carlo simulation with package PENELOPE; Avaliacao da resposta do gel polimerico MAGIC-f modificado utilizando uma fonte clinica de braquiterapia e simulacao Monte Carlo com o pacote PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, Ana Luiza; Nicolucci, Patricia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica; Borges, Leandro F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Setor de Radioterapia

    2016-07-01

    In this work a comparison of experimental and simulated relative doses of a clinical brachytherapy source was performed. A 5 x 5 x 7 cm{sup 3} phantom with a modified MAGIC-f gel was irradiated using a clinical {sup 192}Ir source and read using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE was used to simulate the dose distributions of the same radiation source. The dose distributions were obtained in two planes perpendicular to the source: one passing through the source's center and the other at 0.5 cm away from the source's center. The higher differences found between experimental and computational distributions were 12.5% at a point 0.62 cm from the source for the central plane and 8.6% at 1.3 cm from the source to the plane 0.5 cm away from the source's center. Considering the high dose gradient of these dose distributions, the results obtained show that the modified MAGIC-f gel is promising for brachytherapy dosimetry. (author)

  19. Randomized trial on external radiation therapy alone versus external radiation therapy followed by brachytherapy in early stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a long term result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Li; Yuan Zhiyong; Xu Guozhen; Li Suyan; Xiao Guangli; Cai Weiming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare local control and toxicity in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy (BT) versus external beam radiotherapy alone (RT) for locally early stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From 1990 to 1997, 126 NPC patients staged T1 and T2 by 1992 Fuzhou Staging System (oropharynx, carotid sheath and soft tissue around cervical vertebral involvement excluded) were randomized into RT alone and RT followed BT groups. The two groups were comparable in age, gender, stage and pathology. The median follow-up was 112 months. T1 patients were randomized before the treatment into RT alone group of 66-70 Gy and RT plus BT with the dose of 56 Gy plus 10-16 Gy BT boost to the nasopharynx. For T2 patients, if MRI or CT showed no residual lesion in parapharyngeal space after 50 Gy, they were randomized into RT alone (median dose: 72 Gy) or RT of 66 Gy followed by 8-24 Gy BT boost (1-3 fractions over 1-3 weeks). Results: In RT group, 8 patients (13.1%) failed in primary site during the follow-up period, 7 (11%) in BT group. The 5-year local control rates was 86% for RT group and 88% for BT group (P=0.47). The 5-year overall survival rates were 83% and 84% (P=0.84), respectively. Ten patients (18%) in RT group (4 of grade I, 6 of grade II) and 7 patients (11%) in BT group (4 of grade I, 3 of grade II, P=0.31) developed radiation induced encephalopathy. The incidence of trismus was much lower in BT group than in RT group (26% versus 10%, P=0.02). No soft palate perforation or sphenoid necrosis were observed. Conclusion: Compared to conventional external beam radiotherapy, planned irradiation plus intracavitary brachytherapy not only can achieve similar local control and survival rates for locally early stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma, but also decrease irradiation dose and the trismus incidence. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of radiation doses on critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Taciana; Jansem, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one type of treatment of the cervix carcinoma. During the planning for this therapy, especial attention is given to proximal normal organs such as bladder and rectum. In fact, due to their radiosensibility and localization, bladder and rectum are considered as critical organs. In this work we have studied the influence of the positioning of patient legs in the dose delivered to these critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy. (author)

  1. Applications and opportunities for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    An important spin-off benefit from the nuclear industry has been the ability to produce a wide variety of ionizing radiation sources for industrial, medical and scientific applications. These sources include radionuclides produced by irradiation of target material in reactors and cyclotrons or recovered from spent fuels, and accelerators. The uses of radiation in both medicine and industry can be expected to evolve. Traditional uses such as cancer therapy will mature and in some cases be displaced by new technology. Major new applications, including food processing and waste treatment, are expected to maintain the demand for isotopes such as cobalt 60 and to stimulate the development of economical and reliable accelerator systems. (L.L.) (Tab., 2 figs.)

  2. Regulation of radiation sources in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.R.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes in general the Canadian program for the regulation of radiation sources, with particular emphasis on radioisotope licences. The Atomic Energy Control Board is described, as are the most significant parts of the Regulations. Licensing, which is the method chosen for control, is explained by describing the assessment of an application through the enforcement of the requirements, and the overall effectiveness of the program is measured by analyzing the incidents and overexposures that have occurred in recent years

  3. Safety of radiation sources in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belicic-Kolsek, A.; Sutej, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Republic of Slovenia, a central European country which has been independent since 1991, has about 2 million inhabitants and an area of 20,256 km 2 . The Constitutional Law on Enforcement of the Basic Constitutional Charter on the Autonomy and Independence of the Republic of Slovenia, adopted on 23 June 1991 (Off. Gaz. of the R of Slovenia No. 1/91), provided that all the laws adopted by the Socialist Federal Republic (SFR) of Yugoslavia should remain in force in the Republic of Slovenia pending the adoption of appropriate legislation by the Slovene Parliament. Under the Slovene Constitution, all international treaties ratified by Slovenia constitute an integral part of Slovenia's legislation and can be applied directly. In Slovenia, all regular types of ionizing radiation source are being used for peaceful purposes and are covered by a system for their safe use and control. All radiation sources and radioactive materials are registered and under regulatory control. Inspections are carried out periodically by the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia (HIRS) and, in the case of nuclear installations, the Slovene Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA). Technical checks on radiation sources are carried out periodically by technical support organizations: the Jozef Stefan Institute and the Institute for Occupational Safety (IOS). (author)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of 252Cf brachytherapy sources and adherence to AAPM TG-43 dosimetry protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.; Balcazar, M.; Azorin, J.; Francois, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The AAPM TG-43 dosimetry protocol was used for the calculation of the neutron absorbed dose rate from 252 Cf sources in some media for medical applications; a) Tissue substitute materials: water, A-150 plastic and b) Normal tissue: muscle (skeletal), brain. Monte Carlo MNCPX code was employed to characterize the neutron dosimetry in the vicinity of three 252 Cf sources, using the Maxwell fission neutron energy spectrum. The neutron air kerma rate is obtained with the +F6 heating tally to estimate the total energy deposition per mass unit of all particles in a spherical geometry of 200 cm in radius. Each set of evaluations required transport of 10 8 particle histories to achieve relative standard uncertainties 252 Cf sources, AT, Vari Source and μSelectron were simulated using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code in spherical geometry for the following factors: a) conversion coefficient of neutron air kerma strength, b) neutron dose rate constant, c) neutron radial dose function, d) geometry factor, e) anisotropy function and f) neutron absorbed dose rate. The simulations consider that neutrons were emitted isotropically and uniformly from a cylindrical active element of Pd:Cf 2 O 3 ceramic-metal matrix. The reference neutron dose rate in water at 1 cm and 90 degrees from the source long axis, using the Maxwell fission spectrum have been determined for the models AT, Vari Source and μSelectron: 1.8606±0.0003 c Gy h -1 μg -1 , 2.012±0.0003 c Gy h -1 μg -1 and 2.147±0.0003 c Gy h -1 μg -1 , respectively. (Author)

  5. Prospective Phase II Study of Brachytherapy Boost as a Component of Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-SAYED, M.E.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to assess the response rate and toxicity profile in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer using brachytherapy (BT) boost following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), concomitant with chemotherapy as a component of the neoadjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective phase II study of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who presented to the department of radiation oncology, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Seventeen patients had been included in the study. Radiation therapy was given as: phase I,45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of EBRT, followed by brachytherapy boost (within one week after the end of EBRT) using high dose rate iridium 192 (Ir 192 ) aiming at 800 c Gy given in 2 fractions (each 400 c Gy) separated by 1 week. All patients received the same concomitant chemotherapy in the form of Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin. The clinical and pathological response rates, together with the toxicity profile were assessed. Results: Seventeen patients had been studied; the majority (14; 82%) were males, while 3 only (18%) were females, their mean age was 57.4 years. All patients had low anterior resection (LAR). The clinical response rate, assessed by digital rectal examination ± endoscopy examination 4 weeks after the end of EBRT and BT, revealed that complete clinical response (cCR) was noted in 3 patients (18%), clinical partial response (cPR) in 14 patients (82%); while the pathological response rate was: complete pathological response (pCR) in 8 patients (47%), pathological partial response (pPR) in 9 patients (53%). The toxicity profile showed that grade III radiation proctitis was seen in one patient (6%), grade III dermatitis in 2 (12%), while no patients developed grade III cystitis. For chemotherapy toxicities, three patients (18%) developed grade III nausea and/or vomiting, 2 (12%) developed grade III diarrhea. Conclusion

  6. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In addition to a basic guide to the principles of the production of ionizing radiation and to methods of radiation protection and dosimetry, this booklet includes information about radiation protection procedures for brachytherapy

  7. Black silicon-based infrared radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Momen; Sabry, Yasser; Basset, Philippe; Marty, Frédéric; Bourouina, Tarik; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    Micromachined infrared sources are enabling component for interferometric and spectroscopic sensors. Their compact size and low cost transform bulky instruments to the sensor scale, which is needed for a wide range of applications in the conventional and unconventional environments. The silicon micromachined sources should be engineered to have good emissivity across a large wavelength range because the intrinsic emissivity of silicon is low. This optimization was reported in literature by either the deposition of black metal at the surface of an emitter or the use of deep phonic crystal cavities, which complicates the fabrication technology and results in sharp dip lines in the spectral emissivity, respectively. In this work we report a micromachined infrared radiation source based on a heater on the top of black silicon structure for the first time in the literature, up to the authors' knowledge. The temperature of the device is characterized versus the applied voltage and the radiated spectrum is captured in the 1300 nm to 2500 nm spectral range; limited by the spectrum analysis instrument. The reported source opens the doors for completely integrated MEMS spectral sensors onchip.

  8. The natural sources of ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximilien, R.

    1982-01-01

    Natural sources of ionizing radiation include external sources (cosmic rays, natural radionuclides present in the crust of the earth and in building materials) and internal sources (naturally occuring radionuclides in the human body, especially the potassium 40 and radon short lived decay products). The principal ways of human exposure to theses different components in ''normal'' areas are reviewed; some examples of the variability of exposure with respect to different regions of the world or the habits of life are given. Actual estimations of the doses delivered to the organs are presented; for the main contributors to population exposure, the conversion into effective dose equivalent has been made for allowing a better evaluation of their respective importance [fr

  9. Undulators as sources of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinsky, S.

    1983-01-01

    At the present time the first generation of facilities having electron storage rings designed for and dedicated to synchrotron radiation research are beginning operations in the US, Europe and Japan. The use of wigglers and undulators as enhanced sources of synchrotron radiation plays an important role at all these facilities. Moreover, recently there has been much activity in the design of the next generation machines, which will place even greater, and perhaps exclusive, emphasis on the use of wigglers and undulators. The operation of these insertion devices has been made even more attractive by advances in the design and construction of permanent magnet wigglers and undulators. This reliable and economical technology eliminates the need for more complex superconducting magnets, except to achieve very high magnetic fields for the production of hard photons from relatively low energy rings. We review the spectral properties of the radiation, emphasizing the complementary aspects of time- and frequency-domain analyses. We next study the brightness of the undulator source. Finally, we consider some limitations associated with operating an undulator in a storage ring.

  10. Quality of life following 3D conformal radiation therapy or permanent interstitial brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, J.M.; Kong, F.M.; Mansur, D.B.; Ahmed, N.; Perez, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Both 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) and Transperineal Interstitial Permanent Brachytherapy (TIPPB) are offered as suitable non-surgical alternatives to radical prostatectomy. Despite equivalent cancer control, very little data has been published that compares Quality of Life (QOL) in contemporary cohorts of patients choosing these treatments. Materials and Methods: Since 1998, patients selecting either 3DCRT alone or TIPPB (monotherapy or boost after external beam) for primary management of localized prostate cancer were asked to participate in a prospective assessment of QOL measures. In this preliminary report, 41 3DCRT and 40 TIPPB (34 monotherapy, 6 boost) patients completed validated QOL instruments at each followup visit. QOL instruments included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), FACT-P, and Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire (SAQ). Results: The average age of men in each group was 69 years. Choice of treatment was left to the patient unless there were significant medical or technical contraindications to either modality. 3DCRT total doses ranged from 61-78 Gy (mean 73.5Gy) and TIPPB doses were 145Gy (TG43) in 34 I-125 implants and 115 Gy in 1 Pd-103 (monotherapy) or 90 Gy in 5 Pd-103 (boost) implants. Patients undergoing TIPPB reported significantly worse urinary and sexual function than their counterparts receiving 3DCRT. The mean cumulative IPSS was 12.5 with TIPPB compared to 8.3 with 3DCRT (p=0.036). Differences were most pronounced in the first 12 months after treatment, particularly with respect to the strength of stream and the need to strain. TIPPB patients were more likely to report a need to urinate frequently (p=0.02), require a pad (p=0.001), be bothered (p=0.02), or have activity limited by urinary side effects (p=0.01). TIPPB patients were less likely to resume sexual activity within 6 months after treatment (p=0.0003) and engaged in sexual activity less often (p= 0.016) than 3DCRT patients. They were also more

  11. Evaluation of performance and quality control of high dose rate Ir-192 remote afterloading brachytherapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. A. M.

    2005-09-01

    Brachytherapy is the use of encapsulated radioactive sources to deliver a radiation dose at a short distance over a short time for treatment of malignant tumors. In Sudan, mainly in Radiation and Isotopes Center Khartoum (RICK) brachytherapy was introduced in 1989 using manual afterloading low dose rate 137 Cs for treatment of carcinoma of the cervix, but for safety reasons now it replace by high dose rate 192 Ir afterloading system (HDR) with remotely controlled device to deliver controlled radiation dose for treatment of carcinoma of cervix, esophagus and nasopharynx. This study was carried out in high dose rate 192 Ir afterloading brachytherapy equipment (Gamma Med 12i unit) located at RICK to evaluate the performance and to perform comprehensive quality control of the treatment unit with respect to three poles: safety systems, physical parameters and calibration of Ir-192 source through some quality control checks, so as to ensure that the equipment meets the safety standard. The study shows that all the safety systems which include the mechanical checks are work properly, the average of the dose rate measured at different positions from the treatment unit which represent the leakage radiation by using RDS-120 universal survey meter is less than 10μSv/h. The physical parameters which include the check of a source position accuracy by using x-OMAT ready pack film and catheter guide tube is I mm. The source strength that was obtained from the calibration procedures following the IAEA-TECDOC 1274 protocol by using HDR 1000 plus well type ionization chamber is different from the value of International Standard Laboratory by 1.5%. It was found that the brachytherapy equipment and the source used in brachytherapy meets the users requirements except some necessary requirements, so some recommendations was putted include these requirements.(Author)

  12. Dosimetry of indigenously developed 192Ir high-dose rate brachytherapy source: An EGSnrc Monte Carlo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application using high-dose rate (HDR 192Ir sources in remote afterloading technique is a well-established treatment method. In this direction, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, jointly indigenously developed a remote afterloading machine and 192Ir HDR source. The two-dimensional (2D dose distribution and dosimetric parameters of the BRIT 192Ir HDR source are generated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system in a 40 cm dia × 40 cm height cylindrical water phantom. The values of air-kerma strength and dose rate constant for BRIT 192Ir HDR source are 9.894 × 10−8 ± 0.06% UBq−1 and 1.112 ± 0.11% cGyh−1U−1, respectively. The values of radial dose function (gL(r of this source compare well with the corresponding values of BEBIG, Flexisource, and GammaMed 12i source models. This is because of identical active lengths of the sources (3.5 mm and the comparable phantom dimensions. A comparison of gL(r values of BRIT source with microSelectron-v1 show differences about 2% at r = 6 cm and up to 13% at r = 12 cm, which is due to differences in phantom dimensions involved in the calculations. The anisotropy function of BRIT 192Ir HDR source is comparable with the corresponding values of microSelectron-v1 (classic HDR source.

  13. Biology of dose rate in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles underlying brachytherapy, to understand why current treatment regimes are the way they are, and to discuss what the future may hold in store. Brachytherapy has a long history. It was suggested as long ago as 1903 by Alexander Graham Bell, and the optimal application of this technique has been a subject of debate ever since. 'Brachy' means 'short', and the essential features of conventional brachytherapy are: positioning of the source a short distance from, or in, the tumor, allowing good dose distributions; short overall treatment times, to counter tumor repopulation; low dose rate, enabling a good therapeutic advantage between tumor control and damage to late-responding tissue. The advantages of good dose distributions speak for themselves; in some situations, as we shall see, computer-based dose optimization can be used to improve them still further. The advantages of short overall times stem from the fact that accelerated repopulation of the tumor typically begins a few weeks after the start of a radiation treatment. If all the radiation can be crammed in before that time, the risks of tumor repopulation can be considerably reduced. In fact even external-beam radiotherapy is moving in this direction, with the use of highly accelerated protocols. The advantages of low dose rate stem from the differential response to fractionation of early- and late-responding tissues. Essentially, lowering the dose rate spares late-responding tissue more than it does early-responding tissue such as tumors. We shall also discuss some recent innovations in the context of the general principles that have been outlined. For example, High dose rate brachytherapy, particularly for the uterine cervix: Does it work? If so, when and why? Use of Ir-192 sources, with a half life of 70 days: Should corrections be made for changing biological effectiveness as the dose

  14. Ionizing radiation source detection by personal TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, O.; Mirkov, Z.

    2002-01-01

    The Laboratory for personal dosimetry has about 3000 workers under control. The most of them work in medicine. Some institutions, as big health centers, have different ionizing radiation sources. It is usefull to analyze what has been the source of irradiation, special when appears a dosimeter with high dose. Personal dosimetry equipment is Harshaw TLD Reader Model 6600 and dosimeters consist of two chips LiF TLD-100 assembled in bar-coded cards which are wearing in holders with one tissue-equivalent filter (to determine H(10)) and skin-equivalent the other (to determine H(0.07)). The calibration dosimeters have been irradiated in holders by different sources: x-ray (for 80keV and 100keV), 6 0C o, 9 0S r (for different distances from beta source) and foton beem (at radiotherapy accelerator by 6MeV, 10MeV and 18MeV). The dose ratio for two LiF cristals was calculated and represented with graphs. So, it is possible to calculate the ratio H(10)/H(0.07) for a personal TLD and analyze what has been the source of irradiation. Also, there is the calibration for determination the time of irradiation, according to glow curve deconvolution

  15. Assessment of a source position checking tool for the quality assurance of transfer tubes used in HDR 192Ir brachytherapy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awunor, O A

    2018-01-15

    The determination of source positions before treatment is an essential part of the quality assurance (QA) associated with high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The purpose of this study was to design and commission a tool to allow the quantification of source positions across multiple transfer tube types. A bespoke flexi-adapter jig, three transfer tube adapters, and a film piercing pointer were designed and built for source position QA across three transfer tube types-the standard, 6 French, and gynae transfer tubes. The jig was calibrated against a manufacturer source position check tool, and intratube and intertube source position variations investigated across a total of 40 transfer tubes, using strips of Gafchromic film irradiated at multiple positions 20 mm apart with a microSelectron V3 afterloader (Elekta, Holland). The performance of the jig in localizing the nominal dwell positions relative to the manufacturer check tool was assessed. Associated expanded uncertainties were quantified in line with the International Organization for Standardization Guidelines. The mean expanded uncertainty associated with the use of the jig was 0.4 ± 0.0 mm (k = 1). The performance of the jig was 0.3 ± 0.0 mm, while the intratube and intertube source positional variations were observed to be within ±1.0 mm across most transfer tubes. A bespoke flexi-adapter jig capable of allowing source position measurements to be carried out on various transfer tube types has been designed. Measurement results highlight the need for routine QA of all transfer tubes in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of the reference air kerma rate for 192Ir brachytherapy sources and the related uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Eduard van; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Damen, Patricia M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Different methods exist to determine the air kerma calibration factor of an ionization chamber for the spectrum of a 192 Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) or pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) source. An analysis of two methods to obtain such a calibration factor was performed: (i) the method recommended by [Goetsch et al., Med. Phys. 18, 462-467 (1991)] and (ii) the method employed by the Dutch national standards institute NMi [Petersen et al., Report S-EI-94.01 (NMi, Delft, The Netherlands, 1994)]. This analysis showed a systematic difference on the order of 1% in the determination of the strength of 192 Ir HDR and PDR sources depending on the method used for determining the air kerma calibration factor. The definitive significance of the difference between these methods can only be addressed after performing an accurate analysis of the associated uncertainties. For an NE 2561 (or equivalent) ionization chamber and an in-air jig, a typical uncertainty budget of 0.94% was found with the NMi method. The largest contribution in the type-B uncertainty is the uncertainty in the air kerma calibration factor for isotope i, N k i , as determined by the primary or secondary standards laboratories. This uncertainty is dominated by the uncertainties in the physical constants for the average mass-energy absorption coefficient ratio and the stopping power ratios. This means that it is not foreseeable that the standards laboratories can decrease the uncertainty in the air kerma calibration factors for ionization chambers in the short term. When the results of the determination of the 192 Ir reference air kerma rates in, e.g., different institutes are compared, the uncertainties in the physical constants are the same. To compare the applied techniques, the ratio of the results can be judged by leaving out the uncertainties due to these physical constants. In that case an uncertainty budget of 0.40% (coverage factor=2) should be taken into account. Due to the differences in approach between the

  17. Side effects and quality of life after inadvertent radiation overdosage in brachytherapy of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evensen, Jan F.; Bjordal, Kristin; Knutsen, Bjoern H.; Olsen, Dag R.; Stoere, Geir; Tausjoe, Johan E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: By comparing our old (DP5, in use from 1978 to 1994) and new (Plato, Nucletron) dose planning system, we found that the old system underestimated doses by 20-25%. To study the possible consequences for the patients treated between 1978 and 1994, all who were still alive were invited to undergo an examination with respect to side effects and quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: The degree of overdosage was calculated by comparing the isodose distribution generated on the two dose planning systems. Eighty-four patients were then invited to undergo an examination with respect to side effects and QOL. The side effects were scored according to the LENT SOMA system and QOL according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30), and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Head and Neck 35 (QLQ-H and N35). Results: The mean overdosage of brachytherapy was 19.3%. No association was found between overdosage and side effects or QOL. For implants in the lateral border of the tongue, we found a statistically significant correlation between osteoradionecrosis and the following parameters: linear activity, total activity, dose rate, and extrapolated response dose. By multivariate analysis, only total implanted activity and the use of lead protection during brachytherapy were found to be of prognostic significance with respect to development of osteoradionecrosis. Conclusion: The incidence of side effects after brachytherapy at the Norwegian Radium Hospital seems to have been somewhat higher in the period under investigation than at other institutions. There may be several explanations, including the use of external beam radiotherapy before brachytherapy and departure from the Paris system among others. However, the side effects were not associated with the overdosage that was the basis for the study. As opposed to the general consensus of opinion, long-term QOL was found to be worse after

  18. A dosimetric analysis of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as an alternative to adjuvant high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in early endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Bulent; Mundt, Arno J; Smith, Brett D; Mell, Loren K; Wang, Steve; Sutton, Harold; Roeske, John C

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate the role of intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) as an alternative to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of the vagina in postoperative early endometrial cancer patients after surgery. Planning computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients previously treated with HDR were used in this study. In all cases, a dose of 700 cGy/fraction was prescribed at a distance of 0.5 cm from the cylinder surface. The same CT scans were then used in IMRT planning. In this paradigm, the vaginal cylinder represents a component of a hypothetical immobilization system that would be indexed to the linac treatment table. Our study showed that IMRT provided relatively lower rectal doses than HDR when treatment was prescribed at a distance of 0.5 cm away from the cylinder surface. Maximum rectal doses were lower with IMRT compared with HDR (average: 89.0% vs. 142.6%, respectively, p in IMRT plans compared with HDR plans with treatment prescribed either to the surface (average: 14.8% vs. 21.4%, respectively, p in conjunction with a suitable immobilization system, IMRT may provide an alternative to HDR brachytherapy in women with early endometrial cancer after hysterectomy. However, more studies are needed to evaluate the clinical merit of the IMRT in these patients.

  19. Applications of Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandedkar, R.V.

    2003-01-01

    Indus-1 is a 450 MeV electron storage ring. This is a soft X-ray and Vacuum Ultra Violet radiation source with the critical wavelength being 61 A. In this source, the first beam was stored in mid-1999 and was then made available, after initial storage and beam cleaning of the vacuum components, for beamline installation in the early 2000. Two beamlines are commissioned and are working. Other beamlines are in the advanced stage of commissioning. For Indus-1, the injection system consists of a 20 MeV classical microtron as a preinjector and a booster synchrotron that can go up to 700 MeV. For Indus-1, the injection into the storage ring is at full 450 MeV from this booster synchrotron

  20. Definition study of the project Dosimetry Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of the research project Dosimetry Brachytherapy is the standardization of calibration methods and quality control procedures used for Brachytherapy sources. Proposals to develop measurement standards and methods for calibrating these sources are presented. Brachytherapy sources will be calibrated in terms of reference airkerma rate or in terms of absorbed dose in water. Therefore, in this project, special attention will be given to the in-phantom measurement method described by Meertens and the use of re-entrant ionisation chambers as transfer standards. In this report, a workplan and time schedule is included. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig

  1. Erectile function after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Anderson, Richard L.; Kurko, Brian S.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to determine the effect of multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and materials: A total of 226 patients with preimplant erectile function determined by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003 for clinical Stage T1c-T2c (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Of the 226 patients, 132 were potent before treatment and, of those, 128 (97%) completed and returned the IIEF questionnaire after brachytherapy. The median follow-up was 29.1 months. Potency was defined as an IIEF score of ≥13. The clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age; preimplant IIEF score; clinical T stage; pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level; Gleason score; elapsed time after implantation; preimplant nocturnal erections; body mass index; presence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus; tobacco consumption; the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose (V 100/150/200 ); the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate gland (D 90 ); androgen deprivation therapy; supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); isotope; prostate volume; planning volume; and radiation dose to the proximal penis. Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 50.5%. For patients who maintained adequate posttreatment erectile function, the preimplant IIEF score was 29, and in patients with brachytherapy-related ED, the preimplant IIEF score was 25. The median time to the onset of ED was 5.4 months. After brachytherapy, the median IIEF score was 20 in potent patients and 3 in impotent patients. On univariate analysis, the preimplant IIEF score, patient age, presence of nocturnal

  2. Radiation sources safety and radioactive materials security regulation in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyshliaiev, A.; Holubiev, V.; Makarovska, O.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in Ukraine. There are about 2500 users in industry, science, education and about 2800 in medicine. About 80,000 sealed radiation sources with total kerma-equivalent of 450 Gy*M 2 /sec are used in Ukraine. The exact information about the radiation sources and their users will be provided in 2001 after the expected completion of the State inventory of radiation sources in Ukraine. In order to ensure radiation source safety in Ukraine, a State System for regulation of activities dealing with radiation sources has been established. The system includes the following elements: establishment of norms, rules and standards of radiation safety; authorization activity, i.e. issuance of permits (including those in the form of licences) for activities dealing with radiation sources; supervisory activity, i.e. control over observance of norms, rules and standards of radiation safety and fulfilment of conditions of licences for activities dealing with radiation sources, and also enforcement. Comprehensive nuclear legislation was developed and implemented from 1991 to 2000. Radiation source safety is regulated by three main nuclear laws in Ukraine: On the use of nuclear energy and radiation safety (passed on 8 February 1995); On Human Protection from Impact of Ionizing Radiation (passed on 14 January 1998); On permissive activity in the area of nuclear energy utilization (passed on 11 January 2000). The regulatory authorities in Ukraine are the Ministry for Ecology and Natural Resources (Nuclear Regulatory Department) and the Ministry of Health (State sanitary-epidemiology supervision). According to the legislation, activities dealing with radiation sources are forbidden without an officially issued permit in Ukraine. Permitted activities with radiation sources are envisaged: licensing of production, storage and maintenance of radiation sources; licensing of the use of radiation sources; obligatory certification of radiation sources and transport

  3. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  4. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  5. Teaching drawn from brachytherapy accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinillos, L.

    2009-01-01

    The first incidents concern the transport of the sources, bad packaging or bad sealing of the sources. The incidents occurring during the use are the most frequent. They come from mechanical problems or human errors as the unit of computer command or the transfer cable of the source. A power failure affected the safety program, causing a calculation error after the input of incorrect data. The most of reported errors occurred during fractionated treatments, so the errors can be compensated by adjusting the doses at the following session. The worst case was the death of a woman where the source stayed inside the body after the treatment. Radiation monitoring in the treatment room should avoid this kind of accident. The brachytherapy represents 500 000 acts by year, any error can be serious. The accident reports concern all the chain of procedure, among them a death whom first cause was a human error. A team respecting the procedures of quality assurance is indispensable to the accident prevention; the accidents report is important because it allows a sharing of lessons drawn from the past errors to prevent from occurring. (N.C.)

  6. Direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) for treatment of cervical cancer: A planning study with192Ir,60Co, and169Yb HDR sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safigholi, Habib; Han, Dae Yup; Mashouf, Shahram; Soliman, Abraam; Meigooni, Ali S; Owrangi, Amir; Song, William Y

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate plan quality of a novel MRI-compatible direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator using 192 Ir, 60 Co, and 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy sources, for various cervical cancer high-risk clinical target volumes (CTV HR ). The novel DMBT tandem applicator has six peripheral grooves of 1.3-mm diameter along a 5.4-mm thick nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to benchmark the dosimetric parameters of the 192 Ir, 60 Co, and 169 Yb HDR sources in a water phantom against the literature data. 45 clinical cases that were treated using conventional tandem-and-ring applicators with 192 Ir source ( 192 Ir-T&R) were selected consecutively from intErnational MRI-guided BRAchytherapy in CErvical cancer (EMBRACE) trial. Then, for each clinical case, 3D dose distribution of each source inside the DMBT and conventional applicators were calculated and imported onto an in-house developed inverse planning optimization code to generate optimal plans. All plans generated by the DMBT tandem-and-ring (DMBT T&R) from all three sources were compared to the respective 192 Ir-T&R plans. For consistency, all plans were normalized to the same CTV HR D90 achieved in clinical plans. The D 2 cm3 for organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, and D90, D98, D10, V100, and V200 for CTV HR were calculated. In general, plan quality significantly improved when a conventional tandem (Con.T) is replaced with the DMBT tandem. The target coverage metrics were similar across 192 Ir-T&R and DMBT T&R plans with all three sources (P > 0.093). 60 Co-DMBT T&R generated greater hot spots and less dose homogeneity in the target volumes compared with the 192 Ir- and 169 Yb-DMBT T&R plans. Mean OAR doses in the DMBT T&R plans were significantly smaller (P Ir-T&R plans. Mean bladder D 2 cm3 was reduced by 4.07%, 4.15%, and 5.13%, for the 192 Ir-, 60 Co-, and 169 Yb-DMBT T&R plans respectively. Mean rectum (sigmoid) D 2 cm3 was reduced by 3

  7. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B; Proteccion radiologica en braquiterapia intersticial y determinacion de la dosis y tasa de exposicion de una fuente de Ir-192 mediante el MCNP-4B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales L, M.E. [INEN, Av. Angamos Este 2520- Surquillo, Lima (Peru)

    2006-07-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  8. Phase II clinical trial using californium 252 fast neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy in the treatment of bulky, barrel-shaped stage IB cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nagell, J R; Maruyama, Y; Donaldson, E S; Hanson, M B; Gallion, H H; Yoneda, J; Powell, D E; Kryscio, R J; Beach, J L

    1986-05-15

    From June 1977 to June 1983, 32 patients with bulky (greater than 4 cm diameter), barrel-shaped Stage IB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy using californium 252 (252Cf) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Nineteen patients had cervical tumors 4 to 6 cm in diameter, and 13 patients had lesions in excess of 6 cm in diameter. A dose of 4500 rad external photon therapy was given from a linear accelerator, and one or two 6-hour 252Cf implants were given during or immediately after external radiation. Extrafascial hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed 6 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Complications during and after radiation were minimal and included vaginal stenosis (three) and proctitis (two). Tumor clearance in the hysterectomy specimen was complete in 23 patients (72%) and residual cervical tumor was present in 9 patients (28%). Two patients developed tumor recurrence and died of disease 15 and 27 months after therapy, respectively. Thirty patients remain free of disease 26 to 96 months (median, 52 months) after treatment, and none have been lost to follow-up. The actuarial survival of these patients is 97% at 2 years and 94% at 5 years. Intracavitary neutron therapy is well tolerated and is effective when combined with external radiation and hysterectomy in the treatment of bulky, barrel-shaped Stage IB cervical cancer.

  9. Characteristics of the radiochromic film Gafchromictm EBT3 model for use in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luvizotto, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment modality using radioactive sealed sources within walking distance of the tumor, reducing the risk of applying an unwanted dose to adjacent healthy tissues. For brachytherapy is reliable, it is necessary to establish a dosimetric practices program aimed at determining the optimal dose of radiation for this radiotherapy practice. This paper presents the application of two methodologies for the dosimetry using radiochromic films. Experimental measurements were performed with EBT3 films in phantoms consisting of homogeneous and heterogeneous material (lung, bone and soft tissue) built especially for dose measurements in brachytherapy. The processing and analysis of the resulting images of the experimental procedure were performed with ImageJ software and MATLAB. The results were evaluated from comparisons dose of experimental measurements and simulations obtained by the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  10. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, H.-J.; Gohs, U.

    1996-01-01

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  11. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  12. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U

    2015-01-01

    .8-6.2 Gy equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fractions) to the pelvic LN (external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral) in optimized plans, whereas less-dose contribution to CI, para-aortic, and inguinal (mean D50% was 0.5-1.9 Gy equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fractions) was observed. Optimized plans......PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...... involvement. The patients received whole pelvis intensity-modulated radiation therapy (45-50 Gy/25-30 fx) to whole pelvis and two fractions of MRI pulsed-dose-rate BT. The delineated LN groups were para-aortic, inguinal, common iliac (CI), external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral. For each LN...

  13. Low frequency interference between short synchrotron radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Méot

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed analytical formalism describing low frequency far-field synchrotron radiation (SR is applied to the calculation of spectral angular radiation densities from interfering short sources (edge, short magnet. This is illustrated by analytical calculation of synchrotron radiation from various assemblies of short dipoles, including an “isolated” highest density infrared SR source.

  14. Use of Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lieu of Intracavitary Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Inoperable Endometrial Neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmerer, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hernandez, Enrique; Ferriss, James S. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Valakh, Vladimir; Miyamoto, Curtis; Li, Shidong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Micaily, Bizhan, E-mail: bizhan.micaily@tuhs.temple.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of patients with invasive endometrial neoplasia who were treated with external beam radiation therapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost because of the inability to undergo surgery or brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 11 women with stage I-III endometrial cancer with a median age of 78 years that were not candidates for hysterectomy or intracavitary brachytherapy secondary to comorbidities (91%) or refusal (9%). Eight patients were American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I (3 stage IA, 5 stage IB), and 3 patients were AJCC stage III. Patients were treated to a median of 4500 cGy at 180 cGy per fraction followed by SBRT boost (600 cGy per fraction Multiplication-Sign 5). Results: The most common side effect was acute grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity in 73% of patients, with no late toxicities observed. With a median follow-up of 10 months since SBRT, 5 patients (45%) experienced locoregional disease progression, with 3 patients (27%) succumbing to their malignancy. At 12 and 18 months from SBRT, the overall freedom from progression was 68% and 41%, respectively. Overall freedom from progression (FFP) was 100% for all patients with AJCC stage IA endometrial carcinoma, whereas it was 33% for stage IB at 18 months. The overall FFP was 100% for International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology grade 1 disease. The estimated overall survival was 57% at 18 months from diagnosis. Conclusion: In this study, SBRT boost to the intact uterus was feasible, with encouragingly low rates of acute and late toxicity, and favorable disease control in patients with early-stage disease. Additional studies are needed to provide better insight into the best management of these clinically challenging cases.

  15. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  16. A new radiation source: the 'CASSITRON'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, T.; Aucouturier, J.

    1984-01-01

    The CASSITRON, a radiation source conceived and made by CGR MeV, is intended for food processing, the sterilization of disposable medical supplies, sludge sterilization, and the treatment of polymers and chemical products. Its physical characteristics are described. Also the industrial characteristics, i.e. security, simplicity, reliability, easy insertion in a production line system and multipurpose use are explained. Meeting the physical, industrial and economic needs, the CASSITRON is a secure, reliable and simple electric machine. It is a multipurpose accelerator, and can be easily inserted in a production line system. The machine is composed mainly of an electron generator, a modulator, a conversion-device to produce hard x-ray with the electron beam, and a control console. (Mori, K.)

  17. Cesium-137 as a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMullen, W.H.; Sloan, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Byproducts Utilization Program (BUP) seeks to develop and encourage widespread commercial use of defense byproducts that are produced by DOE. Cesium-l37 is one such byproduct that is radioactive and decays with emission of gamma rays. The beneficial use of this radiation to disinfect sewage sludge or disinfest food commodities is actively being pursued by the program. The radiation produced by cesium-l37(Cs-l37) is identical in form to that produced by cobalt-60(Co-60), an isotope that is widely used in commercial applications such as medical product sterilization. The choice of isotope to use depends on several factors ranging from inherent properties of the isotopes to availability and cost. The BUP, although centrally concerned with the beneficial use of Cs-l37, by investigating and assessing the feasibility of various uses hopes to define appropriate circumstances where cesium or cobalt might best be used to accomplish specific objectives. This paper discusses some of the factors that should be considered when evaluating potential uses for isotopic sources

  18. An industrial radiation source for food processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, R.

    1986-01-01

    The scientific linacs realized by CGR MeV in France have been installed in several research centers, the medical accelerators of CGR MeV have been installed in radiotherapy centers all over the world, and the industrial linacs have been used for radiography in heavy industries. Based on the experience for 30 years, CGR MeV has realized a new industrial radiation source for food processing. CARIC is going to install a new machine of CGR MeV, CASSITRON, as the demand for radiation increased. This machine has been devised specially for industrial irradiation purpose. Its main features are security, simplicity and reliability, and it is easy to incorporate it into a production line. The use of CASSITRON for food industry, the ionizing effect on mechanically separated poultry meat, the capital and processing cost and others are explained. Only 10 % of medical disposable supplies is treated by ionizing energy in France. The irradiation for food decontamination, and that for industrial treatment are demanded. Therefore, CARIC is going to increase the capacity by installing a CASSITRON for sterilization. The capital and processing cost are shown. The start of operation is expected in March, 1986. At present, a CASSITRON is being installed in the SPI food processing factory, and starts operation in a few weeks. (Kako, I.)

  19. MO-D-BRD-01: Clinical Implementation of An Electronic Brachytherapy Program for the Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouhib, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  20. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ito, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Nakano, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization

  1. Interference between source-free radiation and radiation from sources: Particle-like behavior for classical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2017-09-01

    A simple junior-level electrodynamics problem is used to illustrate the interference between a source-free standing plane wave and a wave generated by a pulse in a current sheet. Depending upon the relative phases between the standing wave and the current pulse and also upon the relative magnitudes, we can find quite different patterns of emitted energy and momentum. If the source gives a large radiation pulse so that the source-free plane wave can be neglected, then the radiation spreads out symmetrically on either side of the current sheet. However, if the radiation sheet gives a pulse with fields comparable to those of the standing wave, then we can find a single radiation pulse moving to the right while the current sheet recoils to the left or the situation with the directions reversed. The example is a crude illustration of particle-like behavior arising from conventional classical electromagnetic behavior in the presence of source-free radiation. The discussion makes contact with the ideas of photons in modern physics.

  2. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S.; Dumas, I.; Lhomme, C.; Morice, P.; Barillot, I.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  3. Methods to identify and locate spent radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this manual is to provide essential guidance to Member States with nuclear applications involving the use of a wide range of sealed radiation sources on the practical task of physically locating spent radiation sources not properly accounted for. Advice is also provided to render the located source safe on location. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Methods to identify and locate spent radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this manual is to provide essential guidance to Member States with nuclear applications involving the use of a wide range of sealed radiation sources on the practical task of physically locating spent radiation sources not properly accounted for. Advice is also provided to render the located source safe on location. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. The regulatory control of radiation sources in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Birol, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Turkey, the national competent authority for regulating activities involving radioactive sources is the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, which implements the responsibility for the safety and security of radiation sources through its Radiation Health and Safety Department. The report describes the organization of the regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety in Turkey and, after a brief explanation of the current legal framework for such purpose, it refers to how the management of radiation sources is carried out and to the new provisions regarding radiation sources, including inspections of licensees and training on source safety. Finally, the report provides information on the Ikitelli radiological accident in Turkey and the current public concern about radiation sources after it happened. (author)

  6. Remote afterloading for neutron brachytherapy using californium-252.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacev, Taco; Grigorov, Grigor; Papírek, Tomás; Kolarík, Vladimír

    2003-02-01

    Despite a pronounced technical process attained in radiotherapy of malignant neoplasms, no remarkable improvement in the treatment results has been achieved. The reason for this stagnation is the interaction between tumor cell and photon radiation. Tumor resistance against photon bombardment can be broken down by applying high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation-based treatment. The discovery of californium-252 ((252)Cf) nuclide, a source of gamma neutron radiation, established a precondition for using neutrons in tumor brachytherapy. The design of a remote afterloading device using (252)Cf sources remains an unsolved problem. The afterloading device has been designed as a stationary radiator which is composed of three mutually interconnected units: 1. the control and drive unit consisting of a control computer and a motor-driven bowden system carrying the (252)Cf source; 2. the source which is housed in a watertight concrete vessel-storage strong room, situated in the ground at a depth of 25 cm beneath the patient's bed; 3. the afterloading application module installed in the irradiation room. Remote afterloading allows simple, inexpensive and highly efficient radiation protection and work safety for the operating personnel. The sources may be moved arbitrarily during treatment with a position accuracy of 0.5-1.0 mm within a distance of 520 cm from the source storage position in the strong room to the application position. Both afterloading systems' unused indexer outputs are protected electronically and mechanically against any unintentional movement of the source outside the application tubes. The technologic concept of the present automatic afterloading device for neutron brachytherapy represents a possible option from the range of conceivable design variants, which - while minimizing technologic and economic requirements - provides the operating personnel with optimum protection and work safety, thus extending the applicability of high LET radiation

  7. [Use of ionizing radiation sources in metallurgy: risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugni, U

    2012-01-01

    Use of ionizing radiation sources in the metallurgical industry: risk assessment. Radioactive sources and fixed or mobile X-ray equipment are used for both process and quality control. The use of ionizing radiation sources requires careful risk assessment. The text lists the characteristics of the sources and the legal requirements, and contains a description of the documentation required and the methods used for risk assessment. It describes how to estimate the doses to operators and the relevant classification criteria used for the purpose of radiation protection. Training programs must be organized in close collaboration between the radiation protection expert and the occupational physician.

  8. Dosimetric characterization of low dose rate Iridium 192 wires used in interstitial brachytherapy, produced by Brachytherapy Sources Laboratory the CTRS/IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marco Antonio da

    2003-01-01

    In this work they were some dosimetric parameters established by the dosimetry protocol AAPM TG-43 for the thread of 192 Ir with the purpose of complementing the dosimetric specifications of an original source produced at the country. For so much quantities such as the constant of dose rate, A , function of radial dose, g(r), and anisotropy function, F(r,θ), they were experimentally determined and the geometry function, G(r,θ), it was calculated. Measurements with TLD of LiF, with dimensions of 1 mm X 1 mm X 1 mm, was made in a phantom made of 5 plates of solid water RW3 material with dimensions of 300 mm X 300 mm X 10 mm, where it was obtained values of dose rate for some radial distances of the source, between 10 and 100 mm, to for an angle of 90 deg, for g(r), and also for other angles between 0 deg and 180 deg for F(r,θ). Threads of 192 Ir were studied in the lengths of 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm, 50 mm and 100 mm. The stored energy on the thermoluminescent dosimeters was integrated by means of a TLD reader Harshaw 2000 meantime into a cycle of thermal treatment to which the thermoluminescent dosimeters was submitted being, 400 C in an interval of time of 1 hour proceeded immediately for more 2 hours to 105 C, after this treatment the thermoluminescent dosimeters was irradiated; even so, before the reading the detectors was still warm to 105 deg C for 10 minutes. The constant of dose rate for the threads of 192 Ir of 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm, 50 mm and 100 mm are (1,076 =- 3,7%); (0,931 =- 3,7%); (0,714 =- 3,7%); (0,589 =-3,7%) and (0,271 =- 3,7%) cGyh -1 U -1 , respectively (1U = unit of kerma intensity in the air = 1mGy m 2 h -1 = 1cGy cm 2 h -1 ). The results obtained for g(r) and F(r,θ) have uncertainties of (=- 4,5%) and they are compared with values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and also for other values presented in the literature. (author)

  9. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Syam [Malabar Cancer Centre, Kannur, Kerala (India); Sitha [University of Calicut, Calicut, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly.

  10. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Syam; Sitha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly

  11. Predictors of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Akash; Chen, M.-H.; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical factors associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), adjusting for comorbidity, in elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or in conjunction with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 1,978 men of median age 71 (interquartile range, 66-75) years with intermediate-risk disease (Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 20 ng/mL or less, tumor category T2c or less). Fine and Gray's multivariable competing risks regression was used to assess whether prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), age, treatment, year of brachytherapy, PSA level, or tumor category was associated with the risk of PCSM. Results: After a median follow-up of 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.7-5.4) years, the presence of CVD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI 0.04-0.99; p = 0.05), whereas an increasing PSA level was significantly associated with an increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.27; p = 0.02). In the absence of CVD, cumulative incidence estimates of PCSM were higher (p = 0.03) in men with PSA levels above as compared with the median PSA level (7.3 ng/mL) or less; however, in the setting of CVD there was no difference (p = 0.27) in these estimates stratified by the median PSA level (6.9 ng/mL). Conclusions: In elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, CVD status is a negative predictor of PCSM and affects the prognostic capacity of pretreatment PSA level. These observations support the potential utility of prerandomization stratification by comorbidity to more accurately assess prognostic factors and treatment effects within this population.

  12. Radiological control in fires involving radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, J.O.A.; Coelho, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    The copies used during the chatter by techniques from CDTN in the I Mineiro Symposium of Fire Engineering, are presented. The chatter was based on emergency radiation control course, given by CDTN. Basic concepts, such as nuclear physics fundaments, radiation nature and detection, radiation protection and practical aspects of radiological fire emergency, were enphasized. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Nature and magnitude of the problem of spent radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Various types of sealed radiation sources are widely used in industry, medicine and research. Virtually all countries have some sealed sources. The activity in the sources varies from kilobecquerels in consumer products to hundreds of pentabecquerels in facilities for food irradiation. Loss or misuse of sealed sources can give rise to accidents resulting in radiation exposure of workers and members of the general public, and can also give rise to extensive contamination of land, equipment and buildings. In extreme cases the exposure can be lethal. Problems of safety relating to spent radiation sources have been under consideration within the Agency for some years. The first objective of the project has been to prepare a comprehensive report reviewing the nature and background of the problem, also giving an overview of existing practices for the management of spent radiation sources. This report is the fulfilment of this first objective. The safe management of spent radiation sources cannot be studied in isolation from their normal use, so it has been necessary to include some details which are relevant to the use of radiation sources in general, although that area is outside the scope of this report. The report is limited to radiation sources made up of radioactive material. The Agency is implementing a comprehensive action plan for assistance to Member States, especially the developing countries, in all aspects of the safe management of spent radiation sources. The Agency is further seeking to establish regional or global solutions to the problems of long-term storage of spent radiation sources, as well as finding routes for the disposal of sources when it is not feasible to set up safe national solutions. The cost of remedial actions after an accident with radiation sources can be very high indeed: millions of dollars. If the Agency can help to prevent even one such single accident, the cost of its whole programme in this field would be more than covered. Refs

  14. Neutron therapy coupling brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Iara Ferreira.

    1994-12-01

    In the present dissertation, neutron radiation techniques applied into organs of the human body are investigated as oncologic radiation therapy. The proposal treatment consists on connecting two distinct techniques: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and irradiation by discrete sources of neutrons, through the brachytherapy conception. Biological and radio-dosimetrical aspects of the two techniques are considered. Nuclear aspects are discussed, presenting the nuclear reactions occurred in tumoral region, and describing the forms of evaluating the dose curves. Methods for estimating radiation transmission are reviewed through the solution of the neutron transport equation, Monte Carlo methodology, and simplified analytical calculation based on diffusion equation and numerical integration. The last is computational developed and presented as a quickly way to neutron transport evaluation in homogeneous medium. The computational evaluation of the doses for distinct hypothetical situations is presented, applying the coupled techniques BNTC and brachytherapy as an possible oncologic treatment. (author). 78 refs., 61 figs., 21 tabs

  15. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  16. SU-F-BRA-09: New Efficient Method for Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy Source Calibration by Pre-Characterizing Surface Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, S [iCAD Inc., Los Gatos, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective is to improve the efficiency and efficacy of Xoft™ Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy (EBT) calibration of the source & surface applicator using AAPM TG-61 formalism. Methods: Current method of Xoft EBT source calibration involves determination of absolute dose rate of the source in each of the four conical surface applicators using in-air chamber measurements & TG61 formalism. We propose a simplified TG-61 calibration methodology involving initial characterization of surface cone applicators. This is accomplished by calibrating dose rates for all 4 surface applicator sets (for 10 sources) which establishes the “applicator output ratios” with respect to the selected reference applicator (20 mm applicator). After the initial time, Xoft™ Axxent™ source TG61 Calibration is carried out only in the reference applicator. Using the established applicator output ratios, dose rates for other applicators will be calculated. Results: 200 sources & 8 surface applicator sets were calibrated cumulatively using a Standard Imaging A20 ion-chamber in accordance with manufacturer-recommended protocols. Dose rates of 10, 20, 35 & 50mm applicators were normalized to the reference (20mm) applicator. The data in Figure 1 indicates that the normalized dose rate variation for each applicator for all 200 sources is better than ±3%. The average output ratios are 1.11, 1.02 and 0.49 for the 10 mm,35 mm and 50 mm applicators, respectively, which are in good agreement with the manufacturer’s published output ratios of 1.13, 1.02 and 0.49. Conclusion: Our measurements successfully demonstrate the accuracy of a new calibration method using a single surface applicator for Xoft EBT sources and deriving the dose rates of other applicators. The accuracy of the calibration is improved as this method minimizes the source position variation inside the applicator during individual source calibrations. The new method significantly reduces the calibration time to less

  17. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  18. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Shayna L., E-mail: snl2t@virginia.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Petroni, Gina [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Dalal, Parchayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Smolkin, Mark [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  19. Fractionated perineal high-dose-rate temporary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer: is lymph node sampling necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyorgy, Kovacs; Razvan, Galalae

    2003-01-01

    To study the influence of imaging based nodal staging and local dose escalation by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost in the treatment of locally confined prostate cancer in terms of prostate specific antigen (PSA) recurrence-free survival (biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED)), treatment toxicity and prognostic variables. The prospectively recorded files of 144 men aged in a median of 68 years with a mean follow-up of 8 years (60-171 months) receiving curatively intended, transrectal ultrasound guided high-dose-rate 192-iridium-brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for locally confined prostate cancer were analyzed. T-stages were defined by digital rectal investigation and transrectal sonography (TRUS), nodal staging was performed with computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (UICC/AJCR 1992). Twenty-nine patients (20.1%) had T1b-T2a tumors, and 115 patients had T2b-T3 tumors. Median initial PSA (iPSA) was 12.15 ng mL -1 (mean 25.61 ng mL -1 ). The total planned dose applied by external beam radiation was 50 Gy in the pelvis, and 40 Gy in the prostate by in-field-dose modification by individual compensators. The perineal, TRUS guided HDR-BT was delivered in two fractions of 15 Gy each. The target of BT boost was the peripheral zone of the prostate. The overall survival was 71.5%o and that of the disease free survival 82.6%. Freedom from distant metastases in T3 stage was 91.3%, whereas for G3 lesions, it was 88.23%. The bNED rate was 72.9%. Regarding treatment related late toxicity according to the EORTC/RTOG score, we observed grade 1, 2, 3 proctitis in 9.72%, 6.94%, 4.10% as well as grade 1, 2, 3 cystitis in 12.5%, 4.16%2.08%, respectively. Grade 4 and 5 proctitis or cystitis were not registered. The minimum 5-year and mean 8-year results confirm that local dose escalation by TRUS guided perineal HDR-BT and complementary external beam radiation of the pelvic lymphatics has curative potential

  20. Beta radiation field of a 85Kr source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.V.E.; David, J.

    1987-12-01

    The beta radiation field of a 85 Kr(3,7GBq) source utilized in industrial applications was determined, with the use of gamagraphy films, a scintillation detector, an extrapolation chamber and thermoluminescent (TL) dosemeters of CaSO 4 : Tm. Among other characteristics, the isodose curves of beta radiation and Bremsstrahlung radiation were obtained experimentally. (author) [pt

  1. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    This presentation first defines the radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques, indicates the used ionizing radiations (electromagnetic and particles), describes the mechanisms and processes of action of ionizing radiations: they can be physical by photon-matter interactions (Compton effect and photoelectric effect) or due to electron-matter interactions (excitation, ionization), physical-chemical by direct or indirect action (DNA damage), cellular (mitotic or apoptotic death), tissue (sane and tumorous tissues and differential effect). It discusses the biological efficiency of these treatments which depends on different parameters: intrinsic radio-sensitivity, time (session fractioning and organisation in time), oxygen, radiation quality, cellular cycle, dose rate, temperature. It presents the different types of radiotherapy: external radiotherapy (general sequence, delineation, dosimetry, protection of critical organs, treatment session, quality control, monitoring consultation) and briefly presents some specific techniques (total body irradiation, total cutaneous electron therapy, pre-operation radiotherapy, radio-surgery, hadron-therapy). It proposes an overview of the main indications for this treatment: brain tumours, upper aero digestive tract tumours, bronchial tumours, oesophagus, stomach and pancreas tumours, breast tumours, cervix cancer, rectum tumour, and so on, and indicates the possible associated treatments. The next part addresses brachytherapy. It presents the principles and comments the differences with radiotherapy. It indicates the used radio-elements (Caesium 137, Iridium 192, Iodine 125), describes the implementation techniques (plastic tubes, use of iodine 125, intracavitary and endo-luminal radiation therapy). It proposes an overview of the different treated tumours (skin, breast, prostates, bronchial, oesophagus, ENT) and indicates possible early and late secondary effects for different organs

  2. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  4. Natural radiation source fabricated from commercially available instant coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao; Ando, Yoshiaki; Izumi, Yuuichi

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available instant coffee, Nescafe Excella, contained the radionuclide 40 K. From the instant coffee, sixteen coffee-block radiation sources were successfully fabricated with sufficiently low production dependences. The coffee-block radiation sources were examined their suitability for a radiation protection course. Although a part of radiation counts(cpm) obtained with 1 minute measurement were largely deviated, those determined by 5 minute measurements and five times of 1 minute measurement were less deviated, enabling better comprehension of the three cardinal principles of radiation protection. (author)

  5. Protection in handling ionizing radiation sources in national economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The collection of study texts is divided into 13 chapters giving an explanation of the structure of the atom, the properties of ionizing radiation and its interactions, quantities and units used, basic dosimetric methods, biological radiation effects, the sources of population exposure, the principles of radiation protection, technological applications of ionizing radiation, the monitoring of personnel and environment, the method of recording and filing, the method of protection from external radiation and internal contamination, health care, and requirements for protection in handling nonsealed sources. (M.D.)

  6. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Fischer, Larry E [Los Gatos, CA; Felter, Thomas E [Livermore, CA

    2010-04-20

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  7. Sealed source and device design safety testing: Technical report on the findings of task 4 -- Investigation of failed Nitinol brachytherapy wire. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benac, D.J.; Burghard, H.C.

    1996-03-01

    This report covers an investigation of the nature and cause of failure in Nitinol brachytherapy sourcewires. The investigation was initiated after two clinical incidents in which sourcewires failed during or immediately after a treatment. The investigation determined that the two clinical Nitinol sourcewires failed in a brittle manner, which is atypical for Nitinol. There were no material anomalies or subcritical flaws to explain the brittle failures. The bend tests also demonstrated that neither moist environment, radiation, nor low-temperature structural transformation was a likely root cause of the failures. However, degradation of the PTFE was consistently evident, and those sourcewires shipped or stored with PTFE sleeves consistently failed in laboratory bend tests. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the root cause of the in-service failures of the sourcewires was environmentally induced embrittlement due to the breakdown of the PTFE protective sleeves in the presence of the high-radiation field and subsequent reaction or interaction of the breakdown products with the Nitinol alloy

  8. Safety of radiation sources and other radioactive materials in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majali, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Since joining the IAEA Model Project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure in countries of West Asia, Jordan has amended its radiation safety legislation. The Regulatory Authority is improving its inventory system for radiation sources and other radioactive materials and also its notification, registration, licensing, inspection and enforcement systems. It has established national provisions for the management of orphan sources after they have been found. The system for the control of the radiation sources and other radioactive materials entering the country has been improved by the Regulatory Authority. (author)

  9. Detailed observations of the source of terrestrial narrowband electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed observations are presented of a region near the terrestrial plasmapause where narrowband electromagnetic radiation (previously called escaping nonthermal continuum radiation) is being generated. These observations show a direct correspondence between the narrowband radio emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. In addition, electromagnetic radiation propagating in the Z-mode is observed in the source region which provides an extremely accurate determination of the electron plasma frequency and, hence, density profile of the source region. The data strongly suggest that electrostatic waves and not Cerenkov radiation are the source of the banded radio emissions and define the coupling which must be described by any viable theory.

  10. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 [Docket No. USA-2008-0001] RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is finalizing revisions to its regulation concerning radiation sources on...

  11. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, L.M., E-mail: moutinho@ua.pt [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Castro, I.F.C. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Peralta, L. [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M.C. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40–50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25–100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  12. Influence of radioactive sources discretization in the Monte Carlo computational simulations of brachytherapy procedures: a case study on the procedures for treatment of prostate cancer; Influencia da discretizacao das fontes radioativas nas simulacoes computacionais Monte Carlo de procedimentos de braquiterapia: um estudo de caso sobre os procedimentos para tratamento do cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Costa, Kleber Souza Silva [Faculdade Integrada de Pernambuco (FACIPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radiotherapy computational simulation procedures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods have shown to be increasingly important to the improvement of cancer fighting strategies. One of the biases in this practice is the discretization of the radioactive source in brachytherapy simulations, which often do not match with a real situation. This study had the aim to identify and to measure the influence of radioactive sources discretization in brachytherapy MC simulations when compared to those that do not present discretization, using prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 radionuclide as model. Simulations were carried out with 108 events with both types of sources to compare them using EGSnrc code associated to MASH phantom in orthostatic and supine positions with some anatomic adaptations. Significant alterations were found, especially regarding bladder, rectum and the prostate itself. It can be concluded that there is a need to discretized sources in brachytherapy simulations to ensure its representativeness. (author)

  13. Dosimetric comparison between the microSelectron HDR 192Ir v2 source and the BEBIG 60Co source for HDR brachytherapy using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwarul Islam, M.; Akramuzzaman, M.M.; Zakaria, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of miniaturized high activity 192 Ir sources have been made a market preference in modern brachytherapy. The smaller dimensions of the sources are flexible for smaller diameter of the applicators and it is also suitable for interstitial implants. Presently, miniaturized 60 Co HDR sources have been made available with identical dimensions to those of 192 Ir sources. 60 Co sources have an advantage of longer half life while comparing with 192 Ir source. High dose rate brachytherapy sources with longer half life are logically pragmatic solution for developing country in economic point of view. This study is aimed to compare the TG-43U1 dosimetric parameters for new BEBIG 60 Co HDR and new microSelectron 192 Ir HDR sources. Dosimetric parameters are calculated using EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo simulation code accordance with the AAPM TG-43 formalism for microSelectron HDR 192 Ir v2 and new BEBIG 60 Co HDR sources. Air-kerma strength per unit source activity, calculated in dry air are 9.698x10 -8 ± 0.55% U Bq -1 and 3.039x10 -7 ± 0.41% U Bq -1 for the above mentioned two sources, respectively. The calculated dose rate constants per unit air-kerma strength in water medium are 1.116±0.12% cGy h -1 U -1 and 1.097±0.12% cGy h -1 U -1 , respectively, for the two sources. The values of radial dose function for distances up to 1 cm and more than 22 cm for BEBIG 60 Co HDR source are higher than that of other source. The anisotropic values are sharply increased to the longitudinal sides of the BEBIG 60 Co source and the rise is comparatively sharper than that of the other source. Tissue dependence of the absorbed dose has been investigated with vacuum phantom for breast, compact bone, blood, lung, thyroid, soft tissue, testis, and muscle. No significant variation is noted at 5 cm of radial distance in this regard while comparing the two sources except for lung tissues. The true dose rates are calculated with considering photon as well as electron transport using

  14. Verification of radiation dose to a and b position at cervix during low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy in bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Begur, M.

    2001-01-01

    A manual low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy consists two sets viz. 440 mCi (tandem 120,40,40, 40, 40 and ovoids 40, 40 mCi each) and 360 mCi ( tandem 120, 40, 40 mCi and ovoids 40, 40 Mci each) having the dose rates at A were 155.2 cGy/hr and 140.8 cGy/hr. respectively on June 1996) was supplied by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India and are being used in the Delta Medical Centre Limited, Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh for gynecological insertion. BARC also supplied the operation manual quoting the dose at point A and B of cervix of the patient only for straight uterine tubes and separation between vaginal ovoids of 2, 3 and 4 cm. BARC also mentioned that the dose at A and B are within 1-2 % of the mean dose. Manual calculation was done to compare the dose at point A and B for ten intracavitary insertions in the hospital to compare those with the value supplied by the BARC. It was found that the dose varied at point A from +0.46% to +9.11% for eight patients and -3.4% and -5.96% for two patients with the quoted value. Dose at B varied from +0.59% to 9.8% for nine patients and -10.94% for one patient with the quoted value supplied by the supplier. This is not unusual because the tandem used for treatment were with different angles such as, 15 degree, 30 degree etc. as per anatomy of the patient. Moreover, the tolerance dose of the fornix region is much more higher (about 140 Gy) than that of the other critical organs. Overall prognosis of the patients, treated so far, using this manual brachytherapy and performing manual calculation were found to satisfactory. So, the result shows a good result with the manual treatment planning

  15. [UV-radiation--sources, wavelength, environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzle, Erhard; Hönigsmann, Herbert

    2005-09-01

    The UV-radiation in our environment is part of the electromagnetic radiation, which emanates from the sun. It is designated as optical radiation and reaches from 290-4,000 nm on the earth's surface. According to international definitions UV irradiation is divided into short-wave UVC (200-280 nm), medium-wave UVB (280-320 nm), and long-wave UVA (320-400 nm). Solar radiation which reaches the surface of the globe at a defined geographical site and a defined time point is called global radiation. It is modified quantitatively and qualitatively while penetrating the atmosphere. Besides atmospheric conditions, like ozone layer and air pollution, geographic latitude, elevation, time of the season, time of the day, cloudiness and the influence of indirect radiation resulting from stray effects in the atmosphere and reflection from the underground play a role in modifying global radiation, which finally represents the biologically effective radiation. The radiation's distribution on the body surface varies according to sun angle and body posture. The cumulative UV exposure is mainly influenced by outdoor profession and recreational activities. The use of sun beds and phototherapeutic measures additionally may contribute to the cumulative UV dose.

  16. Radiative forcing of iron oxides from combustion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.; Lin, G.; Penner, J.

    2017-12-01

    Combustion aerosols affect the climate by absorbing and scattering radiation. Iron (Fe) oxides emitted from combustion sources largely reside in supermicron aerosols. Fe oxides on aerosols are known to absorb sun light and heat the atmosphere. However, supermicron aerosols from combustion sources are ignored for radiative forcing in climate models. Here, we use a global chemical transport model and a radiative transfer model to estimate the radiative forcing of Fe oxides from combustion sources. The model results suggest that Fe oxides from combustion sources significantly contribute to a warming effect at the top of the atmosphere over the air polluted regions such as China and India as well as biomass burning source regions. However, the estimates strongly depend on chemical speciation of Fe oxides, which is also important for bioavailability. These results suggest comprehensive observations are needed to fully understand the effects of Fe oxides on the net radiative forcing and ecosystems.

  17. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  18. The safety of radiation sources and radioactive materials in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the present infrastructure for the safety of radiation sources in China, where applications of radiation sources have become more and more widespread in the past years. In particular, it refers to the main functions of the National Nuclear Safety Administration of the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), which is acting as the regulatory body for nuclear and radiation safety at nuclear installations, the Ministry of Public Health which issues licences for the use of radiation sources, and the Ministry of Public Security, which deals with the security of radiation sources. The report also refers to the main requirements of the existing regulatory system for radiation safety, i.e. the basic dose limits for radiation workers and the public, the licensing system for nuclear installations and for radioisotope-based and other irradiation devices, and the environmental impact assessment system. Information on the nationwide survey of radiation sources carried out by SEPA in 1991 is provided, and on some accidents that occurred in China due to loss of control of radiation sources and errors in the operation of irradiation facilities. (author)

  19. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters; Proposta de um sistema postal para a calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir, utilizadas em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose, com dosimetros termoluminescentes de LiF: Mn: Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. CNEN Caixa Postal 37750, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  20. Separation of radiation from two sources from their known radiated sum field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for complete and exact separation of the radiated fields of two sources (at the same frequency) from the knowledge of their radiated sum field. The two sources can be arbitrary but it must be possible to enclose the sources inside their own non-intersecting minimum...

  1. Human error in remote Afterloading Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, M.L.; Callan, J.; Schoenfeld, I.; Serig, D.

    1994-01-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US. The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error

  2. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy,

  3. Transperineal Injection of Hyaluronic Acid in Anterior Perirectal Fat to Decrease Rectal Toxicity From Radiation Delivered With Intensity Modulated Brachytherapy or EBRT for Prostate Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Fernandez, Jose; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Rua, Angeles de la; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Fernandez, Jose M.; Juan, German

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Rectal toxicity remains a serious complication affecting quality of life for prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. We began an investigational trial injecting hyaluronic acid (HA) in the perirectal fat to increase the distance between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall. This is the first report using HA injection in oncology. Methods and Materials: This is a trial of external beam radiation therapy with HDR brachytherapy boosts in prostate cancer. During the two high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions, thermoluminescent dosimeter dosimeters were placed in the urethra and in the rectum. Before the second HDR fraction, 3-7 mL (mean, 6 mL) of HA was injected under transrectal ultrasound guidance in the perirectal fat to systematically create a 1.5-cm space. Urethral and rectal HDR doses were calculated and measured. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the stability of the new space. Results: Twenty-seven patients enrolled in the study. No toxicity was produced from the HA or the injection. In follow-up computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the HA injection did not migrate or change in mass/shape for close to 1 year. The mean distance between rectum and prostate was 2.0 cm along the entire length of the prostate. The median measured rectal dose, when normalized to the median urethral dose, demonstrated a decrease in dose from 47.1% to 39.2% (p < 0.001) with or without injection. For an HDR boost dose of 1150 cGy, the rectum mean Dmax reduction was from 708 cGy to 507 cGy, p < 0.001, and the rectum mean Dmean drop was from 608 to 442 cGy, p < 0.001 post-HA injection. Conclusion: The new 2-cm distance derived from the HA injection significantly decreased rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy. Because of the several-month duration of stability, the same distance was maintained during the course of external beam radiation therapy

  4. Large area radiation source for water and wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael T.; Lee, Seungwoo; Kloba, Anthony; Hellmer, Ronald; Kumar, Nalin; Eaton, Mark; Rambo, Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh

    2011-06-01

    There is a strong desire for processes that improve the safety of water supplies and that minimize disinfection byproducts. Stellarray is developing mercury-free next-generation x-ray and UV-C radiation sources in flat-panel and pipe form factors for water and wastewater treatment applications. These new radiation sources are designed to sterilize sludge and effluent, and to enable new treatment approaches to emerging environmental concerns such as the accumulation of estrogenic compounds in water. Our UV-C source, based on cathodoluminescent technology, differs significantly from traditional disinfection approaches using mercury arc lamps or UV LEDs. Our sources accelerate electrons across a vacuum gap, converting their energy into UV-C when striking a phosphor, or x-rays when striking a metallic anode target. Stellarray's large area radiation sources for wastewater treatment allow matching of the radiation source area to the sterilization target area for maximum coverage and improved efficiency.

  5. Remote afterloading for intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy with californium-252

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tačev, Tačo; Grigorov, Grigor; Papírek, Tomáš; Kolařík, Vladimír.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present their design concept of remote afterloading for 252Cf brachytherapy with respect to characteristic peculiarities of 252Cf and the current worldwide development of remote afterloading devices. The afterloading device has been designed as a stationary radiator comprising three mutually interconnected units: (1) a control and drive unit, consisting of a control computer and a motor-driven Bowden system carrying the 252Cf source; (2) a source housed in a watertight, concrete vessel, which is stored in a strong room situated well beneath the patient's bed and (3) an afterloading application module installed in the irradiation room. As 252Cf is a nuclide with low specific activity, it was necessary to produce two independent devices for high dose rate intracavitary treatment and for low dose rate intestinal treatment. The sources may be moved arbitrarily during the treatment with a position accuracy of 0.5-1.0 mm within a distance of 520 cm from the source storage position in the strong room to the application position. The technical concept of the present automatic afterloading device for neutron brachytherapy represents one possible option of a range of conceivable design variants, which, while minimizing the technical and economic requirements, provides operating personnel with optimum protection and work safety, thus extending the applicability of high-LET radiation-based treatment methods in clinical practice.

  6. State Register of Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Occupational exposure

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    One of main tasks of Radiation Protection Centre is to collect, process, systematize, store and provide the data on sources of ionizing radiation and occupational exposures. The number of sources in 2002 is provided and compared with previous year. Distribution of workers according to the type of practice is compared with previous year. Distribution of sealed sources and x-ray machines according their use is presented.

  7. Dosimetric analysis of radiation sources to use in dermatological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions undergoing therapy with radiation sources may have different patterns of malignancy. Malignant lesions or cancer most commonly found in radiotherapy services are carcinomas. Radiation therapy in skin lesions is performed with low penetration beams and orthovoltage X-rays, electron beams and radioactive sources ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, e 90 Sr) arranged on a surface mold or in metal applicator. This study aims to analyze the therapeutic radiation dose profile produced by radiation sources used in skin lesions radiotherapy procedures. Experimental measurements for the analysis of dosimetric radiation sources were compared with calculations obtained from a computer system based on the Monte Carlo Method. Computational results had a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Experimental measurements and computational results by the MCNP4C code have been used to validate the calculations obtained by MCNP code and to provide a reliable medical application for each clinical case. (author)

  8. Synchrotron radiation sources: general features and vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    In the last years the electron or positron storage rings, which were until 1970 only used for high energy physics experiments, begun to be built in several countries exclusively as electromagnetic radiation source (synchrotron radiation). The sources are generally made up by injector (linear accelerator or microtron), 'booster' (synchrotron), storage ring, insertions ('Wigglers' and ondulators) and light lines. The interest by these sources are due to the high intensity, large spectrum (from infrared to the X-rays), polarization and pulsed structure of the produced radiation. For the ultra-vacuum obtainement, necessary for the functioning storage rings (p=10 -9 Torr), several special procedures are used. In Brazil the Synchrotron Radiation National Laboratory of the CNPq worked out a conceptual project of synchrotron radiation source, whose execution should begin by the construction of the several components prototypes. (L.C.) [pt

  9. Verification and source-position error analysis of film reconstruction techniques used in the brachytherapy planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Chui, Chen-Shou; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Tainsong

    2009-09-01

    A method was presented that employs standard linac QA tools to verify the accuracy of film reconstruction algorithms used in the brachytherapy planning system. Verification of reconstruction techniques is important as suggested in the ESTRO booklet 8: "The institution should verify the full process of any reconstruction technique employed clinically." Error modeling was also performed to analyze seed-position errors. The "isocentric beam checker" device was used in this work. It has a two-dimensional array of steel balls embedded on its surface. The checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter, and one axis of its cross marks parallel to the axis of gantry rotation. The gantry of the simulator was rotated to make the checker behave like a three-dimensional array of balls. Three algorithms used in the ABACUS treatment planning system: orthogonal film, 2-films-with-variable-angle, and 3-films-with-variable-angle were tested. After exposing and digitizing the films, the position of each steel ball on the checker was reconstructed and compared to its true position, which can be accurately calculated. The results showed that the error is dependent on the object-isocenter distance, but not the magnification of the object. The averaged errors were less than 1 mm within the tolerance level defined by Roué et al. ["The EQUAL-ESTRO audit on geometric reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy," Radiother. Oncol. 78, 78-83 (2006)]. However, according to the error modeling, the theoretical error would be greater than 2 mm if the objects were located more than 20 cm away from the isocenter with a 0.5 degrees reading error of the gantry and collimator angles. Thus, in addition to carefully performing the QA of the gantry and collimator angle indicators, it is suggested that the patient, together with the applicators or seeds inside, should be placed close to the isocenter as much as possible. This method could be used to

  10. Radiation sources EB and UV curing machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes electron beam processors and related technologies for curing applications to facilitate those industrial personals who are trying to understand and evaluate the applicability and benefits of radiation curing to their products. 4 tabs., 10 figs

  11. THE ROLE OF RADIATION ACCIDENTS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IONIZING RADIATION SOURCES IN THE PROBLEM OF RADIATION DAMAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Кіхтенко, Ігор Миколайович

    2016-01-01

    Subject of research – the relevance of radiation damage at modern development of industry and medicine. In the world of radiation sources used in different fields of practice and their application in the future will increase, which greatly increases the likelihood of injury in a significant contingent of people.Research topic – the definition of the role of nuclear energy and the industrial use of ionizing radiation sources in the problem of radiation damage. The purpose of research – identif...

  12. Natural sources of ionizing radiation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.M.R.; Hughes, J.S.; Lomas, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This publication maps levels of radiation of natural origin throughout the European Community (except in the Lander of the former German Democratic Republic), in Scandinavia and in Austria. The booklet explains in simple terms the basic properties and origin of different types of radiation (cosmic rays, gamma rays and radon) and their contribution to the overall exposure of the population. A glossary, a list of administrative regions used in the maps and detailed references to the data for each country are included

  13. Challenges in Regulating Radiation Sources and Radioactive Waste in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngwakwe, C.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying challenges that hamper the efficiency and efficacy of Regulatory Infrastructure (People and Processes) as regards ensuring safety & security of radiation sources and radioactive waste is a major step towards planning for improvement. In a world constantly motivated by technological advancements, there has been considerable increase in the use of new technologies incorporating radioactive sources in both medical and industrial applications due to its perceived benefits, hence changing the dynamics of regulation. This paper brings to the fore, contemporary challenges experienced by regulators in the course of regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste in Nigeria. These challenges encountered in the business of regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste in Nigeria amongst others include; knowledge gap in the use of novel technologies for industrial applications (e.g. radiotracers in oil & gas and wastewater management), inadequate collaboration with operators to ensure transparency in their operations, inadequate cooperation from other government agencies using ionizing radiation sources, lack of synergy between relevant government agencies, difficulty in establishing standard radioactive waste management facility for orphan & disused sources, and inadequate control of NORMS encountered in industrial activities (e.g. well logging, mining). Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA), the body saddled with the responsibility of regulating the use of ionizing radiation sources in Nigeria is empowered by the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Act to ensure the protection of life, property, and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, hence are not immune to the aforementioned challenges. (author)

  14. Development of Yb-169 radiation source for new nondestructive inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamabayashi, Hisamichi

    1994-01-01

    As the nondestructive inspection method for large structures, there has been radiography, and X-ray and γ-ray have been used as the radiation. The transmissivity of radiation through materials changes by the energy of the radiation and the density and thickness of the materials. At present about 880 γ-ray radiography apparatuses are used in Japanese private enterprises, and about 70% of them use 192 Ir γ-ray sources, and about 30% use 60 Co or 137 Cs sources. Recently the defect inspection for the worlded parts of thin wall small tubes and so on have become to be regarded as important, and the 169 Yb source that emits lower energy γ-ray is suitable to the purpose. There are many reports that 169 Yb radiography was applied successfully. As the 169 Yb radiation source, pellets and balls are on the market. 169 Yb is made by the neutron irradiation of 168 Yb in nuclear reactors. The characteristics of 169 Yb, the manufacture of 169 Yb radiation sources and the applicability of 169 Yb radiation sources to nondestructive inspection are reported. Also in Japan, many basic experiments on 169 Yb radiation sources have been carried out, and the irradiation apparatuses are small and light, and the control area can be set small. (K.I.)

  15. Verification of radiation dose to a and b position during low dose rate 137cs brachytherapy in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Begur, M.

    2001-01-01

    A manual low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy consists of two sets viz. 440 mCi (tandem 120, 40,40, 40,40 and ovoids 40,40 mCi each) and 360 mCi (tandem 120, 40,40 mCi and ovoids 40,40 mCi each) having the dose rates at A were 155.2 c Gy/hr and 140.8 c Gy/hr respectively on June 1996) was supplied by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India and are being used in the Delta Medical Centre Limited, Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh for gynecological insertion. BARC also supplied the operation manual quoting the dose at point A and B of cervix of the patient only for straight uterine tubes and separation between vaginal ovoids of 2, 3 and 4 cm. BARC also mentioned that the dose at A and B are within 1-2 % of the mean value. Manual calculation was done to compare the dose at point A and B for ten intracavitary insertions in the hospital to compare those with the value supplied by the BARC. It was found that dose varied at point A from +0.46 % to +9.11 % for eight patients and -3.4 % to -5.96 % for two patients with quoted value. Dose at B varied from +0.59 % to +9.8 % for nine patients and -10.94 % for one patient with the quoted value supplied by the supplier. This is not unusual because the tandem used for treatment were with different angles such as, 15 degree, 30 degree etc. as per anatomy of the patient. Moreover, the tolerance dose of the fornix region is much higher (about 140 Gy) than that of the other critical organ. Overall prognosis of the patients, treated so far, using this manual brachytherapy and performing manual calculation is satisfactory. So, the results shows a good result with the manual treatment planning

  16. In vivo dosimetry HDR brachytherapy prostate with source CO-60: Results of measures in a point urethra; Dosimetria in vivo en braquiterapia HDR de prostate con fuente de CO-60: Resultados de medidas en un punto de uretra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latorre, D.; Fernandez, J.; Rivero, G.; Crelgo, D.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Sanchez, P.; Villace, A.; Sanchez, E.; Arroyo, M. A.; Garcia, E.; Trabanco, E.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we present and analyze the results of the in vivo dosimetry made a point of urethra with a group of 30 patients treated with brachytherapy prostate high rate with Co-60 source. Taking into account the uncertainties, the results and integration, globally evaluate this system DIV. This DIV system, due to its ease of calibration and use, and provides a relatively simple integration way to avoid serious errors in administering treatment. (Author)

  17. Long duration mild temperature hyperthermia and brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, E P; Raaphorst, G P

    2004-03-01

    Combining long duration mild temperature hyperthermia (LDMH) and low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to enhance therapeutic killing of cancer cells was proposed many years ago. The cellular and tumour research that supports this hypothesis is presented in this review. Research describing LDMH interaction with pulsed brachytherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy using clinically relevant parameters are compared with LDMH/LDR brachytherapy. The mechanism by which LDMH sensitizes LDR has been established as the inhibition of sublethal damage repair. The molecular mechanisms have been shown to involve DNA repair enzymes, but the exact nature of these processes is still under investigation. The relative differences between LDMH interactions with human and rodent cells are presented to help in the understanding of possible roles of LDMH in clinical application. The role of LDMH in modifying tumour blood flow and its possible role in LDR sensitization of tumours is also presented. The positive aspects of LDMH-brachytherapy for clinical application are sixfold; (1) the thermal goals (temperature, time and volume) are achievable with currently available technology, (2) the hyperthermia by itself has no detectable toxic effects, (3) thermotolerance appears to play a minor if any role in radiation sensitization, (4) TER of around 2 can be expected, (5) hypoxic fraction may be decreased due to blood flow modification and (6) simultaneous chemotherapy may also be sensitized. Combined LDMH and brachytherapy is a cancer therapy that has established biological rationale and sufficient technical and clinical advancements to be appropriately applied. This modality is ripe for clinical testing.

  18. Introduction to radiation protection practical knowledge for handling radioactive sources

    CERN Document Server

    Grupen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The book presents an accessible account of the sources of ionising radiation and the methods of radiation protection. The basics of nuclear physics which are directly related to radiation protection are briefly discussed. The book describes the units of radiation protection, the measurement techniques, biological effects of radiation, environmental radiation, and many applications of radiation. For each chapter there is a problem section with full solutions. A detailed glossary and many useful information in appendixes complete the book. The author has addressed the issue of internationality to make sure that the text and, in particular, the complicated regulations can be easily interpreted not only in Europe and the United States but also in other countries. The subject of radiation protection requires a certain amount of mathematics. For those who have forgotten the basic rules of calculus a short refresher course in the form of a mathematical appendix is added.

  19. Population-Based Validation of the 2014 ISUP Gleason Grade Groups in Patients Treated With Radical Prostatectomy, Brachytherapy, External Beam Radiation, or no Local Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Raisa S; Davis-Bondarenko, Helen; Zaffuto, Emanuele; Tian, Zhe; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Schiffmann, Jonas; Saad, Fred; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Tilki, Derya; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2017-05-01

    To test discriminant ability of the 2014 ISUP Gleason grade groups (GGG) for prediction of prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiation (EBRT) or no local treatment (NLT) relative to traditional Gleason grading (TGG). In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-database (2004-2009), 2,42,531 non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) patients were identified, who underwent local treatment (RP, BT, EBRT only) or NLT. Follow-up endpoint was PCSM. Biopsy and/or pathological Gleason score (GS) were categorized as TGG ≤6, 7, 8-10 or GGG: I (≤6), II (3 + 4), III (4 + 3), IV (8), and V (9-10). Kaplan-Meier plots, multivariable Cox regression analyses and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) area under the curve analyses (AUC) were used. Median follow-up was 76 months (IQR: 59-94). For the four examined treatment modalities, all five GGG strata and all three TGG strata independently predicted PCSM. GGG yielded 1.5-fold or greater HR differences between GGG II and GGG III, and twofold or greater HR differences between GGG IV and GGG V. Relative to TGG, GGG added 0.4-1.1% to AUC. This large population-based cohort study confirms the added discriminant properties of the novel GGG strata and confirms a modest gain in predictive accuracy. Prostate 77: 686-693, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Direct reconstruction and associated uncertainties of 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy cervix patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awunor, O. A.; Dixon, B.; Walker, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper details a practical method for the direct reconstruction of high dose rate 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of brachytherapy cervix patients. It also details the uncertainties associated with such a process. Eight Nucletron interstitial ring applicators—Ø26 mm (×4), Ø30 mm (×3) and Ø34 mm (×1), and one 60 mm intrauterine tube were used in this study. RTQA2 and XRQA2 gafchromic films were irradiated at pre-programmed dwell positions with three successive 192Ir sources and used to derive the coordinates of the source dwell positions. The source was observed to deviate significantly from its expected position by up to 6.1 mm in all ring sizes. Significant inter applicator differences of up to 2.6 mm were observed between a subset of ring applicators. Also, the measured data were observed to differ significantly from commercially available source path models provided by Nucletron with differences of up to 3.7 mm across all ring applicator sizes. The total expanded uncertainty (k = 2) averaged over all measured dwell positions in the rings was observed to be 1.1 ± 0.1 mm (Ø26 mm and Ø30 mm rings) and 1.0 ± 0.3 mm (Ø34 mm ring) respectively, and when transferred to the treatment planning system, equated to maximum %dose changes of 1.9%, 13.2% and 1.5% at regions representative of the parametrium, lateral fornix and organs at risk respectively.

  1. Direct reconstruction and associated uncertainties of 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy cervix patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awunor, O A; Dixon, B; Walker, C

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a practical method for the direct reconstruction of high dose rate 192 Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of brachytherapy cervix patients. It also details the uncertainties associated with such a process. Eight Nucletron interstitial ring applicators—Ø26 mm (×4), Ø30 mm (×3) and Ø34 mm (×1), and one 60 mm intrauterine tube were used in this study. RTQA2 and XRQA2 gafchromic films were irradiated at pre-programmed dwell positions with three successive 192 Ir sources and used to derive the coordinates of the source dwell positions. The source was observed to deviate significantly from its expected position by up to 6.1 mm in all ring sizes. Significant inter applicator differences of up to 2.6 mm were observed between a subset of ring applicators. Also, the measured data were observed to differ significantly from commercially available source path models provided by Nucletron with differences of up to 3.7 mm across all ring applicator sizes. The total expanded uncertainty (k = 2) averaged over all measured dwell positions in the rings was observed to be 1.1 ± 0.1 mm (Ø26 mm and Ø30 mm rings) and 1.0 ± 0.3 mm (Ø34 mm ring) respectively, and when transferred to the treatment planning system, equated to maximum %dose changes of 1.9%, 13.2% and 1.5% at regions representative of the parametrium, lateral fornix and organs at risk respectively. (paper)

  2. Regulatory control of radiation sources in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coy, K.

    1998-01-01

    The regulatory programme governing the safe use of radioisotopes in Germany is based on the federal legislation enacted as Atomic Energy Control Act (Atomgesetz) and Radiation Protection Ordinance (Strahlen-schutzverordnung) and its implementation by the competent authorities of the individual states. Despite this highly decentralized infrastructure of enforcement the basic principles of regulations described in this paper such as authorization criteria, conditions imposed as well as depth and intensity of inspection balanced according to the individual radiation hazard involved are harmonized to the greatest possible extent by regular coordination among the competent authorities as well as a series of technical regulations such as standards and guidelines. (author)

  3. Characteristics of miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources based on TG-43U1 formalism using Monte Carlo simulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safigholi, Habib; Faghihi, Reza; Jashni, Somaye Karimi; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine a method for Monte Carlo (MC) characterization of the miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources (MEBXS) and to set dosimetric parameters according to TG-43U1 formalism. TG-43U1 parameters were used to get optimal designs of MEBXS. Parameters that affect the dose distribution such as anode shapes, target thickness, target angles, and electron beam source characteristics were evaluated. Optimized MEBXS designs were obtained and used to determine radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions in the electron energy range of 25-80 keV. Methods: Tungsten anode material was considered in two different geometries, hemispherical and conical-hemisphere. These configurations were analyzed by the 4C MC code with several different optimization techniques. The first optimization compared target thickness layers versus electron energy. These optimized thicknesses were compared with published results by Ihsan et al.[Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 264, 371-377 (2007)]. The second optimization evaluated electron source characteristics by changing the cathode shapes and electron energies. Electron sources studied included; (1) point sources, (2) uniform cylinders, and (3) nonuniform cylindrical shell geometries. The third optimization was used to assess the apex angle of the conical-hemisphere target. The goal of these optimizations was to produce 2D-dose anisotropy functions closer to unity. An overall optimized MEBXS was developed from this analysis. The results obtained from this model were compared to known characteristics of HDR 125 I, LDR 103 Pd, and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy source (XAEBS) [Med. Phys. 33, 4020-4032 (2006)]. Results: The optimized anode thicknesses as a function of electron energy is fitted by the linear equation Y (μm) = 0.0459X (keV)-0.7342. The optimized electron source geometry is obtained for a disk-shaped parallel beam (uniform cylinder) with 0.9 mm radius. The TG-43 distribution

  4. Stochastic electromagnetic radiation of complex sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2007-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by localized complex electric charge and current distributions is studied. A statistical formalism in terms of general dynamical multipole fields is developed. The appearing coefficients are treated as stochastic variables. Hereby as much as possible a

  5. Transport of cobalt-60 industrial radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Gibson, Wayne

    This paper will deal with safety aspects of the handling of Cobalt-60, the most widely used industrial radio-isotope. Cobalt-60 is a man-made radioisotope of Cobalt-59, a naturally occurring non radioactive element, that is made to order for radiation therapy and a wide range of industrial processing applications including sterilization of medical disposables, food irradiation, etc.

  6. WADOSE, Radiation Source in Vitrification Waste Storage Apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Jun-ichi; Tashiro, Shingo; Kikkawa, Shizuo; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: This is a radiation shielding program which analyzes unknown dose rates using known radiation sources. It can also evaluate radiation sources from measured dose rates. For instance, dose rates measured at several points in the hot cell of WASTEF are introduced into WADOS, and as a result, Ci of radiation sources and their positions are estimated with structural arrangement data of the WASTEF cells. The later functional addition is very useful for actual operation of a hot cell and others. NEA-1142/02: The code was originally written in non standard Fortran dialect and has been fully translated into Fortran 90, Fortran 77 compatible. 2 - Method of solution: Point kernel ray tracing method (the same method as QAD code). 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Modeling of source form for input is available for cylinder, plate, point and others which are simplified geometrically

  7. Rules and regulations on ionizing radiations sources installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The finality of this legislative text is to establish the standards and procedures for site, design, building, operation and decommissioning of nuclear installations, radioactive installations and ionizing radiations sources. This text include the commercialization of radioactive substances and equipment fabrication

  8. Regulatory aspects of radiation sources safety in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollani, K.; Kushe, R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper are presented the regulatory aspects of the radiation sources safety in Albania, based in the new Radiological Protection Act and Regulations. The radiation protection infrastructures and procedures are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing and regular inspection, personal dose monitoring, emergency preparedness which are developed in the frame of the IAEA Technical Co-operation Programme. The issue of the security of radiation sources is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country. A special attention is paid to the identification and location of lost sources for their finding and secure storage. (author)

  9. Source book of educational materials for radiation therapy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijar, M.L.

    1979-08-01

    The Source Book is a listing of educational materials in radiation therapy technology. The first 17 sections correspond to the subjects identified in the ASRT Curriculum Guide for schools of radiation therapy. Each section is divided into publications and in some sections audiovisuals and training aids. Entries are listed without endorsement

  10. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-27

    Mar 27, 2017 ... 2Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, ... electron beam-based sources, e.g., backward wave ..... THz wave [3,22]. The phase-sensitive imaging appli- cations require highly spatial or transverse coherent radiation [5,28,42]. THz undulator radiation in ...

  11. Ionizing radiation sources in Tunisia in 1993; Les sources de rayonnements ionisants en Tunisie en 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahed, N.

    1996-10-01

    This document presents the different sources of ionizing radiations in Tunisia. Those radiations are characterized by alpha and gamma particles which are emitted by electric generators, research reactors and power reactors in nuclear plants. Four fields usually use ionizing radiations: medical, industrial, agricultural and research fields. Then different evolutions are studied: evolution in time, classification in fields, distribution in the country. Finally, the different problems caused by these sources are presented and solutions are put forward. (TEC). 4 figs.

  12. American brachytherapy society (ABS) consensus guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Laurie E.; Nag, Subir; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Rao; Speiser, Burton

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, treatment regimens, and dosimetry for brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the esophagus. No guidelines for optimal therapy currently exist. Methods and Materials: Utilizing published reports and clinical experience, representatives of the Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) formulated guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Recommendations were made for brachytherapy in the definitive and palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. (A) Definitive treatment: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal thoracic adeno- or squamous cancers ≤ 10 cm in length, with no evidence of intra-abdominal or metastatic disease. Contraindications include tracheal or bronchial involvement, cervical esophagus location, or stenosis that cannot be bypassed. The esophageal brachytherapy applicator should have an external diameter of 6-10 mm. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 45-50-Gy external beam are used, recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10 Gy in two weekly fractions of 5 Gy each; or (ii) LDR 20 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. All doses are specified 1 cm from the midsource or middwell position. Brachytherapy should follow external beam radiation therapy and should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy. (B) Palliative treatment: Patients with adeno- or squamous cancers of the thoracic esophagus with distant metastases or unresectable local disease progression/recurrence after definitive radiation treatment should be considered for brachytherapy with palliative intent. After limited dose (30 Gy) EBRT, the recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10-14 Gy in one or two fractions; or (ii) LDR 20-25 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. The need for external beam radiation in newly diagnosed patients with a life expectancy of less than 3 months is controversial. In these cases, HDR of 15-20 Gy in two to four fractions or

  13. Challenges in Regulating Radiation Sources and Associated Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehzad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in the fields of medical, industry, agriculture, research, etc. Owing to the inherent risk of exposure to ionizing radiations while using the radiation sources and management of associated waste, safety measures are of utmost importance including robust regulatory control. Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) is responsible for supervising all matters pertaining to nuclear safety and radiation protection in the country. Since its inception, PNRA has made rigorous efforts to regulate the radiation facilities for which regulatory framework was further strengthened by taking into account international norms/practices and implemented afterwards. However, due to vibrant use of these facilities, there are numerous challenges being faced while implementing the regulatory framework. These challenges pertains to shielding design of some facilities, control over service provider for QC/repair maintenance of radiation equipment, assessment of patient doses, and establishment of national diagnostic reference levels for radiological procedures. Further, the regulatory framework also delineate requirements to minimize the generation of associated radioactive waste as low as practicable. The requirements also necessitates that certain sealed radioactive sources (SRS) are returned to the supplier upon completion of their useful life, while other radioactive sources are required to be transported for storage at designated radioactive waste storage facilities in the country, which requires commitment from the licensee. This paper will briefly describe the challenges in regulating the radiation sources and issues related to the waste management associated with these facilities. (author)

  14. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, A; Bradley, D; Nisbet, A

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around...

  15. Experience with qualification examinations of workers handling ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokanova, K.

    1976-01-01

    The organization is described of examinations which have to be passed by supervising staff and workers using radioactive ionizing radiation sources. The requirements are listed of the examination in which these workers have to prove their professional knowledge and skills. The said examinations significantly contribute to the establishment of a system of safeguards at workplaces using ionizing radiation sources and may help economize operations at these workplaces

  16. Radiation Source Mapping with Bayesian Inverse Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hykes, Joshua Michael

    We present a method to map the spectral and spatial distributions of radioactive sources using a small number of detectors. Locating and identifying radioactive materials is important for border monitoring, accounting for special nuclear material in processing facilities, and in clean-up operations. Most methods to analyze these problems make restrictive assumptions about the distribution of the source. In contrast, the source-mapping method presented here allows an arbitrary three-dimensional distribution in space and a flexible group and gamma peak distribution in energy. To apply the method, the system's geometry and materials must be known. A probabilistic Bayesian approach is used to solve the resulting inverse problem (IP) since the system of equations is ill-posed. The probabilistic approach also provides estimates of the confidence in the final source map prediction. A set of adjoint flux, discrete ordinates solutions, obtained in this work by the Denovo code, are required to efficiently compute detector responses from a candidate source distribution. These adjoint fluxes are then used to form the linear model to map the state space to the response space. The test for the method is simultaneously locating a set of 137Cs and 60Co gamma sources in an empty room. This test problem is solved using synthetic measurements generated by a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model and using experimental measurements that we collected for this purpose. With the synthetic data, the predicted source distributions identified the locations of the sources to within tens of centimeters, in a room with an approximately four-by-four meter floor plan. Most of the predicted source intensities were within a factor of ten of their true value. The chi-square value of the predicted source was within a factor of five from the expected value based on the number of measurements employed. With a favorable uniform initial guess, the predicted source map was nearly identical to the true distribution

  17. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume --Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) --Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  18. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume -- Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) -- Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  19. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  20. Auger Electron Therapy And Brachytherapy Tumor Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, B.H.; Shani, G.

    2002-01-01

    Auger Electron Therapy (AET) is a binary approach for improving cancer radiotherapy. It involves the selective targeting of an atom to tumor cells using physiological pathway. The atom is then irradiated by a specific radiation that produces secondary radiation called Auger electrons. One of the problems associated with the clinical application of AET, is that the energy of the photons required for stimulating photoelectric absorption in most of the available high Z target atoms, is too low to achieve penetration through normal surrounding tissues to the depth of the tumor, when an external source is used. The solution is therefore the use of a brachytherapy technique. There are two other problems associated with the use of radiation as a cancer treatment. The first is the limitation on radiation dose to the normal tissue within the treatment volume. The second problem is the limitation imposed by the miniscule size of the critical target of the cell, namely the DNA (0.25% of the cell mass). The solution to the first problem can be achieved by using the brachytherapy technique. The second problem can be resolved by placing the radiation source in close position to the DNA. AET, as we apply it, provides the two solutions to the two problems. When a photon is absorbed by an electron in the K or L shell of an high Z atom, the electron is ejected from the atom, creating a vacancy in the shell. This vacancy is immediately filled with an electron from an upper shell. The energy difference between the two shells is sometimes emitted as an x-ray, however, frequently the energy is transferred to an outer shell electron that is emitted as an Auger electron. These electrons are emitted at energies of up to ∼30 keV and therefore have a very short range in the cell. They will deposit all their energy within 20-30 nm from the point of emission. i.e. all the energy is deposited in the DNA. In our work indium is used as the high Z atom

  1. Feed network and electromagnetic radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John; Linehan, Kevin E.; Ardavan, Houshang; Schmidt-Zwiefel, Andrea Caroline

    2017-01-17

    An antenna may include a volume polarization current radiator and a feed network. The volume polarization current radiator, includes a dielectric solid (such as a dielectric strip), and a plurality of closely-spaced excitation elements (24), each excitation element (24) being configured to induce a volume polarization current distribution in the dielectric solid proximate to the excitation element when a voltage is applied to the excitation element. The feed network is coupled to the volume polarization current radiator. The feed network also includes a plurality of passive power divider elements (32) and a plurality of passive delay elements (d1-d6) coupling the first port (30) and the plurality of second ports (108, 109, 164), the plurality of power divider elements (32) and the plurality of phase delay elements (d1-d6) being configured such that a radio-frequency signal that is applied to the first port (30) experiences a progressive change of phase as it is coupled to the plurality of second ports (108, 109, 164) so as to cause the volume polarization current distribution to propagate along the dielectric solid.

  2. Evaluation of methods to leak test sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbeau, N.D.; Scott, C.K.

    1987-04-01

    The methods for the leak testing of sealed radiation sources were reviewed. One hundred and thirty-one equipment vendors were surveyed to identify commercially available leak test instruments. The equipment is summarized in tabular form by radiation type and detector type for easy reference. The radiation characteristics of the licensed sources were reviewed and summarized in a format that can be used to select the most suitable detection method. A test kit is proposed for use by inspectors when verifying a licensee's test procedures. The general elements of leak test procedures are discussed

  3. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Radiation Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, A.L.; Oldfather, D.E.; Lindner, A.F.

    1993-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a 1.5 Gev synchrotron light source facility consisting of a 120 kev electron gun, 50 Mev linear accelerator, 1.5 Gev booster synchrotron, 200 meter circumference electron storage ring, and many photon beamline transport systems for research. Figure 1. ALS floor plan. Pairs of neutron and gamma radiation monitors are shown as dots numbered from 1 to 12. The Radiation Safety System for the ALS has been designed and built with a primary goal of providing protection against inadvertent personnel exposure to gamma and neutron radiation and, secondarily, to enhance the electrical safety of select magnet power supplies

  4. The present state of brachytherapy practice in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackova, H.; Drabkova, A.

    1995-01-01

    In spite of the fact that radiotherapy departments in the Czech republic have been following the general European and world trends in brachytherapy techniques and that they are installing the new remote AFL systems, the reserves of radium sources are still considerably high and not all professionals carry out their applications of radioactive sources by (at least) manual AFL. In near future the attention should be paid to the diminution of the unnecessary radium reserves at that radiotherapy departments where the small number of applications is executed or where the new remote AFL systems are used. For professionals practically thorough radiation protection is assured when new remote AFL systems are used. But in this case an attention should be paid to the radiation safety of the patient because of the potential exposures when high dose rate systems would failed. The likelihood of this unwanted cases can only be decreased when Quality Assurance programs is introduced into practice

  5. The hazy dawn of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Tubiana, M.; Pierquin, B.

    1998-01-01

    The discovery of radium by Pierre and Marie Curie in December 1898 opened a new era in science and within a few years provided medicine with a new means of tumor treatment. Their personal contribution to the start and early development of clinical applications should not be overlooked. The Curies did not limit their support to providing radium sources to medical pioneers but took a deep interest in the horizons of radiumtherapy. Pierre was one of the first to search for and demonstrate a biological effect of radium radiation. He investigated the radioactivity of the waters of hydrotherapeutic resorts. Marie took care of the measurement of the medical sources personally, convinced that the result of the treatment depends on the precise knowledge of the amount of radium applied. Her perseverance resulted in the establishment of the Institut du Radium (1909) in which, besides the physico-chemical laboratory, a biological department was set up. The latter became the Fondation Curie (1920), a leading medical center of treatment and training, with an integrated team of physicists, radiobiologists and clinicians led by Regaud. One hundred years after the discovery of radium, patients benefit today from the extensive clinical experience that has been collected over the years and from sophisticated developments in application techniques, dosimetry and quality assurance; the professional risk has been precisely assessed and the improvements in material and procedure have enabled the medical personnel to work in hazard-free conditions. This outcome results from the continuous progress that the pioneers gave impulse to. This paper intends to recall their efforts and achievements, as well as the difficulties and the problems they encountered during the first 2 decades when the sturdy foundations of brachytherapy were built. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Dosimetric analysis of rib interference of the CTV during interstitial brachytherapy of lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Sun, Xiaoyang; Pang, Haowen; Shi, Xiangxiang; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Guangpeng; Chen, Renjin; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hong; Lin, Sheng; Wen, Qinglian; Han, Yunwei; Wu, Jingbo

    2017-12-01

    In interstitial brachytherapy for lung tumors, the placement and alignment of the source needles are influenced by the ribs, which can affect the dose distribution. This study evaluated the change in dose to the target by comparing the dose between the actual interstitial brachytherapy plan (AIBP, what is deliverable due to anatomic constraints), and the virtual interstitial brachytherapy plan (VIBP, pretreatment-modified dose distribution). AIBPs and VIBPs were designed for 20 lung tumors. The VIBP was designed with uniform spacing between needles, regardless of the presence of ribs. The prescription dose was 30 Gy. The percentage of normal ipsilateral lung volume that received a dose ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), conformity index (COIN), incremental dose percentage (IDP) to the target, and the dose covering 95% (D 95 ) of the clinical target volume (CTV) were calculated. The V 5 of the VIBPs was significantly smaller than that of the AIBPs ( p 0.05). The regular geometric alignment of needles is important for increasing the target dose and limiting the normal lung dose in interstitial brachytherapy for thoracic tumors. Thus, we recommend that radiation oncologists attempt to achieve the regular alignment of needles during implantation.

  7. Dosimetric analysis of rib interference of the CTV during interstitial brachytherapy of lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In interstitial brachytherapy for lung tumors, the placement and alignment of the source needles are influenced by the ribs, which can affect the dose distribution. This study evaluated the change in dose to the target by comparing the dose between the actual interstitial brachytherapy plan (AIBP, what is deliverable due to anatomic constraints, and the virtual interstitial brachytherapy plan (VIBP, pretreatment-modified dose distribution. Material and methods : AIBPs and VIBPs were designed for 20 lung tumors. The VIBP was designed with uniform spacing between needles, regardless of the presence of ribs. The prescription dose was 30 Gy. The percentage of normal ipsilateral lung volume that received a dose ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 , conformity index (COIN, incremental dose percentage (IDP to the target, and the dose covering 95% (D 95 of the clinical target volume (CTV were calculated. Results : The V 5 of the VIBPs was significantly smaller than that of the AIBPs (p 0.05. Conclusions : The regular geometric alignment of needles is important for increasing the target dose and limiting the normal lung dose in interstitial brachytherapy for thoracic tumors. Thus, we recommend that radiation oncologists attempt to achieve the regular alignment of needles during implantation.

  8. Background radiation and man-made and sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babalola, I.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the use of the atom and its present applications in food and agriculture, industry medicine and health care, energy-environment and research. These applications have inevitably led to concerns about nuclear safety and radioactive waste management and the need for the adoption of procedures for control, safe use and disposal of radioactive sources

  9. Radiological protection of patients in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacc, Ricardo; Herrero, Flavia

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The prefix 'brachy' means short-range, so brachytherapy is the administration of radiation therapy using small radioactive sources in the form of needles, tubes, wires or seeds, which are placed within the tumor -interstitial form- or very near of it, superficially or in an endo-cavity form. This technique, which was limited by the size of the primary tumor, has the advantage, that the radiation, can be adjusted to the size and shape of the tumor volume and the radioisotope used, - short range -, is selected with the criteria of getting the dose in the organs at risk, as low as possible, making what it is known as conformal radiotherapy. Radioactive sources may be permanent or temporary implants. The application of radioactive material, can be manually or automatically. In the first case, a major breakthrough from the radioprotection point of view, was the use of afterloading devices, methodology highly recommended to reduce the radiation exposure to staff. With the development of technology, remotely controlled afterloading devices were introduced, which in addition to complying with the above requirement, allow the source to move in different positions along catheters housed in one or more channels, making therapeutic brachytherapy treatments in tumor volumes possible, that due to its length, decades ago would have been an unthinkable deal. In all cases, sources, which may vary from the 3 mm in length, 125 Iodine or 198 Gold seeds, to extensive wires of 192 Iridium, are encapsulated for two main purposes: preventing leakage of radioactive material and absorption of unwanted radiation, alpha and beta, produced by the radioactive decay. Consequently, it should be highly unlikely that the radioactive material, could be lost or located in the patient, in a different place of the one that was planned. However, history shows us the opposite. Its is known the kind of deterministic effect that radiation is going to produce in the tumor, where the severity of

  10. Technological yields of sources for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1993-01-01

    The present report is prepared for planners of radiation processing of any material. Calculations are focused on accelerators of electrons, divided into two groups: versatile linacs of energy up to 13 MeV, and accelerators of lower energy, below 2 MeV, of better energy yield but of limited applications. The calculations are connected with the confrontation of the author's technological expectations during the preparation of the linac project in the late '60s, with the results of 25 years of exploitation of the machine. One has to realize that from the 200 kW input power from the mains, only 5 kW of bent and scanned beam is recovered on the conveyor. That power is only partially used for radiation induced phenomena, because of the demanded homogeneity of the dose, of the mode of packing of the object and its shape, of edges of the scanned area and in the spaces between boxes, and of loses during the idle time due to the tuning of the machine and dosimetric operations. The use of lower energy accelerators may be more economical than that of linacs in case of objects of specific type. At the first stage already, that is of the conversion of electrical power into that of low energy electron beam, the yield is 2-3 times better than in the case of linacs. Attention has been paid to the technological aspects of electron beam conversion into the more penetrating Bremsstrahlung similar to gamma radiation. The advantages of technologies, which make possible a control of the shape of the processed object are stressed. Special attention is focused to the relation between the yield of processing and the ratio between the maximum to the minimum dose in the object under the irradiation. (author). 14 refs, 14 figs

  11. SU-G-201-06: Directional Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy: Determination of the TG-43 Dose-Rate Constant Analog for a New Pd-103 Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aima, M; Culberson, W; Hammer, C; Micka, J; DeWerd, L [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to determine the TG-43 dose-rate constant analog for a new directional low-dose rate brachytherapy source based on experimental methods and comparison to Monte Carlo simulations. The CivaSheet™ is a new commercially available planar source array comprised of a variable number of discrete directional source elements called “CivaDots”. Given the directional nature and non-conventional design of the source, modifications to the AAPM TG-43 protocol for dosimetry are required. As a result, various parameters of the TG-43 dosimetric formalism have to be adapted to accommodate this source. This work focuses on the dose-rate constant analog determination for a CivaDot. Methods: Dose to water measurements of the CivaDot were performed in a polymethyl methacrylate phantom (20×20×12 cm{sup 3}) using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT3 film. The source was placed in the center of the phantom, and nine TLD micro-cubes were irradiated along its central axis at a distance of 1 cm. For the film measurements, the TLDs were substituted by a (3×3) cm{sup 2} EBT3 film. Primary air-kerma strength measurements of the source were performed using a variable-aperture free-air chamber. Finally, the source was modeled using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code 6. Results: Dose-rate constant analog observed for a total of eight CivaDots using TLDs and five CivaDots using EBT3 film was within ±7.0% and ±2.9% of the Monte Carlo predicted value respectively. The average difference observed was −4.8% and −0.1% with a standard deviation of 1.7% and 2.1% for the TLD and the film measurements respectively, which are both within the comparison uncertainty. Conclusion: A preliminary investigation to determine the doserate constant analog for a CivaDot was conducted successfully with good agreement between experimental and Monte Carlo based methods. This work will aid in the eventual realization of a clinically-viable dosimetric

  12. Radiation safety aspects of fluorescent lamp starters incorporating radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadagopan, Geetha; Shukla, V.K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp starter is a switch applies the voltage to the fluorescent tube after sufficient preheating to allow the tube to conduct an electric current. Radioactive substances used in the starters are 85 Kr, 147 Pm, 3 H and 232 Th. In India, fluorescent lamp starters are classified as consumer products and users are outside regulatory control. However, regulatory control is exercised over the manufacturers at the production stage. Tritium activity measured in the lamp starters ranged from 400-4500 Bq with a mean activity of 1.78 kBq. Thorium activity measured varied from 0.44-3.3 mg. The results of radiation safety assessment of the workplace and radioactivity estimation in the starters are discussed in this paper. (author)

  13. Open Source Radiation Hardened by Design Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology allows use of the latest microcircuit technology with lowest power and fastest speed, with minimal delay and engineering costs, through new Radiation Hardened by Design (RHBD) techniques that do not require extensive process characterization, technique evaluation and re-design at each Moore's Law generation. The separation of critical node groups is explicitly parameterized so it can be increased as microcircuit technologies shrink. The technology will be open access to radiation tolerant circuit vendors. INNOVATION: This technology would enhance computation intensive applications such as autonomy, robotics, advanced sensor and tracking processes, as well as low power applications such as wireless sensor networks. OUTCOME / RESULTS: 1) Simulation analysis indicates feasibility. 2)Compact voting latch 65 nanometer test chip designed and submitted for fabrication -7/2016. INFUSION FOR SPACE / EARTH: This technology may be used in any digital integrated circuit in which a high level of resistance to Single Event Upsets is desired, and has the greatest benefit outside low earth orbit where cosmic rays are numerous.

  14. Ionizing radiation sources used in medical applications in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.M.C.; Carlos, M.T.; Cruz, L.R.F.; Domingues, C.; Farias, J.T.; Ferreira, R.; Figueiredo, L.; Peixoto, J.E.; Oliveira, S.M.V.; Drexler, G.

    1991-02-01

    Preliminary data about ionizing radiation sources used in medical applications and obtained through a national programme by IRD/CNEN together with Brazilian health authorities are presented. The data presentation follows, as close as possible, recommendations given by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). This programme has two main aims: First: to contribute for research in the field of ionizing radiation effects and risks including information about equipment quality control and procedures adopted by professionals working in Radiation Medicine. Second: to investigate the radiation protection status in Brazil, in order to give assistance to Brazilian health authorities for planning regional radiation programmes and training programmes for medical staffs. (F.E.). 13 refs, 19 figs, 34 tabs

  15. Solar radiation data sources, applications, and network design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    A prerequisite to considering solar energy projects is to determine the requirements for information about solar radiation to apply to possible projects. This report offers techniques to help the reader specify requirements in terms of solar radiation data and information currently available, describes the past and present programs to record and present information to be used for most requirements, presents courses of action to help the user meet his needs for information, lists sources of solar radiation data and presents the problems, costs, benefits and responsibilities of programs to acquire additional solar radiation data. Extensive background information is provided about solar radiation data and its use. Specialized information about recording, collecting, processing, storing and disseminating solar radiation data is given. Several Appendices are included which provide reference material for special situations.

  16. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  17. Training of human resources on radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. Argentine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggio, Alfredo L.; Nasazzi, Nora B.; Arias, Cesar

    2004-01-01

    Argentina has a long experience in Radiation Protection training since 25 years ago. In the present work we analyse those variable and non variable training aspects according to scientific development, increasing radiation source diversity (including new concepts like orphan sources and security), mayor concern about patient in Radiation Protection, previous exposures, etc. We comment what we consider the main steps in the training of Radiation Protection specialists, like university degree, post graduate education distinguishing between formative and informative contents and on the job training. Moreover, we point out the trainees aptitudes and attitudes to be developed in order to work properly in this interdisciplinary field. (author)

  18. Radiometric analyzer with plural radiation sources and detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, S.; Oda, M.; Miyashita, K.; Takada, M.

    1977-01-01

    A radiometric analyzer for measuring characteristics of a material by radiation comprises a plurality of systems in which each consists of a radiation source and a radiation detector which are the same in number as the number of elements of the molecule of the material and a linear calibration circuit having inverse response characteristics (calibration curve) of the respective systems of detectors, whereby the measurement is carried out by four fundamental rules by operation of the mutual outputs of said detector system obtained through said linear calibration circuit. One typical embodiment is a radiometric analyzer for hydrocarbons which measures the density of heavy oil, the sulfur content and the calorific value by three detector systems which include a γ-ray source (E/sub γ/ greater than 50 keV), a soft x-ray source (Ex approximately 20 keV), and a neutron ray source. 2 claims, 6 figures

  19. Regulatory control for safe usage of radiation sources in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P.K.; Sonawane, A.U.

    1998-01-01

    The widespread applications of radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment in the field of industry, medicine agriculture and research in India necessitated the establishment of an efficient regulatory framework and consequently the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) was constituted to exercise regulatory control over the safe usage of the radioactive materials and the radiation generating equipment. The Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and the Radiation Protection Rules, 1971 promulgated under the Act forms the basis of radiation safety in India and Chairman, AERB is the Competent Authority to enforce the regulatory provisions of the Radiation Protection Rules, 1971, for safe use of radiation source in the country. AERB has published a number of documents such as Radiation Surveillance Procedures, Standards, Codes, Guides and Manuals for safe use and handling of radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment. Apart from nuclear fuel cycle documents, these publications pertain to industrial radiography, medical application of radiation, transport of radioactive material, industrial gamma irradiators, X-ray units etc. AERB safety related publications are based on international standards e.g. BSS, IAEA, ICRP, ISO etc. This paper outlines the methodology of regulatory control exercised by AERB for safe use of the radioactive materials and the radiation generating equipment in the country. (author)

  20. Radiation protection and regulatory aspects in the use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Amit; Dash Sharma, P.K.; Sonawane, A.U.

    2012-01-01

    The uses of ionising radiation sources (i.e. radioisotopes and radiation generating equipment such as accelerators and X-ray machines) for multifarious applications in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and teaching have been significantly increasing all over the world. In India, the application of radiation sources in various fields has registered phenomenal growth during the last decade. The use of radiation sources mainly include radiation processing for food preservation and sterilization of healthcare products, radiotherapy for treatment of cancer, nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy, gamma chambers for several R and D studies, blood irradiators, industrial radiography for non destructive examinations of steel structures, industrial ionising radiation gauging devices for monitoring/measurement of on-line quality control parameters (e.g. thickness, level, density, moisture, elemental analysis), consumer products such as gaseous tritium light sources (GTLS), gaseous tritium light devices (GTLD), ionisation chamber smoke detectors (ICSD), fluorescent light starters, antistatic devices and incandescent gas mantles containing thorium etc. All these beneficial applications involve use of both sealed and unsealed radioactive sources and amount of radioactivity varies from few kBq (μCi) to hundreds of TBq (thousands of curies). Radiation sources emit ionising radiations and if not handled properly and safely, may give rise to potential exposures leading to an unacceptable hazard. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure a high standard of safety and reliability in handling of radiation equipment and sources through their careful design by ensuring adequate built-in-safety as per applicable national/international standard, safe operation and periodic maintenance procedures, safe transport from one place to another, secured storage when not in use, physical security to radiation sources, effective emergency response plans and preparedness, including safe

  1. Poster - Thur Eve - 06: Comparison of an open source genetic algorithm to the commercially used IPSA for generation of seed distributions in LDR prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Khan, R

    2012-07-01

    In early stage prostate cancer, low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is a favorable treatment modality, where small radioactive seeds are permanently implanted throughout the prostate. Treatment centres currently rely on a commercial optimization algorithm, IPSA, to generate seed distributions for treatment plans. However, commercial software does not allow the user access to the source code, thus reducing the flexibility for treatment planning and impeding any implementation of new and, perhaps, improved clinical techniques. An open source genetic algorithm (GA) has been encoded in MATLAB to generate seed distributions for a simplified prostate and urethra model. To assess the quality of the seed distributions created by the GA, both the GA and IPSA were used to generate seed distributions for two clinically relevant scenarios and the quality of the GA distributions relative to IPSA distributions and clinically accepted standards for seed distributions was investigated. The first clinically relevant scenario involved generating seed distributions for three different prostate volumes (19.2 cc, 32.4 cc, and 54.7 cc). The second scenario involved generating distributions for three separate seed activities (0.397 mCi, 0.455 mCi, and 0.5 mCi). Both GA and IPSA met the clinically accepted criteria for the two scenarios, where distributions produced by the GA were comparable to IPSA in terms of full coverage of the prostate by the prescribed dose, and minimized dose to the urethra, which passed straight through the prostate. Further, the GA offered improved reduction of high dose regions (i.e hot spots) within the planned target volume. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. SU-G-IeP4-14: Prostate Brachytherapy Activity Measurement and Source Localization by Using a Dual Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C; Lin, H; Chuang, K; Chiang, C [National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Y [National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To monitor the activity distribution and needle position during and after implantation in operating rooms. Methods: Simulation studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of measurement activity distribution and seed localization using the DuPECT system. The system consists of a LaBr3-based probe and planar detection heads, a collimation system, and a coincidence circuit. The two heads can be manipulated independently. Simplified Yb-169 brachytherapy seeds were used. A water-filled cylindrical phantom with a 40-mm diameter and 40-mm length was used to model a simplified prostate of the Asian man. Two simplified seeds were placed at a radial distance of 10 mm and tangential distance of 10 mm from the center of the phantom. The probe head was arranged perpendicular to the planar head. Results of various imaging durations were analyzed and the accuracy of the seed localization was assessed by calculating the centroid of the seed. Results: The reconstructed images indicate that the DuPECT can measure the activity distribution and locate the seeds dwelt in different positions intraoperatively. The calculated centroid on average turned out to be accurate within the pixel size of 0.5 mm. The two sources were identified when the duration is longer than 15 s. The sensitivity measured in water was merely 0.07 cps/MBq. Conclusion: Preliminary results show that the measurement of the activity distribution and seed localization are feasible using the DuPECT system intraoperatively. It indicates the DuPECT system has potential to be an approach for dose-distribution-validation. The efficacy of acvtivity distribution measurement and source localization using the DuPECT system will evaluated in more realistic phantom studies (e.g., various attenuation materials and greater number of seeds) in the future investigation.

  3. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Elliott, Sean [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  4. Impact of Intraluminal Brachytherapy on Survival Outcome for Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer: A Propensity-Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Oikawa, Hirobumi [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Iwate (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi (Japan); Kanesaka, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Tamamoto, Tetsuro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nara Medical University of Medicine, Nara (Japan); Kosugi, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Kobayashi, Masao [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takayama, Makoto [Department of Radiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takemoto, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagakura, Hisayasu [Department of Radiology, KKR Sapporo Medical Center, Hokkaido (Japan); Imai, Michiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iwata City Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Kosaka, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Yamazaki, Hideya [Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether adding intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) to definitive radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable biliary tract cancer has a positive impact on survival outcome. Methods and Materials: The original cohort comprised 209 patients, including 153 who underwent external beam RT (EBRT) alone and 56 who received both ILBT and EBRT. By matching propensity scores, 56 pairs (112 patients) consisting of 1 patient with and 1 patient without ILBT were selected. They were well balanced in terms of sex, age, performance status, clinical stage, jaundice, and addition of chemotherapy. The impact of ILBT on overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC) was investigated. Results: The 2-year OS rates were 31% for the ILBT+ group and 40% for theILBT– group (P=.862). The 2-year DSS rates were 42% for the ILBT+ group and 41% for the ILBT– group (P=.288). The 2-year LC rates were 65% for the ILBT+ group and 35% for the ILBT– group (P=.094). Three of the 4 sensitivity analyses showed a significantly better LC for the ILBT+ group (P=.010, .025, .049), and another showed a marginally better LC (P=.068), and none of the sensitivity analyses showed any statistically significant differences in OS or DSS. Conclusions: In the treatment for unresectable biliary tract cancer, the addition of ILBT to RT has no impact on OS or DSS but is associated with better LC. Therefore, the role of ILBT should be addressed by other measures than survival benefit, for example, by less toxicity, prolonged biliary tract patency decreasing the need for further palliative interventions, or patient quality of life.

  5. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  6. Resolving the brachytherapy challenges with government funded hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, D S; Jagtap, A S; Vinothraj, R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to rationalize the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of high dose rate (HDR) cobalt 60 (Co-60) source versus 192-Iridium (192-Ir) source brachytherapy in government funded hospitals and treatment interruption gap because of exchange of sources. A retrospective study of gynecological cancer patients, treated by radiotherapy with curative intent between April 2005 and September 2012 was conducted. We analyzed the total number of patients treated for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (Intracavitary brachytherapy or cylindrical vaginal source). The dates for 192-Ir sources installation and the last date and first date of brachytherapy procedure before and after source installation respectively were also analyzed and calculated the gap in days for brachytherapy interruptions. The study was analyzed the records of 2005 to September 2012 year where eight 192-Ir sources were installed. The mean gap between treatment interruptions was 123.12 days (range 1-647 days). The Institutional incidence of gynecological cancer where radiotherapy was treatment modality (except ovary) is 34.9 percent. Around 52.25 percent of patients who received EBRT at this institute were referred to outside hospital for brachytherapy because of unavailability of Iridium source. The cost for 5 year duration for single cobalt source is approximately 20-22 lakhs while for 15 Iridium sources is approximately 52-53 lakhs. The combined HDR Co-60 brachytherapy and EBRT provide a useful modality in the treatment of gynecological cancer where radiotherapy is indicated, the treatment interruption because of source exchange is longer and can be minimized by using cobalt source as it is cost-effective and has 5 year working life. Thus, Co-60 source for brachytherapy is a feasible option for government funded hospitals in developing countries.

  7. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Calculation of integrated biological response in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Roger G.; Coles, Ian P.; Deehan, Charles; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To present analytical methods for calculating or estimating the integrated biological response in brachytherapy applications, and which allow for the presence of dose gradients. Methods and Materials: The approach uses linear-quadratic (LQ) formulations to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same biological effect as that achieved by a given brachytherapy application. For simple geometrical cases, BED multiplying factors have been derived which allow the equivalent BED for tumors to be estimated from a single BED value calculated at a dose reference point. For more complex brachytherapy applications a voxel-by-voxel determination of the equivalent BED will be more accurate. Equations are derived which when incorporated into brachytherapy software would facilitate such a process. Results: At both high and low dose rates, the BEDs calculated at the dose reference point are shown to be lower than the true values by an amount which depends primarily on the magnitude of the prescribed dose; the BED multiplying factors are higher for smaller prescribed doses. The multiplying factors are less dependent on the assumed radiobiological parameters. In most clinical applications involving multiple sources, particularly those in multiplanar arrays, the multiplying factors are likely to be smaller than those derived here for single sources. The overall suggestion is that the radiobiological consequences of dose gradients in well-designed brachytherapy treatments, although important, may be less significant than is sometimes supposed. The modeling exercise also demonstrates that the integrated biological effect associated with fractionated high-dose-rate (FHDR) brachytherapy will usually be different from that for an 'equivalent' continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) regime. For practical FHDR regimes involving relatively small numbers of fractions, the integrated biological effect to

  9. Control of radioisotopes and radiation sources in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridwan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Radioisotopes and radiation sources are extensively used in Indonesia in medicine, industry, mining, agriculture and research. These materials are controlled by the regulatory authority, according to established legal procedures. The Nuclear Energy Control Board of Indonesia (BAPETEN), which was established in 1998 through the Nuclear Energy Act No. 10/1997, is entrusted with the control of any application of nuclear energy, including the application of radioisotopes and radiation sources, through regulation, licensing and inspection. The control is aimed to assure welfare, security and peace, the safety and health of workers and the public, and environmental protection. The number of licences issued to date is around 2400, consisting of 1600 licences for radioisotopes and radiation sources used in hospitals, 347 in radiography, 256 in industry, 53 in mining, and the rest in many other areas such as research and agriculture. A licence can cover one or more radioisotopes or radiation sources, depending on the location of the user institution. These radioisotopes and radiation sources are Co-60, Cs-137, Ir-192, Ra-226, Am-241, Sr-90, Kr-85, Pm-147, linear accelerator and X-ray, and short half-life radioisotopes such as I-125, I-131 and Tc-99m. There are 10 LINACs, 27 X-ray medicines, 61 radioisotope devices for Co-60 and Cs-137, and 10 mHDR Ir-192 for therapeutic purposes currently used in Indonesia and some Ra-226 in storage. Any activity related to the application of nuclear energy is required to be conducted in a manner which observes safety and security. According to the legal requirements, each user has to employ at least one radiation safety officer. To improve the control of the application of radiation sources and radioactive material in the country, BAPETEN introduced some new approaches to the users, including regular dialogues with radiation safety officers and the management of the users, requalification for radiation protection officers twice in five

  10. Possible sources of radiation in indoor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukanovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    More locations and building material will be needed to solve the housing needs, actually the future quantities will equal the total of all the previous building. And presently one quarter of the world population is already homeless. The development of human civilization in the new technological era goes on extremely quickly. In the search for new spaces, in the last decade of the 20th century, in town renovation planning the application of subterranean civil engineering is very popular. Below ground level, the new towns are built with many stories, with exclusively artificial light and artificial climate. There is not the slightest possibility of natural ventilation. These spaces have not been investigated as regards the contents of radon. Man is not adapted to spend most of the time in under artificial conditions. It is still to be discovered how it will affect humans and what is the degree of exposure to ionizing radiation in such conditions. It might be better to abandon underground construction before the adverse effects are proved. Previous mistakes in building must be overcome and new technologies applied as well as sustainable development in the future. (author)

  11. Evaluation of integrity of radiation sources of nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torohate, Wiclif Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear equipment meters are mainly used in the industry in quality control and process control. The principle of operation consists in a shielded radioactive source together with a radiation detector such that the radiation interacts with the material to be analyzed before reaching the detector, providing real time data. Can be as their fixed and mobile mobility, the unique properties of ionizing radiation are used in three basic modes, transmission, backscatter or dispersion or induced (reactive). With the advancement and technological modernization in the world, the demand for nuclear gauges becomes increasingly larger. Currently in Brazil there are about 465 process control plants and 21 portable systems and Mozambique about 45 facilities using nuclear gauges. This font registration is done through a process called source inventory that allows also to know the category of the source, the danger or risk to human health that the source offers. The handling of this equipment requires personnel, certified, skilled and well trained in radiation protection area in accordance with the requirements of the various CNEN Rules. Due to the presence of radioactive source and because these devices are used by workers risk because there external radiation. In this context, we made the smear test in two fixed meters from the IRD industry laboratory, which determines the integrity of the source package, mandatory item in periodic integrity testing of the radiation source of this type of device. A set of procedures is made for its implementation as an evaluation of the radiological risk by radiological survey. It was intended to contribute to the learning handling and safe use of these meters. (author)

  12. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  13. Strengthening the security of radiation sources in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emi-Reynolds, G.; Banini, G.K.; Flecther, J.J.; Ennison, I.; Schandorf, C.

    1998-01-01

    Legislative instrument LI 1559 of 1993 established the Radiation Protection Board (RPB) as the National Competent Authority (NCA) on radiation matters in Ghana. The Board advises Government through the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission on matters relating to radiation safety, security of sources, sales, import and export, contamination in food and environment, among others. It has wide ranging regulatory power and works in association with country authorities. The regulations in place for controlling the movement and use of radioactive materials in Ghana are discussed. Accountability for radioactive materials especially for those which were brought in before the establishment of the RPB have been the focus of our discussion. The need to for intensify educational programs for the public on matters relating to effect of radiation on man and environment is recommended. Strengthening of regulatory control of sources and intensifying efforts against smuggling, unauthorised use and systems for notification on radioactive transport accidents are noted. (author)

  14. Dosimetry services for internal and external radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) sets radiation dose limits for the operation of nuclear facilities and the possession of prescribed substances within Canada. To administer these regulations the AECB must be satisfied that the dosimetry services used by a licensee meet adequate standards. Licensees are required to use the Occupational Dosimetry Service operated by the Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices, Department of National Health and Welfare (BRMD) to determine doses from external sources of radiation, except where a detailed rationale is given for using another service. No national dosimetry service exists for internal sources of radiation. Licensees who operate or use a dosimetry service other than the BRMD must provide the AECB with evidence of the competence of the staff and adequacy of the equipment, techniques and procedures; provide the AECB with evidence that a quality assurance program has been implemented; and send individual dose or exposure data to the National Dose Registry. (L.L.)

  15. Implementation of 'early alert system' area detector at patient from entrance in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videla Valdebenito, R.

    2001-01-01

    A system of area monitors to detect the involuntary exit of the radiation sources used in low dose rate deferred brachytherapy treatment is being implemented in all facilities in Chile. The first implementation of this system, named 'Early Alert', was 5 years ago as a complement to the administrative procedures and verification measures by the medical physics carried out through visual verifications and by means of portable radiation detectors. This detector of the system should be located preferentially at the exit of the treatment room at a height not smaller than two meters. This has resulted in an increase of facilities safety in this practice. (author) [es

  16. Radiation safety of sealed sources and equipment containing them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The guide gives information and requirements concerning the technical construction, installation, use and licensing of devices containing sealed radioactive sources in order to ensure the operational safety. The requirements are in accordance with the international standards ISO 1677, ISO 2919, ISO 7205 and Nordic Recommendations on radiation protection for radionuclide gauges in permanent installation. The guide explains also the practical measures that must be taken into account when a radiation device is repaired, maintained or removed from the use. (8 refs.)

  17. Radiological Protection Experience with natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quindos, L. S.; Fernandez, P. L.; Vinuela, J.; Arteche, J.; Sainz, G.; Gomez, J.; Matarranz

    2003-01-01

    During the last twenty five years the research Radon Group of the Medical Physics Unit of the University of Cantabria has been involved in projects concerning the measurement of natural radiation, in special that coming from radon gas. At this moment we have available for this field a lot of information in different formats, as paper, video and CD, interesting not only for public in general but also for professionals interested in the evaluation of doses coming from natural sources of radiation. (Author)

  18. Exposure of the Spanish population to radiation from natural sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Talavera, M.; Suarez, E.; Matarranz, J.L.; Salas, R.; Ramos, L. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. Justo Dorado, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    We have assessed the exposure of the Spanish population to natural radiation sources. The annual average effective dose is estimated to be 2.38 mSv, taking into account contributions from cosmic radiation (13.8%), terrestrial gamma radiation (39%), radon and thoron inhalation (34%) and ingestion (13.2%). Cosmic radiation doses were calculated from town altitude data. Terrestrial gamma ray exposure outdoors was derived from the M.A.R.N.A. (natural gamma radiation map of Spain). Indoor gamma ray exposure was calculated by multiplying the corresponding outdoor value conversion factor, which was obtained by a linear least-squares fit of experimental measurements. Radon doses were estimated from national surveys carried out throughout the country. To assess doses by ingestion of water and foodstuffs we considered the results from a detailed study on consumption habits by age and geographical area in Spain, promoted by C.S.N., and average radioactivity values from UNSCEAR. (authors)

  19. BrachyTPS -Interactive point kernel code package for brachytherapy treatment planning of gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilagam, L.; Subbaiah, K.V.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) are always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) applicators. Most of the commercially available brachytherapy TPS softwares estimate the absorbed dose at a point, only taking care of the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. So the doses estimated by them are not much accurate under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, interactive point kernel rode (BrachyTPS) has been developed to perform independent dose calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. As primary input data, the code takes patients' planning data including the source specifications, dwell positions, dwell times and it computes the doses at reference points by dose point kernel formalisms, with multi-layer shield build-up factors accounting for the contributions from scattered radiation. In addition to performing dose distribution calculations, this code package is capable of displaying an isodose distribution curve into the patient anatomy images. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code integrated with treatment planning systems against the other tools which are available in the market. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT) made low dose rate (LDR) applicator, Fletcher Green type LDR applicator and Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR) applicator were studied to test the accuracy of the software

  20. Radiation problems expected for the German spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, K.

    1981-01-01

    The German project for the construction of a Spallation Neutron Source with high proton beam power (5.5 MW) will have to cope with a number of radiation problems. The present report describes these problems and proposes solutions for keeping exposures for the staff and release of activity and radiation into the environment as low as reasonably achievable. It is shown that the strict requirements of the German radiation protection regulations can be met. The main problem will be the exposure of maintenance personnel to remanent gamma radiation, as is the case at existing proton accelerators. Closed ventilation and cooling systems will reduce the release of (mainly short-lived) activity to acceptable levels. Shielding requirements for different sections are discussed, and it is demonstrated by calculations and extrapolations from experiments that fence-post doses well below 150 mrem/y can be obtained at distances of the order of 100 metres from the principal source points. The radiation protection system proposed for the Spallation Neutron Source is discussed, in particular the needs for monitor systems and a central radiation protection data base and alarm system. (orig.)

  1. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  2. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  3. Characteristics of the radiochromic film Gafchromictm EBT3 model for use in brachytherapy; Caracterizacao do filme radiocromico Gafchromictm modelo EBT3 para uso em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luvizotto, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment modality using radioactive sealed sources within walking distance of the tumor, reducing the risk of applying an unwanted dose to adjacent healthy tissues. For brachytherapy is reliable, it is necessary to establish a dosimetric practices program aimed at determining the optimal dose of radiation for this radiotherapy practice. This paper presents the application of two methodologies for the dosimetry using radiochromic films. Experimental measurements were performed with EBT3 films in phantoms consisting of homogeneous and heterogeneous material (lung, bone and soft tissue) built especially for dose measurements in brachytherapy. The processing and analysis of the resulting images of the experimental procedure were performed with ImageJ software and MATLAB. The results were evaluated from comparisons dose of experimental measurements and simulations obtained by the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  4. Dosimetric analysis of radiation sources for use dermatological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions undergoing therapy with radiation sources may have different patterns of malignancy. Malignant lesions or cancer most commonly found in radiotherapy services are carcinomas. Radiation therapy in skin lesions is performed with low penetration beams and orthovoltage X-rays, electron beams and radioactive sources ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, e 90 Sr) arranged on a surface mold or in metal applicator. This study aims to analyze the therapeutic radiation dose profile produced by radiation sources used in skin lesions radiotherapy procedures . Experimental measurements for the analysis of dosimetric radiation sources were compared with calculations obtained from a computer system based on the Monte Carlo Method. Computational results had a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Experimental measurements and computational results by the MCNP4C code were both physically consistent as expected. These experimental measurements compared with calculations using the MCNP-4C code have been used to validate the calculations obtained by MCNP code and to provide a reliable medical application for each clinical case. (author)

  5. Simulation of the radiation fields from ionizing radiation sources inside the containment in an accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalugin, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In the present work, a set of codes used for simulations of the radiation fields from ionizing radiation sources inside the containment in an accident is described. A method of evaluating the gamma dose rate from a space and energy distributed source is given. The dose rate is calculated by means of the design point kernel method and using buildup factors. The code MCU-REA with the ORIMCU module is used for the burnup calculations.

  6. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.; Yoo, S.; Kowalok, M.; Mackie, T.R.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-meter from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum

  7. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  8. Source location of Jupiter's decametric radiation and UV aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koitiro; Carr, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    The source region of a component of Jovian Io-unrelated decametric radiation is inferred geometrically based on simultaneous observations from Voyager spacecraft and a ground-based observatory with the aid of a hollow cone beam model and model of the Jovian magnetic field. The results indicate that the sources of this component lie above the northern hemisphere, and on field lines that connect the Io plasma torus and the Jovian ionosphere in the so-called active sector. It is concluded that an interaction between the Io-torus plasma and the ionospheric plasma through a thin flux tube initiates the decametric radiation.

  9. ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dr. Michel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources, the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE, serving  two free electron lasers, sources for intense coherent THz radiation, mono-energetic positrons, electrons, γ-rays, a neutron time-of-flight system as well as two synchronized ultra-short pulsed Petawatt laser systems are collocated. The characteristics of these beams make the ELBE center a unique research instrument for a variety of external users in fields ranging from material science over nuclear physics to cancer research, as well as scientists of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR.

  10. MCNP model for the many KE-Basin radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    This document presents a model for the location and strength of radiation sources in the accessible areas of KE-Basin which agrees well with data taken on a regular grid in September of 1996. This modelling work was requested to support dose rate reduction efforts in KE-Basin. Anticipated fuel removal activities require lower dose rates to minimize annual dose to workers. With this model, the effects of component cleanup or removal can be estimated in advance to evaluate their effectiveness. In addition, the sources contributing most to the radiation fields in a given location can be identified and dealt with

  11. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Radiation Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, A.; Oldfather, D.; Lindner, A.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source facility consisting of a 120 keV electron gun, 50 MeV linear accelerator, 1.5 Gev booster synchrotron, 200 meter circumference electron storage ring, and many photon beamline transport systems for research. The Radiation Safety System for the ALS has been designed and built with a primary goal of providing protection against inadvertent personnel exposure to gamma and neutron radiation and, secondarily, to enhance the electrical safety of select magnet power supplies

  12. Accelerated interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost technique in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, William C.; Raben, David; Jaffe, Kenneth A.; Salter, Merle M.

    1996-01-01

    delivered on consecutive days. Median brachytherapy dose was 20 Gy (range 9.6 - 30) prescribed 1 cm from the source (median fraction 2 Gy, range 1.2 - 3). Results: Median follow-up was 26.5 months (range 2 - 63, mean 32.4). Local control was 90.9% ((10(11)) for primary cases and 75 % ((3(4))) for recurrences (crude local control 86.7 %). Both post-brachytherapy local recurrences (one margin negative, one microscopically positive) required amputation. Additional surgery for wound complications was required in (2(13)) (15.4%). A majority of preserved limbs had satisfactory functional outcome. Conclusions: Accelerated interstitial HDR brachytherapy as a postoperative boost, either alone or in combination with external beam radiation, provides a feasible alternative to a LDR approach in regards to local control, functional limb conservation, and late complications. The advantages of this strategy include increased convenience for the patient and family and elimination of radiation exposure to medical personnel. In the context of cost reduction, all or a portion of the HDR boost could potentially be offered in an outpatient setting with appropriate patient selection

  13. External Beam Radiation Therapy or Brachytherapy With or Without Short-course Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter, Prospective Study of Quality of Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Hiram A.; Sanda, Martin G.; Liu, Jingxia; Wu, Ningying; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Wei, John T.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Klein, Eric A.; Sandler, Howard M.; Saigal, Christopher S.; Litwin, Mark S.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Hembroff, Larry; Regan, Meredith M.; Chang, Peter; Michalski, Jeff M.; Regan, Meredith; Hembroff, Larry; Wei, John T.; Hamstra, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The long-term effects of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) with radiation therapy on participant-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been characterized in prospective multicenter studies. We evaluated HRQOL for 2 years among participants undergoing radiation therapy (RT) with or without NADT for newly diagnosed, early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed longitudinal cohort data from the Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium to ascertain the HRQOL trajectory of men receiving NADT with external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy. HRQOL was measured using the expanded prostate cancer index composite 26-item questionnaire at 2, 6, 12, and 24 months after the initiation of NADT. We used the χ 2 or Fisher exact test to compare the shift in percentages between groups that did or did not receive NADT. Analyses were conducted at the 2-sided 5% significance level. Results: For subjects receiving EBRT, questions regarding the ability to have an erection, ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, frequency of erections, ability to function sexually, and lack of energy were in a significantly worse dichotomized category for the patients receiving NADT. Comparing the baseline versus 24-month outcomes, 24%, 23%, and 30% of participants receiving EBRT plus NADT shifted to the worse dichotomized category for the ability to reach an org